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Sample records for ccr5 coreceptor antagonist

  1. Computational modeling of human coreceptor CCR5 antagonist as a HIV-1 entry inhibitor: using an integrated homology modeling, docking, and membrane molecular dynamics simulation analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Gadhe, Changdev G; Kothandan, Gugan; Cho, Seung Joo

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is an integral membrane protein that is utilized during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 entry into host cells. CCR5 is a G-protein coupled receptor that contains seven transmembrane (TM) helices. However, the crystal structure of CCR5 has not been reported. A homology model of CCR5 was developed based on the recently reported CXCR4 structure as template. Automated docking of the most potent (14), medium potent (37), and least potent (25) CCR5 antagonists was performed using the CCR5 model. To characterize the mechanism responsible for the interactions between ligands (14, 25, and 37) and CCR5, membrane molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were performed. The position and orientation of ligands (14, 25, and 37) were found to be changed after MD simulations, which demonstrated the ability of this technique to identify binding modes. Furthermore, at the end of simulation, it was found that residues identified by docking were changed and some new residues were introduced in the proximity of ligands. Our results are in line with the majority of previous mutational reports. These results show that hydrophobicity is the determining factor of CCR5 antagonism. In addition, salt bridging and hydrogen bond contacts between ligands (14, 25, and 37) and CCR5 are also crucial for inhibitory activity. The residues newly identified by MD simulation are Ser160, Phe166, Ser180, His181, and Trp190, and so far no site-directed mutagenesis studies have been reported. To determine the contributions made by these residues, additional mutational studies are suggested. We propose a general binding mode for these derivatives based on the MD simulation results of higher (14), medium (37), and lower (25) potent inhibitors. Interestingly, we found some trend for these inhibitors such as, salt bridge interaction between basic nitrogen of ligand and acidic Glu283 seemed necessary for inhibitory activity. Also, two aromatic pockets (pocket I - TM1-3 and pocket II

  2. Analysis of co-receptor usage of circulating viral and proviral HIV genome quasispecies by ultra-deep pyrosequencing in patients who are candidates for CCR5 antagonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbate, I; Rozera, G; Tommasi, C; Bruselles, A; Bartolini, B; Chillemi, G; Nicastri, E; Narciso, P; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2011-05-01

    UDPS combined with genotypic algorithms for prediction of HIV-1 co-receptor usage may provide quantitative data about the tropism of each variant present in the viral quasispecies. The aim of the present study was to assess co-receptor usage by ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS), in comparison with the reference phenotypic test (Trofile), in patients who are candidates for CCR5 antagonist treatment, in both circulating and proviral HIV-1. Seventeen patients who were tested by Trofile were enrolled. UDPS of the V3 loop region was carried out on both plasma RNA and proviral DNA. Genotypic prediction of co-receptor usage was established by position-specific score matrices (PSSM) and confirmed, in discordant cases, with geno2pheno. Genetic heterogeneity of the RNA and DNA quasispecies was assessed as well. A total of 196,729 V3 sequences were considered (mean coverage per site, 6346). Concordance between phenotypic test and UDPS with PSSM was 0.82. Geno2pheno results were in line with those obtained with PSSM. Proviral quasispecies were more heterogeneous than those found in circulating HIV. In most patients eligible for CCR5 antagonist treatment, X4 variants were detected in proviral DNA, ranging from 1.0% to 52.7%. UDPS combined with genotypic algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction highlighted the presence of minority variants, with a discordant tropism with respect to the predominant population, in both circulating viral and proviral HIV. In most patients treated with Maraviroc the virological response was independent of the presence of X4 in proviral DNA. The clinical impact of minority X4 variants present in patients who are candidates for anti-CCR5 antagonists remains a crucial point to be addressed.

  3. PRO 140--a novel CCR5 co-receptor inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Khatib, Nadia; Das, Satyajit

    2010-01-01

    Despite an increase in the variety of anti-retroviral agents in the market, there remains a need for novel agents to treat HIV 1 infected individuals, in order to overcome existing problems with adherence, toxicities, drug interactions and viral resistance. In this article, we will describe Pro 140, one of the recently developed class of anti-retroviral agent, the CCR5 co-receptor inhibitor. We will also describe several preclinical and clinical studies that have evaluated the efficacy, tolerability and toxicity profiles of Pro-140. We will also look at how its mechanism of action and mode of delivery may change the way patients take highly active anti-retroviral therapy. There are some promising patents discussed in this short review for the use of PRO 140 as CCR5 co-receptor Inhibitor.

  4. Molecular Gymnastics: Mechanisms of HIV-1 Resistance to CCR5 Antagonists and Impact on Virus Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Michael; Borm, Katharina; Flynn, Jacqueline K; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters host cells through the binding of its envelope glycoproteins (Env) to the host cell receptor CD4 and then subsequent binding to a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. CCR5 antagonists are a relatively recent class addition to the armamentarium of anti-HIV-1 drugs. These compounds act by binding to a hydrophobic pocket formed by the transmembrane helices of CCR5 and altering the conformation of the extracellular domains, such that they are no longer recognized by Env. Maraviroc is the first drug within this class to be licenced for use in HIV-1 therapy regimens. HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs either through outgrowth of pre-existing CXCR4-using viruses, or through acquisition of the ability of CCR5-using HIV-1 to use the antagonist bound form of CCR5. In the latter scenario, the mechanism underlying resistance is through complex alterations in the way that resistant Envs engage CCR5. These significant changes are unlikely to occur without consequence to the viral entry phenotype and may also open up new avenues to target CCR5 antagonist resistant viruses. This review discusses the mechanism of action of CCR5 antagonists, how HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs, and the subsequent effects on Env function.

  5. Binding of fusion protein FLSC IgG1 to CCR5 is enhanced by CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Latinovic, Olga; Schneider, Kate; Szmacinski, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Heredia, Alonso; Redfield, Robert R

    2014-12-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is crucial for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, acting as the principal coreceptor for HIV-1 entry and transmission and is thus an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Studies have suggested that CCR5 surface density and its conformational changes subsequent to virion engagement are rate limiting for entry, and consequently, infection. Not all CCR5 antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection, suggesting a need for more potent reagents. Here we evaluated full length single chain (FLSC) IgG1, a novel IgG-CD4-gp120(BAL) fusion protein with several characteristics that make it an attractive candidate for treatment of HIV-1 infections, including bivalency and a potentially increased serum half-life over FLSC, the parental molecule. FLSC IgG1 binds two domains on CCR5, the N-terminus and the second extracellular loop, lowering the levels of available CCR5 viral attachment sites. Furthermore, FLSC IgG1 synergizes with Maraviroc (MVC), the only licensed CCR5 antagonist. In this study, we used both microscopy and functional assays to address the mechanistic aspects of the interactions of FLSC IgG1 and MVC in the context of CCR5 conformational changes and viral infection. We used a novel stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), based on high resolution localization of photoswitchable dyes to visualize direct contacts between FLSC IgG1 and CCR5. We compared viral entry inhibition by FLSC IgG1 with that of other CCR5 blockers and showed FLSC IgG1 to be the most potent. We also showed that lower CCR5 surface densities in HIV-1 infected primary cells result in lower FLSC IgG1 EC50 values. In addition, CCR5 binding by FLSC IgG1, but not CCR5 Ab 2D7, was significantly increased when cells were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC allosterically increases exposure of the FLSC IgG1 binding site. These data have implications for future antiviral therapy development.

  6. An anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody and small molecule CCR5 antagonists synergize by inhibiting different stages of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    SciTech Connect

    Safarian, Diana; Carnec, Xavier; Tsamis, Fotini; Kajumo, Francis; Dragic, Tatjana . E-mail: tdragic@aecom.yu.edu

    2006-09-01

    HIV-1 coreceptors are attractive targets for novel antivirals. Here, inhibition of entry by two classes of CCR5 antagonists was investigated. We confirmed previous findings that HIV-1 isolates vary greatly in their sensitivity to small molecule inhibitors of CCR5-mediated entry, SCH-C and TAK-779. In contrast, an anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody (PA14) similarly inhibited entry of diverse viral isolates. Sensitivity to small molecules was V3 loop-dependent and inversely proportional to the level of gp120 binding to CCR5. Moreover, combinations of the MAb and small molecules were highly synergistic in blocking HIV-1 entry, suggesting different mechanisms of action. This was confirmed by time course of inhibition experiments wherein the PA14 MAb and small molecules were shown to inhibit temporally distinct stages of CCR5 usage. We propose that small molecules inhibit V3 binding to the second extracellular loop of CCR5, whereas PA14 preferentially inhibits subsequent events such as CCR5 recruitment into the fusion complex or conformational changes in the gp120-CCR5 complex that trigger fusion. Importantly, our findings suggest that combinations of CCR5 inhibitors with different mechanisms of action will be central to controlling HIV-1 infection and slowing the emergence of resistant strains.

  7. Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc: Medicinal Chemistry and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoyan G.; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes acquired immumodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the worst global pandemic. The virus infects human CD4 T cells and macrophages, and causes CD4 depletion. HIV enters target cells through the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 and the chemokine coreceptor, CXCR4 or CCR5. In particular, the CCR5-utilizing viruses predominate in the blood during the disease course. CCR5 is expressed on the surface of various immune cells including macrophages, monocytes, microglia, dendric cells, and active memory CD4 T cells. In the human population, the CCR5 genomic mutation, CCR5Δ32, is associated with relative resistance to HIV. These findings paved the way for the discovery and development of CCR5 inhibitors to block HIV transmission and replication. Maraviroc, discovered as a CCR5 antagonist, is the only CCR5 inhibitor that has been approved by both US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for treating HIV/AIDS patients. In this review, we summarize the medicinal chemistry and clinical studies of Maraviroc. PMID:25159165

  8. Chemokine receptor CCR5 antagonist maraviroc: medicinal chemistry and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoyan G; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes acquired immumodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the worst global pandemic. The virus infects human CD4 T cells and macrophages, and causes CD4 depletion. HIV enters target cells through the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 and the chemokine coreceptor, CXCR4 or CCR5. In particular, the CCR5-utilizing viruses predominate in the blood during the disease course. CCR5 is expressed on the surface of various immune cells including macrophages, monocytes, microglia, dendric cells, and active memory CD4 T cells. In the human population, the CCR5 genomic mutation, CCR5Δ32, is associated with relative resistance to HIV. These findings paved the way for the discovery and development of CCR5 inhibitors to block HIV transmission and replication. Maraviroc, discovered as a CCR5 antagonist, is the only CCR5 inhibitor that has been approved by both US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for treating HIV/AIDS patients. In this review, we summarize the medicinal chemistry and clinical studies of Maraviroc.

  9. Lack of protection from HIV infection by the mutant HIV coreceptor CCR5 in intravenously HIV infected hemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Malo, A; Rommel, F; Bogner, J; Gruber, R; Schramm, W; Goebel, F D; Riethmüller, G; Wank, R

    1998-02-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is an important coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV strains. Homozygous carriers of the mutated CCR5 receptor with a 32 bp deletion (delta 32-CCR5) are highly protected against HIV infection. A protective effect has also been described for heterozygous individuals carrying both mutated and wildtype CCR5 receptors. We compared the frequency of the mutated delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in HIV positive patients infected by sexual contact (N = 160) with intravenously HIV infected hemophilic patients (N = 84) and HIV negative individuals (N = 421). We found no protective effect of delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in hemophilic patients (p = 0.0134). If proteins of plasma concentrates would be responsible for facilitating the entry of HIV macrophages by upregulation of the CCR5 wildtype receptor it would be of therapeutical interest to identify the responsible plasma proteins.

  10. Relative concordance of human immunodeficiency virus oligomeric and monomeric envelope in CCR5 coreceptor usage

    SciTech Connect

    Teeravechyan, Samaporn; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Essex, Max; Lee, Tun-Hou

    2008-01-20

    A major difference between binding and fusion assays commonly used to study the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope is the use of monomeric envelope for the former assay and oligomeric envelope for the latter. Due to discrepancies in their readouts for some mutants, envelope regions involved in CCR5 coreceptor usage were systematically studied to determine whether the discordance is due to inherent differences between the two assays or whether it genuinely reflects functional differences at each entry step. By adding the binding inhibitor TAK-779 to delay coreceptor binding kinetics in the fusion assay, the readouts were found comparable between the assays for the mutants analysed in this study. Our finding indicates that monomeric binding reflects oligomeric envelope-CCR5 interaction, thus discordant results between binding and fusion assays do not necessarily indicate differences in coreceptor usage by oligomeric envelope and monomeric gp120.

