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Sample records for ccl3-mediated neutrophil recruitment

  1. Suppression of neutrophil recruitment in mice by geranium essential oil.

    PubMed

    Abe, Shigeru; Maruyama, Naho; Hayama, Kazumi; Inouye, Shigeharu; Oshima, Haruyuki; Yamaguchi, Hideyo

    2004-02-01

    In aromatherapy, essential oils are used as anti-inflammatory remedies, but experimental studies on their action mechanisms are very limited. To assess their anti-inflammatory activities, the effects of essential oils on neutrophil recruitment in mice were examined in vivo. The effect of essential oils on leukocyte and neutrophil recruitment induced 6 h after intraperitoneal injection of casein in mice was examined. Leukocyte recruitment into the peritoneal cavity in mice was suppressed by intraperitoneal injections of geranium, lemongrass and spearmint oils at the dose of 5 microl/mouse, but was not by tea tree oil. This recruitment was inhibited dose-dependently by geranium oil. The suppression of leukocyte recruitment resulted from inhibition of neutrophil accumulation. Some essential oils used as anti-inflammatory remedies suppress neutrophil recruitment into the peritoneal cavity in mice.

  2. Mechanism of neutrophil recruitment to the lung after pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Hoth, J Jason; Wells, Jonathan D; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; McCall, Charles E; Yoza, Barbara K

    2011-06-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion is a common but poorly understood injury. We previously demonstrated that lung contusion activates localized and systemic innate immune mechanisms and recruits neutrophils to the injured lung. We hypothesized that the innate immune and inflammatory activation of neutrophils may figure prominently in the response to lung injury. To investigate this, we used a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans and evaluated postinjury lung function and pulmonary neutrophil recruitment. Comparisons were made between injured mice with and without neutrophil depletion. We further examined the role of chemokines and adhesion receptors in neutrophil recruitment to the injured lung. We found that lung injury and resultant physiological dysfunction after contusion were dependent on the presence of neutrophils in the alveolar space. We show that CXCL1, CXCL2/3, and CXCR2 are involved in neutrophil recruitment to the lung after injury and that intercellular adhesion molecule 1 is locally expressed and actively participates in this process. Injured gp91-deficient mice showed improved lung function, indicating that oxidant production by neutrophil NADPH oxidase mediates lung dysfunction after contusion. These data suggest that both neutrophil presence and function are required for lung injury after lung contusion.

  3. Mechanism of neutrophil recruitment to the lung after pulmonary contusion

    PubMed Central

    Hoth, J. Jason; Wells, Jonathan D.; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M.; McCall, Charles E.; Yoza, Barbara K.

    2011-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion is a common but poorly understood injury. We previously demonstrated that lung contusion activates localized and systemic innate immune mechanisms and recruits neutrophils to the injured lung. We hypothesized that the innate immune and inflammatory activation of neutrophils may figure prominently in the response to lung injury. To investigate this, we used a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans and evaluated postinjury lung function and pulmonary neutrophil recruitment. Comparisons were made between injured mice with and without neutrophil depletion. We further examined the role of chemokines and adhesion receptors in neutrophil recruitment to the injured lung. We found that lung injury and resultant physiological dysfunction after contusion was dependent upon the presence of neutrophils in the alveolar space. We show that CXCL1, CXCL2/3, and CXCR2 are involved in neutrophil recruitment to the lung after injury, and that ICAM-1 is locally expressed and actively participates in this process. Injured gp91phox deficient mice showed improved lung function, indicating that oxidant production by neutrophil NADPH oxidase mediates lung dysfunction after contusion. These data suggest that both neutrophil presence and function are required for lung injury after lung contusion. PMID:21330942

  4. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-08-01

    Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression. Systemic IgE-mediated mast cell activation in apoE(-/-)μMT mice resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesion size as compared to control mice, and interestingly, the number of neutrophils was highly increased in these lesions. In addition, peritoneal mast cell activation led to a massive neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity in C57Bl6 mice, whereas neutrophil numbers in mast cell deficient Kit(W(-sh)/W(-sh)) mice were not affected. Within the newly recruited neutrophil population, increased levels of CXCR2(+) and CXCR4(+) neutrophils were observed after mast cell activation. Indeed, mast cells were seen to contain and release CXCL1 and CXCL12, the ligands for CXCR2 and CXCR4. Intriguingly, peritoneal mast cell activation in combination with anti-CXCR2 receptor antagonist resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment, thus establishing a prominent role for the CXCL1/CXCR2 axis in mast cell-mediated neutrophil recruitment. Our data suggest that chemokines, and in particular CXCL1, released from activated mast cells induce neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, thereby aggravating the ongoing inflammatory response and thus affecting plaque progression and destabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrated pathways for neutrophil recruitment and inflammation in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Delphine J.; Li, Huiying; Ochoa, Maria T.; Tanaka, Motoyuki; Carbone, Ryan J.; Damoiseaux, Robert; Burdick, Anne; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Rea, Thomas H.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment is pivotal to host defense against microbial infection, but also contributes to the immunopathology of disease. We investigated the mechanism of neutrophil recruitment in human infectious disease by bioinformatic pathways analysis of the gene expression profiles in the skin lesions of leprosy. In erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL), which occurs in patients with lepromatous leprosy (L-lep), and is characterized by neutrophil infiltration in lesions, the most overrepresented biologic functional group was “cell movement” including E-selectin, which was coordinately regulated with IL-1β. In vitro activation of TLR2, upregulated in ENL lesions, triggered induction of IL-1β, which together with IFN-γ, induced E-selectin expression on, and neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. Thalidomide, an effective treatment for ENL, inhibited this neutrophil recruitment pathway. The gene expression profile of ENL lesions comprised an integrated pathway of TLR2/FcR activation, neutrophil migration and inflammation, providing insight into mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment in human infectious disease. PMID:20070238

  6. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection

    PubMed Central

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J.; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Hickey, Michael J.; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in post-capillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we show that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor alpha-hemolysin lyses perivascular macrophages leading to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin, and indicate that Staphylococcus aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy. PMID:24270515

  7. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection.

    PubMed

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Hickey, Michael J; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in postcapillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we showed that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor α-hemolysin produced by S. aureus lyses perivascular macrophages, which leads to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin and indicate that S. aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy.

  8. Roles of lung epithelium in neutrophil recruitment during pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuko; Ahyi, Ayele-Nati N; Pepper-Cunningham, Zachary A; Ferrari, Joseph D; Wilson, Andrew A; Jones, Matthew R; Quinton, Lee J; Mizgerd, Joseph P

    2014-02-01

    Epithelial cells line the respiratory tract and interface with the external world. Epithelial cells contribute to pulmonary inflammation, but specific epithelial roles have proven difficult to define. To discover unique epithelial activities that influence immunity during infection, we generated mice with nuclear factor-κB RelA mutated throughout all epithelial cells of the lung and coupled this approach with epithelial cell isolation from infected and uninfected lungs for cell-specific analyses of gene induction. The RelA mutant mice appeared normal basally, but in response to pneumococcus in the lungs they were unable to rapidly recruit neutrophils to the air spaces. Epithelial cells expressed multiple neutrophil-stimulating cytokines during pneumonia, all of which depended on RelA. Cytokine expression by nonepithelial cells was unaltered by the epithelial mutation of RelA. Epithelial cells were the predominant sources of CXCL5 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), whereas nonepithelial cells were major sources for other neutrophil-activating cytokines. Epithelial RelA mutation decreased whole lung levels of CXCL5 and GM-CSF during pneumococcal pneumonia, whereas lung levels of other neutrophil-recruiting factors were unaffected. Defective neutrophil recruitment in epithelial mutant mice could be rescued by administration of CXCL5 or GM-CSF. These results reveal a specialized immune function for the pulmonary epithelium, the induction of CXCL5 and GM-CSF, to accelerate neutrophil recruitment in the infected lung.

  9. Mediators of neutrophil recruitment in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Houard, Xavier; Touat, Ziad; Ollivier, Véronique; Louedec, Liliane; Philippe, Monique; Sebbag, Uriel; Meilhac, Olivier; Rossignol, Patrick; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2009-01-01

    Aims Neutrophils/platelet interactions are involved in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The intraluminal thrombus (ILT) is a human model of platelet/neutrophil interactions. The present study focused on mediators involved in neutrophil recruitment in AAA. Methods and results Conditioned media from luminal, intermediate, and abluminal layers of 29 human ILTs were analysed for neutrophil markers [elastase/α1-antitrypsin and MMP9/NGAL complexes, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and α-defensin peptides], RANTES, platelet factor 4 (PF4), and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Their time-dependent release into serum from clots generated in vitro and their plasma concentrations in AAA patients and controls were determined. Immunohistochemistry for neutrophils, platelets, IL-8, PF4, and RANTES on AAA sections was performed; and molecules involved in ILT neutrophil chemotactic function were analysed in vitro. Neutrophils and platelets colocalized in the luminal layer of the thrombus. Consistently, neutrophil markers and platelet-derived RANTES and PF4 were released predominantly by the luminal thrombus pole, where their concentrations were significantly correlated. The luminal ILT layer was also the main source of IL-8, whose immunostaining colocalized with neutrophils. All were also released time dependently from clots and were increased in plasma of AAA patients. Luminal ILT layers displayed potent neutrophil chemotactic activity in vitro, which was inhibited by RANTES- and IL-8-blocking antibodies as well as by reparixin, an antagonist of the IL-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that platelet-derived RANTES and neutrophil-derived IL-8 are involved in attracting neutrophils to the luminal layer of AAA ILT. PMID:19201759

  10. Chemokine CXCL1 mediated neutrophil recruitment: Role of glycosaminoglycan interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Kirti V.; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Dutta, Amit K.; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Troshkina, Anna; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL1/MGSA plays a pivotal role in the host immune response by recruiting and activating neutrophils for microbial killing at the tissue site. CXCL1 exists reversibly as monomers and dimers, and mediates its function by binding glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and CXCR2 receptor. We recently showed that both monomers and dimers are potent CXCR2 agonists, the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand, lysine and arginine residues located in two non-overlapping domains mediate GAG interactions, and there is extensive overlap between GAG and receptor-binding domains. To understand how these structural properties influence in vivo function, we characterized peritoneal neutrophil recruitment of a trapped monomer and trapped dimer and a panel of WT lysine/arginine to alanine mutants. Monomers and dimers were active, but WT was more active indicating synergistic interactions promote recruitment. Mutants from both domains showed reduced GAG heparin binding affinities and reduced neutrophil recruitment, providing compelling evidence that both GAG-binding domains mediate in vivo trafficking. Further, mutant of a residue that is involved in both GAG binding and receptor signaling showed the highest reduction in recruitment. We conclude that GAG interactions and receptor activity of CXCL1 monomers and dimers are fine-tuned to regulate neutrophil trafficking for successful resolution of tissue injury. PMID:27625115

  11. Role of the endothelial surface layer in neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Marki, Alex; Esko, Jeffrey D; Pries, Axel R; Ley, Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophil recruitment in most tissues is limited to postcapillary venules, where E- and P-selectins are inducibly expressed by venular endothelial cells. These molecules support neutrophil rolling via binding of PSGL-1 and other ligands on neutrophils. Selectins extend ≤ 38 nm above the endothelial plasma membrane, and PSGL-1 extends to 50 nm above the neutrophil plasma membrane. However, endothelial cells are covered with an ESL composed of glycosaminoglycans that is ≥ 500 nm thick and has measurable resistance against compression. The neutrophil surface is also covered with a surface layer. These surface layers would be expected to completely shield adhesion molecules; thus, neutrophils should not be able to roll and adhere. However, in the cremaster muscle and in many other models investigated using intravital microscopy, neutrophils clearly roll, and their rolling is easily and quickly induced. This conundrum was thought to be resolved by the observation that the induction of selectins is accompanied by ESL shedding; however, ESL shedding only partially reduces the ESL thickness (to 200 nm) and thus is insufficient to expose adhesion molecules. In addition to its antiadhesive functions, the ESL also presents neutrophil arrest-inducing chemokines. ESL heparan sulfate can also bind L-selectin expressed by the neutrophils, which contributes to rolling and arrest. We conclude that ESL has both proadhesive and antiadhesive functions. However, most previous studies considered either only the proadhesive or only the antiadhesive effects of the ESL. An integrated model for the role of the ESL in neutrophil rolling, arrest, and transmigration is needed.

  12. CXCL5 Drives Neutrophil Recruitment in TH17-Mediated GN

    PubMed Central

    Disteldorf, Erik M.; Krebs, Christian F.; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Turner, Jan-Eric; Nouailles, Geraldine; Tittel, André; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Stege, Gesa; Brix, Silke; Velden, Joachim; Wiech, Thorsten; Helmchen, Udo; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Peters, Anett; Bennstein, Sabrina B.; Kaffke, Anna; Llanto, Chrystel; Lira, Sergio A.; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Kurts, Christian; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil trafficking to sites of inflammation is essential for the defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but also contributes to tissue damage in TH17-mediated autoimmunity. This process is regulated by chemokines, which often show an overlapping expression pattern and function in pathogen- and autoimmune-induced inflammatory reactions. Using a murine model of crescentic GN, we show that the pathogenic TH17/IL-17 immune response induces chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 5 (CXCL5) expression in kidney tubular cells, which recruits destructive neutrophils that contribute to renal tissue injury. By contrast, CXCL5 was dispensable for neutrophil recruitment and effective bacterial clearance in a murine model of acute bacterial pyelonephritis. In line with these findings, CXCL5 expression was highly upregulated in the kidneys of patients with ANCA-associated crescentic GN as opposed to patients with acute bacterial pyelonephritis. Our data therefore identify CXCL5 as a potential therapeutic target for the restriction of pathogenic neutrophil infiltration in TH17-mediated autoimmune diseases while leaving intact the neutrophil function in protective immunity against invading pathogens. PMID:24904089

  13. Chemokines: sirens of neutrophil recruitment-but is it just one song?

    PubMed

    McDonald, Braedon; Kubes, Paul

    2010-08-27

    Neutrophil trafficking to inflamed tissues requires the integration of multiple chemoattractant guidance signals. In this issue of Immunity, Chou et al. (2010) demonstrate that collaborative "cascades" of chemoattractant mediators control neutrophil recruitment to arthritic joints in mice.

  14. Facilitation of Allergic Sensitization and Allergic Airway Inflammation by Pollen-Induced Innate Neutrophil Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Hosoki, Koa; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Brasier, Allan R; Kurosky, Alexander; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment is a hallmark of rapid innate immune responses. Exposure of airways of naive mice to pollens rapidly induces neutrophil recruitment. The innate mechanisms that regulate pollen-induced neutrophil recruitment and the contribution of this neutrophilic response to subsequent induction of allergic sensitization and inflammation need to be elucidated. Here we show that ragweed pollen extract (RWPE) challenge in naive mice induces C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL) chemokine synthesis, which stimulates chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2)-dependent recruitment of neutrophils into the airways. Deletion of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) abolishes CXCL chemokine secretion and neutrophil recruitment induced by a single RWPE challenge and inhibits induction of allergic sensitization and airway inflammation after repeated exposures to RWPE. Forced induction of CXCL chemokine secretion and neutrophil recruitment in mice lacking TLR4 also reconstitutes the ability of multiple challenges of RWPE to induce allergic airway inflammation. Blocking RWPE-induced neutrophil recruitment in wild-type mice by administration of a CXCR2 inhibitor inhibits the ability of repeated exposures to RWPE to stimulate allergic sensitization and airway inflammation. Administration of neutrophils derived from naive donor mice into the airways of Tlr4 knockout recipient mice after each repeated RWPE challenge reconstitutes allergic sensitization and inflammation in these mice. Together these observations indicate that pollen-induced recruitment of neutrophils is TLR4 and CXCR2 dependent and that recruitment of neutrophils is a critical rate-limiting event that stimulates induction of allergic sensitization and airway inflammation. Inhibiting pollen-induced recruitment of neutrophils, such as by administration of CXCR2 antagonists, may be a novel strategy to prevent initiation of pollen-induced allergic airway inflammation.

  15. Neutrophil recruitment by allergens contribute to allergic sensitization and allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hosoki, Koa; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss the presence and role of neutrophils in asthma and allergic diseases, and outline importance of pollen and cat dander-induced innate neutrophil recruitment in induction of allergic sensitization and allergic inflammation. Recent findings Uncontrolled asthma is associated with elevated numbers of neutrophils, and levels of neutrophil-attracting chemokine IL-8 and IL-17 in BAL fluids. These parameters negatively correlate with lung function. Pollen allergens and cat dander recruit neutrophils to the airways in a TLR4, MD2 and CXCR2-dependent manner. Repeated recruitment of activated neutrophils by these allergens facilitates allergic sensitization and airway inflammation. Inhibition of neutrophil recruitment with CXCR2 inhibitor, disruption of TLR4, or siRNA against MD2 also inhibits allergic inflammation. The molecular mechanisms by which neutrophils shift the inflammatory response of the airways to inhaled allergens to an allergic phenotype is an area of active research. Summary Recent studies have revealed that neutrophil recruitment is important in development of allergic sensitization and inflammation. Inhibition of neutrophils recruitment may be strategy to control allergic inflammation. PMID:26694038

  16. Neutrophil recruitment to the brain in mouse and human ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Perez-de-Puig, Isabel; Miró-Mur, Francesc; Ferrer-Ferrer, Maura; Gelpi, Ellen; Pedragosa, Jordi; Justicia, Carles; Urra, Xabier; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2015-02-01

    Neutrophils are rapidly recruited in response to local tissue infection or inflammation. Stroke triggers a strong inflammatory reaction but the relevance of neutrophils in the ischemic brain is not fully understood, particularly in the absence of reperfusion. We investigated brain neutrophil recruitment in two murine models of permanent ischemia induced by either cauterization of the distal portion of the middle cerebral artery (c-MCAo) or intraluminal MCA occlusion (il-MCAo), and three fatal cases of human ischemic stroke. Flow cytometry analyses revealed progressive neutrophil recruitment after c-MCAo, lesser neutrophil recruitment following il-MCAo, and absence of neutrophils after sham operation. Confocal microscopy identified neutrophils in the leptomeninges from 6 h after the occlusion, in the cortical basal lamina and cortical Virchow-Robin spaces from 15 h, and also in the cortical brain parenchyma at 24 h. Neutrophils showed signs of activation including histone-3 citrullination, chromatin decondensation, and extracellular projection of DNA and histones suggestive of extracellular trap formation. Perivascular neutrophils were identified within the entire cortical infarction following c-MCAo. After il-MCAo, neutrophils prevailed in the margins but not the center of the cortical infarct, and were intraluminal and less abundant in the striatum. The lack of collaterals to the striatum and a collapsed pial anastomotic network due to brain edema in large hemispheric infarctions could impair neutrophil trafficking in this model. Neutrophil extravasation at the leptomeninges was also detected in the human tissue. We concluded that neutrophils extravasate from the leptomeningeal vessels and can eventually reach the brain in experimental animal models and humans with prolonged arterial occlusion.

  17. 5-lipoxygenase-dependent recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages by eotaxin-stimulated murine eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Luz, Ricardo Alves; Xavier-Elsas, Pedro; de Luca, Bianca; Masid-de-Brito, Daniela; Cauduro, Priscila Soares; Arcanjo, Luiz Carlos Gondar; dos Santos, Ana Carolina Cordeiro Faria; de Oliveira, Ivi Cristina Maria; Gaspar-Elsas, Maria Ignez Capella

    2014-01-01

    The roles of eosinophils in antimicrobial defense remain incompletely understood. In ovalbumin-sensitized mice, eosinophils are selectively recruited to the peritoneal cavity by antigen, eotaxin, or leukotriene(LT)B4, a 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolite. 5-LO blockade prevents responses to both antigen and eotaxin. We examined responses to eotaxin in the absence of sensitization and their dependence on 5-LO. BALB/c or PAS mice and their mutants (5-LO-deficient ALOX; eosinophil-deficient GATA-1) were injected i.p. with eotaxin, eosinophils, or both, and leukocyte accumulation was quantified up to 24 h. Significant recruitment of eosinophils by eotaxin in BALB/c, up to 24 h, was accompanied by much larger numbers of recruited neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. These effects were abolished by eotaxin neutralization and 5-LO-activating protein inhibitor MK886. In ALOX (but not PAS) mice, eotaxin recruitment was abolished for eosinophils and halved for neutrophils. In GATA-1 mutants, eotaxin recruited neither neutrophils nor macrophages. Transfer of eosinophils cultured from bone-marrow of BALB/c donors, or from ALOX donors, into GATA-1 mutant recipients, i.p., restored eotaxin recruitment of neutrophils and showed that the critical step dependent on 5-LO is the initial recruitment of eosinophils by eotaxin, not the secondary neutrophil accumulation. Eosinophil-dependent recruitment of neutrophils in naive BALB/c mice was associated with increased binding of bacteria.

  18. Fatty acids as modulators of neutrophil recruitment, function and survival.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Hosana G; Takeo Sato, Fabio; Curi, Rui; Vinolo, Marco A R

    2016-08-15

    Neutrophils are well-known to act in the destruction of invading microorganisms. They have also been implicated in the activation of other immune cells including B- and T-lymphocytes and in the resolution of inflammation and tissue regeneration. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the circulation from where they migrate to tissues to perform their effector functions. Neutrophils are in constant contact with fatty acids that can modulate their function, activation and fate (survival or cell death) through different mechanisms. In this review, the effects of fatty acids pertaining to five classes, namely, long-chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs), short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and omega-3 (n-3), omega-6 (n-6) and omega-9 (n-9) unsaturated fatty acids, on neutrophils and the relevance of these effects for disease development are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellular and molecular choreography of neutrophil recruitment to sites of sterile inflammation.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Braedon; Kubes, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Liberation of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) following tissue injury and necrotic cell death leads to the induction of sterile inflammation. A hallmark of acute inflammation is the recruitment of neutrophils to injured tissues. This review focuses on the journey of neutrophils to sites of sterile inflammation and the cellular and molecular mechanisms that choreograph this complex voyage. We review the pathway of leukocyte recruitment, with emphasis on recent additions to our understanding of intravascular neutrophil migration. The contributions of various tissue-resident sentinel cell populations to the detection of danger signals (DAMPs) and coordination of neutrophil recruitment and migration are discussed. In addition, we highlight recent data on the control of neutrophil chemotaxis towards sites of sterile inflammation, including new insight into the temporal and spatial regulation of chemoattractant guidance signals that direct cell migration. Given that inappropriate neutrophilic inflammation is a cornerstone in the pathogenesis of many diseases, a complete understanding of the choreography of neutrophil recruitment to sites of sterile inflammation may uncover new avenues for therapeutic interventions to treat inflammatory pathologies.

  20. Inhibitors of neutrophil recruitment identified using transgenic zebrafish to screen a natural product library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingang; Robertson, Anne L; Li, Jingyu; Chai, Ruth Jinfen; Haishan, Wang; Sadiku, Pranvera; Ogryzko, Nikolay V; Everett, Martin; Yoganathan, Kanagasundaram; Luo, Hongbo Robert; Renshaw, Stephen A; Ingham, Philip W

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to the inflammatory response, but uncontrolled cell migration and excess recruitment of neutrophils and other leukocytes can cause damage to the tissue. Here we describe the use of an in vivo model - the Tg(mpx:GFP)(i114) zebrafish line, in which neutrophils are labelled by green fluorescent protein (GFP) - to screen a natural product library for compounds that can affect neutrophil migratory behaviour. Among 1040 fungal extracts screened, two were found to inhibit neutrophil migration completely. Subfractionation of these extracts identified sterigmatocystin and antibiotic PF1052 as the active components. Using the EZ-TAXIScan chemotaxis assay, both compounds were also found to have a dosage-dependent inhibitory effect on murine neutrophil migration. Furthermore, neutrophils treated with PF1052 failed to form pseudopods and appeared round in shape, suggesting a defect in PI3-kinase (PI3K) signalling. We generated a transgenic neutrophil-specific PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) reporter zebrafish line, which revealed that PF1052 does not affect the activation of PI3K at the plasma membrane. In human neutrophils, PF1052 neither induced apoptosis nor blocked AKT phosphorylation. In conclusion, we have identified an antibiotic from a natural product library with potent anti-inflammatory properties, and have established the utility of the mpx:GFP transgenic zebrafish for high-throughput in vivo screens for novel inhibitors of neutrophil migration.

  1. Inhibitors of neutrophil recruitment identified using transgenic zebrafish to screen a natural product library

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingang; Robertson, Anne L.; Li, Jingyu; Chai, Ruth Jinfen; Haishan, Wang; Sadiku, Pranvera; Ogryzko, Nikolay V.; Everett, Martin; Yoganathan, Kanagasundaram; Luo, Hongbo Robert; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Ingham, Philip W.

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to the inflammatory response, but uncontrolled cell migration and excess recruitment of neutrophils and other leukocytes can cause damage to the tissue. Here we describe the use of an in vivo model – the Tg(mpx:GFP)i114 zebrafish line, in which neutrophils are labelled by green fluorescent protein (GFP) – to screen a natural product library for compounds that can affect neutrophil migratory behaviour. Among 1040 fungal extracts screened, two were found to inhibit neutrophil migration completely. Subfractionation of these extracts identified sterigmatocystin and antibiotic PF1052 as the active components. Using the EZ-TAXIScan chemotaxis assay, both compounds were also found to have a dosage-dependent inhibitory effect on murine neutrophil migration. Furthermore, neutrophils treated with PF1052 failed to form pseudopods and appeared round in shape, suggesting a defect in PI3-kinase (PI3K) signalling. We generated a transgenic neutrophil-specific PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) reporter zebrafish line, which revealed that PF1052 does not affect the activation of PI3K at the plasma membrane. In human neutrophils, PF1052 neither induced apoptosis nor blocked AKT phosphorylation. In conclusion, we have identified an antibiotic from a natural product library with potent anti-inflammatory properties, and have established the utility of the mpx:GFP transgenic zebrafish for high-throughput in vivo screens for novel inhibitors of neutrophil migration. PMID:24291762

  2. G Protein-Coupled Receptor 43 Modulates Neutrophil Recruitment during Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Alyce J.; Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Mason, Linda J.; Binge, Lauren; Mackay, Charles R.; Wong, Connie H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibre in the gut yields large amounts of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs can impart biological responses in cells through their engagement of ‘metabolite-sensing’ G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). One of the main SCFA receptors, GPR43, is highly expressed by neutrophils, which suggests that the actions of GPR43 and dietary fibre intake may affect neutrophil recruitment during inflammatory responses in vivo. Using intravital imaging of the small intestine, we found greater intravascular neutrophil rolling and adhesion in Gpr43−/−mice in response to LPS at 1 h. After 4 h of LPS challenge, the intravascular rolling velocity of GPR43-deficient neutrophils was reduced significantly and increased numbers of neutrophils were found in the lamina propria of Gpr43−/−mice. Additionally, GPR43-deficient leukocytes demonstrated exacerbated migration into the peritoneal cavity following fMLP challenge. The fMLP-induced neutrophil migration was significantly suppressed in wildtype mice that were treated with acetate, but not in Gpr43−/−mice, strongly suggesting a role for SCFAs in modulating neutrophil migration via GPR43. Indeed, neutrophils of no fibre-fed wildtype mice exhibited elevated migratory behaviour compared to normal chow-fed wildtype mice. Interestingly, this elevated migration could also be reproduced through simple transfer of a no fibre microbiota into germ-free mice, suggesting that the composition and function of microbiota stemming from a no fibre diet mediated the changes in neutrophil migration. Therefore, GPR43 and a microbiota composition that allows for SCFA production function to modulate neutrophil recruitment during inflammatory responses. PMID:27658303

  3. CARD9-Dependent Neutrophil Recruitment Protects against Fungal Invasion of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Lim, Jean K.; Mendez, Laura M.; Fink, Danielle L.; Hsu, Amy P.; Zhai, Bing; Karauzum, Hatice; Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Rose, Stacey R.; Ferre, Elise M. N.; Yockey, Lynne; Lemberg, Kimberly; Kuehn, Hye Sun; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Lin, Xin; Chittiboina, Prashant; Datta, Sandip K.; Belhorn, Thomas H.; Weimer, Eric T.; Hernandez, Michelle L.; Hohl, Tobias M.; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Candida is the most common human fungal pathogen and causes systemic infections that require neutrophils for effective host defense. Humans deficient in the C-type lectin pathway adaptor protein CARD9 develop spontaneous fungal disease that targets the central nervous system (CNS). However, how CARD9 promotes protective antifungal immunity in the CNS remains unclear. Here, we show that a patient with CARD9 deficiency had impaired neutrophil accumulation and induction of neutrophil-recruiting CXC chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid despite uncontrolled CNS Candida infection. We phenocopied the human susceptibility in Card9-/- mice, which develop uncontrolled brain candidiasis with diminished neutrophil accumulation. The induction of neutrophil-recruiting CXC chemokines is significantly impaired in infected Card9-/- brains, from both myeloid and resident glial cellular sources, whereas cell-intrinsic neutrophil chemotaxis is Card9-independent. Taken together, our data highlight the critical role of CARD9-dependent neutrophil trafficking into the CNS and provide novel insight into the CNS fungal susceptibility of CARD9-deficient humans. PMID:26679537

  4. NK cells promote neutrophil recruitment in the brain during sepsis-induced neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    He, Hao; Geng, Tingting; Chen, Piyun; Wang, Meixiang; Hu, Jingxia; Kang, Li; Song, Wengang; Tang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis could affect the central nervous system and thus induces neuroinflammation, which subsequently leads to brain damage or dysfunction. However, the mechanisms of generation of neuroinflammation during sepsis remain poorly understood. By administration of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in mice to mimic sepsis, we found that shortly after opening the blood–brain barrier, conventional CD11b+CD27+ NK subset migrated into the brain followed by subsequent neutrophil infiltration. Interestingly, depletion of NK cells prior to LPS treatment severely impaired neutrophil recruitment in the inflamed brain. By in vivo recruitment assay, we found that brain-infiltrated NK cells displayed chemotactic activity to neutrophils, which depended on the higher expression of chemokines such as CXCL2. Moreover, microglia were also responsible for neutrophil recruitment, and their chemotactic activity was significantly impaired by ablation of NK cells. Furthermore, depletion of NK cells could significantly ameliorate depression-like behavior in LPS-treated mice. These data indicated a NK cell-regulated neutrophil recruitment in the blamed brain, which also could be seen on another sepsis model, cecal ligation and puncture. So, our findings revealed an important scenario in the generation of sepsis-induced neuroinflammation. PMID:27270556

  5. Early Enhanced Local Neutrophil Recruitment in Peritonitis-Induced Sepsis Improves Bacterial Clearance and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Craciun, Florin L.; Schuller, Elizabeth R.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are critical for the rapid eradication of bacterial pathogens, but they also contribute to the development of multiple organ failure in sepsis. We hypothesized that increasing early recruitment of neutrophils to the focus of infection will increase bacterial clearance and improve survival. Sepsis was induced in mice, using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP); blood samples were collected at 6 and 24 h; and survival was followed for 28 d. In separate experiments, peritoneal bacteria and inflammatory cells were measured. Septic mice predicted to die based on IL-6 levels (Die-P) had higher concentrations of CXCL1 and CXCL2 in the peritoneum and plasma compared with those predicted to live (Live-P). At 6 h, Live-P and Die-P had equivalent numbers of peritoneal neutrophils and bacteria. In Die-P mice the number of peritoneal bacteria increased between 6 and 24 h post-CLP, whereas in Live-P it decreased. The i.p. injection of CXCL1 and CXCL2 in naive mice resulted in local neutrophil recruitment. When given immediately after CLP, CXC chemokines increased peritoneal neutrophil recruitment at 6 h after CLP. This early increase in neutrophils induced by exogenous chemokines resulted in significantly fewer peritoneal bacteria by 24 h [CFU (log) = 6.04 versus 4.99 for vehicle versus chemokine treatment; p < 0.05]. Chemokine treatment significantly improved survival at both 5 d (40 versus 72%) and 28 d (27 versus 52%; p < 0.02 vehicle versus chemokines). These data demonstrate that early, local treatment with CXC chemokines enhances neutrophil recruitment and clearance of bacteria as well as improves survival in the CLP model of sepsis. PMID:21041722

  6. Early enhanced local neutrophil recruitment in peritonitis-induced sepsis improves bacterial clearance and survival.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Florin L; Schuller, Elizabeth R; Remick, Daniel G

    2010-12-01

    Neutrophils are critical for the rapid eradication of bacterial pathogens, but they also contribute to the development of multiple organ failure in sepsis. We hypothesized that increasing early recruitment of neutrophils to the focus of infection will increase bacterial clearance and improve survival. Sepsis was induced in mice, using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP); blood samples were collected at 6 and 24 h; and survival was followed for 28 d. In separate experiments, peritoneal bacteria and inflammatory cells were measured. Septic mice predicted to die based on IL-6 levels (Die-P) had higher concentrations of CXCL1 and CXCL2 in the peritoneum and plasma compared with those predicted to live (Live-P). At 6 h, Live-P and Die-P had equivalent numbers of peritoneal neutrophils and bacteria. In Die-P mice the number of peritoneal bacteria increased between 6 and 24 h post-CLP, whereas in Live-P it decreased. The i.p. injection of CXCL1 and CXCL2 in naive mice resulted in local neutrophil recruitment. When given immediately after CLP, CXC chemokines increased peritoneal neutrophil recruitment at 6 h after CLP. This early increase in neutrophils induced by exogenous chemokines resulted in significantly fewer peritoneal bacteria by 24 h [CFU (log) = 6.04 versus 4.99 for vehicle versus chemokine treatment; p < 0.05]. Chemokine treatment significantly improved survival at both 5 d (40 versus 72%) and 28 d (27 versus 52%; p < 0.02 vehicle versus chemokines). These data demonstrate that early, local treatment with CXC chemokines enhances neutrophil recruitment and clearance of bacteria as well as improves survival in the CLP model of sepsis.

  7. Type I IFN suppresses Cxcr2 driven neutrophil recruitment into the sensory ganglia during viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Infection induces the expression of inflammatory chemokines that recruit immune cells to the site of inflammation. Whereas tissues such as the intestine and skin express unique chemokines during homeostasis, whether different tissues express distinct chemokine profiles during inflammation remains unclear. With this in mind, we performed a comprehensive screen of the chemokines expressed by two tissues (skin and sensory ganglia) infected with a common viral pathogen (herpes simplex virus type 1). After infection, the skin and ganglia showed marked differences in their expression of the family of Cxcr2 chemokine ligands. Specifically, Cxcl1/2/3, which in turn controlled neutrophil recruitment, was up-regulated in the skin but absent from the ganglia. Within the ganglia, Cxcl2 expression and subsequent neutrophil recruitment was inhibited by type I interferon (IFN). Using a combination of bone marrow chimeras and intracellular chemokine staining, we show that type I IFN acted by directly suppressing Cxcl2 expression by monocytes, abrogating their ability to recruit neutrophils to the ganglia. Overall, our findings describe a novel role for IFN in the direct, and selective, inhibition of Cxcr2 chemokine ligands, which results in the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment to neuronal tissue. PMID:24752295

  8. Epithelial Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α Facilitates the Progression of Colon Tumors through Recruiting Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Triner, Daniel; Xue, Xiang; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Jung, Inkyung; Colacino, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inflammation is a significant risk factor for colon cancer. Recent work has demonstrated essential roles for several infiltrating immune populations in the metaplastic progression following inflammation. Hypoxia and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are hallmark features of inflammation and solid tumors. Previously, we demonstrated an important role for tumor epithelial HIF-2α in colon tumors; however, the function of epithelial HIF-2α as a critical link in the progression of inflammation to cancer has not been elucidated. In colitis-associated colon cancer models, epithelial HIF-2α was essential in tumor growth. Concurrently, epithelial disruption of HIF-2α significantly decreased neutrophils in the colon tumor microenvironment. Intestinal epithelial HIF-2α-overexpressing mice demonstrated that neutrophil recruitment was a direct response to increased epithelial HIF-2α signaling. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of HIF-2α-overexpressing mice in conjunction with data mining from the Cancer Genome Atlas showed that the neutrophil chemokine CXCL1 gene was highly upregulated in colon tumor epithelium in a HIF-2α-dependent manner. Using selective peptide inhibitors of the CXCL1-CXCR2 signaling axis identified HIF-2α-dependent neutrophil recruitment as an essential mechanism to increase colon carcinogenesis. These studies demonstrate that HIF-2α is a novel regulator of neutrophil recruitment to colon tumors and that it is essential in shaping the protumorigenic inflammatory microenvironment in colon cancer. PMID:27956697

  9. Protection from septic peritonitis by rapid neutrophil recruitment through omental high endothelial venules

    PubMed Central

    Buscher, Konrad; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Xueli; Striewski, Paul; Wirth, Benedikt; Saggu, Gurpanna; Lütke-Enking, Stefan; Mayadas, Tanya N.; Ley, Klaus; Sorokin, Lydia; Song, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Acute peritonitis is a frequent medical condition that can trigger severe sepsis as a life-threatening complication. Neutrophils are first-responders in infection but recruitment mechanisms to the abdominal cavity remain poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that high endothelial venules (HEVs) of the greater omentum constitute a main entry pathway in TNFα-, Escherichia coli (E. coli)- and caecal ligation and puncture-induced models of inflammation. Neutrophil transmigration across HEVs is faster than across conventional postcapillary venules and requires a unique set of adhesion receptors including peripheral node addressin, E-, L-selectin and Mac-1 but not P-selectin or LFA-1. Omental milky spots readily concentrate intra-abdominal E. coli where macrophages and recruited neutrophils collaborate in phagocytosis and killing. Inhibition of the omental neutrophil response exacerbates septic progression of peritonitis. This data identifies HEVs as a clinically relevant vascular recruitment site for neutrophils in acute peritonitis that is indispensable for host defence against early systemic bacterial spread and sepsis. PMID:26940548

  10. TNFα-activated mesenchymal stromal cells promote breast cancer metastasis by recruiting CXCR2(+) neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Yu, P F; Huang, Y; Han, Y Y; Lin, L Y; Sun, W H; Rabson, A B; Wang, Y; Shi, Y F

    2017-01-26

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) tend to infiltrate into tumors and form a major component of the tumor microenvironment. Our previous work demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-activated MSCs significantly promoted tumor growth. However, the role of TNFα-treated MSCs in tumor metastasis remains elusive. Employing a lung metastasis model of murine breast cancer, we found that TNFα-activated MSCs strikingly enhanced tumor metastasis compared with normal MSCs. We analyzed the chemokine profiles and found that the expression of CCL5, CCR2 and CXCR2 ligands were enhanced in TNFα-activated MSCs. Using genetic or pharmacological strategies to inhibit CCL5 or CCR2, we demonstrated that CCL5 and CCR2 ligands were indispensable in supporting TNFα-activated MSCs to promote tumor metastasis. Analysis of immune cells revealed that CXCR2 ligands (CXCL1, CXCL 2 and CXCL5) expressed by TNFα-activated MSCs efficiently recruited CXCR2(+) neutrophils into tumor. These neutrophils were responsible for the pro-metastatic effect of MSCs since inhibition of this chemotaxis abolished increased neutrophil recruitment and tumor metastasis. The interaction between neutrophils and tumor cells resulted in markedly elevated metastasis-related genes by tumor cells, including CXCR4, CXCR7, MMP12, MMP13, IL-6 and TGFβ. Importantly, in IL8(high) human breast cancer samples, we also observed similar alterations of gene expression. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that TNFα-activated MSCs promote tumor metastasis via CXCR2(+) neutrophil recruitment.

  11. Simvastatin Reduces Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Decreasing Neutrophil Recruitment and Radical Formation

    PubMed Central

    Grommes, Jochen; Vijayan, Santosh; Drechsler, Maik; Hartwig, Helene; Mörgelin, Matthias; Dembinski, Rolf; Jacobs, Michael; Koeppel, Thomas Andreas; Binnebösel, Marcel; Weber, Christian; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) remains an unsolved problem in intensive care medicine. As simvastatin exerts protective effects in inflammatory diseases we explored its effects on development of ALI and due to the importance of neutrophils in ALI also on neutrophil effector functions. Methods C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to aerosolized LPS (500 µg/ml) for 30 min. The count of alveolar, interstitial, and intravasal neutrophils were assessed 4 h later by flow cytometry. Lung permeability changes were assessed by FITC-dextran clearance and albumin content in the BAL fluid. In vitro, we analyzed the effect of simvastatin on neutrophil adhesion, degranulation, apoptosis, and formation of reactive oxygen species. To monitor effects of simvastatin on bacterial clearance we performed phagocytosis and bacterial killing studies in vitro as well as sepsis experiments in mice. Results Simvastatin treatment before and after onset of ALI reduces neutrophil influx into the lung as well as lung permeability indicating the protective role of simvastatin in ALI. Moreover, simvastatin reduces the formation of ROS species and adhesion of neutrophils without affecting apoptosis, bacterial phagocytosis and bacterial clearance. Conclusion Simvastatin reduces recruitment and activation of neutrophils hereby protecting from LPS-induced ALI. Our results imply a potential role for statins in the management of ALI. PMID:22701728

  12. Bacillary replication and macrophage necrosis are determinants of neutrophil recruitment in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Repasy, Teresa; Martinez, Nuria; Lee, Jinhee; West, Kim; Li, Wenjun; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2015-08-01

    We previously determined that burst size necrosis is the chief mode of mononuclear cell death in the lungs of mice with tuberculosis. The present study explored the link between infection-induced necrosis of mononuclear phagocytes and neutrophil accumulation in the lungs of mice challenged with one of four Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of increasing virulence (RvΔphoPR mutant, H37Ra, H37Rv and Erdman). At all time points studied, Erdman produced the highest bacterial load and the highest proportion and number of M. tuberculosis-infected neutrophils. These parameters, and the proportion of TUNEL-positive cells, tracked with virulence across all strains tested. Differences in neutrophil infection were not reflected by levels of chemoattractant cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, while interferon-γ (reported to suppress neutrophil trafficking to the lung in tuberculosis) was highest in Erdman-infected mice. Treating Erdman-infected mice with ethambutol decreased the proportion of mononuclear phagocytes with high bacterial burden and the ratio of infected neutrophils to infected mononuclear cells in a dose-dependent manner. We propose that faster replicating M. tuberculosis strains cause more necrosis which in turn promotes neutrophil recruitment. Neutrophils infected with M. tuberculosis constitute a biomarker for poorly controlled bacterial replication, infection-induced mononuclear cell death, and increased severity of immune pathology in tuberculosis.

  13. Activated Human Valvular Interstitial Cells Sustain Interleukin-17 Production To Recruit Neutrophils in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Shun, Chia-Tung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Wei; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Yang, Chia-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie valvular inflammation in streptococcus-induced infective endocarditis (IE) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) can activate human heart valvular interstitial cells (VIC) to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine involved in T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activated VIC can enhance neutrophil infiltration through sustained IL-17 production, leading to valvular damage. To monitor cytokine and chemokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and the induction or expansion of CD4+ CD45RA− CD25− CCR6+ Th17 cells, primary human VIC were cultured in vitro and activated by GTFs. Serum cytokine levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and neutrophils and Th17 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in infected valves from patients with IE. The expression of IL-21, IL-23, IL-17, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (Rorc) was upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which may enhance the proliferation of memory Th17 cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. Many chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), were upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which might recruit neutrophils and CD4+ T cells. Moreover, CXCL1 production in VIC was induced in a dose-dependent manner by IL-17 to enhance neutrophil chemotaxis. CXCL1-expressing VIC and infiltrating neutrophils could be detected in infected valves, and serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased in patients with IE compared to healthy donors. Furthermore, elevated serum IL-21 levels have been significantly associated with severe valvular damage, including rupture of chordae tendineae, in IE patients. Our findings suggest that VIC are activated by bacterial modulins to recruit neutrophils and that such activities might be further enhanced by the production of Th17-associated cytokines. Together, these factors can amplify the

  14. The atypical receptor CCRL2 is required for CXCR2-dependent neutrophil recruitment and tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Annalisa; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Mazzon, Cristina; Toffali, Lara; Sozio, Francesca; Za, Lorena; Bosisio, Daniela; Gazzurelli, Luisa; Salvi, Valentina; Tiberio, Laura; Liberati, Chiara; Scanziani, Eugenio; Vecchi, Annunciata; Laudanna, Carlo; Mellado, Mario; Mantovani, Alberto; Sozzani, Silvano

    2017-09-07

    CCRL2 is a 7-transmembrane domain receptor that shares structural and functional similarities with the family of atypical chemokine receptors (ACKRs). CCRL2 is upregulated by inflammatory signals and, unlike other ACKRs, it is not a chemoattractant-scavenging receptor, does not activate β-arrestins, and is widely expressed by many leukocyte subsets. Therefore, the biological role of CCRL2 in immunity is still unclear. We report that CCRL2-deficient mice have a defect in neutrophil recruitment and are protected in 2 models of inflammatory arthritis. In vitro, CCRL2 was found to constitutively form homodimers and heterodimers with CXCR2, a main neutrophil chemotactic receptor. By heterodimerization, CCRL2 could regulate membrane expression and promote CXCR2 functions, including the activation of β2-integrins. Therefore, upregulation of CCRL2 observed under inflammatory conditions is functional to finely tune CXCR2-mediated neutrophil recruitment at sites of inflammation. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Airway Infection Recruits and Modulates Neutrophilic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Öz, Hasan H.; Zhou, Benyuan; Voss, Pina; Carevic, Melanie; Schroth, Carolin; Frey, Nina; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes infections mainly in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Despite innate and adaptive immune responses upon infection, P. aeruginosa is capable of efficiently escaping host defenses, but the underlying immune mechanisms remain poorly understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells that are functionally characterized by their potential to suppress T- and natural killer (NK)-cell responses. Here we demonstrate, using an airway in vivo infection model, that P. aeruginosa recruits and activates neutrophilic MDSCs, which functionally suppress T-cell responses. We further show that the CF gene defect (CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR) modulates the functionality, but not the recruitment or generation of neutrophilic MDSCs. Collectively, we define a mechanism by which P. aeruginosa airway infection undermines host immunity by modulating neutrophilic MDSCs in vivo. PMID:27965936

  16. Recruitment of opioid peptide-containing neutrophils is independent of formyl peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Hackel, D; Stolz, A; Mousa, S A; Brack, A; Rittner, H L

    2011-01-01

    In complete Freund's adjuvants (CFA) inflammation opioid containing neutrophils release opioid peptides upon stimulation and mediate peripheral analgesia. Neutrophil migration is regulated partially by chemokines, but other mediators e.g. formyl peptides could also contribute. In vitro, formyl peptides but not Mycobacterium butyricum (CFA component) induced migration of neutrophils. In contrast, local formyl peptide injection did not induce leukocyte recruitment in vivo due to insufficient up-regulation of adhesion molecule expression. Furthermore, leukocyte recruitment and peripheral opioid-mediated analgesia were unaffected by systemic formyl peptide receptor blockade in CFA inflammation. Thus, while formyl peptides do not regulate migration they directly stimulate opioid peptide release. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cytokine-regulated neutrophil recruitment is required for brain but not spinal cord inflammation during EAE

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Sarah B.; Liggitt, Denny; Goverman, Joan M.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease in which inflammatory lesions lead to tissue injury in the brain and/or spinal cord. The specific sites of tissue injury are strong determinants of clinical outcome in MS, but the pathways that determine whether damage occurs in the brain or spinal cord are not understood. Previous studies in mouse models of MS demonstrated that IFN-γ and IL-17 regulate lesion localization within the brain, however, the mechanisms by which these cytokines mediate their effects have not been identified. Here we show that IL-17 promoted, but IFN-γ inhibited, ELR+ chemokine-mediated neutrophil recruitment to the brain, and that neutrophil infiltration was required for parenchymal tissue damage in the brain. In contrast, IFN-γ promoted ELR+ chemokine expression and neutrophil recruitment to the spinal cord. Surprisingly, tissue injury in the spinal cord did not exhibit the same dependence on neutrophil recruitment that was observed for the brain. Our results demonstrate that the brain and spinal cord exhibit distinct sensitivities to cellular mediators of tissue damage, and that IL-17 and IFN-γ differentially regulate recruitment of these mediators to each microenvironment. These findings suggest an approach toward tailoring therapies for patients with distinct patterns of neuroinflammation. PMID:24913979

  18. IL-17A-mediated neutrophil recruitment limits expansion of segmented filamentous bacteria.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, K L; Ngo, V L; Geem, D; Harusato, A; Hirota, S A; Parkos, C A; Lukacs, N W; Nusrat, A; Gaboriau-Routhiau, V; Cerf-Bensussan, N; Gewirtz, A T; Denning, T L

    2016-09-14

    Specific components of the intestinal microbiota are capable of influencing immune responses such that a mutualistic relationship is established. In mice, colonization with segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) induces T-helper-17 (Th17) cell differentiation in the intestine, yet the effector functions of interleukin (IL)-17A in response to SFB remain incompletely understood. Here we report that colonization of mice with SFB-containing microbiota induced IL-17A- and CXCR2-dependent recruitment of neutrophils to the ileum. This response required adaptive immunity, as Rag-deficient mice colonized with SFB-containing microbiota failed to induce IL-17A, CXCL1 and CXCL2, and displayed defective neutrophil recruitment to the ileum. Interestingly, neutrophil depletion in wild-type mice resulted in significantly augmented Th17 responses and SFB expansion, which correlated with impaired expression of IL-22 and antimicrobial peptides. These data provide novel insight into a dynamic IL-17A-CXCR2-neutrophil axis during acute SFB colonization and demonstrate a central role for neutrophils in limiting SFB expansion.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 14 September 2016. doi:10.1038/mi.2016.80.

  19. Platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Suidan, Georgette L.; Demers, Melanie; Herr, Nadine; Carbo, Carla; Brill, Alexander; Cifuni, Stephen M.; Mauler, Maximilian; Cicko, Sanja; Bader, Michael; Idzko, Marco; Bode, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The majority of peripheral serotonin is stored in platelets, which secrete it on activation. Serotonin releases Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) and we asked whether absence of platelet serotonin affects neutrophil recruitment in inflammatory responses. Tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)1–deficient mice, lacking non-neuronal serotonin, showed mild leukocytosis compared with wild-type (WT), primarily driven by an elevated neutrophil count. Despite this, 50% fewer leukocytes rolled on unstimulated mesenteric venous endothelium of Tph1−/− mice. The velocity of rolling leukocytes was higher in Tph1−/− mice, indicating fewer selectin-mediated interactions with endothelium. Stimulation of endothelium with histamine, a secretagogue of WPBs, or injection of serotonin normalized the rolling in Tph1−/− mice. Diminished rolling in Tph1−/− mice resulted in reduced firm adhesion of leukocytes after lipopolysaccharide treatment. Blocking platelet serotonin uptake with fluoxetine in WT mice reduced serum serotonin by > 80% and similarly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion. Four hours after inflammatory stimulation, neutrophil extravasation into lung, peritoneum, and skin wounds was reduced in Tph1−/− mice, whereas in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis was independent of serotonin. Survival of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock was improved in Tph1−/− mice. In conclusion, platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils in acute inflammation, supporting an important role for platelet serotonin in innate immunity. PMID:23243271

  20. IL-17A-mediated neutrophil recruitment limits expansion of segmented filamentous bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Ngo, Vu L.; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Hirota, Simon A.; Parkos, Charles A.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Nusrat, Asma; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valérie; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Specific components of the intestinal microbiota are capable of influencing immune responses such that a mutualistic relationship is established. In mice, colonization with segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) induces Th17 cell differentiation in the intestine, yet the effector functions of IL-17A in response to SFB remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that colonization of mice with SFB-containing microbiota induced IL-17A- and CXCR2-dependent recruitment of neutrophils to the ileum. This response required adaptive immunity as Rag-deficient mice colonized with SFB-containing microbiota failed to induce IL-17A, CXCL1 and CXCL2, and displayed defective neutrophil recruitment to the ileum. Interestingly, neutrophil depletion in wild-type mice resulted in significantly augmented Th17 responses and SFB expansion, which correlated with impaired expression of IL-22 and antimicrobial peptides. These data provide novel insight into a dynamic IL-17A-CXCR2-neutrophil axis during acute SFB colonization and demonstrate a central role for neutrophils in limiting SFB expansion. PMID:27624780

  1. Platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Duerschmied, Daniel; Suidan, Georgette L; Demers, Melanie; Herr, Nadine; Carbo, Carla; Brill, Alexander; Cifuni, Stephen M; Mauler, Maximilian; Cicko, Sanja; Bader, Michael; Idzko, Marco; Bode, Christoph; Wagner, Denisa D

    2013-02-07

    The majority of peripheral serotonin is stored in platelets, which secrete it on activation. Serotonin releases Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) and we asked whether absence of platelet serotonin affects neutrophil recruitment in inflammatory responses. Tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)1–deficient mice, lacking non-neuronal serotonin, showed mild leukocytosis compared with wild-type (WT), primarily driven by an elevated neutrophil count. Despite this, 50% fewer leukocytes rolled on unstimulated mesenteric venous endothelium of Tph1(-/-) mice. The velocity of rolling leukocytes was higher in Tph1(-/-) mice, indicating fewer selectin-mediated interactions with endothelium. Stimulation of endothelium with histamine, a secretagogue of WPBs, or injection of serotonin normalized the rolling in Tph1(-/-) mice. Diminished rolling in Tph1(-/-) mice resulted in reduced firm adhesion of leukocytes after lipopolysaccharide treatment. Blocking platelet serotonin uptake with fluoxetine in WT mice reduced serum serotonin by > 80% and similarly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion. Four hours after inflammatory stimulation, neutrophil extravasation into lung, peritoneum, and skin wounds was reduced in Tph1(-/-) mice, whereas in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis was independent of serotonin. Survival of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock was improved in Tph1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils in acute inflammation, supporting an important role for platelet serotonin in innate immunity.

  2. Circumventing Y. pestis Virulence by Early Recruitment of Neutrophils to the Lungs during Pneumonic Plague.

    PubMed

    Vagima, Yaron; Zauberman, Ayelet; Levy, Yinon; Gur, David; Tidhar, Avital; Aftalion, Moshe; Shafferman, Avigdor; Mamroud, Emanuelle

    2015-05-01

    Pneumonic plague is a fatal disease caused by Yersinia pestis that is associated with a delayed immune response in the lungs. Because neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to sites of infection, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for their delayed homing to the lung. During the first 24 hr after pulmonary infection with a fully virulent Y. pestis strain, no significant changes were observed in the lungs in the levels of neutrophils infiltrate, expression of adhesion molecules, or the expression of the major neutrophil chemoattractants keratinocyte cell-derived chemokine (KC), macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In contrast, early induction of chemokines, rapid neutrophil infiltration and a reduced bacterial burden were observed in the lungs of mice infected with an avirulent Y. pestis strain. In vitro infection of lung-derived cell-lines with a YopJ mutant revealed the involvement of YopJ in the inhibition of chemoattractants expression. However, the recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs of mice infected with the mutant was still delayed and associated with rapid bacterial propagation and mortality. Interestingly, whereas KC, MIP-2 and G-CSF mRNA levels in the lungs were up-regulated early after infection with the mutant, their protein levels remained constant, suggesting that Y. pestis may employ additional mechanisms to suppress early chemoattractants induction in the lung. It therefore seems that prevention of the early influx of neutrophils to the lungs is of major importance for Y. pestis virulence. Indeed, pulmonary instillation of KC and MIP-2 to G-CSF-treated mice infected with Y. pestis led to rapid homing of neutrophils to the lung followed by a reduction in bacterial counts at 24 hr post-infection and improved survival rates. These observations shed new light on the virulence mechanisms of Y. pestis during pneumonic plague, and have implications for the development of novel

  3. Circumventing Y. pestis Virulence by Early Recruitment of Neutrophils to the Lungs during Pneumonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Vagima, Yaron; Zauberman, Ayelet; Levy, Yinon; Gur, David; Tidhar, Avital; Aftalion, Moshe; Shafferman, Avigdor; Mamroud, Emanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonic plague is a fatal disease caused by Yersinia pestis that is associated with a delayed immune response in the lungs. Because neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to sites of infection, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for their delayed homing to the lung. During the first 24 hr after pulmonary infection with a fully virulent Y. pestis strain, no significant changes were observed in the lungs in the levels of neutrophils infiltrate, expression of adhesion molecules, or the expression of the major neutrophil chemoattractants keratinocyte cell-derived chemokine (KC), macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In contrast, early induction of chemokines, rapid neutrophil infiltration and a reduced bacterial burden were observed in the lungs of mice infected with an avirulent Y. pestis strain. In vitro infection of lung-derived cell-lines with a YopJ mutant revealed the involvement of YopJ in the inhibition of chemoattractants expression. However, the recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs of mice infected with the mutant was still delayed and associated with rapid bacterial propagation and mortality. Interestingly, whereas KC, MIP-2 and G-CSF mRNA levels in the lungs were up-regulated early after infection with the mutant, their protein levels remained constant, suggesting that Y. pestis may employ additional mechanisms to suppress early chemoattractants induction in the lung. It therefore seems that prevention of the early influx of neutrophils to the lungs is of major importance for Y. pestis virulence. Indeed, pulmonary instillation of KC and MIP-2 to G-CSF-treated mice infected with Y. pestis led to rapid homing of neutrophils to the lung followed by a reduction in bacterial counts at 24 hr post-infection and improved survival rates. These observations shed new light on the virulence mechanisms of Y. pestis during pneumonic plague, and have implications for the development of novel

  4. Lidocaine reduces neutrophil recruitment by abolishing chemokine-induced arrest and transendothelial migration in septic patients.

    PubMed

    Berger, Christian; Rossaint, Jan; Van Aken, Hugo; Westphal, Martin; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Zarbock, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The inappropriate activation, positioning, and recruitment of leukocytes are implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple organ failure in sepsis. Although the local anesthetic lidocaine modulates inflammatory processes, the effects of lidocaine in sepsis are still unknown. This double-blinded, prospective, randomized clinical trial was conducted to investigate the effect of lidocaine on leukocyte recruitment in septic patients. Fourteen septic patients were randomized to receive either a placebo (n = 7) or a lidocaine (n = 7) bolus (1.5 mg/kg), followed by continuous infusion (100 mg/h for patients >70 kg or 70 mg/h for patients <70 kg) over a period of 48 h. Selectin-mediated slow rolling, chemokine-induced arrest, and transmigration were investigated by using flow chamber and transmigration assays. Lidocaine treatment abrogated chemokine-induced neutrophil arrest and significantly impaired neutrophil transmigration through endothelial cells by inhibition of the protein kinase C-θ while not affecting the selectin-mediated slow leukocyte rolling. The observed results were not attributable to changes in surface expression of adhesion molecules or selectin-mediated capturing capacity, indicating a direct effect of lidocaine on signal transduction in neutrophils. These data suggest that lidocaine selectively inhibits chemokine-induced arrest and transmigration of neutrophils by inhibition of protein kinase C-θ while not affecting selectin-mediated slow rolling. These findings may implicate a possible therapeutic role for lidocaine in decreasing the inappropriate activation, positioning, and recruitment of leukocytes during sepsis.

  5. Soluble extract from the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis induces CXCR2 dependent/IL-17 independent neutrophil recruitment

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Amy E.; Redding, Kevin M.; Hess, Jessica A.; Lok, James B.; Nolan, Thomas J.; Abraham, David

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment via CXCR2 is required for innate and adaptive protective immunity to the larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis in mice. The goal of the present study was to determine the mechanism of CXCR2-mediated neutrophil recruitment to S. stercoralis. Mice deficient in the receptor for IL-17A and IL-17F, upstream mediators of CXCR2 ligand production, were infected with S. stercoralis larvae; there was no difference in larval survival, neutrophil recruitment, or production of CXCR2 ligands compared with wild type mice. In vivo and in vitro stimulation of neutrophils with S. stercoralis soluble extract resulted in significant neutrophil recruitment. In vitro assays demonstrated that the recruitment functioned through both chemokinesis and chemotaxis, was specific for CXCR2, and was a G protein coupled response involving tyrosine kinase and PI3K. Finally, neutrophil stimulation with S. stercoralis soluble extract induced release of the CXCR2 ligands MIP-2 and KC from neutrophils, thereby potentially enhancing neutrophil recruitment. PMID:21315175

  6. FPR2 signaling without β-arrestin recruitment alters the functional repertoire of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabl, Michael; Holdfeldt, Andre; Sundqvist, Martina; Lomei, Jalal; Dahlgren, Claes; Forsman, Huamei

    2017-08-30

    G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) biased agonism or functional selectivity has become an essential concept in GPCR research over the last years. Receptor-specific biased agonists selectively trigger one signaling pathway over another and induce a restricted/directed functional response. In this study, we aimed to characterize the concept of biased agonism for FPR2, a member of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) subfamily of GPCRs. We show that the earlier described FPR2-activating pepducin F2Pal10 is a biased FPR2 agonist. The effects of F2Pal10 on neutrophil function differed in several aspects compared to those mediated by WKYMVM, a conventional FPR2-specific peptide agonist. Upon interaction with FPR2 expressed by neutrophils both F2Pal10 and WKYMVM activated the PLC-PIP2-Ca(2+) signaling pathway and the superoxide-generating NADPH-oxidase, but only WKYMVM activated the receptor to recruit β-arrestin. The functional consequences linked to a lack of β-arrestin recruitment were further explored, and we demonstrate that FPR2 desensitization occurred independent of β-arrestin. Despite this, reactivation of desensitized receptors achieved through a disruption of the cytoskeleton and through a novel FPR2 cross-talk mechanism with P2Y2R (the ATP receptor) and PAFR (the receptor for PAF) differed between F2Pal10-desensitized and WKYMVM-desensitized neutrophils. Further, the inability to recruit β-arrestin was found to be associated with a reduced rate of receptor internalization and impaired chemotaxis in neutrophils. In summary, we provide experimental evidence of biased agonism for FPR2 and our data disclose critical roles of β-arrestin in neutrophil chemotaxis and reactivation of desensitized receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Annexin A1 and the Resolution of Inflammation: Modulation of Neutrophil Recruitment, Apoptosis, and Clearance.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Michelle Amantéa; Vago, Juliana Priscila; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (also named polymorphonuclear leukocytes or PMN) are essential components of the immune system, rapidly recruited to sites of inflammation, providing the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Since neutrophils can also cause tissue damage, their fine-tuned regulation at the inflammatory site is required for proper resolution of inflammation. Annexin A1 (AnxA1), also known as lipocortin-1, is an endogenous glucocorticoid-regulated protein, which is able to counterregulate the inflammatory events restoring homeostasis. AnxA1 and its mimetic peptides inhibit neutrophil tissue accumulation by reducing leukocyte infiltration and activating neutrophil apoptosis. AnxA1 also promotes monocyte recruitment and clearance of apoptotic leukocytes by macrophages. More recently, some evidence has suggested the ability of AnxA1 to induce macrophage reprogramming toward a resolving phenotype, resulting in reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines and increased release of immunosuppressive and proresolving molecules. The combination of these mechanisms results in an effective resolution of inflammation, pointing to AnxA1 as a promising tool for the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases.

  8. Nlrp12 mutation causes C57BL/6J strain-specific defect in neutrophil recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ulland, Tyler K.; Jain, Nidhi; Hornick, Emma E.; Elliott, Eric I.; Clay, Gwendolyn M.; Sadler, Jeffrey J.; Mills, Kathleen A. M.; Janowski, Ann M.; Volk, A. Paige Davis; Wang, Kai; Legge, Kevin L.; Gakhar, Lokesh; Bourdi, Mohammed; Ferguson, Polly J.; Wilson, Mary E.; Cassel, Suzanne L.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.

    2016-01-01

    The inbred mouse strain C57BL/6J is widely used in models of immunological and infectious diseases. Here we show that C57BL/6J mice have a defect in neutrophil recruitment to a range of inflammatory stimuli compared with the related C57BL/6N substrain. This immune perturbation is associated with a missense mutation in Nlrp12 in C57BL/6J mice. Both C57BL/6J and NLRP12-deficient mice have increased susceptibility to bacterial infection that correlates with defective neutrophil migration. C57BL/6J and NLRP12-deficient macrophages have impaired CXCL1 production and the neutrophil defect observed in C57BL/6J and NLRP12-deficient mice is rescued by restoration of macrophage NLRP12. These results demonstrate that C57BL/6J mice have a functional defect in NLRP12 and that macrophages require NLRP12 expression for effective recruitment of neutrophils to inflammatory sites. PMID:27779193

  9. Annexin A1 and the Resolution of Inflammation: Modulation of Neutrophil Recruitment, Apoptosis, and Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Michelle Amantéa; Vago, Juliana Priscila; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (also named polymorphonuclear leukocytes or PMN) are essential components of the immune system, rapidly recruited to sites of inflammation, providing the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Since neutrophils can also cause tissue damage, their fine-tuned regulation at the inflammatory site is required for proper resolution of inflammation. Annexin A1 (AnxA1), also known as lipocortin-1, is an endogenous glucocorticoid-regulated protein, which is able to counterregulate the inflammatory events restoring homeostasis. AnxA1 and its mimetic peptides inhibit neutrophil tissue accumulation by reducing leukocyte infiltration and activating neutrophil apoptosis. AnxA1 also promotes monocyte recruitment and clearance of apoptotic leukocytes by macrophages. More recently, some evidence has suggested the ability of AnxA1 to induce macrophage reprogramming toward a resolving phenotype, resulting in reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines and increased release of immunosuppressive and proresolving molecules. The combination of these mechanisms results in an effective resolution of inflammation, pointing to AnxA1 as a promising tool for the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:26885535

  10. Intravascular clearance of disseminating Cryptococcus neoformans in the brain can be improved by enhancing neutrophil recruitment in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Donglei; Zhang, Mingshun; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Hui; Li, Chang; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Xiquan; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-07-01

    Extrapulmonary dissemination of Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) is one of the most critical steps in the development of meningoencephalitis. Here, we report that clearance of the disseminating C. neoformans occurs within the brain microvasculature. Interestingly, the efficiency of the intravascular clearance in the brain is reduced compared to that in the lung. Intravascular clearance is mainly mediated by neutrophils, and complement C5a receptor signaling is crucial for mediating neutrophil recruitment in the vasculature. C. neoformans stimulated actin polymerization of neutrophils is critically involved in their recruitment to the lung, which is associated with the unique vascular structure detected in the lung. The relatively lower efficiency of fungal clearance in the brain vasculature correlates with less efficient recruitment of neutrophils. Accordingly, intravascular clearance of C. neoformans in the brain could be remarkably improved by increasing the recruitment of neutrophils. We conclude that neutrophils have the ability to eliminate C. neoformans arrested in the vasculature. However, insufficient recruitment of neutrophils limited the optimal clearance of this microorganism in the brain. These results imply that a therapeutic strategy aimed at enhancing the accumulation of neutrophils could help prevent cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

  11. Nicorandil inhibits neutrophil recruitment in carrageenan-induced experimental pleurisy in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Tamires C; Coura, Giovanna M E; Melo, Ivo S F; Batista, Carla R A; Augusto, Paulo Sérgio A; Godin, Adriana M; Araújo, Débora P; César, Isabela C; Ribeiro, Lucas S; Souza, Danielle G; Klein, André; de Fátima, Ângelo; Machado, Renes R; Coelho, Márcio M

    2015-12-15

    Nicorandil is a drug characterized by the coupling of a nitric oxide (NO) donor to nicotinamide. We have previously demonstrated that nicotinamide exhibits activity in different models of pain and inflammation. Now, we investigated the effects induced by per os (p.o.) administration of nicorandil (25, 50 or 100mg/Kg) on neutrophil recruitment in a carrageenan-induced model of pleurisy in mice. Effects induced by nicorandil (100mg/kg) were compared with those induced by equimolar doses of nicotinamide (58mg/kg) and N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-nicotinamide (NHN; 79mg/kg). We also investigated whether effects on the production of inflammatory mediators play a role in the activity of nicorandil. P.o. nicorandil, 0.5h before and 1h after the i.pl. injection of carrageenan, reduced neutrophil recruitment. However, equimolar doses of nicotinamide or NHN failed to induce such effect. Single treatment (previous or late) with nicorandil (100mg/Kg, p.o.) also reduced neutrophils recruitment, although to a lesser extent when compared to the double treatment. Nicorandil reduced the concentrations of interleukin-1β, CXCL-1 and prostaglandin E2 in the pleural exudate. Concluding, we demonstrated the activity of nicorandil in a model of pleurisy induced by carrageenan. This activity was characterized by reduction of the neutrophil accumulation and inhibition of production of inflammatory mediators. The effects induced by nicorandil on the leukocytes recruitment and production of inflammatory mediators contribute to a better understanding of its clinical benefits and indicate that these benefits may be due to its vasodilating and anti-inflammatory activities.

  12. Actin dynamics in the regulation of endothelial barrier functions and neutrophil recruitment during endotoxemia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Schnoor, Michael; García Ponce, Alexander; Vadillo, Eduardo; Pelayo, Rosana; Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2017-02-02

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death worldwide. Increased vascular permeability is a major hallmark of sepsis. Dynamic alterations in actin fiber formation play an important role in the regulation of endothelial barrier functions and thus vascular permeability. Endothelial integrity requires a delicate balance between the formation of cortical actin filaments that maintain endothelial cell contact stability and the formation of actin stress fibers that generate pulling forces, and thus compromise endothelial cell contact stability. Current research has revealed multiple molecular pathways that regulate actin dynamics and endothelial barrier dysfunction during sepsis. These include intracellular signaling proteins of the small GTPases family (e.g., Rap1, RhoA and Rac1) as well as the molecules that are directly acting on the actomyosin cytoskeleton such as myosin light chain kinase and Rho kinases. Another hallmark of sepsis is an excessive recruitment of neutrophils that also involves changes in the actin cytoskeleton in both endothelial cells and neutrophils. This review focuses on the available evidence about molecules that control actin dynamics and regulate endothelial barrier functions and neutrophil recruitment. We also discuss treatment strategies using pharmaceutical enzyme inhibitors to target excessive vascular permeability and leukocyte recruitment in septic patients.

