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Sample records for cck2 retseptori puudulikkusega

  1. The role of CCK2 receptors in energy homeostasis: insights from the CCK2 receptor-deficient mouse.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Tracey J; Voudouris, Nicholas J; Kent, Stephen

    2004-09-15

    The present study explored the contribution of type 2 cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors in energy regulation. A total of 78 CCK2 receptor-deficient mice and 80 wild-type controls were acclimated to a 12:12 light-dark cycle at 30 +/- 1 degrees C. Using a computer-monitored biotelemetry system, circadian patterns of body temperature, food intake, and activity were monitored for 4 days. Body weight and water consumption were manually recorded during this period. Results indicate that CCK2 receptor invalidation produces elevated body temperature during both the photophase and scotophase (by 0.38 and 0.12 degrees C, respectively), increased body weight (29.3 +/- 0.2 vs. 26.8 +/- 0.2 g) and water consumption (4.1 +/- 0.1 vs. 3.2 +/- 0.1 ml), and decreased scotophase locomotor activity (WT: 7.0 +/- 0.2 vs. KO: 6.1 +/- 0.2 counts/min). These findings suggest an important role for CCK2 receptors in processes underlying energy regulation during basal and possibly pathological states.

  2. CCK2 receptor-deficient mice have increased sensitivity of dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kõks, S; Abramov, U; Veraksits, A; Bourin, M; Matsui, T; Vasar, E

    2003-02-01

    The present study supports a role of CCK(2) receptors in the regulation of dopamine neurones. In pharmacological studies conducted on male CCK(2) receptor-deficient mice the changes in the activity of dopamine system were established. A low dose of dopamine agonist apomorphine (0.1 mg/kg), stimulating the pre-synaptic dopamine receptors, induced significantly stronger suppression of locomotor activity in mutant mice (-/-) compared to their wild-type littermates (+/+). The administration of amphetamine (3-6 mg/kg), a drug increasing dopamine release, caused a dose-dependent stimulation of locomotor activity in wild-type mice. In mice lacking CCK(2) receptors, a lower dose of amphetamine (3 mg/kg) tended to suppress the motor activity, whereas the higher dose (6 mg/kg) induced the significantly stronger motor stimulation in mutant mice. Moreover, in the CCK(2) receptor-deficient mice the affinity of dopamine D(2) receptors, but not 5-HT(2) receptors, was increased. Altogether, the targeted genetic suppression of CCK(2) receptors increased the sensitivity of pre- and post-synaptic dopamine D(2) receptors.

  3. Deletion of the CCK2 receptor gene reduces mechanical sensitivity and abolishes the development of hyperalgesia in mononeuropathic mice.

    PubMed

    Kurrikoff, Kaido; Kõks, Sulev; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Bourin, Michel; Arend, Andres; Aunapuu, Marina; Vasar, Eero

    2004-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that cholecystokinin (CCK) is implicated in the modulation of pain sensitivity and the development of neuropathic pain. We used CCK(2) receptor deficient (CCK(2) (-/-)) mice and assessed their mechanical sensitivity using Von Frey filaments, as well as the development and time course of mechanical hyperalgesia in a model of neuropathic pain. We found that CCK(2) (-/-) mice displayed mechanical hyposensitivity, which was reversed to the level of wild-type animals after administration of naloxone (0.1-10 mg/kg). On the other hand, injection of L-365260 (0.01-1 mg/kg), an antagonist of CCK(2) receptors, decreased dose-dependently, mechanical sensitivity in wild-type mice. The mechanism of reduced mechanical sensitivity in CCK(2) (-/-) mice may be explained by changes in interactions between CCK and opioid systems. Indeed, CCK(2) (-/-) mice natively expressed higher levels of lumbar CCK(1), opioid delta and kappa receptors. Next, we found that CCK(2) (-/-) mice did not develop mechanical hyperalgesia in the Bennett's neuropathic pain model. Induction of neuropathy resulted in decrease of lumbar pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene expression in wild-type mice, but increase of POMC expression in CCK(2) (-/-) mice. In addition, induction of neuropathy resulted in further increase of opioid delta receptor in CCK(2) (-/-) mice. Gene expression results indicate up-regulation of opioid system in CCK(2) (-/-) mice, which apparently result in decreased neuropathy score. Our study suggests that not only pain sensitivity, but also mechanical sensitivity and the development of neuropathic pain are regulated by antagonistic interactions between CCK and opioid systems.

  4. Synthesis and solid-phase purification of anthranilic sulfonamides as CCK-2 ligands.

    PubMed

    Woods, Craig R; Hack, Michael D; Allison, Brett D; Phuong, Victor K; Rosen, Mark D; Morton, Magda F; Prendergast, Clodagh E; Barrett, Terrance D; Shankley, Nigel P; Rabinowitz, Michael H

    2007-12-15

    A novel strategy for the synthesis of cholecystokinin-2 receptor ligands was developed. The route employs a solution-phase synthesis of a series of anthranilic sulfonamides followed by a resin capture purification strategy to produce multi-milligram quantities of compounds for bioassay. The synthesis was used to produce >100 compounds containing various functional groups, highlighting the general applicability of this strategy and to address specific metabolism issues in our CCK-2 program.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of ligands at cholecystokinin CCK2 receptors in rat cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Harper, E A; Roberts, S P; Kalindjian, S B

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Several studies using radioligand binding assays, have shown that measurement of thermodynamic parameters can allow discrimination of agonists and antagonists (Weiland et al., 1979; Borea et al., 1996a). Here we investigate whether agonists and antagonists can be thermodynamically discriminated at CCK2 receptors in rat cerebral cortex. Experimental approach: The pKL of [3H]-JB93182 in rat cerebral cortex membranes was determined at 4, 12, 21 and 37°C in 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer (buffer B pH 6.96; containing 0.089 mM bacitracin). pKI values of ligands of diverse chemical structure and with differing intrinsic activity (α), as defined by the lumen-perfused rat and mouse stomach bioassays, were determined in buffer B at 4, 12, 21 and 37°C. Key results: [3H]-JB93182 labelled a homogeneous population of receptors in rat cerebral cortex at 4, 12, 21 and 37°C and the pKL and Bmax were not altered by incubation temperature. [3H]-JB93182 binding reached equilibrium after 10, 50, 90 and 220 min at 37, 21, 12 and 4°C, respectively. pKI values for R-L-365,260, R-L-740,093, YM220, PD134,308 and JB95008 were higher at 4°C than at 37°C. There was no effect of temperature on pKI values for pentagastrin, CCK-8S, S-L-365,260, YM022, PD140,376 and JB93242. Conclusions and implications: CCK2 receptor agonists and antagonists at rat CCK2 receptors cannot be discriminated by thermodynamic analysis using [3H]-JB93182 as the radioligand. PMID:17592503

  6. Evidence for a nucleus accumbens CCK2 receptor regulation of rat ventral pallidal GABA levels: a dual probe microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, L; O'Connor, W T; Glennon, J; Tomasini, M C; Bebe, B W; Tanganelli, S; Antonelli, T

    2000-12-22

    We employed dual probe microdialysis in the nucleus accumbens and ipsilateral ventral pallidum of the halothane anaesthetized rat to investigate the effect of intra-accumbens perfusion with the sulphated octapeptide cholecystokinin (CCK-8S, 10-1000 nM, 60 min) alone and in the presence of the selective CCK1 and CCK2 receptor antagonists L-364,718 (10 and 100 nM) and PD134308 (10 nM), tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1000 nM) and the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline (1000 nM), on dialysate GABA levels in the ventral pallidum. Intra-accumbens perfusion with the 100 and 1000 nM concentration of CCK-8S was associated with a significant decrease (-16+/-3% and -23+/-3% vs basal, respectively) in ventral pallidum GABA levels. The CCK-8S (1000 nM) induced decrease in ventral pallidal dialysate GABA levels was abolished when PD134308, TTX and bicuculline, but not L-364,718, were included into the perfusion medium of the accumbens probe. The data indicate that nucleus accumbens CCK-8S exerts a CCK2 receptor mediated inhibition of ventral pallidal GABA levels. Furthermore, the TTX and bicuculline sensitivity of this effect suggests that this is possibly mediated via CCK2 receptors probably located on local GABA interneurons.

  7. Distinct changes in the behavioural effects of morphine and naloxone in CCK2 receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Rünkorg, Kertu; Veraksits, Alar; Kurrikoff, Kaido; Luuk, Hendrik; Raud, Sirli; Abramov, Urho; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Bourin, Michel; Kõks, Sulev; Vasar, Eero

    2003-09-15

    The effects of morphine, mu-opioid receptor agonist, and naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, in the locomotor activity and place conditioning tests were studied in the CCK(2) receptor-deficient male mice. The exposure of mice to the motility boxes for 3 consecutive days induced a significant inhibition of locomotor activity in the wild-type (+/+) mice compared to homozygous (-/-) animals. The administration of naloxone (10 mg/kg i.p.) to animals, adapted to the motility boxes, induced a significant reduction of locomotor activity in the homozygous (-/-), but not in the wild-type (+/+) mice. Treatment of habituated mice with morphine (10 mg/kg i.p.) caused a stronger increase of locomotor activity in the wild-type (+/+) mice compared to the homozygous (-/-) littermates. In the place preference test the pairing of the preferred side with naloxone (1 and 10 mg/kg i.p.) induced a dose-dependent place aversion in the wild-type (+/+) mice. The treatment with naloxone was less effective in the homozygous (-/-) mice, because the high dose of naloxone (10 mg/kg) tended to shift the preference. The pairing of morphine (3 mg/kg i.p.) injections with the non-preferred side induced a significant place preference both in the wild-type (+/+) and homozygous (-/-) mice. The increased density of opioid receptors was established in the striatum of homozygous (-/-) mice, but not in the other forebrain structures. In conclusion, the targeted invalidation of CCK(2) receptors induces a dissociation of behavioural effects of morphine and naloxone. Morphine-induced place preference remained unchanged, whereas hyper-locomotion was less pronounced in the mutant mice compared to the wild-type (+/+) littermates. By contrast, naloxone-induced place aversion was weaker, but naloxone caused a stronger inhibition of locomotor activity in the homozygous (-/-) mice than in the wild-type (+/+) animals. These behavioural alterations can be explained in the light of data that the

  8. Rapakinin, Arg-Ile-Tyr, derived from rapeseed napin, shows anti-opioid activity via the prostaglandin IP receptor followed by the cholecystokinin CCK(2) receptor in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuko; Ohinata, Kousaku; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Yoshikawa, Masaaki

    2011-02-01

    Rapakinin, Arg-Ile-Tyr, is a vasorelaxing, anti-hypertensive and anorexigenic peptide derived from rapeseed napin. In this study, we found that rapakinin intracerebroventricularly administered to mice inhibited the analgesic effect of morphine, evaluated by the tail-pinch test. The anti-opioid activity of rapakinin was blocked by LY225910, an antagonist of the cholecystokinin (CCK) CCK(2) receptor, but not by lorglumide, an antagonist of the CCK(1) receptor. The anti-opioid activity of rapakinin was also blocked by CAY10441, an antagonist of the prostaglandin (PG) IP receptor. These results suggest that the anti-opioid activity of rapakinin is mediated by the CCK(2) and IP receptors. The anti-opioid activity induced by ciprostene, an IP receptor agonist, was blocked by LY225910, while that of CCK-8 was not blocked by CAY10441. Thus, it is demonstrated that the CCK-CCK(2) system was activated downstream of the PGI(2)-IP receptor system. Taken together, rapakinin shows anti-opioid activity via the activation of the PGI(2)-IP receptor system followed by the CCK-CCK(2) receptor system.