  11. New approaches in the treatment of HIV/AIDS – focus on maraviroc and other CCR5 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Hans P; Schellhorn, Sarah; Dezube, Bruce J; Jacobson, Jeffrey M

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection has produced dramatic success for many patients. Nevertheless, viral resistance continues to limit the efficacy of currently available agents in many patients. The CCR5 antagonists are a new class of antiretroviral agents that target a necessary coreceptor for viral entry of many strains of HIV-1. Recently, the first agent within this class, maraviroc, was approved by a number of regulatory agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration. Herein we review the role of the CCR5 receptor in HIV-1 infection and potential methods to target it in anti-HIV-1 therapy. We review the various categories of agents and discuss specific agents that have progressed to clinical study. We discuss in detail the recently approved, first in class CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, and discuss aspects of resistance to CCR5 antagonism and the potential role of CCR5 antagonism in the management of HIV-1 infection. PMID:18728830

  12. HIV type 1 coreceptor tropism, CCR5 genotype, and integrase inhibitor resistance profiles in Vietnam: implications for the introduction of new antiretroviral regimens.

    PubMed

    Luu, Quynh Phuong; Dean, Jonathan; Do, Trinh Thi Diem; Carr, Michael J; Dunford, Linda; Coughlan, Suzie; Connell, Jeff; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Hall, William W; Nguyen Thi, Lan Anh

    2012-10-01

    In Vietnam, where an estimated 280,000 people will be HIV-positive by 2012, recommended antiretroviral regimens do not include more recently developed therapeutics, such as Integrase inhibitors (INI) and coreceptor antagonists. This study examined HIV-1 coreceptor tropism and INI drug resistance profiles, in parallel with CCR5 genotypes, in a cohort of 60 HIV-positive individuals from different regions of Vietnam. No evidence of INI resistance was detected. Some 40% of individuals had X4-tropic HIV-1, making them unsuitable for treatment with CCR5 antagonists. We identified a novel CCR5 variant-S272P-along with other, previously reported variants: G106R, C178R, W153C, R223Q, and S336I. Interestingly, CCR5 variants known to affect HIV-1 infectivity were observed only in individuals harboring X4-tropic virus. Together, this study presents valuable baseline information on HIV-1 INI resistance, coreceptor tropism, and CCR5 variants in HIV-positive individuals in Vietnam. This should help inform policy on the future use of novel antiretrovirals in Vietnam.

  13. A Novel CCR5 Mutation Common in Sooty Mangabeys Reveals SIVsmm Infection of CCR5-Null Natural Hosts and Efficient Alternative Coreceptor Use In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Riddick, Nadeene E.; Hermann, Emilia A.; Loftin, Lamorris M.; Elliott, Sarah T.; Wey, Winston C.; Cervasi, Barbara; Taaffe, Jessica; Engram, Jessica C.; Li, Bing; Else, James G.; Li, Yingying; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Sodora, Donald L.; Apetrei, Cristian; Paiardini, Mirko; Silvestri, Guido; Collman, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to HIV infection in humans and SIV in macaques, SIV infection of natural hosts including sooty mangabeys (SM) is non-pathogenic despite robust virus replication. We identified a novel SM CCR5 allele containing a two base pair deletion (Δ2) encoding a truncated molecule that is not expressed on the cell surface and does not support SIV entry in vitro. The allele was present at a 26% frequency in a large SM colony, along with 3% for a CCR5Δ24 deletion allele that also abrogates surface expression. Overall, 8% of animals were homozygous for defective CCR5 alleles and 41% were heterozygous. The mutant allele was also present in wild SM in West Africa. CD8+ and CD4+ T cells displayed a gradient of CCR5 expression across genotype groups, which was highly significant for CD8+ cells. Remarkably, the prevalence of natural SIVsmm infection was not significantly different in animals lacking functional CCR5 compared to heterozygous and homozygous wild-type animals. Furthermore, animals lacking functional CCR5 had robust plasma viral loads, which were only modestly lower than wild-type animals. SIVsmm primary isolates infected both homozygous mutant and wild-type PBMC in a CCR5-independent manner in vitro, and Envs from both CCR5-null and wild-type infected animals used CXCR6, GPR15 and GPR1 in addition to CCR5 in transfected cells. These data clearly indicate that SIVsmm relies on CCR5-independent entry pathways in SM that are homozygous for defective CCR5 alleles and, while the extent of alternative coreceptor use in SM with CCR5 wild type alleles is uncertain, strongly suggest that SIVsmm tropism and host cell targeting in vivo is defined by the distribution and use of alternative entry pathways in addition to CCR5. SIVsmm entry through alternative pathways in vivo raises the possibility of novel CCR5-negative target cells that may be more expendable than CCR5+ cells and enable the virus to replicate efficiently without causing disease in the face of extremely

  14. HIV Type 1 from a Patient with Baseline Resistance to CCR5 Antagonists Uses Drug-Bound Receptor for Entry

    PubMed Central

    Tilton, John C.; Amrine-Madsen, Heather; Miamidian, John L.; Kitrinos, Kathryn M.; Pfaff, Jennifer; Demarest, James F.; Ray, Neelanjana; Jeffrey, Jerry L.; Labranche, Celia C.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract CCR5 antagonists are a new class of antiretroviral drugs that block viral entry by disrupting interactions between the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein and coreceptor. During the CCR100136 (EPIC) Phase IIb study of the CCR5 antagonist aplaviroc (APL) in treatment-naive individuals, a patient was identified who harbored virus strains that exhibited partial resistance to APL at the time of virologic failure. Retrospectively, it was found that APL resistance was present at baseline as well. To investigate the mechanism of APL resistance in this patient, we cloned HIV-1 env genes from plasma obtained at baseline and after virologic failure. Approximately 85% of cloned Envs were functional, and all exhibited partial resistance to APL. All Envs were R5-tropic, were partially resistant to other CCR5 antagonists including maraviroc on cells with high CCR5 expression, but remained sensitive to the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide. Competition studies with natural CCR5 ligands revealed that the mechanism of drug resistance entailed the use of the drug-bound conformation of CCR5 by the Env proteins obtained from this individual. The degree of drug resistance varied between Env clones, and also varied depending on the cell line used or the donor from whom the primary T cells were obtained. Thus, both virus and host factors contribute to CCR5 antagonist resistance. This study shows that R5 HIV-1 strains resistant to CCR5 inhibitors can arise in patients, confirming a mechanism of resistance previously characterized in vitro. In addition, some patients can harbor CCR5 antagonist-resistant viruses prior to treatment, which may have implications for the clinical use of this new class of antiretrovirals. PMID:20055594

  15. [Frequency of the coreceptor CCR5 gene delta 32 mutation in different French regions].

    PubMed

    Lucotte, G; Mercier, G

    1998-05-01

    We studied the frequency of the coreceptor CCR5 gene delta 32 mutation on 1,836 DNA samples originating from ten French regions. This mutation confers, in the homozygous state, resistance to HIV-1 infection. For the whole territory, the mean percentage presence of the delta 32 mutation is 9.2%. The mutation is statistically more frequent in the north (11.2%) than in the south (6.3%) of the country; this differentiation corresponds probably to a gradient of decreasing frequencies of the delta 32 mutation in Europe.

  16. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVagm Efficiently Utilizes Non-CCR5 Entry Pathways in African Green Monkey Lymphocytes: Potential Role for GPR15 and CXCR6 as Viral Coreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Riddick, Nadeene E.; Wu, Fan; Matsuda, Kenta; Whitted, Sonya; Ourmanov, Ilnour; Goldstein, Simoy; Goeken, Robert M.; Plishka, Ronald J.; Buckler-White, Alicia; Brenchley, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT African green monkeys (AGM) are natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and infection in these animals is generally nonpathogenic, whereas infection of nonnatural hosts, such as rhesus macaques (RM), is commonly pathogenic. CCR5 has been described as the primary entry coreceptor for SIV in vivo, while human-derived CXCR6 and GPR15 also appear to be used in vitro. However, sooty mangabeys that are genetically deficient in CCR5 due to an out-of-frame deletion are infectible with SIVsmm, indicating that SIVsmm can use alternative coreceptors in vivo. In this study, we examined the CCR5 dependence of SIV strains derived from vervet AGM (SIVagmVer) and the ability of AGM-derived GPR15 and CXCR6 to serve as potential entry coreceptors. We found that SIVagmVer replicated efficiently in AGM and RM peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the presence of the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc, despite the fact that maraviroc was capable of blocking the CCR5-tropic strains SIVmac239, SIVsmE543-3, and simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-AD8 in RM PBMC. We also found that AGM CXCR6 and AGM GPR15, to a lesser extent, supported entry of pseudotype viruses bearing SIVagm envelopes, including SIVagm transmitted/founder envelopes. Lastly, we found that CCR5, GPR15, and CXCR6 mRNAs were detected in AGM and RM memory CD4+ T cells. These results suggest that GPR15 and CXCR6 are expressed on AGM CD4+ T cells and are potential alternative coreceptors for SIVagm use in vivo. These data suggest that the use of non-CCR5 entry pathways may be a common feature of SIV replication in natural host species, with the potential to contribute to nonpathogenicity in these animals. IMPORTANCE African green monkeys (AGM) are natural hosts of SIV, and infection in these animals generally does not cause AIDS, whereas SIV-infected rhesus macaques (RM) typically develop AIDS. Although it has been reported that SIV generally uses CD4 and CCR5 to enter target cells in vivo, other

  17. Inheritance pattern of mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coreceptor gene CCR5 in an Indian family.

    PubMed

    Husain, S; Goila, R; Shahi, S; Banerja, A C

    1998-01-01

    The most common form of mutation found in the CCR5 gene has been the precise 32-base pair (bp) deletion in the region corresponding to second extracellular loop of the chemokine receptor CCR5. Individuals homozygous for the delta 32 allele of CCR5 usually remain uninfected despite multiple exposures to HIV, whereas heterozygous individuals support less virus replication and show slower progression of the disease. This mutant allele in either homozygous or heterozygous form is quite common in white people of European heritage. Earlier work involving large populations of Asians and Africans failed to detect the presence of this mutant allele. We screened 145 normal unrelated healthy Indians and found one person who was heterozygous for the delta 32 allele of CCR5. We studied the inheritance of this deleted allele in this person's family. One parent, one of two sons, and the only daughter possessed this mutant allele. We cloned the entire coding region of wild-type and mutant alleles of CCR5 gene from the heterozygous individual mentioned and studied its coreceptor functions. The mutant allele had only a moderate interfering effect on coreceptor activity of the wild-type CCR5 allele in a cell fusion assay. We also report an improved method of genotyping CCR5 gene in this communication.

  18. Viremic Control and Viral Coreceptor Usage in Two HIV-1-Infected Persons Homozygous for CCR5 Δ32

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Hanhauser, Emily; Hu, Zixin; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Noah, Christian; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Pereyra, Florencia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine viral and immune factors involved in transmission and control of HIV-1 infection in persons without functional CCR5 Design Understanding transmission and control of HIV-1 in persons homozygous for CCR5Δ32 is important given efforts to develop HIV-1 curative therapies aimed at modifying or disrupting CCR5 expression. Methods We identified two HIV-infected CCR5Δ32/Δ32 individuals among a cohort of patients with spontaneous control of HIV-1 infection without antiretroviral therapy and determined co-receptor usage of the infecting viruses. We assessed genetic evolution of full-length HIV-1 envelope sequences by single-genome analysis from one participant and his sexual partner, and explored HIV-1 immune responses and HIV-1 mutations following virologic escape and disease progression. Results Both participants experienced viremia of less than 4,000 RNA copies/ml with preserved CD4+ T cell counts off ART for at least 3.3 and 4.6 years after diagnosis, respectively. One participant had phenotypic evidence of X4 virus, had no known favorable HLA alleles, and appeared to be infected by minority X4 virus from a pool that predominately used CCR5 for entry. The second participant had virus that was unable to use CXCR4 for entry in phenotypic assay but was able to engage alternative viral coreceptors (e.g. CXCR6) in vitro. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that individuals may be infected by minority X4 viruses from a population that predominately uses CCR5 for entry, and that viruses may bypass traditional HIV-1 coreceptors (CCR5 and CXCR4) completely by engaging alternative coreceptors to establish and propagate HIV-1 infection. PMID:25730507

  19. [Secondary effects of treatment with maraviroc and other CCR5 antagonists. Potential impact of the CCR5 blocker].

    PubMed

    Arribas López, José R

    2008-10-01

    Maraviroc is the first inhibitor of CCR5 co-receptors to be marketed as an antiretroviral. The pre-clinical studies and phase III trials have shown that it has a very favourable safety profile. No characteristic adverse effect of maraviroc has been identified. Unlike with aplaviroc, where its clinical development was stopped due to serious hepatoxicity, no increase in liver toxicity has been demonstrated in patients treated with maraviroc even if they are co-infected by hepatotropic virus. Nor was there any evidence of an increase in the incidence of neoplasms or serious infections in patients treated with maraviroc. In a study on naive patients, maraviroc produced nonsignificant changes in total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and triglycerides. Although CCR5 co-receptors play a role in the immune response of the body, it has not been shown whether individuals homozygote for its deletion (delta-32 mutation) have an increased risk of serious infections, with the possible exception of encephalitis due to the West Nile virus. However, long-term follow up is required on patients treated with to be able to rule out any increased susceptibility to infections or neoplasms.