  13. Pathogen response-like recruitment and activation of neutrophils by sterile immunogenic dying cells drives neutrophil-mediated residual cell killing.

    PubMed

    Garg, Abhishek D; Vandenberk, Lien; Fang, Shentong; Fasche, Tekele; Van Eygen, Sofie; Maes, Jan; Van Woensel, Matthias; Koks, Carolien; Vanthillo, Niels; Graf, Norbert; de Witte, Peter; Van Gool, Stefaan; Salven, Petri; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2017-05-01

    Innate immune sensing of dying cells is modulated by several signals. Inflammatory chemokines-guided early recruitment, and pathogen-associated molecular patterns-triggered activation, of major anti-pathogenic innate immune cells like neutrophils distinguishes pathogen-infected stressed/dying cells from sterile dying cells. However, whether certain sterile dying cells stimulate innate immunity by partially mimicking pathogen response-like recruitment/activation of neutrophils remains poorly understood. We reveal that sterile immunogenic dying cancer cells trigger (a cell autonomous) pathogen response-like chemokine (PARC) signature, hallmarked by co-release of CXCL1, CCL2 and CXCL10 (similar to cells infected with bacteria or viruses). This PARC signature recruits preferentially neutrophils as first innate immune responders in vivo (in a cross-species, evolutionarily conserved manner; in mice and zebrafish). Furthermore, key danger signals emanating from these dying cells, that is, surface calreticulin, ATP and nucleic acids stimulate phagocytosis, purinergic receptors and toll-like receptors (TLR) i.e. TLR7/8/9-MyD88 signaling on neutrophil level, respectively. Engagement of purinergic receptors and TLR7/8/9-MyD88 signaling evokes neutrophil activation, which culminates into H2O2 and NO-driven respiratory burst-mediated killing of viable residual cancer cells. Thus sterile immunogenic dying cells perform 'altered-self mimicry' in certain contexts to exploit neutrophils for phagocytic targeting of dead/dying cancer cells and cytotoxic targeting of residual cancer cells.

  14. ARF1 recruits RAC1 to leading edge in neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Mazaki, Yuichi; Onodera, Yasuhito; Higashi, Tsunehito; Horinouchi, Takahiro; Oikawa, Tsukasa; Sabe, Hisataka

    2017-10-02

    The small GTPase ARF1 mediates membrane trafficking mostly from the Golgi, and is essential for the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils. In this process, ARF1 is activated by the guanine nucleotide exchanger GBF1, and is inactivated by the GTPase-activating protein GIT2. Neutrophils generate the Gβγ-PAK1-αPIX-GIT2 linear complex during GPCR-induced chemotaxis, in which αPIX activates RAC1/CDC42, which then employs PAK1. However, it has remained unclear as to why GIT2 is included in this complex. We investigated the association between ARF1 and RAC1/CDC42 during the fMLP-stimulated chemotaxis of HL60 cells. We found that the silencing of GBF1 significantly impaired the recruitment of RAC1 to the leading edges, but not PAK1, αPIX, RAC2, or CDC42. A significant population of RAC1 colocalized with ARF1 at the leading edges in stimulated cells, whereas fMLP activated both ARF1 and ARF5. Consistently, the silencing of ARF1, but not ARF5, impaired the recruitment of RAC1, whereas the silencing of RAC1 did not affect the recruitment of ARF1 to the leading edges. Our results indicated that the activation of ARF1 triggers the plasma membrane recruitment of RAC1 in GPCR-mediated chemotaxis, which is essential for cortical actin remodeling. Thus, membrane remodeling at the leading edges appears to precede actin remodeling in chemotaxis. Together with the fact that GIT2, which inactivates ARF1, is an integral component of the machinery activating RAC1, we proposed a model in which the ARF1-RAC1 linkage enables the regulation of ARF1 by repetitive on/off cycles during GPCR-mediated neutrophil chemotaxis.

  15. Pertussis toxin inhibits early chemokine production to delay neutrophil recruitment in response to Bordetella pertussis respiratory tract infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Charlotte; Carbonetti, Nicholas H

    2008-11-01

    Pertussis is an acute respiratory disease of humans caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. Pertussis toxin (PT) plays a major role in the virulence of this pathogen, including important effects that it has soon after inoculation. Studies in our laboratory and other laboratories have indicated that PT inhibits early neutrophil influx to the lungs and airways in response to B. pertussis respiratory tract infection in mice. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that PT can affect neutrophils directly by ADP ribosylating G(i) proteins associated with surface chemokine receptors, thereby inhibiting neutrophil migration in response to chemokines. However, in this study, by comparing responses to wild-type (WT) and PT-deficient strains, we found that PT has an indirect inhibitory effect on neutrophil recruitment to the airways in response to infection. Analysis of lung chemokine expression indicated that PT suppresses early neutrophil recruitment by inhibiting chemokine upregulation in alveolar macrophages and other lung cells in response to B. pertussis infection. Enhancement of early neutrophil recruitment to the airways in response to WT infection by addition of exogenous keratinocyte-derived chemokine, one of the dominant neutrophil-attracting chemokines in mice, further revealed an indirect effect of PT on neutrophil chemotaxis. Additionally, we showed that intranasal administration of PT inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced chemokine gene expression and neutrophil recruitment to the airways, presumably by modulation of signaling through Toll-like receptor 4. Collectively, these results demonstrate how PT inhibits early inflammatory responses in the respiratory tract, which reduces neutrophil influx in response to B. pertussis infection, potentially providing an advantage to the pathogen in this interaction.

  16. Microbiome-mediated neutrophil recruitment via CXCR2 and protection from amebic colitis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Koji; Gilchrist, Carol A; Uddin, Md Jashim; Burgess, Stacey L; Abhyankar, Mayuresh M; Moonah, Shannon N; Noor, Zannatun; Donowitz, Jeffrey R; Schneider, Brittany N; Arju, Tuhinur; Ahmed, Emtiaz; Kabir, Mamun; Alam, Masud; Haque, Rashidul; Pramoonjago, Patcharin; Mehrad, Borna; Petri, William A

    2017-08-01

    The disease severity of Entamoeba histolytica infection ranges from asymptomatic to life-threatening. Recent human and animal data implicate the gut microbiome as a modifier of E. histolytica virulence. Here we have explored the association of the microbiome with susceptibility to amebiasis in infants and in the mouse model of amebic colitis. Dysbiosis occurred symptomatic E. histolytica infection in children, as evidenced by a lower Shannon diversity index of the gut microbiota. To test if dysbiosis was a cause of susceptibility, wild type C57BL/6 mice (which are innately resistant to E. histiolytica infection) were treated with antibiotics prior to cecal challenge with E. histolytica. Compared with untreated mice, antibiotic pre-treated mice had more severe colitis and delayed clearance of E. histolytica. Gut IL-25 and mucus protein Muc2, both shown to provide innate immunity in the mouse model of amebic colitis, were lower in antibiotic pre-treated mice. Moreover, dysbiotic mice had fewer cecal neutrophils and myeloperoxidase activity. Paradoxically, the neutrophil chemoattractant chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, as well as IL-1β, were higher in the colon of mice with antibiotic-induced dysbiosis. Neutrophils from antibiotic pre-treated mice had diminished surface expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2, potentially explaining their inability to migrate to the site of infection. Blockade of CXCR2 increased susceptibility of control non-antibiotic treated mice to amebiasis. In conclusion, dysbiosis increased the severity of amebic colitis due to decreased neutrophil recruitment to the gut, which was due in part to decreased surface expression on neutrophils of CXCR2.

  17. Critical role of dipeptidyl peptidase I in neutrophil recruitment during the development of experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Monica B.; Bartoli, Michel A.; Ennis, Terri L.; Mao, Dongli; Simmons, Pamela M.; Thompson, Robert W.; Pham, Christine T. N.

    2007-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) is a lysosomal cysteine protease critical for the activation of granule-associated serine proteases, including neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase 3. DPPI and granule-associated serine proteases have been shown to play a key role in regulating neutrophil recruitment at sites of inflammation. It has recently been suggested that neutrophils and neutrophil-associated proteases may also be important in the development and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), a common vascular disease associated with chronic inflammation and destructive remodeling of aortic wall connective tissue. Here we show that mice with a loss-of-function mutation in DPPI are resistant to the development of elastase-induced experimental AAAs. This is in part because of diminished recruitment of neutrophils to the elastase-injured aortic wall and impaired local production of CXC-chemokine ligand (CXCL) 2. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils is sufficient to restore susceptibility to AAAs in DPPI-deficient mice, as well as aortic wall expression of CXCL2. In addition, in vivo blockade of CXCL2 by using neutralizing antibodies directed against its cognate receptor leads to a significant reduction in aortic dilatation. These findings suggest that DPPI and/or granule-associated serine proteases are necessary for neutrophil recruitment into the diseased aorta and that these proteases act to amplify vascular wall inflammation that leads to AAAs. PMID:17301245

  18. The atypical cannabinoid O-1602 protects against experimental colitis and inhibits neutrophil recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Schicho, Rudolf; Bashashati, Mohammad; Bawa, Misha; McHugh, Douglas; Saur, Dieter; Hu, Huang-Ming; Zimmer, Andreas; Lutz, Beat; Mackie, Ken; Bradshaw, Heather B.; McCafferty, Donna-Marie; Sharkey, Keith A.; Storr, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background Cannabinoids are known to reduce intestinal inflammation. Atypical cannabinoids produce pharmacological effects via unidentified targets. We were interested whether the atypical cannabinoid O-1602, reportedly an agonist of the putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55, reduces disease severity of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in C57BL/6N and CD1 mice. Methods DSS (2.5% and 4%) was supplied in drinking water for one week while TNBS (4 mg) was applied as a single intrarectal bolus. Results Both treatments caused severe colitis. Injection of O-1602 (5 mg/kg i.p.) significantly reduced macroscopic and histological colitis scores, and myeloperoxidase activity. The protective effect was still present in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) double knockout mice and mice lacking the GPR55 gene. To investigate a potential mechanism underlying the protection by O-1602 we performed neutrophil chemotactic assays. O-1602 concentration-dependently inhibited migration of murine neutrophils to keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and the N-formyl-peptide receptor ligand WKYMVm. The inhibitory effect of O-1602 was preserved in neutrophils from CB1/CB2 double knockout and GPR55 knockout mice. No differences were seen in locomotor activity between O-1602-treated and control mice indicating lack of central sedation by this compound. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that O-1602 is protective against experimentally induced colitis and inhibits neutrophil recruitment independently of CB1, CB2 and GPR55 receptors. Thus, atypical cannabinoids represent a novel class of therapeutics that may be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:21744421

  19. PGF2α, a Prostanoid Released by Endothelial Cells Activated by Hypoxia, Is a Chemoattractant Candidate for Neutrophil Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Arnould, Thierry; Thibaut-Vercruyssen, Rose; Bouaziz, Najat; Dieu, Marc; Remacle, José; Michiels, Carine

    2001-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence supporting the involvement of neutrophils in ischemic and postischemic damages, the mechanisms underlying the early recruitment of these cells are not completely understood. In this report, the effects of conditioned media from hypoxic endothelial cells on neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated by biochemical and morphological studies. We showed that conditioned media collected from several endothelial cell origins submitted to hypoxia as well as ischemic rat liver perfusion liquids have a chemotactic activity for neutrophils. The role of various chemoattractant molecules like HETEs, platelet-activating factor, and cytokines such as interleukin-8 and interleukin-1 was examined in the same model. Chemotactic peptide contribution was ruled out as boiled conditioned media still trigger chemotaxis. However, cell treatment with cyclooxygenase inhibitors, neutralization of PGF2α biological activity with polyclonal antibodies, and the neutrophil preincubation with a specific PGF2α antagonist, all dramatically inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis. A strong chemoattractant effect of pure exogenous PGF2α or of a synthetic analog was also observed. The major effect of PGF2α on neutrophil chemotaxis was confirmed ex vivo in a rat liver perfusion ischemic model. These results suggest that PGF2α, a prostanoid abundantly released by the endothelium of hypoxic or ischemic tissues, is a chemoattractant molecule that might be involved in the early recruitment of neutrophils in ischemic organs. PMID:11438482

  20. NOD2 dependent neutrophil recruitment is required for early protective immune responses against infectious Litomosoides sigmodontis L3 larvae

    PubMed Central

    Ajendra, Jesuthas; Specht, Sabine; Ziewer, Sebastian; Schiefer, Andrea; Pfarr, Kenneth; Parčina, Marijo; Kufer, Thomas A.; Hoerauf, Achim; Hübner, Marc P.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) recognizes muramyl dipeptide (MDP) of bacterial cell walls, triggering NFκB-induced pro-inflammation. As most human pathogenic filariae contain Wolbachia endobacteria that synthesize the MDP-containing cell wall precursor lipid II, NOD2’s role during infection with the rodent filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis was investigated. In NFκB reporter-cells, worm-extract containing Wolbachia induced NOD2 and NOD1. NOD2-deficient mice infected with L. sigmodontis had significantly more worms than wildtype controls early in infection. Increased worm burden was not observed after subcutaneous infection, suggesting that protective NOD2-dependent immune responses occur within the skin. Flow cytometry demonstrated that neutrophil recruitment to the skin was impaired in NOD2−/− mice after intradermal injection of third stage larvae (L3), and blood neutrophil numbers were reduced after L. sigmodontis infection. PCR array supported the requirement of NOD2 for recruitment of neutrophils to the skin, as genes associated with neutrophil recruitment and activation were downregulated in NOD2−/− mice after intradermal L3 injection. Neutrophil depletion before L. sigmodontis infection increased worm recovery in wildtype mice, confirming that neutrophils are essential against invading L3 larvae. This study indicates that NOD-like receptors are implemented in first-line protective immune responses against filarial nematodes. PMID:28004792

  1. The E-Selectin Ligand Basigin/CD147 Is Responsible for Neutrophil Recruitment in Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Noritoshi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Kosugi, Tomoki; Hobo, Akinori; Sato, Waichi; Miwa, Yuko; Sakamoto, Kazuma; Matsuo, Seiichi; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    E-selectin and its ligands are essential for extravasation of leukocytes in inflammation. Here, we report that basigin (Bsg)/CD147 is a ligand for E-selectin that promotes renal inflammation in ischemia/reperfusion. Compared with wild-type mice, Bsg-deficient (Bsg−/−) mice demonstrated striking suppression of neutrophil infiltration in the kidney after renal ischemia/reperfusion. Although E-selectin expression increased similarly between the two genotypes, Bsg−/− mice exhibited less renal damage, suggesting that Bsg on neutrophils contribute to renal injury in this model. Neutrophils expressed Bsg with N-linked polylactosamine chains and Bsg−/− neutrophils showed reduced binding to E-selectin. Bsg isolated from HL-60 cells bound to E-selectin, and tunicamycin treatment to abolish N-linked glycans from Bsg abrogated this binding. Furthermore, Bsg−/− neutrophils exhibited reduced E-selectin-dependent adherence to human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. Injection of labeled neutrophils into mice showed that Bsg−/− neutrophils were less readily recruited to the kidney after renal ischemia/reperfusion than Bsg+/+ neutrophils, regardless of the recipient's genotype. Taken together, these results indicate that Bsg is a physiologic ligand for E-selectin that plays a critical role in the renal damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:19443639

  2. Yersinia enterocolitica YopH-Deficient Strain Activates Neutrophil Recruitment to Peyer's Patches and Promotes Clearance of the Virulent Strain.

    PubMed

    Dave, Mabel N; Silva, Juan E; Eliçabe, Ricardo J; Jeréz, María B; Filippa, Verónica P; Gorlino, Carolina V; Autenrieth, Stella; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Di Genaro, María S

    2016-11-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica evades the immune response by injecting Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into the cytosol of host cells. YopH is a tyrosine phosphatase critical for Yersinia virulence. However, the mucosal immune mechanisms subverted by YopH during in vivo orogastric infection with Y. enterocolitica remain elusive. The results of this study revealed neutrophil recruitment to Peyer's patches (PP) after infection with a YopH-deficient mutant strain (Y. enterocolitica ΔyopH). While the Y. enterocolitica wild-type (WT) strain in PP induced the major neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL1 mRNA and protein levels, infection with the Y. enterocolitica ΔyopH mutant strain exhibited a higher expression of the CXCL1 receptor, CXCR2, in blood neutrophils, leading to efficient neutrophil recruitment to the PP. In contrast, migration of neutrophils into PP was impaired upon infection with Y. enterocolitica WT strain. In vitro infection of blood neutrophils revealed the involvement of YopH in CXCR2 expression. Depletion of neutrophils during Y. enterocolitica ΔyopH infection raised the bacterial load in PP. Moreover, the clearance of WT Y. enterocolitica was improved when an equal mixture of Y. enterocolitica WT and Y. enterocolitica ΔyopH strains was used in infecting the mice. This study indicates that Y. enterocolitica prevents early neutrophil recruitment in the intestine and that the effector protein YopH plays an important role in the immune evasion mechanism. The findings highlight the potential use of the Y. enterocolitica YopH-deficient strain as an oral vaccine carrier. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Early neutrophil recruitment and aggregation in the murine lung inhibit germination of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia.

    PubMed

    Bonnett, Colin R; Cornish, E Jean; Harmsen, Allen G; Burritt, James B

    2006-12-01

    Several types of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) deficiency are a predisposing condition for fatal Aspergillus fumigatus infection. In order to study the defensive role of PMNs in the lungs, with particular reference to PMN recruitment and antimicrobial oxidant activity, responses to pulmonary instillation of A. fumigatus conidia were examined. Responses in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were compared with those in CXCR2(-/-) and gp91(phox-/-) mice, which are known to have delayed recruitment of PMN to the lungs in response to inflammatory stimuli and inactive NADPH oxidase, respectively. In BALB/c mice, PMNs were recruited to the lungs and formed oxidase-active aggregates with conidia, which inhibited germination. In C57BL/6, gp91(phox-/-), and CXCR2(-/-) mice, PMN recruitment was slower and there was increased germination compared to that in BALB/c mice at 6 and 12 h. In gp91(phox-/-) mice, germination was extensive in PMN aggregates but negligible in alveolar macrophages (AM). Lung sections taken at 6 and 48 h from BALB/c mice showed PMN accumulation at peribronchiolar sites but no germinating conidia. Those from C57BL/6 and CXCR2(-/-) mice showed germinating conidia at 6 h but not at 48 h and few inflammatory cells. In contrast, those from gp91(phox-/-) mice showed germination at 6 h with more-extensive hyphal proliferation and tissue invasion at 48 h. These results indicate that when the lungs are exposed to large numbers of conidia, in addition to the phagocytic activity of AM, early PMN recruitment and formation of oxidative-active aggregates are essential in preventing germination of A. fumigatus conidia.

  4. CD133 Regulates IL-1β Signaling and Neutrophil Recruitment in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon Yong; Kim, Jun-Kyum; Jeon, Hee-Young; Ham, Seok Won; Kim, Hyunggee

    2017-01-01

    CD133, a pentaspan transmembrane glycoprotein, is generally used as a cancer stem cell marker in various human malignancies, but its biological function in cancer cells, especially in glioma cells, is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrated that forced expression of CD133 increases the expression of IL-1β and its downstream chemokines, namely, CCL3, CXCL3 and CXCL5, in U87MG glioma cells. Although there were no apparent changes in cell growth and sphere formation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, in vitro trans-well studies and in vivo tumor xenograft assays showed that neutrophil recruitment was markedly increased by the ectopic expression of CD133. In addition, the clinical relevance between CD133 expression and IL-1β gene signature was established in patients with malignant gliomas. Thus, these results imply that glioma cells expressing CD133 are capable of modulating tumor microenvironment through the IL-1β signaling pathway. PMID:28736425

  5. Treadmill exercise induces neutrophil recruitment into muscle tissue in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner. An intravital microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Silva, Albená; Bernardes, Priscila T T; Rezende, Bárbara M; Lopes, Fernando; Gomes, Elisa C; Marques, Pedro E; Lima, Paulo M A; Coimbra, Cândido C; Menezes, Gustavo B; Teixeira, Mauro M; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase) mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process.

  6. Treadmill Exercise Induces Neutrophil Recruitment into Muscle Tissue in a Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Manner. An Intravital Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-Silva, Albená; Bernardes, Priscila T. T.; Rezende, Bárbara M.; Lopes, Fernando; Gomes, Elisa C.; Marques, Pedro E.; Lima, Paulo M. A.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase) mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process. PMID:24798414

  7. Neutrophil recruitment is critical for 5-fluorouracil-induced diarrhea and the decrease in aquaporins in the colon.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Jo, Ara; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Sato, Ken; Ikegami, Daigo; Horie, Syunji; Matoba, Motohiro; Narita, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    Diarrhea is a common side effect experienced by cancer patients undergoing clinical chemotherapy, such as with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the precise mechanisms underlying 5-FU-induced diarrhea remain unclear. In the present study, we examined the role of neutrophil in 5-FU-induced diarrhea. Mice were given 5-FU (50mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 4 days. Sivelestat sodium (100 or 300 mg/kg, i.p., neutorophil elastase inhibitor) or SB225002 (3 or 9 mg/kg, i.p., CXCR2 antagonist) was administered before the administration of 5-FU. Gene expression levels of aquaporin (AQP) 4 and 8, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, neutrophil elastase (Elane) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the colon were examined by real-time RT-PCR. The neutrophil (Ly-6G positive cell) number in the mucosa of colon was measured by flow-cytometric analysis. Administration of 5-FU induced diarrhea and decreased the expression levels of AQP 4 and 8 in the colon. Under the present conditions, the expression levels of CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, the neutrophil markers Elane and MPO, as well as Ly-6G-positive neutrophils, in the colon were significantly increased by 5-FU. Neutrophil recruitment with decreased levels of AQP 4 and 8 were dramatically inhibited by either sivelestat sodium or SB225002. Furthermore, these reagents reduced the 5-FU-induced body weight loss and diarrhea. These findings provide evidence that neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil elastase may decrease the levels of AQP 4 and 8 in the colon of mice treated with 5-FU and contribute to the pathophysiology of 5-FU-induced body weight loss and diarrhea.

  8. Intravital Imaging of Neutrophil Recruitment Reveals the Efficacy of FPR1 Blockade in Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Honda, Masaki; Takeichi, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Yoshii, Daiki; Isono, Kaori; Hayashida, Shintaro; Ohya, Yuki; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2017-02-15

    Neutrophils are considered responsible for the pathophysiological changes resulting from hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, which is a complication of trauma, shock, liver resection, and transplantation. Recently, evidence is accumulating that formyl-peptide receptor (FPR) signaling constitutes an important danger signal that guides neutrophils to sites of inflammation. This study aimed to investigate dynamic neutrophil recruitment using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy (TPLSM) in response to FPR1 blockade during hepatic I/R. LysM-eGFP mice were subjected to partial warm hepatic I/R. They were pretreated with an FPR1 antagonist, cyclosporine H (CsH), or formyl peptide, fMLF. Liver was imaged after hepatic laser irradiation or I/R using the TPLSM technique. CsH treatment alleviated hepatic I/R injury, as evidenced by decreased serum transaminase levels, reduced hepatocyte necrosis/apoptosis, and diminished inflammatory cytokine, chemokine, and oxidative stress. In contrast, systemic administration of fMLF showed few effects. Time-lapse TPLSM showed that FPR1 blockade inhibited the accumulation of neutrophils in the necrotic area induced by laser irradiation in vivo. In the CsH-treated I/R group, the number and crawling velocity of neutrophils in the nonperfused area were lower than those in the control group. Meanwhile, FPR1 blockade did not affect monocyte/macrophage recruitment. Hepatic I/R promoted the retention of neutrophils and their active behavior in the spleen, whereas CsH treatment prevented their changes. Intravital TPLSM revealed that formyl-peptide-FPR1 signaling is responsible for regulating neutrophil chemotaxis to allow migration into the necrotic area in hepatic I/R. Our findings suggest effective approaches for elucidating the mechanisms of immune cell responses in hepatic I/R.

  9. IL-18 enhances collagen-induced arthritis by recruiting neutrophils via TNF-alpha and leukotriene B4.

    PubMed

    Canetti, Claudio A; Leung, Bernard P; Culshaw, Shauna; McInnes, Iain B; Cunha, Fernando Q; Liew, Foo Y; Cannetti, Claudio A

    2003-07-15

    IL-18 expression and functional activity have been associated with a range of autoimmune diseases. However, the precise mechanism by which IL-18 induces such pathology remains unclear. In this study we provide direct evidence that IL-18 activates neutrophils via TNF-alpha induction, which drives the production of leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), which in turn leads to neutrophil accumulation and subsequent local inflammation. rIL-18 administered i.p. resulted in the local synthesis of LTB(4) and a rapid influx of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavity, which could be effectively blocked by the LTB(4) synthesis inhibitor MK-886 (MK) or its receptor antagonist CP-105,696. IL-18-induced neutrophils recruitment and LTB(4) production could also be blocked by a neutralizing anti-TNF-alpha Ab. In addition, IL-18 failed to induce neutrophil accumulation in vivo in TNFRp55(-/-) mice. In an IL-18-dependent murine collagen-induced arthritis model, administration of MK significantly inhibited disease severity and reduced articular inflammation and joint destruction. Furthermore, MK-886-treated mice also displayed suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production in response to type II collagen in vitro. Finally, we showed that IL-18-activated human peripheral blood neutrophils produced significant amounts of LTB(4) that were effectively blocked by the MK. Together, these findings provide a novel mechanism whereby IL-18 can promote inflammatory diseases.

  10. CD4+ T cells are required for antigen-specific recruitment of neutrophils by BCG-immune spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R

    1992-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-immune spleen cells co-inoculated into the peritoneal cavity of normal mice with BCG sonicate protein as antigen could induce an antigen-specific recruitment of neutrophils, dependent on the antigen dose and cell number. This response was significantly reduced by anti-T lymphocyte and anti-CD4 treatment of the immune spleen cells prior to the inoculation. Removal of adherent or phagocytic cells or lysis of B cells, had no significant effect. Killing of dividing cells in the splenic population induced a slight reduction in the ability of spleen cells to recruit neutrophils. M. avium sonicate protein was also able to induce BCG-immune spleen cells to mobilize neutrophils but bovine serum albumin, Listeria monocytogenes cytosolic protein and 65,000 MW heat shock protein were not. These results show that CD4+ T cells are able to induce neutrophil recruitment in an antigen-specific way during a mycobacterial infection. PMID:1374053

  11. Targeting distinct tautomerase sites of D-DT and MIF with a single molecule for inhibition of neutrophil lung recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Deepa; Zierow, Swen; Syed, Mansoor; Bucala, Richard; Bhandari, Vineet; Lolis, Elias J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new inflammatory activity for extracellular d-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT), the recruitment of neutrophils to the lung on D-DT intratracheal installation of C57BL/6J mice with an EC50 of 5.6 μg. We also find that D-DT and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) have additive effects in neutrophil recruitment. Although the tautomerase site of D-DT and its homologue MIF are biophysically very different, 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP) forms a covalent bond with Pro-1 of both proteins, resulting in a 6-phenylpyrimidine (6-PP) adduct. Recruitment of neutrophils to the lung for the 6-PP adducts of D-DT and MIF are reduced by ∼50% relative to the apo proteins, demonstrating that an unmodified Pro-1 is important for this activity, but there is no cooperativity in inhibition of the proteins together. The differences in the binding mode of the 6-PP adduct for D-DT was determined by crystallographic studies at 1.13 Å resolution and compared to the structure of the MIF–6-PP complex. There are major differences in the location of the 6-PP adduct to the D-DT and MIF active sites that provide insight into the lack of cooperativity by 4-IPP and into tuning the properties of the covalent inhibitors of D-DT and MIF that are necessary for the development of therapeutic small molecules against neutrophil damage from lung infections such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients.—Rajasekaran, D., Zierow, S., Syed, M., Bucala, R., Bhandari, V., Lolis, E. J. Targeting distinct tautomerase sites of D-DT and MIF with a single molecule for inhibition of neutrophil lung recruitment. PMID:25016026

  12. Tir Triggers Expression of CXCL1 in Enterocytes and Neutrophil Recruitment during Citrobacter rodentium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Habibzay, Maryam; Glegola-Madejska, Izabela; Guenot, Marianne; Collins, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The hallmarks of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection are formation of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions on mucosal surfaces and actin-rich pedestals on cultured cells, both of which are dependent on the type III secretion system effector Tir. Following translocation into cultured cells and clustering by intimin, Tir Y474 is phosphorylated, leading to recruitment of Nck, activation of N-WASP, and actin polymerization via the Arp2/3 complex. A secondary, weak, actin polymerization pathway is triggered via an NPY motif (Y454). Importantly, Y454 and Y474 play no role in A/E lesion formation on mucosal surfaces following infection with the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. In this study, we investigated the roles of Tir segments located upstream of Y451 and downstream of Y471 in C. rodentium colonization and A/E lesion formation. We also tested the role that Tir residues Y451 and Y471 play in host immune responses to C. rodentium infection. We found that deletion of amino acids 382 to 462 or 478 to 547 had no impact on the ability of Tir to mediate A/E lesion formation, although deletion of amino acids 478 to 547 affected Tir translocation. Examination of enterocytes isolated from infected mice revealed that a C. rodentium strain expressing Tir_Y451A/Y471A recruited significantly fewer neutrophils to the colon and triggered less colonic hyperplasia on day 14 postinfection than the wild-type strain. Consistently, enterocytes isolated from mice infected with C. rodentium expressing Tir_Y451A/Y471A expressed significantly less CXCL1. These result show that Tir-induced actin remodeling plays a direct role in modulation of immune responses to C. rodentium infection. PMID:26077760

  13. Tir Triggers Expression of CXCL1 in Enterocytes and Neutrophil Recruitment during Citrobacter rodentium Infection.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Valerie F; Habibzay, Maryam; Glegola-Madejska, Izabela; Guenot, Marianne; Collins, James W; Frankel, Gad

    2015-09-01

    The hallmarks of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection are formation of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions on mucosal surfaces and actin-rich pedestals on cultured cells, both of which are dependent on the type III secretion system effector Tir. Following translocation into cultured cells and clustering by intimin, Tir Y474 is phosphorylated, leading to recruitment of Nck, activation of N-WASP, and actin polymerization via the Arp2/3 complex. A secondary, weak, actin polymerization pathway is triggered via an NPY motif (Y454). Importantly, Y454 and Y474 play no role in A/E lesion formation on mucosal surfaces following infection with the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. In this study, we investigated the roles of Tir segments located upstream of Y451 and downstream of Y471 in C. rodentium colonization and A/E lesion formation. We also tested the role that Tir residues Y451 and Y471 play in host immune responses to C. rodentium infection. We found that deletion of amino acids 382 to 462 or 478 to 547 had no impact on the ability of Tir to mediate A/E lesion formation, although deletion of amino acids 478 to 547 affected Tir translocation. Examination of enterocytes isolated from infected mice revealed that a C. rodentium strain expressing Tir_Y451A/Y471A recruited significantly fewer neutrophils to the colon and triggered less colonic hyperplasia on day 14 postinfection than the wild-type strain. Consistently, enterocytes isolated from mice infected with C. rodentium expressing Tir_Y451A/Y471A expressed significantly less CXCL1. These result show that Tir-induced actin remodeling plays a direct role in modulation of immune responses to C. rodentium infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. G protein-coupled receptor 43 is essential for neutrophil recruitment during intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sina, Christian; Gavrilova, Olga; Förster, Matti; Till, Andreas; Derer, Stefanie; Hildebrand, Friederike; Raabe, Björn; Chalaris, Athena; Scheller, Jürgen; Rehmann, Ateequr; Franke, Andre; Ott, Stephan; Häsler, Robert; Nikolaus, Susanna; Fölsch, Ulrich R; Rose-John, Stefan; Jiang, Hui-Ping; Li, Jun; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2009-12-01

    Molecular danger signals attract neutrophilic granulocytes (polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs)) to sites of infection. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 43 recognizes propionate and butyrate and is abundantly expressed on PMNs. The functional role of GPR43 activation for in vivo orchestration of immune response is unclear. We examined dextrane sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced acute and chronic intestinal inflammatory response in wild-type and Gpr43-deficient mice. The severity of colonic inflammation was assessed by clinical signs, histological scoring, and cytokine production. Chemotaxis of wild-type and Gpr43-deficient PMNs was assessed through transwell cell chemotactic assay. A reduced invasion of PMNs and increased mortality due to septic complications were observed in acute DSS colitis. In chronic DSS colitis, Gpr43(-/-) animals showed diminished PMN intestinal migration, but protection against inflammatory tissue destruction. No significant difference in PMN migration and cytokine secretion was detected in a sterile inflammatory model. Ex vivo experiments show that GPR43-induced migration is dependent on activation of the protein kinase p38alpha, and that this signal acts in cooperation with the chemotactic cytokine keratinocyte chemoattractant. Interestingly, shedding of L-selectin in response to propionate and butyrate was compromised in Gpr43(-/-) mice. These results indicate a critical role for GPR43-mediated recruitment of PMNs in containing intestinal bacterial translocation, yet also emphasize the bipotential role of PMNs in mediating tissue destruction in chronic intestinal inflammation.

  15. Calpains promote neutrophil recruitment and bacterial clearance in an acute bacterial peritonitis model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Everingham, Stephanie; Hall, Christine; Greer, Peter A; Craig, Andrew W B

    2014-03-01

    Activation of the innate immune system is critical for clearance of bacterial pathogens to limit systemic infections and host tissue damage. Here, we report a key role for calpain proteases in bacterial clearance in mice with acute peritonitis. Using transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase primarily in innate immune cells (fes-Cre), we generated conditional capns1 knockout mice. Consistent with capns1 being essential for stability and function of the ubiquitous calpains (calpain-1, calpain-2), peritoneal cells from these mice had reduced levels of calpain-2/capns1, and reduced proteolysis of their substrate selenoprotein K. Using an acute bacterial peritonitis model, we observed impaired bacterial killing within the peritoneum and development of bacteremia in calpain knockout mice. These defects correlated with significant reductions in IL-1α release, neutrophil recruitment, and generation of reactive oxygen species in calpain knockout mice with acute bacterial peritonitis. Peritoneal macrophages from calpain knockout mice infected with enterobacteria ex vivo, were competent in phagocytosis of bacteria, but showed impaired clearance of intracellular bacteria compared with control macrophages. Together, these results implicate calpains as key mediators of effective innate immune responses to acute bacterial infections, to prevent systemic dissemination of bacteria that can lead to sepsis.

  16. VAP-1 blockade prevents subarachnoid hemorrhage-associated cerebrovascular dilating dysfunction via repression of a neutrophil recruitment-related mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; N Pavuluri, Mani; Zhai, Fengguo; Nanegrungsunk, Danop; Paisansathan, Chanannait; Pelligrino, Dale A

    2015-04-07

    Our previous findings indicated that in rats subjected to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), suppression of post-SAH neuroinflammation via vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) blockade provides significant neuroprotection. We and others have reported that neuroinflammation contributes to cerebral microvascular impairment. Thus, in the present study, we tested the hypotheses that: (1) treatment with LJP-1586, a selective VAP-1 blocker, prevents SAH-associated pial arteriolar dilating dysfunction; and (2) the vasculoprotective effect of LJP-1586 arises from inhibiting SAH-elicited neutrophil recruitment. We utilized an endovascular perforation model of SAH. Rats subjected to SAH were either treated with LJP-1586 or rendered neutropenic via anti-neutrophil-antibody treatment. Findings from these groups were compared to their respective control groups. At 48 h post-SAH, rats were evaluated for neurobehavioral function, pial venular leukocyte trafficking, and pial arteriolar reactivity to topically-applied acetylcholine (ACh) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP). Pial arteriolar responses decreased at 48 h post-SAH. However, in the presence of LJP-1586, those responses were significantly preserved. Neutrophil-depletion yielded a substantial suppression of SAH-associated leukocyte adhesion and infiltration. This was accompanied by a significant preservation of pial arteriolar dilating function, suggesting a direct link between neutrophil recruitment and the loss of cerebral microvascular reactivity. Moreover, neutrophil depletion also was associated with significant protection of neurobehavioral function. The present findings suggest that attenuating SAH-linked elevation in neutrophil trafficking will protect against the development of microvascular dysfunction and subsequent neurological impairment.

  17. Enhanced neutrophil longevity and recruitment contribute to the severity of oviduct pathology during Chlamydia muridarum infection.

    PubMed

    Frazer, Lauren C; O'Connell, Catherine M; Andrews, Charles W; Zurenski, Matthew A; Darville, Toni

    2011-10-01

    Our previous studies revealed that intravaginal infection of mice with a plasmid-deficient strain of Chlamydia muridarum, CM3.1, does not induce the development of oviduct pathology. In this study, we determined that infection with CM3.1 resulted in a significantly reduced frequency and absolute number of neutrophils in the oviducts during acute infection. This reduction in neutrophils was associated with significantly lower levels of neutrophil chemokines in the oviducts and decreased production of neutrophil chemokines by oviduct epithelial cells infected with CM3.1 in vitro. Infection with CM3.1 also resulted in an increased frequency of late apoptotic/dead neutrophils in the oviduct. Examination of the ability of Chlamydia trachomatis to prevent neutrophil apoptosis in vitro revealed that C. trachomatis strain D/UW-3/Cx exhibited an enhanced ability to prevent neutrophil apoptosis compared to plasmid-deficient CTD153, and this effect was dependent on the presence of CD14(high) monocytes. The presence of monocytes also resulted in enhanced neutrophil cytokine production and increased production of tissue-damaging molecules in response to D/UW-3/Cx relative to results with CTD153. Attempts to use antibody-mediated depletion to discern the specific role of neutrophils in infection control and pathology in vivo revealed that although Ly6G(high) neutrophils were eliminated from the blood and oviducts with this treatment, immature neutrophils and high levels of tissue-damaging molecules were still detectable in the upper genital tract. These data support the role of neutrophils in chlamydia-induced pathology and reveal that novel methods of depletion must be developed before their role can be specifically determined in vivo.

  18. The Influenza Virus Protein PB1-F2 Increases Viral Pathogenesis through Neutrophil Recruitment and NK Cells Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vidy, Aurore; Maisonnasse, Pauline; Da Costa, Bruno; Delmas, Bernard; Chevalier, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The influenza A virus (IAV) PB1-F2 protein is a virulence factor contributing to the pathogenesis observed during IAV infections in mammals. In this study, using a mouse model, we compared the host response associated with PB1-F2 with an early transcriptomic signature that was previously associated with neutrophils and consecutively fatal IAV infections. This allowed us to show that PB1-F2 is partly involved in neutrophil-related mechanisms leading to death. Using neutropenic mice, we confirmed that the harmful effect of PB1-F2 is due to an excessive inflammation mediated by an increased neutrophil mobilization. We identified the downstream effects of this PB1-F2-exacerbated neutrophil recruitment. PB1-F2 had no impact on the lymphocyte recruitment in the airways at day 8 pi. However, functional genomics analysis and flow cytometry in broncho-alveolar lavages at 4 days pi revealed that PB1-F2 induced a NK cells deficiency. Thus, our results identify PB1-F2 as an important immune disruptive factor during the IAV infection. PMID:27798704

  19. L-selectin-mediated neutrophil recruitment in experimental rodent aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Hannawa, Kevin K; Eliason, Jonathan L; Woodrum, Derek T; Pearce, Charles G; Roelofs, Karen J; Grigoryants, Vladimir; Eagleton, Matthew J; Henke, Peter K; Wakefield, Thomas W; Myers, Daniel D; Stanley, James C; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2005-07-12

    This investigation tested the hypothesis that L-selectin is important in experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation in rodents. Rat abdominal aortas were perfused with saline (control) or porcine pancreatic elastase and studied on postperfusion days 1, 2, 4, 7, and 14 (n=5 per treatment group per day). Neutrophil (polymorphonucleur leukocyte, PMN) and macrophage counts per high-powered field (HPF) were performed on fixed sections. L-selectin expression and protein levels in aortic tissue were determined by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. Elastase-perfused aortic diameters were significantly increased compared with control aortas at all time points except day 1 (P<0.05). PMN counts significantly increased in elastase-perfused aortas compared with control aortas at days 1, 2, and 4, reaching maximum levels at day 7 (40.8 versus 0.3 PMNs/HPF, P=0.001). L-selectin mRNA expression in elastase-perfused aortas was 18 (P=0.018), 17 (P<0.001), and 8 times (P=0.02) times greater than control aortas at days 1, 2, and 4, respectively. Western blot demonstrated a significant 69% increase in L-selectin protein at day 7 in elastase- as compared with saline-perfused aortas (P=0.005). Subsequent experiments involved similar studies on postperfusion days 4, 7, and 14 of aortas from C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice (n=21) and L-selectin-knockout (LKO) mice (n=19). LKO mice had significantly smaller aortic diameters at day 14 as compared with WT mice (88% versus 123%, P=0.02). PMN counts were significantly greater in elastase-perfused WT mouse aortas as compared with LKO mouse aortas at day 4 after perfusion (12.8 versus 4.8 PMNs/HPF, P=0.02). Macrophage counts were significantly greater at all time points after perfusion in elastase-perfused WT mouse aortas compared with elastase-perfused LKO mouse aortas, with a maximum difference at day 7 after perfusion (13.3 versus 0.5 macrophages/HPF, P<0.001). L-selectin-mediated neutrophil recruitment may be a

  20. Neutrophil Recruitment by Tumor Necrosis Factor from Mast Cells in Immune Complex Peritonitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ramos, Bernard F.; Jakschik, Barbara A.

    1992-12-01

    During generalized immune complex-induced inflammation of the peritoneal cavity, two peaks of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were observed in the peritoneal exudate of normal mice. In mast cell-deficient mice, the first peak was undetected, and the second peak of TNF and neutrophil influx were significantly reduced. Antibody to TNF significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration in normal but not in mast cell-deficient mice. Mast cell repletion of the latter normalized TNF, neutrophil mobilization, and the effect of the antibody to TNF. Thus, in vivo, mast cells produce the TNF that augments neutrophil emigration.

  1. Optineurin deficiency in mice contributes to impaired cytokine secretion and neutrophil recruitment in bacteria-driven colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Thean S.; O'Shea, Nuala R.; Sewell, Gavin W.; Oehlers, Stefan H.; Mulvey, Claire M.; Crosier, Philip S.; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka; Bloom, Stuart L.; Smith, Andrew M.; Segal, Anthony W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment and bacterial clearance at sites of acute inflammation as a result of impaired secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages. To investigate the impaired cytokine secretion and confirm our previous findings, we performed transcriptomic analysis in macrophages and identified a subgroup of individuals with CD who had low expression of the autophagy receptor optineurin (OPTN). We then clarified the role of OPTN deficiency in: macrophage cytokine secretion; mouse models of bacteria-driven colitis and peritonitis; and zebrafish Salmonella infection. OPTN-deficient bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with heat-killed Escherichia coli secreted less proinflammatory TNFα and IL6 cytokines despite similar gene transcription, which normalised with lysosomal and autophagy inhibitors, suggesting that TNFα is mis-trafficked to lysosomes via bafilomycin-A-dependent pathways in the absence of OPTN. OPTN-deficient mice were more susceptible to Citrobacter colitis and E. coli peritonitis, and showed reduced levels of proinflammatory TNFα in serum, diminished neutrophil recruitment to sites of acute inflammation and greater mortality, compared with wild-type mice. Optn-knockdown zebrafish infected with Salmonella also had higher mortality. OPTN plays a role in acute inflammation and neutrophil recruitment, potentially via defective macrophage proinflammatory cytokine secretion, which suggests that diminished OPTN expression in humans might increase the risk of developing CD. PMID:26044960

  2. Optineurin deficiency in mice contributes to impaired cytokine secretion and neutrophil recruitment in bacteria-driven colitis.

    PubMed

    Chew, Thean S; O'Shea, Nuala R; Sewell, Gavin W; Oehlers, Stefan H; Mulvey, Claire M; Crosier, Philip S; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka; Bloom, Stuart L; Smith, Andrew M; Segal, Anthony W

    2015-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment and bacterial clearance at sites of acute inflammation as a result of impaired secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages. To investigate the impaired cytokine secretion and confirm our previous findings, we performed transcriptomic analysis in macrophages and identified a subgroup of individuals with CD who had low expression of the autophagy receptor optineurin (OPTN). We then clarified the role of OPTN deficiency in: macrophage cytokine secretion; mouse models of bacteria-driven colitis and peritonitis; and zebrafish Salmonella infection. OPTN-deficient bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with heat-killed Escherichia coli secreted less proinflammatory TNFα and IL6 cytokines despite similar gene transcription, which normalised with lysosomal and autophagy inhibitors, suggesting that TNFα is mis-trafficked to lysosomes via bafilomycin-A-dependent pathways in the absence of OPTN. OPTN-deficient mice were more susceptible to Citrobacter colitis and E. coli peritonitis, and showed reduced levels of proinflammatory TNFα in serum, diminished neutrophil recruitment to sites of acute inflammation and greater mortality, compared with wild-type mice. Optn-knockdown zebrafish infected with Salmonella also had higher mortality. OPTN plays a role in acute inflammation and neutrophil recruitment, potentially via defective macrophage proinflammatory cytokine secretion, which suggests that diminished OPTN expression in humans might increase the risk of developing CD.

  3. Role of platelet-activating factor in polymorphonuclear neutrophil recruitment in reperfused ischemic rabbit heart.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Alloatti, G.; Mariano, F.; Comino, A.; Cacace, G.; Polloni, R.; De Filippi, P. G.; Emanuelli, G.; Camussi, G.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the role of platelet-activating factor in the recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in a rabbit model of cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. The accumulation of PMN was evaluated 2 and 24 hours after removal of 40 minutes of coronary occlusion by morphometric analysis and 111In-labeled PMN infiltration. The administration of two structurally unrelated platelet-activating factor-receptor antagonists (SDZ 63-675, 5 mg/kg body weight, and WEB 2170, 5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the accumulation of PMN, as well as the hemodynamic alterations and the size of necrotic area. Two hours after reperfusion, the percentage of increase of 111In-labeled PMN in transmural central ischemic zone was significantly reduced in rabbits pretreated with SDZ 63-675 (51.4 +/- 7.9) or WEB 2170 (32.4 +/- 8.8) with respect to untreated rabbits (107.6 +/- 13.5). The morphometric analysis of myocardial sections confirmed the reduction of PMN infiltration at 2 hours and demonstrated that at 24 hours the phenomenon was even more significant. In addition, SDZ 63-675 and WEB 2170 prevented early transient bradycardia and hypotension and reduced the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium at 2 and 24 hours after reperfusion, and by histological examination at 24 hours. These results suggest that platelet-activating factor is involved in the accumulation of PMN in the reperfused ischemic myocardium and contributes to the evolution of myocardial injury. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8434642

  4. Leptin Receptor Mutation Results in Defective Neutrophil Recruitment to the Colon during Entamoeba histolytica Infection

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Caitlin; Burgess, Stacey; Madan, Rajat; Buonomo, Erica; Razzaq, Khadija; Ralston, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Amebiasis is an enteric infection caused by Entamoeba histolytica, with symptoms ranging in severity from asymptomatic colonization to dysentery. Humans with the Q223R leptin receptor mutation have increased susceptibility to amebiasis, but the mechanism has been unclear. Using a mouse model expressing the mutation, we tested the impact of the Q223R mutation on the innate immune response to E. histolytica infection. The 223R mutation resulted in delayed clearance of amebae from the cecum, as had been previously observed. We found that neutrophil influx to the site of the infection was reduced 12 h after infection in 223R mice. Depletion of neutrophils with anti-Ly6G monoclonal antibody increased susceptibility of wild-type mice to infection, supporting the importance of neutrophils in innate defense. Leptin expression was increased in the cecum by E. histolytica infection, suggesting that leptin could serve as a homing signal for neutrophils to the gut. Interestingly, neutrophils from mice with the 223R mutation had diminished chemotaxis toward leptin. This impaired chemotaxis likely explained the reduced gut infiltration of neutrophils. The newly recognized effect of the leptin receptor Q223R mutation on neutrophil chemotaxis and the impact of this mutation on multiple infectious diseases suggest a broader impact of this mutation on susceptibility to disease. PMID:25516614

  5. Prevention of Both Neutrophil and Monocyte Recruitment Promotes Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Steven; Weinstein, Philip; van Rooijen, Nico; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Strategies that block infiltration of leukocytes into the injured spinal cord improve sparing of white matter and neurological recovery. In this article, we examine the dependency of recovery on hematogenous depletion of neutrophils and monocytes. Mice were depleted of neutrophils or monocytes by systemic administration of anti-Ly6G or clodronate-liposomes. A third group was depleted of both subsets. Neurological improvement, based on a battery of tests of performance, and white matter sparing, occurred only in animals depleted of both neutrophils and monocytes. We also attempted to define the nature of the environment that was favorable to recovery. Hemeoxygenase-1 and malondialdehyde, markers of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, respectively, were reduced to similar levels in animals depleted of both neutrophils and monocytes, or only monocytes, but remained elevated in the group only depleted of neutrophils. Matrix metalloproteinase-9, a protease involved in early damage, was most strongly reduced in animals depleted of both leukocyte subsets. Finally, disruption of the blood–spinal cord barrier and abnormal nonheme iron accumulation were reduced only in animals depleted of both neutrophils and monocytes. Together, these findings indicate cooperation between neutrophils and monocytes in mediating early pathogenesis in the contused spinal cord and defining long-term neurological recovery. PMID:21657851

  6. Targeting distinct tautomerase sites of D-DT and MIF with a single molecule for inhibition of neutrophil lung recruitment.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Deepa; Zierow, Swen; Syed, Mansoor; Bucala, Richard; Bhandari, Vineet; Lolis, Elias J

    2014-11-01

    We report a new inflammatory activity for extracellular d-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT), the recruitment of neutrophils to the lung on D-DT intratracheal installation of C57BL/6J mice with an EC50 of 5.6 μg. We also find that D-DT and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) have additive effects in neutrophil recruitment. Although the tautomerase site of D-DT and its homologue MIF are biophysically very different, 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP) forms a covalent bond with Pro-1 of both proteins, resulting in a 6-phenylpyrimidine (6-PP) adduct. Recruitment of neutrophils to the lung for the 6-PP adducts of D-DT and MIF are reduced by ∼ 50% relative to the apo proteins, demonstrating that an unmodified Pro-1 is important for this activity, but there is no cooperativity in inhibition of the proteins together. The differences in the binding mode of the 6-PP adduct for D-DT was determined by crystallographic studies at 1.13 Å resolution and compared to the structure of the MIF-6-PP complex. There are major differences in the location of the 6-PP adduct to the D-DT and MIF active sites that provide insight into the lack of cooperativity by 4-IPP and into tuning the properties of the covalent inhibitors of D-DT and MIF that are necessary for the development of therapeutic small molecules against neutrophil damage from lung infections such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. © FASEB.

  7. Interleukin-22 level is negatively correlated with neutrophil recruitment in the lungs in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia model.

    PubMed

    Broquet, Alexis; Jacqueline, Cédric; Davieau, Marion; Besbes, Anissa; Roquilly, Antoine; Martin, Jérôme; Caillon, Jocelyne; Dumoutier, Laure; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Heslan, Michèle; Josien, Régis; Asehnoune, Karim

    2017-09-08

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major threat for immune-compromised patients. Bacterial pneumonia can induce uncontrolled and massive neutrophil recruitment ultimately leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome and epithelium damage. Interleukin-22 plays a central role in the protection of the epithelium. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the role of interleukin-22 and its soluble receptor IL-22BP in an acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia model in mice. In this model, we noted a transient increase of IL-22 during Pseudomonas aeruginosa challenge. Using an antibody-based approach, we demonstrated that IL-22 neutralisation led to increased susceptibility to infection and to lung damage correlated with an increase in neutrophil accumulation in the lungs. On the contrary, rIL-22 administration or IL-22BP neutralisation led to a decrease in mouse susceptibility and lung damage associated with a decrease in neutrophil accumulation. This study demonstrated that the IL-22/IL-22BP system plays a major role during Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia by moderating neutrophil accumulation in the lungs that ultimately leads to epithelium protection.

  8. Neutrophil recruitment limited by high-affinity bent β2 integrin binding ligand in cis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhichao; McArdle, Sara; Marki, Alex; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Gutierrez, Edgar; Engelhardt, Britta; Deutsch, Urban; Ginsberg, Mark; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for innate immunity and inflammation and many neutrophil functions are β2 integrin-dependent. Integrins can extend (E+) and acquire a high-affinity conformation with an ‘open' headpiece (H+). The canonical switchblade model of integrin activation proposes that the E+ conformation precedes H+, and the two are believed to be structurally linked. Here we show, using high-resolution quantitative dynamic footprinting (qDF) microscopy combined with a homogenous conformation-reporter binding assay in a microfluidic device, that a substantial fraction of β2 integrins on human neutrophils acquire an unexpected E−H+ conformation. E−H+ β2 integrins bind intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) in cis, which inhibits leukocyte adhesion in vitro and in vivo. This endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanism inhibits neutrophil aggregation, accumulation and inflammation. PMID:27578049

  9. Toll-like receptor 4 orchestrates neutrophil recruitment into airways during the first hours of Bordetella pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Griselda; Errea, Agustina; Van Maele, Laurye; Roberts, Roy; Léger, Hélène; Sirard, Jean Claude; Benecke, Arndt; Rumbo, Martin; Hozbor, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Most of the knowledge on the impact of Bordetella pertussis lipo-oligosaccharide (LOS) on the infectious process was obtained when the bacteria was established within the host. The aim of the present work was to determine the role of TLR4 at a very early step of the infectious process. To this end we used a transcriptomic approach on B. pertussis intranasal infection model in C3H/HeN, a TLR4-competent mouse strain, and C3H/HeJ, a TLR4-deficient mouse strain. The expression of approximately 140 genes was significantly changed 2 h post-infection in the C3H/HeN animals compared to the C3H/HeJ animals, which were essentially non-responders at this early time point. Pathways specific for immunity and defense, chemokine- and cytokine-mediated functions and TLR signaling, were activated upon infection in the TLR4 competent mice either at 2 h or 24 h. Furthermore, we observed that TLR4 signaling is absolutely required to promote the rapid recruitment of neutrophils into the airways. Interestingly, the depletion of those neutrophils impacted on B. pertussis lung counts in the first three days, thereby exacerbating the lung infection. In summary, we determined that TLR4 is a central player in initial neutrophil recruitment and orchestration of the very early innate defense against B. pertussis. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Spinal GABA-B receptor modulates neutrophil recruitment to the knee joint in zymosan-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Gabriel S; do C Malvar, David; Cunha, Thiago M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Kanashiro, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the central nervous system controls inflammatory responses by activating complex efferent neuroimmune pathways. The present study was designed to evaluate the role that central gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA-B) receptor plays in neutrophil migration in a murine model of zymosan-induced arthritis by using different pharmacological tools. We observed that intrathecal administration of baclofen, a selective GABA-B agonist, exacerbated the inflammatory response in the knee after zymosan administration characterized by an increase in the neutrophil recruitment and knee joint edema, whereas saclofen, a GABA-B antagonist, exerted the opposite effect. Intrathecal pretreatment of the animals with SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) blocked the pro-inflammatory effect of baclofen. On the other hand, systemic administration of guanethidine, a sympatholytic drug that inhibits catecholamine release, and nadolol, a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, reversed the effect of saclofen. Moreover, saclofen suppressed the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines into the knee joint (ELISA) and pain-related behaviors (open field test). Since the anti-inflammatory effect of saclofen depends on the sympathetic nervous system integrity, we observed that isoproterenol, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, mimics the central GABA-B blockade decreasing knee joint neutrophil recruitment. Together, these results demonstrate that the pharmacological manipulation of spinal GABAergic transmission aids control of neutrophil migration to the inflamed joint by modulating the activation of the knee joint-innervating sympathetic terminal fibers through a mechanism dependent on peripheral beta-adrenergic receptors and central components, such as p38 MAPK.

  11. Quantitative Trait Loci and Candidate Genes for Neutrophil Recruitment in Sterile Inflammation Mapped in AXB-BXA Recombinant Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Quyen; Seltzer, Ze’ev; Sima, Corneliu; Lakschevitz, Flavia S.; Glogauer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment (NR) to sites of sterile inflammation plays a key role in tissue damage and healing potential of lesions characteristic to non-infectious inflammatory diseases. Previous studies suggested significant genetic control of neutrophil survival, function, and migration in inflammatory responses to endogenous and exogenous stimuli. We have mapped the murine genome for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) harbouring genetic determinants that regulate NR in SI using a murine model of chemically-induced peritonitis. NR was quantified in 16 AXB-BXA recombinant inbred strains and their progenitors, A/J (A) and C57BL/6J (B). A continuous distribution of NR was found among the strains, with parent B showing higher NR and parent A showing lower NR (3.0-fold difference, p=0.05). Within the progeny strains, a 5.5-fold difference in NR was observed between the lowest, BXA1, and the highest responders AXB19 (p<0.001). This data was analyzed using GeneNetwork, which linked NR to one significant QTL on chromosome 12 (Peritoneal Neutrophil Recruitment 1, PNR1) and two suggestive QTLs (PNR2, PNR3) on chromosomes 12 and 16 respectively. Sixty-four candidate genes within PNR1 were cross-referenced with currently published data, mRNA expression from two NR microarrays, and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. The present study brings new light into the genetics of NR in response to cell injury and highlights potential candidate genes Hif1α, Fntb, and Prkch and their products for further studies on neutrophil infiltration and inflammation resolution in sterile inflammation. PMID:25942439

  12. Intraluminal crawling of neutrophils to emigration sites: a molecularly distinct process from adhesion in the recruitment cascade.

    PubMed

    Phillipson, Mia; Heit, Bryan; Colarusso, Pina; Liu, Lixin; Ballantyne, Christie M; Kubes, Paul

    2006-11-27

    The prevailing view is that the beta2-integrins Mac-1 (alphaMbeta2, CD11b/CD18) and LFA-1 (alphaLbeta2, CD11a/CD18) serve similar biological functions, namely adhesion, in the leukocyte recruitment cascade. Using real-time and time-lapse intravital video-microscopy and confocal microscopy within inflamed microvessels, we systematically evaluated the function of Mac-1 and LFA-1 in the recruitment paradigm. The chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 induced equivalent amounts of adhesion in wild-type and Mac-1-/- mice but very little adhesion in LFA-1-/- mice. Time-lapse video-microscopy within the postcapillary venules revealed that immediately upon adhesion, there is significant intraluminal crawling of all neutrophils to distant emigration sites in wild-type mice. In dramatic contrast, very few Mac-1-/- neutrophils crawled with a 10-fold decrease in displacement and a 95% reduction in velocity. Therefore, Mac-1-/- neutrophils initiated transmigration closer to the initial site of adhesion, which in turn led to delayed transmigration due to movement through nonoptimal emigration sites. Interestingly, the few LFA-1-/- cells that did adhere crawled similarly to wild-type neutrophils. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 but not intercellular adhesion molecule-2 mediated the Mac-1-dependent crawling. These in vivo results clearly delineate two fundamentally different molecular mechanisms for LFA-1 and Mac-1 in vivo, i.e., LFA-1-dependent adhesion followed by Mac-1-dependent crawling, and both steps ultimately contribute to efficient emigration out of the vasculature.

  13. Intraluminal crawling of neutrophils to emigration sites: a molecularly distinct process from adhesion in the recruitment cascade

    PubMed Central

    Phillipson, Mia; Heit, Bryan; Colarusso, Pina; Liu, Lixin; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Kubes, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The prevailing view is that the β2-integrins Mac-1 (αMβ2, CD11b/CD18) and LFA-1 (αLβ2, CD11a/CD18) serve similar biological functions, namely adhesion, in the leukocyte recruitment cascade. Using real-time and time-lapse intravital video-microscopy and confocal microscopy within inflamed microvessels, we systematically evaluated the function of Mac-1 and LFA-1 in the recruitment paradigm. The chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 induced equivalent amounts of adhesion in wild-type and Mac-1−/− mice but very little adhesion in LFA-1−/− mice. Time-lapse video-microscopy within the postcapillary venules revealed that immediately upon adhesion, there is significant intraluminal crawling of all neutrophils to distant emigration sites in wild-type mice. In dramatic contrast, very few Mac-1−/− neutrophils crawled with a 10-fold decrease in displacement and a 95% reduction in velocity. Therefore, Mac-1−/− neutrophils initiated transmigration closer to the initial site of adhesion, which in turn led to delayed transmigration due to movement through nonoptimal emigration sites. Interestingly, the few LFA-1−/− cells that did adhere crawled similarly to wild-type neutrophils. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 but not intercellular adhesion molecule-2 mediated the Mac-1–dependent crawling. These in vivo results clearly delineate two fundamentally different molecular mechanisms for LFA-1 and Mac-1 in vivo, i.e., LFA-1–dependent adhesion followed by Mac-1–dependent crawling, and both steps ultimately contribute to efficient emigration out of the vasculature. PMID:17116736

  14. NKT cells mediate the recruitment of neutrophils by stimulating epithelial chemokine secretion during colitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Enyu; Liu, Ronghua; Lu, Zhou; Liu, Jiajing; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-05-27

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a kind of inflammatory bowel diseases characterized by chronic inflammation and ulcer in colon, and UC patients have increased risk of getting colorectal cancer. NKT cells are cells that express both NK cell markers and semi-invariant CD1d-restricted TCRs, can regulate immune responses via secreting a variety of cytokines upon activation. In our research, we found that the NKT cell-deficient CD1d(-/-) mice had relieved colitis in the DSS-induced colitis model. Further investigations revealed that the colon of CD1d(-/-) mice expressed less neutrophil-attracting chemokine CXCL 1, 2 and 3, and had decreased neutrophil infiltration. Infiltrated neutrophils also produced less reactive oxygen species (ROS) and TNF-α, indicating they may cause less epithelial damage. In addition, colitis-associated colorectal cancer was also relieved in CD1d(-/-) mice. During colitis, NKT cells strongly expressed TNF-α, which could stimulate CXCL 1, 2, 3 expressions by the epithelium. In conclusion, NKT cells can regulate colitis via the NKT cell-epithelium-neutrophil axis. Targeting this mechanism may help to improve the therapy of UC and prevent colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reversible Demyelination, Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown, and Pronounced Neutrophil Recruitment Induced by Chronic IL-1 Expression in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Depino, Amaicha M.; Prada, Federico; Muraro, Nara; Campbell, Sandra; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Perry, V. Hugh; Anthony, Daniel C.; Pitossi, Fernando J.

    2004-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1) expression is associated with a spectrum of neuroinflammatory processes related to chronic neurodegenerative diseases. The single-bolus microinjection of IL-1 into the central nervous system (CNS) parenchyma gives rise to delayed and localized neutrophil recruitment, transient blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, but no overt damage to CNS integrity. However, acute microinjections of IL-1 do not mimic the chronic IL-1 expression, which is a feature of many CNS diseases. To investigate the response of the CNS to chronic IL-1 expression, we injected a recombinant adenovirus expressing IL-1 into the striatum. At the peak of IL-1 expression (days 8 and 14 post-injection), there was a marked recruitment of neutrophils, vasodilatation, and breakdown of the BBB. Microglia and astrocyte activation was evident during the first 14 days post-injection. At days 8 and 14, extensive demyelination was observed but the number of neurons was not affected by any treatment. Finally, at 30 days, signs of inflammation were no longer present, there was evidence of tissue reorganization, the BBB was intact, and the process of remyelination was noticeable. In summary, our data show that chronic expression of IL-1, in contrast to its acute delivery, can reversibly damage CNS integrity and implicates this cytokine or downstream components as major mediators of demyelination in chronic inflammatory and demyelinating diseases. PMID:15509551

  16. Trappin-2 promotes early clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa through CD14-dependent macrophage activation and neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Thomas S; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Hamilton, Thomas W; Lipka, Alexander F; Farrell, Lesley; Davidson, Donald J; Duffin, Rodger; Morris, Andrew Conway; Haslett, Chris; Govan, John R W; Gregory, Christopher D; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Simpson, A John

    2009-04-01

    Microaspiration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contributes to the pathogenesis of nosocomial pneumonia. Trappin-2 is a host defense peptide that assists with the clearance of P. aeruginosa through undefined mechanisms. A model of macrophage interactions with replicating P. aeruginosa (strain PA01) in serum-free conditions was developed, and the influence of subantimicrobial concentrations of trappin-2 was subsequently studied. PA01 that was pre-incubated with trappin-2 (at concentrations that have no direct antimicrobial effects), but not control PA01, was cleared by alveolar and bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, trappin-2-enhanced clearance of PA01 was completely abrogated by CD14- null macrophages. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated the presence of trappin-2 on the bacterial cell surface of trappin-2-treated PA01. In a murine model of early lung infection, trappin-2-treated PA01 was cleared more efficiently than control PA01 2 hours of intratracheal instillation. Furthermore, trappin-2-treated PA01 up-regulated the murine chemokine CXCL1/KC after 2 hours with a corresponding increase in neutrophil recruitment 1 hour later. These in vivo trappin-2-treated PA01 effects were absent in CD14-deficient mice. Trappin-2 appears to opsonize P. aeruginosa for more efficient, CD14-dependent clearance by macrophages and contributes to the induction of chemokines that promote neutrophil recruitment. Trappin-2 may therefore play an important role in innate recognition and clearance of pathogens during the very earliest stages of pulmonary infection.