  9. Selective Tumor Targeting of Desacetyl Vinblastine Hydrazide and Tubulysin B via Conjugation to a Cholecystokinin 2 Receptor (CCK2R) Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As the delivery of selectively targeted cytotoxic agents via antibodies or small molecule ligands to malignancies has begun to show promise in the clinic, the need to identify and validate additional cellular targets for specific therapeutic delivery is critical. Although a multitude of cancers have been targeted using the folate receptor, PSMA, bombesin receptor, somatostatin receptor, LHRH, and αvβ3, there is a notable lack of specific small molecule ligand/receptor pairs to cellular targets found within cancers of the GI tract. Because of the selective GI tract expression of the cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R), we undertook the creation of conjugates that would deliver microtubule-disrupting drugs to malignancies through the specific targeting of CCK2R via a high affinity small molecule ligand. The cytotoxic activity of these conjugates were shown to be receptor mediated in vitro and in vivo with xenograft mouse models exhibiting delayed growth or regression of tumors that expressed CCK2R. Overall, this work demonstrates that ligands to CCK2R can be used to create selectively targeted therapeutic conjugates. PMID:26043355

  10. Different pathways mediated by CCK1 and CCK2 receptors: effect of intraperitonal mrna antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to cholecystokinin on anxiety-like and learning behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Hagit; Kaplan, Zeev; Matar, Michael A; Buriakovsky, Igor; Bourin, Michel; Kotler, Moshe

    2004-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) and its analogs generate anxiety in humans and measurable anxiety-like behaviors in rats. CCK receptor blockers have been reported to have variable effects in the treatment of anxiety disorders. In a prior study, intracerebroventricular administration of CCK-antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASODN) for 3 days significantly diminished anxiety-like behavior in rats. Counter to our expectations, intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CCK-ASODN significantly increased anxiety-like behavior and impaired retention performance in the Morris water maze. The aim of the present study was to manipulate CCK-mediated anxiety-like behavior and spatial memory in rats by peripheral (i.p.) administration of ASODN to preproCCK in the presence of antagonists to CCK1 and CCK2 receptor subtypes to further elucidate the roles of these two receptors and better understand the effects of i.p. CCK-ASODN. CCK-ASODN was injected i.p. to rats five times at 24-hr intervals with and without administration of CCK1R antagonist PD135158 or CCK2 antagonist benzotrip. Control groups received injections of either a scrambled oligodeoxynucleotide (ScrODN) or vehicle. On Day 6, the rats were assessed in the elevated plus maze paradigm and in the Morris water maze. The rats were sacrificed and their blood was assessed for corticosterone, ACTH, and prolactin levels. The results show that i.p. CCK-ASODN significantly increased anxiety-like behavior and impaired retention performance in the Morris water maze, compared to both control groups, accompanied by increased plasma corticosterone and plasma ACTH concentrations. In contrast, administration of CCK-ASODN together with CCK2R antagonist, but not with CCK1R antagonist, significantly decreased anxiety-like behavior in rats, but still impaired retention performance in the Morris water maze paradigm. Lower levels of plasma corticosterone and ACTH in CCK-ASODN+CCK2R antagonist-treated rats accompanied the reduced anxiety-like behavior

  11. The investigation of membrane binding by amphibian peptide agonists of CCK2R using (31)P and (2)H solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Patrick J; Separovic, Frances; Bowie, John H

    2014-05-01

    It has been proposed that some neuropeptides may be anchored to the cell membranes prior to attaching to the adjacent active sites of transmembrane receptors. The three amphibian skin neuropeptides signiferin 1 [RLCIPYIIPC(OH)] (smooth muscle active and immunomodulator), riparin 1.1 [[RLCIPVIFPC(OH)] (immunomodulator) and rothein 1 [SVSNIPESIGF(OH)] (immunomodulator) act via CCK2 transmembrane receptors. A combination of (31)P and (2)H solid state NMR studies of each of these three peptides in eukaryotic phospholipid models at 25°C shows that rothein 1 does not interact with the membrane at all. In contrast, both of the cyclic disulfides signiferin 1 and riparin 1.1 interact with phospholipid head groups and partially penetrate into the upper leaflet of the model bilayer, but to different extents. These interactions are not sufficiently effective to cause disruption of the lipid bilayer since the peptides are not antimicrobial, anticancer, antifungal nor active against enveloped viruses. PMID:24582625

  12. Pain management by a new series of dual inhibitors of enkephalin degrading enzymes: long lasting antinociceptive properties and potentiation by CCK2 antagonist or methadone.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, Stéphanie; Mas Nieto, Magdalena; Canestrelli, Corinne; Chen, Huixiong; Fournié-Zaluski, Marie-Claude; Cupo, Annie; Maldonado, Rafaël; Roques, Bernard P; Noble, Florence

    2003-07-01

    The discovery that the endogenous morphine-like peptides named enkephalins are inactivated by two metallopeptidases, neutral endopeptidase and aminopeptidase N, which can be blocked by dual inhibitors, represents a promising way to develop 'physiological' analgesics devoid of the side effects of morphine. A new series of dual aminophosphinic inhibitors of the two enkephalin-catabolizing enzymes has been recently designed. In this study, one of these inhibitors, RB3007, was tested in various assays commonly used to select analgesics (mouse hot-plate test, rat tail-flick test, writhing and formalin tests in mice, and paw pressure test in rats), and the extracellular levels of the endogenous enkephalins in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey have been measured by microdialysis after systemic administration of RB3007. In the mouse hot-plate test, the dual inhibitor induced long-lasting (2 h) antinociceptive effects with a maximum of 35% analgesia 60 min after i.v. or i.p. administration. These antinociceptive responses were antagonized by prior injection of naloxone (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.). Similar long lasting effects were observed in the other animal models used. Very interestingly, injection of RB3007 (50 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased (82%) the extracellular levels of Met-enkephalin with a peak 60 min after i.p. injection. This increase parallels the antinociceptive responses observed. In addition, strong facilitatory effects of subanalgesic doses of the CCK(2) receptor antagonist, PD-134,308 or the synthetic opioid agonist, methadone on RB3007-induced antinociceptive responses were observed. These findings may constitute promising data for future development of a new class of analgesics that could be of major interest in a number of severe and persistent pain syndromes.

  13. Involvement of cholecystokinin 2 receptor in food intake regulation: hyperphagia and increased fat deposition in cholecystokinin 2 receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Pascal; Coll Constans, Maria Gràcia; Lulka, Hubert; Broussaud, Stéphanie; Guigné, Charlotte; Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Perrin, Christophe; Knauf, Claude; Carpéné, Christian; Pénicaud, Luc; Seva, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy; Valet, Philippe; Fourmy, Daniel; Dufresne, Marlène

    2007-03-01

    The role of cholecystokinin (CCK) as a satiety factor has been extensively documented. Although most work implies that CCK1 receptor mediates the control of food intake, a contributing role for CCK2 receptor (CCK2R) in the CCK-induced satiety cannot be totally excluded. The hypothesis that CCK2R invalidation disrupts regulatory pathways with impact on feeding behavior was examined in CCK2R(-/-) mice. CCK2R(-/-) mice developed obesity that was associated with hyperphagia. Obesity was related with increased fat deposition resulting from adipocyte hypertrophy. Expression of several adipokines was dysregulated consistently with obesity. Moreover, obesity was associated with disturbed glucose homeostasis as revealed by increased fasting glycemia and insulinemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and hepatic insulin resistance in CCK2R(-/-) mice. In vitro analysis of isolated adipocytes metabolism was consistent with increased storage but preserved insulin sensitivity. Suppression of feeding and concomitant increased expression of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin after intracerebroventricular injection of gastrin into control mice demonstrates that hypothalamic CCK2 receptors mediate inhibition of food intake. Comparative analysis of hypothalamic mediator gene expression in fed knockout and control mice demonstrated overexpression of ghrelin receptors in CCK2R(-/-) mice, indicating up-regulation of orexigenic pathways. This effect was also observed after body weight normalization, indicating a causative role in the development of hyperphagia and obesity of CCK2R(-/-) mice. Our results give evidence that CCK2 receptor activity plays a contributing regulatory role in the control of food intake.

  14. Progress in developing cholecystokinin (CCK)/gastrin receptor ligands which have therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Tapia, Jose A.; Sancho, Veronica; Jensen, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Gastrin and CCK are two of the oldest hormones and within the last 15 years there has been an exponential increase in knowledge of their pharmacology, cell biology, receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) and roles in physiology and pathological conditions. Despite these advances there is no approved disease indication for CCK receptor antagonists and only minor use of agonists. In this review the important factors determining this slow therapeutic development are reviewed. To assess this it is necessary to briefly review what is known about the roles of CCK receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) in normal human physiology, their role in pathologic conditions, the selectivity of available potent CCKR agonists/antagonists as well as review their use in human conditions to date and the results. Despite extensive studies in animals and some in humans, recent studies suggest that monotherapy with CCK1R agonists will not be effective in obesity, nor CCK2R antagonists in panic disorders or CCK2R antagonists to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer. Areas that require more study include the use of CCK2R agonists for imaging tumors and radiotherapy, CCK2R antagonists in hypergastrinemic states especially with long term PPI use and for potentiation of analgesia as well as use of CCK1R antagonists for a number of gastrointestinal disorders [motility disorders (irritable bowel syndrome, dyspepsia, constipation) and pancreatitis (acute, chronic)]. PMID:17997137

  15. Preclinical evaluation of new radioligand of cholecystokinin/gastrin receptors in endocrine tumors xenograft nude mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brillouet, S.; Caselles, O.; Dierickx, L. O.; Mestre, B.; Nalis, J.; Picard, C.; Favre, G.; Poirot, M.; Silvente-Poirot, S.; Courbon, F.