  20. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Alona; Vaknin, Karin; Gdalevsky, Garik; Vyazmensky, Maria; Marks, Robert S; Taube, Ran; Engel, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4) mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential.

  1. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmina, Alona; Vaknin, Karin; Gdalevsky, Garik; Vyazmensky, Maria; Marks, Robert S.; Taube, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4) mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential. PMID:26629902

  2. gp120 envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency viruses competitively antagonize signaling by coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5.

    PubMed

    Madani, N; Kozak, S L; Kavanaugh, M P; Kabat, D

    1998-07-07

    Signal transductions by the dual-function CXCR4 and CCR5 chemokine receptors/HIV type 1 (HIV-1) coreceptors were electrophysiologically monitored in Xenopus laevis oocytes that also coexpressed the viral receptor CD4 and a G protein-coupled inward-rectifying K+ channel (Kir 3.1). Large Kir 3.1-dependent currents generated in response to the corresponding chemokines (SDF-1alpha for CXCR4 and MIP-1alpha; MIP-1beta and RANTES for CCR5) were blocked by pertussis toxin, suggesting involvement of inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Prolonged exposures to chemokines caused substantial but incomplete desensitization of responses with time constants of 5-7 min and recovery time constants of 12-19 min. CXCR4 and CCR5 exhibited heterologous desensitization in this oocyte system, suggesting possible inhibition of a common downstream step in their signaling pathways. In contrast to chemokines, perfusion with monomeric or oligomeric preparations of the glycoprotein of Mr 120, 000 (gp120) derived from several isolates of HIV-1 did not activate signaling by CXCR4 or CCR5 regardless of CD4 coexpression. However, adsorption of the gp120 from a T-cell-tropic virus resulted in CD4-dependent antagonism of CXCR4 response to SDF-1alpha, whereas gp120 from macrophage-tropic viruses caused CD4-dependent antagonism of CCR5 response to MIP-1alpha. These antagonisms could be partially overcome by high concentrations of chemokines and were specific for coreceptors of the corresponding HIV-1 isolates, suggesting that they resulted from direct interactions of gp120-CD4 complexes with coreceptors and that they did not involve the desensitization pathway. These results indicate that monomeric or oligomeric gp120s specifically antagonize CXCR4 and CCR5 signaling in response to chemokines, but they do not exclude the possibility that gp120s might also function as weak agonists in some cells. The gp120-mediated disruption of CXCR4 and CCR5 signaling may contribute to AIDS pathogenesis.

  3. The GHS-R blocker D-[Lys3] GHRP-6 serves as CCR5 chemokine receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kalpesh; Dixit, Vishwa Deep; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jie Wan; Schaffer, Eric M; Nguyen, Dzung; Taub, Dennis D

    2012-01-01

    [D-Lys3]-Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-6 (DLS) is widely utilized in vivo and in vitro as a selective ghrelin receptor (GHS-R) antagonist. This antagonist is one of the most common antagonists utilized in vivo to block GHS-R function and activity. Here, we found that DLS also has the ability to modestly block chemokine function and ligand binding to the chemokine receptor CCR5. The DLS effects on RANTES binding and Erk signaling as well as calcium mobilization appears to be much stronger than its effects on MIP-1α and MIP-1β. CCR5 have been shown to act as major co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the CD4 positive host cells. To this end, we also found that DLS blocks M-tropic HIV-1 propagation in activated human PBMCs. These data demonstrate that DLS may not be a highly selective GHS-R1a inhibitor and may also effects on other G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family members. Moreover, DLS may have some potential clinical applications in blocking HIV infectivity and CCR5-mediated migration and function in various inflammatory disease states.

  4. Total synthesis of anibamine, a novel natural product as a chemokine receptor CCR5 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo; Watson, Karen; Buckheit, Robert W; Zhang, Yan

    2007-05-10

    The total synthesis of anibamine, the first and only natural product known as a chemokine receptor CCR5 antagonist, is reported herein. Anibamine was synthesized from acetylacetone and cyanoacetamide in 10 steps.

  5. Discovery of a Potent and Orally Bioavailable CCR2 and CCR5 Dual Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the discovery of a potent, orally bioavailable CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist which, while optimized for CCR2 potency, also had potent CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) activity.

  6. High intrapatient HIV-1 evolutionary rate is associated with CCR5-to-CXCR4 coreceptor switch.

    PubMed

    Mild, Mattias; Gray, Rebecca R; Kvist, Anders; Lemey, Philippe; Goodenow, Maureen M; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Albert, Jan; Salemi, Marco; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Medstrand, Patrik

    2013-10-01

    In approximately 70% of individuals infected with HIV-1 subtype B, the virus switches coreceptor use from exclusively CCR5 use (R5 virus) to either inclusion of or exclusively CXCR4 use (X4 virus) during infection. This switch is associated with an accelerated loss of CD4(+) T-cells and a faster progression to AIDS. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms responsible for coreceptor switch remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated associations between viral evolutionary rate and selection pressure versus viral coreceptor use and rate of disease progression in eight patients with longitudinally sampled HIV-1 env V1-V3 sequences. By employing a Bayesian hierarchical phylogenetic model, we found that the HIV-1 evolutionary rate was more strongly associated with coreceptor switch than with rate of disease progression in terms of CD4(+)T-cell decline. Phylogenetic analyses showed that X4 variants evolved from R5 populations. In addition, coreceptor switch was associated with higher evolutionary rates on both the synonymous and non-synonymous substitution level, but not with dN/dS ratio rates. Our findings suggest that X4 viruses evolved from pre-existing R5 viral populations and that the evolution of coreceptor switch is governed by high replication rates rather than by selective pressure. Furthermore, the association of viral evolutionary rate was more strongly associated with coreceptor switch than disease progression. This adds to the understanding of the complex virus-host interplay that influences the evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1 coreceptor use.

  7. HIV-1 entry inhibition by small-molecule CCR5 antagonists: A combined molecular modeling and mutant study using a high-throughput assay

    SciTech Connect

    Labrecque, Jean; Metz, Markus; Lau, Gloria; Darkes, Marilyn C.; Wong, Rebecca S.Y.; Bogucki, David; Carpenter, Bryon; Chen Gang; Li Tongshuang; Nan, Susan; Schols, Dominique; Bridger, Gary J.; Fricker, Simon P.; Skerlj, Renato T.

    2011-05-10

    Based on the attrition rate of CCR5 small molecule antagonists in the clinic the discovery and development of next generation antagonists with an improved pharmacology and safety profile is necessary. Herein, we describe a combined molecular modeling, CCR5-mediated cell fusion, and receptor site-directed mutagenesis approach to study the molecular interactions of six structurally diverse compounds (aplaviroc, maraviroc, vicriviroc, TAK-779, SCH-C and a benzyloxycarbonyl-aminopiperidin-1-yl-butane derivative) with CCR5, a coreceptor for CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains. This is the first study using an antifusogenic assay, a model of the interaction of the gp120 envelope protein with CCR5. This assay avoids the use of radioactivity and HIV infection assays, and can be used in a high throughput mode. The assay was validated by comparison with other established CCR5 assays. Given the hydrophobic nature of the binding pocket several binding models are suggested which could prove useful in the rational drug design of new lead compounds.

  8. Epigenetic mechanisms, T-cell activation, and CCR5 genetics interact to regulate T-cell expression of CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor.

    PubMed

    Gornalusse, German G; Mummidi, Srinivas; Gaitan, Alvaro A; Jimenez, Fabio; Ramsuran, Veron; Picton, Anabela; Rogers, Kristen; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Avadhanam, Nymisha; Murthy, Krishna K; Martinez, Hernan; Molano Murillo, Angela; Chykarenko, Zoya A; Hutt, Richard; Daskalakis, Demetre; Shostakovich-Koretskaya, Ludmila; Abdool Karim, Salim; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Hecht, Frederick; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Clark, Robert A; Okulicz, Jason; Valentine, Fred T; Martinson, Neil; Tiemessen, Caroline Tanya; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Hunt, Peter W; He, Weijing; Ahuja, Sunil K

    2015-08-25

    T-cell expression levels of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) are a critical determinant of HIV/AIDS susceptibility, and manifest wide variations (i) between T-cell subsets and among individuals and (ii) in T-cell activation-induced increases in expression levels. We demonstrate that a unifying mechanism for this variation is differences in constitutive and T-cell activation-induced DNA methylation status of CCR5 cis-regulatory regions (cis-regions). Commencing at an evolutionarily conserved CpG (CpG -41), CCR5 cis-regions manifest lower vs. higher methylation in T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels (memory vs. naïve T cells) and in memory T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels. HIV-related and in vitro induced T-cell activation is associated with demethylation of these cis-regions. CCR5 haplotypes associated with increased vs. decreased gene/surface expression levels and HIV/AIDS susceptibility magnify vs. dampen T-cell activation-associated demethylation. Methylation status of CCR5 intron 2 explains a larger proportion of the variation in CCR5 levels than genotype or T-cell activation. The ancestral, protective CCR5-HHA haplotype bears a polymorphism at CpG -41 that is (i) specific to southern Africa, (ii) abrogates binding of the transcription factor CREB1 to this cis-region, and (iii) exhibits a trend for overrepresentation in persons with reduced susceptibility to HIV and disease progression. Genotypes lacking the CCR5-Δ32 mutation but with hypermethylated cis-regions have CCR5 levels similar to genotypes heterozygous for CCR5-Δ32. In HIV-infected individuals, CCR5 cis-regions remain demethylated, despite restoration of CD4+ counts (≥800 cells per mm(3)) with antiretroviral therapy. Thus, methylation content of CCR5 cis-regions is a central epigenetic determinant of T-cell CCR5 levels, and possibly HIV-related outcomes.

  9. The Lupane-type Triterpene 30-Oxo-calenduladiol Is a CCR5 Antagonist with Anti-HIV-1 and Anti-chemotactic Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-González, Jonathan; El Jaber-Vazdekis, Nabil; García-Expósito, Laura; Machado, José-David; Zárate, Rafael; Ravelo, Ángel G.; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    The existence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viruses in patients receiving antiretroviral treatment urgently requires the characterization and development of new antiretroviral drugs designed to inhibit resistant viruses and to complement the existing antiretroviral strategies against AIDS. We assayed several natural or semi-synthetic lupane-type pentacyclic triterpenes in their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection in permissive cells. We observed that the 30-oxo-calenduladiol triterpene, compound 1, specifically impaired R5-tropic HIV-1 envelope-mediated viral infection and cell fusion in permissive cells, without affecting X4-tropic virus. This lupane derivative competed for the binding of a specific anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody or the natural CCL5 chemokine to the CCR5 viral coreceptor with high affinity. 30-Oxo-calenduladiol seems not to interact with the CD4 antigen, the main HIV receptor, or the CXCR4 viral coreceptor. Our results suggest that compound 1 is a specific CCR5 antagonist, because it binds to the CCR5 receptor without triggering cell signaling or receptor internalization, and inhibits RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted)-mediated CCR5 internalization, intracellular calcium mobilization, and cell chemotaxis. Furthermore, compound 1 appeared not to interact with β-chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2b, CCR3, or CCR4. Thereby, the 30-oxo-calenduladiol-associated anti-HIV-1 activity against R5-tropic virus appears to rely on the selective occupancy of the CCR5 receptor to inhibit CCR5-mediated HIV-1 infection. Therefore, it is plausible that the chemical structure of 30-oxo-calenduladiol or other related dihydroxylated lupane-type triterpenes could represent a good model to develop more potent anti-HIV-1 molecules to inhibit viral infection by interfering with early fusion and entry steps in the HIV life cycle. PMID:19386595

  10. mRNA transfection of a novel TAL effector nuclease (TALEN) facilitates efficient knockout of HIV co-receptor CCR5.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Machowicz, Rafał; Hauber, Ilona; Horn, Stefan; Abramowski, Pierre; Berdien, Belinda; Hauber, Joachim; Fehse, Boris

    2015-06-23

    Homozygosity for a natural deletion variant of the HIV-coreceptor molecule CCR5, CCR5Δ32, confers resistance toward HIV infection. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a CCR5Δ32-homozygous donor has resulted in the first cure from HIV ('Berlin patient'). Based thereon, genetic disruption of CCR5 using designer nucleases was proposed as a promising HIV gene-therapy approach. Here we introduce a novel TAL-effector nuclease, CCR5-Uco-TALEN that can be efficiently delivered into T cells by mRNA electroporation, a gentle and truly transient gene-transfer technique. CCR5-Uco-TALEN mediated high-rate CCR5 knockout (>90% in PM1 and >50% in primary T cells) combined with low off-target activity, as assessed by flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing and a newly devised, very convenient gene-editing frequency digital-PCR (GEF-dPCR). GEF-dPCR facilitates simultaneous detection of wild-type and gene-edited alleles with remarkable sensitivity and accuracy as shown for the CCR5 on-target and CCR2 off-target loci. CCR5-edited cells were protected from infection with HIV-derived lentiviral vectors, but also with the wild-type CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL strain. Long-term exposure to HIV-1BaL resulted in almost complete suppression of viral replication and selection of CCR5-gene edited T cells. In conclusion, we have developed a novel TALEN for the targeted, high-efficiency knockout of CCR5 and a useful dPCR-based gene-editing detection method.