  17. Defective Neutrophil Recruitment in Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I Disease Causes Local IL-17-driven Inflammatory Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Moutsopoulos, Niki; Konkel, Joanne; Sarmadi, Mojgan; Eskan, Mehmet A.; Wild, Teresa; Dutzan, Nicolas; Abusleme, Loreto; Zenobia, Camille; Hosur, Kavita B.; Abe, Toshiharu; Uzel, Gulbu; Chen, WanJun; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Holland, Steven M.; Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency Type I (LAD-I), a disease syndrome associated with frequent microbial infections, is caused by mutations on the CD18 subunit of β2 integrins. LAD-I is invariably associated with severe periodontal bone loss, historically attributed to lack of neutrophil surveillance of the periodontal infection. Here, we challenge this dogma by showing that the cytokine IL-17 plays a major role in the oral pathology of LAD-I. Defective neutrophil recruitment in LAD-I patients, or in LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18)-deficient mice that exhibit the LAD-I periodontal phenotype, was associated with excessive production of predominantly T cell-derived IL-17 in the periodontal tissue. The pathological elevation of IL-17 in the LFA-1–deficient periodontal tissue derived also from innate lymphoid cells. Strikingly, local treatment with anti-IL-17 (or anti-IL-23) in LFA-1-deficient mice not only blocked inflammatory periodontal bone loss but also caused a reduction in the total bacterial burden, suggesting that the IL-17-driven pathogenesis of LAD-I periodontitis leads to dysbiosis. Our findings therefore support an IL-17-targeted therapy for this condition. PMID:24670684

  18. Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Facilitate Heart Repair by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization and Neutrophil Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Luo, Lan; Yan, Chen; Zhang, Tian-Xia; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Mangoura, Safwat A.; Abdel-Raheem, Mahmoud H.; Zhang, Shouhua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs), one of the promising stem cell sources for myocardial repair, have been tested in clinical trials and resulted in beneficial effects; however, the relevant mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that CDCs favor heart repair by switching the macrophages from a pro-inflammatory phenotype (M1) into a regulatory anti-inflammatory phenotype (M2). Macrophages from mice were cultured with CDCs-conditioned medium or with fibroblasts-conditioned medium as a control. Immunostaining showed that CDCs-conditioned medium significantly enhanced the expression of CD206 (a marker for M2 macrophages), but decreased the expression of CD86 (a marker for M1 macrophages) 3 days after culture. For animal studies, we used an acute myocardial infarction model of mice. We injected CDCs, fibroblasts, or saline only into the border zone of infarction. Then we collected the heart tissues for histological analysis 5 and 14 days after treatment. Compared with control animals, CDCs treatment significantly decreased M1 macrophages and neutrophils but increased M2 macrophages in the infarcted heart. Furthermore, CDCs-treated mice had reduced infarct size and fewer apoptotic cells compared to the controls. Our data suggest that CDCs facilitate heart repair by modulating M1/M2 macrophage polarization and neutrophil recruitment, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms of stem cell-based myocardial repair. PMID:27764217

  19. Interleukin-10 plays a key role in the modulation of neutrophils recruitment and lung inflammation during infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Peñaloza, Hernán F; Nieto, Pamela A; Muñoz-Durango, Natalia; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Torres, Javiera; Parga, María J; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bueno, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major aetiological agent of pneumonia worldwide, as well as otitis media, sinusitis, meningitis and sepsis. Recent reports have suggested that inflammation of lungs due to S. pneumoniae infection promotes bacterial dissemination and severe disease. However, the contribution of anti-inflammatory molecules to the pathogenesis of S. pneumoniae remains unknown. To elucidate whether the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) is beneficial or detrimental for the host during pneumococcal pneumonia, we performed S. pneumoniae infections in mice lacking IL-10 (IL-10−/− mice). The IL-10−/− mice showed increased mortality, higher expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and an exacerbated recruitment of neutrophils into the lungs after S. pneumoniae infection. However, IL-10−/− mice showed significantly lower bacterial loads in lungs, spleen, brain and blood, when compared with mice that produced this cytokine. Our results support the notion that production of IL-10 during S. pneumoniae infection modulates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the infiltration of neutrophils into the lungs. This feature of IL-10 is important to avoid excessive inflammation of tissues and to improve host survival, even though bacterial dissemination is less efficient in the absence of this cytokine. PMID:26032199

  20. Interleukin-10 plays a key role in the modulation of neutrophils recruitment and lung inflammation during infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Peñaloza, Hernán F; Nieto, Pamela A; Muñoz-Durango, Natalia; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Torres, Javiera; Parga, María J; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bueno, Susan M

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major aetiological agent of pneumonia worldwide, as well as otitis media, sinusitis, meningitis and sepsis. Recent reports have suggested that inflammation of lungs due to S. pneumoniae infection promotes bacterial dissemination and severe disease. However, the contribution of anti-inflammatory molecules to the pathogenesis of S. pneumoniae remains unknown. To elucidate whether the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) is beneficial or detrimental for the host during pneumococcal pneumonia, we performed S. pneumoniae infections in mice lacking IL-10 (IL-10(-/-) mice). The IL-10(-/-) mice showed increased mortality, higher expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and an exacerbated recruitment of neutrophils into the lungs after S. pneumoniae infection. However, IL-10(-/-) mice showed significantly lower bacterial loads in lungs, spleen, brain and blood, when compared with mice that produced this cytokine. Our results support the notion that production of IL-10 during S. pneumoniae infection modulates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the infiltration of neutrophils into the lungs. This feature of IL-10 is important to avoid excessive inflammation of tissues and to improve host survival, even though bacterial dissemination is less efficient in the absence of this cytokine. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Interleukin-8 secretion and neutrophil recruitment accompanies induced sputum eosinophil activation in children with acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Norzila, M Z; Fakes, K; Henry, R L; Simpson, J; Gibson, P G

    2000-03-01

    Although airway inflammation is recognized as a key feature of asthma, the characteristics of airway inflammation in children with acute severe asthma are not well defined. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of airway inflammation in children with an acute exacerbation of asthma using sputum cell counts and fluid-phase measurements and to examine the changes in these parameters upon resolution of the exacerbation. Children (n = 38) presenting to the Emergency Department with acute asthma underwent successful sputum induction using ultrasonically nebulized normal saline (n = 22), or expectorated sputum spontaneously (n = 16). Sputum induction was repeated at least 2 wk later when the children had recovered (n = 28). Sputum portions were selected, dispersed and total and differential cell counts performed. Neutrophil elastase and EG2-positive eosinophils were assessed and fluid-phase eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), myeloperoxidase (MPO), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and IL-5 were measured. During the acute exacerbation the median (range) total cell count was 8.4 x 10(6)/ml (0.5 to 190.3), and fell significantly at resolution to 1.3 x 10(6)/ml (p < 0.01). The inflammatory cell infiltrate was mixed and included eosinophils (0.8 x 10(6)/ml), neutrophils (3.3 x 10(6)/ml), and mast cells. EG2(+) cells were high and correlated with the degree of airflow obstruction (r = -0.5, p = 0.02). They decreased significantly at resolution as did supernatant ECP (1,078 versus 272 ng/ml), suggesting that eosinophils were activated during the exacerbation. MPO was 220 ng/ ml at exacerbation and fell significantly to 1 ng/ml at resolution. Levels of IL-8 and IL-5 were elevated during the acute exacerbation and IL-8 concentrations decreased at resolution. In conclusion, airway inflammation can be studied in children with acute asthma by sputum induction. Airway inflammation is present during an acute exacerbation of asthma, and is characterized by infiltration and

  2. FGF23 signaling impairs neutrophil recruitment and host defense during CKD

    PubMed Central

    Rossaint, Jan; Oehmichen, Jessica; Van Aken, Hugo; Reuter, Stefan; Pavenstädt, Hermann J.; Meersch, Melanie; Unruh, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been associated with impaired host response and increased susceptibility to infections. Leukocyte recruitment during inflammation must be tightly regulated to protect the host against pathogens. FGF23 levels are increased in blood during CKD, and levels of this hormone have been associated with a variety of adverse effects in CKD patients. Here, we have shown that CKD impairs leukocyte recruitment into inflamed tissue and host defense in mice and humans. FGF23 neutralization during CKD in murine models restored leukocyte recruitment and host defense. Intravital microscopy of animals with chronic kidney failure showed that FGF23 inhibits chemokine-activated leukocyte arrest on the endothelium, and downregulation of FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) on PMNs rescued host defense in these mice. In vitro, FGF23 inhibited PMN adhesion, arrest under flow, and transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, FGF23 binding to FGFR2 counteracted selectin- and chemokine-triggered β2 integrin activation on PMNs by activating protein kinase A (PKA) and inhibiting activation of the small GTPase Rap1. Moreover, knockdown of PKA abolished the inhibitory effect of FGF23 on integrin activation. Together, our data reveal that FGF23 acts directly on PMNs and dampens host defense by direct interference with chemokine signaling and integrin activation. PMID:26878171

  3. FGF23 signaling impairs neutrophil recruitment and host defense during CKD.

    PubMed

    Rossaint, Jan; Oehmichen, Jessica; Van Aken, Hugo; Reuter, Stefan; Pavenstädt, Hermann J; Meersch, Melanie; Unruh, Mark; Zarbock, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been associated with impaired host response and increased susceptibility to infections. Leukocyte recruitment during inflammation must be tightly regulated to protect the host against pathogens. FGF23 levels are increased in blood during CKD, and levels of this hormone have been associated with a variety of adverse effects in CKD patients. Here, we have shown that CKD impairs leukocyte recruitment into inflamed tissue and host defense in mice and humans. FGF23 neutralization during CKD in murine models restored leukocyte recruitment and host defense. Intravital microscopy of animals with chronic kidney failure showed that FGF23 inhibits chemokine-activated leukocyte arrest on the endothelium, and downregulation of FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) on PMNs rescued host defense in these mice. In vitro, FGF23 inhibited PMN adhesion, arrest under flow, and transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, FGF23 binding to FGFR2 counteracted selectin- and chemokine-triggered β2 integrin activation on PMNs by activating protein kinase A (PKA) and inhibiting activation of the small GTPase Rap1. Moreover, knockdown of PKA abolished the inhibitory effect of FGF23 on integrin activation. Together, our data reveal that FGF23 acts directly on PMNs and dampens host defense by direct interference with chemokine signaling and integrin activation.

  4. Short-Term Heat Exposure Inhibits Inflammation by Abrogating Recruitment of and Nuclear Factor-κB Activation in Neutrophils Exposed to Chemotactic Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mira; Salanova, Birgit; Rolle, Susanne; Wellner, Maren; Schneider, Wolfgang; Luft, Friedrich C.; Kettritz, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Cytokines, such as granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-8 attract neutrophils into inflammatory sites. During emigration from the blood neutrophils interact with extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin. Fibronectin provides β2-integrin co-stimulation, allowing GM-CSF and IL-8 to activate nuclear factor (NF)-κB, an effect that does not occur in suspension. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of mice to fever-like temperatures abrogates neutrophil recruitment and NF-κB activation in a mouse model of skin inflammation. Mice that were exposed to 40°C for 1 hour showed strongly reduced GM-CSF- and IL-8-induced neutrophilic skin inflammation. In vitro heat exposure did not interfere with neutrophil adhesion or spreading on fibronectin but strongly inhibited migration toward both cytokines. Using specific inhibitors, we found that PI3-K/Akt was pivotal for neutrophil migration and that heat down-regulated this pathway. Furthermore, neutrophils on fibronectin showed abrogated NF-κB activation in response to GM-CSF and IL-8 after heat. In vivo heat exposure of mice followed by ex vivo stimulation of isolated bone marrow neutrophils confirmed these results. Finally, less NF-κB activation was seen in the inflammatory lesions of mice exposed to fever-like temperatures as demonstrated by in situ hybridization for IκBα mRNA. These new findings suggest that heat may have anti-inflammatory effects in neutrophil-dependent inflammation. PMID:18187571

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of IL-27 in Zymosan-Induced Peritonitis: Inhibition of Neutrophil Recruitment Partially Explained by Impaired Mobilization from Bone Marrow and Reduced Chemokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Francesca Diane M.; Schwab, Jan M.; Hamann, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Rapid activation of the innate immune system is critical for an efficient host response to invading pathogens. However, the inflammatory reaction has to be strictly controlled to minimize harmful immunopathology. A number of mediators including the cytokine interleukin-27 (IL-27) appear to be responsible for limitation and resolution of inflammation. Despite increasing knowledge of its suppressive effects on T cells, the influence on neutrophils and macrophages is poorly understood. To determine the role of IL-27 in innate immune responses we analysed the effect of IL-27 in a T cell independent model of zymosan-induced peritonitis. Early administration of recombinant IL-27 strongly reduced the number of neutrophils recruited to the peritoneal cavity after zymosan application as well as the neutrophil frequency in the blood. Simultaneously, IL-27 reduced the release of neutrophils from the bone marrow upon inflammation. Although cytokine levels were not affected by IL-27 treatment, the levels of the chemokines KC, MCP-1 and MIP-1α in the peritoneal fluid were strongly decreased. These findings demonstrate that IL-27 is able to control mobilisation and recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavity and identify a novel mechanism to limit inflammation caused by innate immune cells. PMID:26360023

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of IL-27 in Zymosan-Induced Peritonitis: Inhibition of Neutrophil Recruitment Partially Explained by Impaired Mobilization from Bone Marrow and Reduced Chemokine Levels.

    PubMed

    Watzlawick, Ralf; Kenngott, Elisabeth E; Liu, Francesca Diane M; Schwab, Jan M; Hamann, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Rapid activation of the innate immune system is critical for an efficient host response to invading pathogens. However, the inflammatory reaction has to be strictly controlled to minimize harmful immunopathology. A number of mediators including the cytokine interleukin-27 (IL-27) appear to be responsible for limitation and resolution of inflammation. Despite increasing knowledge of its suppressive effects on T cells, the influence on neutrophils and macrophages is poorly understood. To determine the role of IL-27 in innate immune responses we analysed the effect of IL-27 in a T cell independent model of zymosan-induced peritonitis. Early administration of recombinant IL-27 strongly reduced the number of neutrophils recruited to the peritoneal cavity after zymosan application as well as the neutrophil frequency in the blood. Simultaneously, IL-27 reduced the release of neutrophils from the bone marrow upon inflammation. Although cytokine levels were not affected by IL-27 treatment, the levels of the chemokines KC, MCP-1 and MIP-1α in the peritoneal fluid were strongly decreased. These findings demonstrate that IL-27 is able to control mobilisation and recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavity and identify a novel mechanism to limit inflammation caused by innate immune cells.

  7. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Lyn controls neutrophil adhesion by recruiting the CrkL–C3G complex and activating Rap1 at the leading edge

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Kapoor, Ashish; Cook, Sara; Liu, Shubai; Xiang, Yang; Rao, Christopher V.; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Wang, Fei

    2011-01-01

    Establishing new adhesions at the extended leading edges of motile cells is essential for stable polarity and persistent motility. Despite recent identification of signaling pathways that mediate polarity and chemotaxis in neutrophils, little is known about molecular mechanisms governing cell–extracellular-matrix (ECM) adhesion in these highly polarized and rapidly migrating cells. Here, we describe a signaling pathway in neutrophils that is essential for localized integrin activation, leading edge attachment and persistent migration during chemotaxis. This pathway depends upon Gi-protein-mediated activation and leading edge recruitment of Lyn, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src kinase family. We identified the small GTPase Rap1 as a major downstream effector of Lyn to regulate neutrophil adhesion during chemotaxis. Depletion of Lyn in neutrophil-like HL-60 cells prevented chemoattractant-induced Rap1 activation at the leading edge of the cell, whereas ectopic expression of Rap1 largely rescued the defects induced by Lyn depletion. Furthermore, Lyn controls spatial activation of Rap1 by recruiting the CrkL–C3G protein complex to the leading edge. Together, these results provide novel mechanistic insights into the poorly understood signaling network that controls leading edge adhesion during chemotaxis of neutrophils, and possibly other amoeboid cells. PMID:21628423

  8. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Lyn controls neutrophil adhesion by recruiting the CrkL-C3G complex and activating Rap1 at the leading edge.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Kapoor, Ashish; Cook, Sara; Liu, Shubai; Xiang, Yang; Rao, Christopher V; Kenis, Paul J A; Wang, Fei

    2011-07-01

    Establishing new adhesions at the extended leading edges of motile cells is essential for stable polarity and persistent motility. Despite recent identification of signaling pathways that mediate polarity and chemotaxis in neutrophils, little is known about molecular mechanisms governing cell-extracellular-matrix (ECM) adhesion in these highly polarized and rapidly migrating cells. Here, we describe a signaling pathway in neutrophils that is essential for localized integrin activation, leading edge attachment and persistent migration during chemotaxis. This pathway depends upon G(i)-protein-mediated activation and leading edge recruitment of Lyn, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src kinase family. We identified the small GTPase Rap1 as a major downstream effector of Lyn to regulate neutrophil adhesion during chemotaxis. Depletion of Lyn in neutrophil-like HL-60 cells prevented chemoattractant-induced Rap1 activation at the leading edge of the cell, whereas ectopic expression of Rap1 largely rescued the defects induced by Lyn depletion. Furthermore, Lyn controls spatial activation of Rap1 by recruiting the CrkL-C3G protein complex to the leading edge. Together, these results provide novel mechanistic insights into the poorly understood signaling network that controls leading edge adhesion during chemotaxis of neutrophils, and possibly other amoeboid cells.

  9. Chemokine (C-C Motif) Receptor 1 Is Required for Efficient Recruitment of Neutrophils during Respiratory Infection with Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara

    PubMed Central

    Price, Philip J. R.; Luckow, Bruno; Torres-Domínguez, Lino E.; Brandmüller, Christine; Zorn, Julia; Kirschning, Carsten J.; Sutter, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) serves as a versatile platform in vaccine development. This highly attenuated orthopoxvirus, which cannot replicate in mammalian cells, triggers strong innate immune responses, including cell migration. Previously, we have shown that induction of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) by MVA is necessary for the recruitment of monocytes and T cells, but not neutrophils, to the lung. Here, we identified neutrophil-attracting chemokines produced by MVA-infected primary murine lung fibroblasts and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. We demonstrate that MVA, but not vaccinia virus (VACV) strain WR, induces chemokine expression, which is independent of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) signaling. Additionally, we show that both chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 1 (CCR1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2) are involved in MVA-induced neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro. Finally, intranasal infection of Ccr1−/− mice with MVA, as well as application of the CCR1 antagonist J-113863, revealed a role for CCR1 in leukocyte recruitment, including neutrophils, into the lung. IMPORTANCE Rapid attraction of leukocytes to the site of inoculation is unique to MVA in comparison to other VACV strains. The findings here extend current knowledge about the regulation of MVA-induced leukocyte migration, particularly regarding neutrophils, which could potentially be exploited to improve other VACV strains currently in development as oncolytic viruses and viral vectors. Additionally, the data presented here indicate that the inflammatory response may vary depending on the cell type infected by MVA, highlighting the importance of the site of vaccine application. Moreover, the rapid recruitment of neutrophils and other leukocytes can directly contribute to the induction of adaptive immune responses elicited by MVA inoculation. Thus, a better understanding of leukocyte migration upon MVA infection is particularly relevant for further

  10. Neutrophil recruitment to the lung in both C5a- and CXCL1-induced alveolitis is impaired in vitamin D-binding protein-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Glenda; Habiel, David M; Ge, Lingyin; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Cooke, Nancy E; Kew, Richard R

    2013-07-15

    Knowledge of how neutrophils respond to chemotactic signals in a complex inflammatory environment is not completely understood. Moreover, even less is known about factors in physiological fluids that regulate the activity of chemoattractants. The vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) has been shown to significantly enhance chemotaxis to complement activation peptide C5a using purified proteins in vitro, and by ex vivo depletion of DBP in physiological fluids, but this function has not been determined in vivo. DBP null ((-/-)) mice were used to investigate how a systemic absence of this plasma protein affects leukocyte recruitment in alveolitis models of lung inflammation. DBP(-/-) mice had significantly reduced (~50%) neutrophil recruitment to the lungs compared with their wild-type DBP(+/+) counterparts in three different alveolitis models, two acute and one chronic. The histology of DBP(-/-) mouse lungs also showed significantly less injury than wild-type animals. The chemotactic cofactor function of DBP appears to be selective for neutrophil recruitment, but, in contrast to previous in vitro results, in vivo DBP can enhance the activity of other chemoattractants, including CXCL1. The reduced neutrophil response in DBP(-/-) mice could be rescued to wild-type levels by administering exogenous DBP. Finally, in inflammatory fluids, DBP binds to G-actin released from damaged cells, and this complex may be the active chemotactic cofactor. To our knowledge, results show for the first time that DBP is a significant chemotactic cofactor in vivo and not specific for C5a, suggesting that this ubiquitous plasma protein may have a more significant role in neutrophil recruitment than previously recognized.

  11. Neutrophil Recruitment to the Lung in both C5a and CXCL1-Induced Alveolitis is Impaired in Vitamin D Binding Protein Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Glenda; Habiel, David M.; Ge, Lingyin; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Cooke, Nancy E.; Kew, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of how neutrophils respond to chemotactic signals in a complex inflammatory environment is not completely understood. Moreover, even less is known about factors in physiological fluids that regulate the activity of chemoattractants. The vitamin D binding protein (DBP) has been shown to significantly enhance chemotaxis to complement activation peptide C5a using purified proteins in vitro, and by ex vivo depletion of DBP in physiological fluids, but this function has not been determined in vivo. DBP null (-/-) mice were used to investigate how a systemic absence of this plasma protein affects leukocyte recruitment in alveolitis models of lung inflammation. DBP-/- mice had significantly reduced (~50%) neutrophil recruitment to the lungs compared to their wild-type DBP+/+ counterparts in three different alveolitis models, two acute and one chronic. The histology of DBP-/- mouse lungs also showed significantly less injury than wild-type animals. The chemotactic cofactor function of DBP appears to be selective for neutrophil recruitment, but in contrast to previous in vitro results, in vivo DBP can enhance the activity of other chemoattractants including CXCL1. The reduced neutrophil response in DBP-/- mice could be rescued to wild-type levels by administering exogenous DBP. Finally, in inflammatory fluids DBP binds to G-actin released from damaged cells and this complex may be the active chemotactic cofactor. Results show for the first time that DBP is a significant chemotactic cofactor in vivo and not specific for C5a, suggesting that this ubiquitous plasma protein may have a more significant role in neutrophil recruitment than previously recognized. PMID:23752613

  12. IL-17RA in Non-Hematopoietic Cells Controls CXCL-1 and 5 Critical to Recruit Neutrophils to the Lung of Mycobacteria-Infected Mice during the Adaptive Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, Robin; Epardaud, Mathieu; Le Vern, Yves; Buzoni-Gatel, Dominique; Winter, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    During chronic infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), bacilli multiplication is constrained within lung granulomas until excessive inflammation destroys the lung. Neutrophils are recruited early and participate in granuloma formation, but excessive neutrophilia exacerbates the tuberculosis disease. Neutrophils thus appear as potential targets for therapeutic interventions, especially in patients for whom no antibiotic treatment is possible. Signals that regulate neutrophil recruitment to the lung during mycobacterial infection need to be better understood. We demonstrated here, in the mouse model, that neutrophils were recruited to the lung in two waves after intranasal infection with virulent Mtb or the live attenuated vaccine strain Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG). A first wave of neutrophils was swiftly recruited, followed by a subsequent adaptive wave that reached the lung together with IFN-γ- and IL-17A-producing T cells. Interestingly, the second neutrophil wave did not participate to mycobacteria control in the lung and established contacts with T cells. The adaptive wave was critically dependent on the expression of IL-17RA, the receptor for IL-17A, expressed in non-hematopoietic cells. In absence of this receptor, curtailed CXCL-1 and 5 production in the lung restrained neutrophil recruitment. CXCL-1 and 5 instillation reconstituted lung neutrophil recruitment in BCG-infected IL17RA-/- mice. PMID:26871571

  13. Brucella CβG induces a dual pro- and anti-inflammatory response leading to a transient neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Degos, Clara; Gagnaire, Aurélie; Banchereau, Romain; Moriyón, Ignacio; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is the causing agent of a chronic zoonosis called brucellosis. The Brucella β-1,2 cyclic glucan (CβG) is a virulence factor, which has been described as a potent immune stimulator, albeit with no toxicity for cells and animals. We first used a genome-wide approach to characterize human myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) responses to CβG. Transcripts related to inflammation (IL-6, IL2RA, PTGS2), chemokine (CXCR7, CXCL2) and anti-inflammatory pathways (TNFAIP6, SOCS3) were highly expressed in CβG-treated mDC. In mouse GMCSF-derived DC, CβG triggered the expression of both activation (CXCL2, KC) and inhibition (SOCS3 and TNFAIP6) molecules. We then characterized the inflammatory infiltrates at the level of mouse ear when injected with CβG or LPS. CβG yielded a lower and transient recruitment of neutrophils compared to LPS. The consequence of these dual pro- and anti-inflammatory signals triggered by CβG corresponds to the induction of a controlled local inflammation.

  14. CXCR2-specific chemokines mediate leukotriene B4-dependent recruitment of neutrophils to inflamed joints in mice with antigen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Grespan, Renata; Fukada, Sandra Y; Lemos, Henrique P; Vieira, Silvio M; Napimoga, Marcelo H; Teixeira, Mauro M; Fraser, Alasdair R; Liew, Foo Y; McInnes, Iain B; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the mechanism underlying neutrophil migration into the articular cavity in experimental arthritis and, by extension, human inflammatory synovitis. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was generated in mice with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA). Migration assays and histologic analysis were used to evaluate neutrophil recruitment to knee joints. Levels of inflammatory mediators were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies and pharmacologic inhibitors were used in vivo to determine the role of specific disease mediators. Samples of synovial tissue and synovial fluid from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis patients were evaluated for CXCL1 and CXCL5 expression. High levels of CXCL1, CXCL5, and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were expressed in the joints of arthritic mice. Confirming their respective functional roles, repertaxin (a CXCR1/CXCR2 receptor antagonist), anti-CXCL1 antibody, anti-CXCL5 antibody, and MK886 (a leukotriene synthesis inhibitor) reduced mBSA-induced neutrophil migration to knee joints. Repertaxin reduced LTB4 production in joint tissue, and neutrophil recruitment induced by CXCL1 or CXCL5 was inhibited by MK886, suggesting a sequential mechanism. Levels of both CXCL1 and CXCL5 were elevated in synovial fluid and were released in vitro by RA synovial tissues. Moreover, RA synovial fluid neutrophils stimulated with CXCL1 or CXCL5 released significant amounts of LTB4. Our data implicate CXCL1, CXCL5, and LTB4, acting sequentially, in neutrophil migration in AIA. Elevated levels of CXCL1 and CXCL5 in the synovial compartment of RA patients provide robust comparative data indicating that this mechanism plays a role in inflammatory joint disease. Together, these results suggest that inhibition of CXCL1, CXCL5, or LTB4 may represent a potential therapeutic strategy in RA.

  15. Interleukin-23 (IL-23), independent of IL-17 and IL-22, drives neutrophil recruitment and innate inflammation during Clostridium difficile colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Andrew J; Falkowski, Nicole R; McDonald, Roderick A; Pandit, Chinmay R; Young, Vincent B; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the role of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-23 (IL-23) in promoting neutrophil recruitment, inflammatory cytokine expression and intestinal histopathology in response to Clostridium difficile infection. Wild-type (WT) and p19(-/-) (IL-23KO) mice were pre-treated with cefoperazone in their drinking water for 5 days, and after a 2-day recovery period were challenged with spores from C. difficile strain VPI 10463. Interleukin-23 deficiency was associated with significant defects in both the recruitment of CD11b(High) Ly6G(H) (igh) neutrophils to the colon and the expression of neutrophil chemoattractants and stabilization factors including Cxcl1, Cxcl2, Ccl3 and Csf3 within the colonic mucosa as compared with WT animals. Furthermore, the expression of inflammatory cytokines including Il33, Tnf and Il6 was significantly reduced in IL-23-deficient animals. There was also a trend towards less severe colonic histopathology in the absence of IL-23. The induction of Il17a and Il22 was also significantly abrogated in IL-23KO mice. Inflammatory cytokine expression and neutrophilic inflammation were not reduced in IL-17a-deficient mice or in mice treated with anti-IL-22 depleting monoclonal antibody. However, induction of RegIIIg was significantly reduced in animals treated with anti-IL-22 antibody. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-23, but not IL-17a or IL-22, promotes neutrophil recruitment and inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression in the colon in response to C. difficile infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The α-Tocopherol Form of Vitamin E Reverses Age-Associated Susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae Lung Infection by Modulating Pulmonary Neutrophil Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Elsa N. Bou; Clark, Stacie; Du, Xiaogang; Wu, Dayong; Camilli, Andrew; Leong, John M.; Meydani, Simin N.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in older patients. Uncontrolled neutrophil-driven pulmonary inflammation exacerbates this disease. To test whether the α-tocopherol (α-Toc) form of vitamin E, a regulator of immunity, can modulate neutrophil responses as a preventive strategy to mitigate the age-associated decline in resistance to S. pneumoniae, young (4 mo) and old (22–24 mo) C57BL/6 mice were fed a diet containing 30-PPM (control) or 500-PPM (supplemented) α-Toc for 4 wk and intratracheally infected with S. pneumoniae. Aged mice fed a control diet were exquisitely more susceptible to S. pneumoniae than young mice. At 2 d postinfection, aged mice suffered 1000-fold higher pulmonary bacterial burden, 2.2-fold higher levels of neutrophil recruitment to the lung, and a 2.25-fold higher rate of lethal septicemia. Strikingly, α-Toc supplementation of aged mice resulted in a 1000-fold lower bacterial lung burden and full control of infection. This α-Toc–induced resistance to pneumococcal challenge was associated with a 2-fold fewer pulmonary neutrophils, a level comparable to S. pneumoniae–challenged, conventionally fed young mice. α-Toc directly inhibited neutrophil egress across epithelial cell monolayers in vitro in response to pneumococci or hepoxilin-A3, an eicosanoid required for pneumococcus-elicited neutrophil trans-epithelial migration. α-Toc altered expression of multiple epithelial and neutrophil adhesion molecules involved in migration, including CD55, CD47, CD18/CD11b, and ICAM-1. These findings suggest that α-Toc enhances resistance of aged mice to bacterial pneumonia by modulating the innate immune response, a finding that has potential clinical significance in combating infection in aged individuals through nutritional intervention. PMID:25512603

  17. An orally administered butyrate-releasing derivative reduces neutrophil recruitment and inflammation in dextran sulphate sodium-induced murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Simeoli, Raffaele; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Pirozzi, Claudio; Lama, Adriano; Santoro, Anna; Russo, Roberto; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Berni Canani, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Perretti, Mauro; Meli, Rosaria

    2017-06-01

    Butyrate has shown benefits in inflammatory bowel diseases. However, it is not often administered orally because of its rancid smell and unpleasant taste. The efficacy of a more palatable butyrate-releasing derivative, N-(1-carbamoyl-2-phenylethyl) butyramide (FBA), was evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS). Male 10 week-old BALB/c mice received DSS (2.5%) in drinking water (for 5 days) followed by DSS-free water for 7 days (DSS group). Oral FBA administration (42.5 mg·kg(-1) ) was started 7 days before DSS as preventive (P-FBA), or 2 days after DSS as therapeutic (T-FBA); both treatments lasted 19 days. One DSS-untreated group received only tap water (CON). FBA treatments reduced colitis symptoms and colon damage. P-FBA and T-FBA significantly decreased polymorphonuclear cell infiltration score compared with the DSS group. FBA reversed the imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (reducing inducible NOS protein expression, CCL2 and IL-6 transcripts in colon and increasing TGFβ and IL-10). Morever, P-FBA and T-FBA limited neutrophil recruitment (by expression and localization of the neutrophil granule protease Ly-6G), restored deficiency of the butyrate transporter and improved intestinal epithelial integrity, preventing tight-junction impairment (zonulin-1 and occludin). FBA, similar to its parental compound sodium butyrate, inhibited histone deacetylase-9 and restored H3 histone acetylation, exerting an anti-inflammatory effect through NF-κB inhibition and the up-regulation of PPARγ. FBA reduces inflammatory intestinal damage in mice indicating its potential as a postbiotic derivative without the problems associated with the oral administration of sodium butyrate. This article is part of a themed section on Principles of Pharmacological Research of Nutraceuticals. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.11/issuetoc. © 2016 The British

  18. HS1 deficiency impairs neutrophil recruitment in vivo and activation of the small GTPases Rac1 and Rap1.

    PubMed

    Latasiewicz, Joanna; Artz, Annette; Jing, Ding; Blanco, Mariana Pacheco; Currie, Silke M; Avila, Martha Velázquez; Schnoor, Michael; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2017-01-25

    Neutrophil extravasation is a critical step of the innate immune system's response to inflammation. This multistep process is tightly regulated by adhesion and signaling molecules in the endothelium and neutrophils. Activation of the β2 integrin LFA-1 is critical for adhesion of leukocytes to postcapillary venules. This step requires coordinated activation of signaling pathways in chemokine-stimulated neutrophils, including GTPase activation and cytoskeletal remodeling, leading to conformational changes in LFA-1. Hematopoietic cell-specific lyn substrate 1 (HS1) is a cortactin-related and leukocyte-specific actin-binding protein (ABP) that regulates several processes in various immune cells. It has been shown in vitro that HS1 is important for neutrophil chemotaxis and transendothelial migration of NK cells, but its role in neutrophil extravasation in vivo has not been investigated yet. Intravital microscopy of CXCL1-stimulated cremaster venules revealed an increased rolling velocity and reduced neutrophil adhesion and transmigration in HS1 knockout (KO) mice. CXCL1-induced rapid neutrophil arrest in vivo and adhesion under flow conditions in vitro were also reduced significantly. Whereas random motility of neutrophils was unaffected, chemotaxis toward a CXCL1 gradient was reduced in the absence of HS1. Further analysis of the underlying mechanisms demonstrated that HS1 controls CXCL1-induced activation of the small GTPases Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1), thus supporting LFA-1-mediated neutrophil adhesion. Importantly, with the use of Rac1 KO neutrophils, we could show that Rac1 acts upstream of Rap1. Our results establish HS1 as an important regulator of proper Rac1 and Rap1 activation and neutrophil extravasation.

  19. 17β-Estradiol Protects Females against Influenza by Recruiting Neutrophils and Increasing Virus-Specific CD8 T Cell Responses in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Dionne P.; Hall, Olivia J.; Nilles, Tricia L.; Bream, Jay H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT 17β-Estradiol (E2) treatment limits the pathology associated with pulmonary diseases caused by pathogens, allergens, and asthma, partly by reducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. To test the hypothesis that E2 protects against influenza A virus (IAV) infection by altering the recruitment and activity of innate immune cells and T cells, chemokine concentrations were measured and innate and adaptive immune cells were enumerated from the lungs of E2- and placebo-treated ovariectomized female C57BL/6 mice following infection. Females treated with E2 experienced less morbidity but had similar lung virus titers to placebo-treated females. Females treated with E2 had lower induction of CCL2 but higher CCL3 and CXCL1 responses in their lungs than placebo-treated females. Pulmonary recruitment of neutrophils, NK cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells was increased following infection, but only neutrophil numbers were greater in E2-treated than placebo-treated females. Neutrophils enhance the responses of influenza virus-specific CD8 T cells to promote virus clearance and improve the outcome of infection. Total numbers of virus-specific CD8 T cells were not altered by treatment with E2, but the proportion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-producing, virus-specific CD8 T cells was increased. Neutrophil depletion in E2-treated females increased morbidity, reduced pulmonary production of chemoattractants for neutrophils, and reduced IFN-γ production by virus-specific CD8 T cells. Neutrophils mediate both inflammation and tissue repair during IAV infection and are regulated by E2 to improve the outcome of influenza in females. IMPORTANCE Severe influenza is associated with excessive inflammation that leads to tissue damage. We demonstrate that estradiol (E2) is a potent anti-inflammatory hormone that reduces the severity of influenza A virus infection in females. Treatment of female C57BL/6 mice with E

  20. The leukotriene B4-leukotriene B4 receptor axis promotes cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by modulating neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo; Lin, Yuli; Ma, Shuai; Zheng, Yin; Yang, Xuguang; Li, Bingji; Yu, Wenyan; Xu, Qingqing; Liu, Tingyan; Hao, Chuanming; He, Rui; Ding, Feng

    2017-03-15

    Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent and widely used in treatment of various solid organ malignancies, including head and neck, ovarian, and testicular cancers. However, the induction of acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of its main side effects. Leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (BLT1) mediates the majority of physiological effects of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a potent lipid chemoattractant generated at inflammation sites, but the role of the LTB4-BLT1 axis in cisplatin-induced AKI remains unknown. Here we found upregulated LTB4 synthesis and BLT1 expression in the kidney after cisplatin administration. Cisplatin was found to directly upregulate gene expression of leukotriene A4 hydrolase and stimulate LTB4 production in renal tubular epithelial cells. Reduced kidney structural/functional damage, inflammation, and apoptosis were observed in BLT1(-/-) mice, as well as in wild-type mice treated with the LTA4H inhibitor SC-57461A and the BLT1 antagonist U-75302. Neutrophils were likely the target of this pathway, as BLT1 absence induced a significant decrease in infiltrating neutrophils in the kidney. Adoptive transfer of neutrophils from wild-type mice restored kidney injury in BLT1(-/-) mice following cisplatin challenge. Thus, the LTB4-BLT1 axis contributes to cisplatin-induced AKI by mediating kidney recruitment of neutrophils, which induce inflammation and apoptosis in the kidney. Hence, the LTB4-BLT1 axis could be a potential therapeutic target in cisplatin-induced AKI.

  1. IL-23-Dependent IL-17 Production Is Essential in Neutrophil Recruitment and Activity in Mouse Lung Defense against Respiratory Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qun; Martin, Richard J.; Rino, John G.; Breed, Rachel; Torres, Raul M.; Chu, Hong Wei

    2007-01-01

    IL-23 induces IL-17 production in activated CD4+ T cells and participates in host defense against many encapsulated bacteria. However, whether IL-23/IL-17 axis contributes to a Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp)-induced lung inflammation (e.g., neutrophils) has not been addressed. Using an acute respiratory Mp infection murine model, we found significantly up-regulated lung IL-23p19 mRNA in the early phase of infection (4 h), and alveolar macrophages were an important cell source of Mp-induced IL-23. We further showed that Mp significantly increased IL-17 protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Lung gene expression of IL-17, IL-17C and IL-17F was also markedly up-regulated by Mp in vivo. IL-17 and IL-17F were found to be derived mainly from lung CD4+ T cells, and were increased upon IL-23 stimulation in vitro. In vivo blocking of IL-23p19 alone or in combination with IL-23/IL-12p40 resulted in a significant reduction of Mp-induced IL-17 protein and IL-17/IL-17F mRNA expression, which was accompanied by a trend toward reduced lung neutrophil recruitment, BAL neutrophil activity, and Mp clearance. However, IL-23 neutralization had no effect on Mp-induced lung IL-17C mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that IL-17/IL-17F production is IL-23-dependent in an acute Mp infection, and contributes to neutrophil recruitment and activity in lung defense against the infection. PMID:17198762

  2. Effect of 100% oxygen on E-selectin expression, recruitment of neutrophils and enterocyte apoptosis following intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in a rat.

    PubMed

    Sukhotnik, Igor; Coran, Arnold G; Greenblatt, Robert; Brod, Vera; Mogilner, Jorge; Shiloni, Eitan; Shaoul, Ron; Bitterman, Haim

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that neutrophil recruitment may initiate cell apoptosis in ischemic tissues. We have recently shown that enterocyte apoptosis is increased following intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of hyperoxia on E-selectin expression, neutrophil recruitment and enterocyte apoptosis following intestinal IR in a rat. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three experimental groups: (1) sham rats underwent laparotomy without vascular occlusion and were ventilated with air (Sham) (2) IR rats underwent occlusion of both the superior mesenteric artery and portal vein for 30 min and were ventilated with air (IR), and (3) IR-O2 rats underwent IR and were ventilated with 100% started 10 min before reperfusion and continued for 6 h (IR-O2). Intestinal structural changes were determined 24 h following IR. Immunohistochemistry for E-selectin (using E-selectin cleaved concentrated polyclonal antibody) was performed to identify E-selectin immunoreactivity localized to the endothelium of venules. The recruitment of neutrophils was calculated per 100 venules. Immunohistochemistry for Caspase-3 was performed for identification of apoptotic cells. Non-parametric one-way ANOVA test was used for statistical analysis with p less than 0.05 considered statistically significant. A significant increase in E-selectin expression in the jejunum (6.1 +/- 2.2 vs. 2.5 +/- 1.0 E-selectin positive vessels/100 vessels, p < 0.05) and ileum (12.1 +/- 2.7 vs. 3.3 +/- 1.2 E-selectin positive vessels/100 vessels, p < 0.05) and a concomitant increase in neutrophil recruitment in the ileum (5.5 +/- 1.6 vs. 1.3 +/- 0.6 adhered PMN's per 100 venules) were observed in IR rats compared to sham animals and were accompanied by increased cell apoptosis (p < 0.05). Treatment with 100% oxygen resulted in a significant attenuation in E-selectin expression in the ileum (2.7 +/- 1.1 vs. 12.1 +/- 2.7 E-selectin positive vessels/100

  3. Decreasing SMPD1 activity in BEAS-2B bronchial airway epithelial cells results in increased NRF2 activity, cytokine synthesis and neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    MacFadden-Murphy, Elyse; Roussel, Lucie; Martel, Guy; Bérubé, Julie; Rousseau, Simon

    2017-01-22

    Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) type B is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by variable levels of impairment in sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) activity. Lung involvement is the most important prognostic factor in NPD-B, with recurrent respiratory infections starting in infancy being the major cause of morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that decreased SMPD1 activity impaired airway epithelium host defense response. SMPD1 activity was reduced using inducible shRNA. Surprisingly, decreasing SMPD1 activity by 50%, resulted in increased neutrophil recruitment, both at baseline and in response to bacterial stimulation. This correlated with elevated levels of cytokine mRNA shown to contribute to neutrophil recruitment in unstimulated (e.g. IL-8 and GRO-α) and infected cells (e.g. IL-8, GRO-α, GM-CSF and CCL20). Instead of preventing the host defence responses, decreased SMPD1 activity results in an inflammatory response even in the absence of infection. Moreover, decreasing SMPD1 activity resulted in a pro-oxidative shift. Accordingly, expression of an inactive mutant, SMPD1[L225P] but not the WT enzyme increased activation of the antioxidant transcription factor NRF2. Therefore, decreasing SMPD1 activity by 50% in airway epithelial cells, the equivalent of the loss of one allele, results in the accumulation of oxidants that activates NRF2 and a concomitant increased cytokine production as well as neutrophil recruitment. This can result in a chronic inflammatory state that impairs host defence similar to scenarios observe in other chronic inflammatory lung disease such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Cystic Fibrosis.

  4. Preferential Recruitment of Neutrophils into the Cerebellum and Brainstem Contributes to the Atypical Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yudong; Holdbrooks, Andrew T.; Meares, Gordon P.; Buckley, Jessica A.

    2015-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is critical for development, regulation, and termination of immune responses, and dysregulation of the JAK/STAT pathway, that is, hyperactivation, has pathological implications in autoimmune and neuroinflammatory diseases. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) regulates STAT3 activation in response to cytokines that play important roles in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory diseases, including IL-6 and IL-23. We previously demonstrated that myeloid lineage–specific deletion of SOCS3 resulted in a severe, nonresolving atypical form of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), characterized by lesions, inflammatory infiltrates, elevated STAT activation, and elevated cytokine and chemokine expression in the cerebellum. Clinically, these mice exhibit ataxia and tremors. In this study, we provide a detailed analysis of this model, demonstrating that the atypical EAE observed in LysMCre-SOCS3fl/fl mice is characterized by extensive neutrophil infiltration into the cerebellum and brainstem, increased inducible NO synthase levels in the cerebellum and brainstem, and prominent axonal damage. Importantly, infiltrating SOCS3-deficient neutrophils produce high levels of CXCL2, CCL2, CXCL10, NO, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Kinetic studies demonstrate that neutrophil infiltration into the cerebellum and brainstem of LysMCre-SOCS3fl/fl mice closely correlates with atypical EAE clinical symptoms. Ab-mediated depletion of neutrophils converts the atypical phenotype to the classical EAE phenotype and, in some cases, a mixed atypical/classical phenotype. Blocking CXCR2 signaling ameliorates atypical EAE development by reducing neutrophil infiltration into the cerebellum/brainstem. Thus, neutrophils lacking SOCS3 display elevated STAT3 activation and expression of proinflammatory mediators and play a critical role in the development of atypical EAE. PMID:26085687

  5. Engagement of beta2 integrins recruits 14-3-3 proteins to c-Cbl in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Melander, Fredrik; Andersson, Tommy; Dib, Karim

    2004-05-14

    We found that engagement of beta2 integrins on human neutrophils triggered both tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of c-Cbl. Pretreatment of the neutrophils with the broad range protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF-109203X blocked the serine but not the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl. Moreover, the Src kinase inhibitor PP1 prevented the beta2 integrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl but not the simultaneous serine phosphorylation. These results indicate that Src family kinases and PKC can separately modulate the properties of c-Cbl. Indeed, tyrosine kinase-dependent phosphorylation of c-Cbl regulated the ubiquitin ligase activity of that protein, whereas PKC-dependent phosphorylation of c-Cbl had no such effect. Instead, c-Cbl that underwent PKC-induced serine phosphorylation associated with the scaffolding and anti-apoptotic 14-3-3 proteins. Consequently, c-Cbl can independently target proteins for degradation or intracellular localization and may initiate an anti-apoptotic signal in neutrophils.

  6. The absence of mrp4 has no effect on the recruitment of neutrophils and eosinophils into the lung after LPS, cigarette smoke or allergen challenge.

    PubMed

    Schymeinsky, Jürgen; Mayer, Hannah; Tomsic, Christopher; Tilp, Cornelia; Schuetz, John D; Cui, Yunhai; Wollin, Lutz; Gantner, Florian; Erb, Klaus J

    2013-01-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 4 (Mrp4) is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that is capable of exporting the second messenger cAMP from cells, a process that might regulate cAMP-mediated anti-inflammatory processes. However, using LPS- or cigarette smoke (CS)-inflammation models, we found that neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were similar in Mrp4(-/-) and Mrp4(+/+) mice treated with LPS or CS. Similarly, neutrophil numbers were not reduced in the BALF of LPS-challenged wt mice after treatment with 10 or 30 mg/kg of the Mrp1/4 inhibitor MK571. The absence of Mrp4 also had no impact on the influx of eosinophils or IL-4 and IL-5 levels in the BALF after OVA airway challenge in mice sensitized with OVA/alum. LPS-induced cytokine release in whole blood ex vivo was also not affected by the absence of Mrp4. These data clearly suggest that Mrp4 deficiency alone is not sufficient to reduce inflammatory processes in vivo. We hypothesized that in combination with PDE4 inhibitors, used at suboptimal concentrations, the anti-inflammatory effect would be more pronounced. However, LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment into the lung was no different between Mrp4(-/-) and Mrp4(+/+) mice treated with 3 mg/kg Roflumilast. Finally, the single and combined administration of 10 and 30 mg/kg MK571 and the specific breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) inhibitor KO143 showed no reduction of LPS-induced TNFα release into the BALF compared to vehicle treated control animals. Similarly, LPS-induced TNFα release in murine whole blood of Mrp4(+/+) or Mrp4(-/-) mice was not reduced by KO143 (1, 10 µM). Thus, BCRP seems not to be able to compensate for the absence or inhibition of Mrp4 in the used models. Taken together, our data suggest that Mrp4 is not essential for the recruitment of neutrophils into the lung after LPS or CS exposure or of eosinophils after allergen exposure.

  7. Group B Streptococcus Induces Neutrophil Recruitment to Gestational Tissues and Elaboration of Extracellular Traps and Nutritional Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kothary, Vishesh; Doster, Ryan S.; Rogers, Lisa M.; Kirk, Leslie A.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Romano-Keeler, Joann; Haley, Kathryn P.; Manning, Shannon D.; Aronoff, David M.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, or Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is a gram-positive bacterial pathogen associated with infection during pregnancy and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Infection of the extraplacental membranes surrounding the developing fetus, a condition known as chorioamnionitis, is characterized histopathologically by profound infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs, neutrophils) and greatly increases the risk for preterm labor, stillbirth, or neonatal GBS infection. The advent of animal models of chorioamnionitis provides a powerful tool to study host-pathogen relationships in vivo and ex vivo. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the innate immune response elicited by GBS and evaluate how antimicrobial strategies elaborated by these innate immune cells affect bacteria. Our work using a mouse model of GBS ascending vaginal infection during pregnancy reveals that clinically isolated GBS has the capacity to invade reproductive tissues and elicit host immune responses including infiltration of PMNs within the choriodecidua and placenta during infection, mirroring the human condition. Upon interacting with GBS, murine neutrophils elaborate DNA-containing extracellular traps, which immobilize GBS and are studded with antimicrobial molecules including lactoferrin. Exposure of GBS to holo- or apo-forms of lactoferrin reveals that the iron-sequestration activity of lactoferrin represses GBS growth and viability in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data indicate that the mouse model of ascending infection is a useful tool to recapitulate human models of GBS infection during pregnancy. Furthermore, this work reveals that neutrophil extracellular traps ensnare GBS and repress bacterial growth via deposition of antimicrobial molecules, which drive nutritional immunity via metal sequestration strategies. PMID:28217556

  8. Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Are Necessary for the Recruitment of CD8+ T Cells in the Liver in a Pregnant Mouse Model of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci Serotype 1) Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Oca, Roberto Montes; Buendía, Antonio J.; Del Río, Laura; Sánchez, Joaquín; Salinas, Jesús; Navarro, Jose A.

    2000-01-01

    The role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in the development of the specific immune response against Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection was studied in a pregnant mouse model involving treatment with RB6-8C5 monoclonal antibody. PMN depletion significantly affected the immune response in the liver, in which the T-lymphocyte and F4/80+ cell populations decreased, particularly the CD8+ T-cell population. A Th1-like response, characterized by high levels of gamma interferon without detectable levels of interleukin 4 (IL-4) in serum, was observed in both depleted and nondepleted mice, although an increased production of IL-10 was detected in the depleted group. Our results suggest that PMNs play a very important role in the recruitment of other leukocyte populations to the inflammatory foci but have little influence in the polarization of the immune specific response toward a Th1-like response. PMID:10679002

  9. Lipopolysaccharide modulates neutrophil recruitment and macrophage polarization on lymphatic vessels and impairs lymphatic function in rat mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Zawieja, Scott D.; Wang, Wei; Lee, Yang; Wang, Yuan J.; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves; Zawieja, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of the lymphatic system is apparent in multiple inflammatory pathologies connected to elevated endotoxins such as LPS. However, the direct mechanisms by which LPS influences the lymphatic contractility are not well understood. We hypothesized that a dynamic modulation of innate immune cell populations in mesentery under inflammatory conditions perturbs tissue cytokine/chemokine homeostasis and subsequently influences lymphatic function. We used rats that were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (10 mg/kg) to determine the changes in the profiles of innate immune cells in the mesentery and in the stretch-mediated contractile responses of isolated lymphatic preparations. Results demonstrated a reduction in the phasic contractile activity of mesenteric lymphatic vessels from LPS-injected rats and a severe impairment of lymphatic pump function and flow. There was a significant reduction in the number of neutrophils and an increase in monocytes/macrophages present on the lymphatic vessels and in the clear mesentery of the LPS group. This population of monocytes and macrophages established a robust M2 phenotype, with the majority showing high expression of CD163 and CD206. Several cytokines and chemoattractants for neutrophils and macrophages were significantly changed in the mesentery of LPS-injected rats. Treatment of lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) with LPS showed significant changes in the expression of adhesion molecules, VCAM1, ICAM1, CXCR2, and galectin-9. LPS-TLR4-mediated regulation of pAKT, pERK pI-κB, and pMLC20 in LMCs promoted both contractile and inflammatory pathways. Thus, our data provide the first evidence connecting the dynamic changes in innate immune cells on or near the lymphatics and complex cytokine milieu during inflammation with lymphatic dysfunction. PMID:26453331

  10. Lipopolysaccharide modulates neutrophil recruitment and macrophage polarization on lymphatic vessels and impairs lymphatic function in rat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Zawieja, Scott D; Wang, Wei; Lee, Yang; Wang, Yuan J; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves; Zawieja, David C; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2015-12-15

    Impairment of the lymphatic system is apparent in multiple inflammatory pathologies connected to elevated endotoxins such as LPS. However, the direct mechanisms by which LPS influences the lymphatic contractility are not well understood. We hypothesized that a dynamic modulation of innate immune cell populations in mesentery under inflammatory conditions perturbs tissue cytokine/chemokine homeostasis and subsequently influences lymphatic function. We used rats that were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (10 mg/kg) to determine the changes in the profiles of innate immune cells in the mesentery and in the stretch-mediated contractile responses of isolated lymphatic preparations. Results demonstrated a reduction in the phasic contractile activity of mesenteric lymphatic vessels from LPS-injected rats and a severe impairment of lymphatic pump function and flow. There was a significant reduction in the number of neutrophils and an increase in monocytes/macrophages present on the lymphatic vessels and in the clear mesentery of the LPS group. This population of monocytes and macrophages established a robust M2 phenotype, with the majority showing high expression of CD163 and CD206. Several cytokines and chemoattractants for neutrophils and macrophages were significantly changed in the mesentery of LPS-injected rats. Treatment of lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) with LPS showed significant changes in the expression of adhesion molecules, VCAM1, ICAM1, CXCR2, and galectin-9. LPS-TLR4-mediated regulation of pAKT, pERK pI-κB, and pMLC20 in LMCs promoted both contractile and inflammatory pathways. Thus, our data provide the first evidence connecting the dynamic changes in innate immune cells on or near the lymphatics and complex cytokine milieu during inflammation with lymphatic dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Complement C5 Activation during Influenza A Infection in Mice Contributes to Neutrophil Recruitment and Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Cristiana C.; Weston-Davies, Wynne; Russo, Remo C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Rachid, Milene A.; Alves-Filho, José C.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Ryffel, Bernhard; Nunn, Miles A.; Teixeira, Mauro M.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus A (IAV) causes annual epidemics and intermittent pandemics that affect millions of people worldwide. Potent inflammatory responses are commonly associated with severe cases of IAV infection. The complement system, an important mechanism of innate and humoral immune responses to infections, is activated during primary IAV infection and mediates, in association with natural IgM, viral neutralization by virion aggregation and coating of viral hemmagglutinin. Increased levels of the anaphylatoxin C5a were found in patients fatally infected with the most recent H1N1 pandemic virus. In this study, our aim was to evaluate whether targeting C5 activation alters inflammatory lung injury and viral load in a murine model of IAV infection. To address this question C57Bl/6j mice were infected intranasally with 104 PFU of the mouse adapted Influenza A virus A/WSN/33 (H1N1) or inoculated with PBS (Mock). We demonstrated that C5a is increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) upon experimental IAV infection. To evaluate the role of C5, we used OmCI, a potent arthropod-derived inhibitor of C5 activation that binds to C5 and prevents release of C5a by complement. OmCI was given daily by intraperitoneal injection from the day of IAV infection until day 5. Treatment with OmCI only partially reduced C5a levels in BALF. However, there was significant inhibition of neutrophil and macrophage infiltration in the airways, Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) formation, death of leukocytes, lung epithelial injury and overall lung damage induced by the infection. There was no effect on viral load. Taken together, these data suggest that targeting C5 activation with OmCI during IAV infection could be a promising approach to reduce excessive inflammatory reactions associated with the severe forms of IAV infections. PMID:23696894

  12. Muramyl dipeptide synergizes with Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid to recruit neutrophils in the mammary gland and to stimulate mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bougarn, Salim; Cunha, Patricia; Harmache, Abdallah; Fromageau, Angélina; Gilbert, Florence B; Rainard, Pascal

    2010-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a major pathogen for the mammary gland of dairy ruminants, elicits the recruitment of neutrophils into milk during mastitis, but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. We investigated the response of the bovine mammary gland to muramyl dipeptide (MDP), an elementary constituent of the bacterial peptidoglycan, alone or in combination with lipoteichoic acid (LTA), another staphylococcal microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP). MDP induced a prompt and marked influx of neutrophils in milk, and its combination with LTA elicited a more intense and prolonged influx than the responses to either stimulus alone. The concentrations of several chemoattractants for neutrophils (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CXCL8, and C5a) increased in milk after challenge, and the highest increases followed challenge with the combination of MDP and LTA. MDP and LTA were also synergistic in inducing in vitro chemokine production by bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEpC). Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2), a major sensor of MDP, was expressed (mRNA) in bovine mammary tissue and by bMEpC in culture. The production of interleukin-8 (IL-8) following the stimulation of bMEpC by LTA and MDP was dependent on the activation of NF-κB. LTA-induced IL-8 production did not depend on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR), as the PAFR antagonist WEB2086 was without effect. In contrast, bMEpC and mammary tissue are known to express Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and to respond to TLR2 agonists. Although the levels of expression of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-1β were increased by LTA and MDP at the mRNA level, no protein could be detected in the bMEpC culture supernatant. The level of induction of IL-6 was low at both the mRNA and protein levels. These results indicate that MDP and LTA exert synergistic effects to induce neutrophilic inflammation in the mammary gland. These results also show that bMEpC could contribute

  13. Muramyl Dipeptide Synergizes with Staphylococcus aureus Lipoteichoic Acid To Recruit Neutrophils in the Mammary Gland and To Stimulate Mammary Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Bougarn, Salim; Cunha, Patricia; Harmache, Abdallah; Fromageau, Angélina; Gilbert, Florence B.; Rainard, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a major pathogen for the mammary gland of dairy ruminants, elicits the recruitment of neutrophils into milk during mastitis, but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. We investigated the response of the bovine mammary gland to muramyl dipeptide (MDP), an elementary constituent of the bacterial peptidoglycan, alone or in combination with lipoteichoic acid (LTA), another staphylococcal microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP). MDP induced a prompt and marked influx of neutrophils in milk, and its combination with LTA elicited a more intense and prolonged influx than the responses to either stimulus alone. The concentrations of several chemoattractants for neutrophils (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CXCL8, and C5a) increased in milk after challenge, and the highest increases followed challenge with the combination of MDP and LTA. MDP and LTA were also synergistic in inducing in vitro chemokine production by bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEpC). Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2), a major sensor of MDP, was expressed (mRNA) in bovine mammary tissue and by bMEpC in culture. The production of interleukin-8 (IL-8) following the stimulation of bMEpC by LTA and MDP was dependent on the activation of NF-κB. LTA-induced IL-8 production did not depend on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR), as the PAFR antagonist WEB2086 was without effect. In contrast, bMEpC and mammary tissue are known to express Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and to respond to TLR2 agonists. Although the levels of expression of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-1β were increased by LTA and MDP at the mRNA level, no protein could be detected in the bMEpC culture supernatant. The level of induction of IL-6 was low at both the mRNA and protein levels. These results indicate that MDP and LTA exert synergistic effects to induce neutrophilic inflammation in the mammary gland. These results also show that bMEpC could contribute

  14. Alveolar macrophages are required for protective pulmonary defenses in murine Klebsiella pneumonia: elimination of alveolar macrophages increases neutrophil recruitment but decreases bacterial clearance and survival.

    PubMed Central

    Broug-Holub, E; Toews, G B; van Iwaarden, J F; Strieter, R M; Kunkel, S L; Paine, R; Standiford, T J

    1997-01-01

    To study the in vivo role of alveolar macrophages (AM) in gram-negative bacterial pneumonia in mice, AM were eliminated by the intratracheal (i.t.) administration of dichloromethylene diphosphonate encapsulated liposomes. Subsequently, the AM-depleted mice were infected i.t. with 100 CFU of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and the effects of AM depletion on survival, bacterial clearance, and neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte [PMN]) recruitment were assessed. It was shown that depletion of AM decreases survival dramatically, with 100% lethality at day 3 postinfection, versus 100% long-term survival in the control group. This increased mortality was accompanied by 20- to 27- and 3- to 10-fold increases in the number of K. pneumoniae CFU in lung and plasma, respectively, compared to those in nondepleted animals. This decreased bacterial clearance was not due to an impaired PMN recruitment; on the contrary, the K. pneumoniae-induced PMN recruitment in AM-depleted lungs was sevenfold greater 48 h postinfection than that in control infected lungs. Together with an increased PMN infiltration, 3- and 10-fold increases in lung homogenate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) levels, respectively, were measured. Neutralization of TNF-alpha or MIP-2, 2 h before infection, reduced the numbers of infiltrating PMN by 41.6 and 64.2%, respectively, indicating that these cytokines mediate PMN influx in infected lungs, rather then just being produced by the recruited PMN themselves. Our studies demonstrate, for the first time, the relative importance of the AM in the containment and clearance of bacteria in the setting of Klebsiella pneumonia. PMID:9119443

  15. The Neutrophil Response Induced by an Agonist for Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (GPR43) Is Primed by Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and by Receptor Uncoupling from the Cytoskeleton but Attenuated by Tissue Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, Lena; Mårtensson, Jonas; Winther, Malene; Gabl, Michael; Holdfeldt, André; Uhrbom, Martin; Bylund, Johan; Højgaard Hansen, Anders; Pandey, Sunil K.; Ulven, Trond; Forsman, Huamei

    2016-01-01

    Ligands with improved potency and selectivity for free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2R) have become available, and we here characterize the neutrophil responses induced by one such agonist (Cmp1) and one antagonist (CATPB). Cmp1 triggered an increase in the cytosolic concentration of Ca2+, and the neutrophils were then desensitized to Cmp1 and to acetate, a naturally occurring FFA2R agonist. The antagonist CATPB selectively inhibited responses induced by Cmp1 or acetate. The activated FFA2R induced superoxide anion secretion at a low level in naive blood neutrophils. This response was largely increased by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in a process associated with a recruitment of easily mobilizable granules, but neutrophils recruited to an aseptic inflammation in vivo were nonresponding. Superoxide production induced by Cmp1 was increased in latrunculin A-treated neutrophils, but no reactivation of desensitized FFA2R was induced by this drug, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is not directly involved in terminating the response. The functional and regulatory differences between the receptors that recognize short-chain fatty acids and formylated peptides, respectively, imply different roles of these receptors in the orchestration of inflammation and confirm the usefulness of a selective FFA2R agonist and antagonist as tools for the exploration of the precise role of the FFA2R. PMID:27503855

  16. Pam3CSK4/TLR2 signaling elicits neutrophil recruitment and restricts invasion of Escherichia coli P4 into mammary gland epithelial cells in a murine mastitis model.

    PubMed

    Mintz, Michal; Mintz, Dvir; Ezra-Elia, Raaya; Ilia-Ezra, Raaya; Shpigel, Nahum Y

    2013-03-15

    Mastitis-inflammation of the mammary gland is an important disease affecting dairy animals worldwide. The disease is caused by mammary pathogenic bacteria, and Escherichia coli is frequently implicated. Intramammary challenge with bacterial LPS is sufficient to elicit the disease. However, using toll-like receptor (TLR) 4-deficient mice, we previously found that mammary pathogenic E. coli is still able to elicit neutrophil recruitment, indicating the presence of bacterial virulence factors other than LPS. To date, no specific virulence factors have been identified in E. coli isolates associated with mastitis, and other microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), such as bacterial lipoproteins, are prime candidates. The synthetic analog of bacterial lipopeptides, Pam3CSK4, is recognized by TLR2 and mimics the proinflammatory properties of triacylated lipoproteins of Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of the present work was to determine the role of bacterial lipoproteins recognized by TLR2 on mammary cells as virulence factors in the mammary gland. Using the murine mastitis model, we previously showed that following intramammary LPS challenge, neutrophil recruitment is strictly dependent on alveolar macrophages. Thus, the role of alveolar macrophages in the response to intramammary bacterial lipoprotein challenge was also studied. Here, Pam3CSK4 infusion induced mastitis in wild-type mice, but not in TLR2-deficient mice. The wild-type phenotype was not restored by adoptive transfer of TLR2-expressing macrophages into the alveolar milk space of TLR2-deficient mice, indicating that cells other than alveolar macrophages are essential for Pam3CSK4/TLR2 signaling. In contrast to the Pam3CSK4 treatment, infection with E. coli P4 resulted in inflammation, even in the absence of TLR2 signaling, indicating that lipoproteins are sufficient, but not essential virulence factors in the pathogenesis of the intact bacteria. However, in the absence of TLR2, the infecting E. coli P4

  17. Antigen-specific Treg regulate Th17-mediated lung neutrophilic inflammation, B cell recruitment and polymeric IgA and IgM levels in the airways

    PubMed Central

    Jaffar, Zeina; Ferrini, Maria E.; Girtsman, Teri A.; Roberts, Kevan

    2010-01-01

    Summary Th17 cells play key roles in mediating autoimmunity, inflammation and mucosal host defense against pathogens. To determine whether naturally occurring Treg (nTreg) limit Th17-mediated pulmonary inflammation, OVA-specific CD4+ Th17 cells and expanded CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ nTreg were cotransferred into BALB/c mice that were then exposed to OVA aerosols. Th17 cells, when transferred alone, accumulated in the lungs and posterior mediastinal LN and evoked a pronounced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and neutrophilic inflammation, characterized by B cell recruitment and elevated IgA and IgM levels. Cotransfer of antigen-specific nTreg markedly reduced the Th17-induced pulmonary inflammation and associated neutrophilia, B cell influx and polymeric Ig levels in the airways, but did not inhibit AHR. Moreover, the regulation appeared restricted to the site of mucosal inflammation, since transfer of nTreg did not affect the Th17 response developing in the lung draining LN, as evidenced by unaltered levels of IL-17 production and low numbers of Foxp3+ Treg. Our findings suggest a crucial role for Th17 cells in mediating airway B cell influx and IgA response and demonstrate that antigen-specific nTreg suppress Th17-mediated lung inflammation. These results provide new insights into how Th17 responses are limited and may facilitate development of novel approaches for controlling Th17-induced inflammation. PMID:19830731

  18. Interleukin 1 receptor-driven neutrophil recruitment accounts to MyD88-dependent pulmonary clearance of legionella pneumophila infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Danielle P A; Pereira, Marcelo S F; Manin, Graziele Z; Hori, Juliana I; Zamboni, Dario S

    2015-01-15

    Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires' disease, triggers activation of multiple innate immune pathways that lead to the restriction of bacterial replication in vivo. Despite the critical role for MyD88 in infection clearance, the receptors and mechanisms responsible for MyD88-mediated pulmonary bacterial clearance are still unclear. Here, we used flagellin mutants of L. pneumophila, which bypass the NAIP5/NLRC4-mediated restriction of bacterial replication, to assess the receptors involved in MyD88-mediated pulmonary bacterial clearance. By systematically comparing pulmonary clearance of L. pneumophila in C57BL/6 MyD88(-/-), TLR2(-/-), TLR3(-/-), TLR4(-/-), TLR9(-/-), IL-1R(-/-), and IL-18(-/-) mice, we found that, while the knockout of a single Toll-like receptor or interleukin 18 resulted only in minor impairment of bacterial clearance, deficiency in the interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor led to a significant impairment. IL-1/MyD88-mediated pulmonary bacterial clearance occurs via processes involving the recruitment of neutrophils. Collectively, our data contribute to the understanding of the effector mechanisms involved in MyD88-mediated pulmonary bacterial clearance.

  19. Hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain triggers necrotic lung pathology associated with enhanced recruitment of neutrophils in resistant C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fabrício M.; Ventura, Thatiana L. B.; Amaral, Eduardo P.; Ribeiro, Simone C. M.; Calixto, Sanderson D.; Manhães, Marcelle R.; Rezende, Andreza L.; Souzal, Giliane S.; de Carvalho, Igor S.; Silva, Elisangela C.; da Silva, Juliana Azevedo; Carvalho, Eulógio C. Q.; Kritski, Afranio L.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that in most cases induces irreversible necrosis of lung tissue as a result of excessive inflammatory reactions. The murine model of TB in resistant C57BL/6 mice infected with reference Mtb strains is widely used in TB studies; however, these mice do not show a necrotic pathology, which restricts their use in studies of irreversible tissue damage. Recently, we demonstrated that necrotic lung lesions could be induced in the C57BL/6 mice by highly virulent Mtb strains belonging to the modern Beijing sublineage. However, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to necrosis in this model were not elucidated. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of lung lesions in mice infected with highly virulent Beijing Mtb strain M299, compared with those infected with laboratory Mtb strain H37Rv. The data demonstrate that necrotic lung lesions in mice infected by the strain M299 were associated with enhanced recruitment of myeloid cells, especially neutrophils, and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, consistent with exacerbated inflammation. High levels of IFN-γ production contributed to the control of bacterial growth. Further progression to chronic disease was associated with a reduction in the levels of inflammatory mediators in the lungs, the accumulation of foamy macrophages and partial healing of the necrotic tissue by fibrosis. At a late stage of disease, degradation of foamy cells resulted in the liberation of accumulated lipids and persisting bacilli and further activation of inflammation, which promoted lung consolidation. Overall, our studies show that C57BL/6 mice infected with highly virulent Mtb strain may serve as a TB model reproducing an exacerbated inflammatory response in a resistant host to hypervirulent mycobacteria, leading to irreversible necrotic lung lesions. PMID:28306733

  20. Hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain triggers necrotic lung pathology associated with enhanced recruitment of neutrophils in resistant C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fabrício M; Ventura, Thatiana L B; Amaral, Eduardo P; Ribeiro, Simone C M; Calixto, Sanderson D; Manhães, Marcelle R; Rezende, Andreza L; Souzal, Giliane S; de Carvalho, Igor S; Silva, Elisangela C; Silva, Juliana Azevedo da; Carvalho, Eulógio C Q; Kritski, Afranio L; Lasunskaia, Elena B

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that in most cases induces irreversible necrosis of lung tissue as a result of excessive inflammatory reactions. The murine model of TB in resistant C57BL/6 mice infected with reference Mtb strains is widely used in TB studies; however, these mice do not show a necrotic pathology, which restricts their use in studies of irreversible tissue damage. Recently, we demonstrated that necrotic lung lesions could be induced in the C57BL/6 mice by highly virulent Mtb strains belonging to the modern Beijing sublineage. However, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to necrosis in this model were not elucidated. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of lung lesions in mice infected with highly virulent Beijing Mtb strain M299, compared with those infected with laboratory Mtb strain H37Rv. The data demonstrate that necrotic lung lesions in mice infected by the strain M299 were associated with enhanced recruitment of myeloid cells, especially neutrophils, and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, consistent with exacerbated inflammation. High levels of IFN-γ production contributed to the control of bacterial growth. Further progression to chronic disease was associated with a reduction in the levels of inflammatory mediators in the lungs, the accumulation of foamy macrophages and partial healing of the necrotic tissue by fibrosis. At a late stage of disease, degradation of foamy cells resulted in the liberation of accumulated lipids and persisting bacilli and further activation of inflammation, which promoted lung consolidation. Overall, our studies show that C57BL/6 mice infected with highly virulent Mtb strain may serve as a TB model reproducing an exacerbated inflammatory response in a resistant host to hypervirulent mycobacteria, leading to irreversible necrotic lung lesions.

  1. The Multifaceted Functions of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Mayadas, Tanya N.; Cullere, Xavier; Lowell, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils and neutrophil-like cells are the major pathogen-fighting immune cells in organisms ranging from slime molds to mammals. Central to their function is their ability to be recruited to sites of infection, to recognize and phagocytose microbes, and then to kill pathogens through a combination of cytotoxic mechanisms. These include the production of reactive oxygen species, the release of antimicrobial peptides, and the recently discovered expulsion of their nuclear contents to form neutrophil extracellular traps. Here we discuss these primordial neutrophil functions, which also play key roles in tissue injury, by providing details of neutrophil cytotoxic functions and congenital disorders of neutrophils. In addition, we present more recent evidence that interactions between neutrophils and adaptive immune cells establish a feed-forward mechanism that amplifies pathologic inflammation. These newly appreciated contributions of neutrophils are described in the setting of several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:24050624

  2. An essential role for IL-17 in preventing pathogen-initiated bone destruction: recruitment of neutrophils to inflamed bone requires IL-17 receptor–dependent signals

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeffrey J.; Ruddy, Matthew J.; Wong, Grace C.; Sfintescu, Cornelia; Baker, Pamela J.; Smith, Jeffrey B.; Evans, Richard T.

    2007-01-01

    IL-17 and its receptor are founding members of a novel family of inflammatory cytokines. IL-17 plays a pathogenic role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)–associated bone destruction. However, IL-17 is also an important regulator of host defense through granulopoiesis and neutrophil trafficking. Therefore, the role of IL-17 in pathogen-initiated bone loss was not obvious. The most common form of infection-induced bone destruction occurs in periodontal disease (PD). In addition to causing significant morbidity, PD is a risk factor for atherosclerotic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Similar to RA, bone destruction in PD is caused by the immune response. However, neutrophils provide critical antimicrobial defense against periodontal organisms. Since IL-17 is bone destructive in RA but a key regulator of neutrophils, we examined its role in inflammatory bone loss induced by the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis in IL-17RA–deficient mice. These mice showed enhanced periodontal bone destruction, suggesting a bone-protective role for IL-17, reminiscent of a neutrophil deficiency. Although IL-17RA–deficient neutrophils functioned normally ex vivo, IL-17RA knock-out (IL-17RAKO) mice exhibited reduced serum chemokine levels and concomitantly reduced neutrophil migration to bone. Consistently, CXCR2KO mice were highly susceptible to alveolar bone loss; interestingly, these mice also suggested a role for chemokines in maintaining normal bone homeostasis. These results indicate a nonredundant role for IL-17 in mediating host defense via neutrophil mobilization. PMID:17202320

  3. A3 and P2Y2 receptors control the recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs in a mouse model of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshiaki; Chen, Yu; Hirsh, Mark I; Yip, Linda; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2008-08-01

    We have recently shown that A3 adenosine receptors and P2Y2 purinergic receptors play an important role in neutrophil chemotaxis. Chemotaxis of neutrophils to sites of infections is critical for immune defense. However, excessive accumulation of neutrophils in the lungs can cause acute lung tissue damage. Here we assessed the role of A3 and P2Y2 receptors in neutrophil sequestration to the lungs in a mouse model of sepsis. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) using adult male C57BL/6J mice (wild type [WT]), homozygous A3 receptor knockout (A3KO) mice, and P2Y2 receptor knockout (P2Y2KO) mice. Animals were killed 2, 4, 6, or 8 h after CLP, and peritoneal lavage fluid and blood were collected. Lungs were removed, and neutrophil infiltration was evaluated using elastase as a marker. Leukocyte and bacterial counts in peritoneal lavage fluid and blood samples were determined. Survival after sepsis was determined in a separate group. Leukocyte counts in the peritoneum were lower in A3KO and P2Y2KO mice than in WT mice. Conversely, initial leukocyte counts in the peripheral blood were higher in KO mice than in WT mice. Neutrophil sequestration to the lungs reached a maximum 2 h after CLP and remained significantly higher in WT mice compared with A3KO and P2Y2KO mice (P < 0.001). Survival after 24 h was significantly lower in WT mice (37.5%) than in A3KO or P2Y2KO mice (82.5%; P < 0.05). These data suggest that A3 and P2Y2 receptors are involved in the influx of neutrophils into the lungs after sepsis. Thus, pharmaceutical approaches that target these receptors might be useful to control acute lung tissue injury in sepsis.