    2007-02-01

    The cholecystokinin(CCK)/gastrin 2 receptors (R-CCK2) are overexpressed in 90% of medullary thyroid cancers (MTC) and in 60% of small cell lung cancers but not or poorly in corresponding healthy tissues. They represent a relevant target for the diagnosis and internal targeted radiotherapy of these tumors. Although previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of radiolabeled CCK/gastrin to target CCK-2 receptor-expressing tissues in animals and patients, some problems remained unsolved to identify an optimum candidate for in vivo targeting of R-CCK2-expressing tumors. By a rational approach and " in silico" drug design, we synthesized a new CCK-derivative with high affinity for the R-CCK2. The aim of this study was to achieve the radiolabeling of a new radioligand, to assess its efficacy using a published CCK radioligand ( 111In-DTPA-CCK8) as a control for the R-CCK2 targeting. This new CCK-derivative was radiolabeled with 111In. Nude mice, bearing the human MTC TT tumors and NIH-3T3 cell line expressing a tumorigenic mutant of the R-CCK2, were injected with this radiolabeled peptide. In vivo planar scintigraphies were acquired. Thereafter, biodistribution studies (%ID/g tissue) were done. The conditions of radiolabelling were optimized to obtain a radiochemical purity >90%. Scintigraphic images of xenograft mice showed significant tumor uptake with a target to nontarget ratio higher than two. These results were confirmed by the biodistribution studies which showed as expected a significant activity in the spleen, the liver and the kidneys. Therefore, this new radiolabeled compound is a promised new candidate for molecular imaging and internal radiotherapy for R-CCK2 tumor targeting.

  16. Cholecystokinin receptors regulate sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation via uptake of HCO3-.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuchuan; Ru, Yanfei; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Yanjiao; Wu, Bin; Upur, Halmurat; Zhang, Yonglian

    2015-10-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a peptide hormone and a neurotransmitter, was detected in mature sperm two decades ago. However, the exact role of CCK and the types of CCK receptors (now termed CCK1 and CCK2) in sperm have not been identified. Here, we find that CCK1 and CCK2 receptors are immunolocalized to the acrosomal region of mature sperm. The antagonist of CCK1 or CCK2 receptor strongly activated the soluble adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway that drives sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in dose- and time-dependent manners. But these actions of stimulation were abolished when sperm were incubated in the medium in the absence of HCO3-. Further investigation demonstrated that the inhibitor of CCK1 or CCK2 receptor could accelerate the uptake of HCO3- and significantly elevate the intracellular pH of sperm. Interestingly, the synthetic octapeptide of CCK (CCK8) showed the same action and mechanism as antagonists of CCK receptors. Moreover, CCK8 and the antagonist of CCK1 or CCK2 receptor were also able to accelerate human sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation by stimulating the influx of HCO3-. Thus, the present results suggest that CCK and its receptors may regulate sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation by modulating the uptake of HCO3-.

  17. Cholecystokinin and panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel; Dailly, Eric

    2004-04-01

    Evidence for implication of cholecystokinin (CCK) in the neurobiology of panic disorder is reviewed through animal and human pharmacological studies. The results of these investigations raise two issues: (i) selectivity of action of CCK-2 agonists in anxiety disorders; and (ii) aberrations of the CCK system in anxiety disorders, both of which are discussed.

  18. Role of CCK/gastrin receptors in gastrointestinal/metabolic diseases and results of human studies using gastrin/CCK receptor agonists/antagonists in these diseases

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the estabished and possible roles of CCK1 and CCK2 receptors in gastrointestinal (GI) and metabolic diseases are reviewed and available results from human agonist/antagonist studies are discussed. While there is evidence for the involvement of CCK1R in numerous diseases including pancreatic disorders, motility disorders, tumor growth, regulation of satiety and a number of CCK-deficient states, the role of CCK1R in these conditions is not clearly defined. There are encouraging data from several clinical studies of CCK1R antagonists in some of these conditions, but their role as therapeutic agents remains unclear. The role of CCK2R in physiological (atrophic gastritis, pernicious anemia) and pathological (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome) hypergastrinemic states, its effects on the gastric mucosa (ECL cell hyperplasia, carcinoids, parietal cell mass) and its role in acid-peptic disorders are clearly defined. Furthermore, recent studies point to a possible role for CCK2R in a number of GI malignancies. Current data from human studies of CCK2R antagonists are presented and their potential role in the treatment of these conditions reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CCK2 receptors as targets for medical imaging is discussed. Even though cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin were among the first gastrointestinal hormones discovered [1,2], both their physiological roles as well as their roles in clinically relevant gastrointestinal diseases remain unclear and even controversial in many cases [3–6]. The structural characterization of CCK and gastrin [7,8], pharmacological identification [9–13] and cloning [14,15] of CCK and gastrin receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R), characterization of receptor location, peptide and receptor genes, development of receptor antagonists and receptor/agonist knockout animals [16–21] have led to important advancements in our understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological role of CCK and gastrin signaling [3]. Most of these topics

  19. Gastrin attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced intestinal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihao; Luo, Yongli; Cheng, Yunjiu; Zou, Dezhi; Zeng, Aihong; Yang, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a devastating complication when the blood supply is reflowed in ischemic organs. Gastrin has critical function in regulating acid secretion, proliferation, and differentiation in the gastric mucosa. We aimed to determine whether gastrin has an effect on intestinal I/R damage. Intestinal I/R injury was induced by 60-min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery followed by 60-min reperfusion, and the rats were induced to be hypergastrinemic by pretreated with omeprazole or directly injected with gastrin. Some hypergastrinemic rats were injected with cholecystokinin-2 (CCK-2) receptor antagonist prior to I/R operation. After the animal surgery, the intestine was collected for histological analysis. Isolated intestinal epithelial cells or crypts were harvested for RNA and protein analysis. CCK-2 receptor expression, intestinal mucosal damage, cell apoptosis, and apoptotic protein caspase-3 activity were measured. We found that high gastrin in serum significantly reduced intestinal hemorrhage, alleviated extensive epithelial disruption, decreased disintegration of lamina propria, downregulated myeloperoxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor-α, and caspase-3 activity, and lead to low mortality in response to I/R injury. On the contrary, CCK-2 receptor antagonist L365260 could markedly impair intestinal protection by gastrin on intestinal I/R. Severe edema of mucosal villi with severe intestinal crypt injury and numerous intestinal villi disintegrated were observed again in the hypergastrinemic rats with L365260. The survival in the hypergastrinemic rats after intestinal I/R injury was shortened by L365260. Finally, gastrin could remarkably upregulated intestinal CCK-2 receptor expression. Our data suggest that gastrin by omeprazole remarkably attenuated I/R induced intestinal injury by enhancing CCK-2 receptor expression and gastrin could be a potential mitigator for intestinal I/R damage in the clinical setting. PMID

  20. Identification and optimization of anthranilic sulfonamides as novel, selective cholecystokinin-2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Allison, Brett D; Phuong, Victor K; McAtee, Laura C; Rosen, Mark; Morton, Magda; Prendergast, Clodagh; Barrett, Terry; Lagaud, Guy; Freedman, Jamie; Li, Lina; Wu, Xiaodong; Venkatesan, Hariharan; Pippel, Marna; Woods, Craig; Rizzolio, Michèle C; Hack, Michael; Hoey, Kenway; Deng, Xiaohu; King, Christopher; Shankley, Nigel P; Rabinowitz, Michael H

    2006-10-19

    A high throughput screening approach to the identification of selective cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK-2R) ligands resulted in the discovery of a novel series of antagonists, represented by 1-[2-[(2,1,3-benzothiadiazol-4-ylsulfonyl)amino]-5-chlorobenzoyl]-piperidine (1; CCK-2R, pK(I) = 6.4). Preliminary exploration of the structure-activity relationships around the anthranilic ring and the amide and sulfonamide moieties led to a nearly 50-fold improvement of receptor affinity and showed a greater than 1000-fold selectivity over the related cholecystokinin-1 receptor. Pharmacokinetic evaluation led to the identification of 4-[4-iodo-2-[(5-quinoxalinylsulfonyl)amino]benzoyl]-morpholine, 26d, a compound that demonstrates promising pharmacokinetic properties in the rat and dog with respect to plasma clearance and oral bioavailability and is a potent inhibitor in vivo of pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion in the rat when dosed orally.

  1. Development of a time-resolved fluorescence probe for evaluation of competitive binding to the cholecystokinin 2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Dayan Elshan, N. G. R.; Jayasundera, Thanuja; Weber, Craig S.; Lynch, Ronald M.; Mash, Eugene A.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and use of Eu-DTPA-PEGO-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe-NH2 (Eu-DTPA-PEGO-CCK4), a luminescent probe targeted to cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R, aka CCKBR), are described. The probe was prepared by solid phase synthesis. A Kd value of 17 ± 2 nM was determined by means of saturation binding assays using HEK-293 cells that overexpress CCK2R. The probe was then used in competitive binding assays against Ac-CCK4 and three new trivalent CCK4 compounds. Repeatable and reproducible binding assay results were obtained. Given its ease of synthesis, purification, receptor binding properties, and utility in competitive binding assays, Eu-DTPA-PEGO-CCK4 could become a standard tool for high-throughput screening of compounds in development targeted to cholecystokinin receptors. PMID:25769518

  2. Distribution, elimination, and renal handling of (99m)technetium-Demogastrin 1.

    PubMed

    Trejtnar, Frantisek; Laznickova, Alice; Laznicek, Milan; Novy, Zbynek; Maina, Theodosia; Nock, Berthold A; Behe, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Radiolabeled cholecystokinin/gastrin (CCK) receptor-targeting peptides are promising compounds for radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy of certain malignancies. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetic profile of a CCK-2 receptor-specific peptide, Demogastrin 1, labeled with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc-Demogastrin 1), in rats. To investigate the fate of (99m)Tc-Demogastrin 1 in the rat, biodistribution and elimination studies in vivo were performed, and elimination parameters in perfused rat liver and kidney were determined. Biodistribution studies showed that (99m)Tc-Demogastrin 1 was rapidly cleared from the blood and most organs. A significant amount of radioactivity was detected in the CCK-2 receptor-rich organs, such as the stomach. Low radioactivity was found in the CCK-1 receptor-rich organs. Radioactivity in bowels and stomach declined relatively slowly. High and long-term retention of radioactivity in the kidneys was observed. Elimination of (99m)Tc-Demogastrin 1 via the bile was negligible. A high and rapid renal excretion was observed in elimination experiments in vivo. In the perfused kidney, glomerular filtration was found to be the main renal excretion mechanism of (99m)Tc-Demogastrin 1. Demogastrin 1 was distributed preferentially to the organs expressing CCK-2 receptors. The decisive elimination route of (99m)Tc-Demogastrin 1 in rats was urinary excretion. A high and prolonged renal retention may limit potential clinical use of the compound.