  11. Pharmacotherapy of HIV-1 Infection: Focus on CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc

    PubMed Central

    Latinovic, Olga; Kuruppu, Janaki; Davis, Charles; Le, Nhut; Heredia, Alonso

    2009-01-01

    Sustained inhibition of HIV-1, the goal of antiretroviral therapy, is often impeded by the emergence of viral drug resistance. For patients infected with HIV-1 resistant to conventional drugs from the viral reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitor classes, the recently approved entry and integration inhibitors effectively suppress HIV-1 and offer additional therapeutic options. Entry inhibitors are particularly attractive because, unlike conventional antiretrovirals, they target HIV-1 extracellularly, thereby sparing cells from both viral- and drug-induced toxicities. The fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide and the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc are the first entry inhibitors licensed for patients with drug-resistant HIV-1, with maraviroc restricted to those infected with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 (R5 HIV-1) only. Vicriviroc (another CCR5 antagonist) is in Phase III clinical trials, whereas the CCR5 antibodies PRO 140 and HGS 004 are in early stages of clinical development. Potent antiviral synergy between maraviroc and CCR5 antibodies, coupled with distinct patterns of resistance, suggest their combinations might be particularly effective in patients. In addition, given that oral administration of maraviroc achieves high drug levels in cervicovaginal fluid, combinations of maraviroc and other CCR5 inhibitors could be effective in preventing HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, since CCR5 antagonists prevent rejection of transplanted organs, maraviroc could both suppress HIV-1 and prolong organ survival for the growing number of HIV-1 patients with kidney or liver failure necessitating organ transplantation. Thus, maraviroc offers an important treatment option for patients with drug-resistant R5 HIV-1, who presently account for >50% of drug-resistance cases. PMID:19920876

  12. The isolation of novel phage display-derived human recombinant antibodies against CCR5, the major co-receptor of HIV.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai; Hizi, Amnon

    2013-08-01

    Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening strategy by using cells that co-express GFP and CCR5, along with an excess of control cells that do not express these proteins (and are otherwise identical to the CCR5-expressing cells). These control cells are intended to remove most of the phages that bind the cells nonspecifically; thus leading to an enrichment of the phages presenting anti-CCR5-specific antibodies. Subsequently, the CCR5-presenting cells were quantitatively sorted by flow cytometry, and the bound phages were eluted, amplified, and used for further successive selection rounds. Several different clones of human single-chain Fv antibodies that interact with CCR5-expressing cells were identified. The most specific monoclonal antibody was converted to a full-length IgG and bound the second extracellular loop of CCR5. The experimental approach presented herein for screening for CCR5-specific antibodies can be applicable to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against any cell-surface expressed protein of interest.

  13. Usage of the coreceptors CCR-5, CCR-3, and CXCR-4 by primary and cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Sol, N; Ferchal, F; Braun, J; Pleskoff, O; Tréboute, C; Ansart, I; Alizon, M

    1997-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR-5 and CXCR-4, and possibly CCR-3, are the principal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coreceptors, apparently interacting with HIV-1 envelope, in association with CD4. Cell lines coexpressing CD4 and these chemokine receptors were infected with a panel of seven primary HIV-2 isolates passaged in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and three laboratory HIV-2 strains passaged in T-cell lines. The CCR-5, CCR-3, and CXCR-4 coreceptors could all be used by HIV-2. The ability to use CXCR-4 represents a major difference between HIV-2 and the closely related simian immunodeficiency viruses. Most HIV-2 strains using CCR-5 could also use CCR-3, sometimes with similar efficiencies. As observed for HIV-1, the usage of CCR-5 or CCR-3 was observed principally for HIV-2 strains derived from asymptomatic individuals, while HIV-2 strains derived from AIDS patients used CXCR-4. However, there were several exceptions, and the patterns of coreceptor usage seemed more complex for HIV-2 than for HIV-1. The two T-tropic HIV-2 strains tested used CXCR-4 and not CCR-5, while T-tropic HIV-1 can generally use both. Moreover, among five primary HIV-2 strains all unable to use CXCR-4, three could replicate in CCR-5-negative PBMC, which has not been reported for HIV-1. These observations suggest that the CCR-5 coreceptor is less important for HIV-2 than for HIV-1 and indicate that HIV-2 can use other cell entry pathways and probably other coreceptors. One HIV-2 isolate replicating in normal or CCR-5-negative PBMC failed to infect CXCR-4+ cells or the U87MG-CD4 and sMAGI cell lines, which are permissive to infection by HIV-2 but not by HIV-1. This suggests the existence of several HIV-2-specific coreceptors, which are differentially expressed in cell lines and PBMC. PMID:9343175

  14. CCR5 antagonism in HIV infection: current concepts and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Timothy J; Gulick, Roy M

    2012-01-01

    CCR5 antagonists inhibit HIV-1 entry by blocking the interaction of HIV-1 with the CCR5 cellular receptor. In patients with established HIV-1 infection, some viral strains use an alternative coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, CXCR4; CCR5 antagonists are not effective in patients harboring these viral strains. Coreceptor tropism testing of viral strains in an individual patient is necessary prior to treating with a CCR5 antagonist. There is one CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, that is FDA-approved for treatment of HIV-1 infection. This drug is used most commonly for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in patients who have failed other antiretroviral regimens. In addition to virologic effects, CCR5 antagonists are under investigation for immune-modulating effects and for HIV-1 prevention. Ongoing research will further elucidate the role of CCR5 antagonists in combating HIV disease.

  15. I-TAC/CXCL11 is a natural antagonist for CCR5.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Vibor; Moghini, Christian; Paoletti, Samantha; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Gerber, Basil

    2004-09-01

    The selective CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) agonists, monokine induced by interferon-gamma (IFN- gamma)/CXC chemokine ligand 9 (CXCL9), IFN-inducible protein 10/CXCL10, and IFN-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC)/CXCL11, attract CXCR3+ cells such as CD45RO+ T lymphocytes, B cells, and natural killer cells. Further, all three chemokines are potent, natural antagonists for chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) and feature defensin-like, antimicrobial activities. In this study, we show that I-TAC, in addition to these effects, acts as an antagonist for CCR5. I-TAC inhibited the binding of macrophage-inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha)/CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3) to cells transfected with CCR5 and to monocytes. Furthermore, cell migration evoked by regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5 and MIP-1beta/CCL4, the selective agonist of CCR5, was inhibited in transfected cells and monocytes, respectively. In two other functional assays, namely the release of free intracellular calcium and actin polymerization, I-TAC reduced CCR5 activities to minimal levels. Sequence and structure analyses indicate a potential role for K17, K49, and Q51 of I-TAC in CCR5 binding. Our results expand on the potential role of I-TAC as a negative modulator in leukocyte migration and activation, as I-TAC would specifically counteract the responses mediated by many "classical," inflammatory chemokines that act not only via CCR3 but via CCR5 as well.

  16. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1

  17. In vivo effect of statins on the expression of the HIV co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During the HIV-1 replication cycle, several molecules including chemokine receptors and cholesterol are crucial, and are therefore potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Indeed statins, compounds that inhibit cellular synthesis of cholesterol and have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties were shown to inhibit HIV-1 infection by R5 tropic strains but not by X4 strains in vitro, mainly by altering the chemokine receptor/ligands axes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize in vivo, the capacity of statins to modulate in HIV seronegative and chronically HIV-1-infected adults the expression of CCR5 and CXCR4, of their ligands and the tropism of circulating HIV-1 strains. Methods Samples from asymptomatic HIV-1-infected adults enrolled in a clinical trial aimed at evaluating the antiretroviral activity of lovastatin were used to evaluate in vivo the modulation by lovastatin of CCR5, CXCR4, their ligands, and the shift in plasma viral tropism over one year of intervention. In addition, ten HIV negative adults received a daily oral dose of 40 mg of lovastatin or 20 mg of atorvastatin; seven other HIV negative individuals who received no treatment were followed as controls. The frequency and phenotype of immune cells were determined by flow-cytometry; mRNA levels of chemokine receptors and their ligands were determined by real-time PCR. Viral tropism was determined by PCR and sequencing, applying the clonal and clinical model of analyses. Results Our study shows that long-term administration of lovastatin in HIV-infected individuals does not induce a shift in viral tropism, or induce a significant modulation of CCR5 and CXCR4 on immune cells in HIV-infected patients. Similar results were found in HIV seronegative control subjects, treated with lovastatin or atorvastatin, but a significant increase in CCL3 and CCL4 transcription was observed in these individuals. Conclusions These findings suggest that long

  18. Reduced maximal inhibition in phenotypic susceptibility assays indicates that viral strains resistant to the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc utilize inhibitor-bound receptor for entry.

    PubMed

    Westby, Mike; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Mori, Julie; Lewis, Marilyn; Mosley, Michael; Stockdale, Mark; Dorr, Patrick; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Perros, Manos

    2007-03-01

    Maraviroc is a CCR5 antagonist in clinical development as one of a new class of antiretrovirals targeting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coreceptor binding. We investigated the mechanism of HIV resistance to maraviroc by using in vitro sequential passage and site-directed mutagenesis. Serial passage through increasing maraviroc concentrations failed to select maraviroc-resistant variants from some laboratory-adapted and clinical isolates of HIV-1. However, high-level resistance to maraviroc was selected from three of six primary isolates passaged in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The SF162 strain acquired resistance to maraviroc in both treated and control cultures; all resistant variants were able to use CXCR4 as a coreceptor. In contrast, maraviroc-resistant virus derived from isolates CC1/85 and RU570 remained CCR5 tropic, as evidenced by susceptibility to the CCR5 antagonist SCH-C, resistance to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, and an inability to replicate in CCR5 Delta32/Delta32 PBL. Strain-specific mutations were identified in the V3 loop of maraviroc-resistant CC1/85 and RU570. The envelope-encoding region of maraviroc-resistant CC1/85 was inserted into an NL4-3 background. This recombinant virus was completely resistant to maraviroc but retained susceptibility to aplaviroc. Reverse mutation of gp120 residues 316 and 323 in the V3 loop (numbering from HXB2) to their original sequence restored wild-type susceptibility to maraviroc, while reversion of either mutation resulted in a partially sensitive virus with reduced maximal inhibition (plateau). The plateaus are consistent with the virus having acquired the ability to utilize maraviroc-bound receptor for entry. This hypothesis was further corroborated by the observation that a high concentration of maraviroc blocks the activity of aplaviroc against maraviroc-resistant virus.

  19. Development of maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV, using a novel tropism assay.

    PubMed

    van der Ryst, Elna; Heera, Jayvant; Demarest, James; Knirsch, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Assays to identify infectious organisms are critical for diagnosis and enabling the development of therapeutic agents. The demonstration that individuals with a 32-bp deletion within the CCR5 locus were resistant to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, while those heterozygous for the mutation progressed more slowly, led to the discovery of maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist. As MVC is only active against CCR5-tropic strains of HIV, it was critical to develop a diagnostic assay to identify appropriate patients. Trofile™, a novel phenotypic tropism assay, was used to identify patients with CCR5-tropic virus for the MVC development program. Results of these clinical studies demonstrated that the assay correctly identified patients likely to respond to MVC. Over time, the performance characteristics of the phenotypic assay were enhanced, necessitating retesting of study samples. Genotypic tropism tests that have the potential to allow for local use and more rapid turnaround times are also being developed. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  20. HIV-1 tropism testing and clinical management of CCR5 antagonists: Quebec review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Cécile; Hardy, Isabelle; Lalonde, Richard; Trottier, Benoit; Tsarevsky, Irina; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Roger, Michel; Wainberg, Mark; Baril, Jean-Guy

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 tropism assays play a crucial role in determining the response to CCR5 receptor antagonists. Initially, phenotypic tests were used, but limited access to these tests prompted the development of alternative strategies. Recently, genotyping tropism has been validated using a Canadian technology in clinical trials investigating the use of maraviroc in both experienced and treatment-naive patients. The present guidelines review the evidence supporting the use of genotypic assays and provide recommendations regarding tropism testing in daily clinical management.