  4. Neutrophil adhesion and activation under flow

    PubMed Central

    Zarbock, Alexander; Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment into inflamed tissue in response to injury or infection is tightly regulated. Reduced neutrophil recruitment can result in a reduced ability to fight invading microorganisms. During inflammation, neutrophils roll along the endothelial wall of postcapillary venules and integrate inflammatory signals. Neutrophil activation by selectins and chemokines regulates integrin adhesiveness. Binding of activated integrins to their counter-receptors on endothelial cells induces neutrophil arrest and firm adhesion. Adherent neutrophils can be further activated to undergo cytoskeletal rearrangement, crawling, transmigration, superoxide production and respiratory burst. Signaling through G-protein coupled receptors, selectin ligands, Fc receptors and outside-in signaling of integrins are all involved in neutrophil activation, but their interplay in the multistep process of recruitment are only beginning to emerge. This review provides an overview of signaling in rolling and adherent neutrophils. PMID:19037827

  5. Interleukin-17 contributes to generation of Th1 immunity and neutrophil recruitment during Chlamydia muridarum genital tract infection but is not required for macrophage influx or normal resolution of infection.

    PubMed

    Scurlock, Amy M; Frazer, Lauren C; Andrews, Charles W; O'Connell, Catherine M; Foote, Isaac P; Bailey, Sarabeth L; Chandra-Kuntal, Kumar; Kolls, Jay K; Darville, Toni

    2011-03-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17) contributes to development of Th1 immunity and neutrophil influx during Chlamydia muridarum pulmonary infection, but its role during C. muridarum genital tract infection has not been described. We detected similar numbers of Chlamydia-specific Th17 and Th1 cells in iliac nodes of wild-type mice early during genital C. muridarum infection, while Th1 cells predominated later. il17ra(-/-) mice exhibited a reduced chlamydia-specific Th1 response in draining iliac nodes and decreased local IFN-γ production. Neutrophil influx into the genital tract was also decreased. However, il17ra(-/-) mice resolved infection normally, and no difference in pathology was observed compared to the wild type. Macrophage influx and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production were increased in il17ra(-/-) mice, providing a compensatory mechanism to effectively control chlamydial genital tract infection despite a reduced Th1 response. In ifnγ(-/-) mice, a marked increase in cellular infiltrates and chronic pathology was associated with an increased Th17 response. Although neutralization of IL-17 in ifnγ(-/-) mice decreased neutrophil influx, macrophage infiltration remained intact and the bacterial burden was not increased. Collectively, these results indicate that IL-17 contributes to the generation of Th1 immunity and neutrophil recruitment but is not required for macrophage influx or normal resolution of C. muridarum genital infection. These data highlight the redundant immune mechanisms operative at this mucosal site and the importance of examining site-specific responses to mucosal pathogens.

  6. Lower Respiratory Tract Infection of the Ferret by 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza A Virus Triggers Biphasic, Systemic, and Local Recruitment of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Jeremy V.; Bagci, Ulas; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Squier, Brendan; Fraig, Mostafa; Uriarte, Silvia M.; Guo, Haixun; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection of the lower respiratory tract by influenza A viruses results in increases in inflammation and immune cell infiltration in the lung. The dynamic relationships among the lung microenvironments, the lung, and systemic host responses during infection remain poorly understood. Here we used extensive systematic histological analysis coupled with live imaging to gain access to these relationships in ferrets infected with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1pdm virus). Neutrophil levels rose in the lungs of H1N1pdm virus-infected ferrets 6 h postinfection and became concentrated at areas of the H1N1pdm virus-infected bronchiolar epithelium by 1 day postinfection (dpi). In addition, neutrophil levels were increased throughout the alveolar spaces during the first 3 dpi and returned to baseline by 6 dpi. Histochemical staining revealed that neutrophil infiltration in the lungs occurred in two waves, at 1 and 3 dpi, and gene expression within microenvironments suggested two types of neutrophils. Specifically, CCL3 levels, but not CXCL8/interleukin 8 (IL-8) levels, were higher within discrete lung microenvironments and coincided with increased infiltration of neutrophils into the lung. We used live imaging of ferrets to monitor host responses within the lung over time with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Sites in the H1N1pdm virus-infected ferret lung with high FDG uptake had high levels of proliferative epithelium. In summary, neutrophils invaded the H1N1pdm virus-infected ferret lung globally and focally at sites of infection. Increased neutrophil levels in microenvironments did not correlate with increased FDG uptake; hence, FDG uptake may reflect prior infection and inflammation of lungs that have experienced damage, as evidenced by bronchial regeneration of tissues in the lungs at sites with high FDG levels. IMPORTANCE Severe influenza disease is characterized by an acute infection of the lower airways that may progress rapidly to organ failure

  7. Lower Respiratory Tract Infection of the Ferret by 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza A Virus Triggers Biphasic, Systemic, and Local Recruitment of Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Camp, Jeremy V; Bagci, Ulas; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Squier, Brendan; Fraig, Mostafa; Uriarte, Silvia M; Guo, Haixun; Mollura, Daniel J; Jonsson, Colleen B

    2015-09-01

    Infection of the lower respiratory tract by influenza A viruses results in increases in inflammation and immune cell infiltration in the lung. The dynamic relationships among the lung microenvironments, the lung, and systemic host responses during infection remain poorly understood. Here we used extensive systematic histological analysis coupled with live imaging to gain access to these relationships in ferrets infected with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1pdm virus). Neutrophil levels rose in the lungs of H1N1pdm virus-infected ferrets 6 h postinfection and became concentrated at areas of the H1N1pdm virus-infected bronchiolar epithelium by 1 day postinfection (dpi). In addition, neutrophil levels were increased throughout the alveolar spaces during the first 3 dpi and returned to baseline by 6 dpi. Histochemical staining revealed that neutrophil infiltration in the lungs occurred in two waves, at 1 and 3 dpi, and gene expression within microenvironments suggested two types of neutrophils. Specifically, CCL3 levels, but not CXCL8/interleukin 8 (IL-8) levels, were higher within discrete lung microenvironments and coincided with increased infiltration of neutrophils into the lung. We used live imaging of ferrets to monitor host responses within the lung over time with [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Sites in the H1N1pdm virus-infected ferret lung with high FDG uptake had high levels of proliferative epithelium. In summary, neutrophils invaded the H1N1pdm virus-infected ferret lung globally and focally at sites of infection. Increased neutrophil levels in microenvironments did not correlate with increased FDG uptake; hence, FDG uptake may reflect prior infection and inflammation of lungs that have experienced damage, as evidenced by bronchial regeneration of tissues in the lungs at sites with high FDG levels. Severe influenza disease is characterized by an acute infection of the lower airways that may progress rapidly to organ failure and death. Well

  8. STK11/LKB1 deficiency promotes neutrophil recruitment and proinflammatory cytokine production to suppress T cell activity in the lung tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A.; Li, Yvonne Y.; Aref, Amir R.; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Buczkowski, Kevin A.; Liu, Yan; Awad, Mark M.; Denning, Warren L.; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Parra-Cuentas, Edwin R.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Soucheray, Margaret; Thai, Tran C.; Asahina, Hajime; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Altabef, Abigail; Cavanaugh, Jillian D.; Rhee, Kevin; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Haikuo; Fecci, Peter E.; Shimamura, Takeshi; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Heymach, John V.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Freeman, Gordon J.; Barbie, David A.; Dranoff, Glenn; Hammerman, Peter S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2016-01-01

    STK11/LKB1 is among the most commonly inactivated tumor suppressors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in tumors harboring KRAS mutations. Many oncogenes promote immune escape, undermining the effectiveness of immunotherapies, but it is unclear whether inactivation of tumor suppressor genes such as STK11/LKB1 exert similar effects. In this study, we investigated the consequences of STK11/LKB1 loss on the immune microenvironment in a mouse model of KRAS-driven NSCLC. Genetic ablation of STK11/LKB1 resulted in accumulation of neutrophils with T cell suppressive effects, along with a corresponding increase in the expression of T cell exhaustion markers and tumor-promoting cytokines. The number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was also reduced in LKB1-deficient mouse and human tumors. Furthermore, STK11/LKB1 inactivating mutations were associated with reduced expression of PD-1 ligand PD-L1 in mouse and patient tumors as well as in tumor-derived cell lines. Consistent with these results, PD-1 targeting antibodies were ineffective against Lkb1-deficient tumors. In contrast, treating Lkb1-deficient mice with an IL-6 neutralizing antibody or a neutrophil-depleting antibody yielded therapeutic benefits associated with reduced neutrophil accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Our findings illustrate how tumor suppressor mutations can modulate the immune milieu of the tumor microenvironment, and they offer specific implications for addressing STK11/LKB1 mutated tumors with PD-1 targeting antibody therapies. PMID:26833127

  9. STK11/LKB1 Deficiency Promotes Neutrophil Recruitment and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production to Suppress T-cell Activity in the Lung Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A; Li, Yvonne Y; Aref, Amir R; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Buczkowski, Kevin A; Liu, Yan; Awad, Mark M; Denning, Warren L; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Parra-Cuentas, Edwin R; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Soucheray, Margaret; Thai, Tran; Asahina, Hajime; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Altabef, Abigail; Cavanaugh, Jillian D; Rhee, Kevin; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Haikuo; Fecci, Peter E; Shimamura, Takeshi; Hellmann, Matthew D; Heymach, John V; Hodi, F Stephen; Freeman, Gordon J; Barbie, David A; Dranoff, Glenn; Hammerman, Peter S; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2016-03-01

    STK11/LKB1 is among the most commonly inactivated tumor suppressors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in tumors harboring KRAS mutations. Many oncogenes promote immune escape, undermining the effectiveness of immunotherapies, but it is unclear whether the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, such as STK11/LKB1, exerts similar effects. In this study, we investigated the consequences of STK11/LKB1 loss on the immune microenvironment in a mouse model of KRAS-driven NSCLC. Genetic ablation of STK11/LKB1 resulted in accumulation of neutrophils with T-cell-suppressive effects, along with a corresponding increase in the expression of T-cell exhaustion markers and tumor-promoting cytokines. The number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was also reduced in LKB1-deficient mouse and human tumors. Furthermore, STK11/LKB1-inactivating mutations were associated with reduced expression of PD-1 ligand PD-L1 in mouse and patient tumors as well as in tumor-derived cell lines. Consistent with these results, PD-1-targeting antibodies were ineffective against Lkb1-deficient tumors. In contrast, treating Lkb1-deficient mice with an IL6-neutralizing antibody or a neutrophil-depleting antibody yielded therapeutic benefits associated with reduced neutrophil accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Our findings illustrate how tumor suppressor mutations can modulate the immune milieu of the tumor microenvironment, and they offer specific implications for addressing STK11/LKB1-mutated tumors with PD-1-targeting antibody therapies.

  10. Brief Glutamine Pretreatment Increases Alveolar Macrophage CD163/Heme Oxygenase-1/p38-MAPK Dephosphorylation Pathway and Decreases Capillary Damage but Not Neutrophil Recruitment in IL-1/LPS-Insufflated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Agazio, Amanda; Wilson, Paul; Elkins, Nancy; Domaleski, Luke; He, Qianbin; Baer, Kaily A.; Moss, Angela F. D.; Wischmeyer, Paul E.; Repine, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glutamine (GLN) attenuates acute lung injury (ALI) but its effect on alveolar macrophages is unknown. We hypothesized that GLN pretreatment would induce the anti-inflammatory CD163/heme oxygenase (HO)-1/p38-MAPK dephosphorylation pathway in alveolar macrophages and reduce ALI in rats insufflated with interleukin-1 (IL-1) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to the following groups: GLN-IL-1/LPS-, GLN+IL-1/LPS-, GLN-IL-1/LPS+, and GLN+IL-1/LPS+. GLN pretreatment was given via gavage (1g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine) daily for 2 days. ALI was subsequently induced by insufflating 50ng IL-1 followed by 5mg/kg E.coli LPS. After 24h, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and neutrophil concentrations were analyzed. BAL alveolar macrophage CD163+ expression, HO-1 and p38-MAPK concentrations were measured, as well as alveolar macrophage tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-10 concentrations. Histology and immunofluorescence studies were also performed. Results Following IL-1/LPS insufflation, GLN pretreated rats had significantly decreased BAL protein and LDH concentrations, but not BAL neutrophil counts, compared to non-GLN pretreated rats. The number of alveolar macrophages and the number of CD163+ macrophages were significantly increased in GLN pretreated IL-1/LPS-insufflated rats compared to non-GLN pretreated, IL-1/LPS-insufflated rats. GLN pretreatment before IL-1/LPS also significantly increased HO-1 concentrations and dephosphorylated p38-MAPK levels but not cytokine levels in alveolar macrophages. Immunofluorescence localized CD163 and HO-1 in alveolar macrophages. Conclusion Short-term GLN pretreatment activates the anti-inflammatory CD163/HO-1/p38-MAPK dephosphorylation pathway of alveolar macrophages and decreases capillary damage but not neutrophil recruitment in IL-1/LPS-insufflated rats. PMID:26147379

  11. Brief Glutamine Pretreatment Increases Alveolar Macrophage CD163/Heme Oxygenase-1/p38-MAPK Dephosphorylation Pathway and Decreases Capillary Damage but Not Neutrophil Recruitment in IL-1/LPS-Insufflated Rats.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Agazio, Amanda; Wilson, Paul; Elkins, Nancy; Domaleski, Luke; He, Qianbin; Baer, Kaily A; Moss, Angela F D; Wischmeyer, Paul E; Repine, John E

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine (GLN) attenuates acute lung injury (ALI) but its effect on alveolar macrophages is unknown. We hypothesized that GLN pretreatment would induce the anti-inflammatory CD163/heme oxygenase (HO)-1/p38-MAPK dephosphorylation pathway in alveolar macrophages and reduce ALI in rats insufflated with interleukin-1 (IL-1) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to the following groups: GLN-IL-1/LPS-, GLN+IL-1/LPS-, GLN-IL-1/LPS+, and GLN+IL-1/LPS+. GLN pretreatment was given via gavage (1 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine) daily for 2 days. ALI was subsequently induced by insufflating 50 ng IL-1 followed by 5mg/kg E.coli LPS. After 24h, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and neutrophil concentrations were analyzed. BAL alveolar macrophage CD163+ expression, HO-1 and p38-MAPK concentrations were measured, as well as alveolar macrophage tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-10 concentrations. Histology and immunofluorescence studies were also performed. Following IL-1/LPS insufflation, GLN pretreated rats had significantly decreased BAL protein and LDH concentrations, but not BAL neutrophil counts, compared to non-GLN pretreated rats. The number of alveolar macrophages and the number of CD163+ macrophages were significantly increased in GLN pretreated IL-1/LPS-insufflated rats compared to non-GLN pretreated, IL-1/LPS-insufflated rats. GLN pretreatment before IL-1/LPS also significantly increased HO-1 concentrations and dephosphorylated p38-MAPK levels but not cytokine levels in alveolar macrophages. Immunofluorescence localized CD163 and HO-1 in alveolar macrophages. Short-term GLN pretreatment activates the anti-inflammatory CD163/HO-1/p38-MAPK dephosphorylation pathway of alveolar macrophages and decreases capillary damage but not neutrophil recruitment in IL-1/LPS-insufflated rats.

  12. Leishmania amazonensis Amastigotes Trigger Neutrophil Activation but Resist Neutrophil Microbicidal Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Carlsen, Eric D.; Hay, Christie; Henard, Calvin A.; Popov, Vsevolod; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first cells to infiltrate to the site of Leishmania promastigote infection, and these cells help to reduce parasite burden shortly after infection is initiated. Several clinical reports indicate that neutrophil recruitment is sustained over the course of leishmaniasis, and amastigote-laden neutrophils have been isolated from chronically infected patients and experimentally infected animals. The goal of this study was to compare how thioglycolate-elicited murine neutrophils respond to L. amazonensis metacyclic promastigotes and amastigotes derived from axenic cultures or from the lesions of infected mice. Neutrophils efficiently internalized both amastigote and promastigote forms of the parasite, and phagocytosis was enhanced in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated neutrophils or when parasites were opsonized in serum from infected mice. Parasite uptake resulted in neutrophil activation, oxidative burst, and accelerated neutrophil death. While promastigotes triggered the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), uptake of amastigotes preferentially resulted in the secretion of interleukin-10 (IL-10) from neutrophils. Finally, the majority of promastigotes were killed by neutrophils, while axenic culture- and lesion-derived amastigotes were highly resistant to neutrophil microbicidal mechanisms. This study indicates that neutrophils exhibit distinct responses to promastigote and amastigote infection. Our findings have important implications for determining the impact of sustained neutrophil recruitment and amastigote-neutrophil interactions during the late phase of cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:23918780

  13. Pleiotropic regulations of neutrophil receptors response to sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huafeng; Sun, Bingwei

    2017-03-01

    Sepsis is a complex clinical condition that causes a high mortality rate worldwide. Numerous studies on the pathophysiology of sepsis have revealed an imbalance in the inflammatory network, thus leading to tissue damage, organ failure, and ultimately death. The impairment of neu-trophil migration is associated with the outcome of sepsis. Literature review was performed on the roles of neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil receptors as pleiotropic regulators during sepsis. Additionally, we systematically classify neutrophil receptors with regard to the neutrophil response during sepsis and discuss the clinical implications of these receptors for the treatment of sepsis. Increasing evidence suggests that there is significant dysfunction in neutrophil recruitment during sepsis, characterized by the failure to migrate to the site of infection. Neutrophil receptors, as pleiotropic regulators, play important roles in the neutrophil response during sepsis. Neutrophil receptors play key roles in chemotactic neutrophil migration and may prove to be suitable targets in future pharmacological therapies for sepsis.

  14. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Induced Colitis Increases NADPH Oxidase 1 Expression, Oxidative Stress, and Neutrophil Recruitment in the Colon: Preventive Effect of Apocynin

    PubMed Central

    Mouzaoui, Souad; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Makhezer, Nesrine; Kroviarski, Yolande; El-Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species- (ROS-) mediated injury has been implicated in several inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are the major source of endogenous ROS. Here, we investigated the role of NOXs derived-ROS in a mouse model of colitis induced by the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Intraperitoneal injection of TNFα (10 μg · kg−1) induced an acute inflammation of the colon and a marked increase in expression of NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1), a colon specific NADPH oxidase isoform. TNFα-induced colitis was also characterized by high production of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) and mucosal infiltration of neutrophils, NOX2-expressing cells. Concomitantly, ROS production and lipid peroxidation were significantly enhanced while catalase activity and glutathione level were reduced indicating a redox imbalance in the colon. Furthermore, the redox-sensitive MAP kinases, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, were activated during TNFα-induced colitis. Pretreatment of mice with apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor with antioxidant properties, before TNFα challenge, prevented all these events. These data suggest that ROS derived from NADPH oxidases (mainly NOX1 and NOX2) and MAP kinase pathways could contribute to the induction and expansion of oxidative lesions characteristics of IBD and that apocynin could potentially be beneficial in IBD treatment. PMID:25276054

  15. Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) clearance is associated with the early recruitment of neutrophils and CD8(+)T cells in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Del Río, L; Buendía, A J; Sánchez, J; Garcés, B; Caro, M R; Gallego, M C; Bernabé, A; Cuello, F; Salinas, J

    2000-01-01

    The immune mechanisms in response to Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection were studied in C57BL/6 and CBA mice. The infection was monitored and the following aspects of the immune response were evaluated: the nature of the leucocyte infiltrate in the liver, the percentages of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), macrophages and lymphocytes in the spleen, and the concentrations of cytokines in serum. In addition, the serum concentrations of IgG1 and IgG2a were determined. Both mouse strains showed a Th1-like immune response, with high concentrations of IFN-gamma and minimal levels of IL-4; however, C57 mice differed from CBA mice in showing milder clinical signs and earlier resolution of infection. The greater ability of C57 mice than CBA mice to eliminate chlamydophilae was related to the establishment of an earlier innate immunity, based on a more pronounced PMN response, and on a greater presence of CD8(+)T cells.

  16. Necator americanus: The Na-ASP-2 protein secreted by the infective larvae induces neutrophil recruitment in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Molly A.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Mendez, Susana

    2008-01-01

    The L3-secreted Ancylostoma Secreted Protein-2 from the human hookworm Necator americanus (Na-ASP-2) has been selected as a candidate vaccine antigen in anticipation of clinical trials. Its crystal structure revealed that Na-ASP-2 has structural and charge similarities to CC-chemokines, suggesting that it might act as a chemokine mimic when released by the infective larvae during tissue migration. Using the air pouch model of acute inflammation, we found that Na-ASP-2 induced a significant leukocyte influx to the skin pouch, mostly comprised of neutrophils (60%) and monocytes (30%) that was transient and resolved in 24 h. Other hookworm larval proteins did not cause any inflammatory leukocytes to migrate into air pouches. In vitro chemotaxis assays confirmed our results and demonstrated that leukocyte migration was a direct effect of Na-ASP-2 exposure and not caused by other molecules released by host cells in the inflammatory microenvironment or by the expression vector. PMID:18199436

  17. Neutrophil recruitment and phagocytosis of boar spermatozoa after artificial insemination of sows, and the effects of inseminate volume, sperm dose and specific additives in the extender.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, A; Engel, B; Woelders, H

    2003-03-01

    In this study the recruitment of leucocytes and phagocytosis of spermatozoa after artificial insemination of multiparous sows was investigated. In Expt 1, groups of sows received either no inseminate (n = 6) or inseminates with various concentrations of spermatozoa and seminal plasma or different inseminate volumes (n = 9 per group). In Expt 2, groups of sows received inseminates containing no addition, caffeine + CaCl(2), or excess EDTA (n = 6 per group). Leucocytes and spermatozoa were counted in the collected backflow from the vulva, and in the PBS flushings of the genital tract of sows killed at 4 h after insemination. Tissue homogenates were checked for remaining spermatozoa. Leucocyte recruitment did not depend on the presence of seminal plasma or spermatozoa. In the control groups about 43% of the inseminated spermatozoa were found in the backflow and 5% in the genital tract. Many spermatozoa could be recognized inside polymorphonuclear leucocytes. With an inseminate volume of 20 ml instead of 80 ml, fewer spermatozoa were found in the backflow and more (non-phagocytosed) spermatozoa were recovered in the uterus (P < or = 0.05). With a sperm dose of 0.24 x 10(9) instead of 2.4 x 10(9), a higher percentage of the inseminated spermatozoa was recovered in the oviducts (P < or = 0.05). The use of caffeine + CaCl(2) resulted in lower recruitment of leucocytes (P < or = 0.05) and a higher number of non-phagocytosed spermatozoa in the uterus (P < or = 0.01) compared with controls. The numbers of spermatozoa in the oviducts were not different. Insemination with excess EDTA had no positive effects on the number of spermatozoa in the genital tract.

  18. Pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and bronchial reactivity in formaldehyde-exposed rats are modulated by mast cells and differentially by neuropeptides and nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lino dos Santos Franco, Adriana; Damazo, Amilcar Sabino; Beraldo de Souza, Hyula Regines; Domingos, Helory Vanni; Oliveira-Filho, Ricardo Martins; Oliani, Sonia Maria; Costa, Soraia Katia Pereira; Tavares de Lima, Wothan . E-mail: wtdelima@icb.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    We have used a pharmacological approach to study the mechanisms underlying the rat lung injury and the airway reactivity changes induced by inhalation of formaldehyde (FA) (1% formalin solution, 90 min once a day, 4 days). The reactivity of isolated tracheae and intrapulmonary bronchi were assessed in dose-response curves to methacholine (MCh). Local and systemic inflammatory phenomena were evaluated in terms of leukocyte countings in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, blood, bone marrow lavage and spleen. Whereas the tracheal reactivity to MCh did not change, a significant bronchial hyporesponsiveness (BHR) was found after FA inhalation as compared with naive rats. Also, FA exposure significantly increased the total cell numbers in BAL, in peripheral blood and in the spleen, but did not modify the counts in bone marrow. Capsaicin hindered the increase of leukocyte number recovered in BAL fluid after FA exposure. Both compound 48/80 and indomethacin were able to prevent the lung neutrophil influx after FA, but indomethacin had no effect on that of mononuclear cells. Following FA inhalation, the treatment with sodium cromoglycate (SCG), but not with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor L-NAME, significantly reduced the total cell number in BAL. Compound 48/80, L-NAME and SCG significantly prevented BHR to MCh after FA inhalation, whereas capsaicin was inactive in this regard. On the other hand, indomethacin exacerbated BHR. These data suggest that after FA inhalation, the resulting lung leukocyte influx and BHR may involve nitric oxide, airway sensory fibers and mast cell-derived mediators. The effect of NO seemed to be largely restricted to the bronchial tonus, whereas neuropeptides appeared to be linked to the inflammatory response, therefore indicating that the mechanisms responsible for the changes of airway responsiveness caused by FA may be separate from those underlying its inflammatory lung effects.

  19. A comparison of the pulmonary defenses against streptococcal infection in rats and mice following O3 exposure: Differences in disease susceptibility and neutrophil recruitment

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, M.I.; Selgrade, M.K. )

    1993-12-01

    Ozone (O3) exposure reduces alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis in mice and increases their susceptibility to Streptococcus zooepidemicus. O3 exposure also decreases AM phagocytosis in rats but does not result in mortality to infection. To investigate the mechanism of disease protection in rats, antibacterial defenses of two strains of mice and F344 rats were compared. O3 exposure (3 hr, 0.4 or 0.8 ppm) and infection with S. zooepidemicus resulted in a dose-dependent proliferation of bacteria in the lungs of mice and high mortality. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were observed in severely affected individuals 2 or more days postinfection and did not alter the fatal infection. In contrast, microbial inactivation was only impaired in O3-exposed rat lungs during the first 48 hr after infection. In these animals PMNs could be isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid between 6 and 48 hr postinfection with the peak response occurring at 24 hr. Pretreatment with anti-PMN serum eliminated the neutrophil influx and impaired further the bactericidal activity in ozone-exposed rats. The results suggest that inhaled streptococci are cleared normally from the mouse lung by AMs. Following exposure to O3, AM phagocytosis is reduced and the mice develop a fatal infection. The persistence of bacteria in the lungs of O3-exposed rats triggers a transient influx of PMNs whose appearance corresponds with elimination of the bacteria. Differences in antimicrobial defenses between various experimental species and humans need to be better understood in order to predict effects of air pollutants on susceptibility to infection in man.

  20. Neutrophils in Cancer: Two Sides of the Same Coin.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in blood and are considered to be the first line of defense during inflammation and infections. In addition, neutrophils are also found infiltrating many types of tumors. Tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) have relevant roles in malignant disease. Indeed neutrophils may be potent antitumor effector cells. However, increasing clinical evidence shows TANs correlate with poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment controls neutrophil recruitment and in turn TANs help tumor progression. Hence, TANs can be beneficial or detrimental to the host. It is the purpose of this review to highlight these two sides of the neutrophil coin in cancer and to describe recent studies that provide some light on the mechanisms for neutrophil recruitment to the tumor, for neutrophils supporting tumor progression, and for neutrophil activation to enhance their antitumor functions.

  1. Neutrophils in Cancer: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    PubMed Central

    Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in blood and are considered to be the first line of defense during inflammation and infections. In addition, neutrophils are also found infiltrating many types of tumors. Tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) have relevant roles in malignant disease. Indeed neutrophils may be potent antitumor effector cells. However, increasing clinical evidence shows TANs correlate with poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment controls neutrophil recruitment and in turn TANs help tumor progression. Hence, TANs can be beneficial or detrimental to the host. It is the purpose of this review to highlight these two sides of the neutrophil coin in cancer and to describe recent studies that provide some light on the mechanisms for neutrophil recruitment to the tumor, for neutrophils supporting tumor progression, and for neutrophil activation to enhance their antitumor functions. PMID:26819959

  2. Contribution of neutrophils to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Grommes, Jochen; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), remain unsolved problems of intensive care medicine. ALI/ARDS are characterized by lung edema due to increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier and subsequent impairment of arterial oxygenation. Lung edema, endothelial and epithelial injury are accompanied by an influx of neutrophils into the interstitium and broncheoalveolar space. Hence, activation and recruitment of neutrophils are regarded to play a key role in progression of ALI/ARDS. Neutrophils are the first cells to be recruited to the site of inflammation and have a potent antimicrobial armour that includes oxidants, proteinases and cationic peptides. Under pathological circumstances, however, unregulated release of these microbicidal compounds into the extracellular space paradoxically can damage host tissues. This review focuses on the mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment into the lung and on the contribution of neutrophils to tissue damage in ALI.

  3. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Blocks Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Nayyer; Fahlgren, Anna; Fällman, Maria

    2016-12-01

    Neutrophils are essential components of immunity and are rapidly recruited to infected or injured tissue. Upon their activation, neutrophils release granules to the cell's exterior, through a process called degranulation. These granules contain proteins with antimicrobial properties that help combat infection. The enteropathogenic bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis successfully persists as an extracellular bacterium during infection by virtue of its translocation of virulence effectors (Yersinia outer proteins [Yops]) that act in the cytosol of host immune cells to subvert phagocytosis and proinflammatory responses. Here, we investigated the effect of Y. pseudotuberculosis on neutrophil degranulation upon cell contact. We found that virulent Y. pseudotuberculosis was able to prevent secondary granule release. The blocking effect was general, as the release of primary and tertiary granules was also reduced. Degranulation of secondary granules was also blocked in primed neutrophils, suggesting that this mechanism could be an important element of immune evasion. Further, wild-type bacteria conferred a transient block on neutrophils that prevented their degranulation upon contact with plasmid-cured, avirulent Y. pseudotuberculosis and Escherichia coli Detailed analyses showed that the block was strictly dependent on the cooperative actions of the two antiphagocytic effectors, YopE and YopH, suggesting that the neutrophil target structures constituting signaling molecules needed to initiate both phagocytosis and general degranulation. Thus, via these virulence effectors, Yersinia can impair several mechanisms of the neutrophil's antimicrobial arsenal, which underscores the power of its virulence effector machinery. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Neutrophil Functions in Periodontal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Vieyra, Ricarda; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oral tissues are constantly exposed to damage from the mechanical effort of eating and to microorganisms, mostly bacteria. In healthy gingiva tissue remodeling and a balance between bacteria and innate immune cells are maintained. However, excess of bacteria biofilm (plaque) creates an inflammation state that recruits more immune cells, mainly neutrophils to the gingiva. Neutrophils create a barrier for bacteria to reach inside tissues. When neutrophils are insufficient, bacteria thrive causing more inflammation that has been associated with systemic effects on other conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. But paradoxically when neutrophils persist, they can also promote a chronic inflammatory state that leads to periodontitis, a condition that leads to damage of the bone-supporting tissues. In periodontitis, bone loss is a serious complication. How a neutrophil balance is needed for maintaining healthy oral tissues is the focus of this review. We present recent evidence on how alterations in neutrophil number and function can lead to inflammatory bone loss, and how some oral bacteria signal neutrophils to block their antimicrobial functions and promote an inflammatory state. Also, based on this new information, novel therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:27019855

  5. Neutrophil Functions in Periodontal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Vieyra, Ricarda; Rosales, Carlos; Uribe-Querol, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Oral tissues are constantly exposed to damage from the mechanical effort of eating and to microorganisms, mostly bacteria. In healthy gingiva tissue remodeling and a balance between bacteria and innate immune cells are maintained. However, excess of bacteria biofilm (plaque) creates an inflammation state that recruits more immune cells, mainly neutrophils to the gingiva. Neutrophils create a barrier for bacteria to reach inside tissues. When neutrophils are insufficient, bacteria thrive causing more inflammation that has been associated with systemic effects on other conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. But paradoxically when neutrophils persist, they can also promote a chronic inflammatory state that leads to periodontitis, a condition that leads to damage of the bone-supporting tissues. In periodontitis, bone loss is a serious complication. How a neutrophil balance is needed for maintaining healthy oral tissues is the focus of this review. We present recent evidence on how alterations in neutrophil number and function can lead to inflammatory bone loss, and how some oral bacteria signal neutrophils to block their antimicrobial functions and promote an inflammatory state. Also, based on this new information, novel therapeutic approaches are discussed.

  6. Alarmins Link Neutrophils and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, De; de la Rosa, Gonzalo; Tewary, Poonam; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first major population of leukocyte to infiltrate infected or injured tissues and are crucial for initiating host innate defense and adaptive immunity. Although the contribution of neutrophils to innate immune defense is mediated predominantly by phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms, neutrophils also participate in the induction of adaptive immune responses. At sites of infection and/or injury, neutrophils release numerous mediators upon degranulation or death, among these are alarmins which have a characteristic dual capacity to mobilize and activate antigen-presenting cells. We describe here how alarmins released by neutrophil degranulation and/or death can link neutrophils to dendritic cells by promoting their recruitment and activation, resulting in the augmentation of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:19699678

  7. Moesin regulates neutrophil rolling velocity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masanori; Hirata, Takako

    2016-01-01

    During inflammation, the selectin-induced slow rolling of neutrophils on venules cooperates with chemokine signaling to mediate neutrophil recruitment into tissues. Previous studies identified P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and CD44 as E-selectin ligands that activate integrins to induce slow rolling. We show here that in TNF-α-treated cremaster muscle venules, slow leukocyte rolling was impaired in mice deficient in moesin, a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family. Accordingly, neutrophil recruitment in a peritonitis model was decreased in moesin-deficient mice when chemokine signaling was blocked with pertussis toxin. These results suggest that moesin contributes to the slow rolling and subsequent recruitment of neutrophils during inflammation.

  8. Recombinant gamma interferon causes neutrophil migration mediated by the release of a macrophage neutrophil chemotactic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, R. A.; Cunha, F. Q.; Ferreira, S. H.

    1990-01-01

    A dose-dependent neutrophil migration was observed following the injection of purified (Hu IFN-gamma) or recombinant (rIFN-gamma) human gamma interferon into rat peritoneal cavities. This finding contrasts with their inability to cause chemotaxis in vitro in the Boyden chamber. Neutrophil migration into peritoneal cavities and subcutaneous air pouches induced by both preparations of interferon was abolished by pretreatment of the animals with dexamethasone. IFN-gamma-induced neutrophil migration was enhanced when the macrophage population of the peritoneal cavities was increased by previous injection of thioglycollate and reduced by peritoneal lavage. Macrophage monolayers pretreated either with rIFN-gamma or with lipopolysaccharide from E. coli release into the supernatant a factor that stimulates neutrophil recruitment in animals treated with dexamethasone. Dexamethasone blocked this release but did not affect the neutrophil recruitment induced by this factor. These results suggest that IFN-gamma-induced neutrophil migration in vivo may be mediated by the release from resident macrophages of a neutrophil chemotactic factor and that dexamethasone blockade of neutrophil recruitment by IFN-gamma is due to inhibition of the release of this factor. PMID:2119790

  9. CFTR targeting during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hang Pong; Valentine, Vincent G; Wang, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel, plays critical roles in phagocytic host defense. However, how activated neutrophils regulate CFTR channel distribution subcellularly is not well defined. To investigate, we tested multiple Abs against different CFTR domains, to examine CFTR expression in human peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. The data confirmed that resting neutrophils had pronounced CFTR expression. Activation of neutrophils with soluble or particulate agonists did not significantly increase CFTR expression level, but induced CFTR redistribution to cell surface. Such CFTR mobilization correlated with cell-surface recruitment of formyl-peptide receptor during secretory vesicle exocytosis. Intriguingly, neutrophils from patients with ΔF508-CF, despite expression of the mutant CFTR, showed little cell-surface mobilization upon stimulation. Although normal neutrophils effectively targeted CFTR to their phagosomes, ΔF508-CF neutrophils had impairment in that process, resulting in deficient hypochlorous acid production. Taken together, activated neutrophils regulate CFTR distribution by targeting this chloride channel to the subcellular sites of activation, and ΔF508-CF neutrophils fail to achieve such targeting, thus undermining their host defense function.

  10. Exposure to Leishmania braziliensis triggers neutrophil activation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Falcão, Sarah A C; Weinkopff, Tiffany; Hurrell, Benjamin P; Celes, Fabiana S; Curvelo, Rebecca P; Prates, Deboraci B; Barral, Aldina; Borges, Valeria M; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; de Oliveira, Camila I

    2015-03-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are rapidly recruited to the sites of Leishmania inoculation. During Leishmania braziliensis infection, depletion of inflammatory cells significantly increases the parasite load whereas co-inoculation of neutrophils plus L. braziliensis had an opposite effect. Moreover, the co-culture of infected macrophages and neutrophils also induced parasite killing leading us to ask how neutrophils alone respond to an L. braziliensis exposure. Herein we focused on understanding the interaction between neutrophils and L. braziliensis, exploring cell activation and apoptotic fate. Inoculation of serum-opsonized L. braziliensis promastigotes in mice induced neutrophil accumulation in vivo, peaking at 24 h. In vitro, exposure of thyoglycollate-elicited inflammatory or bone marrow neutrophils to L. braziliensis modulated the expression of surface molecules such as CD18 and CD62L, and induced the oxidative burst. Using mCherry-expressing L. braziliensis, we determined that such effects were mainly observed in infected and not in bystander cells. Neutrophil activation following contact with L. braziliensis was also confirmed by the release of TNF-α and neutrophil elastase. Lastly, neutrophils infected with L. braziliensis but not with L. major displayed markers of early apoptosis. We show that L. braziliensis induces neutrophil recruitment in vivo and that neutrophils exposed to the parasite in vitro respond through activation and release of inflammatory mediators. This outcome may impact on parasite elimination, particularly at the early stages of infection.

  11. Neutrophil-mediated lung permeability and host defense proteins.

    PubMed

    Kantrow, Stephen P; Shen, Zhiwei; Jagneaux, Tonya; Zhang, Ping; Nelson, Steve

    2009-10-01

    Neutrophil recruitment to the alveolar space is associated with increased epithelial permeability. The present study investigated in mice whether neutrophil recruitment to the lung leads to accumulation of plasma-derived host defense proteins in the alveolar space and whether respiratory burst contributes to this increase in permeability. Albumin, complement C1q, and IgM were increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid 6 h after intratracheal LPS challenge. Neutrophil depletion before LPS treatment completely prevented this increase in BAL fluid protein concentration. Respiratory burst was not detected in neutrophils isolated from BAL fluid, and BAL proteins were increased in mice deficient in a key subunit of the respiratory burst apparatus, gp91(phox), similar to wild-type mice. Neutrophil recruitment elicited by intratracheal instillation of the chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine was also accompanied by accumulation of albumin, C1q, and IgM. During neutrophil recruitment to the alveolar space, epithelial permeability facilitates delivery of host defense proteins. The observed increase in epithelial permeability requires recruitment of neutrophils, but not activation of the respiratory burst, and occurs with chemokine-induced neutrophil migration independent of LPS exposure.

  12. Serum amyloid A1α induces paracrine IL-8/CXCL8 via TLR2 and directly synergizes with this chemokine via CXCR2 and formyl peptide receptor 2 to recruit neutrophils.

    PubMed

    De Buck, Mieke; Berghmans, Nele; Pörtner, Noëmie; Vanbrabant, Lotte; Cockx, Maaike; Struyf, Sofie; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Jo; Gouwy, Mieke

    2015-12-01

    Cell migration depends on the ability of leukocytes to sense an external gradient of chemotactic proteins produced during inflammation. These proteins include chemokines, complement factors, and some acute phase proteins, such as serum amyloid A. Serum amyloid A chemoattracts neutrophils, monocytes, and T lymphocytes via its G protein-coupled receptor formyl peptide receptor 2. We demonstrate that serum amyloid A1α more potently chemoattracts neutrophils in vivo than in vitro. In contrast to CD14(+) monocytes, no rapid (within 2 h) induction of interleukin-8/CXC chemokine ligand 8 or macrophage-inflammatory protein-1α/CC chemokine ligand 3 was observed in purified human neutrophils after stimulation of the cells with serum amyloid A1α or lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, interleukin-8/CXC chemokine ligand 8 induction in monocytes by serum amyloid A1α was mediated by toll-like receptor 2 and was inhibited by association of serum amyloid A1α with high density lipoprotein. This indicates that the potent chemotactic response of neutrophils toward intraperitoneally injected serum amyloid A1α is indirectly enhanced by rapid induction of chemokines in peritoneal cells, synergizing in a paracrine manner with serum amyloid A1α. We observed direct synergy between IL-8/CXC chemokine ligand 8 and serum amyloid A1α, but not lipopolysaccharide, in chemotaxis and shape change assays with neutrophils. Furthermore, the selective CXC chemokine receptor 2 and formyl peptide receptor 2 antagonists, SB225002 and WRW4, respectively, blocked the synergy between IL-8/CXC chemokine ligand 8 and serum amyloid A1α in neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro, indicating that for synergy their corresponding G protein-coupled receptors are required. Additionally, SB225002 significantly inhibited serum amyloid A1α-mediated peritoneal neutrophil influx. Taken together, endogenous (e.g., IL-1β) and exogenous (e.g., lipopolysaccharide) inflammatory mediators induce primary chemoattractants such as

  13. Intergrin-dependent neutrophil migration in the injured mouse cornea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As an early responder to an inflammatory stimulus, neutrophils must exit the vasculature and migrate through the extravascular tissue to the site of insult, which is often remote from the point of extravasation. Following a central epithelial corneal abrasion, neutrophils recruited from the peripher...

  14. Transendothelial migration enables subsequent transmigration of neutrophils through underlying pericytes.

    PubMed

    Ayres-Sander, Chantal E; Lauridsen, Holly; Maier, Cheryl L; Sava, Parid; Pober, Jordan S; Gonzalez, Anjelica L

    2013-01-01

    During acute inflammation, neutrophil recruitment into extravascular tissue requires neutrophil tethering and rolling on cytokine-activated endothelial cells (ECs), tight adhesion, crawling towards EC junctions and transendothelial migration (TEM). Following TEM, neutrophils must still traverse the subendothelial basement membrane and network of pericytes (PCs). Until recently, the contribution of the PC layer to neutrophil recruitment was largely ignored. Here we analyze human neutrophil interactions with interleukin (IL)-1β-activated human EC monolayers, PC monolayers and EC/PC bilayers in vitro. Compared to EC, PC support much lower levels of neutrophil binding (54.6% vs. 7.1%, respectively) and transmigration (63.7 vs. 8.8%, respectively) despite comparable levels of IL-8 (CXCL8) synthesis and display. Remarkably, EC/PC bilayers support intermediate levels of transmigration (37.7%). Neutrophil adhesion to both cell types is Mac-1-dependent and while ICAM-1 transduction of PCs increases neutrophil adhesion to (41.4%), it does not increase transmigration through PC monolayers. TEM, which increases neutrophil Mac-1 surface expression, concomitantly increases the ability of neutrophils to traverse PCs (19.2%). These data indicate that contributions from both PCs and ECs must be considered in evaluation of microvasculature function in acute inflammation.

  15. Regulation of plasminogen binding to neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Herren, T; Burke, T A; Jardi, M; Felez, J; Plow, E F

    2001-02-15

    Plasminogen plays an integral role in the inflammatory response, and this participation is likely to depend on its interaction with cell surfaces. It has previously been reported that isolation of human neutrophils from blood leads to a spontaneous increase in their plasminogen-binding capacity, and the basis for this up-regulation has been explored as a model for mechanisms for modulation of plasminogen receptor expression. Freshly isolated human peripheral blood neutrophils exhibited relatively low plasminogen binding, but when cultured for 20 hours, they increased this capacity dramatically, up to 50-fold. This increase was abolished by soybean trypsin inhibitor and was susceptible to carboxypeptidase B treatment, implicating proteolysis and exposure of carboxy-terminal lysines in the enhanced interaction. In support of this hypothesis, treatment of neutrophils with elastase, cathepsin G, or plasmin increased their plasminogen binding, and specific inhibitors of elastase and cathepsin G suppressed the up-regulation that occurred during neutrophil culture. When neutrophils were stimulated with phorbol ester, their plasminogen binding increased rapidly, but this increase was insensitive to the protease inhibitors. These results indicate that plasminogen binding to neutrophils can be up-regulated by 2 distinct pathways. A major pathway with the propensity to markedly up-regulate plasminogen binding depends upon the proteolytic remodeling of the cell surface. In response to thioglycollate, neutrophils recruited into the peritoneum of mice were shown to bind more plasminogen than those in peripheral blood, suggesting that modulation of plasminogen binding by these or other pathways may also occur in vivo.

  16. Characterization of arginase expression by equine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Martin, James G; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2014-02-15

    Neutrophils are the predominant cells recruited in the airways of horses suffering from heaves. These cells have been shown to express arginase in some species. The metabolism of l-arginine is thought to be involved in chronic inflammation, and airway obstruction and remodeling. The aim of this study was to assess the expression, regulation, activity, and functional role of arginase isoforms in equine neutrophils. Arginase I, arginase II, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) expression were assessed in resting and stimulated (IL-4, LPS/fMLP, PMA; 5 and 18 h) blood neutrophils using quantitative PCR. Arginase expression was also studied by Western blot and enzyme activity assay. The effect of nor-NOHA (1mM), a specific arginase inhibitor, was assessed on arginase activity in vitro and ex vivo on neutrophil's inflammatory gene expression and viability. Results showed that equine neutrophils constitutively express arginase isoform 2, ODC and OAT. Neutrophil ex vivo stimulation did not induce arginase I or influence arginase II mRNA expression. Ex vivo inhibition of arginase activity by nor-NOHA had no effect on neutrophils inflammatory gene expression induced by LPS/fMLP (5h) but significantly reversed the cell loss observed after this stimulation.

  17. Circulating platelet-neutrophil complexes are important for subsequent neutrophil activation and migration.

    PubMed

    Kornerup, Kristin N; Salmon, Gary P; Pitchford, Simon C; Liu, Wai L; Page, Clive P

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that platelets are essential for the migration of eosinophils into the lungs of allergic mice, and that this is dependent on the functional expression of platelet P-selectin. We sought to investigate whether the same is true for nonallergic, acute inflammatory stimuli administered to distinct anatomic compartments. Neutrophil trafficking was induced in two models, namely zymosan-induced peritonitis and LPS-induced lung inflammation, and the platelet dependence of these responses investigated utilizing mice rendered thrombocytopenic. The relative contribution of selectins was also investigated. The results presented herein clearly show that platelet depletion (>90%) significantly inhibits neutrophil recruitment in both models. In addition, we show that P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, but not P-selectin, is essential for neutrophil recruitment in mice in vivo, thus suggesting the existence of different regulatory mechanisms for the recruitment of leukocyte subsets in response to allergic and nonallergic stimuli. Further studies in human blood demonstrate that low-dose prothrombotic and pro-inflammatory stimuli (CCL17 or CCL22) synergize to induce platelet and neutrophil activation, as well as the formation of platelet-neutrophil conjugates. We conclude that adhesion between platelets and neutrophils in vivo is an important event in acute inflammatory responses. Targeting this interaction may be a successful strategy for inflammatory conditions where current therapy fails to provide adequate treatment.

  18. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling in intestinal stromal cells controls KC/ CXCL1 secretion, which correlates with recruitment of IL-22- secreting neutrophils at early stages of Citrobacter rodentium infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Soo; Yang, Hyungjun; Yang, Jin-Young; Kim, Yeji; Lee, Su-Hyun; Kim, Ji Heui; Jang, Yong Ju; Vallance, Bruce A; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2015-08-01

    Attaching and effacing pathogens, including enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in humans and Citrobacter rodentium in mice, raise serious public health concerns. Here we demonstrate that interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling is indispensable for protection against C. rodentium infection in mice. Four days after infection with C. rodentium, there were significantly fewer neutrophils (CD11b+ Ly6C+ Ly6G+) in the colons of IL-1R−/− mice than in wild-type mice. Levels of mRNA and protein of KC/CXCL1 were also significantly reduced in colon homogenates of infected IL-1R−/− mice relative to wild-type mice. Of note, infiltrated CD11b+ Ly6C+ Ly6G+ neutrophils were the main source of IL-22 secretion after C. rodentium infection. Interestingly, intestinal stromal cells isolated from IL-1R−/− mice secreted lower levels of KC/CXCL1 than stromal cells from wild-type mice during C. rodentium infection. Similar effects were found when mouse intestinal stromal cells and human nasal polyp stromal cells were treated with IL-1R antagonists (i.e., anakinra) in vitro. These results suggest that IL-1 signaling plays a pivotal role in activating mucosal stromal cells to secrete KC/CXCL1, which is essential for infiltration of IL-22-secreting neutrophils upon bacterial infection.

  19. Neutrophils: Between Host Defence, Immune Modulation, and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Philipp; Saffarzadeh, Mona; Weber, Alexander N. R.; Rieber, Nikolaus; Radsak, Markus; von Bernuth, Horst; Benarafa, Charaf; Roos, Dirk; Skokowa, Julia; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant human immune cells, are rapidly recruited to sites of infection, where they fulfill their life-saving antimicrobial functions. While traditionally regarded as short-lived phagocytes, recent findings on long-term survival, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, heterogeneity and plasticity, suppressive functions, and tissue injury have expanded our understanding of their diverse role in infection and inflammation. This review summarises our current understanding of neutrophils in host-pathogen interactions and disease involvement, illustrating the versatility and plasticity of the neutrophil, moving between host defence, immune modulation, and tissue damage. PMID:25764063

  20. Exosomes Mediate LTB4 Release during Neutrophil Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Ritankar; Tavakoli Tameh, Aidin; Parent, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is secreted by chemotactic neutrophils, forming a secondary gradient that amplifies the reach of primary chemoattractants. This strategy increases the recruitment range for neutrophils and is important during inflammation. Here, we show that LTB4 and its synthesizing enzymes localize to intracellular multivesicular bodies that, upon stimulation, release their content as exosomes. Purified exosomes can activate resting neutrophils and elicit chemotactic activity in a LTB4 receptor-dependent manner. Inhibition of exosome release leads to loss of directional motility with concomitant loss of LTB4 release. Our findings establish that the exosomal pool of LTB4 acts in an autocrine fashion to sensitize neutrophils towards the primary chemoattractant, and in a paracrine fashion to mediate the recruitment of neighboring neutrophils in trans. We envision that this mechanism is used by other signals to foster communication between cells in harsh extracellular environments. PMID:26741884

  1. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-01-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. PMID:24909063

  2. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. © 2014 The Authors. Parasite Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Management of neutrophilic dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Schadt, Courtney R; Callen, Jeffrey P

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic dermatoses, including Sweet's syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, and rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatitis, are inflammatory conditions of the skin often associated with underlying systemic disease. These are characterized by the accumulation of neutrophils in the skin. The associated conditions, potential for systemic neutrophilic infiltration, and therapeutic management of these disorders can be similar. Sweet's syndrome can often be effectively treated with a brief course of systemic corticosteroids. Pyoderma gangrenosum, however, can be recurrent, and early initiation of a steroid-sparing agent is prudent. Second-line treatment for both of these conditions includes medications affecting neutrophil function, in addition to immunosuppressant medications.

  4. Neutrophil Dysfunction in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Liu, An-Lei; Gao, Shuang; Ma, Shui; Guo, Shu-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection. In this article, we reviewed the correlation between neutrophil dysfunction and sepsis. Data Sources: Articles published up to May 31, 2016, were selected from the PubMed databases, with the keywords of “neutrophil function”, “neutrophil dysfunction”, and “sepsis”. Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the neutrophil function in infection and neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Results: We emphasized the diagnosis of sepsis and its limitations. Pathophysiological mechanisms involve a generalized circulatory, immune, coagulopathic, and/or neuroendocrine response to infection. Many studies focused on neutrophil burst or cytokines. Complement activation, impairment of neutrophil migration, and endothelial lesions are involved in this progress. Alterations of cytokines, chemokines, and other mediators contribute to neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Conclusions: Sepsis represents a severe derangement of the immune response to infection, resulting in neutrophil dysfunction. Neutrophil dysfunction promotes sepsis and even leads to organ failure. Mechanism studies, clinical practice, and strategies to interrupt dysregulated neutrophil function in sepsis are desperately needed. PMID:27824008

  5. Deep insight into neutrophil trafficking in various organs.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Young-Min; Hong, Chang-Won

    2017-09-01

    Neutrophils are professional phagocytes that constitute the first line of defense in humans. The primary function of neutrophils is to eliminate invading pathogens through oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms. Because neutrophils rapidly migrate into inflammatory foci via diapedesis and chemotaxis, neutrophil recruitment has long been considered a hallmark of inflammation. Recent advances in intravital microscopic technologies using animal model systems have enabled researchers to directly visualize neutrophil trafficking. Consequently, the specific mechanisms of neutrophil transmigration have been identified, and even the reverse migration of neutrophils can be verified visually. Moreover, the detailed phenomena of neutrophil infiltration into various organs, such as the liver, lymphoid organs, and CNS have been identified. This progress in the study of neutrophil migration from the blood vessels to organs results in a deeper understanding of these immune cells' motility and morphology, which are closely related to the spatiotemporal regulation of the overall immune response. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of neutrophil trafficking in various organs. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  6. Recapitulation of in vivo-like neutrophil transendothelial migration using a microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojie; Newbold, Molly A; Haynes, Christy L

    2015-08-07

    Neutrophil transendothelial migration (TEM) is an essential physiological process that regulates the recruitment of neutrophils in response to inflammatory signals. Herein, a versatile hydrogel scaffold is embedded in a microfluidic platform that supports an endothelial cell layer cultured in the vertical direction and highly stable chemical gradients; this construct is employed to mimic the in vivo neutrophil TEM process. We found that the number of neutrophils migrating across the endothelial cell layer is dependent on the presented chemoattractant concentration and the spatial profile of the chemical gradient. Endothelial cells play a critical role in neutrophil TEM by promoting neutrophil morphological changes as well as expressing surface receptor molecules that are indispensable for inducing neutrophil attachment and migration. Furthermore, the microfluidic device also supports competing chemoattractant gradients to facilitate neutrophil TEM studies in complex microenvironments that more accurately model the in vivo system than simplified microenvironments without the complexity of chemical gradients. This work demonstrates that combinations of any two different chemoattractants induce more significant neutrophil migration than a single chemoattractant in the same total amount, indicating synergistic effects between distinct chemoattractants. The in vitro reconstitution of neutrophil TEM successfully translates planar neutrophil movement into in vivo-like neutrophil recruitment and accelerates understanding of cellular interactions between neutrophils and endothelial cells within the complicated physiological milieu.

  7. The Neutrophil Btk Signalosome Regulates Integrin Activation during Sterile Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Volmering, Stephanie; Block, Helena; Boras, Mark; Lowell, Clifford A.; Zarbock, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are recruited from the blood to sites of sterile inflammation, where they are involved in wound healing but can also cause tissue damage. During sterile inflammation, necrotic cells release pro-inflammatory molecules including formylated peptides. However, the signaling pathway triggered by formylated peptides to integrin activation and leukocyte recruitment is unknown. By using spinning-disk confocal intravital microscopy, we examined the molecular mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment to sites of focal hepatic necrosis in vivo. We demonstrated that the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) was required for multiple Mac-1 activation events involved in neutrophil recruitment and functions during sterile inflammation triggered by fMLF. The Src family kinase Hck, Wiskott-Aldrich-syndrome protein, and phospholipase Cγ2 were also involved in this pathway required for fMLF-triggered Mac-1 activation and neutrophil recruitment. Thus, we have identified a neutrophil Btk signalosome that is involved in a signaling pathway triggered by formylated peptides leading to the selective activation of Mac-1 and neutrophil recruitment during sterile inflammation. PMID:26777396

  8. Neutrophilic dermatoses in children.

    PubMed

    Berk, David R; Bayliss, Susan J

    2008-01-01

    The neutrophilic dermatoses are rare disorders, especially in children, and are characterized by neutrophilic infiltrates in the skin and less commonly in extracutaneous tissue. The neutrophilic dermatoses share similar clinical appearances and associated conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, malignancies, and medications. Overlap forms of disease demonstrating features of multiple neutrophilic dermatoses may be seen. The manuscript attempts to provide an up-to-date review of (i) classical neutrophilic dermatoses, focusing on distinctive features in children and (ii) neutrophilic dermatoses which may largely be pediatric or genodermatosis-associated (Majeed, SAPHO [synovitis, severe acne, sterile palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis] syndrome, PAPA (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne), PFAPA (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenopathy), and other periodic fever syndromes, and congenital erosive and vesicular dermatosis healing with reticulated supple scarring).

  9. Review of the neutrophil response to Bordetella pertussis infection

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Joshua C.; Hoffman, Casandra L.; Gonyar, Laura A.; Hewlett, Erik L.

    2015-01-01

    The nature and timing of the neutrophil response to infection with Bordetella pertussis is influenced by multiple virulence factors expressed by the bacterium. After inoculation of the host airway, the recruitment of neutrophils signaled by B. pertussis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is suppressed by pertussis toxin (PTX). Over the next week, the combined activities of PTX, LOS and adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) result in production of cytokines that generate an IL-17 response, promoting neutrophil recruitment which peaks at 10–14 days after inoculation in mice. Arriving at the site of infection, neutrophils encounter the powerful local inhibitory activity of ACT, in conjunction with filamentous hemagglutinin. With the help of antibodies, neutrophils contribute to clearance of B. pertussis, but only after 28–35 days in a naïve mouse. Studies of the lasting, antigen-specific IL-17 response to infection in mice and baboons has led to progress in vaccine development and understanding of pathogenesis. Questions remain about the mediators that coordinate neutrophil recruitment and the mechanisms by which neutrophils overcome B. pertussis virulence factors. PMID:26432818

  10. Review of the neutrophil response to Bordetella pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Eby, Joshua C; Hoffman, Casandra L; Gonyar, Laura A; Hewlett, Erik L

    2015-12-01

    The nature and timing of the neutrophil response to infection with Bordetella pertussis is influenced by multiple virulence factors expressed by the bacterium. After inoculation of the host airway, the recruitment of neutrophils signaled by B. pertussis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is suppressed by pertussis toxin (PTX). Over the next week, the combined activities of PTX, LOS and adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) result in production of cytokines that generate an IL-17 response, promoting neutrophil recruitment which peaks at 10-14 days after inoculation in mice. Arriving at the site of infection, neutrophils encounter the powerful local inhibitory activity of ACT, in conjunction with filamentous hemagglutinin. With the help of antibodies, neutrophils contribute to clearance of B. pertussis, but only after 28-35 days in a naïve mouse. Studies of the lasting, antigen-specific IL-17 response to infection in mice and baboons has led to progress in vaccine development and understanding of pathogenesis. Questions remain about the mediators that coordinate neutrophil recruitment and the mechanisms by which neutrophils overcome B. pertussis virulence factors. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Leukotriene B4 mediates neutrophil migration induced by heme.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana Paula T; Pinheiro, Carla S; Luna-Gomes, Tatiana; Alves, Liliane R; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Porto, Barbara N; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Benjamim, Claudia F; Peters-Golden, Marc; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Bozza, Marcelo T; Canetti, Claudio

    2011-06-01

    High concentrations of free heme found during hemolytic events or cell damage leads to inflammation, characterized by neutrophil recruitment and production of reactive oxygen species, through mechanisms not yet elucidated. In this study, we provide evidence that heme-induced neutrophilic inflammation depends on endogenous activity of the macrophage-derived lipid mediator leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)). In vivo, heme-induced neutrophil recruitment into the peritoneal cavity of mice was attenuated by pretreatment with 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors and leukotriene B(4) receptor 1 (BLT1) receptor antagonists as well as in 5-LO knockout (5-LO(-/-)) mice. Heme administration in vivo increased peritoneal levels of LTB(4) prior to and during neutrophil recruitment. Evidence that LTB(4) was synthesized by resident macrophages, but not mast cells, included the following: 1) immuno-localization of heme-induced LTB(4) was compartmentalized exclusively within lipid bodies of resident macrophages; 2) an increase in the macrophage population enhanced heme-induced neutrophil migration; 3) depletion of resident mast cells did not affect heme-induced LTB(4) production or neutrophil influx; 4) increased levels of LTB(4) were found in heme-stimulated peritoneal cavities displaying increased macrophage numbers; and 5) in vitro, heme was able to activate directly macrophages to synthesize LTB(4). Our findings uncover a crucial role of LTB(4) in neutrophil migration induced by heme and suggest that beneficial therapeutic outcomes could be achieved by targeting the 5-LO pathway in the treatment of inflammation associated with hemolytic processes.

  12. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehong; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors. PMID:26966341

  13. Propagation of thrombosis by neutrophils and extracellular nucleosome networks

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiler, Susanne; Stark, Konstantin; Massberg, Steffen; Engelmann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils, early mediators of the innate immune defense, are recruited to developing thrombi in different types of thrombosis. They amplify intravascular coagulation by stimulating the tissue factor-dependent extrinsic pathway via inactivation of endogenous anticoagulants, enhancing factor XII activation or decreasing plasmin generation. Neutrophil-dependent prothrombotic mechanisms are supported by the externalization of decondensed nucleosomes and granule proteins that together form neutrophil extracellular traps. These traps, either in intact or fragmented form, are causally involved in various forms of experimental thrombosis as first indicated by their role in the enhancement of both microvascular thrombosis during bacterial infection and carotid artery thrombosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps can be induced by interactions of neutrophils with activated platelets; vice versa, these traps enhance adhesion of platelets via von Willebrand factor. Neutrophil-induced microvascular thrombus formation can restrict the dissemination and survival of blood-borne bacteria and thereby sustain intravascular immunity. Dysregulation of this innate immune pathway may support sepsis-associated coagulopathies. Notably, neutrophils and extracellular nucleosomes, together with platelets, critically promote fibrin formation during flow restriction-induced deep vein thrombosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps/extracellular nucleosomes are increased in thrombi and in the blood of patients with different vaso-occlusive pathologies and could be therapeutically targeted for the prevention of thrombosis. Thus, during infections and in response to blood vessel damage, neutrophils and externalized nucleosomes are major promoters of intravascular blood coagulation and thrombosis. PMID:27927771

  14. Neutrophils in cancer.

    PubMed

    Treffers, Louise W; Hiemstra, Ida H; Kuijpers, Taco W; van den Berg, Timo K; Matlung, Hanke L

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in cancer. This does not only relate to the well-established prognostic value of the presence of neutrophils, either in the blood or in tumor tissue, in the context of cancer progression or for the monitoring of therapy, but also to their active role in the progression of cancer. In the current review, we describe what is known in general about the role of neutrophils in cancer. What is emerging is a complex, rather heterogeneous picture with both pro- and anti-tumorigenic roles, which apparently differs with cancer type and disease stage. Furthermore, we will discuss the well-known role of neutrophils as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and also on the role of neutrophils as important effector cells during antibody therapy in cancer. It is clear that neutrophils contribute substantially to cancer progression in multiple ways, and this includes both direct effects on the cancer cells and indirect effect on the tumor microenvironment. While in many cases neutrophils have been shown to promote tumor progression, for instance by acting as MDSC, there are also protective effects, particularly when antibody immunotherapy is performed. A better understanding of the role of neutrophils is likely to provide opportunities for immunomodulation and for improving the treatment of cancer patients.

  15. Lack of Long-Lasting Hydrosalpinx in A/J Mice Correlates with Rapid but Transient Chlamydial Ascension and Neutrophil Recruitment in the Oviduct following Intravaginal Inoculation with Chlamydia muridarum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo; Zhou, Zhou; Chen, Jianlin; Wu, Ganqiu; Yang, Zhangsheng; Zhou, Zhiguang; Baseman, Joel; Zhang, Jin; Reddick, Robert Lee

    2014-01-01

    Lower genital tract infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and C. muridarum can induce long-lasting hydrosalpinx in the upper genital tract of women and female mice, respectively. However, A/J mice were highly resistant to induction of long-lasting hydrosalpinx by C. muridarum. We further compared host inflammatory responses and chlamydial infection courses between the hydrosalpinx-resistant A/J mice and CBA/J mice known to be susceptible to hydrosalpinx induction. Both mouse strains developed robust pyosalpinx during the acute phase followed by hydrosalpinx during the chronic phase. However, the hydrosalpinges disappeared in A/J mice by day 60 after infection, suggesting that some early hydrosalpinges are reversible. Although the overall inflammatory responses were indistinguishable between CBA/J and A/J mice, we found significantly more neutrophils in oviduct lumen of A/J mice on days 7 and 10, which correlated with a rapid but transient oviduct invasion by C. muridarum with a peak infection on day 7. In contrast, CBA/J mice developed a delayed and extensive oviduct infection. These comparisons have revealed an important role of the interactions of oviduct infection with inflammatory responses in chlamydial induction of long-lasting hydrosalpinx, suggesting that a rapid but transient invasion of oviduct by chlamydial organisms can prevent the development of the long-lasting hydrosalpinges. PMID:24711570

  16. Blocking neutrophil diapedesis prevents hemorrhage during thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hillgruber, Carina; Pöppelmann, Birgit; Weishaupt, Carsten; Steingräber, Annika Kathrin; Wessel, Florian; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Gessner, J Engelbert; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît; Vestweber, Dietmar; Goerge, Tobias

    2015-07-27

    Spontaneous organ hemorrhage is the major complication in thrombocytopenia with a potential fatal outcome. However, the exact mechanisms regulating vascular integrity are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophils recruited to inflammatory sites are the cellular culprits inducing thrombocytopenic tissue hemorrhage. Exposure of thrombocytopenic mice to UVB light provokes cutaneous petechial bleeding. This phenomenon is also observed in immune-thrombocytopenic patients when tested for UVB tolerance. Mechanistically, we show, analyzing several inflammatory models, that it is neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier that is responsible for the bleeding defect. First, bleeding is triggered by neutrophil-mediated mechanisms, which act downstream of capturing, adhesion, and crawling on the blood vessel wall and require Gαi signaling in neutrophils. Second, mutating Y731 in the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin, known to selectively affect leukocyte diapedesis, but not the induction of vascular permeability, attenuates bleeding. Third, and in line with this, simply destabilizing endothelial junctions by histamine did not trigger bleeding. We conclude that specifically targeting neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier may represent a new therapeutic avenue to prevent fatal bleeding in immune-thrombocytopenic patients.