  3. Expression, purification and characterization of recombinant toxins consisting of truncated gastrin 17 and pseudomonas exotoxin.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Li; Liu, Xi-Lin; Lu, Shi-Ying; Ren, Hong-Lin; Li, Yan-Song; Hu, Pan; Wang, Quan; Tong, Weihua; Yan, Dong-Ming; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Song; Jin, Wen; Liu, Zeng-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity around world. However the effectiveness of the current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer is limited. Recombinant targeted toxins may represent a novel direction of cancer therapy. In this study, we aimed to explore whether recombinant toxins fused with the truncated forms of G17 could target to kill cancer cells by recognizing CCK2R. Four recombinant Pseudomonas toxins PE38 fused with the forward or reverse truncated forms of G17 (G14 and G13) were successfully constructed, expressed, and purified. Their characteristics were further analyzed by SDS-PAGE, western blot and indirect immunofluorescence assay. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that only reversely fused recombinant toxins rG14PE38 and rG13PE38 exhibited certain toxicity on several cancer cell lines, and a competition assay indicated that the binding of the reverse gastrin-endotoxin to CCK2R (+) cells may be mediated by interaction between gastrin/gastrin-like and CCK2R.

  4. Cholecystokinin in White Sea Bream: Molecular Cloning, Regional Expression, and Immunohistochemical Localization in the Gut after Feeding and Fasting

    PubMed Central

    D’Ascola, Angela; Guerrera, M. Cristina; Levanti, M. Beatrice; Germanà, Antonino; Muglia, Ugo

    2012-01-01

    Background The peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK), secreted by the midgut, plays a key role in digestive physiology of vertebrates including teleosts, by stimulating pancreatic secretion, gut motility, and gallbladder contraction, as well as by delaying gastric emptying. Moreover, CCK is involved in the regulation of food intake and satiation. Secretion of CCK by the hindgut is controversial, and its biological activity remains to be elucidated. The present paper addresses the regional distribution of intestinal CCK in the white sea bream, Diplodus sargus, as well as the possible involvement of hindgut CCK in digestive processes. Methodology/Principal Findings Full-lengths mRNAs encoding two CCK isoforms (CCK-1 and CCK-2) were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. CCK gene and protein expression levels in the different gut segments were measured 3 h and 72 h after feeding, by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Moreover, endocrine CCK cells were immunoistochemically detected. Fasting induced a significant decrease in CCK-2 in all intestinal segments, including the hindgut. On the other hand, no significant difference was induced by fasting on hindgut CCK-1. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrated two CCK isoforms in the hindgut of D.sargus, one of which (CCK-2) may be involved in the feedback control of uncompleted digestive processes. On the other hand, a functional role alternative to regulation of digestive processes may be inferred for D.sargus CCK-1, since its expression was unaffected by feeding or fasting. PMID:23285038

  5. Molecular mechanism of action of triazolobenzodiazepinone agonists of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor. Possible cooperativity across the receptor homo-dimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Aditya J.; Lam, Polo C.H.; Orry, Andrew; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2016-01-01

    The type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R) has multiple physiologic roles relating to nutrient homeostasis, including mediation of post-cibal satiety. This effect has been central in efforts to develop agonists of this receptor as part of a program to manage and/or prevent obesity. While a number of small molecule CCK1R agonists have been developed, none has yet been approved for clinical use, based on inadequate efficacy, side effects, or the potential for toxicity. Understanding the molecular details of docking and mechanism of action of these ligands can be helpful in the rational refinement and enhancement of small molecule drug candidates. In the current work, we have defined the mechanism of binding and activity of two triazolobenzodiazepinones, CE-326597 and PF-04756956, which are reported to be full agonist ligands. To achieve this, we utilized receptor binding with a series of allosteric and orthosteric radioligands at structurally-related CCK1R and CCK2R, as well as chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs exchanging residues in the allosteric pocket, and assessment of biological activity. These triazolobenzodiazepinones docked within the intramembranous small molecule allosteric ligand pocket, with higher affinity binding to CCK2R than CCK1R, yet with biological activity exclusive to or greatly enhanced at CCK1R. These ligands exhibited cooperativity with benzodiazepine binding across the CCK1R homodimeric complex, resulting in their ability to inhibit only a fraction of the saturable binding of a benzodiazepine radioligand, unlike other small molecule antagonists and agonists of this receptor. This may contribute to the understanding of the unique short duration and reversible gallbladder contraction observed in vivo upon administration of these drugs. PMID:26654202

  6. Molecular Mechanism of Action of Triazolobenzodiazepinone Agonists of the Type 1 Cholecystokinin Receptor. Possible Cooperativity across the Receptor Homodimeric Complex.

    PubMed

    Desai, Aditya J; Lam, Polo C H; Orry, Andrew; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Miller, Laurence J

    2015-12-24

    The type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R) has multiple physiologic roles relating to nutrient homeostasis, including mediation of postcibal satiety. This effect has been central in efforts to develop agonists of this receptor as part of a program to manage and/or prevent obesity. While a number of small molecule CCK1R agonists have been developed, none have yet been approved for clinical use, based on inadequate efficacy, side effects, or the potential for toxicity. Understanding the molecular details of docking and mechanism of action of these ligands can be helpful in the rational refinement and enhancement of small molecule drug candidates. In the current work, we have defined the mechanism of binding and activity of two triazolobenzodiazepinones, CE-326597 and PF-04756956, which are reported to be full agonist ligands. To achieve this, we utilized receptor binding with a series of allosteric and orthosteric radioligands at structurally related CCK1R and CCK2R, as well as chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs exchanging residues in the allosteric pocket, and assessment of biological activity. These triazolobenzodiazepinones docked within the intramembranous small molecule allosteric ligand pocket, with higher affinity binding to CCK2R than CCK1R, yet with biological activity exclusive to or greatly enhanced at CCK1R. These ligands exhibited cooperativity with benzodiazepine binding across the CCK1R homodimeric complex, resulting in their ability to inhibit only a fraction of the saturable binding of a benzodiazepine radioligand, unlike other small molecule antagonists and agonists of this receptor. This may contribute to the understanding of the unique short duration and reversible gallbladder contraction observed in vivo upon administration of these drugs.

  7. Development of a Highly Selective Allosteric Antagonist Radioligand for the Type 1 Cholecystokinin Receptor and Elucidation of Its Molecular Basis of Binding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Vattelana, Ashton M.; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Orry, Andrew J.; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M.; Haines, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of ligand binding to receptors provides insights useful for rational drug design. This work describes development of a new antagonist radioligand of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R), (2-fluorophenyl)-2,3-dihydro-3-[(3-isoquinolinylcarbonyl)amino]-6-methoxy-2-oxo-l-H-indole-3-propanoate (T-0632), and exploration of the molecular basis of its binding. This radioligand bound specifically with high affinity within an allosteric pocket of CCK1R. T-0632 fully inhibited binding and action of CCK at this receptor, while exhibiting no saturable binding to the closely related type 2 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK2R). Chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs were used to explore the molecular basis of T-0632 binding. Exchanging exonic regions revealed the functional importance of CCK1R exon 3, extending from the bottom of transmembrane segment (TM) 3 to the top of TM5, including portions of the intramembranous pocket as well as the second extracellular loop region (ECL2). However, CCK1R mutants in which each residue facing the pocket was changed to that present in CCK2R had no negative impact on T-0632 binding. Extending the chimeric approach to ECL2 established the importance of its C-terminal region, and site-directed mutagenesis of each nonconserved residue in this region revealed the importance of Ser208 at the top of TM5. A molecular model of T-0632-occupied CCK1R was consistent with these experimental determinants, also identifying Met121 in TM3 and Arg336 in TM6 as important. Although these residues are conserved in CCK2R, mutating them had a distinct impact on the two closely related receptors, suggesting differential orientation. This establishes the molecular basis of binding of a highly selective nonpeptidyl allosteric antagonist of CCK1R, illustrating differences in docking that extend beyond determinants attributable to distinct residues lining the intramembranous pocket in the two receptor subtypes. PMID:25319540

  8. Discovery of potent cholecystokinin-2 receptor antagonists: elucidation of key pharmacophore elements by X-ray crystallographic and NMR conformational analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Mark D; Hack, Michael D; Allison, Brett D; Phuong, Victor K; Woods, Craig R; Morton, Magda F; Prendergast, Clodagh E; Barrett, Terrance D; Schubert, Carsten; Li, Lina; Wu, Xiaodong; Wu, Jiejun; Freedman, Jamie M; Shankley, Nigel P; Rabinowitz, Michael H

    2008-04-01

    A novel series of cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK-2R) antagonists has been identified, as exemplified by anthranilic sulfonamide 1 (pK(i)=7.6). Pharmacokinetic and stability studies indicated that this series of compounds suffered from metabolic degradation, and that both the benzothiadiazole and piperidine rings were rapidly oxidized by liver enzymes. A combination of synthesis, computational methods, (1)H NMR conformational studies, and X-ray crystallographic analyses were applied to elucidate key pharmacophore elements, and to discover analogs with improved pharmacokinetic profiles, and high receptor binding affinity and selectivity.