  1. Evolution of CCR5 Antagonist Resistance in an HIV-1 Subtype C Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Tsibris, Athe M.N.; Lewine, Nicolas R.P.; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Leopold, Kay E.; Sagar, Manish; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We previously reported vicriviroc (VCV) resistance in an HIV-infected subject and used deep sequencing and clonal analyses to track the evolution of V3 sequence forms over 28 weeks of therapy. Here, we test the contribution of gp120 mutations to CCR5 antagonist resistance and investigate why certain minority V3 variants emerged as the dominant species under drug pressure. Methods 19 site-directed HIV-1 mutants were generated that contained gp120 VCV-resistance mutations. Viral sensitivities to VCV, maraviroc, TAK-779 and HGS004 were determined. Results Three patterns of susceptibilities were observed: sigmoid inhibition curves with IC50s similar to pre-treatment virus (07J-week 0 [W0]), single mutants with decreased IC50s compared to 07J-W0, and mutants that contained ≥5 of 7 VCV-resistance mutations with flattened inhibition curves and decreased or negative percent maximal inhibition. Substitutions such as S306P, which sensitized virus to CCR5 antagonists when present as single mutations, were not detected in the baseline virus population but were necessary for maximal resistance when incorporated into V3 backbones that included pre-existing VCV resistance mutations. Conclusion CCR5 antagonist resistance was reproduced only when a majority of V3 mutations were present. Minority V3 loop variants may serve as a scaffold upon which additional mutations lead to complete VCV resistance. PMID:20856130

  2. CCR5 and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanpain, Cédric; Libert, Frédérick; Vassart, Gilbert; Parmentier, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play a crucial role in the trafficking of leukocyte populations across the body, and are involved in the development of a large variety of human diseases. CCR5 is the main coreceptor used by macrophage (M)-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2, which are responsible for viral transmission. CCR5 therefore plays an essential role in HIV pathogenesis. A number of inflammatory CC-chemokines, including MIP-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, RANTES, MCP-2, and HCC-1[9-74] act as CCR5 agonists, while MCP-3 is a natural antagonist of the receptor. CCR5 is mainly expressed in memory T-cells, macrophages, and immature dendritic cells, and is upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines. It is coupled to the Gi class of heterotrimeric G-proteins, and inhibits cAMP production, stimulates Ca2+ release, and activates PI3-kinase and MAP kinases, as well as other tyrosine kinase cascades. A mutant allele of CCR5, CCR5 delta 32 is frequent in populations of European origin, and encodes a nonfunctional truncated protein that is not transported to the cell surface. Homozygotes for the delta 32 allele exhibit a strong, although incomplete, resistance to HIV infection, whereas heterozygotes display delayed progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Many other alleles, affecting the primary structure of CCR5 or its promoter have been described, some of which lead to nonfunctional receptors or otherwise influence AIDS progression. CCR5 is considered as a drug target in the field of HIV, but also in a growing number of inflammatory diseases. Modified chemokines, monoclonal antibodies and small chemical antagonists, as well as a number of gene therapy approaches have been developed in this frame.

  3. Medicinal chemistry of small molecule CCR5 antagonists for blocking HIV-1 entry: a review of structural evolution.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Dujuan; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a member of G protein-coupled receptors superfamily, plays an important role in the HIV-1 entry process. Antagonism of this receptor finally leads to the inhibition of R5 strains of HIV entry into the human cells. The identification of CCR5 antagonists as antiviral agents will provide more option for HAART. Now, more than a decade after the first small molecule CCR5 inhibitor was discovered, great achievements have been made. In this article, we will give a brief introduction of several series of small molecule CCR5 antagonists, focused on their appealing structure evolution, essential SAR information and thereof the enlightenment of strategies on CCR5 inhibitors design.

  4. Induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses against the HIV coreceptor CCR5 upon intramuscular immunization and aerosol delivery of a Virus-like Particle based vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Z; Smyth, HD; Durfee, P; Chackerian, B

    2009-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) can be exploited as platforms to increase the immunogenicity of poorly immunogenic antigens, including self-proteins. We have developed VLP-based vaccines that target two domains of the HIV coreceptor CCR5 that are involved in HIV binding. These vaccines induce anti-CCR5 antibodies that bind to native CCR5 and inhibit SIV infection in vitro. Given the role of mucosal surfaces in HIV transmission and replication, we also asked whether an aerosolized, VLP-based pulmonary vaccine targeting CCR5 could induce a robust mucosal response in addition to a systemic response. In rats, both intramuscular and pulmonary immunization induced high titer IgG and IgA against the vaccine in the serum, but only aerosol vaccination induced IgA antibodies at local mucosal sites. An intramuscular prime followed by an aerosol boost resulted in strong serum and mucosal antibody responses. These results show that VLP-based vaccines targeting CCR5 induce high-titer systemic antibodies, and can elicit both local and systemic mucosal response when administered via an aerosol. Vaccination against a self-molecule that is critically involved during HIV transmission and pathogenesis is an alternative to targeting the virus itself. More generally, our results provide a general method for inducing broad systemic and mucosal antibody responses using VLP-based immunogens. PMID:19849995

  5. HIV-1 tropism testing and clinical management of CCR5 antagonists: Quebec review and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Cécile; Hardy, Isabelle; Lalonde, Richard; Trottier, Benoit; Tsarevsky, Irina; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Roger, Michel; Wainberg, Mark; Baril, Jean-Guy

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 tropism assays play a crucial role in determining the response to CCR5 receptor antagonists. Initially, phenotypic tests were used, but limited access to these tests prompted the development of alternative strategies. Recently, genotyping tropism has been validated using a Canadian technology in clinical trials investigating the use of maraviroc in both experienced and treatment-naive patients. The present guidelines review the evidence supporting the use of genotypic assays and provide recommendations regarding tropism testing in daily clinical management. PMID:24489562

  6. Genome editing of the HIV co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 by CRISPR-Cas9 protects CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhepeng; Chen, Shuliang; Jin, Xu; Wang, Qiankun; Yang, Kongxiang; Li, Chenlin; Xiao, Qiaoqiao; Hou, Panpan; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Shaoshuai; Hou, Wei; Xiong, Yong; Kong, Chunyan; Zhao, Xixian; Wu, Li; Li, Chunmei; Sun, Guihong; Guo, Deyin

    2017-01-01

    The main approach to treat HIV-1 infection is combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Although cART is effective in reducing HIV-1 viral load and controlling disease progression, it has many side effects, and is expensive for HIV-1 infected patients who must remain on lifetime treatment. HIV-1 gene therapy has drawn much attention as studies of genome editing tools have progressed. For example, zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 have been utilized to successfully disrupt the HIV-1 co-receptors CCR5 or CXCR4, thereby restricting HIV-1 infection. However, the effects of simultaneous genome editing of CXCR4 and CCR5 by CRISPR-Cas9 in blocking HIV-1 infection in primary CD4(+) T cells has been rarely reported. Furthermore, combination of different target sites of CXCR4 and CCR5 for disruption also need investigation. In this report, we designed two different gRNA combinations targeting both CXCR4 and CCR5, in a single vector. The CRISPR-sgRNAs-Cas9 could successfully induce editing of CXCR4 and CCR5 genes in various cell lines and primary CD4(+) T cells. Using HIV-1 challenge assays, we demonstrated that CXCR4-tropic or CCR5-tropic HIV-1 infections were significantly reduced in CXCR4- and CCR5-modified cells, and the modified cells exhibited a selective advantage over unmodified cells during HIV-1 infection. The off-target analysis showed that no non-specific editing was identified in all predicted sites. In addition, apoptosis assays indicated that simultaneous disruption of CXCR4 and CCR5 in primary CD4(+) T cells by CRISPR-Cas9 had no obvious cytotoxic effects on cell viability. Our results suggest that simultaneous genome editing of CXCR4 and CCR5 by CRISPR-Cas9 can potentially provide an effective and safe strategy towards a functional cure for HIV-1 infection.

  7. T-Cell surface CCR5 density is not correlated with hepatitis severity in hepatitis C virus/HIV-coinfected individuals: implications for the therapeutic use of CCR5 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Thierry; Portales, Pierre; Baillat, Vincent; de Boever, Corinne Merle; Le Moing, Vincent; Vidal, Michèle; Ducos, Jacques; Clot, Jacques; Reynes, Jacques; Corbeau, Pierre

    2005-03-01

    CCR5 antagonists represent promising anti-HIV agents. Yet, if the CCR5 chemokine receptor plays a positive role in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, CCR5 antagonists might be contraindicated in HCV/HIV-coinfected subjects. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the level of T-cell surface CCR5 expression, which might determine the intensity of HCV-specific T-cell recruitment into the liver, and thereby the efficiency of the anti-HCV response, could determine HCV disease evolution. For this purpose, we compared CCR5 density, measured by quantitative flow cytometry at the surface of nonactivated (human leukocyte antigen-D-related [HLA-DR]-) T cells of 51 HCV/HIV patients, with HCV load, serum aminotransferase levels, and liver histology (inflammatory activity, fibrosis, and rate of fibrosis progression). DR-CD4+ T-cell surface CCR5 density, which correlated with DR-CD8+ T-cell surface CCR5 density and was stable over time in HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals, did not correlate with any of the biologic parameters of HCV infection analyzed and was not linked to the capacity to clear the virus. In conclusion, we failed to demonstrate any impact of interindividual variability in T-cell surface CCR5 density on HCV infection, which would have argued against the use of CCR5 antagonists in HIV/HCV-coinfected subjects.

  8. Protection against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in persons with repeated exposure: evidence for T cell immunity in the absence of inherited CCR5 coreceptor defects.

    PubMed

    Goh, W C; Markee, J; Akridge, R E; Meldorf, M; Musey, L; Karchmer, T; Krone, M; Collier, A; Corey, L; Emerman, M; McElrath, M J

    1999-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that protection against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection may result from either acquired host immunity, inheritance of a dysfunctional CCR5 HIV-1 coreceptor, or a low or attenuated virus inoculum. Thirty-seven HIV-1-uninfected persons engaging in repeated high-risk sexual activity with an HIV-1-infected partner were prospectively studied to determine the contribution of these factors in protecting against HIV-1 transmission. More than one-third (13/36) demonstrated HIV-1-specific cytotoxicity, and this activity significantly correlated with the wild type CCR5 genotype (P=.03). Only 1 subject (3%) demonstrated the homozygous CCR5 32-bp deletion (Delta32/Delta32). Median plasma HIV-1 RNA levels from 18 HIV-1-infected sex partners were not statistically different from those of matched infected control patients. These results indicate that inheritance of the Delta32 CCR5 mutation does not account for the majority of persistently HIV-1-resistant cases, and the presence of cellular immunity in these persons suggests either undetected infection or protective immunity.

  9. Combined 3D-QSAR modeling and molecular docking study on azacycles CCR5 antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yongjun; Shu, Mao; Lin, Yong; Wang, Yuanqiang; Wang, Rui; Hu, Yong; Lin, Zhihua

    2013-08-01

    The beta chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is an attractive target for pharmaceutical industry in the HIV-1, inflammation and cancer therapeutic areas. In this study, we have developed quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models for a series of 41 azacycles CCR5 antagonists using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), and Topomer CoMFA methods. The cross-validated coefficient q2 values of 3D-QASR (CoMFA, CoMSIA, and Topomer CoMFA) methods were 0.630, 0.758, and 0.852, respectively, the non-cross-validated R2 values were 0.979, 0.978, and 0.990, respectively. Docking studies were also employed to determine the most probable binding mode. 3D contour maps and docking results suggested that bulky groups and electron-withdrawing groups on the core part would decrease antiviral activity. Furthermore, docking results indicated that H-bonds and π bonds were favorable for antiviral activities. Finally, a set of novel derivatives with predicted activities were designed.

  10. CCR5 receptor antagonists block metastasis to bone of v-Src-oncogene-transformed metastatic prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sicoli, Daniela; Jiao, Xuanmao; Ju, Xiaoming; Velasco-Velazquez, Marco; Ertel, Adam; Addya, Sankar; Li, Zhiping; Ando, Sebastiano; Fatatis, Alessandro; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Thakur, Mathew L.; Lisanti, Michael P; Pestell, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) integrate signal transduction for multiple receptors, regulating cellular proliferation invasion and metastasis in human cancer. Although Src is rarely mutated in human prostate cancer, SFK activity is increased in the majority of human prostate cancers. In order to determine the molecular mechanisms governing prostate cancer bone metastasis, FVB murine prostate epithelium was transduced with oncogenic v-Src. The prostate cancer cell lines metastasized in FVB mice to brain and bone. Gene expression profiling of the tumors identified activation of a CCR5 signaling module when the prostate epithelial cells (PEC) lines were grown in vivo vs. tissue cultures. The whole body, bone and brain metastatic prostate cancer burden was reduced by oral CCR5 antagonist. Clinical trials of CCR5 inhibitors may warrant consideration in patients with CCR5 activation in their tumors. PMID:25452256

  11. [Use of maraviroc, the first CCR5 receptor antagonist, in HIV treatment regimens].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, A V

    2013-01-01

    The paper gives the results of international trials of and guidelines for the use of maraviroc, the first CCR5 receptor antagonist, in treatment regimens for HIV-infected patients. The trials have convincingly shown that the maraviroc-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens are highly effective and safe for R5-tropic HIV-infected patients regardless of previous ART, baseline HIV RNA levels, and CD4+ lymphocyte count. Maraviroc can be recommended for HIV-infected patients who have previously received ART and who have been found to have a R5-tropic virus. The changes in the ART regimen and inclusion of maraviroc may be associated with both an ineffective previous treatment regimen and therapy-induced adverse events. In 2012, Russia's first reagent kit for the determination of HIV tropism was put to tests and registered at the Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare.