  17. Neutrophil stunning by metoprolol reduces infarct size

    PubMed Central

    García-Prieto, Jaime; Villena-Gutiérrez, Rocío; Gómez, Mónica; Bernardo, Esther; Pun-García, Andrés; García-Lunar, Inés; Crainiciuc, Georgiana; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Sreeramkumar, Vinatha; Bourio-Martínez, Rafael; García-Ruiz, José M; del Valle, Alfonso Serrano; Sanz-Rosa, David; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Hidalgo, Andrés; Fuster, Valentín; Ibanez, Borja

    2017-01-01

    The β1-adrenergic-receptor (ADRB1) antagonist metoprolol reduces infarct size in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients. The prevailing view has been that metoprolol acts mainly on cardiomyocytes. Here, we demonstrate that metoprolol reduces reperfusion injury by targeting the haematopoietic compartment. Metoprolol inhibits neutrophil migration in an ADRB1-dependent manner. Metoprolol acts during early phases of neutrophil recruitment by impairing structural and functional rearrangements needed for productive engagement of circulating platelets, resulting in erratic intravascular dynamics and blunted inflammation. Depletion of neutrophils, ablation of Adrb1 in haematopoietic cells, or blockade of PSGL-1, the receptor involved in neutrophil–platelet interactions, fully abrogated metoprolol's infarct-limiting effects. The association between neutrophil count and microvascular obstruction is abolished in metoprolol-treated AMI patients. Metoprolol inhibits neutrophil–platelet interactions in AMI patients by targeting neutrophils. Identification of the relevant role of ADRB1 in haematopoietic cells during acute injury and the protective role upon its modulation offers potential for developing new therapeutic strategies. PMID:28416795

  18. MLK3 regulates fMLP-stimulated neutrophil motility

    PubMed Central

    Polesskaya, Oksana; Wong, Christopher; Chamberlain, Jeffrey M.; Gelbard, Harris A.; Goodfellow, Val; Kim, Minsoo; Daiss, John L.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mixed Lineage Kinase 3 (MLK3) is part of the intracellular regulatory system that connects extracellular cytokine or mitogen signals received through G-protein coupled receptors to changes in gene expression. MLK3 activation stimulates motility of epithelial cells and epithelial-derived tumor cells, but its role in mediating the migration of other cell types remains unknown. Since neutrophils play a crucial role in innate immunity and contribute to the pathogenesis of several diseases, we therefore examined whether MLK3 might regulate the motility of mouse neutrophils responding to a chemotactic stimulus, the model bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Methods The expression of Mlk3 in mouse neutrophils was determined by immunocytochemistry and by RT-PCR. In vitro chemotaxis in a gradient of fMLP, fMLP-stimulated random motility, fMLP-stimulated F-actin formation were measured by direct microscopic observation using neutrophils pre-treated with a novel small molecule inhibitor of MLK3 (URMC099) or neutrophils obtained from Mlk3−/− mice. In vivo effects of MLK3 inhibition were measured by counting the fMLP-induced accumulation of neutrophils in the peritoneum following pre-treatment with URMC099 in wild-type C57Bl/6 or mutant Mlk3−/−mice. Results The expression of Mlk3 mRNA and protein was observed in neutrophils purified from wild-type C57Bl/6 mice but not in neutrophils from mutant Mlk3−/− mice. Chemotaxis by wild-type neutrophils induced by a gradient of fMLP was reduced by pre-treatment with URMC099. Neutrophils from C57Bl/6 mice pretreated with URMC099 and neutrophils from Mlk3−/− mice moved far less upon fMLP-stimulation and did not form F-actin as readily as untreated neutrophils from C57Bl/6 controls. In vivo recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneum by fMLP was significantly reduced in wild-type mice treated with URMC099, as well as in untreated Mlk3−/− mice – thereby confirming the role of MLK3 in neutrophil migration

  19. MLK3 regulates fMLP-stimulated neutrophil motility.

    PubMed

    Polesskaya, Oksana; Wong, Christopher; Lebron, Luis; Chamberlain, Jeffrey M; Gelbard, Harris A; Goodfellow, Val; Kim, Minsoo; Daiss, John L; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is part of the intracellular regulatory system that connects extracellular cytokine or mitogen signals received through G-protein coupled receptors to changes in gene expression. MLK3 activation stimulates motility of epithelial cells and epithelial-derived tumor cells, but its role in mediating the migration of other cell types remains unknown. Since neutrophils play a crucial role in innate immunity and contribute to the pathogenesis of several diseases, we therefore examined whether MLK3 might regulate the motility of mouse neutrophils responding to a chemotactic stimulus, the model bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. The expression of Mlk3 in mouse neutrophils was determined by immunocytochemistry and by RT-PCR. In vitro chemotaxis in a gradient of fMLP, fMLP-stimulated random motility, fMLP-stimulated F-actin formation were measured by direct microscopic observation using neutrophils pre-treated with a novel small molecule inhibitor of MLK3 (URMC099) or neutrophils obtained from Mlk3-/- mice. In vivo effects of MLK3 inhibition were measured by counting the fMLP-induced accumulation of neutrophils in the peritoneum following pre-treatment with URMC099 in wild-type C57Bl/6 or mutant Mlk3-/- mice. The expression of Mlk3 mRNA and protein was observed in neutrophils purified from wild-type C57Bl/6 mice but not in neutrophils from mutant Mlk3-/- mice. Chemotaxis by wild-type neutrophils induced by a gradient of fMLP was reduced by pre-treatment with URMC099. Neutrophils from C57Bl/6 mice pretreated with URMC099 and neutrophils from Mlk3-/- mice moved far less upon fMLP-stimulation and did not form F-actin as readily as untreated neutrophils from C57Bl/6 controls. In vivo recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneum by fMLP was significantly reduced in wild-type mice treated with URMC099, as well as in untreated Mlk3-/- mice-thereby confirming the role of MLK3 in neutrophil migration. Mlk3 mRNA is expressed in murine neutrophils. Genetic

  20. Employee recruitment.

    PubMed

    Breaugh, James A

    2013-01-01

    The way an organization recruits can influence the type of employees it hires, how they perform, and their retention rate. This article provides a selective review of research that has addressed recruitment targeting, recruitment methods, the recruitment message, recruiters, the organizational site visit, the job offer, and the timing of recruitment actions. These and other topics (e.g., the job applicant's perspective) are discussed in terms of their potential influence on prehire (e.g., the quality of job applicants) and posthire (e.g., new employee retention) recruitment outcomes. In reviewing research, attention is given to the current state of scientific knowledge, limitations of previous research, and important issues meriting future investigation.

  1. Neutrophil paralysis in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Alves-Filho, José C; Spiller, Fernando; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2010-09-01

    Sepsis develops when the initial host response is unable to contain the primary infection, resulting in widespread inflammation and multiple organ dysfunction. The impairment of neutrophil migration into the infection site, also termed neutrophil paralysis, is a critical hallmark of sepsis, which is directly related to the severity of the disease. Although the precise mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood, there has been much advancement in the understanding of this field. In this review, we highlight the recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of neutrophil paralysis during sepsis.

  2. Simulation model for flow of neutrophils in pulmonary capillary network.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Atsushi; Fujita, Ryo; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    The concentration of neutrophils in the pulmonary microvasculature is higher than in systemic large vessels. It is thought that the high concentration of neutrophils facilitates their effective recruitment to sites of inflammation. Thus, in order to understand the role of neutrophils in the immune system, it is important to clarify their flow characteristics in the pulmonary microvasculature. In previous studies, we numerically investigated the motion of a neutrophil through a single capillary segment modeled by a moderate axisymmetric constriction in a straight pipe, developing a mathematical model for the prediction of the transit time of the cell through the segment. In the present study, this model was extended for application to network simulation of the motion of neutrophils. First, we numerically investigated shape recovery of a neutrophil after expulsion from a narrow capillary segment. This process was modeled in two different phases: elastic recovery and viscous recovery. The resulting model was combined with the previously developed models to simulate motion of the cells and plasma flow in a capillary network. A numerical simulation of the motion of neutrophils and plasma flow in a simple lattice capillary network showed that neutrophils were widely dispersed in the network with an increased concentration.

  3. Gβ1 is required for neutrophil migration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ke, Wenfan; Ye, Ding; Mersch, Kacey; Xu, Hui; Chen, Songhai; Lin, Fang

    2017-08-01

    Signaling mediated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential for the migration of cells toward chemoattractants. The recruitment of neutrophils to injured tissues in zebrafish larvae is a useful model for studying neutrophil migration and trafficking in vivo. Indeed, the study of this process led to the discovery that PI3Kγ is required for the polarity and motility of neutrophils, features that are necessary for the directed migration of these cells to wounds. However, the mechanism by which PI3Kγ is activated remains to be determined. Here we show that signaling by specifically the heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gβ1 is critical for neutrophil migration in response to wounding. In embryos treated with small-molecule inhibitors of Gβγ signaling, neutrophils failed to migrate to wound sites. Although both the Gβ1 and Gβ4 isoforms are expressed in migrating neutrophils, only deficiency for the former (morpholino-based knockdown) interfered with the directed migration of neutrophils towards wounds. The Gβ1 deficiency also impaired the ability of cells to change cell shape and reduced their general motility, defects that are similar to those in neutrophils deficient for PI3Kγ. Transplantation assays showed that the requirement for Gβ1 in neutrophil migration is cell autonomous. Finally, live imaging revealed that Gβ1 is required for polarized activation of PI3K, and for the actin dynamics that enable neutrophil migration. Collectively, our data indicate that Gβ1 signaling controls proper neutrophil migration by activating PI3K and modulating actin dynamics. Moreover, they illustrate a role for a specific Gβ isoform in chemotaxis in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CCR2 dependent neutrophil activation and mobilization rely on TLR4-p38 axis during liver ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Zhang, Junbin; Wang, Hui; Wang, Guoliang; Wang, Cong-Yi; Zhang, Jinxiang

    2017-01-01

    Liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common clinical problem in which neutrophil recruitment is an essential event. Our previous study revealed the important role of C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) in neutrophils during liver IRI. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the underlying mechanisms mediating the changes in CCR2 expression in neutrophils during this pathophysiological process. Herein, we found that TLR4 ablation reduced neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow and the subsequent infiltration into the liver during liver IRI; neutrophil-derived CCR2 expression was also repressed. In addition, neutrophil mobilization was dependent on CCR2 expression in neutrophils, which in turn relied on activation of the TLR4-p38 axis during liver IRI. In conclusion, neutrophil-derived CCR2 expression regulates neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow and infiltration into the liver, which requires activation of the TLR4-p38 axis during liver IRI. PMID:28670376

  5. Vestibular recruitment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsemakhov, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibular recruitment is defined through the analysis of several references. It is concluded that vestibular recruitment is an objective phenomenon which manifests itself during the affection of the vestibular receptor and thus serves as a diagnostic tool during affection of the vestibular system.

  6. Recruiter's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Michael; Recio, Manuel

    The manual assists both experienced and inexperienced personnel in defining and completing the entire range of tasks associated with the position of Pennsylvania Migrant Education Recruiter. The recruiter's primary responsibilities are to identify migrant children in the area and enroll those children eligible under Title I ESEA (Elementary and…

  7. Student Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Amy R.

    A practical process for developing or improving student recruitment programs for Catholic schools is presented in this handbook. Planning for and preparing the recruitment program is discussed in the first half of the document. The booklet reviews the process of assessing the school, its program, and its image; identifying the financial, material,…

  8. Commensal microbiota stimulate systemic neutrophil migration through induction of Serum amyloid A

    PubMed Central

    Kanther, Michelle; Tomkovich, Sarah; Sun, Xiaolun; Grosser, Melinda R.; Koo, Jaseol; Flynn, Edward J.; Jobin, Christian; Rawls, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neutrophils serve critical roles in inflammatory responses to infection and injury, and mechanisms governing their activity represent attractive targets for controlling inflammation. The commensal microbiota is known to regulate the activity of neutrophils and other leucocytes in the intestine, but the systemic impact of the microbiota on neutrophils remains unknown. Here we utilized in vivo imaging in gnotobiotic zebrafish to reveal diverse effects of microbiota colonization on systemic neutrophil development and function. The presence of a microbiota resulted in increased neutrophil number and myeloperoxidase expression, and altered neutrophil localization and migratory behaviours. These effects of the microbiota on neutrophil homeostasis were accompanied by an increased recruitment of neutrophils to injury. Genetic analysis identified the microbiota-induced acute phase protein serum amyloid A (Saa) as a host factor mediating microbial stimulation of tissue-specific neutrophil migratory behaviours. In vitro studies revealed that zebrafish cells respond to Saa exposure by activating NF-κB, and that Saa-dependent neutrophil migration requires NF-κB-dependent gene expression. These results implicate the commensal microbiota as an important environmental factor regulating diverse aspects of systemic neutrophil development and function, and reveal a critical role for a Saa-NF-κB signalling axis in mediating neutrophil migratory responses. PMID:24373309

  9. Proteinase 3 contributes to transendothelial migration of NB1-positive neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kuckleburg, Christopher J; Tilkens, Sarah B; Santoso, Sentot; Newman, Peter J

    2012-03-01

    Neutrophil transmigration requires the localization of neutrophils to endothelial cell junctions, in which receptor-ligand interactions and the action of serine proteases promote leukocyte diapedesis. NB1 (CD177) is a neutrophil-expressed surface molecule that has been reported to bind proteinase 3 (PR3), a serine protease released from activated neutrophils. PR3 has demonstrated proteolytic activity on a number of substrates, including extracellular matrix proteins, although its role in neutrophil transmigration is unknown. Recently, NB1 has been shown to be a heterophilic binding partner for the endothelial cell junctional protein, PECAM-1. Disrupting the interaction between NB1 and PECAM-1 significantly inhibits neutrophil transendothelial cell migration on endothelial cell monolayers. Because NB1 interacts with endothelial cell PECAM-1 at cell junctions where transmigration occurs, we considered that NB1-PR3 interactions may play a role in aiding neutrophil diapedesis. Blocking Abs targeting the heterophilic binding domain of PECAM-1 significantly inhibited transmigration of NB1-positive neutrophils through IL-1β-stimulated endothelial cell monolayers. PR3 expression and activity were significantly increased on NB1-positive neutrophils following transmigration, whereas neutrophils lacking NB1 demonstrated no increase in PR3. Finally, using selective serine protease inhibitors, we determined that PR3 activity facilitated transmigration of NB1-positive neutrophils under both static and flow conditions. These data demonstrate that PR3 contributes in the selective recruitment of the NB1-positive neutrophil population.

  10. Patrolling monocytes promote intravascular neutrophil activation and glomerular injury in the acutely inflamed glomerulus

    PubMed Central

    Finsterbusch, Michaela; Hall, Pam; Li, Anqi; Devi, Sapna; Westhorpe, Clare L. V.; Kitching, A. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Nonclassical monocytes undergo intravascular patrolling in blood vessels, positioning them ideally to coordinate responses to inflammatory stimuli. Under some circumstances, the actions of monocytes have been shown to involve promotion of neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanisms whereby patrolling monocytes control the actions of neutrophils in the circulation are unclear. Here, we examined the contributions of monocytes to antibody- and neutrophil-dependent inflammation in a model of in situ immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Multiphoton and spinning disk confocal intravital microscopy revealed that monocytes patrol both uninflamed and inflamed glomeruli using β2 and α4 integrins and CX3CR1. Monocyte depletion reduced glomerular injury, demonstrating that these cells promote inappropriate inflammation in this setting. Monocyte depletion also resulted in reductions in neutrophil recruitment and dwell time in glomerular capillaries and in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by neutrophils, suggesting a role for cross-talk between monocytes and neutrophils in induction of glomerulonephritis. Consistent with this hypothesis, patrolling monocytes and neutrophils underwent prolonged interactions in glomerular capillaries, with the duration of these interactions increasing during inflammation. Moreover, neutrophils that interacted with monocytes showed increased retention and a greater propensity for ROS generation in the glomerulus. Also, renal patrolling monocytes, but not neutrophils, produced TNF during inflammation, and TNF inhibition reduced neutrophil dwell time and ROS production, as well as renal injury. These findings show that monocytes and neutrophils undergo interactions within the glomerular microvasculature. Moreover, evidence indicates that, in response to an inflammatory stimulus, these interactions allow monocytes to promote neutrophil recruitment and activation within the glomerular microvasculature, leading to neutrophil

  11. An overview of the role of neutrophils in innate immunity, inflammation and host-biomaterial integration

    PubMed Central

    Selders, Gretchen S.; Fetz, Allison E.; Radic, Marko Z.; Bowlin, Gary L.

    2017-01-01

    Despite considerable recent progress in defining neutrophil functions and behaviors in tissue repair, much remains to be determined with regards to its overall role in the tissue integration of biomaterials. This article provides an overview of the neutrophil’s numerous, important roles in both inflammation and resolution, and subsequently, their role in biomaterial integration. Neutrophils function in three primary capacities: generation of oxidative bursts, release of granules and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs); these combined functions enable neutrophil involvement in inflammation, macrophage recruitment, M2 macrophage differentiation, resolution of inflammation, angiogenesis, tumor formation and immune system activation. Neutrophils exhibit great flexibility to adjust to the prevalent microenvironmental conditions in the tissue; thus, the biomaterial composition and fabrication will potentially influence neutrophil behavior following confrontation. This review serves to highlight the neutrophil’s plasticity, reiterating that neutrophils are not just simple suicidal killers, but the true maestros of resolution and regeneration. PMID:28149530

  12. Central role of neutrophil in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-wen; Meng, Xiao-xiao; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an acute abdominal disease with the strong systemic inflammatory response, and rapidly progresses from a local pancreatic damage into multiple organ dysfunction. For many decades, the contributions of neutrophils to the pathology of SAP were traditionally thought to be the chemokine and cytokine cascades that accompany inflammation. In this review, we focus mainly on those recently recognized aspects of neutrophils in SAP processes. First, emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic interventions targeting neutrophils significantly lower tissue damage and protect against the occurrence of pancreatitis. Second, trypsin activation promotes the initial neutrophils recruitment into local pancreas, and subsequently neutrophils infiltration in turn triggers trypsin production. Finally, neutrophils have the unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. PMID:26249268

  13. MACROPHAGE MIGRATION INHIBITORY FACTOR REGULATES NEUTROPHIL CHEMOTACTIC RESPONSES IN INFLAMMATORY ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Leilani L.; Fan, Huapeng; Hall, Pam; Ngo, Devi; Mackay, Charles R.; Fingerle-Rowson, Gunter; Bucala, Richard; Hickey, Michael J.; Morand, Eric F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) facilitates multiple aspects of inflammatory arthritis, the pathogenesis of which is significantly contributed to by neutrophils. The effects of MIF on neutrophil recruitment are unknown. We investigated the contribution of MIF to the regulation of neutrophil chemotactic responses. Methods K/BxN serum transfer arthritis was induced in wild-type (WT), MIF -/-, and MCP1 (CCL2)-deficient mice, and in WT mice treated with anti-KC (CXCL1) mAb. In vivo leukocyte trafficking was examined using intravital microscopy, and in vitro neutrophil function was examined using migration chambers and MAP kinase activation. Results K/BxN serum transfer arthritis was markedly attenuated in MIF-/- mice, with reductions in clinical and histological severity as well as synovial expression of KC and IL-1. Arthritis was also reduced by anti-KC antibody treatment, but not in MCP-1-deficient mice. In vivo neutrophil recruitment responses to KC were reduced in MIF-/- mice. Similarly, MIF-/-neutrophils exhibited reduced in vitro chemotactic responses to KC, despite unaltered chemokine receptor expression. Reduced chemotactic responses in MIF-/- neutrophils were associated with reduced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. Conclusion These data suggest MIF promotes neutrophil trafficking in inflammatory arthritis via facilitation of chemokine-induced migratory responses and MAP kinase activation. Therapeutic MIF inhibition could limit synovial neutrophil recruitment. PMID:21452319

  14. Galectin-1 promotes human neutrophil migration.

    PubMed

    Auvynet, Constance; Moreno, Samadhi; Melchy, Erika; Coronado-Martínez, Iris; Montiel, Jose Luis; Aguilar-Delfin, Irma; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    An important step of innate immune response is the recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) to injured tissues through chemotactic molecules. Galectins, a family of endogenous lectins, participate in numerous functions such as lymphoid cell migration, homing, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Particularly, galectin-3 (Gal-3) and -9 have been implicated in the modulation of acute and chronic inflammation by inducing the directional migration of monocytes/macrophages and eosinophils, whereas Gal-1 is considered to function as an anti-inflammatory molecule, capable of inhibiting the influx of PMN to the site of injury. In this study, we assessed the effect of Gal-1 on neutrophil recruitment, in the absence of additional inflammatory insults. Contrasting with its capacity to inhibit cell trafficking and modulate the release of mediators described in models of acute inflammation and autoimmunity, we evidenced that Gal-1 has the capacity to induce neutrophil migration both in vitro and in vivo. This effect is not mediated through a G-protein-coupled receptor but potentially through the sialoglycoprotein CD43, via carbohydrate binding and through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. These results suggest a novel biological function for CD43 on neutrophils and highlight that depending on the environment, Gal-1 can act either as chemoattractant or, as a molecule that negatively regulates migration under acute inflammatory conditions, underscoring the potential of Gal-1 as a target for innovative drug development.

  15. Neutrophil Response to Dental Plaque by Gender and Race

    PubMed Central

    Wahaidi, V.Y.; Dowsett, S.A.; Eckert, G.J.; Kowolik, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    The inflammatory response, which has both genetic and environmental components, is a central mechanism linking oral and systemic diseases. We hypothesized that dental plaque accumulation over 21 days in the experimental gingivitis model would elicit systemic inflammatory responses [change in white blood cell (WBC) count and neutrophil activity], and that these responses would differ by gender/race. We recruited 156 healthy young adults, including black and white males and females. Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), systemic WBC counts, and peripheral neutrophil oxidative activity were recorded. Overall, 128 participants completed the study. During the experimental phase, the correlation between PI and GI was 0.79. Total WBC and neutrophil counts did not change. Neutrophil activity increased in blacks but not whites, suggesting that there may be racial differences in the inflammatory response to dental plaque accumulation. PMID:19734456

  16. Neutrophil response to dental plaque by gender and race.

    PubMed

    Wahaidi, V Y; Dowsett, S A; Eckert, G J; Kowolik, M J

    2009-08-01

    The inflammatory response, which has both genetic and environmental components, is a central mechanism linking oral and systemic diseases. We hypothesized that dental plaque accumulation over 21 days in the experimental gingivitis model would elicit systemic inflammatory responses [change in white blood cell (WBC) count and neutrophil activity], and that these responses would differ by gender/race. We recruited 156 healthy young adults, including black and white males and females. Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), systemic WBC counts, and peripheral neutrophil oxidative activity were recorded. Overall, 128 participants completed the study. During the experimental phase, the correlation between PI and GI was 0.79. Total WBC and neutrophil counts did not change. Neutrophil activity increased in blacks but not whites, suggesting that there may be racial differences in the inflammatory response to dental plaque accumulation.

  17. Neutrophils scan for activated platelets to initiate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sreeramkumar, Vinatha; Adrover, José M.; Ballesteros, Ivan; Cuartero, Maria Isabel; Rossaint, Jan; Bilbao, Izaskun; Nácher, Maria; Pitaval, Christophe; Radovanovic, Irena; Fukui, Yoshinori; McEver, Rodger P.; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Zarbock, Alexander; Moro, María A.; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Immune and inflammatory responses require leukocytes to migrate within and through the vasculature, a process that is facilitated by their capacity to switch to a polarized morphology with asymmetric distribution of receptors. We report that neutrophil polarization within activated venules served to organize a protruding domain that engaged activated platelets present in the bloodstream. The selectin ligand PSGL-1 transduced signals emanating from these interactions, resulting in redistribution of receptors that drive neutrophil migration. Consequently, neutrophils unable to polarize or to transduce signals through PSGL-1 displayed aberrant crawling, and blockade of this domain protected mice against thrombo-inflammatory injury. These results reveal that recruited neutrophils scan for activated platelets, and suggest that their bipolarity allows integration of signals present at both the endothelium and the circulation before inflammation proceeds. PMID:25477463

  18. Elevated expression of the NLRP3 inflammasome in neutrophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Jodie L; Phipps, Simon; Baines, Katherine J; Oreo, Kevin M; Gunawardhana, Lakshitha; Gibson, Peter G

    2014-04-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous inflammatory airways disorder where interleukin (IL)-1β is thought to be a key mediator, especially in the neutrophilic subtype of asthma. The generation of active IL-1β requires proteolytic cleavage typically mediated through the formation of a caspase-1-containing inflammasome. This study hypothesised that an IL-1β endotype associated with the nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat-containing family protein (NLRP)3/apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ASC)/caspase-1 inflammasome is characteristic of patients with the neutrophilic subtype of asthma. Participants with asthma (n=85) and healthy controls (n=27) underwent clinical assessment, spirometry and sputum induction. Sputum was processed for differential cell count, gene expression and protein mediators. NLRP3 and caspase-1 expression was also determined by immunocytochemistry. Sputum macrophages were isolated (n=8) and gene expression of NLRP3 and IL-1β determined. There was significantly elevated gene expression of NLRP3, caspase-1, caspase-4, caspase-5 and IL-1β in participants with neutrophilic asthma. Protein levels of IL-1β were significantly higher in those with neutrophilic asthma and correlated with sputum IL-8 levels. Sputum macrophages, as well as sputum neutrophils in neutrophilic asthma, expressed NLRP3 and caspase-1 protein. NLRP3 inflammasome is upregulated in neutrophilic asthma and may regulate the inflammation process observed in this asthma phenotype through production of IL-1β.

  19. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and infection-related vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2012-11-01

    The innate immune system orchestrated by leukocytes primarily neutrophils, serves to remove dead and dying host cells and to provide protection against invasion by pathogens. Failure of this system results in the onset of sepsis leading to grave consequences for the host. Together with mechanical methods to physically isolate and remove the pathogen, neutrophils also release an important set of proinflammatory biological modulators that mediate recruitment of additional cells to a site of infection and amplify the innate protective response. Additionally, neutrophils release highly charged mixtures of DNA and nuclear proteins named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These electrostatically-charged adhesive networks trigger intrinsic coagulation, limit dispersion and entrap the pathogens. NETs also contain the neutrophil secretary granule-derived serine proteases, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G, known to regulate the reactivity of both neutrophils and platelets. Since the characterization of NETs in 2004, new studies of their functional effect in vivo continue to expand upon unexpected extracellular roles for DNA, and in doing so renew attention to the haemostatic role of the leukocyte. This review will provide a basic description of NETs and examine current knowledge of this important system of defense, including recent work illustrating a role for NETs in activation of thrombosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  1. Chemerin15 inhibits neutrophil-mediated vascular inflammation and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury through ChemR23

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Jenna L; Bena, Stefania; Headland, Sarah E; McArthur, Simon; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Perretti, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil activation and adhesion must be tightly controlled to prevent complications associated with excessive inflammatory responses. The role of the anti-inflammatory peptide chemerin15 (C15) and the receptor ChemR23 in neutrophil physiology is unknown. Here, we report that ChemR23 is expressed in neutrophil granules and rapidly upregulated upon neutrophil activation. C15 inhibits integrin activation and clustering, reducing neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis in vitro. In the inflamed microvasculature, C15 rapidly modulates neutrophil physiology inducing adherent cell detachment from the inflamed endothelium, while reducing neutrophil recruitment and heart damage in a murine myocardial infarction model. These effects are mediated through ChemR23. We identify the C15/ChemR23 pathway as a new regulator and thus therapeutic target in neutrophil-driven pathologies. PMID:23999103

  2. Lipopolysaccharide: a p38 MAPK-dependent disrupter of neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Adil I; Heit, Bryan; Andonegui, Graciela; Colarusso, Pina; Kubes, Paul

    2005-01-01

    In sepsis, and in models of sepsis including endotoxemia, impaired neutrophil recruitment and chemotaxis have been reported. The inability of the endotoxemic neutrophil to chemotax could be attributed to the fact that intracellular signaling via LPS overrides signals from endogenous chemokines or, alternatively, that sequestration of neutrophils into lungs prevents access to peripheral tissues. Using both in vitro and in vivo chemotaxis assays the authors established that neutrophils from healthy mice chemotaxed in vivo toward MIP-2, whereas endotoxemic neutrophils did not. Since LPS activates leukocytes via the p38 MAPK pathway, SKF86002, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, was given to endotoxemic animals. SKF86002 significantly reversed the LPS-induced impairment in emigration of endotoxic neutrophils in response to MIP-2. Neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro was also impaired by LPS, via a p38 MAPK-dependent pathway, and this impairment could be reversed via p38 MAPK inhibition. Although neutrophil numbers dropped in the circulation and trapped in lungs during endotoxemia, SKF86002 did not reverse these parameters, demonstrating that p38 MAPK inhibition did not release trapped neutrophils from the lungs. In conclusion, the data suggest that the impaired emigration and chemotaxis of neutrophils at peripheral sites during endotoxemia may be partially due to a p38 MAPK-mediated inhibition of neutrophil responses to endogenous chemokines.

  3. Simultaneous tether extraction contributes to neutrophil rolling stabilization: a model study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2007-01-15

    Neutrophil rolling is the initial step of neutrophil recruitment to sites of inflammation. During the rolling, membrane tethers are very likely extracted from both the neutrophil and the endothelial cell lining of vessel walls. Here, we present a two-dimensional neutrophil-rolling model to investigate whether and how membrane tethers contribute to stable neutrophil rolling. In our model, neutrophils are assumed to be rigid spheres covered with randomly distributed deformable microvilli, and endothelial cells are modeled as flat membrane surfaces decorated with evenly distributed ligands. The instantaneous rolling velocity and other unknowns of the model are calculated by coupling the hydrodynamic resistance functions, the geometric relationships, and the constitutive equations that govern microvillus extension and tether extraction. Our results show that glutaraldehyde-fixed neutrophils (without microvillus extension or tether extraction) roll unstably on a P-selectin-coated substrate with large variance in rolling velocity. In contrast, normal neutrophils roll much more stably, with small variance in rolling velocity. Compared with tether extraction from the neutrophil alone, simultaneous tether extraction from the neutrophil and endothelial cell greatly increases the lifetime of the adhesive bond that mediates the rolling, allows more transient tethers to make the transition into stable rolling, and enables rolling neutrophils to be more shear-resistant.

  4. Fer kinase limits neutrophil chemotaxis toward end target chemoattractants.

    PubMed

    Khajah, Maitham; Andonegui, Graciela; Chan, Ronald; Craig, Andrew W; Greer, Peter A; McCafferty, Donna-Marie

    2013-03-01

    Neutrophil recruitment and directional movement toward chemotactic stimuli are important processes in innate immune responses. This study examines the role of Fer kinase in neutrophil recruitment and chemotaxis to various chemoattractants in vitro and in vivo. Mice targeted with a kinase-inactivating mutation (Fer(DR/DR)) or wild type (WT) were studied using time-lapse intravital microscopy to examine leukocyte recruitment and chemotaxis in vivo. In response to keratinocyte-derived cytokine, no difference in leukocyte chemotaxis was observed between WT and Fer(DR/DR) mice. However, in response to the chemotactic peptide WKYMVm, a selective agonist of the formyl peptide receptor, a 2-fold increase in leukocyte emigration was noted in Fer(DR/DR) mice (p < 0.05). To determine whether these defects were due to Fer signaling in the endothelium or other nonhematopoietic cells, bone marrow chimeras were generated. WKYMVm-induced leukocyte recruitment in chimeric mice (WT bone marrow to Fer(DR/DR) recipients or vice versa) was similar to WT mice, suggesting that Fer kinase signaling in both leukocytes and endothelial cells serves to limit chemotaxis. Purified Fer(DR/DR) neutrophils demonstrated enhanced chemotaxis toward end target chemoattractants (WKYMVm and C5a) compared with WT using an under-agarose gel chemotaxis assay. These defects were not observed in response to intermediate chemoattractants (keratinocyte-derived cytokine, MIP-2, or LTB(4)). Increased WKYMVm-induced chemotaxis of Fer(DR/DR) neutrophils correlated with sustained PI3K activity and reduced reliance on the p38 MAPK pathway compared with WT neutrophils. Together, these data identify Fer as a novel inhibitory kinase for neutrophil chemotaxis toward end target chemoattractants through modulation of PI3K activity.

  5. Lung inflammation promotes metastasis through neutrophil protease-mediated degradation of Tsp-1

    PubMed Central

    El Rayes, Tina; Catena, Raúl; Lee, Sharrell; Stawowczyk, Marcin; Joshi, Natasha; Fischbach, Claudia; Powell, Charles A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Altorki, Nasser K.; Gao, Dingcheng; Mittal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is inextricably associated with primary tumor progression. However, the contribution of inflammation to tumor outgrowth in metastatic organs has remained underexplored. Here, we show that extrinsic inflammation in the lungs leads to the recruitment of bone marrow-derived neutrophils, which degranulate azurophilic granules to release the Ser proteases, elastase and cathepsin G, resulting in the proteolytic destruction of the antitumorigenic factor thrombospondin-1 (Tsp-1). Genetic ablation of these neutrophil proteases protected Tsp-1 from degradation and suppressed lung metastasis. These results provide mechanistic insights into the contribution of inflammatory neutrophils to metastasis and highlight the unique neutrophil protease–Tsp-1 axis as a potential antimetastatic therapeutic target. PMID:26668367

  6. Neutrophil disorders and their management

    PubMed Central

    Lakshman, R; Finn, A

    2001-01-01

    Neutrophil disorders are an uncommon yet important cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and children. This article is an overview of these conditions, with emphasis on clinical recognition, rational investigation, and treatment. A comprehensive list of references is provided for further reading. Key Words: neutrophil disorders • chronic granulomatous disease • neutrophil chemotaxis • phagocytosis PMID:11271792

  7. Evidence for chemokine synergy during neutrophil migration in ARDS.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew E; José, Ricardo J; Mercer, Paul F; Brealey, David; Parekh, Dhruv; Thickett, David R; O'Kane, Cecelia; McAuley, Danny F; Chambers, Rachel C

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening condition characterised by pulmonary oedema, respiratory failure and severe inflammation. ARDS is further characterised by the recruitment of neutrophils into the lung interstitium and alveolar space. The factors that regulate neutrophil infiltration into the inflamed lung and our understanding of the pathomechanisms in ARDS remain incomplete. This study aimed at determining the role of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)2 and CCL7 in ARDS. CCL2 and CCL7 protein levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid obtained from lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-challenged human volunteers and two separate cohorts of patients with ARDS. Neutrophil chemotaxis to ARDS BAL fluid was evaluated and the contribution of each was assessed and compared with chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8). Chemokine receptor expression on neutrophils from blood or BAL fluid of patients with ARDS was analysed by flow cytometry. CCL2 and CCL7 were significantly elevated in BAL fluid recovered from LPS-challenged volunteers and patients with ARDS. BAL fluid from patients with ARDS was highly chemotactic for human neutrophils and neutralising either CCL2 or CCL7 attenuated the neutrophil chemotactic response. Moreover, CCL2 and CCL7 synergised with CXCL8 to promote neutrophil migration. Furthermore, neutrophils isolated from the blood or BAL fluid differentially regulated the cell surface expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 1 and C-C chemokine receptor type 2 during ARDS. This study highlights important inflammatory chemokines involved in regulating neutrophil migration, which may have potential value as therapeutic targets for the treatment of ARDS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Evidence for chemokine synergy during neutrophil migration in ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Andrew E; José, Ricardo J; Mercer, Paul F; Brealey, David; Parekh, Dhruv; Thickett, David R; O'Kane, Cecelia; McAuley, Danny F; Chambers, Rachel C

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening condition characterised by pulmonary oedema, respiratory failure and severe inflammation. ARDS is further characterised by the recruitment of neutrophils into the lung interstitium and alveolar space. Objectives The factors that regulate neutrophil infiltration into the inflamed lung and our understanding of the pathomechanisms in ARDS remain incomplete. This study aimed at determining the role of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)2 and CCL7 in ARDS. Methods CCL2 and CCL7 protein levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid obtained from lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-challenged human volunteers and two separate cohorts of patients with ARDS. Neutrophil chemotaxis to ARDS BAL fluid was evaluated and the contribution of each was assessed and compared with chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8). Chemokine receptor expression on neutrophils from blood or BAL fluid of patients with ARDS was analysed by flow cytometry. Results CCL2 and CCL7 were significantly elevated in BAL fluid recovered from LPS-challenged volunteers and patients with ARDS. BAL fluid from patients with ARDS was highly chemotactic for human neutrophils and neutralising either CCL2 or CCL7 attenuated the neutrophil chemotactic response. Moreover, CCL2 and CCL7 synergised with CXCL8 to promote neutrophil migration. Furthermore, neutrophils isolated from the blood or BAL fluid differentially regulated the cell surface expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 1 and C-C chemokine receptor type 2 during ARDS. Conclusion This study highlights important inflammatory chemokines involved in regulating neutrophil migration, which may have potential value as therapeutic targets for the treatment of ARDS. PMID:27496101

  9. FOXO1 Regulates Bacteria-Induced Neutrophil Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guangyu; Song, Liang; Tian, Chen; Wang, Yu; Miao, Fang; Zheng, Jiabao; Lu, Chanyi; Alsadun, Sarah; Graves, Dana T.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the innate immune response to microbial infection and are particularly important in clearing bacterial infection. We investigated the role of the transcription factor FOXO1 in the response of neutrophils to bacterial challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis in vivo and in vitro. In these experiments, the effect of lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion in LyzM.Cre+FOXO1L/L mice was compared with matched littermate controls. FOXO1 deletion negatively affected several critical aspects of neutrophil function in vivo including mobilization of neutrophils from the bone marrow (BM) to the vasculature, recruitment of neutrophils to sites of bacterial inoculation, and clearance of bacteria. In vitro FOXO1 regulated neutrophil chemotaxis and bacterial killing. Moreover, bacteria-induced expression of CXCR2 and CD11b, which are essential for several aspects of neutrophil function, was dependent on FOXO1 in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, FOXO1 directly interacted with the promoter regions of CXCR2 and CD11b. Bacteria-induced nuclear localization of FOXO1 was dependent upon toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and/or TLR4 and was significantly reduced by inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide synthase) and deacetylases (Sirt1 and histone deacetylases). These studies show for the first time that FOXO1 activation by bacterial challenge is needed to mobilize neutrophils to transit from the BM to peripheral tissues in response to infection as well as for bacterial clearance in vivo. Moreover, FOXO1 regulates neutrophil function that facilitates chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and bacterial killing. PMID:28928749

  10. The Neutrophil Nucleus and Its Role in Neutrophilic Function.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Leonardo Olivieri; Aquino, Elaine Nascimento; Neves, Anne Caroline Dias; Fontes, Wagner

    2015-09-01

    The cell nucleus plays a key role in differentiation processes in eukaryotic cells. It is not the nucleus in particular, but the organization of the genes and their remodeling that provides the data for the adjustments to be made according to the medium. The neutrophil nucleus has a different morphology. It is a multi-lobed nucleus where some researchers argue no longer function. However, studies indicate that it is very probable the occurrence of chromatin remodeling during activation steps. It may be that the human neutrophil nucleus also contributes to the mobility of neutrophils through thin tissue spaces. Questions like these will be discussed in this small review. The topics include morphology of human neutrophil nucleus, maturation process and modifications of the neutrophil nucleus, neutrophil activation and chromatin modifications, causes and consequences of multi-lobulated segmented morphology, and importance of the nucleus in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Neutrophil Elastase Alters the Murine Gut Microbiota Resulting in Enhanced Salmonella Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Navkiran; Ferreira, Rosana B. R.; Antunes, L. Caetano M.; Willing, Benjamin P.; Sekirov, Inna; Al-Zahrani, Fatimah; Hartmann, Martin; Finlay, B. Brett

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has been found to play a central role in the colonization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we present a novel process through which Salmonella benefit from inflammatory induced changes in the microbiota in order to facilitate disease. We show that Salmonella infection in mice causes recruitment of neutrophils to the gut lumen, resulting in significant changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiota. This occurs through the production of the enzyme elastase by neutrophils. Administration of recombinant neutrophil elastase to infected animals under conditions that do not elicit neutrophil recruitment caused shifts in microbiota composition that favored Salmonella colonization, while inhibition of neutrophil elastase reduced colonization. This study reveals a new relationship between the microbiota and the host during infection. PMID:23155475

  12. Formylpeptide receptors are critical for rapid neutrophil mobilization in host defense against Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyong; Chen, Keqiang; Yoshimura, Teizo; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Wang, Aimin; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M.; Wang, Ji Ming

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria) causes opportunistic infection in immunocompromised hosts with high mortality. Resistance to Listeria depends on immune responses and recruitment of neutrophils of the immune system into infected sites is an early and critical step. Mouse neutrophils express two G protein-coupled formylpeptide receptor subtypes Fpr1 and Fpr2 that recognize bacterial and host-derived chemotactic molecules including Listeria peptides for cell migration and activation. Here we report deficiency in Fprs exacerbated the severity of the infection and increased the mortality of infected mice. The mechanism involved impaired early neutrophil recruitment to the liver with Fpr1 and Fpr2 being sole receptors for neutrophils to sense Listeria chemoattractant signals and for production of bactericidal superoxide. Thus, Fprs are essential sentinels to guide the first wave of neutrophil infiltration in the liver of Listeria-infected mice for effective elimination of the invading pathogen. PMID:23139859

  13. Chemokine receptor Ccr1 drives neutrophil-mediated kidney immunopathology and mortality in invasive candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Lionakis, Michail S; Fischer, Brett G; Lim, Jean K; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Wan, Wuzhou; Richard Lee, Chyi-Chia; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Scheinberg, Phillip; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the 4(th) leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in the US with mortality that exceeds 40% despite administration of antifungal therapy; neutropenia is a major risk factor for poor outcome after invasive candidiasis. In a fatal mouse model of invasive candidiasis that mimics human bloodstream-derived invasive candidiasis, the most highly infected organ is the kidney and neutrophils are the major cellular mediators of host defense; however, factors regulating neutrophil recruitment have not been previously defined. Here we show that mice lacking chemokine receptor Ccr1, which is widely expressed on leukocytes, had selectively impaired accumulation of neutrophils in the kidney limited to the late phase of the time course of the model; surprisingly, this was associated with improved renal function and survival without affecting tissue fungal burden. Consistent with this, neutrophils from wild-type mice in blood and kidney switched from Ccr1(lo) to Ccr1(high) at late time-points post-infection, when Ccr1 ligands were produced at high levels in the kidney and were chemotactic for kidney neutrophils ex vivo. Further, when a 1∶1 mixture of Ccr1(+/+) and Ccr1(-/-) donor neutrophils was adoptively transferred intravenously into Candida-infected Ccr1(+/+) recipient mice, neutrophil trafficking into the kidney was significantly skewed toward Ccr1(+/+) cells. Thus, neutrophil Ccr1 amplifies late renal immunopathology and increases mortality in invasive candidiasis by mediating excessive recruitment of neutrophils from the blood to the target organ.

  14. Recent advances in understanding neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Deniset, Justin F.; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils have long been regarded as key effectors of the innate immune response during acute inflammation. Recent evidence has revealed a greater functional diversity for these cells than previously appreciated, expanding roles for neutrophils in adaptive immunity and chronic pathologies. In this review, we summarize some of the evolving paradigms in the neutrophil field and highlight key advances that have contributed to our understanding of neutrophil behavior and function in vivo. We examine the concept of neutrophil subsets and polarization, we discuss novel immunomodulatory roles for neutrophils in shaping the immune response, and, finally, we identify technical advances that will further enhance our ability to track the function and fate of neutrophils. PMID:28105328

  15. Asymmetric Localization of Calpain 2 during Neutrophil Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzi, Paul A.; Senetar, Melissa A.

    2007-01-01

    Chemoattractants induce neutrophil polarization through localized polymerization of F-actin at the leading edge. The suppression of rear and lateral protrusions is required for efficient chemotaxis and involves the temporal and spatial segregation of signaling molecules. We have previously shown that the intracellular calcium-dependent protease calpain is required for cell migration and is involved in regulating neutrophil chemotaxis. Here, we show that primary neutrophils and neutrophil-like HL-60 cells express both calpain 1 and calpain 2 and that chemoattractants induce the asymmetric recruitment of calpain 2, but not calpain 1, to the leading edge of polarized neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 cells. Using time-lapse microscopy, we show that enrichment of calpain 2 at the leading edge occurs during early pseudopod formation and that its localization is sensitive to changes in the chemotactic gradient. We demonstrate that calpain 2 is recruited to lipid rafts and that cholesterol depletion perturbs calpain 2 localization, suggesting that its enrichment at the front requires proper membrane organization. Finally, we show that catalytic activity of calpain is required to limit pseudopod formation in the direction of chemoattractant and for efficient chemotaxis. Together, our findings identify calpain 2 as a novel component of the frontness signal that promotes polarization during chemotaxis. PMID:17192410

  16. Studying Neutrophil Migration In Vivo Using Adoptive Cell Transfer.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Yoshishige; Kim, Nancy D; Miyabe, Chie; Luster, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer experiments can be used to study the roles of cell trafficking molecules on the migratory behavior of specific immune cell populations in vivo. Chemoattractants and their G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane-spanning receptors regulate migration of cells in vivo, and dysregulated expression of chemoattractants and their receptors is implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Inflammatory arthritides, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), are characterized by the recruitment of inflammatory cells into joints. The K/BxN serum transfer mouse model of inflammatory arthritis shares many similar features with RA. In this autoantibody-induced model of arthritis, neutrophils are the critical immune cells necessary for the development of joint inflammation and damage. We have used adoptive neutrophil transfer to define the contributions of chemoattractant receptors, cytokines, and activation receptors expressed on neutrophils that critically regulate their entry into the inflamed joint. In this review, we describe the procedure of neutrophil adoptive transfer to study the influence of neutrophil-specific receptors or mediators upon the their recruitment into the joint using the K/BxN model of inflammatory arthritis as a model of how adoptive cell transfer studies can be used to study immune cell migration in vivo.

  17. Neutrophil trails guide influenza-specific CD8+ T cells in the airways

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kihong; Hyun, Young-Min; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Capece, Tara; Bae, Seyeon; Miller, Richard; Topham, David J.; Kim, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    During viral infections, chemokines guide activated effector T cells to infection sites. However, the cells responsible for producing these chemokines and how such chemokines recruit T cells is unknown. Here, we show that the early recruitment of neutrophils into influenza-infected trachea is essential for CD8+ T cell-mediated immune protection in mice. We observed that migrating neutrophils leave behind long-lasting trails that are enriched in the chemokine CXCL12. Experiments with granulocyte-specific CXCL12 conditional knock-out mice and a CXCR4 antagonist revealed that CXCL12 derived from neutrophil trails is critical for virus-specific CD8+ T cell recruitment and effector functions. Collectively, these results suggest neutrophils deposit long-lasting, chemokine-containing trails, which may provide both chemotactic and haptotactic cues for efficient CD8+ T cell migration and localization in influenza-infected tissues. PMID:26339033

  18. Keratin pearl degradation in oral squamous cell carcinoma: reciprocal roles of neutrophils and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Essa, Ahmed A M; Yamazaki, Manabu; Maruyama, Satoshi; Abé, Tatsuya; Babkair, Hamzah; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    We have reported that neutrophilic infiltration was associated with round-shaped dyskeratosis foci, a kind of keratin pearl, of oral carcinoma in situ and that those inflammatory cells are recruited from intra-epithelially entrapped blood vessels. Based on these lines of evidence, we have formulated a hypothesis that keratin pearls are terminally degraded by neutrophils. To confirm this hypothesis, we investigated immunohistochemically stepwise degradation of keratin pearls in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) to clarify any other type scavenger cells in addition to neutrophils are involved in this particular degradation process. Neutrophils (neutrophil elastase) and macrophage subpopulations (CD68, CD163 and CD204) were immunohistochemically localized in 30 cases of oral SCC with typical round-shaped keratin pearls. SCC cells were revealed by immunohistochemistry for keratin (K) 17, and blood vessels were demonstrated by CD31. Keratin pearl degradation process was divided into four steps: (i) intact stage: no macrophage infiltration but minimal neutrophils were found in keratin pearls; (ii) neutrophil recruit stage: no macrophage infiltration but focal neutrophilic infiltration within the pearls; (iii) neutrophil predominant stage: dense neutrophil infiltration with minimal macrophages and segregated keratinized cancer cells strongly positive for K17; and (iv) macrophage predominant stage: dense infiltration of CD68-, CD163 (mononuclear)- and CD204 (multinucleated)-positive macrophages engulfing detached keratinized SCC cells. Keratin pearl degradation in oral SCC is strictly regulated by two types of scavenger cells: neutrophils, which perform initial tasks, and macrophages, which reciprocally take over from neutrophils the role to finalize the degradation processes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Dual Role of Neutrophils in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wéra, Odile; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Oury, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are characterised by aberrant immunological responses leading to chronic inflammation without tissue regeneration. These two diseases are considered distinct entities, and there is some evidence that neutrophil behaviour, above all other aspects of immunity, clearly separate them. Neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to the site of inflammation, and their action is crucial to limit invasion by microorganisms. Furthermore, they play an essential role in proper resolution of inflammation. When these processes are not tightly regulated, they can trigger positive feedback amplification loops that promote neutrophil activation, leading to significant tissue damage and evolution toward chronic disease. Defective chemotaxis, as observed in Crohn’s disease, can also contribute to the disease through impaired microbe elimination. In addition, through NET production, neutrophils may be involved in thrombo-embolic events frequently observed in IBD patients. While the role of neutrophils has been studied in different animal models of IBD for many years, their contribution to the pathogenesis of IBD remains poorly understood, and no molecules targeting neutrophils are used and validated for the treatment of these pathologies. Therefore, it is crucial to improve our understanding of their mode of action in these particular conditions in order to provide new therapeutic avenues for IBD. PMID:27999328

  20. Granule Protein Processing and Regulated Secretion in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Sheshachalam, Avinash; Srivastava, Nutan; Mitchell, Troy; Lacy, Paige; Eitzen, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are part of a family of granulocytes that, together with eosinophils and basophils, play an essential role in innate immunity. Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating leukocytes and are vital for rapid immune responses, being recruited to sites of injury or infection within minutes, where they can act as specialized phagocytic cells. However, another prominent function of neutrophils is the release of pro-inflammatory compounds, including cytokines, chemokines, and digestive enzymes, which are stored in intracellular compartments and released through regulated exocytosis. Hence, an important feature that contributes to rapid immune responses is capacity of neutrophils to synthesize and store pre-formed pro-inflammatory mediators in specialized intracellular vesicles and thus no new synthesis is required. This review will focus on advancement in three topics relevant to neutrophil secretion. First, we will examine what is known about basal level pro-inflammatory mediator synthesis, trafficking, and storage in secretory compartments. Second, we will review recent advancements in the mechanisms that control vesicle mobilization and the release of pre-formed mediators. Third, we will examine the upregulation and de novo synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators by neutrophils engaged at sites of infection. PMID:25285096

  1. Central Role of Conventional Dendritic Cells in Regulation of Bone Marrow Release and Survival of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jingjing; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Kocabayoglu, Peri; Rahman, Adeeb H.; Chow, Andrew; Hashimoto, Daigo; Leboeuf, Marylene; Kraus, Thomas; Moran, Thomas; Carrasco-Avino, Gonzalo; Friedman, Scott L.; Merad, Miriam; Aloman, Costica

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant cell type in the immune system and play an important role in the innate immune response. Using a diverse range of mouse models with either defective DC development or conditional DC depletion, we provide in vivo evidence indicating that conventional dendritic cells (cDC) play an important role in the regulation of neutrophil homeostasis. Flk2, Flt3L and Batf3 knockout mice, which have defects in DC development, have increased numbers of liver neutrophils in the steady state. Conversely, neutrophil frequency is reduced in DC-specific PTEN knockout mice, which have an expansion of CD8+ and CD103+ DCs. In chimeric CD11c-DTR mice, cDC depletion results in a systemic increase of neutrophils in peripheral organs in the absence of histological inflammation or an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. This effect is also present in splenectomized chimeric CD11c-DTR mice and is absent in chimeric mice with 50% normal bone marrow. In chimeric CD11c-DTR mice, DT treatment results in enhanced neutrophil trafficking from the bone marrow into circulation and increased neutrophil recruitment. Moreover, there is an increased expression of chemokines/cytokines involved in neutrophil homeostasis and reduced neutrophil apoptosis. These data underscore the role of the DC pool in regulating the neutrophil compartment in non-lymphoid organs. PMID:24591364

  2. Technical Advance: Changes in neutrophil migration patterns upon contact with platelets in a microfluidic assay.

    PubMed

    Frydman, Galit H; Le, Anna; Ellett, Felix; Jorgensen, Julianne; Fox, James G; Tompkins, Ronald G; Irimia, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophils are traditionally regarded as the "first responders" of the immune system. However, recent observations revealed that platelets often respond earlier to recruit and activate neutrophils within sites of injury and inflammation. Currently, platelet-neutrophil interactions are studied by intravital microscopy. Although such studies provide exceptional, physiologic in vivo data, they are also laborious and have low throughput. To accelerate platelet-neutrophil interaction studies, we have developed and optimized an ex vivo microfluidic platform with which the interactions between platelets and moving neutrophils are measured at single-cell level in precise conditions and with high throughput. With the use of this new assay, we have evaluated changes in neutrophil motility upon direct contact with platelets. Motility changes include longer distances traveled, frequent changes in direction, and faster neutrophil velocities compared with a standard motility response to chemoattractant fMLP. We also found that the neutrophil-platelet direct interactions are transient and mediated by CD62P-CD162 interactions, localized predominantly at the uropod of moving neutrophils. This "crawling," oscillatory neutrophil behavior upon platelet contact is consistent with previous in vivo studies and validates the use of this new test for the exploration of this interactive relationship.

  3. Tracking neutrophil intraluminal crawling, transendothelial migration and chemotaxis in tissue by intravital video microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Najia; Lei, Xi; Liu, Lixin

    2011-09-24

    The recruitment of circulating leukocytes from blood stream to the inflamed tissue is a crucial and complex process of inflammation(1,2). In the postcapillary venules of inflamed tissue, leukocytes initially tether and roll on the luminal surface of venular wall. Rolling leukocytes arrest on endothelium and undergo firm adhesion in response to chemokine or other chemoattractants on the venular surface. Many adherent leukocytes relocate from the initial site of adhesion to the junctional extravasation site in endothelium, a process termed intraluminal crawling(3). Following crawling, leukocytes move across endothelium (transmigration) and migrate in extravascular tissue toward the source of chemoattractant (chemotaxis)(4). Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in vivo and revealing cellular and molecular mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment(2,5). In this report, we provide a comprehensive description of using brightfield intravital microscopy to visualize and determine the detailed processes of neutrophil recruitment in mouse cremaster muscle in response to the gradient of a neutrophil chemoattractant. To induce neutrophil recruitment, a small piece of agarose gel (~1-mm(3) size) containing neutrophil chemoattractant MIP-2 (CXCL2, a CXC chemokine) or WKYMVm (Trp-Lys-Tyr-Val-D-Met, a synthetic analog of bacterial peptide) is placed on the muscle tissue adjacent to the observed postcapillary venule. With time-lapsed video photography and computer software ImageJ, neutrophil intraluminal crawling on endothelium, neutrophil transendothelial migration and the migration and chemotaxis in tissue are visualized and tracked. This protocol allows reliable and quantitative analysis of many neutrophil recruitment parameters such as intraluminal crawling velocity, transmigration time, detachment time, migration velocity, chemotaxis velocity and chemotaxis index in tissue. We demonstrate that using this protocol, these

  4. Neutrophilic Fixed Drug Eruption.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Leah; Reddy, Swathi B; Kassim, Andrea; Dettloff, Jennifer; Reddy, Vijaya B

    2015-07-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a cutaneous reaction to a medication that recurs in the same fairly localized site with each exposure to the offending drug. The classical histopathologic findings in FDE consist of an interface dermatitis with predominantly lymphocytic inflammatory cell infiltrate. An unusual case of FDE in a 27-year-old pregnant woman who presented with widespread lesions and a predominantly neutrophilic infiltrate on histopathologic examination is reported.

  5. Neutrophilic Epitheliotropism is a Histopathological Clue to Neutrophilic Urticarial Dermatosis.

    PubMed

    Broekaert, Sigrid M C; Böer-Auer, Almut; Kerl, Katrin; Herrgott, Ilka; Schulz, Xenia; Bonsmann, Gisela; Brehler, Randolf; Metze, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (NUD) comprises a particular autoinflammatory condition within the spectrum of aseptic neutrophilic dermatoses characterized by a distinct urticarial eruption clinically and a neutrophilic dermatosis histopathologically. In this study, we reviewed skin biopsies of lesional skin of patients seen in our outpatient clinic for autoimmune dermatoses and in allergy department from 1982 to 2014 that fulfilled these criteria. A total of 77 biopsies from 50 patients were analyzed histopathologically. Included were cases of Schnitzler syndrome, Still disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, primary biliary cirrhosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and those that had signs of systemic inflammation not otherwise specified, that is, fever, arthritis, leukocytosis, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. A control cohort was defined as including a total of 70 biopsies from 50 patients comprising neutrophilic urticaria (pressure-induced and not pressure-induced), conventional urticaria, lupus erythematosus expressing neutrophils, and exanthematous drug reaction of macular type expressing neutrophils. Skin biopsies of NUD revealed a perivascular and interstitial neutrophilic infiltrate focally extending into the epithelia of epidermis, hair follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands, a feature which we termed neutrophilic epitheliotropism. This neutrophilic epitheliotropism proved to be of high sensitivity (83.1%) and lower specificity (74.3%). The histological findings could be substantiated by immunohistochemical markers for leukocytes (elastase and myeloperoxidase), in particular in cases where neutrophils showed uncharacteristic band-like nuclei. Neutrophilic epitheliotropism is a new sensitive and specific histopathological clue for NUD, a histopathological reaction pattern within the spectrum of neutrophilic dermatoses that needs to be differentiated from conventional urticaria.

  6. Neutrophil responses to injury or inflammation impair peripheral gustatory function

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Pamela Wall; Shi, Liqiao; He, Lianying; McCluskey, Lynnette Phillips

    2010-01-01

    The adult peripheral taste system is capable of extensive functional plasticity after injury. Sectioning the chorda tympani (CT), a primary sensory afferent nerve, elicits transient changes in the uninjured, contralateral population of taste receptor cells. Remarkably, the deficits are specific to the sodium transduction pathway. Normal function is quickly restored in the intact nerve, in parallel with an influx of macrophages to both the denervated and uninjured sides of the tongue. However, changing the dietary environment by restricting sodium blocks the macrophage response and prolongs functional alterations. Since the functional deficits occur before macrophages are present in the peripheral taste system, we hypothesized that neutrophils play a role in modulating neural responses in the intact CT. First, the dynamics of the neutrophil response to nerve injury were analyzed in control-fed and sodium-deficient rats. Nerve sectioning briefly increased the number of neutrophils on both the denervated and uninjured sides of the tongue. The low-sodium diet amplified and extended the bilateral neutrophil response to injury, in parallel with the persistent changes in sodium taste function. To test the impact of neutrophils on taste function, we depleted these cells prior to nerve sectioning and recorded neural responses from the intact CT. This treatment restored normal sodium responses in the uninjured nerve. Moreover, recruiting neutrophils to the tongue induced deficits in sodium taste function in both CT nerves. Neutrophils play a critical role in ongoing inflammatory responses in the oral cavity, and may induce changes in taste perception. We also suggest that balanced neutrophil and macrophage responses enable normal neural responses after neural injury. PMID:20219636

  7. Cell Intrinsic Galectin-3 Attenuates Neutrophil ROS-Dependent Killing of Candida by Modulating CR3 Downstream Syk Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Yang; Huang, Juin-Hua; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chan, Yi-Chen; Lin, Chun-Hung; Chen, Yee-Chun; Liu, Fu-Tong; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is a leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Neutrophils are the important effector cells in host resistance to candidiasis. To investigate the modulation of neutrophil fungicidal function will advance our knowledge on the control of candidiasis. While recombinant galectin-3 enhances neutrophil phagocytosis of Candida, we found that intracellular galectin-3 downregulates neutrophil fungicidal functions. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining reveal that cytosolic gal3 physically interacts with Syk in neutrophils after Candida stimulation. Gal3−/− neutrophils have higher level of Syk activation as well as greater abilities to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and kill Candida than gal3+/+ cells. While galectin-3 deficiency modulates neutrophil and macrophage activation and the recruitment of monocytes and dendritic cells, the deficiency does not affect the numbers of infiltrating neutrophils or macrophages. Galectin-3 deficiency ameliorates systemic candidiasis by reducing fungal burden, renal pathology, and mortality. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrate that cell intrinsic galectin-3 negatively regulates neutrophil effector functions against candidiasis. Reducing galectin-3 expression or activity by siRNA or gal3 inhibitor TD139 enhances human neutrophil ROS production. Mice treated with TD139 have enhanced ability to clear the fungus. Our work unravels the mechanism by which galectin-3 regulates Syk-dependent neutrophil fungicidal functions and raises the possibility that blocking gal3 in neutrophils may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treating systemic candidiasis. PMID:28217127

  8. Soluble CD40 ligand stimulates CD40-dependent activation of the β2 integrin Mac-1 and protein kinase C zeda (PKCζ) in neutrophils: implications for neutrophil-platelet interactions and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Yu, Shiyong; Song, Zifang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Wang, Cuiping; Yan, Jinchuan; Wu, Fusheng; Nanda, Anil; Granger, D Neil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has revealed an essential involvement of soluble CD40L (sCD40L) in inflammation and vascular disease. Activated platelets are the major source of sCD40L, which has been implicated in platelet and leukocyte activation, although its exact functional impact on leukocyte-platelet interactions and the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We aimed to determine the impact and the mechanisms of sCD40L on neutrophils. We studied neutrophil interactions with activated, surface-adherent platelets as a model for leukocyte recruitment to the sites of injury. Our data show that CD40L contributes to neutrophil firm adhesion to and transmigration across activated surface-adherent platelets, possibly through two potential mechanisms. One involves the direct interaction of ligand-receptor (CD40L-CD40), i.e., platelet surface CD40L interaction with neutrophil CD40; another involves an indirect mechanism, i.e. soluble CD40L stimulates activation of the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils and thereby further promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration. Activation of the integrin Mac-1 is known to be critical for mediating neutrophil adhesion and migration. sCD40L activated Mac-1 in neutrophils and enhanced neutrophil-platelet interactions in wild-type neutrophils, but failed to elicit such responses in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Furthermore, our data show that the protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ) is critically required for sCD40L-induced Mac-1 activation and neutrophil adhesive function. sCD40L strongly stimulated the focal clustering of Mac-1 (CD11b) and the colocalization of Mac-1 with PKCζ in wild-type neutrophils, but had minimal effect in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Blocking PKCζ completely inhibited sCD40L-induced neutrophil firm adhesion. Moreover, sCD40L strongly stimulates neutrophil oxidative burst via CD40-dependent activation of PI3K/NF-KB, but independent of Mac-1 and PKCζ. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the

  9. Neutrophil Toxicity of Amphotericin B

    PubMed Central

    Chunn, C. John; Starr, P. R.; Gilbert, David N.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of amphotericin B (AmB) for neutrophils and the protective effect of serum cholesterol were investigated. Neutrophils were exposed in vitro to varying concentrations of AmB. As judged by trypan blue exclusion, neutrophil viability decreased by 40% (P < 0.001) within 30 min of incubation in sterol-free buffer containing 5 μg of AmB per ml. In the presence of 4 mg of cholesterol per 100 ml in buffer, the AmB concentration could be increased to 50 μg/ml before significant (P < 0.01) neutrophil toxicity occurred. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity of neutrophils incubated in serum or cholesterol-containing buffer with 10 μg of AmB per ml was normal. These results suggest that serum contains a protective factor, probably cholesterol, which protects neutrophils in vitro from the toxic effects of AmB. PMID:900919

  10. Characterization of neutrophil function in Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Helen; White, Phillipa; Dias, Irundika; McKaig, Sarah; Veeramachaneni, Ratna; Thakker, Nalin; Grant, Melissa; Chapple, Iain

    2016-08-01

    Papillon-Lefévre syndrome is a rare, inherited, autosomal-recessive disease, characterized by palmoplantar keratosis and severe prepubertal periodontitis, leading to premature loss of all teeth. Papillon-Lefévre syndrome is caused by a mutation in the cathepsin C gene, resulting in complete loss of activity and subsequent failure to activate immune response proteins. Periodontitis in Papillon-Lefévre syndrome is thought to arise from failure to eliminate periodontal pathogens as a result of cathepsin C deficiency, although mechanistic pathways remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to characterize comprehensively neutrophil function in Papillon-Lefévre syndrome. Peripheral blood neutrophils were isolated from 5 patients with Papillon-Lefévre syndrome, alongside matched healthy control subjects. For directional chemotactic accuracy, neutrophils were exposed to the chemoattractants MIP-1α and fMLP and tracked by real-time videomicroscopy. Reactive oxygen species generation was measured by chemiluminescence. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation was assayed fluorometrically, and proinflammatory cytokine release was measured following overnight culture of neutrophils with relevant stimuli. Neutrophil serine protease deficiencies resulted in a reduced ability of neutrophils to chemotax efficiently and an inability to generate neutrophil extracellular traps. Neutrophil extracellular trap-bound proteins were also absent in Papillon-Lefévre syndrome, and Papillon-Lefévre syndrome neutrophils released higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines in unstimulated and stimulated conditions, and plasma cytokines were elevated. Notably, neutrophil chemoattractants MIP-1α and CXCL8 were elevated in Papillon-Lefévre syndrome neutrophils, as was reactive oxygen species formation. We propose that relentless recruitment and accumulation of hyperactive/reactive neutrophils (cytokines, reactive oxygen species) with increased tissue transit times into periodontal

  11. Characterization of Neutrophil Function in Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    Conceição, Jacilara; Davis, Richard; Carneiro, Pedro Paulo; Giudice, Angela; Muniz, Aline C.; Wilson, Mary E.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Bacellar, Olívia

    2016-01-01

    Infection with different Leishmania spp. protozoa can lead to a variety of clinical syndromes associated in many cases with inflammatory responses in the skin. Although macrophages harbor the majority of parasites throughout chronic infection, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of infection. Whether neutrophils promote parasite clearance or exacerbate disease in murine models varies depending on the susceptible or resistant status of the host. Based on the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to a systemic inflammatory state in humans with symptomatic L. braziliensis infection, we evaluated the phenotype of neutrophils from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) during the course of L. braziliensis infection. After in vitro infection with L. braziliensis, CL patient neutrophils produced more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher levels of CXCL8 and CXCL9, chemokines associated with recruitment of neutrophils and Th1-type cells, than neutrophils from control healthy subjects (HS). Despite this, CL patient and HS neutrophils were equally capable of phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. There was no difference between the degree of activation of neutrophils from CL versus healthy subjects, assessed by CD66b and CD62L expression using flow cytometry. Of interest, these studies revealed that both parasite-infected and bystander neutrophils became activated during incubation with L. braziliensis. The enhanced ROS and chemokine production in neutrophils from CL patients reverted to baseline after treatment of disease. These data suggest that the circulating neutrophils during CL are not necessarily more microbicidal, but they have a more pro-inflammatory profile after parasite restimulation than neutrophils from healthy subjects. PMID:27167379

  12. Mincle activation enhances neutrophil migration and resistance to polymicrobial septic peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wook-Bin; Yan, Ji-Jing; Kang, Ji-Seon; Zhang, Quanri; Choi, Won Young; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Young-Joon

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to bacterial infection. The therapeutic options for treating sepsis are limited. Impaired neutrophil recruitment into the infection site is directly associated with severe sepsis, but the precise mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Mincle plays a key role in neutrophil migration and resistance during polymicrobial sepsis. Mincle-deficient mice exhibited lower survival rates in experimental sepsis from cecal ligation and puncture and Escherichia coli–induced peritonitis. Mincle deficiency led to higher serum inflammatory cytokine levels and reduced bacterial clearance and neutrophil recruitment. Transcriptome analyses revealed that trehalose dimycolate, a Mincle ligand, reduced the expression of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in neutrophils. Indeed, GRK2 expression was upregulated, but surface expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 was downregulated in blood neutrophils from Mincle-deficient mice with septic injury. Moreover, CXCL2-mediated adhesion, chemotactic responses, and F-actin polymerization were reduced in Mincle-deficient neutrophils. Finally, we found that fewer Mincle-deficient neutrophils infiltrated from the blood circulation into the peritoneal fluid in bacterial septic peritonitis compared with wild-type cells. Thus, our results indicate that Mincle plays an important role in neutrophil infiltration and suggest that Mincle signaling may provide a therapeutic target for treating sepsis. PMID:28112221

  13. Pneumovirus-Induced Lung Disease in Mice Is Independent of Neutrophil-Driven Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lutter, René; Boon, Louis; Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B. M.