  9. Functional Compensation between Cholecystokinin-1 and -2 Receptors in Murine Paraventricular Nucleus Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Shahid; Ozaki, Tomoya; Takeuchi, Kouhei; Unno, Katsuya; Yamoto, Kurumi; Morioka, Eri; Takiguchi, Soichi; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) and its receptor subtypes CCK-1 and -2 have diverse homeostatic functions. CCK-1 and -2 receptors share a common phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway, yet little is known regarding their possible functional coupling. We focused on CCK-mediated Ca2+ signaling in parvocellular paraventricular nucleus (PVN) cells, which control satiety and other autonomic functions. Analysis of mouse hypothalamic slices demonstrated that the general CCK receptor agonist CCK-8s (10 nm) triggered Ca2+ transients most significantly in the posterior subregion of the PVN (PaPo). This 10 nm CCK-8s-induced response was absent in CCK-1 receptor knock-out (CCK1R−/−) slices, showing that the response is mediated by CCK-1 receptors. CCK-8s concentrations higher than 30 nm triggered a Ca2+ rise similarly in wild-type and CCK1R−/− slices. The large CCK-8s (100 nm)-induced Ca2+ responses in CCK1R−/− slices were blocked by a CCK-2 receptor antagonist (CI-988), whereas those in wild-type slices required a mixture of CI-988 and lorglumide (a CCK-1 receptor antagonist) for complete antagonism. Therefore, CCK-1 and -2 receptors may function synergistically in single PaPo neurons and deletion of CCK-1 receptors may facilitate CCK-2 receptor signaling. This hypothesis was supported by results of real-time RT-PCR, immunofluorescence double labeling and Western blotting assays, which indicated CCK-2 receptor overexpression in PaPo neurons of CCK1R−/− mice. Furthermore, behavioral studies showed that intraperitoneal injections of lorglumide up-regulated food accesses in wild-type but not in CCK1R−/− mice, whereas CI-988 injections up-regulated food accesses in CCK1R−/− but not in wild-type mice. Compensatory CCK signaling via CCK-2 receptors in CCK1R−/− mice shed light on currently controversial satiety-controlling mechanisms. PMID:23038256

  10. Devazepide, a nonpeptide antagonist of CCK receptors, induces apoptosis and inhibits Ewing tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Jaime; Agra, Noelia; Fernández, Noemí; Pestaña, Angel; Alonso, Javier

    2009-08-01

    The Ewing family of tumors is a group of highly malignant tumors that mainly arise in bone and most often affect children and young adults in the first two decades of life. Despite the use of multimodal therapy, the long-term disease-free survival rate of patients with Ewing tumors is still disappointingly low, making the discovery of innovative therapeutic strategies all the more necessary. We have recently shown that cholecystokinin (CCK), a neuroendocrine peptide, involved in many biological functions, including cell growth and proliferation, is a relevant target of the EWS/FLI1 oncoprotein characteristic of Ewing tumors. CCK silencing inhibits cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo, suggesting that CCK acts as an autocrine growth factor for Ewing cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of two CCK receptor antagonists, devazepide (a CCK1-R antagonist) and L365 260 (a CCK2-R antagonist), on the growth of Ewing tumor cells. Devazepide (10 micromol/l) inhibited cell growth of four different Ewing tumor cells in vitro (range 85-88%), whereas the effect of the CCK2-R antagonist on cell growth was negligible. In a mouse tumor xenograft model, devazepide reduced tumor growth by 40%. Flow cytometry experiments showed that devazepide, but not L365 260, induced apoptosis of Ewing tumor cells. In summary, devazepide induces cell death of Ewing tumor cells, suggesting that it could represent a new therapeutic approach in the management of Ewing's tumor patients.

  11. Skeletal effects of a gastrin receptor antagonist in H+/K+ATPase beta subunit KO mice.

    PubMed

    Aasarød, Kristin M; Ramezanzadehkoldeh, Masoud; Shabestari, Maziar; Mosti, Mats P; Stunes, Astrid K; Reseland, Janne E; Beisvag, Vidar; Eriksen, Erik Fink; Sandvik, Arne K; Erben, Reinhold G; Schüler, Christiane; Boyce, Malcolm; Skallerud, Bjørn H; Syversen, Unni; Fossmark, Reidar

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest an increased fracture risk in patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for long term. The underlying mechanism, however, has been disputed. By binding to the gastric proton pump, PPIs inhibit gastric acid secretion. We have previously shown that proton pump (H(+)/K(+)ATPase beta subunit) KO mice exhibit reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and inferior bone strength compared with WT mice. Patients using PPIs as well as these KO mice exhibit gastric hypoacidity, and subsequently increased serum concentrations of the hormone gastrin. In this study, we wanted to examine whether inhibition of the gastrin/CCK2 receptor influences bone quality in these mice. KO and WT mice were given either the gastrin/CCK2 receptor antagonist netazepide dissolved in polyethylene glycol (PEG) or only PEG for 1year. We found significantly lower bone mineral content and BMD, as well as inferior bone microarchitecture in KO mice compared with WT. Biomechanical properties by three-point bending test also proved inferior in KO mice. KO mice receiving netazepide exhibited significantly higher cortical thickness, cortical area fraction, trabecular thickness and trabecular BMD by micro-CT compared with the control group. Three-point bending test also showed higher Young's modulus of elasticity in the netazepide KO group compared with control mice. In conclusion, we observed that the gastrin receptor antagonist netazepide slightly improved bone quality in this mouse model, suggesting that hypergastrinemia may contribute to deteriorated bone quality during acid inhibition. PMID:27325243

  12. Cholecystokinin tetrapeptide improves water maze performance of neonatally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned young rats.

    PubMed

    Rex, André; Fink, Heidrun

    2004-09-01

    This study addressed the proposed memory-modulating effect of the cholecystokinin (CCK) 2 agonist Boc-CCK-4 in rats using a Morris water maze. In the brain, CCK is colocalized and interacts with dopamine, respectively. To impair dopaminergic neurotransmission, and consequently, dopamine-mediated learning and memory, rat pups received the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the left [Day 5 postnatal (p.n.)] and right (Day 8 p.n.) ventricles (50 microg/5 microl each). After 6-OHDA treatment, dopamine brain levels were reduced by 60% on Day 50 p.n. Lesioned rats had a lower body weight but normal swimming abilities. In the acquisition phase of the water maze (Day 50 p.n.), sham-lesioned rats learned quickly, compared to lesioned rats. Treatment with Boc-CCK-4 (40 microg/kg ip) did not affect performance in sham-lesioned rats but restored the learning curve in lesioned rats without increasing swimming speed indicating a better spatial learning in the dopamine-depleted rats. In summary, these findings demonstrate that stimulation of CCK2 receptors may counteract cognitive deficits of dopamine-depleted rats.

  13. Contribution of CCK1 receptors to cardiovascular and respiratory effects of cholecystokinin in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Szereda-Przestaszewska, Małgorzata

    2015-12-01

    The study investigated the share of vagal input at infra- and supra-nodosal level and the contribution of CCK1 and CCK2 receptors to the cardiorespiratory responses produced by an intravenous injection of sulfated cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) in anesthetized rats. This compound administered intravenously at a dose of 50μg/kg induced short-lived decline in tidal volume and respiratory rate resulting in depression of minute ventilation. Midcervical vagotomy had no effect on CCK-8-evoked ventilatory changes, whereas supranodosal denervation abolished slowing down of breathing. Cardiovascular response to CCK challenge was characterized by a transient decrease followed by an augmentation in the mean blood pressure (MAP) in the intact animals. Vagotomy performed at both levels abrogated the declining phase of MAP. Blood pressure changes were associated with decreased heart rate present in all neural states. All cardiovascular and respiratory effects were antagonized by pre-treatment with devazepide-CCK1 receptors' antagonist, whereas CI988-antagonist of CCK2 receptors was ineffective. In conclusion, our results indicate that CCK-8 modulates slowing down of respiratory rhythm via CCK1 receptors located in the nodose ganglia (NG) and depresses tidal volume via central CCK1 dependent mechanism. CCK-8-evoked decline in blood pressure may be due to activation of vagal afferents, whereas pressor responses seem to be mediated by an activation of CCK1 receptors in the central nervous system. Bradycardia was probably induced by the direct action of CCK-8 on the heart pacemaker cells.

  14. Drug mechanisms in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Hascoët, M

    2001-02-01

    The most common and successful therapyfor the majority of patients suffering from anxiety is treatment with benzodiazepines (BZDs). The problem of drug-induced dependency following treatment with these drugs may be avoided by developing more selective and specific BZD compounds, such as 2,3-substituted BZDs. Alternative approaches to the treatment of anxiety include the following: (i) antidepressants such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which are active in treating most anxiety disorders, including GAD; (ii) metabotropic glutamate (mGluR2) receptor agonists, which negatively modulate glutamate neurotransmission, and CRF antagonists, which have been proposed to exhibit anxiolytic properties; (iii) 5-HT1A receptor agonists which have demonstrated anxiolytic effects in clinical studies, although preclinical studies have reported weak or variable effects; (iv) 5-HT moduline antagonists, as well as 5-HT2C receptor antagonists, which may have anxiolytic properties; and, finally, (v) other approaches which are under investigation, including CCK2 antagonists.

  15. Cross-interactions of two p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors and two cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists with the CCK1 receptor and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Morel, Caroline; Ibarz, Géraldine; Oiry, Catherine; Carnazzi, Eric; Bergé, Gilbert; Gagne, Didier; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Martinez, Jean

    2005-06-01

    Although SB202190 and SB203580 are described as specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, several reports have indicated that other enzymes are also sensitive to SB203580. Using a pharmacological approach, we report for the first time that compounds SB202190 and SB203580 were able to directly and selectively interact with a G-protein-coupled receptor, namely the cholecystokinin receptor subtype CCK1, but not with the CCK2 receptor. We demonstrated that these compounds were non-competitive antagonists of the CCK1 receptor at concentrations typically used to inhibit protein kinases. By chimeric construction of the CCK2 receptor, we determined the involvement of two CCK1 receptor intracellular loops in the binding of SB202190 and SB203580. We also showed that two CCK antagonists, L364,718 and L365,260, were able to regulate p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Using a reporter gene strategy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrated that both CCK antagonists inhibited selectively the enzymatic activity of p38 MAP kinase. Kinase assays suggested that this inhibition resulted from a direct interaction with both CCK antagonists. Molecular modeling simulations suggested that this interaction occurs in the ATP binding pocket of p38 MAP kinase. These results suggest that SB202190 and SB203580 bind to the CCK1 receptor and, as such, these compounds should be used with caution in models that express this receptor. We also found that L364,718 and L365,260, two CCK receptor antagonists, directly interacted with p38 MAP kinase and inhibited its activity. These findings suggest that the CCK1 receptor shares structural analogies with the p38 MAP kinase ATP binding site. They open the way to potential design of either a new family of MAP kinase inhibitors from CCK1 receptor ligand structures or new CCK1 receptor ligands based on p38 MAP kinase inhibitor structures.