  12. Complexity in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-receptor usage: roles of CCR3 and CCR5 in HIV-1 infection of monocyte-derived macrophages and brain microglia.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Lokesh; Maxwell, Christina R; Peters, Paul J; Clapham, Paul R; Liu, Sue M; Mackay, Charles R; Strayer, David S

    2009-03-01

    CCR3 has been implicated as a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), particularly in brain microglia cells. We sought to clarify the comparative roles of CCR3 and CCR5 in the central nervous system (CNS) HIV-1 infection and the potential utility of CCR3 as a target for manipulation via gene transfer. To target CCR3, we developed a single-chain antibody (SFv) and an interfering RNA (RNAi), R3-526. Coding sequences for both were cloned into Tag-deleted SV40-dervied vectors, as these vectors transduce brain microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) highly efficiently. These anti-CCR3 transgenes were compared to SFv-CCR5, an SFv against CCR5, and RNAi-R5, an RNAi that targets CCR5, for the ability to protect primary human brain microglia and MDM from infection with peripheral and neurotropic strains of HIV-1. Downregulation of CCR3 and CCR5 by these transgenes was independent from one another. Confocal microscopy showed that CCR3 and CCR5 co-localized at the plasma membrane with each other and with CD4. Targeting either CCR5 or CCR3 largely protected both microglia and MDM from infection by many strains of HIV-1. That is, some HIV-1 strains, isolated from either the CNS or periphery, required both CCR3 and CCR5 for optimal productive infection of microglia and MDM. Some HIV-1 strains were relatively purely CCR5-tropic. None was purely CCR3-tropic. Thus, some CNS-tropic strains of HIV-1 utilize CCR5 as a co-receptor but do not need CCR3, while for other isolates both CCR3 and CCR5 may be required.

  13. Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) generated by lentivirus vector-mediated delivery of the CCR5{Delta}32 gene despite detectable expression of the HIV-1 co-receptors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qingwen; Marsh, Jon; Cornetta, Kenneth; Alkhatib, Ghalib

    2008-10-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that there are two distinct mechanisms for genetic resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) conferred by the CCR5Delta32 gene: the loss of wild-type CCR5 surface expression and the generation of CCR5Delta32 protein, which interacts with CXCR4. To analyse the protective effects of long-term expression of the CCR5Delta32 protein, recombinant lentiviral vectors were used to deliver the CCR5Delta32 gene into human cell lines and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells that had been immortalized by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1. Blasticidin S-resistant cell lines expressing the lentivirus-encoded CCR5Delta32 showed a significant reduction in HIV-1 Env-mediated fusion assays. It was shown that CD4(+) T lymphocytes expressing the lentivirus-encoded CCR5Delta32 gene were highly resistant to infection by a primary but not by a laboratory-adapted X4 strain, suggesting different infectivity requirements. In contrast to previous studies that analysed the CCR5Delta32 protective effects in a transient expression system, this study showed that long-term expression of CCR5Delta32 conferred resistance to HIV-1 despite cell-surface expression of the HIV co-receptors. The results suggest an additional unknown mechanism for generating the CCR5Delta32 resistance phenotype and support the hypothesis that the CCR5Delta32 protein acts as an HIV-suppressive factor by altering the stoichiometry of the molecules involved in HIV-1 entry. The lentiviral-CCR5Delta32 vectors offer a method of generating HIV-resistant cells by delivery of the CCR5Delta32 gene that may be useful for stem cell- or T-cell-based gene therapy for HIV-1 infection.

  14. Characterizing the Diverse Mutational Pathways Associated with R5-Tropic Maraviroc Resistance: HIV-1 That Uses the Drug-Bound CCR5 Coreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaowei; Feyertag, Felix; Meehan, Conor J.; McCormack, Grace P.; Travers, Simon A.; Craig, Charles; Westby, Mike; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entry inhibitors represent a potent class of antiretroviral drugs that target a host cell protein, CCR5, an HIV-1 entry coreceptor, and not viral protein. Lack of sensitivity can occur due to preexisting virus that uses the CXCR4 coreceptor, while true resistance occurs through viral adaptation to use a drug-bound CCR5 coreceptor. To understand this R5 resistance pathway, we analyzed >500 envelope protein sequences and phenotypes from viruses of 20 patients from the clinical trials MOTIVATE 1 and 2, in which treatment-experienced patients received maraviroc plus optimized background therapy. The resistant viral population was phylogenetically distinct and associated with a genetic bottleneck in each patient, consistent with de novo emergence of resistance. Recombination analysis showed that the C2-V3-C3 region tends to genotypically correspond to the recombinant's phenotype, indicating its primary importance in conferring resistance. Between patients, there was a notable lack of commonality in the specific sites conferring resistance, confirming the unusual nature of R5-tropic resistance. We used coevolutionary and positive-selection analyses to characterize the genotypic determinants of resistance and found that (i) there are complicated covariation networks, indicating frequent coevolutionary/compensatory changes in the context of protein structure; (ii) covarying sites under positive selection are enriched in resistant viruses; (iii) CD4 binding sites form part of a unique covariation network independent of the V3 loop; and (iv) the covariation network formed between the V3 loop and other regions of gp120 and gp41 intersects sites involved in glycosylation and protein secretion. These results demonstrate that while envelope sequence mutations are the key to conferring maraviroc resistance, the specific changes involved are context dependent and thus inherently unpredictable. IMPORTANCE The entry inhibitor drug maraviroc makes the cell coreceptor CCR5

  15. Mutations in the V3 stem versus the V3 crown and C4 region have different effects on the binding and fusion steps of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 interaction with the CCR5 coreceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Essex, Max; Lee, Tun-Hou . E-mail: tunhoule@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-03-30

    The current model for HIV-1 envelope-coreceptor interaction depicts the V3 stem and bridging sheet binding to the CCR5 N-terminus while the V3 crown interacts with the second extracellular loop, which is the coreceptor domain that appears to be relatively more important for fusion and infection. Our prediction based on this model is that mutations in the V3 crown might consequently have more effects on cell-cell fusion and virus entry than mutations introduced in the V3 stem and C4 region. We performed alanine-scanning of the V3 loop and selected C4 residues in the JRFL envelope and tested the capacity of the resulting mutants for CCR5 binding, cell-cell fusion, and virus infection. Our cross comparison analysis revealed that residues in C4 and in both the V3 stem and crown were important for CCR5 binding of gp120 subunits. Contrary to our prediction, mutations in the V3 crown had less effect on membrane fusion than mutations in the V3 stem. The V3 stem thus appears to be the most important region for CCR5 utilization since it affected both coreceptor binding and subsequent fusion and viral entry. Our data raises the possibility that some residues in the V3 crown and in C4 may play distinct roles in the binding and fusion steps of envelope-coreceptor interaction.

  16. Maraviroc, a CCR5 Antagonist, Prevents Development of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Callejero, Laura; Pérez-Martínez, Laura; Rubio-Mediavilla, Susana; Oteo, José A.; Martínez, Alfredo; Blanco, José R.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic liver disease may result in a sequential progression through fibrosis, cirrhosis and lead, eventually, to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) seem to be responsible for the fibrogenic response through the activation of an autocrine loop involving the chemokine receptor, CCR5. However, the role of CCR5 in HCC remains poorly understood. Since this receptor is also one of the main ports of entry for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), several CCR5 inhibitors are being used in the clinic to reduce viral load. We used one of these inhibitors, maraviroc (MVC), in a mouse model of diet-induced HCC to investigate whether this intervention would reduce disease progression. Animals treated with MVC on top of a normal control diet did not present any evidence of toxicity or any morphological change when compared with non-treated mice. Animals treated with MVC presented higher survival, less liver fibrosis, lower levels of liver injury markers and chemokines, less apoptosis, lower proliferation index, and lower tumor burden than their counterparts receiving only the hepatotoxic diet. In addition, MVC inhibits HSC activation markers such as phosphorylation of p38 and ERK, and increases hepatocyte survival. This study suggests that MVC, a well tolerated and clinically characterized drug, may be used as a preventative treatment for HCC. Clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the efficacy of this drug, or other CCR5 inhibitors, in patients with high risk of developing HCC. PMID:23326556

  17. The strength of the chemotactic response to a CCR5 binding chemokine is determined by the level of cell surface CCR5 density.

    PubMed

    Desmetz, Caroline; Lin, Yea-Lih; Mettling, Clément; Portalès, Pierre; Rabesandratana, Herisoa; Clot, Jacques; Corbeau, Pierre

    2006-12-01

    We have shown that the intensity of expression of the C-C chemokine receptor CCR5 at the single CD4(+) cell level strongly determines the efficiency of its function as a coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1. By analogy, we examined if the number of CCR5 molecules at the cell surface might determine its chemotactic response to CCR5 ligands. To test this hypothesis, we measured by flow cytometry the migration of primary human T cells towards the CCR5-binding chemokine CCL5 in vitro. First, we observed a dose-dependent blockage of this migration exerted by an anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody. Second, we sorted peripheral blood mononuclear cells into five subpopulations expressing various cell surface CCR5 densities, and observed a correlation between the intensity of migration towards CCL5 and the level of CCR5 expression on these subpopulations. Third, we transduced CCR5(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells with the CCR5 gene, and observed that the CCR5 over-expression induced an over-migration towards CCL5. Finally, we observed in healthy donors a correlation between the chemotactic response of peripheral blood CD8(+) T cell to CCL5 and their level of surface CCR5 expression. T-cell surface CCR5 density, which is constant over time for a given individual, but varies drastically among individuals, might therefore be an important personal determinant of T-cell migration in many biological situations where CCR5-binding chemokines play a role, such as graft rejection, T helper 1-mediated auto-immune diseases, and infectious diseases involving CCR5. Moreover, our data highlight the therapeutic potential of CCR5 antagonists in these situations.

  18. Frequencies of 32 base pair deletion of the (Delta 32) allele of the CCR5 HIV-1 co-receptor gene in Caucasians: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard

    2002-05-01

    The CCR5 gene encodes for the co-receptor for the major macrophage-tropics strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and a mutant allele of this gene (Delta 32) provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection by HIV. The frequency of the Delta 32 allele was investigated in 40 populations of 8842 non-infected subjects coming from Europe, the Middle-East and North Africa. A clear north-south decreasing gradient was evident for Delta 32 frequencies, with a significant correlation coefficient (r=0.83). The main frequency value of Delta 32 for Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland (0.134) is significantly (chi(2)=63.818, P<0.001) highest than the Delta 32 mean value, indicating that probably the Vikings might have been instrumental in disseminating the Delta 32 allele during the eighth to the tenth centuries during historical times. Possibly variola virus has discriminated the Delta 32 carriers in Europe since the eighth century AD, explaining the high frequency of the Delta 32 allele in Europe today.