    2016-01-01

    The human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common pathogen causing lower respiratory tract disease in young children worldwide. A hallmark of severe human RSV infection is the strong neutrophil recruitment to the airways and lungs. Massive neutrophil activation has been proven detrimental in numerous diseases, yet in RSV the contribution of neutrophils to disease severity, and thereby, the relevance of targeting them, is largely unknown. To determine the relevance of potential neutrophil targeting therapies, we implemented antibody-mediated neutrophil depletion in a mouse pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) model. PVM is a host specific murine pneumovirus closely related to human RSV, which reproduces many of the features of RSV infection, such as high viral replication and neutrophil recruitment. Clinical disease and markers of lung inflammation and injury were studied in PVM-infected mice treated with either depleting or isotype control antibodies. To confirm our results we performed all experiments in two mice strains: C57Bl6 and BALBc mice. Neutrophil depletion in blood and lungs was efficient throughout the disease. Remarkably, in both mouse strains we found no difference in clinical disease severity between neutrophil-depleted and control arms. In line with this observation, we found no differences between groups in histopathological lung injury and lung viral loads. In conclusion, our study shows that in mice neutrophil recruitment to the lungs does not affect disease outcome or viral clearance during severe PVM infection. As such, this model does not support the notion that neutrophils play a key role in mouse pneumovirus disease. PMID:28005954

  14. Chemorepellent Semaphorin 3E Negatively Regulates Neutrophil Migration In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Movassagh, Hesam; Saati, Abeer; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Mohammed, Ashfaque; Tatari, Nazanin; Shan, Lianyu; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S; Fowke, Keith R; Lin, Francis; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2017-02-01

    Neutrophil migration is an essential step in leukocyte trafficking during inflammatory responses. Semaphorins, originally discovered as axon guidance cues in neural development, have been shown to regulate cell migration beyond the nervous system. However, the potential contribution of semaphorins in the regulation of neutrophil migration is not well understood. This study examines the possible role of a secreted chemorepellent, Semaphorin 3E (Sema3E), in neutrophil migration. In this study, we demonstrated that human neutrophils constitutively express Sema3E high-affinity receptor, PlexinD1. Sema3E displayed a potent ability to inhibit CXCL8/IL-8-induced neutrophil migration as determined using a microfluidic device coupled to real-time microscopy and a transwell system in vitro. The antimigratory effect of Sema3E on human neutrophil migration was associated with suppression of CXCL8/IL-8-mediated Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 GTPase activity and actin polymerization. We further addressed the regulatory role of Sema3E in the regulation of neutrophil migration in vivo. Allergen airway exposure induced higher neutrophil recruitment into the lungs of Sema3e(-/-) mice compared with wild-type controls. Administration of exogenous recombinant Sema3E markedly reduced allergen-induced neutrophil recruitment into the lungs, which was associated with alleviation of allergic airway inflammation and improvement of lung function. Our data suggest that Sema3E could be considered an essential regulatory mediator involved in modulation of neutrophil migration throughout the course of neutrophilic inflammation. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Regulation of tissue infiltration by neutrophils: Role of integrin α3β1 and other factors

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Pallavi; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Neutrophils have traditionally been viewed in the context of acute infection and inflammation forming the first line of defence against invading pathogens. Neutrophil trafficking to the site of inflammation requires adhesion and transmigration through blood vessels, which is orchestrated by adhesion molecules, such as β2- and β1-integrins, chemokines and cytokines. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the regulators of neutrophil recruitment during inflammation in both acute and chronic settings. Recent findings Recent findings suggest that besides the established pathways of selectin or chemokine-mediated integrin activation, signaling by distinct TLRs (especially TLR2, TLR4 and TLR5) can activate integrin-dependent neutrophil adhesion. Moreover, the integrin α3β1 has been vitally implicated as a new player in neutrophil recruitment and TLR-mediated responses in septic inflammation. Furthermore, several endogenous inhibitory mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment have been identified, including the secreted molecules Del-1, PTX3, and GDF-15, which block distinct steps of the leukocyte adhesion cascade, as well as novel regulatory signaling pathways, involving the protein kinase AKT1 and IFN-λ2/IL-28A. Summary The leukocyte adhesion cascade is a tightly regulated process, subjected to both positive and negative regulators. Dysregulation of this process and hence neutrophil recruitment can lead to the development of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26554893

  16. A unique protein profile of peripheral neutrophils from COPD patients does not reflect cytokine-induced protein profiles of neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inflammation, both local and systemic, is a hallmark of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Inflammatory mediators such as TNFα and GM-CSF are secreted by lung epithelium, alveolar macrophages and other inflammatory cells and are thought to be important contributors in the pathogenesis of COPD. Indeed, neutrophils are activated by these cytokines and these cells are one of the major inflammatory cell types recruited to the pulmonary compartment of COPD patients. Furthermore, these inflammatory mediators are found in the peripheral blood of COPD patients and, therefore, we hypothesized that TNFα/GM-CSF-induced protein profiles can be found in peripheral neutrophils of COPD patients. Methods Using fluorescence 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis we investigated differentially regulated proteins in peripheral neutrophils from COPD patients and healthy age-matched control subjects. Furthermore, protein profiles from COPD patients were compared with those of neutrophils of healthy age-matched controls that were stimulated with TNFα and/or GM-CSF in vitro. Protein gels were compared using DeCyder 7.0 software. Results We identified 7 significantly regulated protein spots between peripheral neutrophils from COPD patients and age-matched healthy control subjects. Stimulation of peripheral neutrophils with TNFα, GM-CSF or TNFα + GM-CSF in vitro resulted in 13, 20 and 22 regulated protein spots, respectively. However, these cytokine-induced protein differences did not correspond with the protein differences found in neutrophils from COPD patients. Conclusion These results show that neutrophils from COPD patients have a unique protein profile compared to neutrophils from healthy age-matched controls. Furthermore, the neutrophil profiles of COPD patients do not reflect putative dominant signals induced by TNFα, GM-CSF or their combination. Our results indicate that systemic neutrophil responses in COPD patients are caused by a unique but

  17. New insights into the mechanisms of nuclear segmentation in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, J A; Wangh, L J

    1999-04-01

    During human neutrophil differentiation, large portions of the genome condense and associate with the nuclear envelope to form filament-like structures. As a result, the nucleus of the mature neutrophil typically consists of a linear array of three or four lobes joined by thin, DNA-containing filaments. Despite the medical significance of neutrophil nuclear morphology, little is known about the events regulating neutrophil nuclear differentiation and its pathological states. This work presents a new model of the mechanisms governing nuclear filament formation in human neutrophils. This model is based on recent chromosome mapping studies in human neutrophils and on studies of genetic and pathological conditions affecting neutrophil nuclear shape. According to this model, filament assembly is initiated by factors that interact with specific regions of the genome in a hierarchical and dose-dependent manner. In this regard, the strategies governing the molecular interactions responsible for filament formation appear to resemble those involved in transcriptional silencing, a phenomenon that also affects the properties of extended chromosomal regions. According to the silencing paradigm, bound filament control Factors must recruit additional Filament Foehn factors which spread along adjacent DNA to mediate filament formation. A better understanding of the factors that shape the neutrophil nucleus may lead to new clinical tools for the diagnosis and manipulation of abnormal neutrophil differentiation.

  18. Neutrophils are dispensable in the modulation of T cell immunity against cutaneous HSV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Hor, Jyh Liang; Heath, William R.; Mueller, Scott N.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils rapidly infiltrate sites of inflammation during peripheral infection or tissue injury. In addition to their well described roles as pro-inflammatory phagocytes responsible for pathogen clearance, recent studies have demonstrated a broader functional repertoire including mediating crosstalk between innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Specifically, neutrophils have been proposed to mediate antigen transport to lymph nodes (LN) to modulate T cell priming and to influence T cell migration to infected tissues. Using a mouse model of cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection we explored potential contributions of neutrophils toward anti-viral immunity. While a transient, early influx of neutrophils was triggered by dermal scarification, we did not detect migration of neutrophils from the skin to LN. Furthermore, despite recruitment of neutrophils into LN from the blood, priming and expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was unaffected following neutrophil depletion. Finally, we found that neutrophils were dispensable for the migration of effector T cells into infected skin. Our study suggests that the immunomodulatory roles of neutrophils toward adaptive immunity may be context-dependent, and are likely determined by the type of pathogen and anatomical site of infection. PMID:28112242

  19. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.E. Jr.; Rotrosen, D.; Fontaine, J.W.; Haudenschild, C.C.; Diamond, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of /sup 51/Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of /sup 51/Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers.

  20. Vascular sprouts induce local attraction of proangiogenic neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Christoffersson, Gustaf; Lomei, Jalal; O'Callaghan, Paul; Kreuger, Johan; Engblom, Stefan; Phillipson, Mia

    2017-09-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, is a complex process requiring the orchestration of numerous different cell types, growth factors, and chemokines. Some of the recently acknowledged actors in this process are immune cells. They accumulate at hypoxic sites, but the kinetics, dynamics, and regulation of that trafficking are unknown. In this study, we used intravital and live cell imaging to understand how neutrophils and macrophages migrate and behave at angiogenic sites. We developed two reproducible models of angiogenesis: one by transplanting isolated and hypoxic pancreatic islets into the cremaster muscles of mice, and another by in vitro coculturing of mouse aortic rings with neutrophils. In vivo imaging of the hypoxic site revealed recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages, which occurred in parallel, with depletion of one subset not affecting the accumulation of the other. We found, by cell tracking and statistical analyses, that neutrophils migrated in a directional manner to "angiogenic hotspots" around the islet where endothelial sprouting occurs, which was confirmed in the in vitro model of angiogenesis and is dependent on CXCL12 signaling. Intimate interactions between neutrophils and neovessels were prevalent, and neutrophil depletion greatly hampered vessel growth. Macrophages were less motile and attained supportive positions around the neovessels. Here, we present two novel in vivo and in vitro imaging models to study leukocyte behavior and actions during angiogenesis. These models unveiled that neutrophil migration at a hypoxic site was guided by signals emanating from sprouting endothelium where these immune cells gathered at "angiogenic hotspots" at which vascular growth occurred. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  1. Marine Natural Product Inhibitors of Neutrophil-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chang, Wen-Yi; Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are widely recognized to play an important role in acute inflammatory responses, and recent evidence has expanded their role to modulating chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and microbicidal compounds released from neutrophils that are recruited to the site of inflammation contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple inflammation-associated diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, atherosclerosis, and hepatitis. Marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with potential for industrial and pharmaceutical application. Marine natural products that inhibit neutrophil activation could be used as drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Numerous studies investigating marine natural products have reported novel anti-inflammatory agents. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanisms underlying their actions, which could facilitate our understanding of the molecular events occurring in neutrophils, have not been reported in most of the associated research studies. Therefore, in this review, we will present marine products that inhibit neutrophil-associated inflammation. Furthermore, we will be limiting the detailed discussion to agents with well-investigated molecular targets. PMID:27472345

  2. Marine Natural Product Inhibitors of Neutrophil-Associated Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chang, Wen-Yi; Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-07-26

    Neutrophils are widely recognized to play an important role in acute inflammatory responses, and recent evidence has expanded their role to modulating chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and microbicidal compounds released from neutrophils that are recruited to the site of inflammation contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple inflammation-associated diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, atherosclerosis, and hepatitis. Marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with potential for industrial and pharmaceutical application. Marine natural products that inhibit neutrophil activation could be used as drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Numerous studies investigating marine natural products have reported novel anti-inflammatory agents. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanisms underlying their actions, which could facilitate our understanding of the molecular events occurring in neutrophils, have not been reported in most of the associated research studies. Therefore, in this review, we will present marine products that inhibit neutrophil-associated inflammation. Furthermore, we will be limiting the detailed discussion to agents with well-investigated molecular targets.

  3. Presence of neutrophil-bearing antigen in lymphoid organs of immune mice.

    PubMed

    Maletto, Belkys A; Ropolo, Andrea S; Alignani, Diego O; Liscovsky, Miriam V; Ranocchia, Romina P; Moron, Victor Gabriel; Pistoresi-Palencia, María C

    2006-11-01

    Neutrophils play a crucial early role during the innate response, but little is known about their possible contribution when an adaptive immune response is installed. A robust neutrophilia and a T helper 1 (Th1) immune response are present after immunization with Complete Freund Adjuvant (CFA). We show that when FITC-labeled OVA was injected into the footpad of OVA/CFA immunized mice, the main OVA-FITC+ cells recruited in draining popliteal lymph nodes (LNs) were neutrophils, with most of them arriving at the LN by means of lymphatic vessels. The development of this OVA-FITC+ neutrophil influx requires an immune response against OVA. The OVA-FITC+ neutrophils present in LNs displayed mainly intracellular TNF-alpha, and their depletion resulted in an increase in the specific IL-5 levels. These data provide new evidence about the role played by neutrophils in vivo in adaptive immunity.

  4. Neutrophil depletion inhibits experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Eliason, Jonathan L; Hannawa, Kevin K; Ailawadi, Gorav; Sinha, Indranil; Ford, John W; Deogracias, Michael P; Roelofs, Karen J; Woodrum, Derek T; Ennis, Terri L; Henke, Peter K; Stanley, James C; Thompson, Robert W; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2005-07-12

    serves only as a marker for the presence of neutrophils and is not critical for AAA formation. Circulating neutrophils are an important initial component of experimental AAA formation. Neutrophil depletion inhibits AAA development through a non-MMP-2/9-mediated mechanism associated with attenuated inflammatory cell recruitment.

  5. Vav1 is essential for mechanotactic crawling and migration of neutrophils out of the inflamed microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Phillipson, Mia; Heit, Bryan; Parsons, Sean A; Petri, Björn; Mullaly, Sarah C; Colarusso, Pina; Gower, R Michael; Neely, Gregory; Simon, Scott I; Kubes, Paul

    2009-06-01

    Mac-1-dependent crawling is a new step in the leukocyte recruitment cascade that follows LFA-1-dependent adhesion and precedes emigration. Neutrophil adhesion via LFA-1 has been shown to induce cytoskeletal reorganization through Vav1-dependent signaling, and the current study investigates the role of Vav1 in the leukocyte recruitment process in vivo with particular attention to the events immediately downstream of LFA-1-dependent adhesion. Intravital and spinning-disk-confocal microscopy was used to investigate intravascular crawling in relation to endothelial junctions in vivo in wild-type and Vav1(-/-) mice. Adherent wild-type neutrophils almost immediately began crawling perpendicular to blood flow via Mac-1 until they reached an endothelial junction where they often changed direction. This pattern of perpendicular, mechanotactic crawling was recapitulated in vitro when shear was applied. In sharp contrast, the movement of Vav1(-/-) neutrophils was always in the direction of flow and appeared more passive as if the cells were dragged in the direction of flow in vivo and in vitro. More than 80% of Vav1(-/-) neutrophils moved independent of Mac-1 and could be detached with LFA-1 Abs. An inability to release the uropod was frequently noted for Vav1(-/-) neutrophils, leading to greatly elongated tails. The Vav1(-/-) neutrophils failed to stop or follow junctions and ultimately detached, leading to fewer emigrated neutrophils. The Vav1(-/-) phenotype resulted in fewer neutrophils recruited in a relevant model of infectious peritonitis. Clearly, Vav1 is critical for the complex interplay between LFA-1 and Mac-1 that underlies the programmed intravascular crawling of neutrophils.

  6. Vav1 is Essential for Mechanotactic Crawling and Migration of Neutrophils out of the Inflamed Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Phillipson, Mia; Heit, Bryan; Parsons, Sean A.; Petri, Björn; Mullaly, Sarah C.; Colarusso, Pina; Gower, R. Michael; Neely, Gregory; Simon, Scott I.; Kubes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Mac-1 dependent crawling is a new step in the leukocyte recruitment cascade which follows LFA-1 dependent adhesion and precedes emigration. Neutrophil adhesion via LFA-1 has been shown to induce cytoskeletal reorganization through Vav1-dependent signaling, and the current study investigates the role of Vav1 in the leukocyte recruitment process in vivo with particular attention to the events immediately downstream of LFA-1 dependent adhesion. Intravital and spinning-disk-confocal microscopy was used to investigate intravascular crawling in relation to endothelial junctions in vivo in wild-type (WT) and Vav1−/− mice. Adherent WT neutrophils almost immediately began crawling perpendicular to or against blood flow via Mac-1 until they reached an endothelial junction where they often changed direction. This pattern of perpendicular, mechanotactic crawling was recapitulated in vitro when shear was applied. In sharp contrast, the movement of Vav1−/− neutrophils was always in the direction of flow, and appeared more passive as if the cells were dragged in the direction of flow in vivo and in vitro. More than 80% of Vav1−/− neutrophils moved independent of Mac-1 and could be detached with LFA-1 antibodies. An inability to release the uropod was frequently noted for Vav1−/− neutrophils, leading to greatly elongated tails. The Vav1−/− neutrophils failed to stop or follow junctions, and ultimately detached leading to fewer emigrated neutrophils. The Vav1−/− phenotype resulted in fewer neutrophils recruited in a relevant model of infectious peritonitis. Clearly, Vav1 is critical for the complex interplay between LFA-1 and Mac-1 that underlies the programmed intravascular crawling of neutrophils. PMID:19454683

  7. Neutrophil swarms require LTB4 and integrins at sites of cell death in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lämmermann, Tim; Afonso, Philippe V.; Angermann, Bastian R.; Wang, Ji Ming; Kastenmüller, Wolfgang; Parent, Carole A.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment from blood to extravascular sites of sterile or infectious tissue damage is a hallmark of early innate immune responses, and the molecular events leading to cell exit from the bloodstream have been well defined1,2. Once outside the vessel, individual neutrophils often show extremely coordinated chemotaxis and cluster formation reminiscent of the swarming behaviour of insects3–11. The molecular players that direct this response at the single-cell and population levels within the complexity of an inflamed tissue are unknown. Using two-photon intravital microscopy in mouse models of sterile injury and infection, we show a critical role for intercellular signal relay among neutrophils mediated by the lipid leukotriene B4, which acutely amplifies local cell death signals to enhance the radius of highly directed interstitial neutrophil recruitment. Integrin receptors are dispensable for long-distance migration12, but have a previously unappreciated role in maintaining dense cellular clusters when congregating neutrophils rearrange the collagenous fibre network of the dermis to form a collagen-free zone at the wound centre. In this newly formed environment, integrins, in concert with neutrophil-derived leukotriene B4 and other chemoattractants, promote local neutrophil interaction while forming a tight wound seal. This wound seal has borders that cease to grow in kinetic concert with late recruitment of monocytes and macrophages at the edge of the displaced collagen fibres. Together, these data provide an initial molecular map of the factors that contribute to neutrophil swarming in the extravascular space of a damaged tissue. They reveal how local events are propagated over large-range distances, and how auto-signalling produces coordinated, self-organized neutrophil-swarming behaviour that isolates the wound or infectious site from surrounding viable tissue. PMID:23708969

  8. Myeloid-specific deletion of tumor suppressor PTEN augments neutrophil transendothelial migration during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sarraj, Bara; Massberg, Steffen; Li, Yitang; Kasorn, Anongnard; Subramanian, Kulandayan; Loison, Fabien; Silberstein, Leslie E; von Andrian, Ulrich; Luo, Hongbo R

    2009-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)) is a second messenger that is involved in a number of cell activities including cell growth, proliferation, and motility. PIP(3) is produced by PI3K and regulated by PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and SHIP lipid phosphatases. Evidence from our experiments shows that enhanced PIP(3) production results in elevated neutrophil recruitment under inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanism of this elevation is not well understood. We used intravital video microscopy to investigate neutrophil recruitment in the cremaster venules of wild-type and PTEN knockout (KO) mice. Neutrophil transmigration was augmented in PTEN KO mice 4 h after TNF-alpha intrascrotal injection. PTEN KO neutrophils also showed significantly enhanced transmigration 2 h after MIP-2 intrascrotal injection, an effect that dramatically decreased when PI3K or Src kinase inhibitor treatments preceded MIP-2 stimulation. Similarly, fMLP superfusion of the cremaster muscle lead to enhanced emigration in PTEN KO mice. The observed elevation in neutrophil emigration was likely caused by increased speed of crawling, crossing the venular wall, and migrating through the muscular tissue in PTEN KO mice because the effect of PTEN depletion on neutrophil rolling or adhesion was minimal. Interestingly, chemoattractant-induced release of gelatinase and elastase was also elevated in PTEN null neutrophils, providing a potential mechanism for the enhanced neutrophil migration in the PTEN KO mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PTEN deletion in neutrophils enhances their invasivity and recruitment to inflamed sites more likely by raising the cell physical capability to cross the vascular and tissue barriers.

  9. On-chip evaluation of neutrophil activation and neutrophil-endothelial cell interaction during neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyuk; Haynes, Christy L

    2013-11-19

    Neutrophils are always surrounded by/interacting with other components of the immune system; however, the current mechanistic understanding of neutrophil function is largely based on how neutrophils respond to a single chemical signal in a simplified environment. Such approaches are unable to recapitulate the in vivo microenvironment; thus, cell behavior may not fully represent the physiological behavior. Herein, we exploit a microfluidic model of the complex in vivo milieu to investigate how cell-cell interactions influence human neutrophil migration and surface marker expression. Neutrophil migration against a bacterially derived chemoattractant (formyl-met-leu-phe, fMLP), with and without preactivation by interleukins (interleukin-2 or interleukin-6), was evaluated in the presence and absence of endothelial support cells. Preactivation by interleukins or interaction with endothelial cells resulted in altered migration rates compared to naïve neutrophils, and migration trajectories deviated from the expected movement toward the fMLP signal. Interestingly, interaction with both interleukins and endothelial cells simultaneously resulted in a slight compensation in the deviation-on endothelial cells, 34.4% of untreated neutrophils moved away from the fMLP signal, while only 15.2 or 22.2% (interleukin-2-or interleukin-6-activated) of preactivated cells moved away from fMLP. Neutrophils interacting with interleukins and/or endothelial cells were still capable of prioritizing the fMLP signal over a competing chemoattractant, leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Fluorescence imaging of individual human neutrophils revealed that neutrophils treated with endothelial-cell-conditioned media showed up-regulation of the surface adhesion molecules cluster determinant 11b and 66b (CD11b and CD66b) upon stimulation. On the other hand, CD11b and CD66b down-regulation was observed in untreated neutrophils. These results leverage single cell analysis to reveal that the interaction between

  10. Adipocytes and Neutrophils Give a Helping Hand to Pancreatic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-08-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation can build up a confined microenvironment in pancreatic adenocarcinoma that is associated with increased desmoplasia, neutrophil recruitment, reduced delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs, and immune evasion. Targeting molecular pathways empowering this circuit might represent a necessary measure to reach clinical efficacy for combination therapies in patients with excess body weight. Cancer Discov; 6(8); 821-3. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Incio et al., p. 852.

  11. Whole Blood Human Neutrophil Trafficking in a Microfluidic Model of Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Bashar; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate inflammatory responses to wounds and infections require adequate numbers of neutrophils arriving at injury sites. Both insufficient and excessive neutrophil recruitment can be detrimental, favouring systemic spread of microbes or triggering severe tissue damage. Despite its importance in health and disease, the trafficking of neutrophils through tissues remains difficult to control and the mechanisms regulating it are insufficiently understood. These mechanisms are also complex and difficult to isolate using traditional in vivo models. Here we designed a microfluidic model of tissue infection/inflammation, in which human neutrophils emerge from a droplet-size samples of whole blood and display bi-directional traffic between this and micro-chambers containing chemoattractant and microbe-like particles. Two geometrical barriers restrict the entrance of red blood cells from the blood to the micro-chambers and simulate the mechanical function of the endothelial barrier separating the cells in blood from cells in tissues. We found that in the presence of chemoattractant, the number of neutrophils departing the chambers by retrotaxis is in dynamic equilibrium with the neutrophils recruited by chemotaxis. We also found that in the presence of microbe-like particles, the number of neutrophils trapped in the chambers is proportional to the number of particles. Together, the dynamic equilibrium between migration, reversed-migration and trapping processes determine the optimal number of neutrophils at a site. These neutrophils are continuously refreshed and responsive to the number of microbes. Further studies using this infection-inflammation-on-a-chip-model could help study the processes of inflammation resolution. The new in vitro experimental tools may also eventually help testing new therapeutic strategies to limit neutrophil accumulation in tissues during chronic inflammation, without increasing the risk for infections. PMID:25987163

  12. Serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 regulates neutrophil clearance during inflammation resolution.

    PubMed

    Burgon, Joseph; Robertson, Anne L; Sadiku, Pranvera; Wang, Xingang; Hooper-Greenhill, Edward; Prince, Lynne R; Walker, Paul; Hoggett, Emily E; Ward, Jonathan R; Farrow, Stuart N; Zuercher, William J; Jeffrey, Philip; Savage, Caroline O; Ingham, Philip W; Hurlstone, Adam F; Whyte, Moira K B; Renshaw, Stephen A

    2014-02-15

    The inflammatory response is integral to maintaining health by functioning to resist microbial infection and repair tissue damage. Large numbers of neutrophils are recruited to inflammatory sites to neutralize invading bacteria through phagocytosis and the release of proteases and reactive oxygen species into the extracellular environment. Removal of the original inflammatory stimulus must be accompanied by resolution of the inflammatory response, including neutrophil clearance, to prevent inadvertent tissue damage. Neutrophil apoptosis and its temporary inhibition by survival signals provides a target for anti-inflammatory therapeutics, making it essential to better understand this process. GM-CSF, a neutrophil survival factor, causes a significant increase in mRNA levels for the known anti-apoptotic protein serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1). We have characterized the expression patterns and regulation of SGK family members in human neutrophils and shown that inhibition of SGK activity completely abrogates the antiapoptotic effect of GM-CSF. Using a transgenic zebrafish model, we have disrupted sgk1 gene function and shown this specifically delays inflammation resolution, without altering neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites in vivo. These data suggest SGK1 plays a key role in regulating neutrophil survival signaling and thus may prove a valuable therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory disease.

  13. Serum and Glucocorticoid Regulated Kinase 1 (SGK1) Regulates Neutrophil Clearance During Inflammation Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Burgon, Joseph; Robertson, Anne L.; Sadiku, Pranvera; Wang, Xingang; Hooper-Greenhill, Edward; Prince, Lynne R.; Walker, Paul; Hoggett, Emily E.; Ward, Jonathan R.; Farrow, Stuart N.; Zuercher, William J.; Jeffrey, Philip; Savage, Caroline O.; Ingham, Philip W.; Hurlstone, Adam F.; Whyte, Moira K. B.; Renshaw, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    The inflammatory response is integral to maintaining health, by functioning to resist microbial infection and repair tissue damage. Large numbers of neutrophils are recruited to inflammatory sites to neutralise invading bacteria through phagocytosis and the release of proteases and reactive oxygen species into the extracellular environment. Removal of the original inflammatory stimulus must be accompanied by resolution of the inflammatory response, including neutrophil clearance, to prevent inadvertent tissue damage. Neutrophil apoptosis and its temporary inhibition by survival signals provides a target for anti-inflammatory therapeutics, making it essential to better understand this process. GM-CSF, a neutrophil survival factor, causes a significant increase in mRNA levels for the known anti-apoptotic protein Serum and Glucocorticoid Regulated Kinase 1 (SGK1). We have characterised the expression patterns and regulation of SGK family members in human neutrophils, and shown that inhibition of SGK activity completely abrogates the anti-apoptotic effect of GM-CSF. Using a transgenic zebrafish model, we have disrupted sgk1 gene function and shown this specifically delays inflammation resolution, without altering neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites in vivo. These data suggest SGK1 plays a key role in regulating neutrophil survival signalling, and thus may prove a valuable therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory disease. PMID:24431232

  14. Neutrophil-derived JAML Inhibits Repair of Intestinal Epithelial Injury During Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Dominique A.; Sumagin, Ronen; McCall, Ingrid C.; Leoni, Giovanna; Neumann, Philipp A.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Brazil, Jennifer C.; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Denning, Timothy L.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil transepithelial migration (TEM) during acute inflammation is associated with mucosal injury. Using models of acute mucosal injury in-vitro and in-vivo, we describe a new mechanism by which neutrophils infiltrating the intestinal mucosa disrupt epithelial homeostasis. We report that junctional adhesion molecule-like protein (JAML) is cleaved from neutrophil surface by zinc-metalloproteases during TEM. Neutrophil-derived soluble JAML bound to the epithelial tight junction protein coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) resulting in compromised barrier and inhibition of wound repair, through decreased epithelial proliferation. The deleterious effects of JAML on barrier and wound repair were reversed with an anti-JAML mAb that inhibits JAML-CAR binding. Thus, JAML released from transmigrating neutrophils across inflamed epithelia can promote recruitment of leukocytes and aid in clearance of invading microorganisms. However, sustained release of JAML under pathologic conditions associated with persistence of large numbers of infiltrated neutrophil would compromise intestinal barrier and inhibit mucosal healing. Targeting JAML-CAR interactions may thus improve mucosal healing responses under conditions of dysregulated neutrophil recruitment. PMID:24621992

  15. Galectin-3–null mice display defective neutrophil clearance during acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Rachael D; Souza, Patricia R.; Flak, Magdalena B.; Thedchanamoorthy, Prasheetha; Norling, Lucy V.; Cooper, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    Galectin-3 has been associated with a plethora of proinflammatory functions because of its ability, among others, to promote neutrophil activation and because of the reduction in neutrophil recruitment in models of infection in Gal-3-null mice. Conversely, it has also been linked to resolution of inflammation through its actions as an opsonin and its ability to promote efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. Using a self-resolving model of peritonitis, we have addressed the modulation and role of Gal-3 in acute inflammation. We have shown that Gal-3 expression is increased in neutrophils that travel to the inflamed peritoneum and that cellular localization of this lectin is modulated during the course of the inflammatory response. Furthermore, neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed peritoneum is increased in Gal-3–null mice during the course of the response, and that correlates with reduced numbers of monocytes/macrophages in the cavities of those mice, as well as reduced apoptosis and efferocytosis of Gal-3–null neutrophils. These data indicate a role for endogenous Gal-3 in neutrophil clearance during acute inflammation. PMID:27733579

  16. The endothelin B receptor plays a crucial role in the adhesion of neutrophils to the endothelium in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, Bérengère; Nivoit, Pierre; El Nemer, Wassim; Lenoir, Olivia; Hermand, Patricia; Pereira, Catia; Brousse, Valentine; Guyonnet, Léa; Ghinatti, Giulia; Benkerrou, Malika; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Although the primary origin of sickle cell disease is a hemoglobin disorder, many types of cells contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of the disease. The adhesion of neutrophils to activated endothelium is critical in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease and targeting neutrophils and their interactions with endothelium represents an important opportunity for the development of new therapeutics. We focused on endothelin-1, a mediator involved in neutrophil activation and recruitment in tissues, and investigated the involvement of the endothelin receptors in the interaction of neutrophils with endothelial cells. We used fluorescence intravital microscopy analyses of the microcirculation in sickle mice and quantitative microfluidic fluorescence microscopy of human blood. Both experiments on the mouse model and patients indicate that blocking endothelin receptors, particularly ETB receptor, strongly influences neutrophil recruitment under inflammatory conditions in sickle cell disease. We show that human neutrophils have functional ETB receptors with calcium signaling capability, leading to increased adhesion to the endothelium through effects on both endothelial cells and neutrophils. Intact ETB function was found to be required for tumor necrosis factor α-dependent upregulation of CD11b on neutrophils. Furthermore, we confirmed that human neutrophils synthesize endothelin-1, which may be involved in autocrine and paracrine pathophysiological actions. Thus, the endothelin-ETB axis should be considered as a cytokine-like potent pro-inflammatory pathway in sickle cell disease. Blockade of endothelin receptors, including ETB, may provide major benefits for preventing or treating vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell patients. PMID:28385784

  17. ITAM Signaling by Vav Family Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Regulates Interstitial Transit Rates of Neutrophils In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Francesca; Delgado, Ryan; Miller, Mark J.; Swat, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Background In response to infection, neutrophils are quickly recruited from the blood into inflamed tissues. The interstitial migration of neutrophils is crucial for the efficient capture and control of rapidly proliferating microbes before microbial growth can overwhelm the host's defenses. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate interstitial migration are incompletely understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we use two-photon microscopy (2PM) to study discrete steps of neutrophil responses during subcutaneous infection with bacteria. Our study demonstrates that signals emanating from ITAM-containing receptors mediated by Vav family Rho GEFs control the velocity, but not the directionality, of neutrophil migration towards sites of bacterial infection. Conclusions/Significance Here we show that during neutrophil migration towards sites of bacterial infection, signals emanating from ITAM-containing receptors specifically control interstitial neutrophil velocity. PMID:19247495

  18. Type I Interferon Transcriptional Signature in Neutrophils and Low-Density Granulocytes Are Associated with Tissue Damage in Malaria.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Bruno Coelho; Marques, Pedro Elias; Leoratti, Fabiana Maria de Souza; Junqueira, Caroline; Pereira, Dhelio Batista; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro do Valle; Menezes, Gustavo Batista; Golenbock, Douglas Taylor; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes

    2015-12-29

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte population in the bloodstream, the primary compartment of Plasmodium sp. infection. However, the role of these polymorphonuclear cells in mediating either the resistance or the pathogenesis of malaria is poorly understood. We report that circulating neutrophils from malaria patients are highly activated, as indicated by a strong type I interferon transcriptional signature, increased expression of surface activation markers, enhanced release of reactive oxygen species and myeloperoxidase, and a high frequency of low-density granulocytes. The activation of neutrophils was associated with increased levels of serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, indicating liver damage. In a rodent malaria model, we observed intense recruitment of neutrophils to liver sinusoids. Neutrophil migration and IL-1β and chemokine expression as well as liver damage were all dependent on type I interferon signaling. The data suggest that type I interferon signaling has a central role in neutrophil activation and malaria pathogenesis.

  19. Analyzing the Effects of Stromal Cells on the Recruitment of Leukocytes from Flow

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Hafsa; Rainger, G. Ed; Nash, Gerard B.; McGettrick, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Stromal cells regulate the recruitment of circulating leukocytes during inflammation through cross-talk with neighboring endothelial cells. Here we describe two in vitro “vascular” models for studying the recruitment of circulating neutrophils from flow by inflamed endothelial cells. A major advantage of these models is the ability to analyze each step in the leukocyte adhesion cascade in order, as would occur in vivo. We also describe how both models can be adapted to study the role of stromal cells, in this case mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), in regulating leukocyte recruitment. Primary endothelial cells were cultured alone or together with human MSC in direct contact on Ibidi microslides or on opposite sides of a Transwell filter for 24 hr. Cultures were stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) for 4 hr and incorporated into a flow-based adhesion assay. A bolus of neutrophils was perfused over the endothelium for 4 min. The capture of flowing neutrophils and their interactions with the endothelium was visualized by phase-contrast microscopy. In both models, cytokine-stimulation increased endothelial recruitment of flowing neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of the behavior of recruited neutrophils showed a dose-dependent decrease in rolling and a dose-dependent increase in transmigration through the endothelium. In co-culture, MSC suppressed neutrophil adhesion to TNFα-stimulated endothelium. Our flow based-adhesion models mimic the initial phases of leukocyte recruitment from the circulation. In addition to leukocytes, they can be used to examine the recruitment of other cell types, such as therapeutically administered MSC or circulating tumor cells. Our multi-layered co-culture models have shown that MSC communicate with endothelium to modify their response to pro-inflammatory cytokines, altering the recruitment of neutrophils. Further research using such models is required to fully understand how stromal cells from different

  20. Endogenous TNFα orchestrates the trafficking of neutrophils into and within lymphatic vessels during acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Arokiasamy, Samantha; Zakian, Christian; Dilliway, Jessica; Wang, Wen; Nourshargh, Sussan; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are recognised to play a pivotal role at the interface between innate and acquired immunities following their recruitment to inflamed tissues and lymphoid organs. While neutrophil trafficking through blood vessels has been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms regulating their migration into the lymphatic system are still poorly understood. Here, we have analysed neutrophil-lymphatic vessel interactions in real time and in vivo using intravital confocal microscopy applied to inflamed cremaster muscles. We show that antigen sensitisation of the tissues induces a rapid but transient entry of tissue-infiltrated neutrophils into lymphatic vessels and subsequent crawling along the luminal side of the lymphatic endothelium. Interestingly, using mice deficient in both TNF receptors p55 and p75, chimeric animals and anti-TNFα antibody blockade we demonstrate that tissue-release of TNFα governs both neutrophil migration through the lymphatic endothelium and luminal crawling. Mechanistically, we show that TNFα primes directly the neutrophils to enter the lymphatic vessels in a strictly CCR7-dependent manner; and induces ICAM-1 up-regulation on lymphatic vessels, allowing neutrophils to crawl along the lumen of the lymphatic endothelium in an ICAM-1/MAC-1-dependent manner. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a new role for TNFα as a key regulator of neutrophil trafficking into and within lymphatic system in vivo. PMID:28287124

  1. Correlation between probing pocket depth and neutrophil counts in dental plaque, saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid.

    PubMed

    Bhadbhade, Smruti Jayprakash; Acharya, Anirudh Balakrishna; Thakur, Srinath

    2012-02-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the innate immune response. There are no studies that have correlated the neutrophils in plaque, saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) to probing pocket depth (PPD) and to each other in periodontally healthy and diseased subjects. The aim of the present investigation was to assess and correlate the neutrophil levels in dental plaque, saliva, and GCF in periodontally healthy and diseased subjects. Forty-five subjects were recruited. They were divided into three groups based on the Gingival Index (GI) and the Russell Periodontal Index (PI) as clinically healthy (group 1), gingivitis (group 2), and chronic generalized periodontitis (group 3). Saliva and GCF samples were collected using a Durapore filter, and plaque samples were collected using an area-specific subgingival curette. Neutrophils were counted using an improved Neubauer chamber. Neutrophils were present in the plaque, saliva, and GCF of all three samples. There was a statistically significant difference between the neutrophil numbers in all the samples with respect to the severity of periodontal disease. The strength of association was the strongest between PPD and plaque neutrophils. The neutrophils in dental plaque samples correlated positively with PPD in periodontally healthy and diseased subjects.

  2. Endogenous TNFα orchestrates the trafficking of neutrophils into and within lymphatic vessels during acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Arokiasamy, Samantha; Zakian, Christian; Dilliway, Jessica; Wang, Wen; Nourshargh, Sussan; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit

    2017-03-13

    Neutrophils are recognised to play a pivotal role at the interface between innate and acquired immunities following their recruitment to inflamed tissues and lymphoid organs. While neutrophil trafficking through blood vessels has been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms regulating their migration into the lymphatic system are still poorly understood. Here, we have analysed neutrophil-lymphatic vessel interactions in real time and in vivo using intravital confocal microscopy applied to inflamed cremaster muscles. We show that antigen sensitisation of the tissues induces a rapid but transient entry of tissue-infiltrated neutrophils into lymphatic vessels and subsequent crawling along the luminal side of the lymphatic endothelium. Interestingly, using mice deficient in both TNF receptors p55 and p75, chimeric animals and anti-TNFα antibody blockade we demonstrate that tissue-release of TNFα governs both neutrophil migration through the lymphatic endothelium and luminal crawling. Mechanistically, we show that TNFα primes directly the neutrophils to enter the lymphatic vessels in a strictly CCR7-dependent manner; and induces ICAM-1 up-regulation on lymphatic vessels, allowing neutrophils to crawl along the lumen of the lymphatic endothelium in an ICAM-1/MAC-1-dependent manner. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a new role for TNFα as a key regulator of neutrophil trafficking into and within lymphatic system in vivo.

  3. PTPN22 Is a Critical Regulator of Fcγ Receptor–Mediated Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Katherine; Chu, Julia Y.; Salter, Donald; Zamoyska, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils act as a first line of defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but they are also important effectors of acute and chronic inflammation. Genome-wide association studies have established that the gene encoding the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22) makes an important contribution to susceptibility to autoimmune disease, notably rheumatoid arthritis. Although PTPN22 is most highly expressed in neutrophils, its function in these cells remains poorly characterized. We show in this article that neutrophil effector functions, including adhesion, production of reactive oxygen species, and degranulation induced by immobilized immune complexes, were reduced in Ptpn22−/− neutrophils. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Lyn and Syk was altered in Ptpn22−/− neutrophils. On stimulation with immobilized immune complexes, Ptpn22−/− neutrophils manifested reduced activation of key signaling intermediates. Ptpn22−/− mice were protected from immune complex–mediated arthritis, induced by the transfer of arthritogenic serum. In contrast, in vivo neutrophil recruitment following thioglycollate-induced peritonitis and in vitro chemotaxis were not affected by lack of PTPN22. Our data suggest an important role for PTPN22-dependent dephosphorylation events, which are required to enable full FcγR-induced activation, pointing to an important role for this molecule in neutrophil function. PMID:27807193

  4. PTPN22 Is a Critical Regulator of Fcγ Receptor-Mediated Neutrophil Activation.

    PubMed

    Vermeren, Sonja; Miles, Katherine; Chu, Julia Y; Salter, Donald; Zamoyska, Rose; Gray, Mohini

    2016-12-15

    Neutrophils act as a first line of defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but they are also important effectors of acute and chronic inflammation. Genome-wide association studies have established that the gene encoding the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22) makes an important contribution to susceptibility to autoimmune disease, notably rheumatoid arthritis. Although PTPN22 is most highly expressed in neutrophils, its function in these cells remains poorly characterized. We show in this article that neutrophil effector functions, including adhesion, production of reactive oxygen species, and degranulation induced by immobilized immune complexes, were reduced in Ptpn22(-/-) neutrophils. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Lyn and Syk was altered in Ptpn22(-/-) neutrophils. On stimulation with immobilized immune complexes, Ptpn22(-/-) neutrophils manifested reduced activation of key signaling intermediates. Ptpn22(-/-) mice were protected from immune complex-mediated arthritis, induced by the transfer of arthritogenic serum. In contrast, in vivo neutrophil recruitment following thioglycollate-induced peritonitis and in vitro chemotaxis were not affected by lack of PTPN22. Our data suggest an important role for PTPN22-dependent dephosphorylation events, which are required to enable full FcγR-induced activation, pointing to an important role for this molecule in neutrophil function.

  5. Leishmania donovani promastigotes evade the antimicrobial activity of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Christelle; McMaster, W Robert; Girard, Denis; Descoteaux, Albert

    2010-10-01

    Upon their recruitment to a site of infection and their subsequent activation, neutrophils release DNA and a subset of their granule content to form filamentous structures, known as neutrophil extracellular traps, which capture and kill microorganisms. In this study, we show that Leishmania promastigotes induced the rapid release of neutrophil extracellular traps from human neutrophils and were trapped by these structures. The use of Leishmania mutants defective in the biosynthesis of either lipophosphoglycan or GP63 revealed that these two major surface promastigote virulence determinants were not responsible for inducing the release of the surface protease neutrophil extracellular traps. We also demonstrate that this induction was independent of superoxide production by neutrophils. Finally, in contrast to wild-type Leishmania donovani promastigotes, mutants defective in lipophosphoglycan biosynthesis were highly susceptible to the antimicrobial activity of neutrophil extracellular traps. Altogether, our data suggest that neutrophil extracellular traps may contribute to the containment of L. donovani promastigotes at the site of inoculation, thereby facilitating their uptake by mononuclear phagocytes.

  6. Leukotriene B4 production by blood neutrophils in allergic rhinitis--effects of cetirizine.

    PubMed

    Cheria-Sammari, S; Aloui, R; Gormand, F; Chabannes, B; Gallet, H; Grosclaude, M; Melac, M; Rihoux, J P; Perrin-Fayolle, M; Lagarde, M

    1995-08-01

    Mucosal inflammatory processes in late phase of allergic diseases involve cytokine production, cell adhesion molecule overexpression and release of inflammatory mediators with chemotactic activity, such as leukotriene B4 (LTB4). We had previously observed increased production of LTB4 by neutrophils in patients with allergic rhinitis and discussed the role of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) priming. Some antihistaminic compounds were shown to diminish the production of leukotrienes by neutrophils. In a first step, we evaluated in ex vivo and in vitro studies, the effects of cetirizine on LTB4 production by blood neutrophils from allergic and healthy subjects. In a second step, we studied the in vitro effect of cetirizine on LTB4 production by neutrophils from healthy subjects during GM-CSF priming of these cells. Neutrophils from both populations were purified from venous blood and LTB4 production was measured using high performance liquid cromatography (HPLC) method. In ex vivo studies, cetirizine treatment induced a decreased LTB4 production by neutrophils in allergic rhinitis. This effect of decreased LTB4 production was reproduced in vitro with 10(-8)-10(-6)M cetirizine. Nevertheless, this anti-H1 compound had no effect on neutrophil priming with GM-CSF. As LTB4 is an important chemotactic factor, Cetirizine could act on inflammatory cell recruitment by inhibiting LTB4 production by neutrophils.

  7. Catchup: a mouse model for imaging-based tracking and modulation of neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Hasenberg, Anja; Hasenberg, Mike; Männ, Linda; Neumann, Franziska; Borkenstein, Lars; Stecher, Manuel; Kraus, Andreas; Engel, Daniel R; Klingberg, Anika; Seddigh, Pegah; Abdullah, Zeinab; Klebow, Sabrina; Engelmann, Swen; Reinhold, Annegret; Brandau, Sven; Seeling, Michaela; Waisman, Ari; Schraven, Burkhart; Göthert, Joachim R; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Gunzer, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Neutrophil granulocyte biology is a central issue of immunological research, but the lack of animal models that allow for neutrophil-selective genetic manipulation has delayed progress. By modulating the neutrophil-specific locus Ly6G with a knock-in allele expressing Cre recombinase and the fluorescent protein tdTomato, we generated a mouse model termed Catchup that exhibits strong neutrophil specificity. Transgene activity was found only in very few eosinophils and basophils and was undetectable in bone marrow precursors, including granulomonocytic progenitors (GMPs). Cre-mediated reporter-gene activation allowed for intravital two-photon microscopy of neutrophils without adoptive transfer. Homozygous animals were Ly6G deficient but showed normal leukocyte cellularity in all measured organs. Ly6G-deficient neutrophils were functionally normal in vitro and in multiple models of sterile or infectious inflammation in vivo. However, Cre-mediated deletion of FcγRIV in neutrophils reduced the cells' recruitment to immune-complex-mediated peritonitis, suggesting a cell-intrinsic role for activating Fc receptors in neutrophil trafficking.

  8. Neutrophil swarming toward Cryptococcus neoformans is mediated by complement and leukotriene B4.

    PubMed

    Sun, Donglei; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-09-02

    Swarming behavior of neutrophils has been noticed in both sterile injury and infection models and the mechanisms are being unveiled. So far, no in vitro model has been established to study neutrophil swarming to microbes. In the current study, using live-cell imaging, we observed in vitro neutrophil swarming toward Cryptococcus neoformans, a fungal pathogen causing human meningoencephalitis. Complement C3 and CD11b expression are essential for neutrophils to form cell swarms surrounding C. neoformans. Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was quickly released by neutrophils during their interactions with C. neoformans. Blockade of LTB4 synthesis inhibited the swarming response to C. neoformans. Importantly, blockade of LTB4 synthesis also significantly reduced neutrophil recruitment in the lung vasculature of mice infected intravenously with C. neoformans, demonstrating a critical role of LTB4 in intravascular neutrophil swarming during infection. Together, this is the first report of neutrophil dynamics of swarming toward a microorganism in vitro, mediated by complement and LTB4.

  9. A Simple and Efficient Method to Detect Nuclear Factor Activation in Human Neutrophils by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Erick; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in peripheral blood. These cells are the first to appear at sites of inflammation and infection, thus becoming the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophils possess important antimicrobial functions such as phagocytosis, release of lytic enzymes, and production of reactive oxygen species. In addition to these important defense functions, neutrophils perform other tasks in response to infection such as production of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibition of apoptosis. Cytokines recruit other leukocytes that help clear the infection, and inhibition of apoptosis allows the neutrophil to live longer at the site of infection. These functions are regulated at the level of transcription. However, because neutrophils are short-lived cells, the study of transcriptionally regulated responses in these cells cannot be performed with conventional reporter gene methods since there are no efficient techniques for neutrophil transfection. Here, we present a simple and efficient method that allows detection and quantification of nuclear factors in isolated and immunolabeled nuclei by flow cytometry. We describe techniques to isolate pure neutrophils from human peripheral blood, stimulate these cells with anti-receptor antibodies, isolate and immunolabel nuclei, and analyze nuclei by flow cytometry. The method has been successfully used to detect NF-κB and Elk-1 nuclear factors in nuclei from neutrophils and other cell types. Thus, this method represents an option for analyzing activation of transcription factors in isolated nuclei from a variety of cell types. PMID:23603868

  10. Involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinases in neutrophil activation and the development of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yum, H K; Arcaroli, J; Kupfner, J; Shenkar, R; Penninger, J M; Sasaki, T; Yang, K Y; Park, J S; Abraham, E

    2001-12-01

    Activated neutrophils contribute to the development and severity of acute lung injury (ALI). Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3-K) and the downstream serine/threonine kinase Akt/protein kinase B have a central role in modulating neutrophil function, including respiratory burst, chemotaxis, and apoptosis. In the present study, we found that exposure of neutrophils to endotoxin resulted in phosphorylation of Akt, activation of NF-kappaB, and expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha through PI3-K-dependent pathways. In vivo, endotoxin administration to mice resulted in activation of PI3-K and Akt in neutrophils that accumulated in the lungs. The severity of endotoxemia-induced ALI was significantly diminished in mice lacking the p110gamma catalytic subunit of PI3-K. In PI3-Kgamma(-/-) mice, lung edema, neutrophil recruitment, nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB, and pulmonary levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were significantly lower after endotoxemia as compared with PI3-Kgamma(+/+) controls. Among neutrophils that did accumulate in the lungs of the PI3-Kgamma(-/-) mice after endotoxin administration, activation of NF-kappaB and expression of proinflammatory cytokines was diminished compared with levels present in lung neutrophils from PI3-Kgamma(+/+) mice. These results show that PI3-K, and particularly PI3-Kgamma, occupies a central position in regulating endotoxin-induced neutrophil activation, including that involved in ALI.

  11. SerpinB1 protects the mature neutrophil reserve in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Benarafa, Charaf; LeCuyer, Tessa E; Baumann, Mathias; Stolley, James Michael; Cremona, Tiziana P; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen

    2011-07-01

    SerpinB1 is among the most efficient inhibitors of neutrophil serine proteases--NE, CG, and PR-3--and we investigated here its role in neutrophil development and homeostasis. We found that serpinB1 is expressed in all human bone marrow leukocytes, including stem and progenitor cells. Expression levels were highest in the neutrophil lineage and peaked at the promyelocyte stage, coincident with the production and packaging of the target proteases. Neutrophil numbers were decreased substantially in the bone marrow of serpinB1(-/-) mice. This cellular deficit was associated with an increase in serum G-CSF levels. On induction of acute pulmonary injury, neutrophils were recruited to the lungs, causing the bone marrow reserve pool to be completely exhausted in serpinB1(-/-) mice. Numbers of myeloid progenitors were normal in serpinB1(-/-) bone marrow, coincident with the absence of target protease expression at these developmental stages. Maturation arrest of serpinB1(-/-) neutrophils was excluded by the normal CFU-G growth in vitro and the normal expression in mature neutrophils of early and late differentiation markers. Normal absolute numbers of proliferating neutrophils and pulse-chase kinetic studies in vivo showed that the bone marrow deficit in serpinB1(-/-) mice was largely restricted to mature, postmitotic neutrophils. Finally, upon overnight culture, apoptosis and necrosis were greater in purified bone marrow neutrophils from serpinB1(-/-) compared with WT mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that serpinB1 sustains a healthy neutrophil reserve that is required in acute immune responses.

  12. SerpinB1 protects the mature neutrophil reserve in the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Benarafa, Charaf; LeCuyer, Tessa E.; Baumann, Mathias; Stolley, James Michael; Cremona, Tiziana P.; Remold-O′Donnell, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    SerpinB1 is among the most efficient inhibitors of neutrophil serine proteases—NE, CG, and PR-3—and we investigated here its role in neutrophil development and homeostasis. We found that serpinB1 is expressed in all human bone marrow leukocytes, including stem and progenitor cells. Expression levels were highest in the neutrophil lineage and peaked at the promyelocyte stage, coincident with the production and packaging of the target proteases. Neutrophil numbers were decreased substantially in the bone marrow of serpinB1−/− mice. This cellular deficit was associated with an increase in serum G-CSF levels. On induction of acute pulmonary injury, neutrophils were recruited to the lungs, causing the bone marrow reserve pool to be completely exhausted in serpinB1−/− mice. Numbers of myeloid progenitors were normal in serpinB1−/− bone marrow, coincident with the absence of target protease expression at these developmental stages. Maturation arrest of serpinB1−/− neutrophils was excluded by the normal CFU-G growth in vitro and the normal expression in mature neutrophils of early and late differentiation markers. Normal absolute numbers of proliferating neutrophils and pulse-chase kinetic studies in vivo showed that the bone marrow deficit in serpinB1−/− mice was largely restricted to mature, postmitotic neutrophils. Finally, upon overnight culture, apoptosis and necrosis were greater in purified bone marrow neutrophils from serpinB1−/− compared with WT mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that serpinB1 sustains a healthy neutrophil reserve that is required in acute immune responses. PMID:21248149

  13. Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps under Low Oxygen Level

    PubMed Central

    Branitzki-Heinemann, Katja; Möllerherm, Helene; Völlger, Lena; Husein, Diab M.; de Buhr, Nicole; Blodkamp, Stefanie; Reuner, Friederike; Brogden, Graham; Naim, Hassan Y.; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been characterized as a fundamental host innate immune defense mechanism. Conversely, excessive NET-release may have a variety of detrimental consequences for the host. A fine balance between NET formation and elimination is necessary to sustain a protective effect during an infectious challenge. Our own recently published data revealed that stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) by the iron chelating HIF-1α-agonist desferoxamine or AKB-4924 enhanced the release of phagocyte extracellular traps. Since HIF-1α is a global regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen, we hypothesized that NET formation may be similarly increased under low oxygen conditions. Hypoxia occurs in tissues during infection or inflammation, mostly due to overconsumption of oxygen by pathogens and recruited immune cells. Therefore, experiments were performed to characterize the formation of NETs under hypoxic oxygen conditions compared to normoxia. Human blood-derived neutrophils were isolated and incubated under normoxic (21%) oxygen level and compared to hypoxic (1%) conditions. Dissolved oxygen levels were monitored in the primary cell culture using a Fibox4-PSt3 measurement system. The formation of NETs was quantified by fluorescence microscopy in response to the known NET-inducer phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or Staphylococcus (S.) aureus wild-type and a nuclease-deficient mutant. In contrast to our hypothesis, spontaneous NET formation of neutrophils incubated under hypoxia was distinctly reduced compared to control neutrophils incubated under normoxia. Furthermore, neutrophils incubated under hypoxia showed significantly reduced formation of NETs in response to PMA. Gene expression analysis revealed that mRNA level of hif-1α as well as hif-1α target genes was not altered. However, in good correlation to the decreased NET formation under hypoxia, the cholesterol content of the neutrophils

  14. Neutrophil-derived IL-1β Is Sufficient for Abscess Formation in Immunity against Staphylococcus aureus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, John S.; Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Hebroni, Frank; Plaisier, Seema B.; Xuan, Caiyun; Granick, Jennifer L.; Matsushima, Hironori; Takashima, Akira; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Cheng, Genhong; Lee, Delphine J.; Simon, Scott I.; Miller, Lloyd S.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil abscess formation is critical in innate immunity against many pathogens. Here, the mechanism of neutrophil abscess formation was investigated using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus cutaneous infection. Gene expression analysis and in vivo multispectral noninvasive imaging during the S. aureus infection revealed a strong functional and temporal association between neutrophil recruitment and IL-1β/IL-1R activation. Unexpectedly, neutrophils but not monocytes/macrophages or other MHCII-expressing antigen presenting cells were the predominant source of IL-1β at the site of infection. Furthermore, neutrophil-derived IL-1β was essential for host defense since adoptive transfer of IL-1β-expressing neutrophils was sufficient to restore the impaired neutrophil abscess formation in S. aureus-infected IL-1β-deficient mice. S. aureus-induced IL-1β production by neutrophils required TLR2, NOD2, FPR1 and the ASC/NLRP3 inflammasome in an α-toxin-dependent mechanism. Taken together, IL-1β and neutrophil abscess formation during an infection are functionally, temporally and spatially linked as a consequence of direct IL-1β production by neutrophils. PMID:23209417

  15. Treatment with selectin blocking antibodies after lengthening contractions of mouse muscle blunts neutrophil accumulation but does not reduce damage.

    PubMed

    Sloboda, Darcée D; Brooks, Susan V

    2016-01-01

    P- and E-selectins are expressed on the surface of endothelial cells and may contribute to neutrophil recruitment following injurious lengthening contractions of skeletal muscle. Blunting neutrophil, but not macrophage, accumulation after lengthening contractions may provide a therapeutic benefit as neutrophils exacerbate damage to muscle fibers, while macrophages promote repair. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that P- and E-selectins contribute to neutrophil, but not macrophage, accumulation in muscles after contraction-induced injury, and that reducing neutrophil accumulation by blocking the selectins would be sufficient to reduce damage to muscle fibers. To test our hypothesis, we treated mice with antibodies to block P- and E-selectin function and assessed leukocyte accumulation and damage in muscles 2 days after lengthening contractions. Treatment with P/E-selectin blocking antibodies reduced neutrophil content by about half in muscles subjected to lengthening contractions. In spite of the reduction in neutrophil accumulation, we did not detect a decrease in damage 2 days after lengthening contractions. We conclude that P- and/or E-selectin contribute to the neutrophil accumulation associated with contraction-induced muscle damage and that only a portion of the neutrophils that typically accumulate following injurious lengthening contractions is sufficient to induce muscle fiber damage and force deficits. Thus, therapeutic interventions based on blocking the selectins or other adhesion proteins will have to reduce neutrophil numbers by more than 50% in order to provide a benefit.

  16. Specific depletion reveals a novel role for neutrophil-mediated protection in the liver during Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Karen D.; Sieve, Amy N.; Indramohan, Mohanalaxmi; Break, Timothy J.; Lee, Suhueng; Berg, Rance E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Previous studies have suggested that neutrophils are required for resistance during infection with multiple pathogenic microorganisms. However, the depleting antibody used in those studies binds to both Ly6G and Ly6C (anti-Gr-1; clone RB6-8C5). This antibody has been shown to not only deplete neutrophils, but also monocytes, and a subset of CD8 T cells. Recently, an antibody against Ly6G has been characterized which specifically depletes neutrophils. In the present study, neutrophils are depleted using the antibody against Ly6G during infection with the intracellular bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes (LM). Our data show that neutrophil depleted mice are much less susceptible to infection than mice depleted with anti-Gr-1. Although neutrophils are required for clearance of LM, their importance is more pronounced in the liver and during a high-dose bacterial challenge. Furthermore, we demonstrate that protection mediated by neutrophils is due to production of TNF-α, but not IFN-γ. Additionally, neutrophils are not required for the recruitment of monocytes or the generation of adaptive T cell responses during LM infection. These studies highlight the importance of neutrophils during LM infection, and also indicate that depletion of neutrophils is less detrimental to the host than depletion of all Gr-1 expressing cell populations. PMID:21660934

  17. Neutrophil in Viral Infections, Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Drescher, Brandon; Bai, Fengwei

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils are the first immune cells to the site of injury and microbial infection. Neutrophils are crucial players in controlling bacterial and fungal infections, and in particular secondary infections, by phagocytosis, degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). While neutrophils have been shown to play important roles in viral pathogenesis, there is a lack of detailed investigation. In this article, we will review recent progresses toward understanding the role of neutrophils in viral pathogenesis. PMID:23178588

  18. AUTOINFLAMMATORY PUSTULAR NEUTROPHILIC DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Haley B.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inflammatory pustular dermatoses constitute a spectrum of non-infectious conditions ranging from localized involvement to generalized disease with associated acute systemic inflammation and multi-organ involvement. Despite the variability in extent and severity of cutaneous presentation, each of these diseases is characterized by non-infectious neutrophilic intra-epidermal microabscesses. Many share systemic findings including fever, elevated inflammatory markers, inflammatory bowel disease and/or osteoarticular involvement, suggesting potential common pathogenic links (Figure 1). The recent discoveries of several genes responsible for heritable pustular diseases have revealed a distinct link between pustular skin disease and regulation of innate immunity. These genetic advances have led to a deeper exploration of common pathways in pustular skin disease and offer the potential for a new era of biologic therapy which targets these shared pathways. This chapter provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biologic insights. We will discuss recently-described monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes, including deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), deficiency of the IL-36 receptor antagonist (DITRA), CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis (CAMPS), and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). We will then discuss how these new genetic advancements may inform how we view previously described pustular diseases, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype. PMID:23827244

  19. Gliadin Induces Neutrophil Migration via Engagement of the Formyl Peptide Receptor, FPR1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Song; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Janka-Junttila, Mirkka; Casolaro, Vincenzo; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Parent, Carole A.; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Background Gliadin, the immunogenic component within gluten and trigger of celiac disease, is known to induce the production of Interleukin-8, a potent neutrophil-activating and chemoattractant chemokine. We sought to study the involvement of neutrophils in the early immunological changes following gliadin exposure. Methods Utilizing immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, the redistribution of major tight junction protein, Zonula occludens (ZO)-1, and neutrophil recruitment were assessed in duodenal tissues of gliadin-gavaged C57BL/6 wild-type and Lys-GFP reporter mice, respectively. Intravital microscopy with Lys-GFP mice allowed monitoring of neutrophil recruitment in response to luminal gliadin exposure in real time. In vitro chemotaxis assays were used to study murine and human neutrophil chemotaxis to gliadin, synthetic alpha-gliadin peptides and the neutrophil chemoattractant, fMet-Leu-Phe, in the presence or absence of a specific inhibitor of the fMet-Leu-Phe receptor-1 (FPR1), cyclosporine H. An irrelevant protein, zein, served as a control. Results Redistribution of ZO-1 and an influx of CD11b+Lys6G+ cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine were observed upon oral gavage of gliadin. In vivo intravital microscopy revealed a slowing down of GFP+ cells within the vessels and influx in the mucosal tissue within 2 hours after challenge. In vitro chemotaxis assays showed that gliadin strongly induced neutrophil migration, similar to fMet-Leu-Phe. We identified thirteen synthetic gliadin peptide motifs that induced cell migration. Blocking of FPR1 completely abrogated the fMet-Leu-Phe-, gliadin- and synthetic peptide-induced migration. Conclusions Gliadin possesses neutrophil chemoattractant properties similar to the classical neutrophil chemoattractant, fMet-Leu-Phe, and likewise uses FPR1 in the process. PMID:26378785

  20. TRPC6 regulates CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis of murine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Otto; Umlauf, Daniel; Frank, Svetlana; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Bertrand, Jessica; Pap, Thomas; Hanley, Peter J; Fabian, Anke; Dietrich, Alexander; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-06-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms involved in chemotactic navigation of immune cells is of particular interest for the development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It is generally agreed upon that members of the classical transient receptor potential channel family (TRPC) are involved in chemotaxis. However, the regulatory role of TRPC channels in chemoattractant receptor-mediated signaling has not yet been clarified in detail. In this study, we demonstrate that the TRPC6 channels play a pronounced role in CXCR2-mediated intermediary chemotaxis, whereas N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine receptor-mediated end-target chemotaxis is TRPC6 independent. The knockout of TRPC6 channels in murine neutrophils led to a strongly impaired intermediary chemotaxis after CXCR2 activation which is not further reinforced by CXCR2, PI3K, or p38 MAPK inhibition. Furthermore, CXCR2-mediated Ca(2+) influx but not Ca(2+) store release was attenuated in TRPC6(-/-) neutrophils. We demonstrate that the TRPC6 deficiency affected phosphorylation of AKT and MAPK downstream of CXCR2 receptor activation and led to altered remodeling of actin. The relevance of this TRPC6-depending defect in neutrophil chemotaxis is underscored by our in vivo findings. A nonseptic peritoneal inflammation revealed an attenuated recruitment of neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity of TRPC6(-/-) mice. In summary, this paper defines a specific role of TRPC6 channels in CXCR2-induced intermediary chemotaxis. In particular, TRPC6-mediated supply of calcium appears to be critical for activation of downstream signaling components.

  1. L-selectin mechanochemistry restricts neutrophil priming in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenghui; Yago, Tadayuki; Zhang, Nan; Panicker, Sumith R.; Wang, Ying; Yao, Longbiao; Mehta-D'souza, Padmaja; Xia, Lijun; Zhu, Cheng; McEver, Rodger P.

    2017-01-01

    Circulating neutrophils must avoid premature activation to prevent tissue injury. The leukocyte adhesion receptor L-selectin forms bonds with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) on other leukocytes and with peripheral node addressin (PNAd) on high endothelial venules. Mechanical forces can strengthen (catch) or weaken (slip) bonds between biological molecules. How these mechanochemical processes influence function in vivo is unexplored. Here we show that mice expressing an L-selectin mutant (N138G) have altered catch bonds and prolonged bond lifetimes at low forces. Basal lymphocyte homing and neutrophil recruitment to inflamed sites are normal. However, circulating neutrophils form unstable aggregates and are unexpectedly primed to respond robustly to inflammatory mediators. Priming requires signals transduced through L-selectin N138G after it engages PSGL-1 or PNAd. Priming enhances bacterial clearance but increases inflammatory injury and enlarges venous thrombi. Thus, L-selectin mechanochemistry limits premature activation of neutrophils. Our results highlight the importance of probing how mechanochemistry functions in vivo. PMID:28497779

  2. Glia maturation factor-γ mediates neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Aerbajinai, Wulin; Liu, Lunhua; Chin, Kyung; Zhu, Jianqiong; Parent, Carole A.; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2011-01-01

    Chemotaxis is fundamental to the directional migration of neutrophils toward endogenous and exogenous chemoattractants. Recent studies have demonstrated that ADF/cofilin superfamily members play important roles in reorganizing the actin cytoskeleton by disassembling actin filaments. GMFG, a novel ADF/cofilin superfamily protein that is expressed in inflammatory cells, has been implicated in regulating actin reorganization in microendothelial cells, but its function in neutrophils remains unclear. Here, we show that GMFG is an important regulator for cell migration and polarity in neutrophils. Knockdown of endogenous GMFG impaired fMLF- and IL-8 (CXCL8)-induced chemotaxis in dHL-60 cells. GMFG knockdown attenuated the formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of cells exposed to fMLF or CXCL8, as well as the phosphorylation of p38 and PAK1/2 in response to fMLF or CXCL8. Live cell imaging revealed that GMFG was recruited to the leading edge of cells in response to fMLF, as well as CXCL8. Overexpression of GMFG enhanced phosphorylation of p38 but not of PAK1/2 in dHL-60 cells. In addition, we found that GMFG is associated with WAVE2. Taken together, our findings suggest that GMFG is a novel factor in regulating neutrophil chemotaxis by modulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. PMID:21653232

  3. Neutrophils rapidly transit inflamed lymphatic vessel endothelium via integrin-dependent proteolysis and lipoxin-induced junctional retraction.

    PubMed

    Rigby, David A; Ferguson, David J P; Johnson, Louise A; Jackson, David G

    2015-12-01

    Neutrophils are the first leukocyte population to be recruited from the circulation following tissue injury or infection, where they play key roles in host defense. However, recent evidence indicates recruited neutrophils can also enter lymph and shape adaptive immune responses downstream in draining lymph nodes. At present, the cellular mechanisms regulating neutrophil entry to lymphatic vessels and migration to lymph nodes are largely unknown. Here, we have investigated these events in an in vivo mouse Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination model, ex vivo mouse dermal explants, and in vitro Transwell system comprising monolayers of primary human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells. We demonstrate that neutrophils are reliant on endothelial activation for adhesion, initially via E-selectin and subsequently, by integrin-mediated binding to ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, combined with CXCL8-dependent chemotaxis. Moreover, we reveal that integrin-mediated neutrophil adhesion plays a pivotal role in subsequent transmigration by focusing the action of matrix metalloproteinases and the 15-lipoxygenase-1-derived chemorepellent 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid at neutrophil:endothelial contact sites to induce transient endothelial junctional retraction and rapid, selective neutrophil trafficking. These findings reveal an unexpectedly intimate collaboration between neutrophils and the lymphatic vessel endothelium, in which these phagocytic leukocytes act as pathfinders for their own transit during inflammation. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  4. Single platelets seal neutrophil-induced vascular breaches via GPVI during immune-complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gros, Angèle; Syvannarath, Varouna; Lamrani, Lamia; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Goerge, Tobias; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-08-20

    Platelets protect vascular integrity during inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that this action is independent of thrombus formation and requires the engagement of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), but it remains unclear how platelets prevent inflammatory bleeding. We investigated whether platelets and GPVI act primarily by preventing detrimental effects of neutrophils using models of immune complex (IC)-mediated inflammation in mice immunodepleted in platelets and/or neutrophils or deficient in GPVI. Depletion of neutrophils prevented bleeding in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated dermatitis. GPVI deficiency did not modify neutrophil recruitment, which was reduced by thrombocytopenia. Neutrophil cytotoxic activities were reduced in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated inflammation. Intravital microscopy revealed that in this setting, intravascular binding sites for platelets were exposed by neutrophils, and GPVI supported the recruitment of individual platelets to these spots. Furthermore, the platelet secretory response accompanying IC-mediated inflammation was partly mediated by GPVI, and blocking of GPVI signaling impaired the vasculoprotective action of platelets. Together, our results show that GPVI plays a dual role in inflammation by enhancing neutrophil-damaging activities while supporting the activation and hemostatic adhesion of single platelets to neutrophil-induced vascular breaches.

  5. A chemotactic gradient sequestered on endothelial heparan sulfate induces directional intraluminal crawling of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Massena, Sara; Christoffersson, Gustaf; Hjertström, Elina; Zcharia, Eyal; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ausmees, Nora; Rolny, Charlotte; Li, Jin-Ping; Phillipson, Mia

    2010-09-16

    During infection, chemokines sequestered on endothelium induce recruitment of circulating leukocytes into the tissue where they chemotax along chemokine gradients toward the afflicted site. The aim of this in vivo study was to determine whether a chemokine gradient was formed intravascularly and influenced intraluminal neutrophil crawling and transmigration. A chemokine gradient was induced by placing a macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2)-containing (CXCL2) gel on the cremaster muscle of anesthetized wild-type mice or heparanase-overexpressing transgenic mice (hpa-tg) with truncated heparan sulfate (HS) side chains. Neutrophil-endothelial interactions were visualized by intravital microscopy and chemokine gradients detected by confocal microscopy. Localized extravascular chemokine release (MIP-2 gel) induced directed neutrophil crawling along a chemotactic gradient immobilized on the endothelium and accelerated their recruitment into the target tissue compared with homogeneous extravascular chemokine concentration (MIP-2 superfusion). Endothelial chemokine sequestration occurred exclusively in venules and was HS-dependent, and neutrophils in hpa-tg mice exhibited random crawling. Despite similar numbers of adherent neutrophils in hpa-tg and wild-type mice, the altered crawling in hpa-tg mice was translated into decreased number of emigrated neutrophils and ultimately decreased the ability to clear bacterial infections. In conclusion, an intravascular chemokine gradient sequestered by endothelial HS effectively directs crawling leukocytes toward transmigration loci close to the infection site.