  16. Membrane Cholesterol Affects Stimulus-Activity Coupling in Type 1, but not Type 2, CCK Receptors: Use of Cell Lines with Elevated Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Harikumar, Kaleeckal G.; Potter, Ross M.; Patil, Achyut; Echeveste, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    The lipid microenvironment of membrane proteins can affect their structure, function, and regulation. We recently described differential effects of acute modification of membrane cholesterol on the function of type 1 and 2 cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors. We now explore the regulatory impact of chronic cholesterol modification on these receptors using novel receptor-bearing cell lines with elevated membrane cholesterol. Stable CCK1R and CCK2R expression was established in clonal lines of 25RA cells having gain-of-function in SCAP [sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein] and SRD15 cells having deficiencies in Insig-1 and Insig-2 enzymes affecting HMG CoA reductase and SREBP. Increased cholesterol in the plasma membrane of these cells was directly demonstrated, and receptor binding and signaling characteristics were shown to reflect predicted effects on receptor function. In both environments, both types of CCK receptors were internalized and recycled normally in response to agonist occupation. No differences in receptor distribution within the membrane were appreciated at the light microscopic level in these CHO-derived cell lines. Fluorescence anisotropy was studied for these receptors occupied by fluorescent agonist and antagonist, as well as when tagged with YFP. These studies demonstrated increased anisotropy of the agonist ligand occupying the active state of the CCK1R in a cholesterol-enriched environment, mimicking fluorescence of the uncoupled, inactive state of this receptor, while there was no effect of increasing cholesterol on fluorescence at the CCK2R. These cell lines should be quite useful for examining the functional characteristics of potential drugs that might be used in an abnormal lipid environment. PMID:23306829

  17. A comparison of the effects of gastrin, somatostatin and dopamine receptor ligands on rat gastric enterochromaffin-like cell secretion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kidd, M; Modlin, I M; Black, J W; Boyce, M; Culler, M

    2007-10-01

    Gastrin regulates ECL cell histamine release and is a critical determinant of acid secretion. ECL cell secretion and proliferation is inhibited by gastrin antagonists and somatostatin but little is known about the role of dopamine agonists in this process. Since the ECL cell exhibits all three classes of receptor we evaluated and compared the effects of the gastrin receptor antagonist, (YF476), lanreotide (SST agonist) and novel dopaminergic agents (BIM53061 and BIM27A760) on ECL cell histamine secretion and proliferation. Highly enriched (>98%) ECL cell preparations prepared from rat gastric mucosa using a FACS approach were studied. Real-time PCR confirmed presence of the CCK2, SS2 and SS5 and D1 receptors on ECL cells. YF476 inhibited histamine secretion and proliferation with IC(50)s of 1.25 nM and 1.3 x 10(-11) M respectively, values 10-1000x more potent than L365,260. Lanreotide inhibited secretion and proliferation (2.2 nM, 1.9 x 10(-10) M) and increased YF476-inhibited proliferation a further 5-fold. The dopamine agonist, BIM53061, inhibited gastrin-mediated ECL cell secretion and proliferation (17 nM, 6 x 10(-10) M) as did the novel dopamine/somatostatin chimera BIM23A760 (22 nM, 4.9 x 10(-10) M). Our studies demonstrate that the gastrin receptor antagonist, YF476, is the most potent inhibitor of ECL cell histamine secretion and proliferation. Lanreotide, a dopamine agonist and a dopamine/somatostatin chimera inhibited ECL cell function but were 10-1000x less potent than YF476. Agents that selectively target the CCK2 receptor may provide alternative therapeutic strategies for gastrin-mediated gastrointestinal cell secretion and proliferation such as evident in the hypergastrinemic gastric carcinoids associated with low acid states.

  18. Improving the In Vivo Profile of Minigastrin Radiotracers: A Comparative Study Involving the Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitor Phosphoramidon.

    PubMed

    Kaloudi, Aikaterini; Nock, Berthold A; Lymperis, Emmanouil; Krenning, Eric P; de Jong, Marion; Maina, Theodosia

    2016-02-01

    Minigastrin radiotracers, such as [(111)In-DOTA]MG0 ([(111)In-DOTA-DGlu(1)]minigastrin), have been considered for diagnostic imaging and radionuclide therapy of CCK2R-positive human tumors, such as medullary thyroid carcinoma. However, the high kidney retention assigned to the pentaGlu(2-6) repeat in the peptide sequence has compromised their clinical applicability. On the other hand, truncated des(Glu)(2-6)-analogs, such as [(111)In-DOTA]MG11 ([(111)In-DOTA-DGlu(10),desGlu(2-6)]minigastrin), despite their low renal uptake, show poor bioavailability and tumor targeting. [(111)In]CP04 ([(111)In-DOTA-DGlu(1-6)]minigastrin) acquired by Glu(2-6)/DGlu(2-6) substitution showed promising tumor-to-kidney ratios in rodents. In the present study, we compare the biological profiles of [(111)In]CP04, [(111)In-DOTA]MG11, and [(111)In-DOTA]MG0 during in situ neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibition, recently shown to improve the bioavailability of several peptide radiotracers. After coinjection of the NEP inhibitor, phosphoramidon (PA), the stability of [(111)In]CP04 and [(111)In-DOTA]MG0 in peripheral mouse blood increased, with an exceptional >14-fold improvement monitored for [(111)In-DOTA]MG11. In line with these findings, PA treatment increased the uptake of [(111)In]CP04 (8.5 ± 0.4%ID/g to 16.0 ± 2.3%ID/g) and [(111)In-DOTA]MG0 (11.9 ± 2.2%ID/g to 17.2 ± 0.9%ID/g) in A431-CCK2R(+) tumors at 4 hours postinjection, whereas the respective increase for [(111)In-DOTA]MG11 was >6-fold (2.5 ± 0.9%ID/g to 15.1 ± 1.7%ID/g). Interestingly, kidney uptake remained lowest for [(111)In-DOTA]MG11, but unfavorably increased by PA treatment for [(111)In-DOTA]MG0. Thus, overall, the most favorable in vivo profile was displayed by [(111)In-DOTA]MG11 during NEP inhibition, highlighting the need to validate this promising concept in the clinic. PMID:26844849

  19. Cholecystokinin receptor-1 mediates the inhibitory effects of exogenous cholecystokinin octapeptide on cellular morphine dependence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8), the most potent endogenous anti-opioid peptide, has been shown to regulate the processes of morphine dependence. In our previous study, we found that exogenous CCK-8 attenuated naloxone induced withdrawal symptoms. To investigate the precise effect of exogenous CCK-8 and the role of cholecystokinin (CCK) 1 and/or 2 receptors in morphine dependence, a SH-SY5Y cell model was employed, in which the μ-opioid receptor, CCK1/2 receptors, and endogenous CCK are co-expressed. Results Forty-eight hours after treating SH-SY5Y cells with morphine (10 μM), naloxone (10 μM) induced a cAMP overshoot, indicating that cellular morphine dependence had been induced. The CCK receptor and endogenous CCK were up-regulated after chronic morphine exposure. The CCK2 receptor antagonist (LY-288,513) at 1–10 μM inhibited the naloxone-precipitated cAMP overshoot, but the CCK1 receptor antagonist (L-364,718) did not. Interestingly, CCK-8 (0.1-1 μM), a strong CCK receptor agonist, dose-dependently inhibited the naloxone-precipitated cAMP overshoot in SH-SY5Y cells when co-pretreated with morphine. The L-364,718 significantly blocked the inhibitory effect of exogenous CCK-8 on the cAMP overshoot at 1–10 μM, while the LY-288,513 did not. Therefore, the CCK2 receptor appears to be necessary for low concentrations of endogenous CCK to potentiate morphine dependence in SH-SY5Y cells. An additional inhibitory effect of CCK-8 at higher concentrations appears to involve the CCK1 receptor. Conclusions This study reveals the difference between exogenous CCK-8 and endogenous CCK effects on the development of morphine dependence, and provides the first evidence for the participation of the CCK1 receptor in the inhibitory effects of exogenous CCK-8 on morphine dependence. PMID:22682150

  20. Design, synthesis, and testing of multivalent compounds targeted to melanocortin receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehigaspitiya, Dilani Chathurika

    Our focus is on developing non-invasive molecular imaging reagents, which target human cancers that presently are difficult to detect, such as melanoma. We wish to apply the multivalency concept to differentiate between healthy cells and melanoma cells. Melanoma cells are known to over-express alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone receptors. A successful multivalent construct should show greater avidity towards melanoma cells than healthy cells due to the synergistic effects arising from multivalency. Both oligomeric and shorter linear constructs bearing the minimum active sequence of melanocyte stimulating hormone, His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH2(MSH4), which binds with low micromolar affinity to alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone receptors, were synthesized. Binding affinities of these constructs were evaluated in a competitive binding assay by competing with labeled ligands, Eu-DTPA-PEGO-MSH7 and/or Eu-DTPA-PEGO-NDP-alpha-MSH on the engineered cell line HEK293 CCK2R/hMC4R, which is genetically modified to over-express both the cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R) and human melanocortin 4 receptor (hMC4R). The oligomers were rapidly assembled using microwave-assisted copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition between a dialkyne derivative of MSH4 and a diazide derivative of (Pro-Gly)3 as co-monomers. Three oligomer mixtures were further analyzed based on their degree of oligomerization and the route by which the MSH4 monomers were oligomerized, protected vs deprotected. Completive binding assay against Eu-DTPA-PEGO-MSH7 showed only a statistical enhancement of binding when calculated based on the total MSH4 concentration. However, when the calculation of avidity is based on an estimation of the particles numbers, there was a seven times enhancement of binding compared to a monovalent MSH4 control. The shorter linear multivalent MSH4 constructs were synthesized using ethylene glycol, glycerol, and mannitol as core scaffolds with maximum inter-ligand distances ranging from 27

  1. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and toxicity studies required for regulatory approval of a phase I clinical trial with 111In-CP04 in medullary thyroid carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Theodosia; Konijnenberg, Mark W.; KolencPeitl, Petra; Garnuszek, Piotr; Nock, Berthold A.; Kaloudi, Aikaterini; Kroselj, Marko; Zaletel, Katja; Maecke, Helmut; Mansi, Rosalba; Erba, Paola; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Mikolajczak, Renata; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction From a series of radiolabelled cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin analogues, 111In-CP04 (111In-DOTA-(DGlu)6-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2) was selected for further translation as a diagnostic radiopharmaceutical towards a first-in-man study in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). A freeze-dried kit formulation for multicentre application has been developed. We herein report on biosafety, in vivo stability, biodistribution and dosimetry aspects of 111In-CP04 in animal models, essential for the regulatory approval of the clinical trial. Materials and methods Acute and extended single dose toxicity of CP04 was tested in rodents, while the in vivo stability of 111In-CP04 was assessed by HPLC analysis of mouse blood samples. The biodistribution of 111In-CP04 prepared from a freeze-dried kit was studied in SCID mice bearing double A431-CCK2R(±) xenografts at 1, 4 and 24 h pi. Further 4-h animal groups were either additionally treated with the plasma expander gelofusine or injected with 111In-CP04 prepared by wet-labelling. Pharmacokinetics in healthy mice included the 30 min, 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h time points pi. Dosimetric calculations were based on extrapolation of mice data to humans adopting two scaling models. Results CP04 was well-tolerated by both mice and rats, with an LD50 > 178.5 μg/kg body weight for mice and a NOAEL (no-observed-adverse-effect-level) of 89 μg/kg body weight for rats. After labelling, 111In-CP04 remained >70% intact in peripheral mouse blood at 5 min pi. The uptake of 111In-CP04 prepared from the freeze-dried kit and by wet-labelling were comparable in the A431-CCK2R(+)-xenografts (9.24 ± 1.35%ID/g and 8.49 ± 0.39%ID/g, respectively; P > 0.05). Gelofusine-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced kidneys values (1.69 ± 0.15%ID/g vs. 5.55 ± 0.94%ID/g in controls, P < 0.001). Dosimetry data revealed very comparable effective tumour doses for the two scaling models applied, of 0.045 and 0.044 m