  19. A receptor theory-based semimechanistic PD model for the CCR5 noncompetitive antagonist maraviroc

    PubMed Central

    Jacqmin, Philippe; McFadyen, Lynn; Wade, Janet R

    2008-01-01

    Aim To develop a novel combined viral dynamics/operational model of (ant-)agonism that describes the pharmacodynamic effects of maraviroc, a noncompetitive CCR5 inhibitor, on viral load. Methods A common theoretical framework based on receptor theory and the operational model of (ant-)agonism has been developed to describe the binding of maraviroc to the CCR5 receptor and the subsequent decrease in viral load. The anchor point of the operational model in the differential equations of the viral dynamic model is the infection rate constant; this is assumed to be dependent on the number of free activated receptors on each target cell. Results The new model provides one explanation for the apparent discrepancy between the in vivo binding of maraviroc to the CCR5 receptor (KD = 0.089 ng ml−1) and the estimated in vivo inhibition (IC50 = 8 ng ml−1) of the infection rate. The estimated KE value of the operational model indicates that only 1.2% of free activated receptors are utilized to elicit 50% of the maximum infection rate. Conclusions The developed model suggests that the target cells, when activated, express more receptors (spare receptors) than needed. In the presence of maraviroc these spare receptors first require blocking before any decrease in the infection rate, and consequently in the viral load at equilibrium, can be detected. The model allows the simultaneous simulation of the binding of maraviroc to the CCR5 receptor and the change in viral load after both short- and long-term treatment. PMID:18333871

  20. Three-year safety and efficacy of vicriviroc, a CCR5 antagonist, in HIV-1-infected treatment-experienced patients.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Timothy J; Su, Zhaohui; Krambrink, Amy; Long, Jianmin; Greaves, Wayne; Gross, Robert; Hughes, Michael D; Flexner, Charles; Skolnik, Paul R; Coakley, Eoin; Godfrey, Catherine; Hirsch, Martin; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Gulick, Roy M

    2010-08-01

    Vicriviroc, an investigational CCR5 antagonist, demonstrated short-term safety and antiretroviral activity. Phase 2, double-blind, randomized study of vicriviroc in treatment-experienced subjects with CCR5-using HIV-1. Vicriviroc (5, 10, or 15 mg) or placebo was added to a failing regimen with optimization of background antiretroviral medications at day 14. Subjects experiencing virologic failure and subjects completing 48 weeks were offered open-label vicriviroc. One hundred eighteen subjects were randomized. Virologic failure (<1 log10 decline in HIV-1 RNA > or =16 weeks postrandomization) occurred by week 48 in 24 of 28 (86%), 12 of 30 (40%), 8 of 30 (27%), 10 of 30 (33%) of subjects randomized to placebo, 5, 10, and 15 mg, respectively. Overall, 113 subjects received vicriviroc at randomization or after virologic failure, and 52 (46%) achieved HIV-1 RNA <50 copies per milliliter within 24 weeks. Through 3 years, 49% of those achieving suppression did not experience confirmed viral rebound. Dual or mixed-tropic HIV-1 was detected in 33 (29%). Vicriviroc resistance (progressive decrease in maximal percentage inhibition on phenotypic testing) was detected in 6 subjects. Nine subjects discontinued vicriviroc due to adverse events. Vicriviroc seems safe and demonstrates sustained virologic suppression through 3 years of follow-up. Further trials of vicriviroc will establish its clinical utility for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  1. Three-Year Safety and Efficacy of Vicriviroc, a CCR5 Antagonist, in HIV-1-Infected, Treatment-Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wilkin, Timothy J.; Su, Zhaohui; Krambrink, Amy; Long, Jianmin; Greaves, Wayne; Gross, Robert; Hughes, Michael D.; Flexner, Charles; Skolnik, Paul R.; Coakley, Eoin; Godfrey, Catherine; Hirsch, Martin; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Gulick, Roy M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Vicriviroc, an investigational CCR5 antagonist, demonstrated short-term safety and antiretroviral activity. Methods Phase 2, double-blind, randomized study of vicriviroc in treatment-experienced subjects with CCR5-using HIV-1. Vicriviroc (5, 10 or 15 mg) or placebo was added to a failing regimen with optimization of background antiretroviral medications at day 14. Subjects experiencing virologic failure and subjects completing 48 weeks were offered open-label vicriviroc. Results 118 subjects were randomized. Virologic failure (<1 log10 decline in HIV-1 RNA ≥16 weeks post-randomization) occurred by week 48 in 24/28 (86%), 12/30 (40%), 8/30 (27%), 10/30 (33%) of subjects randomized to placebo, 5, 10 and 15 mg respectively. Overall, 113 subjects received vicriviroc at randomization or after virologic failure, and 52 (46%) achieved HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL within 24 weeks. Through 3 years, 49% of those achieving suppression did not experience confirmed viral rebound. Dual or mixed-tropic HIV-1 was detected in 33 (29%). Vicriviroc resistance (progressive decrease in maximal percentage inhibition on phenotypic testing) was detected in 6 subjects. Nine subjects discontinued vicriviroc due to adverse events. Conclusions Vicriviroc appears safe and demonstrates sustained virologic suppression through 3 years of follow-up. Further trials of vicriviroc will establish its clinical utility for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:20672447

  2. Design and validation of new genotypic tools for easy and reliable estimation of HIV tropism before using CCR5 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Poveda, Eva; Seclén, Eduardo; González, María del Mar; García, Federico; Chueca, Natalia; Aguilera, Antonio; Rodríguez, Jose Javier; González-Lahoz, Juan; Soriano, Vincent

    2009-05-01

    Genotypic tools may allow easier and less expensive estimation of HIV tropism before prescription of CCR5 antagonists compared with the Trofile assay (Monogram Biosciences, South San Francisco, CA, USA). Paired genotypic and Trofile results were compared in plasma samples derived from the maraviroc expanded access programme (EAP) in Europe. A new genotypic approach was built to improve the sensitivity to detect X4 variants based on an optimization of the webPSSM algorithm. Then, the new tool was validated in specimens from patients included in the ALLEGRO trial, a multicentre study conducted in Spain to assess the prevalence of R5 variants in treatment-experienced HIV patients. A total of 266 specimens from the maraviroc EAP were tested. Overall geno/pheno concordance was above 72%. A high specificity was generally seen for the detection of X4 variants using genotypic tools (ranging from 58% to 95%), while sensitivity was low (ranging from 31% to 76%). The PSSM score was then optimized to enhance the sensitivity to detect X4 variants changing the original threshold for R5 categorization. The new PSSM algorithms, PSSM(X4R5-8) and PSSM(SINSI-6.4), considered as X4 all V3 scoring values above -8 or -6.4, respectively, increasing the sensitivity to detect X4 variants up to 80%. The new algorithms were then validated in 148 specimens derived from patients included in the ALLEGRO trial. The sensitivity/specificity to detect X4 variants was 93%/69% for PSSM(X4R5-8) and 93%/70% for PSSM(SINSI-6.4). PSSM(X4R5-8) and PSSM(SINSI-6.4) may confidently assist therapeutic decisions for using CCR5 antagonists in HIV patients, providing an easier and rapid estimation of tropism in clinical samples.

  3. Specificity for a CCR5 Inhibitor Is Conferred by a Single Amino Acid Residue: ROLE OF ILE198.

    PubMed

    Lau, Gloria; Labrecque, Jean; Metz, Markus; Vaz, Roy; Fricker, Simon P

    2015-04-24

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CCR2b share 89% amino acid homology. CCR5 is a co-receptor for HIV and CCR5 antagonists have been investigated as inhibitors of HIV infection. We describe the use of two CCR5 antagonists, Schering-C (SCH-C), which is specific for CCR5, and TAK-779, a dual inhibitor of CCR5 and CCR2b, to probe the CCR5 inhibitor binding site using CCR5/CCR2b chimeric receptors. Compound inhibition in the different chimeras was assessed by inhibition of chemokine-induced calcium flux. SCH-C inhibited RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) (CCL5)-mediated calcium flux on CCR5 with an IC50 of 22.8 nM but was inactive against monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2)-mediated calcium flux on CCR2b. However, SCH-C inhibited CCL2-induced calcium flux against a CCR5/CCR2b chimera consisting of transmembrane domains IV-VI of CCR5 with an IC50 of 55 nM. A sequence comparison of CCR5 and CCR2b identified a divergent amino acid sequence located at the junction of transmembrane domain V and second extracellular loop. Transfer of the CCR5 sequence KNFQTLKIV into CCR2b conferred SCH-C inhibition (IC50 of 122 nM) into the predominantly CCR2b chimera. Furthermore, a single substitution, R206I, conferred partial but significant inhibition (IC50 of 1023 nM) by SCH-C. These results show that a limited amino acid sequence is responsible for SCH-C specificity to CCR5, and we propose a model showing the interaction with CCR5 Ile(198).

  4. Incompatible Natures of the HIV-1 Envelope in Resistance to the CCR5 Antagonist Cenicriviroc and to Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Takeo; Enomoto, Ikumi; Baba, Masanori; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2015-11-02

    Cenicriviroc is a CCR5 antagonist which prevents human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from cellular entry. The CCR5-binding regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein are important targets for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), and mutations conferring cenicriviroc resistance may therefore affect sensitivity to NAbs. Here, we used the in vitro induction of HIV-1 variants resistant to cenicriviroc or NAbs to examine the relationship between resistance to cenicriviroc and resistance to NAbs. The cenicriviroc-resistant variant KK652-67 (strain KK passaged 67 times in the presence of increasing concentrations of cenicriviroc) was sensitive to neutralization by NAbs against the V3 loop, the CD4-induced (CD4i) region, and the CD4-binding site (CD4bs), whereas the wild-type (WT) parental HIV-1 strain KKWT from which cenicriviroc-resistant strain KK652-67 was obtained was resistant to these NAbs. The V3 region of KK652-67 was important for cenicriviroc resistance and critical to the high sensitivity of the V3, CD4i, and CD4bs epitopes to NAbs. Moreover, induction of variants resistant to anti-V3 NAb 0.5γ and anti-CD4i NAb 4E9C from cenicriviroc-resistant strain KK652-67 resulted in reversion to the cenicriviroc-sensitive phenotype comparable to that of the parental strain, KKWT. Resistance to 0.5γ and 4E9C was caused by the novel substitutions R315K, G324R, and E381K in the V3 and C3 regions near the substitutions conferring cenicriviroc resistance. Importantly, these amino acid changes in the CCR5-binding region were also responsible for reversion to the cenicriviroc-sensitive phenotype. These results suggest the presence of key amino acid residues where resistance to cenicriviroc is incompatible with resistance to NAbs. This implies that cenicriviroc and neutralizing antibodies may restrict the emergence of variants resistant to each other.

  5. Incompatible Natures of the HIV-1 Envelope in Resistance to the CCR5 Antagonist Cenicriviroc and to Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Ikumi; Baba, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Cenicriviroc is a CCR5 antagonist which prevents human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from cellular entry. The CCR5-binding regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein are important targets for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), and mutations conferring cenicriviroc resistance may therefore affect sensitivity to NAbs. Here, we used the in vitro induction of HIV-1 variants resistant to cenicriviroc or NAbs to examine the relationship between resistance to cenicriviroc and resistance to NAbs. The cenicriviroc-resistant variant KK652-67 (strain KK passaged 67 times in the presence of increasing concentrations of cenicriviroc) was sensitive to neutralization by NAbs against the V3 loop, the CD4-induced (CD4i) region, and the CD4-binding site (CD4bs), whereas the wild-type (WT) parental HIV-1 strain KKWT from which cenicriviroc-resistant strain KK652-67 was obtained was resistant to these NAbs. The V3 region of KK652-67 was important for cenicriviroc resistance and critical to the high sensitivity of the V3, CD4i, and CD4bs epitopes to NAbs. Moreover, induction of variants resistant to anti-V3 NAb 0.5γ and anti-CD4i NAb 4E9C from cenicriviroc-resistant strain KK652-67 resulted in reversion to the cenicriviroc-sensitive phenotype comparable to that of the parental strain, KKWT. Resistance to 0.5γ and 4E9C was caused by the novel substitutions R315K, G324R, and E381K in the V3 and C3 regions near the substitutions conferring cenicriviroc resistance. Importantly, these amino acid changes in the CCR5-binding region were also responsible for reversion to the cenicriviroc-sensitive phenotype. These results suggest the presence of key amino acid residues where resistance to cenicriviroc is incompatible with resistance to NAbs. This implies that cenicriviroc and neutralizing antibodies may restrict the emergence of variants resistant to each other. PMID:26525792

  6. Antifibrotic Effects of the Dual CCR2/CCR5 Antagonist Cenicriviroc in Animal Models of Liver and Kidney Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Eric; Moyle, Graeme; Reshef, Ran; Richman, Lee P.; Thompson, Melanie; Hong, Feng; Chou, Hsin-l; Hashiguchi, Taishi; Plato, Craig; Poulin, Dominic; Richards, Toni; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Jenkins, Helen; Wolfgang, Grushenka; Friedman, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Interactions between C-C chemokine receptor types 2 (CCR2) and 5 (CCR5) and their ligands, including CCL2 and CCL5, mediate fibrogenesis by promoting monocyte/macrophage recruitment and tissue infiltration, as well as hepatic stellate cell activation. Cenicriviroc (CVC) is an oral, dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist with nanomolar potency against both receptors. CVC’s anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects were evaluated in a range of preclinical models of inflammation and fibrosis. Methods Monocyte/macrophage recruitment was assessed in vivo in a mouse model of thioglycollate-induced peritonitis. CCL2-induced chemotaxis was evaluated ex vivo on mouse monocytes. CVC’s antifibrotic effects were evaluated in a thioacetamide-induced rat model of liver fibrosis and mouse models of diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and renal fibrosis. Study assessments included body and liver/kidney weight, liver function test, liver/kidney morphology and collagen deposition, fibrogenic gene and protein expression, and pharmacokinetic analyses. Results CVC significantly reduced monocyte/macrophage recruitment in vivo at doses ≥20 mg/kg/day (p < 0.05). At these doses, CVC showed antifibrotic effects, with significant reductions in collagen deposition (p < 0.05), and collagen type 1 protein and mRNA expression across the three animal models of fibrosis. In the NASH model, CVC significantly reduced the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (p < 0.05 vs. controls). CVC treatment had no notable effect on body or liver/kidney weight. Conclusions CVC displayed potent anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic activity in a range of animal fibrosis models, supporting human testing for fibrotic diseases. Further experimental studies are needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms of CVC’s antifibrotic effects. A Phase 2b study in adults with NASH and liver fibrosis is fully enrolled (CENTAUR Study 652-2-203; NCT02217475). PMID:27347680