  6. Neutrophil rolling at high shear: flattening, catch bond behavior, tethers and slings

    PubMed Central

    Sundd, Prithu; Pospieszalska, Maria K.; Ley, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment to sites of inflammation involves neutrophil rolling along the inflamed endothelium in the presence of shear stress imposed by blood flow. Neutrophil rolling in post-capillary venules in vivo is primarily mediated by P-selectin on the endothelium binding to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) constitutively expressed on neutrophils. Blood flow exerts a hydrodynamic drag on the rolling neutrophil which is partially or fully balanced by the adhesive forces generated in the P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds. Rolling is the result of rapid formation and dissociation of P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds at the center and rear of the rolling cell, respectively. Neutrophils roll stably on P-selectin in post-capillary venules in vivo and flow chambers in vitro at wall shear stresses greater than 6 dyn cm−2. However, the mechanisms that enable neutrophils to roll at such high shear stress are not completely understood. In vitro and in vivo studies have led to the discovery of four potential mechanisms, viz. cell flattening, catch bond behavior, membrane tethers, and slings. Rolling neutrophils undergo flattening at high shear stress, which not only increases the size of the cell footprint but also reduces the hydrodynamic drag experienced by the rolling cell. P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds behave as catch bonds at small detachment forces and thus become stronger with increasing force. Neutrophils rolling at high shear stress form membrane tethers which can be longer than the cell diameter and promote the survival of P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds. Finally, neutrophils rolling at high shear stress form slings, which act as cell autonomous adhesive substrates and support step-wise peeling. Tethers and slings act together and contribute to the forces balancing the hydrodynamic drag. How the synergy between the four mechanisms leads to stable rolling at high shear stress is an area that needs further investigation. PMID:23141302

  7. Role of osteopontin in hepatic neutrophil infiltration during alcoholic steatohepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Udayan M.; Banerjee, Atrayee; McRee, Rachel; Wellberg, Elizabeth; Ramaiah, Shashi K. . E-mail: sramaiah@cvm.tamu.edu

    2005-08-22

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major complication of heavy alcohol (EtOH) drinking and is characterized by three progressive stages of pathology: steatosis, steatohepatitis, and fibrosis/cirrhosis. Alcoholic steatosis (AS) is the initial stage of ALD and consists of fat accumulation in the liver accompanied by minimal liver injury. AS is known to render the hepatocytes increasingly sensitive to toxicants such as bacterial endotoxin (LPS). Alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH), the second and rate-limiting step in the progression of ALD, is characterized by hepatic fat accumulation, neutrophil infiltration, and neutrophil-mediated parenchymal injury. However, the pathogenesis of ASH is poorly defined. It has been theorized that the pathogenesis of ASH involves interaction of increased circulating levels of LPS with hepatocytes being rendered highly sensitive to LPS due to heavy EtOH consumption. We hypothesize that osteopontin (OPN), a matricellular protein (MCP), plays an important role in the hepatic neutrophil recruitment due to its enhanced expression during the early phase of ALD (AS and ASH). To study the role of OPN in the pathogenesis of ASH, we induced AS in male Sprague-Dawley rats by feeding EtOH-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 6 weeks. AS rats experienced extensive fat accumulation and minimal liver injury. Moderate induction in OPN was observed in AS group. ASH was induced by feeding male Sprague-Dawley rats EtOH-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 6 weeks followed by LPS injection. The ASH rats had substantial neutrophil infiltration, coagulative oncotic necrosis, and developed higher liver injury. Significant increases in the hepatic and circulating levels of OPN was observed in the ASH rats. Higher levels of the active, thrombin-cleaved form of OPN in the liver in ASH group correlated remarkably with hepatic neutrophil infiltration. Finally, correlative studies between OPN and hepatic neutrophil infiltration was corroborated in a simple

  8. Characterization of canine neutrophil granules.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, R T; Andersen, B R

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate distinct populations of canine neutrophil granules and to compare them with neutrophil granules from other species. Size, shape, density, and content of canine neutrophil granules were determined. Neutrophils obtained by Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation were homogenized, and granule populations were separated by isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient (rho, 1.14 to 1.22 g/ml). The most dense granule population (rho, 1.197 g/ml) contained all of the myeloperoxidase, beta-glucuronidase, and elastase, more than half of the acid beta-glycerophosphatase, and most of the lysozyme. The population with intermediate density (rho, 1.179 g/ml) contained lactoferrin, vitamin B12-binding protein, and the remainder of the acid beta-glycerophosphatase and lysozyme. The least dense granule population did not contain a major peak of any of the enzymes or binding proteins tested but was distinguished by density and morphology. The size and shape of the granules were determined from scanning electron micrographs and assessment of shape was aided by transmission electron micrographs. By these methods three populations of canine neutrophil granules were characterized and named: myeloperoxidase granules, vitamin B12-binding protein granules, and low-density granules. Images PMID:6292095

  9. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs. PMID:27698656

  10. Do neutrophil extracellular traps contribute to the heightened risk of thrombosis in inflammatory diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ashish N; Kazzaz, Nayef M; Knight, Jason S

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic events, both arterial and venous, are a major health concern worldwide. Further, autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome, predispose to thrombosis, and thereby push the risk for these morbid events even higher. In recent years, neutrophils have been identified as important players in both arterial and venous thrombosis. Specifically, chromatin-based structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) play a key role in activating the coagulation cascade, recruiting platelets, and serving as scaffolding upon which the thrombus can be assembled. At the same time, neutrophils and NETs are emerging as important mediators of pathogenic inflammation in the aforementioned autoimmune diseases. Here, we first review the general role of NETs in thrombosis. We then posit that exaggerated NET release contributes to the prothrombotic diatheses of systemic lupus erythematosus, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:26730289

  11. GEF-H1 is necessary for neutrophil shear stress-induced migration during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fine, Noah; Dimitriou, Ioannis D; Rullo, Jacob; Sandí, María José; Petri, Björn; Haitsma, Jack; Ibrahim, Hisham; La Rose, Jose; Glogauer, Michael; Kubes, Paul; Cybulsky, Myron; Rottapel, Robert

    2016-10-10

    Leukocyte crawling and transendothelial migration (TEM) are potentiated by shear stress caused by blood flow. The mechanism that couples shear stress to migration has not been fully elucidated. We found that mice lacking GEF-H1 (GEF-H1(-/-)), a RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), displayed limited migration and recruitment of neutrophils into inflamed tissues. GEF-H1(-/-) leukocytes were deficient in in vivo crawling and TEM in the postcapillary venules. We demonstrated that although GEF-H1 deficiency had little impact on the migratory properties of neutrophils under static conditions, shear stress triggered GEF-H1-dependent spreading and crawling of neutrophils and relocalization of GEF-H1 to flotillin-2-rich uropods. Our results identify GEF-H1 as a component of the shear stress response machinery in neutrophils required for a fully competent immune response to bacterial infection. © 2016 Fine et al.

  12. Regulation of neutrophils by interferon-γ limits lung inflammation during tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Bisweswar; Behar, Samuel M

    2011-10-24

    Resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires the host to restrict bacterial replication while preventing an over-exuberant inflammatory response. Interferon (IFN) γ is crucial for activating macrophages and also regulates tissue inflammation. We dissociate these two functions and show that IFN-γ(-/-) memory CD4(+) T cells retain their antimicrobial activity but are unable to suppress inflammation. IFN-γ inhibits CD4(+) T cell production of IL-17, which regulates neutrophil recruitment. In addition, IFN-γ directly inhibits pathogenic neutrophil accumulation in the infected lung and impairs neutrophil survival. Regulation of neutrophils is important because their accumulation is detrimental to the host. We suggest that neutrophilia during tuberculosis indicates failed Th1 immunity or loss of IFN-γ responsiveness. These results establish an important antiinflammatory role for IFN-γ in host protection against tuberculosis.

  13. Neutrophils support lung colonization of metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wculek, Stefanie K.; Malanchi, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Despite progress in the development of drugs efficiently targeting cancer cells, treatments of metastatic tumours are often ineffective. The now well established dependency of cancer cells on their microenvironment1 suggests that targeting the non-cancer cell component of the tumour might form the basis for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. However, the as yet poorly characterised contribution of host responses during tumour growth and metastatic progression represents a limitation to exploiting this approach. Here we identify neutrophils as the main component and driver of metastatic establishment within the (pre-)metastatic lung microenvironment in mouse breast cancer models. Neutrophils have a fundamental role in inflammatory responses and their contribution to tumourigenesis is still controversial2-4. Using various strategies to block neutrophil recruitment to the pre-metastatic site, we demonstrate that neutrophils specifically support metastatic initiation. Importantly, we find that neutrophil-derived leukotrienes aid the colonization of distant tissue by selectively expanding the sub-pool of cancer cells that retain high tumorigenic potential. Genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of the leukotriene-generating enzyme arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5) abrogates neutrophil pro-metastatic activity and consequently reduces metastasis. Our results reveal the efficacy of using targeted therapy against a specific tumour microenvironment component and indicate that neutrophil Alox5 inhibition may limit metastatic progression. PMID:26649828

  14. Rapid and label-free microfluidic neutrophil purification and phenotyping in diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Han Wei; Petchakup, Chayakorn; Tay, Hui Min; Tam, Zhi Yang; Dalan, Rinkoo; Chew, Daniel Ek Kwang; Li, King Ho Holden; Boehm, Bernhard O.

    2016-07-01

    Advanced management of dysmetabolic syndromes such as diabetes will benefit from a timely mechanistic insight enabling personalized medicine approaches. Herein, we present a rapid microfluidic neutrophil sorting and functional phenotyping strategy for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients using small blood volumes (fingerprick ~100 μL). The developed inertial microfluidics technology enables single-step neutrophil isolation (>90% purity) without immuno-labeling and sorted neutrophils are used to characterize their rolling behavior on E-selectin, a critical step in leukocyte recruitment during inflammation. The integrated microfluidics testing methodology facilitates high throughput single-cell quantification of neutrophil rolling to detect subtle differences in speed distribution. Higher rolling speed was observed in T2DM patients (P < 0.01) which strongly correlated with neutrophil activation, rolling ligand P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) expression, as well as established cardiovascular risk factors (cholesterol, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) and HbA1c). Rolling phenotype can be modulated by common disease risk modifiers (metformin and pravastatin). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and principal component analysis (PCA) revealed neutrophil rolling as an important functional phenotype in T2DM diagnostics. These results suggest a new point-of-care testing methodology, and neutrophil rolling speed as a functional biomarker for rapid profiling of dysmetabolic subjects in clinical and patient-oriented settings.

  15. Aged neutrophils contribute to the first line of defense in the acute inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Bernd; Vadlau, Yannick; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Nekolla, Katharina; Sharaf, Kariem; Gaertner, Florian; Massberg, Steffen; Krombach, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Under steady-state conditions, aged neutrophils are removed from the circulation in bone marrow, liver, and spleen, thereby maintaining myeloid cell homeostasis. The fate of these aged immune cells under inflammatory conditions, however, remains largely obscure. Here, we demonstrate that in the acute inflammatory response during endotoxemia, aged neutrophils cease returning to the bone marrow and instead rapidly migrate to the site of inflammation. Having arrived in inflamed tissue, aged neutrophils were found to exhibit a higher phagocytic activity as compared with the subsequently recruited nonaged neutrophils. This distinct behavior of aged neutrophils under inflammatory conditions is dependent on specific age-related changes in their molecular repertoire that enable these “experienced” immune cells to instantly translate inflammatory signals into immune responses. In particular, aged neutrophils engage Toll-like receptor-4- and p38 MAPK-dependent pathways to induce conformational changes in β2 integrins that allow these phagocytes to effectively accomplish their mission in the front line of the inflammatory response. Hence, ageing in the circulation might represent a critical process for neutrophils that enables these immune cells to properly unfold their functional properties for host defense. PMID:27609642

  16. Rapid and label-free microfluidic neutrophil purification and phenotyping in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Han Wei; Petchakup, Chayakorn; Tay, Hui Min; Tam, Zhi Yang; Dalan, Rinkoo; Chew, Daniel Ek Kwang; Li, King Ho Holden; Boehm, Bernhard O.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced management of dysmetabolic syndromes such as diabetes will benefit from a timely mechanistic insight enabling personalized medicine approaches. Herein, we present a rapid microfluidic neutrophil sorting and functional phenotyping strategy for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients using small blood volumes (fingerprick ~100 μL). The developed inertial microfluidics technology enables single-step neutrophil isolation (>90% purity) without immuno-labeling and sorted neutrophils are used to characterize their rolling behavior on E-selectin, a critical step in leukocyte recruitment during inflammation. The integrated microfluidics testing methodology facilitates high throughput single-cell quantification of neutrophil rolling to detect subtle differences in speed distribution. Higher rolling speed was observed in T2DM patients (P < 0.01) which strongly correlated with neutrophil activation, rolling ligand P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) expression, as well as established cardiovascular risk factors (cholesterol, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) and HbA1c). Rolling phenotype can be modulated by common disease risk modifiers (metformin and pravastatin). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and principal component analysis (PCA) revealed neutrophil rolling as an important functional phenotype in T2DM diagnostics. These results suggest a new point-of-care testing methodology, and neutrophil rolling speed as a functional biomarker for rapid profiling of dysmetabolic subjects in clinical and patient-oriented settings. PMID:27381673

  17. Rapid and label-free microfluidic neutrophil purification and phenotyping in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hou, Han Wei; Petchakup, Chayakorn; Tay, Hui Min; Tam, Zhi Yang; Dalan, Rinkoo; Chew, Daniel Ek Kwang; Li, King Ho Holden; Boehm, Bernhard O

    2016-07-06

    Advanced management of dysmetabolic syndromes such as diabetes will benefit from a timely mechanistic insight enabling personalized medicine approaches. Herein, we present a rapid microfluidic neutrophil sorting and functional phenotyping strategy for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients using small blood volumes (fingerprick ~100 μL). The developed inertial microfluidics technology enables single-step neutrophil isolation (>90% purity) without immuno-labeling and sorted neutrophils are used to characterize their rolling behavior on E-selectin, a critical step in leukocyte recruitment during inflammation. The integrated microfluidics testing methodology facilitates high throughput single-cell quantification of neutrophil rolling to detect subtle differences in speed distribution. Higher rolling speed was observed in T2DM patients (P < 0.01) which strongly correlated with neutrophil activation, rolling ligand P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) expression, as well as established cardiovascular risk factors (cholesterol, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) and HbA1c). Rolling phenotype can be modulated by common disease risk modifiers (metformin and pravastatin). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and principal component analysis (PCA) revealed neutrophil rolling as an important functional phenotype in T2DM diagnostics. These results suggest a new point-of-care testing methodology, and neutrophil rolling speed as a functional biomarker for rapid profiling of dysmetabolic subjects in clinical and patient-oriented settings.

  18. Complete reversal of acid-induced acute lung injury by blocking of platelet-neutrophil aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Zarbock, Alexander; Singbartl, Kai; Ley, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) causes high mortality, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Acid aspiration is a frequent cause of ALI, leading to neutrophil sequestration, increased permeability, and deterioration of gas exchange. We investigated the role of platelet-neutrophil interactions in a murine model of acid-induced ALI. Acid aspiration induced P-selectin–dependent platelet-neutrophil interactions in blood and in lung capillaries. Reducing circulating platelets or blocking P-selectin halted the development of ALI. Bone marrow chimeras showed that platelet, not endothelial, P-selectin was responsible for the injury. The interaction of platelets with neutrophils and endothelia was associated with TXA2 formation, with detrimental effects on permeability and tissue function. Activated platelets induced endothelial expression of ICAM-1 and increased neutrophil adhesion. Inhibition of platelet-neutrophil aggregation improved gas exchange, reduced neutrophil recruitment and permeability, and prolonged survival. The key findings were confirmed in a sepsis-induced model of ALI. These findings may translate into improved clinical treatments for ALI. PMID:17143330

  19. Neutrophil crawling in capillaries; a novel immune response to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Harding, Mark Geoffrey; Zhang, Kunyan; Conly, John; Kubes, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), particularly the USA300 strain, is a highly virulent pathogen responsible for an increasing number of skin and soft tissue infections globally. Furthermore, MRSA-induced soft tissue infections can rapidly progress into life-threatening conditions, such as sepsis and necrotizing fasciitis. The importance of neutrophils in these devastating soft tissue infections remains ambiguous, partly because of our incomplete understanding of their behaviour. Spinning disk confocal microscopy was used to visualize the behaviour of GR1-labelled neutrophils in subcutaneous tissue in response to GFP-expressing MRSA attached to a foreign particle (agarose bead). We observed significant directional neutrophil recruitment towards the S. aureus agarose bead but not a control agarose bead. A significant increase in neutrophil crawling within the capillaries surrounding the infectious nidus was noted, with impaired capillary perfusion in these vessels and increased parenchymal cell death. No neutrophils were able to emigrate from capillaries. The crawling within these capillaries was mediated by the β(2) and α(4) integrins and blocking these integrins 2 hours post infection eliminated neutrophil crawling, improved capillary perfusion, reduced cell death and reduced lesion size. Blocking prior to infection increased pathology. Neutrophil crawling within capillaries during MRSA soft tissue infections, while potentially contributing to walling off or preventing early dissemination of the pathogen, resulted in impaired perfusion and increased tissue injury with time.

  20. Cxcl8b and Cxcr2 Regulate Neutrophil Migration through Bloodstream in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils play an essential role during an inflammatory response, which is dependent on their rapid recruitment from the bone marrow to the vasculature. However, there is no information about the molecular signals that regulate neutrophil entry to circulation during an inflammatory process in humans. This is mainly due to the lack of a suitable model of study that contains similar set of molecules and that allows in vivo analyses. In this study, we used the zebrafish to assess the role of Cxcl8a, Cxcl8b, and Cxcr2 in neutrophil migration to blood circulation after injury. Using Tg(BACmpx:GFP)i114 transgenic embryos and two damage models (severe and mild), we developed in vivo lack of function assays. We found that the transcription levels of cxcl8a, cxcl8b, and cxcr2 were upregulated in the severe damage model. In contrast, only cxcr2 and cxcl8a mRNA levels were increased during mild damage. After knocking down Cxcl8a, neutrophil quantity decreased at the injury site, while Cxcl8b decreased neutrophils in circulation. When inhibiting Cxcr2, we observed a decrease in neutrophil entry to the bloodstream. In conclusion, we identified different functions for both Cxcl8 paralogues, being the Cxcl8b/Cxcr2 axis that regulates neutrophil entry to the bloodstream, while Cxcl8a/Cxcr2 regulates the migration to the affected area. PMID:28642884

  1. Neutrophils support lung colonization of metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wculek, Stefanie K; Malanchi, Ilaria

    2015-12-17

    Despite progress in the development of drugs that efficiently target cancer cells, treatments for metastatic tumours are often ineffective. The now well-established dependency of cancer cells on their microenvironment suggests that targeting the non-cancer-cell component of the tumour might form a basis for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. However, the as-yet poorly characterized contribution of host responses during tumour growth and metastatic progression represents a limitation to exploiting this approach. Here we identify neutrophils as the main component and driver of metastatic establishment within the (pre-)metastatic lung microenvironment in mouse breast cancer models. Neutrophils have a fundamental role in inflammatory responses and their contribution to tumorigenesis is still controversial. Using various strategies to block neutrophil recruitment to the pre-metastatic site, we demonstrate that neutrophils specifically support metastatic initiation. Importantly, we find that neutrophil-derived leukotrienes aid the colonization of distant tissues by selectively expanding the sub-pool of cancer cells that retain high tumorigenic potential. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of the leukotriene-generating enzyme arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5) abrogates neutrophil pro-metastatic activity and consequently reduces metastasis. Our results reveal the efficacy of using targeted therapy against a specific tumour microenvironment component and indicate that neutrophil Alox5 inhibition may limit metastatic progression.

  2. TRPC1 regulates fMLP-stimulated migration and chemotaxis of neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, O; Strodthoff, C; Horstmann, M; Nielsen, N; Jung, F; Schimmelpfennig, S; Heitzmann, M; Schwab, A

    2015-09-01

    Neutrophils form the first line of defense of the innate immune system and are rapidly recruited by chemotactic signals to sites of inflammation. Understanding the mechanisms of neutrophil chemotaxis is therefore of great interest for the potential development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It has been shown that members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of cation channels are involved in both cell migration and chemotaxis. In this study, we demonstrate that TRPC1 channels play an important role in fMLP mediated chemotaxis and migration of murine neutrophils. The knock-out of TRPC1 channels leads to an impaired migration, transmigration and chemotaxis of the neutrophils. In contrast, Ca²⁺ influx but not store release after activation of the TRPC1(-/-) neutrophils with fMLP is strongly enhanced. We show that the enhanced Ca²⁺ influx in the TRPC1(-/-) neutrophils is associated with a steepened front to rear gradient of the intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration with higher levels at the cell rear. Taken together, this paper highlights a distinct role of TRPC1 in neutrophil migration and chemotaxis. We propose that TRPC1 controls the activity of further Ca²⁺ influx channels and thus regulates the maintenance of intracellular Ca²⁺ gradients which are critical for cell migration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  3. BLT1 signalling protects the liver against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive accumulation of hepatic neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kojo, Ken; Ito, Yoshiya; Eshima, Koji; Nishizawa, Nobuyuki; Ohkubo, Hirotoki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takao; Watanabe, Masahiko; Majima, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils. Signalling of LTB4 receptor type 1 (BLT1) has pro-inflammatory functions through neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we investigated whether BLT1 signalling plays a role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury by affecting inflammatory responses including the accumulation of hepatic neutrophils. BLT1-knockout (BLT1−/−) mice and their wild-type (WT) counterparts were subjected to a single APAP overdose (300 mg/kg), and various parameters compared within 24 h after treatment. Compared with WT mice, BLT1−/− mice exhibited exacerbation of APAP-induced liver injury as evidenced by enhancement of alanine aminotransferase level, necrotic area, hepatic neutrophil accumulation, and expression of cytokines and chemokines. WT mice co-treated with APAP and ONO-0457, a specific antagonist for BLT1, displayed amplification of the injury, and similar results to those observed in BLT1−/− mice. Hepatic neutrophils in BLT1−/− mice during APAP hepatotoxicity showed increases in the production of reactive oxygen species and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Administration of isolated BLT1-deficient neutrophils into WT mice aggravated the liver injury elicited by APAP. These results demonstrate that BLT1 signalling dampens the progression of APAP hepatotoxicity through inhibiting an excessive accumulation of activated neutrophils. The development of a specific agonist for BLT1 could be useful for the prevention of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:27404729

  4. Real-time detection of implant-associated neutrophil responses using a formyl peptide receptor-targeting NIR nanoprobe

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Weng, Hong; Tang, Ewin N; Nair, Ashwin; Davé, Digant P; Tang, Liping

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in implant-mediated inflammation and infection. Unfortunately, current methods which monitor neutrophil activity, including enzyme measurements and histological evaluation, require many animals and cannot be used to accurately depict the dynamic cellular responses. To understand the neutrophil interactions around implant-mediated inflammation and infection it is critical to develop methods which can monitor in vivo cellular activity in real time. In this study, formyl peptide receptor (FPR)-targeting near-infrared nanoprobes were fabricated. This was accomplished by conjugating near-infrared dye with specific peptides having a high affinity to the FPRs present on activated neutrophils. The ability of FPR-targeting nanoprobes to detect and quantify activated neutrophils was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. As expected, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated on activated neutrophils in vitro. Following transplantation, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated at the biomaterial implantation site. Equally important, a strong relationship was observed between the extent of fluorescence intensity in vivo and the number of recruited neutrophils at the implantation site. Furthermore, FPR-targeting nanoprobes may be used to detect and quantify the number of neutrophils responding to a catheter-associated infection. The results show that FPR-targeting nanoprobes may serve as a powerful tool to monitor and measure the extent of neutrophil responses to biomaterial implants in vivo. PMID:22619542

  5. Neutrophilic dermatoses as systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Prat, Lola; Bouaziz, Jean-David; Wallach, Daniel; Vignon-Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Bagot, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophilic dermatoses (ND) are inflammatory skin conditions characterized by a sterile infiltrate of normal polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The main clinical forms of ND include Sweet syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, erythema elevatum diutinum, subcorneal pustular dermatosis, and their atypical or transitional forms. ND are often idiopathic, but they may be associated with myeloid hematologic malignancies (Sweet syndrome), inflammatory bowel disease or rheumatoid arthritis (pyoderma gangrenosum), and monoclonal gammopathies (erythema elevatum diutinum, subcorneal pustular dermatosis). The possible infiltration of internal organs with neutrophils during the setting of ND underlies the concept of a neutrophilic systemic disease. ND may be seen as a polygenic autoinflammatory syndrome due to their frequent association with other autoinflammatory disorders (monogenic or polygenic) and the recent published efficacy of interleukin-1 blocking therapies in their management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:27618112

  7. A crucial role for TNF-alpha in mediating neutrophil influx induced by endogenously generated or exogenous chemokines, KC/CXCL1 and LIX/CXCL5.

    PubMed

    Vieira, S M; Lemos, H P; Grespan, R; Napimoga, M H; Dal-Secco, D; Freitas, A; Cunha, T M; Verri, W A; Souza-Junior, D A; Jamur, M C; Fernandes, K S; Oliver, C; Silva, J S; Teixeira, M M; Cunha, F Q

    2009-10-01

    Chemokines orchestrate neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory foci. In the present study, we evaluated the participation of three chemokines, KC/CXCL1, MIP-2/CXCL2 and LIX/CXCL5, which are ligands for chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2), in mediating neutrophil recruitment in immune inflammation induced by antigen in immunized mice. Neutrophil recruitment was assessed in immunized mice challenged with methylated bovine serum albumin, KC/CXCL1, LIX/CXCL5 or tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Cytokine and chemokine levels were determined in peritoneal exudates and in supernatants of macrophages and mast cells by elisa. CXCR2 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression was determined using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Antigen challenge induced dose- and time-dependent neutrophil recruitment and production of KC/CXCL1, LIX/CXCL5 and TNF-alpha, but not MIP-2/CXCL2, in peritoneal exudates. Neutrophil recruitment was inhibited by treatment with reparixin (CXCR1/2 antagonist), anti-KC/CXCL1, anti-LIX/CXCL5 or anti-TNF-alpha antibodies and in tumour necrosis factor receptor 1-deficient mice. Intraperitoneal injection of KC/CXCL1 and LIX/CXCL5 induced dose- and time-dependent neutrophil recruitment and TNF-alpha production, which were inhibited by reparixin or anti-TNF-alpha treatment. Macrophages and mast cells expressed CXCR2 receptors. Increased macrophage numbers enhanced, while cromolyn sodium (mast cell stabilizer) diminished, LIX/CXCL5-induced neutrophil recruitment. Macrophages and mast cells from immunized mice produced TNF-alpha upon LIX/CXCL5 stimulation. Methylated bovine serum albumin induced expression of ICAM-1 on mesenteric vascular endothelium, which was inhibited by anti-TNF-alpha or anti-LIX/CXCL5. Following antigen challenge, CXCR2 ligands are produced and act on macrophages and mast cells triggering the production of TNF-alpha, which synergistically contribute to neutrophil recruitment through induction of the expression of ICAM

  8. Protective role of surface Toll-like receptor 9 expressing neutrophils in local inflammation during systemic inflammatory response syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiuping; Sun, Wei; Ren, Yunjia; Xiao, Yue; Zhao, Peiyan; Lu, Wenting; Hua, Li; Wang, Luowei; Wang, Liying; Yu, Yongli

    2017-10-01

    Clinically, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) occurs after serious trauma or sepsis. In sepsis, neutrophils are the major effector cells responsible for eliminating pathogens. However, the role of neutrophils in development of SIRS, especially in local inflammatory area, is controversial. In this study, we established a SIRS mouse model characterized with cytokine-mediated lethal shock by intraperitoneal injection of oligodexynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN) in D-galactosamine (D-GalN) sensitized mice based on our previous work and found that abundant neutrophils were rapidly recruited into the peritoneal cavity, where some neutrophils expressed surface TLR9 (sTLR9), defined as sTLR9(+) neutrophils. Along with the progression of SIRS, the expression of sTLR9 in sTLR9(+) neutrophils isolated from peritoneal lavage cells (PLCs) was declined in accompany with an increase in the level of the inflammatory cytokine TNFα and a decrease in the level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in Ly6G(+) PLCs. When using CCT ODN, an oligodeoxynucleotide with CCT repeats, which we have previously shown to be capable of rescuing mice from lethal shock, the expression of sTLR9 on neutrophils was significantly elevated. Adoptive therapy using early recruited neutrophil-rich PLCs containing sTLR9(+) neutrophils that express high levels of sTLR9, could rescue mice from SIRS. Overall, the data reveal that the early recruited sTLR9(+) neutrophils may, at least in the area of local inflammation, play a protective role during SIRS development and provide a method to rescue the patients with severe SIRS via the up-regulation of sTLR9 levels on the surface of neutrophils or via adoptive therapy with protective sub-populations of neutrophils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolation and Functional Analysis of Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Douglas B.; Long Priel, Debra A.; Chu, Jessica; Zarember, Kol A.

    2015-01-01

    This unit describes the isolation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from blood using dextran sedimentation and Percoll or Ficoll-Paque density gradients. Assays of neutrophil functions including respiratory burst activation, phagocytosis, and microbial killing are also described. PMID:26528633

  10. APPLICATION OF PROTEOMICS TO NEUTROPHIL BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Luerman, Gregory C.; Uriarte, Silvia M.; Rane, Madhavi J.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils are a primary effector cell of the innate immune system and contribute to the development of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils participate in both the initiation and resolution of inflammatory responses through a series of highly coordinated molecular and phenotypic changes. To accomplish these changes, neutrophils express numerous receptors and use multiple overlapping and redundant signal transduction pathways. Dysregulation of the activation or resolution pathways plays a role in a number of human diseases. A comprehensive understanding of the regulation of neutrophil responses can be provided by high throughput proteomic technologies and sophisticated computational analysis. The first steps in the application of proteomics to understanding neutrophil biology have been taken. Here we review the application of expression, structural, and functional proteomic studies to neutrophils. Although defining the complex molecular events associated with neutrophil activation is in the early stages, the data generated to date suggest that proteomic technologies will dramatically enhance our understanding of neutrophil biology. PMID:19580889

  11. ICAM-1 mediates surface contact between neutrophils and keratocytes following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corneal epithelial abrasion elicits an inflammatory response involving neutrophil (PMN) recruitment from the limbal vessels into the corneal stroma. These migrating PMNs make surface contact with collagen and stromal keratocytes. Using mice deficient in PMN integrin CD18, we previously showed that P...

  12. Isolation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and their use in the study of neutrophil transmigration under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Anutosh; Zhang, Hong; Sharma, Ritu; Parsons, Sean; Patel, Kamala D

    2012-08-08

    Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cell. They form an essential part of the innate immune system. During acute inflammation, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of injury. Recruitment of neutrophils to an injury site is a stepwise process that includes first, dilation of blood vessels to increase blood flow; second, microvascular structural changes and escape of plasma proteins from the bloodstream; third, rolling, adhesion and transmigration of the neutrophil across the endothelium; and fourth accumulation of neutrophils at the site of injury. A wide array of in vivo and in vitro methods has evolved to enable the study of these processes. This method focuses on neutrophil transmigration across human endothelial cells. One popular method for examining the molecular processes involved in neutrophil transmigration utilizes human neutrophils interacting with primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Neutrophil isolation has been described visually elsewhere; thus this article will show the method for isolation of HUVEC. Once isolated and grown to confluence, endothelial cells are activated resulting in the upregulation of adhesion and activation molecules. For example, activation of endothelial cells with cytokines like TNF-α results in increased E-selectin and IL-8 expression. E-selectin mediates capture and rolling of neutrophils and IL-8 mediates activation and firm adhesion of neutrophils. After adhesion neutrophils transmigrate. Transmigration can occur paracellularly (through endothelial cell junctions) or transcellularly (through the endothelial cell itself). In most cases, these interactions occur under flow conditions found in the vasculature. The parallel plate flow chamber is a widely used system that mimics the hydrodynamic shear stresses found in vivo and enables the study of neutrophil recruitment under flow condition in vitro. Several companies produce parallel plate flow chambers and

  13. Isolation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells and Their Use in the Study of Neutrophil Transmigration Under Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Anutosh; Zhang, Hong; Sharma, Ritu; Parsons, Sean; Patel, Kamala D.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cell. They form an essential part of the innate immune system1. During acute inflammation, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of injury. Recruitment of neutrophils to an injury site is a stepwise process that includes first, dilation of blood vessels to increase blood flow; second, microvascular structural changes and escape of plasma proteins from the bloodstream; third, rolling, adhesion and transmigration of the neutrophil across the endothelium; and fourth accumulation of neutrophils at the site of injury2,3. A wide array of in vivo and in vitro methods has evolved to enable the study of these processes4. This method focuses on neutrophil transmigration across human endothelial cells. One popular method for examining the molecular processes involved in neutrophil transmigration utilizes human neutrophils interacting with primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)5. Neutrophil isolation has been described visually elsewhere6; thus this article will show the method for isolation of HUVEC. Once isolated and grown to confluence, endothelial cells are activated resulting in the upregulation of adhesion and activation molecules. For example, activation of endothelial cells with cytokines like TNF-α results in increased E-selectin and IL-8 expression7. E-selectin mediates capture and rolling of neutrophils and IL-8 mediates activation and firm adhesion of neutrophils. After adhesion neutrophils transmigrate. Transmigration can occur paracellularly (through endothelial cell junctions) or transcellularly (through the endothelial cell itself). In most cases, these interactions occur under flow conditions found in the vasculature7,8. The parallel plate flow chamber is a widely used system that mimics the hydrodynamic shear stresses found in vivo and enables the study of neutrophil recruitment under flow condition in vitro9,10. Several companies produce parallel plate flow

  14. Neutrophil dynamics in the blood and milk of crossbred cows naturally infected with Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Dilip K.; Kushwah, Mohar Singh; Kaur, Mandheer; Dang, Ajay K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was designed to evaluate the neutrophil dynamics in terms of the functional competence during subclinical mastitis (SCM) and clinical mastitis (CM). Materials and Methods: A total of 146 Karan fries cows were screened and were divided into three groups as control (n=12), SCM, n=12 and CM, n=12 groups on the basis of California mastitis test scoring, bacteriological evaluation, gross and morphological changes in milk and by counting milk somatic cell count (SCC). Both blood and milk polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) were isolated in the study. Phagocytic activity (PA) was studied by spectrophotometrically; neutrophil extracelluar traps (NETs) were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); CD44 was quantified by flow cytometry and apoptosis was studied by fluorescent microscopy. Results: Significantly (p<0.05) higher SCC, PA was found in milk of CM cows as compared to SCM and control cows. Significantly lower (p<0.05) apoptosis was observed in PMNs isolated from both blood and milk of CM group of cows when compared to control and SCM group. The milk neutrophils of CM group of cows formed NETs as evidenced from the SEM images. Surface expression of CD44 revealed a significantly (p<0.05) lower expression in milk neutrophils of CM group of cows when compared to SCM and control group of cows. Conclusion: The study indicated a positive correlation between delayed neutrophil apoptosis, persistent staying of neutrophils at the site of infection along with formation of NETs as the strategies to fight against the pathogens in the udder during Staphylococcal mastitis. The study forms a strong base for future molecular research in terms of neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil removal from the site of infection. PMID:27047094

  15. Role of Neutrophils in Exacerbation of Brain Injury After Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Hyperlipidemic Mice.

    PubMed

    Herz, Josephine; Sabellek, Pascal; Lane, Thomas E; Gunzer, Matthias; Hermann, Dirk M; Doeppner, Thorsten R

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation-related comorbidities contribute to stroke-induced immune responses and brain damage. We previously showed that hyperlipidemia exacerbates ischemic brain injury, which is associated with elevated peripheral and cerebral granulocyte numbers. Herein, we evaluate the contribution of neutrophils to the exacerbation of ischemic brain injury. Wild-type mice fed with a normal chow and ApoE knockout mice fed with a high cholesterol diet were exposed to middle cerebral artery occlusion. CXCR2 was blocked using the selective antagonist SB225002 (2 mg/kg) or neutralizing CXCR2 antiserum. Neutrophils were depleted using an anti-Ly6G antibody. At 72 hours post ischemia, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and real-time polymerase chain reaction were performed to determine cerebral tissue injury and immunologic changes in the blood, bone marrow, and brain. Functional outcome was assessed by accelerated rota rod and tight rope tests at 4, 7, and 14 days post ischemia. CXCR2 antagonization reduced neurological deficits and infarct volumes that were exacerbated in hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice. This effect was mimicked by neutrophil depletion. Cerebral neutrophil infiltration and peripheral neutrophilia, which were increased on ischemia in hyperlipidemia, were attenuated by CXCR2 antagonization. This downscaling of neutrophil responses was associated with increased neutrophil apoptosis and reduced levels of CXCR2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and NADPH oxidase 2 expression on bone marrow neutrophils. Our data demonstrate a role of neutrophils in the exacerbation of ischemic brain injury induced by hyperlipidemia. Accordingly, CXCR2 blockade, which prevents neutrophil recruitment into the brain, might be an effective option for stroke treatment in patients with hyperlipidemia. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Downregulation of human platelet reactivity by neutrophils. Participation of lipoxygenase derivatives and adhesive proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Valles, J; Santos, M T; Marcus, A J; Safier, L B; Broekman, M J; Islam, N; Ullman, H L; Aznar, J

    1993-01-01

    Unstimulated neutrophils inhibited activation and recruitment of thrombin- or collagen-stimulated platelets in an agonist-specific manner. This occurred under conditions of close physical cell-cell contact, although biochemical adhesion between the cells as mediated by P-selectin was not required. Moreover, in the presence of monoclonal P-selectin antibodies that blocked biochemical platelet-neutrophil adhesion, thrombin-stimulated platelets were more efficiently downregulated by neutrophils. This suggested a prothrombotic role for P-selectin under these circumstances. The neutrophil downregulatory effect on thrombin-stimulated platelets was amplified by lipoxygenase inhibition with 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid. In contrast, the neutrophil inhibitory effect on platelets was markedly reduced by platelet-derived 12S-hydroxy-5,8-cis, 10-trans, 14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid (12S-HETE), as well as by the platelet-neutrophil transcellular product, 12S,20-dihydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12S,20-DiHETE), but not by another comparable metabolite, 5S,12S-dihydroxy-6-trans, 8-cis, 10-trans, 14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid (5S,12S-DiHETE), or the neutrophil-derived hydroxy acid leukotriene B4. The neutrophil downregulatory effect on thrombin-induced platelet reactivity was enhanced by aspirin treatment. This may represent a novel action of aspirin as an inhibitor of platelet function. These results provide in vitro biochemical and functional evidence for the thromboregulatory role of neutrophils and emphasize the multicellular aspect of hemostasis and thrombosis. Images PMID:7690778

  17. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  18. The Pig: A Relevant Model for Evaluating the Neutrophil Serine Protease Activities during Acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bréa, Déborah; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Barc, Céline; Pezant, Jérémy; Melo, Sandrine; Olivier, Michel; Delaunay, Rémy; Boulesteix, Olivier; Berthon, Patricia; Rossignol, Christelle; Burlaud Gaillard, Julien; Becq, Frédéric; Gauthier, Francis; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Caballero-Posadas, Ignacio; Attucci, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    The main features of lung infection and inflammation are a massive recruitment of neutrophils and the subsequent release of neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs). Anti-infectious and/or anti-inflammatory treatments must be tested on a suitable animal model. Mice models do not replicate several aspects of human lung disease. This is particularly true for cystic fibrosis (CF), which has led the scientific community to a search for new animal models. We have shown that mice are not appropriate for characterizing drugs targeting neutrophil-dependent inflammation and that pig neutrophils and their NSPs are similar to their human homologues. We induced acute neutrophilic inflammatory responses in pig lungs using Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic respiratory pathogen. Blood samples, nasal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h post-insfection (p.i.) and biochemical parameters, serum and BAL cytokines, bacterial cultures and neutrophil activity were evaluated. The release of proinflammatory mediators, biochemical and hematological blood parameters, cell recruitment and bronchial reactivity, peaked at 6h p.i.. We also used synthetic substrates specific for human neutrophil proteases to show that the activity of pig NSPs in BALFs increased. These proteases were also detected at the surface of lung neutrophils using anti-human NSP antibodies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung infection in pigs results in a neutrophilic response similar to that described for cystic fibrosis and ventilator-associated pneumonia in humans. Altogether, this indicates that the pig is an appropriate model for testing anti-infectious and/or anti-inflammatory drugs to combat adverse proteolytic effects of neutrophil in human lung diseases. PMID:27992534

  19. Yersinia pestis subverts the dermal neutrophil response in a mouse model of bubonic plague.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Jeffrey G; Hasenkrug, Aaron M; Dorward, David W; Nair, Vinod; Carmody, Aaron B; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2013-08-27

    The majority of human Yersinia pestis infections result from introduction of bacteria into the skin by the bite of an infected flea. Once in the dermis, Y. pestis can evade the host's innate immune response and subsequently disseminate to the draining lymph node (dLN). There, the pathogen replicates to large numbers, causing the pathognomonic bubo of bubonic plague. In this study, several cytometric and microscopic techniques were used to characterize the early host response to intradermal (i.d.) Y. pestis infection. Mice were infected i.d. with fully virulent or attenuated strains of dsRed-expressing Y. pestis, and tissues were analyzed by flow cytometry. By 4 h postinfection, there were large numbers of neutrophils in the infected dermis and the majority of cell-associated bacteria were associated with neutrophils. We observed a significant effect of the virulence plasmid (pCD1) on bacterial survival and neutrophil activation in the dermis. Intravital microscopy of i.d. Y. pestis infection revealed dynamic interactions between recruited neutrophils and bacteria. In contrast, very few bacteria interacted with dendritic cells (DCs), indicating that this cell type may not play a major role early in Y. pestis infection. Experiments using neutrophil depletion and a CCR7 knockout mouse suggest that dissemination of Y. pestis from the dermis to the dLN is not dependent on neutrophils or DCs. Taken together, the results of this study show a very rapid, robust neutrophil response to Y. pestis in the dermis and that the virulence plasmid pCD1 is important for the evasion of this response. Yersinia pestis remains a public health concern today because of sporadic plague outbreaks that occur throughout the world and the potential for its illegitimate use as a bioterrorism weapon. Since bubonic plague pathogenesis is initiated by the introduction of Y. pestis into the skin, we sought to characterize the response of the host's innate immune cells to bacteria early after

  20. Neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes collaborate in generating an optimal cytokine response that protects against pulmonary Legionella pneumophila infection.

    PubMed

    Casson, Cierra N; Doerner, Jessica L; Copenhaver, Alan M; Ramirez, Jasmine; Holmgren, Alicia M; Boyer, Mark A; Siddarthan, Ingharan J; Rouhanifard, Sara H; Raj, Arjun; Shin, Sunny

    2017-04-01

    Early responses mounted by both tissue-resident and recruited innate immune cells are essential for host defense against bacterial pathogens. In particular, both neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes are rapidly recruited to sites of infection. While neutrophils and monocytes produce bactericidal molecules, such as reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, both cell types are also capable of synthesizing overlapping sets of cytokines important for host defense. Whether neutrophils and monocytes perform redundant or non-redundant functions in the generation of anti-microbial cytokine responses remains elusive. Here, we sought to define the contributions of neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes to cytokine production and host defense during pulmonary infection with Legionella pneumophila, responsible for the severe pneumonia Legionnaires' disease. We found that both neutrophils and monocytes are critical for host defense against L. pneumophila. Both monocytes and neutrophils contribute to maximal IL-12 and IFNγ responses, and monocytes are also required for TNF production. Moreover, natural killer (NK) cells, NKT cells, and γδ T cells are sources of IFNγ, and monocytes direct IFNγ production by these cell types. Thus, neutrophils and monocytes cooperate in eliciting an optimal cytokine response that promotes effective control of bacterial infection.

  1. Neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes collaborate in generating an optimal cytokine response that protects against pulmonary Legionella pneumophila infection

    PubMed Central

    Casson, Cierra N.; Doerner, Jessica L.; Copenhaver, Alan M.; Boyer, Mark A.; Siddarthan, Ingharan J.; Rouhanifard, Sara H.

    2017-01-01

    Early responses mounted by both tissue-resident and recruited innate immune cells are essential for host defense against bacterial pathogens. In particular, both neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes are rapidly recruited to sites of infection. While neutrophils and monocytes produce bactericidal molecules, such as reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, both cell types are also capable of synthesizing overlapping sets of cytokines important for host defense. Whether neutrophils and monocytes perform redundant or non-redundant functions in the generation of anti-microbial cytokine responses remains elusive. Here, we sought to define the contributions of neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes to cytokine production and host defense during pulmonary infection with Legionella pneumophila, responsible for the severe pneumonia Legionnaires’ disease. We found that both neutrophils and monocytes are critical for host defense against L. pneumophila. Both monocytes and neutrophils contribute to maximal IL-12 and IFNγ responses, and monocytes are also required for TNF production. Moreover, natural killer (NK) cells, NKT cells, and γδ T cells are sources of IFNγ, and monocytes direct IFNγ production by these cell types. Thus, neutrophils and monocytes cooperate in eliciting an optimal cytokine response that promotes effective control of bacterial infection. PMID:28384349

  2. Interaction of CD44 and hyaluronan is the dominant mechanism for neutrophil sequestration in inflamed liver sinusoids

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Braedon; McAvoy, Erin F.; Lam, Florence; Gill, Varinder; de la Motte, Carol; Savani, Rashmin C.; Kubes, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion molecules known to be important for neutrophil recruitment in many other organs are not involved in recruitment of neutrophils into the sinusoids of the liver. The prevailing view is that neutrophils become physically trapped in inflamed liver sinusoids. In this study, we used a biopanning approach to identify hyaluronan (HA) as disproportionately expressed in the liver versus other organs under both basal and inflammatory conditions. Spinning disk intravital microscopy revealed that constitutive HA expression was restricted to liver sinusoids. Blocking CD44–HA interactions reduced neutrophil adhesion in the sinusoids of endotoxemic mice, with no effect on rolling or adhesion in postsinusoidal venules. Neutrophil but not endothelial CD44 was required for adhesion in sinusoids, yet neutrophil CD44 avidity for HA did not increase significantly in endotoxemia. Instead, activation of CD44–HA engagement via qualitative modification of HA was demonstrated by a dramatic induction of serum-derived HA-associated protein in sinusoids in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS-induced hepatic injury was significantly reduced by blocking CD44–HA interactions. Administration of anti-CD44 antibody 4 hours after LPS rapidly detached adherent neutrophils in sinusoids and improved sinusoidal perfusion in endotoxemic mice, revealing CD44 as a potential therapeutic target in systemic inflammatory responses involving the liver. PMID:18362172

  3. Neutrophils in cancer: neutral no more.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Wellenstein, Max D; de Visser, Karin E

    2016-07-01

    Neutrophils are indispensable antagonists of microbial infection and facilitators of wound healing. In the cancer setting, a newfound appreciation for neutrophils has come into view. The traditionally held belief that neutrophils are inert bystanders is being challenged by the recent literature. Emerging evidence indicates that tumours manipulate neutrophils, sometimes early in their differentiation process, to create diverse phenotypic and functional polarization states able to alter tumour behaviour. In this Review, we discuss the involvement of neutrophils in cancer initiation and progression, and their potential as clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  4. Intraluminal crawling versus interstitial neutrophil migration during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pick, Robert; Brechtefeld, Doris; Walzog, Barbara

    2013-08-01

    Site-directed trafficking of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to their target regions within the tissue is an important prerequisite for efficient host defense during the acute inflammatory response. This process requires intraluminal crawling of PMN on the activated endothelial cells to their extravasation sites. Upon transendothelial diapedesis, PMN migrate in the interstitial tissue to sites of inflammation. These crucial steps within the recruitment cascade are defined as intraluminal crawling and interstitial migration. In this review, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that control and fine-tune these migratory processes and discuss the role of adhesion molecules of the β2 integrin (CD11/CD18) family for these cellular functions.

  5. Neutrophils: Cinderella of innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Sharma, A

    2010-11-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of innate immune defense against infectious diseases. However, since their discovery by Elie Metchnikoff, they have always been considered tissue-destructive cells responsible for inflammatory tissue damage occurring during acute infections. Now, extensive research in the field of neutrophil cell biology and their role skewing the immune response in various infections or inflammatory disorders revealed their importance in the regulation of immune response. Along with releasing various antimicrobial molecules, neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) for the containment of infection and inflammation. Activated neutrophils provide signals for the activation and maturation of macrophages as well as dendritic cells. Neutrophils are also involved in the regulation of T-cell immune response against various pathogens and tumor antigens. Thus, the present review is intended to highlight the emerging role of neutrophils in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity during acute infectious or inflammatory conditions.

  6. Type I interferon transcriptional signature in neutrophils and high frequency of low-density granulocytes are associated with tissue damage in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Bruno Coelho; Marques, Pedro Elias; Leoratti, Fabiana Maria de Souza; Junqueira, Caroline; Pereira, Dhelio Batista; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro do Valle; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte population in the bloodstream, the primary compartment of Plasmodium sp. infection. Yet, the role of these polymorphonuclear cells in mediating either resistance or pathogenesis of malaria is poorly understood. We report that circulating neutrophils from malaria patients are highly activated, as indicated by a strong type I interferon transcriptional signature, increased expression of surface activation markers, the enhanced release of reactive oxygen species and myeloperoxidase, as well as the high frequency of low-density granulocytes. The activation of neutrophils was associated with increased levels of serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, indicating liver damage. In a rodent malaria model, we observed an intense recruitment of neutrophils to liver sinusoids. Neutrophil migration, IL-1β and chemokine expression as well as liver damage were all dependent on type I interferon signaling. The data suggests that type I interferon signaling have a central role in neutrophil activation and malaria pathogenesis. PMID:26711347

  7. Neutrophil extracellular traps - the dark side of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Ole E; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-05-02

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were discovered as extracellular strands of decondensed DNA in complex with histones and granule proteins, which were expelled from dying neutrophils to ensnare and kill microbes. NETs are formed during infection in vivo by mechanisms different from those originally described in vitro. Citrullination of histones by peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is central for NET formation in vivo. NETs may spur formation of autoantibodies and may also serve as scaffolds for thrombosis, thereby providing a link among infection, autoimmunity, and thrombosis. In this review, we present the mechanisms by which NETs are formed and discuss the physiological and pathophysiological consequences of NET formation. We conclude that NETs may be of more importance in autoimmunity and thrombosis than in innate immune defense.

  8. The neutrophil serine protease inhibitor serpinb1 preserves lung defense functions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Benarafa, Charaf; Priebe, Gregory P; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen

    2007-08-06

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs; elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3) directly kill invading microbes. However, excess NSPs in the lungs play a central role in the pathology of inflammatory pulmonary disease. We show that serpinb1, an efficient inhibitor of the three NSPs, preserves cell and molecular components responsible for host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. On infection, wild-type (WT) and serpinb1-deficient mice mount similar early responses, including robust production of cytokines and chemokines, recruitment of neutrophils, and initial containment of bacteria. However, serpinb1(-/-) mice have considerably increased mortality relative to WT mice in association with late-onset failed bacterial clearance. We found that serpinb1-deficient neutrophils recruited to the lungs have an intrinsic defect in survival accompanied by release of neutrophil protease activity, sustained inflammatory cytokine production, and proteolysis of the collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D). Coadministration of recombinant SERPINB1 with the P. aeruginosa inoculum normalized bacterial clearance in serpinb1(-/-) mice. Thus, regulation of pulmonary innate immunity by serpinb1 is nonredundant and is required to protect two key components, the neutrophil and SP-D, from NSP damage during the host response to infection.

  9. The neutrophil serine protease inhibitor serpinb1 preserves lung defense functions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Benarafa, Charaf; Priebe, Gregory P.; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs; elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3) directly kill invading microbes. However, excess NSPs in the lungs play a central role in the pathology of inflammatory pulmonary disease. We show that serpinb1, an efficient inhibitor of the three NSPs, preserves cell and molecular components responsible for host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. On infection, wild-type (WT) and serpinb1-deficient mice mount similar early responses, including robust production of cytokines and chemokines, recruitment of neutrophils, and initial containment of bacteria. However, serpinb1−/− mice have considerably increased mortality relative to WT mice in association with late-onset failed bacterial clearance. We found that serpinb1-deficient neutrophils recruited to the lungs have an intrinsic defect in survival accompanied by release of neutrophil protease activity, sustained inflammatory cytokine production, and proteolysis of the collectin surfactant protein–D (SP-D). Coadministration of recombinant SERPINB1 with the P. aeruginosa inoculum normalized bacterial clearance in serpinb1−/− mice. Thus, regulation of pulmonary innate immunity by serpinb1 is nonredundant and is required to protect two key components, the neutrophil and SP-D, from NSP damage during the host response to infection. PMID:17664292

  10. BAFF-secreting neutrophils drive plasma cell responses during emergency granulopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Harald; Georgoudaki, Anna-Maria; Zhang, Xing-Mei; Jagodic, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged infections or adjuvant usage can trigger emergency granulopoiesis (EG), leading to dysregulation in neutrophil blood counts. However, the impact of EG on T and B cell function remains largely unknown. In this study, to address this question, we used a mouse model of neutropenia and studied immune activation after adjuvant administration. The initial neutropenic state fostered an environment of increased dendritic cell activation and T cell–derived IL-17 production. Interestingly, neutropenic lysozyme 2–diphtheria toxin A mice exhibited striking EG and amplified neutrophil recruitment to the lymph nodes (LNs) that was dependent on IL-17–induced prostaglandin activity. The recruited neutrophils secreted a B cell–activating factor that highly accelerated plasma cell generation and antigen-specific antibody production. Reduction of neutrophil functions via granulocyte colony-stimulating factor neutralization significantly diminished plasma cell formation, directly linking EG with the humoral immune response. We conclude that neutrophils are capable of directly regulating T cell–dependent B cell responses in the LN. PMID:27432941

  11. Absence of CXCL10 Aggravates Herpes Stromal Keratitis with Reduced Primary Neutrophil Influx in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fang-Hsiu; Wang, Shainn-Wei; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Tung, Yuk-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) replication initiates inflammation and angiogenesis responses in the cornea to result in herpetic stromal keratitis (HSK), which is a leading cause of infection-induced vision impairment. Chemokines are secreted to modulate HSK by recruiting leukocytes, which affect virus growth, and by influencing angiogenesis. The present study used a murine infection model to investigate the significance of the chemokine CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10; gamma interferon-inducible protein 10 [IP-10]) in HSK. Here, we show that HSV-1 infection of the cornea induced CXCL10 protein expression in epithelial cells. The corneas of mice with a targeted disruption of the gene encoding CXCL10 displayed decreases in levels of neutrophil-attracting cytokine (interleukin-6), primary neutrophil influx, and viral clearance 2 or 3 days postinfection. Subsequently, absence of CXCL10 aggravated HSK with elevated levels of interleukin-6, chemokines for CD4+ T cells and/or neutrophils (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α and macrophage inflammatory protein-2), angiogenic factor (vascular endothelial growth factor A), and secondary neutrophil influx, as well as infiltration of CD4+ T cells to exacerbate opacity and angiogenesis in the cornea at 14 and up to 28 days postinfection. Our results collectively show that endogenous CXCL10 contributes to recruit the primary neutrophil influx and to affect the expression of cytokines, chemokines, and angiogenic factors as well as to reduce the viral titer and HSK severity. PMID:23720717

  12. Anti-inflammatory deficiencies in neutrophilic asthma: reduced galectin-3 and IL-1RA/IL-1β.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Gibson, Peter G; Baines, Katherine J; Yang, Ian A; Upham, John W; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra; James, Alan L; Jenkins, Christine; Peters, Matthew J; Zhang, Jie; Simpson, Jodie L

    2015-01-24

    Galectin-3 (gal-3), a member of the β-galactoside-binding animal lectins, is involved in the recruitment, activation and removal of neutrophils. Neutrophilic asthma is characterized by a persistent elevation of airway neutrophils and impaired efferocytosis. We hypothesized that sputum gal-3 would be reduced in neutrophilic asthma and the expression of gal-3 would be associated with other markers of neutrophilic inflammation. Adults with asthma (n = 80) underwent a sputum induction following clinical assessment and blood collection. Sputum was dispersed for a differential cell count and ELISA assessment of gal-3, gal-3 binding protein (BP), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (RA), IL-8 and IL-6. Gal-3 and gal-3BP immunoreactivity were assessed in mixed sputum cells. Sputum gal-3 (median, (q1,q3)) was significantly reduced in neutrophilic asthma (183 ng/mL (91,287)) compared with eosinophilic (293 ng/mL (188,471), p = 0.021) and paucigranulocytic asthma (399 ng/mL (213,514), p = 0.004). The gal-3/gal-3BP ratio and IL-1RA/IL-1β ratio were significantly reduced, while gal-3BP and IL-1β were significantly elevated in neutrophilic asthma compared with eosinophilic and paucigranulocytic asthma. Patients with neutrophilic asthma have impairment in anti-inflammatory ratio of gal-3/gal-3BP and IL-1RA/IL-1β which provides a further framework for exploration into pathologic mechanisms of asthma phenotypes.

  13. Microbe-specific unconventional T-cells induce human neutrophil differentiation into antigen cross-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Tyler, Christopher J.; Khan, Mohd Wajid A.; Szakmany, Tamas; Hall, Judith E.; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The early immune response to microbes is dominated by the recruitment of neutrophils whose primary function is to clear invading pathogens. However, there is emerging evidence that neutrophils play additional effector and regulatory roles. The present study demonstrates that human neutrophils assume antigen cross-presenting functions, and suggests a plausible scenario for the local generation of APC-like neutrophils through the mobilization of unconventional T-cells in response to microbial metabolites. Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells and MAIT cells are abundant in blood, inflamed tissues and mucosal barriers. Here, both human cell types responded rapidly to neutrophils after phagocytosis of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria producing the corresponding ligands, and in turn mediated the differentiation of neutrophils into APCs for both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells through secretion of GM-CSF, IFN-γ and TNF-α. In patients with acute sepsis, circulating neutrophils displayed a similar APC-like phenotype and readily processed soluble proteins for cross-presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T-cells, at a time when peripheral Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells were highly activated. Our findings indicate that unconventional T-cells represent key controllers of neutrophil-driven innate and adaptive responses to a broad range of pathogens. PMID:25165152

  14. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM. PMID:26841848

  15. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-02-04

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM.

  16. S. aureus blocks efferocytosis of neutrophils by macrophages through the activity of its virulence factor alpha toxin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Taylor S.; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Hotz, Meghan; Cheng, Lily; Miller, Lloyd S.; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C. Kendall; Sellman, Bret R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia, such as those caused by Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with an influx of inflammatory neutrophils into the lung tissue and airways. Regulation and clearance of recruited neutrophils is essential for preventing tissue damage by “friendly fire”, a responsibility of macrophages in a process called efferocytosis. We hypothesized that S. aureus impairs efferocytosis by alveolar macrophages (AMs) through the activity of the secreted virulence factor alpha toxin (AT), which has been implicated in altering the antimicrobial function of AMs. Infection of mice lacking AMs resulted in significantly increased numbers of neutrophils in the lung, while clearance of neutrophils delivered intranasally into uninfected mice was reduced in AM depleted animals. In vitro, sublytic levels of AT impaired uptake of apoptotic neutrophils by purified AMs. In vivo, the presence of AT reduced uptake of neutrophils by AMs. Differential uptake of neutrophils was not due to changes in either the CD47/CD172 axis or CD36 levels. AT significantly reduced lung expression of CCN1 and altered AM surface localization of DD1α, two proteins known to influence efferocytosis. We conclude that AT may contribute to tissue damage during S. aureus pneumonia by inhibiting the ability of AM to clear neutrophils at the site of infection. PMID:27739519

  17. Macrophage phagocytosis of neutrophils at inflammatory/infectious foci: a cooperative mechanism in the control of infection and infectious inflammation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Manuel T

    2011-05-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils possess overlapping and complementary features associated to their common origin and subsequent specialization during myelopoiesis. That specialization results in macrophage lineage being limited in antimicrobial capacity and cytotoxicity comparatively with the neutrophil lineage. These and other features of mature macrophages and neutrophils, like different lifespan and tissue localization, promote their particular lifestyles and prompt a functional partnership for cooperation in the protective antimicrobial host defense. This partnership includes reciprocal recruitment to infected sites, cooperative effector antimicrobial activities, and pro-resolving anti-inflammatory effects. One modality of the cooperative effector antimicrobial activities involves the phagocytosis by the macrophage of apoptosing neutrophils and of nonapoptosing neutrophils expressing "eat-me" signals. This cooperative interaction results in the enhancement of the comparatively limited macrophage antimicrobial capacity by the acquisition and use of potent neutrophil microbicidal molecules. Here, data are reviewed that suggest that this is a process actively engaging the two professional phagocytes. Phagocytosis of neutrophils by macrophages at inflammatory/infectious foci accumulates two effects beneficial to the protective host immune response: help in the control of the infection and prevention of neutrophil autolysis, effects that converge to accelerate the resolution of the infection-associated inflammation.

  18. Role of neutrophils in IL-17-dependent immunity to mucosal candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Huppler, Anna R.; Conti, Heather R.; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Darville, Toni; Biswas, Partha S.; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, is an opportunistic infection associated with infancy, AIDS and IL-17-related primary immunodeficiencies. The Th17-associated cytokines IL-23 and IL-17 are crucial for immunity to OPC, but the mechanisms by which they mediate immunity are poorly defined. IL-17RA-deficient humans and mice are strongly susceptible to OPC, with reduced levels of CXC chemokines and concomitantly impaired neutrophil recruitment to the oral mucosa. Paradoxically, humans with isolated neutropenia are typically not susceptible to candidiasis. To determine whether immunity to OPC is mediated via neutrophil recruitment, mice lacking CXCR2 were subjected to OPC, and were found to be highly susceptible, although there was no dissemination of fungi to peripheral organs. To assess whether the entire neutrophil response is IL-17-dependent, IL-17RA−/− and IL-23−/− mice were administered neutrophil-depleting antibodies and subjected to OPC. These mice displayed increased oral fungal burdens compared to IL-17RA−/− or IL-23−/− mice alone, indicating that additional IL-17-independent signals contribute to the neutrophil response. WT mice treated with anti-Gr-1 antibodies exhibited a robust infiltrate of CD11b+Ly-6GlowF4/80− cells to the oral mucosa, but were nonetheless highly susceptible to OPC, indicating that this monocytic influx is insufficient for host defense. Surprisingly, Ly-6G antibody treatment did not induce the same strong susceptibility to OPC in WT mice. Thus, CXCR2+ and Gr-1+ neutrophils play a vital role in host defense against OPC. Moreover, defects in the IL-23/17 axis cause a potent but incomplete deficiency in the neutrophil response to oral candidiasis. PMID:24442441

  19. Role of neutrophils in IL-17-dependent immunity to mucosal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Huppler, Anna R; Conti, Heather R; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Darville, Toni; Biswas, Partha S; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2014-02-15

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, is an opportunistic infection associated with infancy, AIDS, and IL-17-related primary immunodeficiencies. The Th17-associated cytokines IL-23 and IL-17 are crucial for immunity to OPC, but the mechanisms by which they mediate immunity are poorly defined. IL-17RA-deficient humans and mice are strongly susceptible to OPC, with reduced levels of CXC chemokines and concomitantly impaired neutrophil recruitment to the oral mucosa. Paradoxically, humans with isolated neutropenia are typically not susceptible to candidiasis. To determine whether immunity to OPC is mediated via neutrophil recruitment, mice lacking CXCR2 were subjected to OPC and were found to be highly susceptible, although there was no dissemination of fungi to peripheral organs. To assess whether the entire neutrophil response is IL-17 dependent, IL-17RA(-/-) and IL-23(-/-) mice were administered neutrophil-depleting Abs and subjected to OPC. These mice displayed increased oral fungal burdens compared with IL-17RA(-/-) or IL-23(-/-) mice alone, indicating that additional IL-17-independent signals contribute to the neutrophil response. WT mice treated with anti-Gr-1 Abs exhibited a robust infiltrate of CD11b(+)Ly-6G(low)F4/80(-) cells to the oral mucosa but were nonetheless highly susceptible to OPC, indicating that this monocytic influx is insufficient for host defense. Surprisingly, Ly-6G Ab treatment did not induce the same strong susceptibility to OPC in WT mice. Thus, CXCR2(+) and Gr-1(+) neutrophils play a vital role in host defense against OPC. Moreover, defects in the IL-23/17 axis cause a potent but incomplete deficiency in the neutrophil response to oral candidiasis.

  20. CXCL1 contributes to host defense in polymicrobial sepsis via modulating T cell and neutrophil functions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liliang; Batra, Sanjay; Douda, David Nobuhiro; Palaniyar, Nades; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2014-10-01

    Severe bacterial sepsis leads to a proinflammatory condition that can manifest as septic shock, multiple organ failure, and death. Neutrophils are critical for the rapid elimination of bacteria; however, the role of neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL1 in bacterial clearance during sepsis remains elusive. To test the hypothesis that CXCL1 is critical to host defense during sepsis, we used CXCL1-deficient mice and bone marrow chimeras to demonstrate the importance of this molecule in sepsis. We demonstrate that CXCL1 plays a pivotal role in mediating host defense to polymicrobial sepsis after cecal ligation and puncture in gene-deficient mice. CXCL1 appears to be essential for restricting bacterial outgrowth and death in mice. CXCL1 derived from both hematopoietic and resident cells contributed to bacterial clearance. Moreover, CXCL1 is essential for neutrophil migration, expression of proinflammatory mediators, activation of NF-κB and MAPKs, and upregulation of adhesion molecule ICAM-1. rIL-17 rescued impaired host defenses in cxcl1(-/-) mice. CXCL1 is important for IL-17A production via Th17 differentiation. CXCL1 is essential for NADPH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species production and neutrophil extracellular trap formation. This study reveals a novel role for CXCL1 in neutrophil recruitment via modulating T cell function and neutrophil-related bactericidal functions. These studies suggest that modulation of CXCL1 levels in tissues and blood could reduce bacterial burden in sepsis.

  1. Neutrophil Elastase, Proteinase 3, and Cathepsin G as Therapeutic Targets in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Marshall S.; Jenne, Dieter E.; Gauthier, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the first cells recruited to inflammatory sites and form the earliest line of defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are three hematopoietic serine proteases stored in large quantities in neutrophil cytoplasmic azurophilic granules. They act in combination with reactive oxygen species to help degrade engulfed microorganisms inside phagolysosomes. These proteases are also externalized in an active form during neutrophil activation at inflammatory sites, thus contributing to the regulation of inflammatory and immune responses. As multifunctional proteases, they also play a regulatory role in noninfectious inflammatory diseases. Mutations in the ELA2/ELANE gene, encoding neutrophil elastase, are the cause of human congenital neutropenia. Neutrophil membrane-bound proteinase 3 serves as an autoantigen in Wegener granulomatosis, a systemic autoimmune vasculitis. All three proteases are affected by mutations of the gene (CTSC) encoding dipeptidyl peptidase I, a protease required for activation of their proform before storage in cytoplasmic granules. Mutations of CTSC cause Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. Because of their roles in host defense and disease, elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are of interest as potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we describe the physicochemical functions of these proteases, toward a goal of better delineating their role in human diseases and identifying new therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of their bioavailability and activity. We also describe how nonhuman primate experimental models could assist with testing the efficacy of proposed therapeutic strategies. PMID:21079042

  2. Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase and soluble guanylyl cyclase disappear in elicited rat neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ciuman, Małgorzata; Siednienko, Jakub; Czyzyk, Rafał; Witwicka, Hanna; Kołosionek, Ewa; Kobiałka, Marcin; Gorczyca, Wojciech A

    2006-11-01

    The nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cGMP-dependent protein kinase (NO/sGC/PKG) cascade has been shown to affect important functions of circulating neutrophils. We demonstrate that neutrophils isolated from rats treated intraperitoneally with peptone protease cannot use this signaling pathway. Although PKG was detected at both the mRNA and protein levels in peripheral blood neutrophils (PBNs) of control rats, it was expressed neither in PBNs nor in peritoneal exudate neutrophils (PENs) of provoked rats. Also, mRNA of the alpha and beta chains of heterodimeric sGC was present in PBNs, but absent in PENs. Consistently, PBNs responded to activators of sGC with cGMP synthesis, while PENs did not. These results showed that neutrophils recruited by a provoking agent lost PKG and, in the case of PENs, also sGC and thus the capacity to respond to NO with cGMP signaling. We speculate that such downregulation of the sGC/PKG pathway is likely a result of the high activity of inducible NO synthase observed in inflammatory neutrophils.

  3. Recruitment and Training. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on recruitment and training. "College Choice: The State of Marketing and Effective Student Recruitment Strategies" (Fredrick Muyia Nafukho, Michael F. Burnett) reports on a study of the recruitment strategies used by Louisiana State University's admissions office and College of…

  4. Recruitment Guide for Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshihara, Shoko, Comp.

    This book is intended to provide U.S. university recruiters with information on higher education and student recruitment opportunities in Thailand. Section A describes recruitment strategies that are professionally and culturally appropriate to Thailand; contact information concerning related institutions is also included. A subsection called…

  5. Adult Recruitment Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Juliet, Ed.; And Others

    Findings of an American College Testing Program 1981 survey on college recruitment of adult students are summarized, and 12 articles on adult recruitment are presented. Titles and authors are as follows: "Adult Recruitment Practices: A Report of a National Survey" (Patricia Spratt, Juliet Kaufmann, Lee Noel); "Three Programs for Adults in Shopping…

  6. The effect of neutrophil migration and prolonged neutrophil contact on epithelial permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, P. E.; Sugahara, K.; Cott, G. R.; Mason, R. J.; Henson, P. M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of neutrophil migration and prolonged neutrophil contact on epithelial permeability was examined. Although neutrophil migration was not associated with a change in epithelial permeability, prolonged neutrophil-epithelial contact following migration resulted in an increase in epithelial permeability. These results were not altered by catalase, a specific neutrophil elastase inhibitor, methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethyl ketone or cyclohexamide. This suggests that neutrophil migration does not occur via an H2O2-induced reversible mechanism of junctional opening, which we describe herein. PMID:3314530

  7. Behavior of Neutrophil Granulocytes during Toxoplasma gondii Infection in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Aindrila; French, Timothy; Düsedau, Henning P.; Mueller, Nancy; Riek-Burchardt, Monika; Dudeck, Anne; Bank, Ute; Schüler, Thomas; Dunay, Ildiko Rita

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is characterized by activation of brain resident cells and recruitment of specific immune cell subsets from the periphery to the central nervous system (CNS). Our studies revealed that the rapidly invaded Ly6G+ neutrophil granulocytes are an early non-lymphoid source of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), the cytokine known to be the major mediator of host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Upon selective depletion of Ly6G+ neutrophils, we detected reduced IFN-γ production and increased parasite burden in the CNS. Ablation of Ly6G+ cells resulted in diminished recruitment of Ly6Chi monocytes into the CNS, indicating a pronounced interplay. Additionally, we identified infiltrated Ly6G+ neutrophils to be a heterogeneous population. The Ly6G+CD62-LhiCXCR4+ subset released cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP), which can promote monocyte dynamics. On the other hand, the Ly6G+CD62-LloCXCR4+ subset produced IFN-γ to establish early inflammatory response. Collectively, our findings revealed that the recruited Ly6G+CXCR4+ neutrophil granulocytes display a heterogeneity in the CNS with a repertoire of effector functions crucial in parasite control and immune regulation upon experimental cerebral toxoplasmosis. PMID:28680853

  8. Inhibition of Ras signalling reduces neutrophil infiltration and tissue damage in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhui; Merza, Mohammed; Luo, Lingtao; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2015-01-05

    Neutrophil recruitment is known to be a rate-limiting step in mediating tissue injury in severe acute pancreatitis (AP). However, the signalling mechanisms controlling inflammation and organ damage in AP remain elusive. Herein, we examined the role of Ras signalling in AP. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with a Ras inhibitor (farnesylthiosalicylic acid, FTS) before infusion of taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Pancreatic and lung tissues as well as blood were collected 24 h after pancreatitis induction. Pretreatment with FTS decreased serum amylase levels by 82% and significantly attenuated acinar cell necrosis, tissue haemorrhage and oedema formation in taurocholate-induced pancreatitis. Inhibition of Ras signalling reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in the inflamed pancreas by 42%. In addition, administration of FTS decreased pancreatic levels of CXC chemokines as well as circulating levels of interleukin-6 and high-mobility group box 1 in animals exposed to taurocholate. Moreover, treatment with FTS reduced taurocholate-induced MPO levels in the lung. Inhibition of Ras signalling had no effect on neutrophil expression of Mac-1 in mice with pancreatitis. Moreover, FTS had no direct impact on trypsin activation in isolated pancreatic acinar cells. These results indicate that Ras signalling controls CXC chemokine formation, neutrophil recruitment and tissue injury in severe AP. Thus, our findings highlight a new signalling mechanism regulating neutrophil recruitment in the pancreas and suggest that inhibition of Ras signalling might be a useful strategy to attenuate local and systemic inflammation in severe AP.