  2. Molecular cloning and tissue distribution of cholecystokinin-1 receptor (CCK-1R) in yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata and its response to feeding and in vitro CCK treatment.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Takahiro; Masumoto, Toshiro; Fukada, Haruhisa

    2013-06-01

    In vertebrates, the peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) is one of the most important neuroregulatory digestive hormones. CCK acts via CCK receptors that are classified into two subtypes, CCK-1 receptor (CCK-1R; formally CCK-A) and CCK-2 receptor (formally CCK-B). In particular, the CCK-1R is involved in digestion and is regulated by CCK. However, very little information is known about CCK-1R in fish. Therefore, we performed molecular cloning of CCK-1R cDNA from the digestive tract of yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed a high sequence identity between the cloned yellowtail CCK receptor cDNA and CCK-1R, which belongs to the CCK-1R cluster. Furthermore, the expression of yellowtail CCK receptor mRNA was observed in gallbladder, pyloric caeca, and intestines, similarly to CCK-1R mRNA expression in mammals, suggesting that the cloned cDNA is of CCK-1R from yellowtail. In in vivo experiments, the CCK-1R mRNA levels increased in the gallbladder and pyloric caeca after feeding, whereas in vitro, mRNA levels of CCK-1R and digestive enzymes in cultured pyloric caeca increased by the addition of CCK. These results suggest that CCK-1R plays an important role in digestion stimulated by CCK in yellowtail. PMID:23467070

  3. NIR-Activated Content Release from Plasmon Resonant Liposomes for Probing Single-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Technological limitations have prevented the interrogation and manipulation of cellular activity in response to bioactive molecules within model and living systems that is required for the development of diagnostic and treatment modalities for diseases, such as cancer. In this work, we demonstrate that gold-coated liposomes are capable of encapsulation and on-demand release of signaling molecules with a spatial and temporal resolution leading to activation of individual cells. As a model system, we used cells modified to overexpress a certain G-protein coupled receptor, the CCK2 receptor, and achieved its activation in a single cell via the localized release of its agonist. This content release was triggered by illumination of the liposomes at wavelengths corresponding to the plasmon resonance of the gold coating. The use of plasmon resonant liposomes may enable on-demand release of a broad range of molecules using biologically safe near infrared light and without molecule chemical modification. In combination with the spectral tunability of plasmon resonant coating, this technology may allow for multiplexed interrogation of complex and diverse signaling pathways in model or living tissues with unprecedented spatial and temporal control. PMID:23106797

  4. In vivo analysis of mouse gastrin gene regulation in enhanced GFP-BAC transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Shibata, Wataru; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Jin, Guangchun; Yang, Xiangdong; Ericksen, Russell; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida; Asfaha, Samuel; Quante, Michael; Betz, Kelly S; Shulkes, Arthur; Wang, Timothy C

    2011-02-01

    Gastrin is secreted from a subset of neuroendocrine cells residing in the gastric antrum known as G cells, but low levels are also expressed in fetal pancreas and intestine and in many solid malignancies. Although past studies have suggested that antral gastrin is transcriptionally regulated by inflammation, gastric pH, somatostatin, and neoplastic transformation, the transcriptional regulation of gastrin has not previously been demonstrated in vivo. Here, we describe the creation of an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter (mGAS-EGFP) mouse using a bacterial artificial chromosome that contains the entire mouse gastrin gene. Three founder lines expressed GFP signals in the gastric antrum and the transitional zone to the corpus. In addition, GFP(+) cells could be detected in the fetal pancreatic islets and small intestinal villi, but not in these organs of the adult mice. The administration of acid-suppressive reagents such as proton pump inhibitor omeprazole and gastrin/CCK-2 receptor antagonist YF476 significantly increased GFP signal intensity and GFP(+) cell numbers in the antrum, whereas these parameters were decreased by overnight fasting, octreotide (long-lasting somatostatin ortholog) infusion, and Helicobacter felis infection. GFP(+) cells were also detected in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and importantly in the colonic tumor cells induced by administration with azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium salt. This transgenic mouse provides a useful tool to study the regulation of mouse gastrin gene in vivo, thus contributing to our understanding of the mechanisms involved in transcriptional control of the gastrin gene.

  5. Ultrastructure of ECL cells in Mastomys after long-term treatment with H2 receptor antagonist loxtidine.

    PubMed

    Vigen, Reidar Alexander; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M; Chen, Duan; Zhao, Chun-Mei

    2012-06-01

    Gastric ECL-cell hyperplasia and carcinoids (ECLoma) develop after 1 year in rats treated with omeprazole or 2 months in Mastomys treated with loxtidine. The aim of this study was to examine the ultrastructure of ECL cells in Mastomys after loxtidine treatment with an attempt to evaluate whether an impairment of autophagy was involved in the tumorigenesis. Mastomys were given loxtidine for 8 or 27 weeks. Morphological analysis of ECL cells showed that (1) cell size was not increased after 8 or 27 weeks; (2) secretory vesicles, a hallmark feature of welldifferentiated ECL cells, were unchanged after 8 weeks but reduced after 27 weeks; (3) granules were reduced after 8 or 27 weeks; (4) microvesicles were unchanged after the treatment; and (5) vacuoles and lipofuscin bodies were found occasionally after 8 weeks but not at 27 weeks. In addition, the appearance of ECL-cell ultrastructure differed between loxtidine-treated Mastomys and rats treated with omeprazole or subjected to antrectomy, but was similar between Mastomys treated with loxtidine for 27 weeks and mice deficient in CCK(2) receptor. We suggest that the ultrastructure of ECL cells in Mastomys after long-term treatment with loxtidine displayed an impaired formation of vacuoles and lipofuscin bodies, markers of the autophagic pathway.

  6. Single cell targeting using plasmon resonant gold-coated liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2012-03-01

    We have developed an experimental system with the potential for the delivery and localized release of an encapsulated agent with high spatial and temporal resolution. We previously introduced liposome-supported plasmon resonant gold nanoshells; in this composite structure, the liposome allows for the encapsulation of substances, such as therapeutic agents, neurotransmitters, or growth factors, and the plasmon resonant structure facilitates the rapid release of encapsulated contents upon laser light illumination. More recently, we demonstrated that these gold-coated liposomes are capable of releasing their contents in a spectrally-controlled manner, where plasmon resonant nanoparticles only release content upon illumination with a wavelength of light matching their plasmon resonance band. We now show that this release mechanism can be used in a biological setting to deliver a peptide derivative of cholecystokinin to HEK293 cells overexpressing the CCK2 receptor. Using directed laser light, we may enable localized release from gold-coated liposomes to enable accurate perturbation of cellular functions in response to released compounds; this system may have possible applications in signaling pathways and drug discovery.

  7. Pharmacological study of IQM-97,423, a potent and selective CCK1 receptor antagonist with protective effect in experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Latorre, M; Bartolomé-Nebreda, J M; García-López, M T; González-Muñiz, R; Herranz, R; Del Río, J; Cenarruzabeitia, E

    2004-10-01

    The pharmacological profile of the new CCK1 receptor antagonist IQM-97,423, (4aS,5R)-2-benzyl-5-(tert-butylaminocarbonyl-tryptophyl)amino-1,3-dioxoperhydropyrido-[1,2-c]pyrimidine, was examined in in vitro and in vivo studies and compared with typical CCK1 antagonists such as devazepide and lorglumide. IQM-97,423 showed a high affinity at [3H]-pCCK8-labeled rat pancreatic CCK1 receptors, and was virtually devoid of affinity at brain CCK2 receptors. IQM-97,423 antagonized CCK8S-stimulated alpha-amylase release from rat pancreatic acini with a potency similar to devazepide and much higher than lorglumide. In the guinea pig isolated longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparation, IQM-97,423 produced a full antagonism of the contractile response elicited by CCK8S and a weaker effect on the contraction elicited by CCK4, suggesting a selective antagonism at CCK1 receptors. The protective effect of IQM-97,423 and devazepide was tested in two models of acute pancreatitis in rats, induced by injection of cerulein or by combined bile and pancreatic duct obstruction. The new compound fully prevented the cerulein-induced increase in plasma pancreatic enzymes and in pancreas weight with a potency similar to devazepide. In common bile-pancreatic duct ligature-induced acute pancreatitis, IQM-97,423 partially prevented, like devazepide, the increase in plasma pancreatic enzyme activity and in pancreas weight. Consequently, the pyridopyrimidine derivative IQM-97,423 is a potent and highly selective CCK1 receptor antagonist with preventive effects in two experimental models of acute pancreatitis and a potential therapeutic interest.

  8. Chronic effect of oral cholestyramine, a bile salt sequestrant, and exogenous cholecystokinin on insulin release in rats.

    PubMed

    Kogire, M; Gomez, G; Uchida, T; Ishizuka, J; Greeley, G H; Thompson, J C

    1992-01-01

    Oral cholestyramine, a bile salt sequestrant, stimulates pancreatic exocrine secretion and growth chiefly by increasing cholecystokinin (CCK) release. In this report, we examine pancreatic insulin content and insulin release from the isolated perfused pancreas in rats given oral cholestyramine (4%, wt/wt) or subcutaneous CCK-8 (1 micrograms/kg every 8 h) for 2 weeks. Cholestyramine significantly increased pancreatic weight by 32%. CCK administration significantly increased pancreatic weight by 15%. Total pancreatic content of protein and DNA were also increased significantly by cholestyramine and pancreatic protein content was increased significantly by CCK administration. Total pancreatic insulin content was not affected by cholestyramine or CCK. Both cholestyramine and CCK significantly increased the first phase of glucose (8.4 mM)-stimulated release of insulin [mean insulin output (ng/min): control, 2.0 +/- 0.1; cholestyramine, 2.7 +/- 0.2; CCK, 2.6 +/- 0.2]. Cholestyramine also significantly enhanced the second phase of glucose-stimulated release of insulin. Insulin release stimulated by CCK-8 (10(-10) M) was not affected by oral cholestyramine or CCK treatment. These findings indicate that oral cholestyramine and exogenous CCK have a stimulatory effect on beta cell function. Since pancreatic insulin content was not affected by cholestyramine and CCK treatment, cholestyramine and CCK may increase the sensitivity of beta cells to glucose. The absence of a stimulatory effect of cholestyramine and CCK administration on insulin release in response to CCK-8 may be related to a down-regulation of CCK receptors on beta cells.

  9. Salt-Inducible Kinase 1 (SIK1) Is Induced by Gastrin and Inhibits Migration of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Selvik, Linn-Karina M.; Rao, Shalini; Steigedal, Tonje S.; Haltbakk, Ildri; Misund, Kristine; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S.; Lægreid, Astrid; Thommesen, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1/Snf1lk) belongs to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family of kinases, all of which play major roles in regulating metabolism and cell growth. Recent studies have shown that reduced levels of SIK1 are associated with poor outcome in cancers, and that this involves an invasive cellular phenotype with increased metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanism(s) regulated by SIK1 in cancer cells is not well explored. The peptide hormone gastrin regulates cellular processes involved in oncogenesis, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to examine the role of SIK1 in gastrin responsive adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J, AGS-GR and MKN45. We show that gastrin, known to signal through the Gq/G11-coupled CCK2 receptor, induces SIK1 expression in adenocarcinoma cells, and that transcriptional activation of SIK1 is negatively regulated by the Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER). We demonstrate that gastrin-mediated signalling induces phosphorylation of Liver Kinase 1B (LKB1) Ser-428 and SIK1 Thr-182. Ectopic expression of SIK1 increases gastrin-induced phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and enhances gastrin-induced transcription of c-fos and CRE-, SRE-, AP1- and NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter plasmids. We also show that gastrin induces phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDACs. Next we find that siRNA mediated knockdown of SIK1 increases migration of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Evidence provided here demonstrates that SIK1 is regulated by gastrin and influences gastrin elicited signalling in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The results from the present study are relevant for the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in gastric adenocarcinomas. PMID:25384047

  10. Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) is induced by gastrin and inhibits migration of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Selvik, Linn-Karina M; Rao, Shalini; Steigedal, Tonje S; Haltbakk, Ildri; Misund, Kristine; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Lægreid, Astrid; Thommesen, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1/Snf1lk) belongs to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family of kinases, all of which play major roles in regulating metabolism and cell growth. Recent studies have shown that reduced levels of SIK1 are associated with poor outcome in cancers, and that this involves an invasive cellular phenotype with increased metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanism(s) regulated by SIK1 in cancer cells is not well explored. The peptide hormone gastrin regulates cellular processes involved in oncogenesis, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to examine the role of SIK1 in gastrin responsive adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J, AGS-GR and MKN45. We show that gastrin, known to signal through the Gq/G11-coupled CCK2 receptor, induces SIK1 expression in adenocarcinoma cells, and that transcriptional activation of SIK1 is negatively regulated by the Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER). We demonstrate that gastrin-mediated signalling induces phosphorylation of Liver Kinase 1B (LKB1) Ser-428 and SIK1 Thr-182. Ectopic expression of SIK1 increases gastrin-induced phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and enhances gastrin-induced transcription of c-fos and CRE-, SRE-, AP1- and NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter plasmids. We also show that gastrin induces phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDACs. Next we find that siRNA mediated knockdown of SIK1 increases migration of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Evidence provided here demonstrates that SIK1 is regulated by gastrin and influences gastrin elicited signalling in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The results from the present study are relevant for the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in gastric adenocarcinomas. PMID:25384047

  11. Diversity and Bias through Receptor-Receptor Interactions in GPCR Heteroreceptor Complexes. Focus on Examples from Dopamine D2 Receptor Heteromerization.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Tarakanov, Alexander; Romero Fernandez, Wilber; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Filip, Malgorzata; Agnati, Luigi F; Garriga, Pere; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980s and 1990s, it was shown that neurotensin (NT) through selective antagonistic NTR-D2 like receptor interactions increased the diversity of DA signaling by reducing D2R-mediated dopamine signaling over D1R-mediated dopamine signaling. Furthermore, D2R protomer appeared to bias the specificity of the NTR orthosteric binding site toward neuromedin N vs. NT in the heteroreceptor complex. Complex CCK2R-D1R-D2R interactions in possible heteroreceptor complexes were also demonstrated further increasing receptor diversity. In D2R-5-HT2AR heteroreceptor complexes, the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI were recently found to exert a biased agonist action on the orthosteric site of the 5-HT2AR protomer leading to the development of an active conformational state different from the one produced by 5-HT. Furthermore, as recently demonstrated allosteric A2A-D2R receptor-receptor interaction brought about not only a reduced affinity of the D2R agonist binding site but also a biased modulation of the D2R protomer signaling in A2A-D2R heteroreceptor complexes. A conformational state of the D2R was induced, which moved away from Gi/o signaling and instead favored β-arrestin2-mediated signaling. These examples on allosteric receptor-receptor interactions obtained over several decades serve to illustrate the significant increase in diversity and biased recognition and signaling that develop through such mechanisms.

  12. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J. Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D. Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling. PMID:25977510

  13. Diversity and Bias through Receptor–Receptor Interactions in GPCR Heteroreceptor Complexes. Focus on Examples from Dopamine D2 Receptor Heteromerization

    PubMed Central

    Fuxe, Kjell; Tarakanov, Alexander; Romero Fernandez, Wilber; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Filip, Malgorzata; Agnati, Luigi F.; Garriga, Pere; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric receptor–receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980s and 1990s, it was shown that neurotensin (NT) through selective antagonistic NTR–D2 like receptor interactions increased the diversity of DA signaling by reducing D2R-mediated dopamine signaling over D1R-mediated dopamine signaling. Furthermore, D2R protomer appeared to bias the specificity of the NTR orthosteric binding site toward neuromedin N vs. NT in the heteroreceptor complex. Complex CCK2R–D1R–D2R interactions in possible heteroreceptor complexes were also demonstrated further increasing receptor diversity. In D2R–5-HT2AR heteroreceptor complexes, the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI were recently found to exert a biased agonist action on the orthosteric site of the 5-HT2AR protomer leading to the development of an active conformational state different from the one produced by 5-HT. Furthermore, as recently demonstrated allosteric A2A–D2R receptor–receptor interaction brought about not only a reduced affinity of the D2R agonist binding site but also a biased modulation of the D2R protomer signaling in A2A–D2R heteroreceptor complexes. A conformational state of the D2R was induced, which moved away from Gi/o signaling and instead favored β-arrestin2-mediated signaling. These examples on allosteric receptor–receptor interactions obtained over several decades serve to illustrate the significant increase in diversity and biased recognition and signaling that develop through such mechanisms. PMID:24860548

  14. Role of cholecystokinin in anorexia induction following oral exposure to the 8-ketotrichothecenes deoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, fusarenon X, and nivalenol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenda; Zhou, Hui-Ren; He, Kaiyu; Pan, Xiao; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Maiko; Zhang, Haibin; Pestka, James J

    2014-04-01

    Cereal grain contamination by trichothecene mycotoxins is known to negatively impact human and animal health with adverse effects on food intake and growth being of particular concern. The head blight fungus Fusarium graminearum elaborates five closely related 8-ketotrichothecene congeners: (1) deoxynivalenol (DON), (2) 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), (3) 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), (4) fusarenon X (FX), and (5) nivalenol (NIV). While anorexia induction in mice exposed intraperitoneally to DON has been linked to plasma elevation of the satiety hormones cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY₃₋₃₆ (PYY₃₋₃₆), the effects of oral gavage of DON or of other 8-keotrichothecenes on release of these gut peptides have not been established. The purpose of this study was to (1) compare the anorectic responses to the aforementioned 8-ketotrichothecenes following oral gavage at a common dose (2.5 mg/kg bw) and (2) relate these effects to changes plasma CCK and PYY₃₋₃₆ concentrations. Elevation of plasma CCK markedly corresponded to anorexia induction by DON and all other 8-ketotrichothecenes tested. Furthermore, the CCK1 receptor antagonist SR 27897 and the CCK2 receptor antagonist L-365,260 dose-dependently attenuated both CCK- and DON-induced anorexia, which was consistent with this gut satiety hormone being an important mediator of 8-ketotrichothecene-induced food refusal. In contrast to CCK, PYY₃₋₃₆ was moderately elevated by oral gavage with DON and NIV but not by 3-ADON, 15-ADON, or FX. Taken together, the results suggest that CCK plays a major role in anorexia induction following oral exposure to 8-ketotrichothecenes, whereas PYY₃₋₃₆ might play a lesser, congener-dependent role in this response.

  15. From preclinical development to clinical application: Kit formulation for radiolabelling the minigastrin analogue CP04 with In-111 for a first-in-human clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak, Dariusz; Rangger, Christine; Peitl, Petra Kolenc; Garnuszek, Piotr; Maurin, Michał; Ihli, Laura; Kroselj, Marko; Maina, Theodosia; Maecke, Helmut; Erba, Paola; Kremser, Leopold; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Mikołajczak, Renata; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A variety of radiolabelled minigastrin analogues targeting the cholecystokinin 2 (CCK2) receptor were developed and compared in a concerted preclinical testing to select the most promising radiotracer for diagnosis and treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). DOTA–DGlu–DGlu–DGlu–DGlu–DGlu–DGlu– Ala–Tyr–Gly–Trp–Met–Asp–Phe–NH2 (CP04) after labelling with 111In displayed excellent characteristics, such as high stability, receptor affinity, specific and persistent tumour uptake and low kidney retention in animal models. Therefore, it was selected for further clinical evaluation within the ERA-NET project GRAN-T-MTC. Here we report on the development of a pharmaceutical freeze-dried formulation of the precursor CP04 for a first multi-centre clinical trial with 111In-CP04 in MTC patients. Materials and methods The kit formulation was optimised by adjustment of buffer, additives and radiolabelling conditions. Three clinical grade batches of a final kit formulation with two different amounts of peptide (10 or 50 μg) were prepared and radiolabelled with 111In. Quality control and stability assays of both the kits and the resulting radiolabelled compound were performed by HPLC analysis. Results Use of ascorbic acid buffer (pH 4.5) allowed freeze-drying of the kit formulation with satisfactory pellet-formation. Addition of methionine and gentisic acid as well as careful selection of radiolabelling temperature was required to avoid extensive oxidation of the Met11-residue. Trace metal contamination, in particular Zn, was found to be a major challenge during the pharmaceutical filling process in particular for the 10 μg formulation. The final formulations contained 10 or 50 μg CP04, 25 mg ascorbic acid, 0.5 mg gentisic acid and 5 mg l-methionine. The radiolabelling performed by incubation of 200–250 MBq 111InCl3 at 90 °C for 15 min resulted in reproducible radiochemical purity (RCP) >94%. Kit-stability was proven for >6