  9. Behavior of Neutrophil Granulocytes during Toxoplasma gondii Infection in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Aindrila; French, Timothy; Düsedau, Henning P; Mueller, Nancy; Riek-Burchardt, Monika; Dudeck, Anne; Bank, Ute; Schüler, Thomas; Dunay, Ildiko Rita

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is characterized by activation of brain resident cells and recruitment of specific immune cell subsets from the periphery to the central nervous system (CNS). Our studies revealed that the rapidly invaded Ly6G(+) neutrophil granulocytes are an early non-lymphoid source of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), the cytokine known to be the major mediator of host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Upon selective depletion of Ly6G(+) neutrophils, we detected reduced IFN-γ production and increased parasite burden in the CNS. Ablation of Ly6G(+) cells resulted in diminished recruitment of Ly6C(hi) monocytes into the CNS, indicating a pronounced interplay. Additionally, we identified infiltrated Ly6G(+) neutrophils to be a heterogeneous population. The Ly6G(+)CD62-L(hi)CXCR4(+) subset released cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP), which can promote monocyte dynamics. On the other hand, the Ly6G(+)CD62-L(lo)CXCR4(+) subset produced IFN-γ to establish early inflammatory response. Collectively, our findings revealed that the recruited Ly6G(+)CXCR4(+) neutrophil granulocytes display a heterogeneity in the CNS with a repertoire of effector functions crucial in parasite control and immune regulation upon experimental cerebral toxoplasmosis.

  10. Enhanced neutrophil response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, A; Batle, S; Miralles, C; Iglesias, J; Busquets, X; MacNee, W; Agusti, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Neutrophils are likely to play a major role in the inflammatory response seen in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study sought to address the hypothesis that an enhanced neutrophil response to proinflammatory agents in COPD may contribute to their recruitment and activation in the lungs.
METHODS—Circulating neutrophils were obtained from 10 patients with COPD, eight long term smokers with normal lung function, and eight healthy never smoking controls. The in vitro production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured by the NADPH oxidase method (respiratory burst) and the surface expression of several adhesion molecules (Mac-1, LFA-1 and L-selectin) was measured by flow cytometry. Measurements were obtained under basal conditions and after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). mRNA levels of p22-phox (a subunit of NADPH oxidase) and Mac-1 (CD11b) were also determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).
RESULTS—Patients with COPD showed enhanced respiratory burst compared with smokers with normal lung function, both under basal conditions (mean (SE) fluorescence intensity (MFI) 15.1 (0.5) v 11.6 (0.5); mean difference -3.4 (95% CI of the difference -5.1 to -1.8), p<0.01) and after PMA stimulation (MFI 210 (7) v 133 (10); mean difference -77 (95% CI of the difference -102 to -52), p<0.01). Mac-1 surface expression was also enhanced in patients with COPD, both under basal conditions (MFI 91 (5) v 45 (3); mean difference -46 (95% CI of the difference -61 to -31), p<0.001) and after stimulation with TNFα (MFI 340 (15) v 263 (11); mean difference -77 (95% CI of the difference -119 to -34), p=0.001). These differences were also apparent when patients with COPD were compared with non-smokers (p<0.05). The mRNA levels of p22-phox and Mac-1 (CD11b) were similar in patients with COPD and smokers with normal lung function, suggesting that the observed

  11. Contributions of Neutrophils to Resolution of Mucosal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Sean P.; Ehrentraut, Stefan F.; Glover, Louise E.; Kominsky, Douglas J.; Campbell, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMN) recruitment from the blood stream into surrounding tissues involves a regulated series of events central to acute responses in host defense. Accumulation of PMN within mucosal tissues have historically been considered pathognomonic features of both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. Historically PMNs have been deemed necessary but detrimental when recruited, given the potential for tissue damage that results from a variety of mechanisms. Recent work, however, has altered our preconcieved notions of PMN contributions to inflammatory processes. In particular, significant evidence implicates a central role for the PMN in triggering inflammatory resolution. Such mechanisms involve both metabolic and biochemical crosstalk pathways during the intimate interactions of PMN with other cell types at inflammatory sites. Here, we highlight several recent examples of how PMN coordinate the resolution of ongoing inflammation, with a particular focus on the gastrointestinal mucosa. PMID:22968707

  12. Prostaglandin mediates IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil migration in inflammation by inhibiting IL-12 and IFNgamma production.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Henrique P; Grespan, Renata; Vieira, Silvio M; Cunha, Thiago M; Verri, Waldiceu A; Fernandes, Karla S S; Souto, Fabricio O; McInnes, Iain B; Ferreira, Sergio H; Liew, Foo Y; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2009-04-07

    IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil recruitment plays a pivotal role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the mechanism of the neutrophil recruitment is obscure. Here we report that prostaglandin enhances the IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil migration in a murine model of RA by inhibiting IL-12 and IFN gamma production. Methylated BSA (mBSA) and IL-23-induced neutrophil migration was inhibited by anti-IL-23 and anti-IL-17 antibodies, COX inhibitors, IL-12, or IFNgamma but was enhanced by prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). IL-23-induced IL-17 production was increased by PGE(2) and suppressed by COX-inhibition or IL-12. Furthermore, COX inhibition failed to reduce IL-23-induced neutrophil migration in IL-12- or IFNgamma-deficient mice. IL-17-induced neutrophil migration was not affected by COX inhibitors, IL-12, or IFNgamma but was inhibited by MK886 (a leukotriene synthesis inhibitor), anti-TNFalpha, anti-CXCL1, and anti-CXCL5 antibodies and by repertaxin (a CXCR1/2 antagonist). These treatments all inhibited mBSA- or IL-23-induced neutrophil migration. IL-17 induced neutrophil chemotaxis through a CXC chemokines-dependent pathway. Our results suggest that prostaglandin plays an important role in IL-23-induced neutrophil migration in arthritis by enhancing IL-17 synthesis and by inhibiting IL-12 and IFNgamma production. We thus provide a mechanism for the pathogenic role of the IL-23/IL-17 axis in RA and also suggest an additional mechanism of action for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  13. Prostaglandin mediates IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil migration in inflammation by inhibiting IL-12 and IFNγ production

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Henrique P.; Grespan, Renata; Vieira, Silvio M.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Verri, Waldiceu A.; Fernandes, Karla S. S.; Souto, Fabricio O.; McInnes, Iain B.; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Liew, Foo Y.; Cunha, Fernando Q.

    2009-01-01

    IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil recruitment plays a pivotal role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the mechanism of the neutrophil recruitment is obscure. Here we report that prostaglandin enhances the IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil migration in a murine model of RA by inhibiting IL-12 and IFN γ production. Methylated BSA (mBSA) and IL-23-induced neutrophil migration was inhibited by anti-IL-23 and anti-IL-17 antibodies, COX inhibitors, IL-12, or IFNγ but was enhanced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). IL-23-induced IL-17 production was increased by PGE2 and suppressed by COX-inhibition or IL-12. Furthermore, COX inhibition failed to reduce IL-23-induced neutrophil migration in IL-12- or IFNγ-deficient mice. IL-17-induced neutrophil migration was not affected by COX inhibitors, IL-12, or IFNγ but was inhibited by MK886 (a leukotriene synthesis inhibitor), anti-TNFα, anti-CXCL1, and anti-CXCL5 antibodies and by repertaxin (a CXCR1/2 antagonist). These treatments all inhibited mBSA- or IL-23-induced neutrophil migration. IL-17 induced neutrophil chemotaxis through a CXC chemokines-dependent pathway. Our results suggest that prostaglandin plays an important role in IL-23-induced neutrophil migration in arthritis by enhancing IL-17 synthesis and by inhibiting IL-12 and IFNγ production. We thus provide a mechanism for the pathogenic role of the IL-23/IL-17 axis in RA and also suggest an additional mechanism of action for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:19289819

  14. The endothelin B receptor plays a crucial role in the adhesion of neutrophils to the endothelium in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Koehl, Bérengère; Nivoit, Pierre; El Nemer, Wassim; Lenoir, Olivia; Hermand, Patricia; Pereira, Catia; Brousse, Valentine; Guyonnet, Léa; Ghinatti, Giulia; Benkerrou, Malika; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2017-07-01

    Although the primary origin of sickle cell disease is a hemoglobin disorder, many types of cells contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of the disease. The adhesion of neutrophils to activated endothelium is critical in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease and targeting neutrophils and their interactions with endothelium represents an important opportunity for the development of new therapeutics. We focused on endothelin-1, a mediator involved in neutrophil activation and recruitment in tissues, and investigated the involvement of the endothelin receptors in the interaction of neutrophils with endothelial cells. We used fluorescence intravital microscopy analyses of the microcirculation in sickle mice and quantitative microfluidic fluorescence microscopy of human blood. Both experiments on the mouse model and patients indicate that blocking endothelin receptors, particularly ETB receptor, strongly influences neutrophil recruitment under inflammatory conditions in sickle cell disease. We show that human neutrophils have functional ETB receptors with calcium signaling capability, leading to increased adhesion to the endothelium through effects on both endothelial cells and neutrophils. Intact ETB function was found to be required for tumor necrosis factor α-dependent upregulation of CD11b on neutrophils. Furthermore, we confirmed that human neutrophils synthesize endothelin-1, which may be involved in autocrine and paracrine pathophysiological actions. Thus, the endothelin-ETB axis should be considered as a cytokine-like potent pro-inflammatory pathway in sickle cell disease. Blockade of endothelin receptors, including ETB, may provide major benefits for preventing or treating vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell patients. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  15. Human neutrophil FcγRIIA regulation by C5aR promotes inflammatory arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Naotake; Ernandez, Thomas; Li, Xun; Nishi, Hiroshi; Cullere, Xavier; Mekala, Divya; Hazen, Melissa; Köhl, Jörg; Lee, David M.; Mayadas, Tanya N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis culminates in joint destruction that in mouse models of disease, is supported by innate immune molecules including FcγRs and complement. However, the results may not predict outcomes in humans given the structural differences between murine and human activating FcγRs on neutrophils, a prominent component of joint exudates. In this study, we examined the role of the human neutrophil FcγRIIA in the development of arthritis and probed the underlying mechanism by which FcγRIIA initiated disease. Methods K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis was examined in mice that express FcγRIIA on neutrophils but lack their own activating FcγRs (γ-chain-deficient). The role of mast cells, complement (C3 and C5a) and CD18 integrins in FcγRIIA-initiated disease was examined using cell reconstitution approaches, inhibitors, and functional blocking antibodies respectively. Cross-talk between C5aR and FcγRIIA on neutrophils was evaluated in vitro. Results Neutrophil FcγRIIA expression was sufficient to restore susceptibility to K/BxN serum induced neutrophil recruitment, synovitis and bone destruction in γ-chain-deficient mice. Joint inflammation was robust and proceeded even in the absence of mast cells and vascular permeability, shown to contribute to disease in wild-type mice. Neutrophil recruitment was dependent on CD18 integrin LFA-1 and C5aR. C5aR in addition significantly enhanced FcγRIIA mediated phagocytosis and oxidative burst in vitro. Conclusion Human and murine activating FcγRs on neutrophils are not functionally equivalent, and in humans may play a primary role in arthritis. Cross-talk between neutrophil C5aR and FcγRIIA is essential for disease thus highlighting a new aspect of complement during the effector phase of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:21280001

  16. Gcsf-Chr19 promotes neutrophil migration to damaged tissue through blood vessels in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Galdames, Jorge A; Zuñiga-Traslaviña, Constanza; Reyes, Ariel E; Feijóo, Carmen G

    2014-07-01

    G-CSF is an essential cytokine that regulates proliferation and differentiation of granulocytes from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. In mammals G-CSF has been identified as a key factor that promotes the release of neutrophils from the bone marrow into the blood circulation. In silico analysis indicates that zebrafish has two gcsf genes, gcsf-chr12 in chromosome 12 and gcsf-chr19 in chromosome 19. Gcsf-Chr12 participates in emergency myelopoiesis, but, in contrast to its mammalian orthologue, is not involved in neutrophil migration toward damaged tissue. In turn, the function of Gcsf-Chr19 has not been examined yet. In this study, we analyzed the role of Gcsf-Chr19 in regulating neutrophil migration toward the wound. Our results indicated that during the first h after caudal fin transection, neutrophils migrate from the hematopoietic tissue toward the injury, using the extracellular matrix as a substrate. Later, between 3 and 4 h postdamage, the recruitment mainly occurs through the bloodstream, and only a few neutrophils still use the extracellular matrix to migrate. During this process, the transcriptional levels of gcsf-chr19 are considerably increased, reaching a peak 1 h postdamage. The knockdown of Gcsf-chr19 indicated that the percentage of neutrophils that reach the wound decreased after the first h postinjury, suggesting that the knockdown specifically affects neutrophils that travel to the wound through blood vessels. Together, our data provide novel information about the regulation of neutrophil migration in zebrafish, positioning Gcsf-Chr19 as a key signal during the course of an inflammatory process triggered by severe damage. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Glycogen storage disease type Ib neutrophils exhibit impaired cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Goo-Young; Lee, Young Mok; Kwon, Joon Hyun; Jun, Hyun Sik; Chou, Janice

    2017-01-22

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis, neutropenia, and neutrophil dysfunction, is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT). Neutrophils play an essential role in the defense against invading pathogens. The recruitment of neutrophils towards the inflammation sites in response to inflammatory stimuli is a tightly regulated process involving rolling, adhesion, and transmigration. In this study, we investigated the role of G6PT in neutrophil adhesion and migration using in vivo and in vitro models. We showed that the GSD-Ib (G6pt(-/-)) mice manifested severe neutropenia in both blood and bone marrow, and treating G6pt(-/-) mice with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) corrected neutropenia. However, upon thioglycolate challenge, neutrophils from both untreated and G-CSF-treated G6pt(-/-)mice exhibited decreased ability to migrate to the peritoneal cavity. In vitro migration and cell adhesion of G6PT-deficient neutrophils were also significantly impaired. Defects in cell migration were not due to enhanced apoptosis or altered fMLP receptor expression. Remarkably, the expression of the β2 integrins CD11a and CD11b, which are critical for cell adhesion, was greatly decreased in G6PT-deficient neutrophils. This study suggests that deficiencies in G6PT cause impairment in neutrophil adhesion and migration via aberrant expression of β2 integrins, and our finding should facilitate the development of novel therapies for GSD-Ib.

  18. Coccidioides Endospores and Spherules Draw Strong Chemotactic, Adhesive, and Phagocytic Responses by Individual Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Thompson III, George R.; Hastey, Christine J.; Hodge, Gregory C.; Lunetta, Jennine M.; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Heinrich, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioides spp. are dimorphic pathogenic fungi whose parasitic forms cause coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever) in mammalian hosts. We use an innovative interdisciplinary approach to analyze one-on-one encounters between human neutrophils and two forms of Coccidioides posadasii. To examine the mechanisms by which the innate immune system coordinates different stages of the host response to fungal pathogens, we dissect the immune-cell response into chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Our single-cell technique reveals a surprisingly strong response by initially quiescent neutrophils to close encounters with C. posadasii, both from a distance (by complement-mediated chemotaxis) as well as upon contact (by serum-dependent adhesion and phagocytosis). This response closely resembles neutrophil interactions with Candida albicans and zymosan particles, and is significantly stronger than the neutrophil responses to Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Rhizopus oryzae under identical conditions. The vigorous in vitro neutrophil response suggests that C. posadasii evades in vivo recognition by neutrophils through suppression of long-range mobilization and recruitment of the immune cells. This observation elucidates an important paradigm of the recognition of microbes, i.e., that intact immunotaxis comprises an intricate spatiotemporal hierarchy of distinct chemotactic processes. Moreover, in contrast to earlier reports, human neutrophils exhibit vigorous chemotaxis toward, and frustrated phagocytosis of, the large spherules of C. posadasii under physiological-like conditions. Finally, neutrophils from healthy donors and patients with chronic coccidioidomycosis display subtle differences in their responses to antibody-coated beads, even though the patient cells appear to interact normally with C. posadasii endospores. PMID:26070210

  19. Citrullination of CXCL8 increases this chemokine's ability to mobilize neutrophils into the blood circulation.

    PubMed

    Loos, Tamara; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Damme, Jo; Proost, Paul

    2009-10-01

    During the first line defense of an infected host, circulating neutrophils invade the inflamed tissue, whereas mature neutrophils from the bone marrow pool migrate into the blood circulation and from there reinforce tissue infiltration. The CXC chemokine CXCL8, also know as interleukin-8, is a potent attractant of neutrophils. Recently, we discovered a new natural post-translational modification of CXCL8, i.e. the deimination of arginine into citrulline by peptidylarginine deiminases. The ability to provoke leukocytosis was assessed by intravenous administration of citrullinated CXCL8 in rabbits. Adsorption of citrullinated CXCL8 to the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines on human or rabbit erythrocytes was evaluated using a competitive binding assay. Finally, surface expression of adhesion molecules was studied after stimulating neutrophils with citrullinated CXCL8. Citrullination of CXCL8 significantly increased this chemokine's ability to recruit neutrophils into the blood circulation. In addition, the competitive binding properties of CXCL8 for the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines were impaired upon citrullination. Since the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines is an important scavenging receptor for CXCL8 in the blood stream, citrullination may delay CXCL8 clearance from the circulation. Furthermore, the shedding of CD62L (L-selectin) and the upregulation of CD11b (beta2-integrin) protein expression on CXCL8-induced neutrophils were improved by deimination of CXCL8, possibly contributing to the neutrophil egress from the bone marrow. Conversely, surface expression of CD15, the neutrophilic ligand of endothelial selectins, was equally well upregulated by intact and citrullinated CXCL8. These data show that citrullination of CXCL8 enhances leukocytosis, possibly through impaired chemokine clearance from the blood circulation and prolonged presentation to the bone marrow.

  20. Osteopontin Undergoes Polymerization in Vivo and Gains Chemotactic Activity for Neutrophils Mediated by Integrin α9β1*

    PubMed Central

    Nishimichi, Norihisa; Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Chen, Chun; Matsuda, Haruo; Sheppard, Dean; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is an integrin-binding inflammatory cytokine that undergoes polymerization catalyzed by transglutaminase 2. We have previously reported that polymeric OPN (polyOPN), but not unpolymerized OPN (OPN*), attracts neutrophils in vitro by presenting an acquired binding site for integrin α9β1. Among many in vitro substrates for transglutaminase 2, only a few have evidence for in vivo polymerization and concomitant function. Although polyOPN has been identified in bone and aorta, the in vivo functional significance of polyOPN is unknown. To determine whether OPN polymerization contributes to neutrophil recruitment in vivo, we injected OPN* into the peritoneal space of mice. Polymeric OPN was detected by immunoblotting in the peritoneal wash of mice injected with OPN*, and both intraperitoneal and plasma OPN* levels were higher in mice injected with a polymerization-incompetent mutant, confirming that OPN* polymerizes in vivo. OPN* injection induced neutrophil accumulation, which was significantly less following injection of a mutant OPN that was incapable of polymerization. The importance of in vivo polymerization was further confirmed with cystamine, a transglutaminase inhibitor, which blocked the polymerization and attenuated OPN*-mediated neutrophil recruitment. The thrombin-cleaved N-terminal fragment of OPN, another ligand for α9β1, was not responsible for neutrophil accumulation because a thrombin cleavage-incompetent mutant recruited similar numbers of neutrophils as wild type OPN*. Neutrophil accumulation in response to both wild type and thrombin cleavage-incompetent OPN* was reduced in mice lacking the integrin α9 subunit in leukocytes, indicating that α9β1 is required for polymerization-induced recruitment. We have illustrated a physiological role of molecular polymerization by demonstrating acquired chemotactic properties for OPN. PMID:21321126

  1. The effects and comparative differences of neutrophil specific chemokines on neutrophil chemotaxis of the neonate.

    PubMed

    Fox, Samuel E; Lu, Wenge; Maheshwari, Akhil; Christensen, Robert D; Calhoun, Darlene A

    2005-02-07

    Neutrophil specific chemokines are potent chemoattractants for neutrophils. IL-8/CXCL8 is the most extensively studied member of this group, and its concentrations increase during inflammatory conditions of the newborn infant including sepsis and chronic lung disease. A significant amount of information exists on the effects of IL-8/CXCL8 on neutrophil chemotaxis of neonates, but little is known about the other neutrophil specific chemokines. The aim of this study was to determine the relative potency of the neutrophil specific chemokines on chemotaxis of neonatal neutrophils and to compare this effect with the effect on adult neutrophils. Neutrophils were isolated from cord blood or healthy adult donors and incubated in a Neuroprobe chemotaxis chamber. Chemokine concentrations ranging from 1-1000 ng/mL were used. Differences in chemotactic potency existed among the seven neutrophil specific chemokines. Specifically, at 100 ng/mL, the order was IL-8/CXCL8>GRO-alpha/CXCL1>GCP-2/CXCL6>NAP-2/CXCL7>ENA-78/CXCL5>GRO-gamma/CXCL2>GRO-beta/CXCL3. This pattern was observed for adult and neonatal neutrophils. We conclude that (1) neutrophils from cord blood exhibit the same pattern of potency for each ELR chemokine as neutrophils from adults, and (2) migration of neonatal neutrophils is significantly less than that of adults at every concentration examined except the lowest (1 ng/mL).

  2. Reduced neutrophil chemotaxis and infiltration contributes to delayed resolution of cutaneous wound infection with advanced age.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Aleah L; Rendon, Juan L; Ramirez, Luis; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2013-02-15

    Advanced age is associated with alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses, which contribute to an increased risk of infection in elderly patients. Coupled with this immune dysfunction, elderly patients demonstrate impaired wound healing with elevated rates of wound dehiscence and chronic wounds. To evaluate how advanced age alters the host immune response to cutaneous wound infection, we developed a murine model of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in young (3-4 mo) and aged (18-20 mo) BALB/c mice. Aged mice exhibit increased bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure over time compared with young mice. These differences were not attributed to alterations in wound neutrophil or macrophage TLR2 or FcγRIII expression, or age-related changes in phagocytic potential and bactericidal activity. To evaluate the role of chemotaxis in our model, we first examined in vivo chemotaxis in the absence of wound injury to KC, a neutrophil chemokine. In response to a s.c. injection of KC, aged mice recruited fewer neutrophils at increasing doses of KC compared with young mice. This paralleled our model of wound infection, where diminished neutrophil and macrophage recruitment was observed in aged mice relative to young mice despite equivalent levels of KC, MIP-2, and MCP-1 chemokine levels at the wound site. This reduced leukocyte accumulation was also associated with lower levels of ICAM-1 in wounds from aged mice at early time points. These age-mediated defects in early neutrophil recruitment may alter the dynamics of the inflammatory phase of wound healing, impacting macrophage recruitment, bacterial clearance, and wound closure.

  3. The Role of Neutrophils in Transplanted Organs.

    PubMed

    Scozzi, D; Ibrahim, M; Menna, C; Krupnick, A S; Kreisel, D; Gelman, A E

    2017-02-01

    Neutrophils are often viewed as nonspecialized effector cells whose presence is a simple indicator of tissue inflammation. There is new evidence that neutrophils exist in subsets and have specialized effector functions that include extracellular trap generation and the stimulation of angiogenesis. The application of intravital imaging to transplanted organs has revealed novel requirements for neutrophil trafficking into graft tissue and has illuminated direct interactions between neutrophils and other leukocytes that promote alloimmunity. Paradoxically, retaining some neutrophilia may be important to induce or maintain tolerance. Neutrophils can stimulate anti-inflammatory signals in other phagocytes and release molecules that inhibit T cell activation. In this article, we will review the available evidence of how neutrophils regulate acute and chronic inflammation in transplanted organs and discuss the possibility of targeting these cells to promote tolerance.

  4. The Role of Neutrophils in Transplanted Organs

    PubMed Central

    Menna, Cecilia; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Kreisel, Daniel; Gelman, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are often viewed as non-specialized effector cells whose presence is a simple indicator of tissue inflammation. There is new evidence that neutrophils exist in subsets and have specialized effector functions that include extracellular trap generation and the stimulation of angiogenesis. The application of intravital imaging to transplanted organs has revealed novel requirements for neutrophil trafficking into graft tissue and illuminated direct interactions between neutrophils and other leukocytes that promote alloimmunity. Paradoxically, retaining some neutrophilia may be important to induce or maintain tolerance. Neutrophils can stimulate anti-inflammatory signals in other phagocytes and release molecules that inhibit T cell activation. Here we will review the available evidence of how neutrophils regulate acute and chronic inflammation in transplanted organs and discuss the possibility of targeting these cells to promote tolerance. PMID:27344051

  5. [Ambiguity role of neutrophils in oncogenesis].

    PubMed

    Mal'tseva, V N; Safronova, V G

    2009-01-01

    The review is focused on the participation of polymorphonuclear granulocytes (neutrophils) in development and spreading of a tumor. We consider both the well known functions of neutrophils (degranulation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS)) and the recently shown one (presentation of an antigene). The special attention is focused on the ambiguity of the neutrophil role in oncogenesis. The dominant view is that neutrophils display exclusively antitumor properties. The update information testifies about protumoral activity of neutrophils: they migrate to a tumor and promote angiogenesis and metastasis at late stages of the tumor. It is interesting that certain components of neutrophil cytotoxic arsenal (ROS, cytokines, specific enzymes) participate both in antitumoral defenses of an organism and protumoral activity.

  6. Neutrophils in Tuberculosis: Heterogeneity Shapes the Way?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Infection with M. tuberculosis remains one of the most common infections in the world. The outcome of the infection depends on host ability to mount effective protection and balance inflammatory responses. Neutrophils are innate immune cells implicated in both processes. Accordingly, during M. tuberculosis infection, they play a dual role. Particularly, they contribute to the generation of effector T cells, participate in the formation of granuloma, and are directly involved in tissue necrosis, destruction, and infection dissemination. Neutrophils have a high bactericidal potential. However, data on their ability to eliminate M. tuberculosis are controversial, and the results of neutrophil depletion experiments are not uniform. Thus, the overall roles of neutrophils during M. tuberculosis infection and factors that determine these roles are not fully understood. This review analyzes data on neutrophil defensive and pathological functions during tuberculosis and considers hypotheses explaining the dualism of neutrophils during M. tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis disease. PMID:28626346

  7. Restraint stress alters neutrophil and macrophage phenotypes during wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Tymen, Stéphanie D.; Rojas, Isolde G.; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Fang, Zong Juan; Zhao, Yan; Marucha, Phillip T.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies reported that stress delays wound healing, impairs bacterial clearance, and elevates the risk for opportunistic infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are responsible for the removal of bacteria present at the wound site. The appropriate recruitment and functions of these cells are necessary for efficient bacterial clearance. In our current study we found that restraint stress induced an excessive recruitment of neutrophils extending the inflammatory phase of healing, and the gene expression of neutrophil attracting chemokines MIP-2 and KC. However, restraint stress did not affect macrophage infiltration. Stress decreased the phagocytic abilities of phagocytic cells ex vivo, yet it did not affect superoxide production. The cell surface expression of adhesion molecules CD11b and TLR4 were decreased in peripheral blood monocytes in stressed mice. The phenotype of macrophages present at the wound site was also altered. Gene expression of markers of pro-inflammatory classically activated macrophages, CXCL10 and CCL5, were down-regulated; as were markers associated with wound healing macrophages, CCL22, IGF-1, RELMα; and the regulatory macrophage marker, chemokine CCL1. Restraint stress also induced up-regulation of IL10 gene expression. In summary, our study has shown that restraint stress suppresses the phenotype shift of the macrophage population, as compared to the changes observed during normal wound healing, while the number of macrophages remains constant. We also observed a general suppression of chemokine gene expression. Modulation of the macrophage phenotype could provide a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of wounds under stress conditions in the clinical setting. PMID:22884902

  8. Restraint stress alters neutrophil and macrophage phenotypes during wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tymen, Stéphanie D; Rojas, Isolde G; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Fang, Zong Juan; Zhao, Yan; Marucha, Phillip T

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies reported that stress delays wound healing, impairs bacterial clearance, and elevates the risk for opportunistic infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are responsible for the removal of bacteria present at the wound site. The appropriate recruitment and functions of these cells are necessary for efficient bacterial clearance. In our current study we found that restraint stress induced an excessive recruitment of neutrophils extending the inflammatory phase of healing, and the gene expression of neutrophil attracting chemokines MIP-2 and KC. However, restraint stress did not affect macrophage infiltration. Stress decreased the phagocytic abilities of phagocytic cells ex vivo, yet it did not affect superoxide production. The cell surface expression of adhesion molecules CD11b and TLR4 were decreased in peripheral blood monocytes in stressed mice. The phenotype of macrophages present at the wound site was also altered. Gene expression of markers of pro-inflammatory classically activated macrophages, CXCL10 and CCL5, were down-regulated; as were markers associated with wound healing macrophages, CCL22, IGF-1, RELMα; and the regulatory macrophage marker, chemokine CCL1. Restraint stress also induced up-regulation of IL10 gene expression. In summary, our study has shown that restraint stress suppresses the phenotype shift of the macrophage population, as compared to the changes observed during normal wound healing, while the number of macrophages remains constant. We also observed a general suppression of chemokine gene expression. Modulation of the macrophage phenotype could provide a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of wounds under stress conditions in the clinical setting.

  9. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases affects KC/CXCL1-induced intraluminal crawling, transendothelial migration, and chemotaxis of neutrophils in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Najia; Hossain, Mokarram; Liu, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling is critical in the pathophysiology of a variety of inflammatory processes. Leukocyte recruitment to the site of inflammation is a multistep process governed by specific signalling cascades. After adhesion in the lumen, many leukocytes crawl to optimal sites at endothelial junctions and transmigrate to extravascular tissue in a Mac-1-dependent manner. The signalling mechanisms that regulate postadhesion steps of intraluminal crawling, transmigration, and chemotaxis in tissue remain incompletely understood. The present study explored the effect of p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 on various parameters of neutrophil recruitment triggered by chemokine KC (CXCL1) gradient. Neutrophil-endothelial interactions in microvasculature of murine cremaster muscle were determined using intravital microscopy and time-lapsed video analysis. SB203580 (100 nM) did not change leukocyte rolling but significantly attenuated neutrophil adhesion, emigration, and transmigration and impaired the initiation of neutrophil crawling and transmigration. In response to KC chemotactic gradient, SB203580 significantly reduced the velocity of migration and chemotaxis index of neutrophils in tissue. The upregulation of Mac-1 expression in neutrophils stimulated by KC was significantly blunted by SB203580 in vitro. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that pharmacological suppression of p38 MAPK significantly impairs multiple steps of neutrophil recruitment in vivo.

  10. Staphylococcal Superantigen-Like Protein 1 and 5 (SSL1 & SSL5) Limit Neutrophil Chemotaxis and Migration through MMP-Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Koymans, Kirsten J; Bisschop, Adinda; Vughs, Mignon M; van Kessel, Kok P M; de Haas, Carla J C; van Strijp, Jos A G

    2016-07-05

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are endopeptidases that degrade components of the extracellular matrix, but also modulate inflammation. During bacterial infections, MMPs are important in the recruitment and migration of inflammatory cells. Besides facilitating cell migration by degrading extracellular matrix components, they potentiate the action of several inflammatory molecules, including cytokines, chemokines, and antimicrobial peptides. Staphylococcus aureus secretes an arsenal of immune evasion molecules that interfere with immune cell functioning and hamper proper immune responses. An earlier study identified staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 5 (SSL5) as an MMP9 inhibitor. Since multiple MMPs are involved in neutrophil recruitment, we set up an in-depth search for additional MMP inhibitors by testing a panel of over 70 secreted staphylococcal proteins on the inhibition of the two main neutrophil MMPs: MMP8 (neutrophil collagenase) and MMP9 (neutrophil gelatinase B). We identified SSL1 and SSL5 as potent inhibitors of both neutrophil MMPs and show that they are actually broad range MMP inhibitors. SSL1 and SSL5 prevent MMP-induced cleavage and potentiation of IL-8 and inhibit the migration of neutrophils through collagen. Thus, through MMP-inhibition, SSL1 and SSL5 interfere with neutrophil activation, chemotaxis, and migration, all vital neutrophil functions in bacterial clearance. Studies on MMP-SSL interactions can have therapeutic potential and SSL based derivatives might prove useful in treatment of cancer and destructive inflammatory diseases.

  11. Staphylococcal Superantigen-Like Protein 1 and 5 (SSL1 & SSL5) Limit Neutrophil Chemotaxis and Migration through MMP-Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Koymans, Kirsten J.; Bisschop, Adinda; Vughs, Mignon M.; van Kessel, Kok P. M.; de Haas, Carla J. C.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are endopeptidases that degrade components of the extracellular matrix, but also modulate inflammation. During bacterial infections, MMPs are important in the recruitment and migration of inflammatory cells. Besides facilitating cell migration by degrading extracellular matrix components, they potentiate the action of several inflammatory molecules, including cytokines, chemokines, and antimicrobial peptides. Staphylococcus aureus secretes an arsenal of immune evasion molecules that interfere with immune cell functioning and hamper proper immune responses. An earlier study identified staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 5 (SSL5) as an MMP9 inhibitor. Since multiple MMPs are involved in neutrophil recruitment, we set up an in-depth search for additional MMP inhibitors by testing a panel of over 70 secreted staphylococcal proteins on the inhibition of the two main neutrophil MMPs: MMP8 (neutrophil collagenase) and MMP9 (neutrophil gelatinase B). We identified SSL1 and SSL5 as potent inhibitors of both neutrophil MMPs and show that they are actually broad range MMP inhibitors. SSL1 and SSL5 prevent MMP-induced cleavage and potentiation of IL-8 and inhibit the migration of neutrophils through collagen. Thus, through MMP-inhibition, SSL1 and SSL5 interfere with neutrophil activation, chemotaxis, and migration, all vital neutrophil functions in bacterial clearance. Studies on MMP-SSL interactions can have therapeutic potential and SSL based derivatives might prove useful in treatment of cancer and destructive inflammatory diseases. PMID:27399672

  12. Nicotine is Chemotactic for Neutrophils and Enhances Neutrophil Responsiveness to Chemotactic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totti, Noel; McCusker, Kevin T.; Campbell, Edward J.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils contribute to chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema associated with cigarette smoking. Nicotine was found to be chemotactic for human neutrophils but not monocytes, with a peak activity at ~ 31 micromolar. In lower concentrations (comparable to those in smokers' plasma), nicotine enhanced the response of neutrophils to two chemotactic peptides. In contrast to most other chemoattractants for neutrophils, however, nicotine did not affect degranulation or superoxide production. Nicotine thus may promote inflammation and consequent lung injury in smokers.

  13. Homeostatic regulation of blood neutrophil counts

    PubMed Central

    von Vietinghoff, Sibylle; Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil counts in blood are determined by the differentiation and proliferation of precursor cells in the bone marrow, release of mature neutrophils into the blood, margination in organs like the lung and spleen, and transmigration through the endothelial lining followed by neutrophil apoptosis and uptake by phagocytes. This brief review summarizes how the regulation of neutrophil production by G-CSF is in part controlled by IL-17 and IL-23. Neutrophils are retained in the bone marrow through interaction of CXCL12 with its receptor CXCR4. The relevance of this mechanism is illustrated by rare diseases in which disrupting the desensitization of CXCR4 results in neutrophil accumulation in the bone marrow. Although blood neutrophil numbers in inbred mouse strains and individual human subjects are tightly controlled, the large variation of blood neutrophil counts among outbred populations suggests genetic control. One example is benign ethnic neutropenia, which is found in about 5% of African Americans. Reduced and elevated neutrophil counts, even within the normal range, are associated with excess all-cause mortality. PMID:18832668

  14. Two neutrophilic dermatoses captured simultaneously on histology

    PubMed Central

    Wlodek, Christina; Bhatt, Nidhi; Kennedy, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    A number of neutrophilic dermatoses are associated with malignancies and their treatment. These rarely occur together in the same patient. A Caucasian 72-year-old male was treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with chemotherapy including daunorubicin and cytarabine. Within 48 hours of commencing treatment, he developed pyrexia and, two days later, disseminated non-tender pink plaques on the limbs and trunk. A skin biopsy showed a dermal interstitial infiltrate of lymphocytes, histiocytoid cells and predominantly neutrophils. This extended into the subcutis, where a neutrophilic lobular panniculitis was seen. These findings are consistent with Sweet’s syndrome. In addition, a neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltrate was also present around eccrine coils and lower ducts. The eccrine epithelium showed squamous metaplasia with dyskeratosis and sloughing into the lumen. These latter findings are consistent with neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis (NEH). These two histologically distinct entities form part of the neutrophilic dermatoses that have been described in oncology patients with reports of concurrent or sequential occurrence of various neutrophilic dermatoses in the same patient. Ours, however, is only the second reported case of simultaneously captured Sweet’s and NEH in the setting of AML. The most likely explanation is that of an epiphenomenon, whereby the neutrophilic infiltrate extended around the sweat glands in the context of the neutrophilic dermatosis. PMID:27648385

  15. Bordetella parapertussis Circumvents Neutrophil Extracellular Bactericidal Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gorgojo, Juan; Scharrig, Emilia; Gómez, Ricardo M.; Harvill, Eric T.; Rodríguez, Maria Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    B. parapertussis is a whooping cough etiological agent with the ability to evade the immune response induced by pertussis vaccines. We previously demonstrated that in the absence of opsonic antibodies B. parapertussis hampers phagocytosis by neutrophils and macrophages and, when phagocytosed, blocks intracellular killing by interfering with phagolysosomal fusion. But neutrophils can kill and/or immobilize extracellular bacteria through non-phagocytic mechanisms such as degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In this study we demonstrated that B. parapertussis also has the ability to circumvent these two neutrophil extracellular bactericidal activities. The lack of neutrophil degranulation was found dependent on the O antigen that targets the bacteria to cell lipid rafts, eventually avoiding the fusion of nascent phagosomes with specific and azurophilic granules. IgG opsonization overcame this inhibition of neutrophil degranulation. We further observed that B. parapertussis did not induce NETs release in resting neutrophils and inhibited NETs formation in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation by a mechanism dependent on adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA)-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Thus, B. parapertussis modulates neutrophil bactericidal activity through two different mechanisms, one related to the lack of proper NETs-inducer stimuli and the other one related to an active inhibitory mechanism. Together with previous results these data suggest that B. parapertussis has the ability to subvert the main neutrophil bactericidal functions, inhibiting efficient clearance in non-immune hosts. PMID:28095485

  16. A bacterial siren song: intimate interactions between neutrophils and pathogenic Neisseria

    PubMed Central

    Criss, Alison K.; Seifert, H. Steven

    2012-01-01

    Preface Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis are Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that are exquisitely adapted for growth at human mucosal surfaces and for efficient transmission between hosts. One factor that is essential to neisserial pathogenesis is the interaction between the bacteria and neutrophils, which are recruited in high numbers during infection. Although this vigorous host response could simply reflect effective immune recognition of the bacteria, there is mounting evidence that in fact these obligate human pathogens manipulate the innate immune response to promote infectious processes. This Review summarizes the mechanisms used by pathogenic neisseriae to resist and modulate the antimicrobial activities of neutrophils. It also details some of the major outstanding questions about the Neisseria–neutrophil relationship and proposes potential benefits of this relationship for the pathogen. PMID:22290508

  17. Neonatal Sepsis and Neutrophil Insufficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Melvan, John Nicholas; Bagby, Gregory J.; Welsh, David A.; Nelson, Steve; Zhang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis has continuously been a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality despite current advances in chemotherapy and patient intensive care facilities. Neonates are at high risk for developing bacterial infections due to quantitative and qualitative insufficiencies of innate immunity, particularly granulocyte lineage development and response to infection. Although antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment, adjuvant therapies enhancing immune function have shown promise in treating sepsis in neonates. This chapter reviews current strategies for the clinical management of neonatal sepsis and analyzes mechanisms underlying insufficiencies of neutrophil defense in neonates with emphasis on new directions for adjuvant therapy development. PMID:20521927

  18. Neutrophil-induced injury of rat pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R H; DeHart, P D; Todd, R F

    1986-01-01

    The damage to pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells that occurs in many inflammatory conditions is thought to be caused in part by phagocytic neutrophils. To investigate this process, we exposed monolayers of purified rat alveolar epithelial cells to stimulated human neutrophils and measured cytotoxicity using a 51Cr-release assay. We found that stimulated neutrophils killed epithelial cells by a process that did not require neutrophil-generated reactive oxygen metabolites. Pretreatment of neutrophils with an antibody (anti-Mo1) that reduced neutrophil adherence to epithelial cells limited killing. Although a variety of serine protease inhibitors partially inhibited cytotoxicity, we found that neutrophil cytoplasts, neutrophil lysates, neutrophil-conditioned medium, purified azurophilic or specific granule contents, and purified human neutrophil elastase did not duplicate the injury. We conclude that stimulated neutrophils can kill alveolar epithelial cells in an oxygen metabolite-independent manner. Tight adherence of stimulated neutrophils to epithelial cell monolayers appears to promote epithelial cell killing. Images PMID:3771800

  19. Transendothelial migration enhances integrin-dependent human neutrophil chemokinesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils induces phenotypic changes that influence the interactions of neutrophils with extravascular tissue components. To assess the influence of transmigration on neutrophil chemokinetic motility, we used polyethylene glycol hydrogels covalently modified with spec...

  20. Motile invaded neutrophils in the small intestine of Toxoplasma gondii-infected mice reveal a potential mechanism for parasite spread

    PubMed Central

    Coombes, Janine L.; Charsar, Brittany A.; Han, Seong-Ji; Halkias, Joanna; Chan, Shiao Wei; Koshy, Anita A.; Striepen, Boris; Robey, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection occurs through the oral route, but we lack important information about how the parasite interacts with the host immune system in the intestine. We used two-photon laser-scanning microscopy in conjunction with a mouse model of oral T. gondii infection to address this issue. T. gondii established discrete foci of infection in the small intestine, eliciting the recruitment and transepithelial migration of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. Neutrophils accounted for a high proportion of actively invaded cells, and we provide evidence for a role for transmigrating neutrophils and other immune cells in the spread of T. gondii infection through the lumen of the intestine. Our data identify neutrophils as motile reservoirs of T. gondii infection and suggest a surprising retrograde pathway for parasite spread in the intestine. PMID:23650399

  1. Dipeptidyl peptidase I activates neutrophil-derived serine proteases and regulates the development of acute experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adkison, April M.; Raptis, Sofia Z.; Kelley, Diane G.; Pham, Christine T.N.

    2002-01-01

    Leukocyte recruitment in inflammation is critical for host defense, but excessive accumulation of inflammatory cells can lead to tissue damage. Neutrophil-derived serine proteases (cathepsin G [CG], neutrophil elastase [NE], and proteinase 3 [PR3]) are expressed specifically in mature neutrophils and are thought to play an important role in inflammation. To investigate the role of these proteases in inflammation, we generated a mouse deficient in dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) and established that DPPI is required for the full activation of CG, NE, and PR3. Although DPPI–/– mice have normal in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis and in vivo neutrophil accumulation during sterile peritonitis, they are protected against acute arthritis induced by passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies against type II collagen. Specifically, there is no accumulation of neutrophils in the joints of DPPI–/– mice. This protective effect correlates with the inactivation of neutrophil-derived serine proteases, since NE–/– × CG–/– mice are equally resistant to arthritis induction by anti-collagen antibodies. In addition, protease-deficient mice have decreased response to zymosan- and immune complex–mediated inflammation in the subcutaneous air pouch. This defect is accompanied by a decrease in local production of TNF-α and IL-1β. These results implicate DPPI and polymorphonuclear neutrophil–derived serine proteases in the regulation of cytokine production at sites of inflammation. PMID:11827996

  2. Non-invasive near-infrared fluorescence imaging of the neutrophil response in a mouse model of transient cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Vaas, Markus; Enzmann, Gaby; Perinat, Therese; Siler, Ulrich; Reichenbach, Janine; Licha, Kai; Kipar, Anja; Rudin, Markus; Engelhardt, Britta; Klohs, Jan

    2016-10-27

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of molecular and cellular processes in live animals. Here we demonstrate the suitability of NIRF imaging to investigate the neutrophil response in the brain after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). We established procedures for ex vivo fluorescent labelling of neutrophils without affecting their activation status. Adoptive transfer of labelled neutrophils in C57BL/6 mice before surgery resulted in higher fluorescence intensities over the ischaemic hemisphere in tMCAO mice with NIRF imaging when compared with controls, corroborated by ex vivo detection of labelled neutrophils using fluorescence microscopy. NIRF imaging showed that neutrophils started to accumulate immediately after tMCAO, peaking at 18 h, and were still visible until 48 h after reperfusion. Our data revealed accumulation of neutrophils also in extracranial tissue, indicating damage in the external carotid artery territory in the tMCAO model. Antibody-mediated inhibition of α4-integrins did reduce fluorescence signals at 18 and 24, but not at 48 h after reperfusion, compared with control treatment animals. Antibody treatment reduced cerebral lesion volumes by 19%. In conclusion, the non-invasive nature of NIRF imaging allows studying the dynamics of neutrophil recruitment and its modulation by targeted interventions in the mouse brain after transient experimental cerebral ischaemia.

  3. The small GTPase Rap1b negatively regulates neutrophil chemotaxis and transcellular diapedesis by inhibiting Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Xu, Juying; Kumar, Rupali Sani; Lakshmikanthan, Sribalaji; Kapur, Reuben; Kofron, Matthew; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Filippi, Marie-Dominique

    2014-08-25

    Neutrophils are the first line of cellular defense in response to infections and inflammatory injuries. However, neutrophil activation and accumulation into tissues trigger tissue damage due to release of a plethora of toxic oxidants and proteases, a cause of acute lung injury (ALI). Despite its clinical importance, the molecular regulation of neutrophil migration is poorly understood. The small GTPase Rap1b is generally viewed as a positive regulator of immune cell functions by controlling bidirectional integrin signaling. However, we found that Rap1b-deficient mice exhibited enhanced neutrophil recruitment to inflamed lungs and enhanced susceptibility to endotoxin shock. Unexpectedly, Rap1b deficiency promoted the transcellular route of diapedesis through endothelial cell. Increased transcellular migration of Rap1b-deficient neutrophils in vitro was selectively mediated by enhanced PI3K-Akt activation and invadopodia-like protrusions. Akt inhibition in vivo suppressed excessive Rap1b-deficient neutrophil migration and associated endotoxin shock. The inhibitory action of Rap1b on PI3K signaling may be mediated by activation of phosphatase SHP-1. Thus, this study reveals an unexpected role for Rap1b as a key suppressor of neutrophil migration and lung inflammation.

  4. Inefficiency of C3H/HeN Mice to Control Chlamydial Lung Infection Correlates with Downregulation of Neutrophil Activation During the Late Stage of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaofei; Bu, Xiaokun; Zhang, Naihong; Li, Xiaoxia; Huang, Huanjun; Bai, Hong; Yang, Xi

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that massive infiltration of neutrophils in C3H/HeN (C3H) mice could not efficiently control Chlamydia muridarum (Cm) infection and might contribute to the high susceptibility of these mice to lung infection. To further define the nature of neutrophil responses in C3H mice during chlamydial infection, we examine the expression of adhesion molecules and CD11b related to neutrophils infiltration and activation, respectively, following intranasal Cm infection. The results showed that the expression of selectins (E-selectin, P-selectin and L-selectin), and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the lung of C3H mice increased more significantly than in C57BL/6 (B6) mice, the more resistant strain. These results correlated well with the massive neutrophils infiltration in C3H mice. In contrast, CD11b expression on peripheral blood and lung neutrophils in C3H mice exhibited a significant reduction compared with B6 mice during the late phage of infection (day 14). These findings suggest that the high-level expression of adhesion molecules in C3H mice may enhance neutrophils recruitment to the lung, but the decline of CD11b expression on neutrophils may attenuate neutrophil function. Therefore, CD11b down-regulation on neutrophils may contribute to the failure of C3H mice to control chlamydial lung infection. PMID:19728926

  5. Manipulating the air-filled zebrafish swim bladder as a neutrophilic inflammation model for acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuefei; Liu, Hongcui; Yao, Junlin; Huang, Yanfeng; Qin, Shenlu; Sun, Zheng; Xu, Yingchun; Wan, Shu; Cheng, Hongqiang; Li, Chunqi; Zhang, Xue; Ke, Yuehai

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and its more severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are life-threatening diseases that are associated with high mortality rates due to treatment limitations. Neutrophils play key roles in the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS by promoting the inflammation and injury of the alveolar microenvironment. To date, in vivo functional approaches have been limited by the inaccessibility to the alveolar sacs, which are located at the anatomical terminal of the respiratory duct in mammals. We are the first to characterize the swim bladder of the zebrafish larva, which is similar to the mammalian lung, as a real-time in vivo model for examining pulmonary neutrophil infiltration during ALI. We observed that the delivery of exogenous materials, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Poly IC and silica nanoparticles, by microinjection triggered significant time- and dose-dependent neutrophil recruitment into the swim bladder. Neutrophils infiltrated the LPS-injected swim bladder through the blood capillaries around the pneumatic duct or a site near the pronephric duct. An increase in the post-LPS inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels coincided with the in vivo neutrophil aggregation in the swim bladder. Microscopic examinations of the LPS-injected swim bladders further revealed in situ injuries, including epithelial distortion, endoplasmic reticulum swelling and mitochondrial injuries. Inhibitor screening assays with this model showed a reduction in neutrophil migration into the LPS-injected swim bladder in response to Shp2 inhibition. Moreover, the pharmacological suppression and targeted disruption of Shp2 in myeloid cells alleviated pulmonary inflammation in the LPS-induced ALI mouse model. Additionally, we used this model to assess pneumonia-induced neutrophil recruitment by microinjecting bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients into swim bladders; this injection enhanced neutrophil aggregation relative to the control. In conclusion, our findings

  6. Isolation and Functional Analysis of Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Douglas B; Long Priel, Debra A; Chu, Jessica; Zarember, Kol A

    2015-11-02

    This unit describes the isolation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from blood using dextran sedimentation and Percoll or Ficoll-Paque density gradients. Assays of neutrophil functions including respiratory burst activation, phagocytosis, and microbial killing are also described. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Neutrophils: potential therapeutic targets in tularemia?

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Lee-Ann H.

    2013-01-01

    The central role of neutrophils in innate immunity and host defense has long been recognized, and the ability of these cells to efficiently engulf and kill invading bacteria has been extensively studied, as has the role of neutrophil apoptosis in resolution of the inflammatory response. In the past few years additional immunoregulatory properties of neutrophils were discovered, and it is now clear that these cells play a much greater role in control of the immune response than was previously appreciated. In this regard, it is noteworthy that Francisella tularensis is one of relatively few pathogens that can successfully parasitize neutrophils as well as macrophages, DC and epithelial cells. Herein we will review the mechanisms used by F. tularensis to evade elimination by neutrophils. We will also reprise effects of this pathogen on neutrophil migration and lifespan as compared with other infectious and inflammatory disease states. In addition, we will discuss the evidence which suggests that neutrophils contribute to disease progression rather than effective defense during tularemia, and consider whether manipulation of neutrophil migration or turnover may be suitable adjunctive therapeutic strategies. PMID:24409419

  8. Broadening the Recruiting Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Central All-Volunteer Force Task Force, Washington, DC.

    The purpose of the study is to broaden the enlisted recruiting market, especially for high school graduates and describe measures to complete or expedite actions initiated by ASD (M and RA) (Assistant Secretary of Defense Manpower and Reserve Affairs) and the military services and to take additional actions to enhance recruiting. (Author)

  9. Resources for Recruiters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Angelo, Diane; And Others

    Recruitment of participants is a long-standing practice for many programs serving children and families, although the way in which it is approached varies greatly. This volume is presented as a practical tool for practitioners to use in systematizing their recruitment efforts. Section 1, "Reaching Diverse Families," contains an interactive…

  10. Broadening the Recruiting Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Central All-Volunteer Force Task Force, Washington, DC.

    The purpose of the study is to broaden the enlisted recruiting market, especially for high school graduates and describe measures to complete or expedite actions initiated by ASD (M and RA) (Assistant Secretary of Defense Manpower and Reserve Affairs) and the military services and to take additional actions to enhance recruiting. (Author)

  11. Recruiting Minority Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Bobette P.; Dandridge, William L.

    To help improve private schools' recruitment of minority students, this handbook discusses where and how to begin, recruitment strategies, applicant assessment, and the need for in-school support systems for minority students. The authors stress that each school should begin by analyzing its own objectives, attitudes, and admission program.…

  12. Chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and plasma cell-related neutrophilic leukaemoid reactions.

    PubMed

    Bain, Barbara J; Ahmad, Shahzaib

    2015-11-01

    Many cases reported as 'chronic neutrophilic leukaemia' have had an associated plasma cell neoplasm. Recent evidence suggests that the great majority of such cases represent a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction to the underlying multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. We have analysed all accessible reported cases to clarify the likely diagnosis and to ascertain whether toxic granulation, Döhle bodies and an increased neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score were useful in making a distinction between chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction. We established that all these changes occur in both conditions. Toxic granulation and Döhle bodies are more consistently present in leukaemoid reactions but also occur quite frequently in chronic neutrophilic leukaemia. The neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score is increased in both conditions and is of no value in making a distinction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The HMGB1/RAGE axis triggers neutrophil-mediated injury amplification following necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Huebener, Peter; Pradere, Jean-Philippe; Hernandez, Celine; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Caviglia, Jorge Matias; Mu, Xueru; Loike, John D.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Antoine, Daniel J.; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to microbially triggered inflammation, mechanisms promoting sterile inflammation remain poorly understood. Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are considered key inducers of sterile inflammation following cell death, but the relative contribution of specific DAMPs, including high–mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is ill defined. Due to the postnatal lethality of Hmgb1-knockout mice, the role of HMGB1 in sterile inflammation and disease processes in vivo remains controversial. Here, using conditional ablation strategies, we have demonstrated that epithelial, but not bone marrow–derived, HMGB1 is required for sterile inflammation following injury. Epithelial HMGB1, through its receptor RAGE, triggered recruitment of neutrophils, but not macrophages, toward necrosis. In clinically relevant models of necrosis, HMGB1/RAGE-induced neutrophil recruitment mediated subsequent amplification of injury, depending on the presence of neutrophil elastase. Notably, hepatocyte-specific HMGB1 ablation resulted in 100% survival following lethal acetaminophen intoxication. In contrast to necrosis, HMGB1 ablation did not alter inflammation or mortality in response to TNF- or FAS-mediated apoptosis. In LPS-induced shock, in which HMGB1 was considered a key mediator, HMGB1 ablation did not ameliorate inflammation or lethality, despite efficient reduction of HMGB1 serum levels. Our study establishes HMGB1 as a bona fide and targetable DAMP that selectively triggers a neutrophil-mediated injury amplification loop in the setting of necrosis. PMID:25562324

  14. Protein kinase C-beta contributes to NADPH oxidase activation in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, L V; Leitges, M; Altschuler, G; Mistry, N; McDermott, A; Roes, J; Segal, A W

    2000-01-01

    We have analysed the involvement of the beta isotype of the protein kinase C (PKC) family in the activation of NADPH oxidase in primary neutrophils. Using immunofluorescence and cell fractionation, PKC-beta is shown to be recruited to the plasma membrane upon stimulation with phorbol ester and to the phagosomal membrane upon phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles (Fcgamma-receptor stimulus). The time course of recruitment is similar to that of NADPH oxidase activation by these stimuli. The PKC-beta specific inhibitor 379196 inhibits the response to PMA as well as to IgG-coated bacteria. Partial inhibition occurs between 10 and 100 nM of inhibitor, the concentration at which PKC-beta, but not other PKC isotypes, is targeted. Neutrophils isolated from a mouse that lacks PKC-beta also showed an inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by PMA and IgG-coated particles. The level of inhibition is comparable to that achieved with 379196 in human neutrophils. Thus the PKC-beta isotype mediates activation of NADPH oxidase by PMA and by stimulation of Fcgamma receptors in neutrophils. PMID:10727429

  15. LITHOCHOLIC ACID FEEDING RESULTS IN DIRECT HEPATO-TOXICITY INDEPENDENT OF NEUTROPHIL FUNCTION IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Li, Feng; Xie, Yuchao; Farhood, Anwar; Fickert, Peter; Trauner, Michael; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Lithocholic acid (LCA) supplementation in the diet results in intrahepatic cholestasis and bile infarcts. Previously we showed that an innate immune response is critical for cholestatic liver injury in the bile duct ligated mice. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the role of neutrophils in the mechanism of liver injury caused by feeding mice a diet containing LCA. C57BL/6 mice were given control or 1% LCA containing diet for 24–96h and then examined for parameters of hepatotoxicity. Plasma ALT levels were significantly increased by 48h after LCA feeding, which correlated with both neutrophil recruitment to the liver and upregulation of numerous pro-inflammatory genes. The injury was confirmed by histology. Deficiency in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression or inhibition of neutrophil function failed to protect against the injury. Bile acid levels were quantified in plasma and bile of LCA-fed mice after 48 and 96h. Only the observed biliary levels of taurochenodeoxycholic acid and potentially tauro-LCA caused direct cytotoxicity in mouse hepatocytes. These data support the conclusion that neutrophil recruitment occurs after the onset of bile acid-induced necrosis in LCA-fed animals, and is not a primary mechanism of cell death when cholestasis occurs through accumulation of hydrophobic bile acids. PMID:24742700

  16. Aqueous extract of Rosmarinus officinalis L. inhibits neutrophil influx and cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Mara de Oliveira E; Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Santin, José Roberto; de Melo, Illana Louise Pereira; Pedrosa, Gabriela Vieira; Genovese, Maria Ines; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Mancini-Filho, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. phenolic compounds have attracted considerable attention because of their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, including its ability to treat inflammatory disorders. In this work, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro effects of R. officinalis aqueous extract on neutrophil trafficking from the blood into an inflamed tissue, on cell-derived secretion of chemical mediators, and on oxidative stress. Anti-inflammatory activity was investigated using carrageenan-induced inflammation in the subcutaneous tissue of male Wistar rats orally treated with the R. officinalis extract (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg). The leukocyte influx (optical microscopy), secretion of chemical mediators (prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), TNF-α, interleukin 6 (IL-6), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and the anti-oxidative profile (super oxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) spectrophotometry) were quantified in the inflamed exudate. N-Formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine-induced chemotaxis, lipopolysaccharide-induced NO2 (-) production (Greiss reaction), and adhesion molecule expression (flow cytometry) were in vitro quantified using oyster glycogen recruited peritoneal neutrophils previous treated with the extract (1, 10, or 100 µg/mL). Animals orally treated with phosphate-buffered saline and neutrophils incubated with Hank's balanced salt solution were used as control. R. officinalis extract oral treatment caused a dose-dependent reduction in the neutrophil migration as well as decreased SOD, TBARS, LTB4, PGE2, IL-6, and TNF-α levels in the inflamed exudate. In vitro treatment with R. officinalis decreased neutrophil chemotaxis, NO2 (-) production, and shedding of L-selectin and β2 integrin expressions. Results here presented show that R. officinalis aqueous extract displays important in vivo and in vitro anti

  17. Role of inflammatory cells, cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases in neutrophil-mediated skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, A V; Cugno, M; Trevisan, V; Fanoni, D; Venegoni, L; Berti, E; Crosti, C

    2010-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease presenting with painful ulcers having undermined edges. Less commonly, bullous and vegetative variants exist. Histology consists of a neutrophil-rich dermal infiltrate. We characterized immunohistochemically the infiltrate in different variants of PG and in another neutrophilic dermatosis as Sweet's syndrome. We studied 21 patients with PG, eight with Sweet's syndrome and 20 controls, evaluating skin immunoreactivity for inflammatory cell markers (CD3, CD163 and myeloperoxidase), cytokines [tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-17], metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immunoreactivities of CD3, CD163, myeloperoxidase, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-17, MMP-2, MMP-9 and VEGF were significantly higher in both PG and Sweet's syndrome than in controls (P = 0·0001). Myeloperoxidase (neutrophil marker), IL-8 (cytokine chemotactic for neutrophils) and MMP-9 (proteinase-mediating tissue damage) were expressed more significantly in both ulcerative and bullous PG than in vegetative PG as well as in Sweet's syndrome (P = 0·008–P = 0·0001). In ulcerative PG, the expression of CD3 (panT cell marker) and CD163 (macrophage marker) were significantly higher in wound edge than wound bed (P = 0·0001). In contrast, the neutrophil marker myeloperoxidase was expressed more significantly in wound bed than wound edge (P = 0·0001). Our study identifies PG as a paradigm of neutrophil-mediated inflammation, with proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and MMPs acting as important effectors for the tissue damage, particularly in ulcerative and bullous PG where damage is stronger. In ulcerative PG, the wound bed is the site of neutrophil-recruitment, whereas in the wound edge activated T lymphocytes and macrophages pave the way to ulcer formation. PMID:20636397

  18. 3D Neutrophil Tractions in Changing Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Flores, Estefany; Reichner, Jonathan; Franck, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Neutrophils are well-known as first responders to defend the body against life threatening bacterial diseases, infections and inflammation. The mechanical properties and the local topography of the surrounding microenvironment play a significant role in the regulating neutrophil behavior including cell adhesion, migration and generation of tractions. In navigating to the site of infection, neutrophils are exposed to changing microenvironments that differ in their composition, structure and mechanical properties. Our goal is to investigate neutrophil behavior, specifically migration and cellular tractions in a well-controlled 3D in vitro system. By utilizing an interchangeable 2D-3D sandwich gel structure system with tunable mechanical properties neutrophil migration and cell tractions can be computed as a function of gel stiffness and geometric dimensionality.

  19. Neutrophil uptake of vaccinia virus in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.C.; Eschete, M.L.; Cox, M.E.; King, J.W.

    1987-10-01

    We studied human neutrophils for uptake of vaccinia virus. Uptake was determined radiometrically and by electron microscopy. Vaccinia virus was labeled with /sup 14/C or /sup 3/H, incubated with neutrophils, and quantified in neutrophil pellets in a new radiometric phagocytosis assay. Better results were obtained from assays of (/sup 3/H)thymidine-labeled virus; uptake increased through 1 hr and then plateaued. Phagocytosis of 3H-labeled Staphylococcus aureus was normal. Uptake of virus was serum dependent. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was measured by two methods. No /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from (/sup 14/C)1-glucose accompanied uptake of vaccinia virus, in contrast to the respiratory burst accompanying bacterial phagocytosis. Electron microscopy showed intact to slightly digested intraphagolysosomal vaccinia virus. Pock reduction assay showed a decrease in viral content due to neutrophils until 6 hr of incubation, when a modest but significant increase was observed. Thus, neutrophil uptake of vaccinia virus is distinguished from bacterial phagocytosis.

  20. Evasion of Neutrophil Killing by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Will A.; Kobayashi, Scott D.; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes many types of infections, ranging from self-resolving skin infections to severe or fatal pneumonia. Human innate immune cells, called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs or neutrophils), are essential for defense against S. aureus infections. Neutrophils are the most prominent cell type of the innate immune system and are capable of producing non-specific antimicrobial molecules that are effective at eliminating bacteria. Although significant progress has been made over the past few decades, our knowledge of S. aureus-host innate immune system interactions is incomplete. Most notably, S. aureus has the capacity to produce numerous molecules that are directed to protect the bacterium from neutrophils. Here we review in brief the role played by neutrophils in defense against S. aureus infection, and correspondingly, highlight selected S. aureus molecules that target key neutrophil functions. PMID:26999220

  1. Superoxide Induces Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in a TLR-4 and NOX-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Tohme, Samer; Yazdani, Hamza Obaid; Miller, David; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils constitute the early innate immune response to perceived infectious and sterile threats. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a novel mechanism to counter pathogenic invasion and sequelae of ischemia, including cell death and oxidative stress. Superoxide is a radical intermediate of oxygen metabolism produced by parenchymal and nonparenchymal hepatic cells, and is a hallmark of oxidative stress after liver ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). While extracellular superoxide recruits neutrophils to the liver and initiates sterile inflammatory injury, it is unknown whether superoxide induces the formation of NETs. We hypothesize that superoxide induces NET formation through a signaling cascade involving Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and neutrophil NADPH oxidase (NOX). We treated neutrophils with extracellular superoxide and observed NET DNA release, histone H3 citrullination and increased levels of MPO-DNA complexes occurring in a TLR-4–dependent manner. Inhibition of superoxide generation by allopurinol and inhibition of NOX by diphenyleneiodonium prevented NET formation. When mice were subjected to warm liver I/R, we found significant NET formation associated with liver necrosis and increased serum ALT in TLR-4 WT but not TLR-4 KO mice. To reduce circulating superoxide, we pretreated mice undergoing I/R with allopurinol and N-acetylcysteine, which resulted in decreased NETs and ameliorated liver injury. Our study demonstrates a requirement for TLR-4 and NOX in superoxide-induced NETs, and suggests involvement of superoxide-induced NETs in pathophysiologic settings. PMID:27453505

  2. Neutrophil Chemokines Secreted by Tumor Cells Mount a Lung Antimetastatic Response during Renal Cell Carcinoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    López-Lago, Miguel A.; Posner, Shai; Thodima, Venkata J.; Molina, Ana M.; Motzer, Robert J.; Chaganti, RSK

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism by which renal cell carcinoma (RCC) colonizes the lung microenvironment during metastasis remains largely unknown. To investigate this process, we grafted human RCC cells with varying lung metastatic potential in mice. Gene expression profiling of the mouse lung stromal compartment revealed a signature enriched for neutrophil-specific functions that was induced preferentially by poorly metastatic cells. Analysis of the gene expression signatures of tumor cell lines showed an inverse correlation between metastatic activity and the levels of a number of chemokines, including CXCL5 and IL8. Enforced depletion of CXCL5 and IL8 in these cell lines enabled us to establish a functional link between lung neutrophil infiltration, secretion of chemokines by cancer cells, and metastatic activity. We further show that human neutrophils display a higher cytotoxic activity against poorly metastatic cells compared to highly metastatic cells. Together, these results support a model in which neutrophils recruited to the lung by tumor-secreted chemokines build an antimetastatic barrier with loss of neutrophil chemokines in tumor cells acting as a critical rate-limiting step during lung metastatic seeding. PMID:22665059

  3. Microbiota signalling through MyD88 is necessary for a systemic neutrophilic inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Karmarkar, Dipti; Rock, Kenneth L

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we have found that intestinal flora strongly influence peritoneal neutrophilic inflammatory responses to diverse stimuli, including pathogen-derived particles like zymosan and sterile irritant particles like crystals. When germ-free and flora-deficient (antibiotic-treated) mice are challenged with zymosan intraperitoneally, neutrophils are markedly impaired in their ability to extravasate from blood into the peritoneum. In contrast, in these animals, neutrophils can extravasate in response to an intraperitoneal injection of the chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 2. Neutrophil recruitment upon inflammatory challenge requires stimulation by microbiota through a myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) -dependent pathway. MyD88 signalling is crucial during the development of the immune system but depending upon the ligand it may be dispensable at the time of the actual inflammatory challenge. Furthermore, pre-treatment of flora-deficient mice with a purified MyD88-pathway agonist is sufficient to restore neutrophil migration. In summary, this study provides insight into the role of gut microbiota in influencing acute inflammation at sites outside the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23909393

  4. DAP12 expression in lung macrophages mediates ischemia reperfusion injury by promoting neutrophil extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Jessica H.; Li, Wenjun; Bribriesco, Alejandro C.; Liu, Jie; Shen, Hua; Ibricevic, Aida; Pan, Jiehong; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Brody, Steven L.; Goldstein, Daniel R.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Miller, Mark J.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are critical mediators of innate immune responses and contribute to tissue injury. However, immune pathways that regulate neutrophil recruitment to injured tissues during noninfectious inflammation remain poorly understood. DAP12 is a cell-membrane associated protein that is expressed in myeloid cells and can either augment or dampen innate inflammatory responses during infections. To elucidate the role of DAP12 in pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury, we took advantage of a clinically relevant mouse model of transplant-mediated lung ischemia reperfusion injury. This technique allowed us to dissect the importance of DAP12 in tissue-resident cells and those that infiltrate injured tissue from the periphery during noninfectious inflammation. Macrophages in both mouse and human lungs that have been subjected to cold ischemic storage express DAP12. We found that donor, but not recipient deficiency in DAP12 protected against pulmonary ischemia reperfusion injury. Analysis of the immune response showed that DAP12 promotes the survival of tissue-resident alveolar macrophages and contributes to local production of