  7. CCR5 inhibitors: Emerging promising HIV therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Padmasri Kutikuppala Surya

    2009-01-01

    Though potent anti-HIV therapy has spectacularly reduced the morbidity and mortality of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection in the advanced countries, it continues to be associated with substantial toxicity, drug-drug interactions, difficulties in adherence, and abnormal cost. As a result, better effective, safe antiretroviral drugs and treatment strategies keep on to be pursued. In this process, CCR5 (chemokine receptor 5) inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral drug used in the treatment of HIV. They are designed to prevent HIV infection of CD4 T-cells by blocking the CCR5. When the CCR5 receptor is unavailable, 'R5-tropic' HIV (the variant of the virus that is common in earlier HIV infection) cannot engage with a CD4 T-cell to infect the cell. In August 2007, the FDA approved the first chemokine (C-C motif) CCR5 inhibitor, maraviroc, for treatment-experienced patients infected with R5-using virus. Studies from different cohort in regions, affected by clad B HIV-1, demonstrate that 81-88% of HIV-1 variants in treatment naïve patients are CCR5 tropic and that virtually all the remaining variants are dual/mixed tropic i.e., are able to utilize both CCR5 and CXCR4 coreceptors. In treatment experienced patients, 49-78% of the variants are purely CCR5 tropic, 22-48% are dual/mixed tropic, and 2-5% exclusively utilize CXCR4. A 32 bp deletion in the CCR5 gene, which results in a frame shift and truncation of the normal CCR5 protein, was identified in a few persons who had remained uninfected after exposure to CCR5 tropic HIV-1 virus. This allele is common in white of European origin, with prevalence near to 10%, but is absent among East Asian, American Indian, Tamil Indian, and African ethnic groups. HIV-infected individuals, who are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32, have slower rates of disease progression. The currently available data supports the continuation of the development of CCR5 antagonists in different settings related to HIV-1 infection. If

  8. The relationship of CCR5 antagonists to CD4+ T-cell gain: a meta-regression of recent clinical trials in treatment-experienced HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Timothy J; Ribaudo, Heather R; Tenorio, Allan R; Gulick, Roy M

    2010-01-01

    Lower CD4+ T-cell counts are related to increased morbidity and mortality despite virologic suppression. CCR5 antagonists are associated with robust CD4+ T-cell responses. We examined the relationship of CCR5 antagonists to CD4+ T-cell gains. Meta-regression of recent phase 2-3 trials evaluating new antiretroviral agents in treatment-experienced subjects. We analyzed the relationship of CCR5 antagonists to CD4+ T-cell count increase 24 weeks after initiating the new regimen using a linear model with generalized estimating equations controlling for differing rates of virologic suppression. Each treatment group was treated as a data point weighted by sample size. We included 46 treatment groups from 17 trials (11 groups from 5 trials used CCR5 antagonists). Controlling for average baseline HIV-1 RNA and proportion of subjects achieving HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL, use of a CCR5 antagonist was associated with an additional significant CD4+ T-cell gain of +30/μL (95% CI, 19-42) at 24 weeks compared to treatment groups not using a CCR5 antagonist. Use of a CCR5 antagonist was associated with an enhanced CD4+ T-cell count response independent of virologic suppression. This observation supports further evaluation of CCR5 antagonists in patients with discordant immunologic and virologic responses to ART.

  9. The Relationship of CCR5 Antagonists to CD4+ T-Cell Gain: A Meta-Regression of Recent Clinical Trials in Treatment-Experienced HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wilkin, Timothy J.; Ribaudo, Heather R.; Tenorio, Allan R.; Gulick, Roy M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Lower CD4+ T-cell counts are related to increased morbidity and mortality despite virologic suppression. CCR5 antagonists are associated with robust CD4+ T-cell responses. We examined the relationship of CCR5 antagonists to CD4+ T-cell gains. Design Meta-regression of recent phase 2–3 trials evaluating new antiretroviral agents in treatment-experienced subjects. Methods We analyzed the relationship of CCR5 antagonists to CD4+ T-cell count increase 24 weeks after initiating the new regimen using a linear model with generalized estimating equations controlling for differing rates of virologic suppression. Each treatment group was treated as a data point weighted by sample size. Results We included 46 treatment groups from 17 trials (11 groups from 5 trials used CCR5 antagonists). Controlling for average baseline HIV-1 RNA and proportion of subjects achieving HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL, use of a CCR5 antagonist was associated with an additional significant CD4+ T-cell gain of +30/μL (95% CI, 19–42) at 24 weeks compared to treatment groups not using a CCR5 antagonist. Conclusions Use of a CCR5 antagonist was associated with an enhanced CD4+ T-cell count response independent of virologic suppression. This observation supports further evaluation of CCR5 antagonists in patients with discordant immunologic and virologic responses to ART. PMID:21239363

  10. Exploration on natural product anibamine side chain modification toward development of novel CCR5 antagonists and potential anti-prostate cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoyan G; Zaidi, Saheem A; Zhang, Feng; Singh, Shilpa; Raborg, Thomas J; Yuan, Yunyun; Zhang, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of death among males in the world. Prostate cancer cells have been shown to express upregulated chemokine receptor CCR5, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that relates to the inflammation process. Anibamine, a natural product containing a pyridine ring and two aliphatic side chains, was shown to carry a binding affinity of 1 μM at CCR5 as an antagonist with potential anti-cancer activity. However, it is not drug-like according to the Lipinski's rule of five mainly due to its two long aliphatic side chains. In our effort to improve its drug-like property, a series of anibamine derivatives were designed and synthesized by placement of aromatic side chains through an amide linkage to the pyridine ring. The newly synthesized compounds were tested for their CCR5 affinity and antagonism, and potential anti-proliferation activity against prostate cancer cell lines. Basal cytotoxicity was finally studied for compounds showing potent anti-proliferation activity. It was found that compounds with hydrophobic substitutions on the aromatic systems seemed to carry more promising CCR5 binding and prostate cancer cell proliferation inhibition activities.

  11. Interaction of small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry with CCR5

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, Christoph . E-mail: seiberc@mail.rockefeller.edu; Ying Weiwen; Gavrilov, Svetlana; Tsamis, Fotini; Kuhmann, Shawn E.; Palani, Anandan; Tagat, Jayaram R.; Clader, John W.; McCombie, Stuart W.; Baroudy, Bahige M.; Smith, Steven O.; Dragic, Tatjana; Moore, John P.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2006-05-25

    The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is the major coreceptor for macrophage-tropic (R5) HIV-1 strains. Several small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 that block chemokine binding and HIV-1 entry are being evaluated as drug candidates. Here we define how CCR5 antagonists TAK-779, AD101 (SCH-350581) and SCH-C (SCH-351125), which inhibit HIV-1 entry, interact with CCR5. Using a mutagenesis approach in combination with a viral entry assay to provide a direct functional read out, we tested predictions based on a homology model of CCR5 and analyzed the functions of more than 30 amino acid residues. We find that a key set of aromatic and aliphatic residues serves as a hydrophobic core for the ligand binding pocket, while E283 is critical for high affinity interaction, most likely by acting as the counterion for a positively charged nitrogen atom common to all three inhibitors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding how specific antagonists interact with CCR5, and may be useful for the rational design of new, improved CCR5 ligands.

  12. Virological Response after Short-Term CCR5 Antagonist Exposure in HIV-Infected Patients: Frequency of Subjects with Virological Response and Associated Factors▿

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; González-Serna, Alejandro; Genebat, Miguel; Machmach, Kawthar; Vidal, Francesc; Muñoz-Fernández, Ángeles; Ferrando-Martinez, Sara; Leal, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The virological response after an 8-day maraviroc monotherapy has been proposed to be an alternative method to determine whether an CCR5 antagonist should be prescribed to HIV-infected patients. The frequency of patients eligible for a combined antiretroviral therapy which includes maraviroc on the basis of the result of this clinical test is not well-known at the moment. In the same way, clinical and immunovirological factors associated with the virological response after antagonist exposure need to be determined. Ninety consecutive HIV-infected patients were exposed to an 8-day maraviroc monotherapy. The virological response was considered positive if either a reduction of ≥1-log10 HIV RNA copies/ml or an undetectable viral load (<40 HIV RNA copies/ml) was achieved. CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic virus levels were determined by using patients' viral isolates and multiple rounds of infection of indicator cell lines (U87-CXCR4 and U87-CCR5). The frequency of patients with a positive virological response was 72.2% (94.7% and 66.2% for treatment-naïve and pretreated patients, respectively). The positive response rates dramatically decreased in patients with lower CD4+ T-cell counts. The CXCR4-tropic virus level was the only variable independently associated with the virological response after short-term maraviroc exposure. Lower CD4+ T-cell strata were associated with higher CXCR4-tropic virus levels. These results support the suggestion that CCR5 antagonists should be an early treatment option before the expansion of CXCR4-tropic strains. PMID:21807977

  13. Antagonists of the human CCR5 receptor as anti-HIV-1 agents. Part 3: a proposed pharmacophore model for 1-[N-(methyl)-N-(phenylsulfonyl)amino]-2-(phenyl)-4-[4-(substituted)piperidin-1-yl]butanes.

    PubMed

    Finke, P E; Meurer, L C; Oates, B; Shah, S K; Loebach, J L; Mills, S G; MacCoss, M; Castonguay, L; Malkowitz, L; Springer, M S; Gould, S L; DeMartino, J A

    2001-09-17

    Structure-activity relationship studies directed toward the optimization of (2S)-2-(3-chlorophenyl)-1-[N-(methyl)-N-(phenylsulfonyl)amino]-4-[4-(substituted)piperidin-1-yl]butanes as CCR5 antagonists resulted in the synthesis of the spiro-indanone derivative 8c (IC50=5 nM). These and previous results are summarized in a proposed pharmacophore model for this class of CCR5 antagonist.

  14. Analysis of Clinical HIV-1 Strains with Resistance to Maraviroc Reveals Strain-Specific Resistance Mutations, Variable Degrees of Resistance, and Minimal Cross-Resistance to Other CCR5 Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Ellenberg, Paula; Duncan, Renee; Ellett, Anne; Zhou, Jingling; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Gray, Lachlan R; Lewis, Marilyn; Jubb, Becky; Westby, Mike; Lee, Benhur; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa; Roche, Michael; Gorry, Paul R

    2017-09-26

    Maraviroc (MVC) is an allosteric inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry, and is the only CCR5 antagonist licensed for use as an anti-HIV-1 therapeutic. It acts by altering the conformation of the CCR5 extracellular loops, rendering CCR5 unrecognizable by the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins. This study aimed to understand the mechanisms underlying the development of MVC resistance in HIV-1-infected patients. To do this, we obtained longitudinal plasma samples from eight subjects who experienced treatment failure with phenotypically verified, CCR5-tropic MVC resistance. We then cloned and characterized HIV-1 Envs (n = 77) from plasma of pretreatment (n = 36) and treatment failure (n = 41) samples. Our results showed variation in the magnitude of MVC resistance as measured by reductions in maximal percent inhibition of Env-pseudotyped viruses, which was more pronounced in 293-Affinofile cells compared to other cells with similar levels of CCR5 expression. Amino acid determinants of MVC resistance localized to the V3 Env region and were strain specific. We also observed minimal cross-resistance to other CCR5 antagonists by MVC-resistant strains. We conclude that 293-Affinofile cells are highly sensitive for detecting and measuring MVC resistance through a mechanism that is CCR5-dependent yet independent of CCR5 expression levels. The strain-specific nature of resistance mutations suggests that sequence-based diagnostics and prognostics will need to be more sophisticated than simple position scoring to be useful for managing resistance in subjects taking MVC. Finally, the minimal levels of cross-resistance suggests that recognition of the MVC-modified form of CCR5 does not necessarily lead to recognition of other antagonist-modified forms of CCR5.

  15. Biased small-molecule ligands for selective inhibition of HIV-1 cell entry via CCR5.

    PubMed

    Berg, Christian; Spiess, Katja; Lüttichau, Hans R; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of HIV's use of CCR5 as the primary coreceptor in fusion, the focus on developing small-molecule receptor antagonists for inhibition hereof has only resulted in one single drug, Maraviroc. We therefore investigated the possibility of using small-molecule CCR5 agonists as HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. A virus-free cell-based fusion reporter assay, based on mixing "effector cells" (expressing HIV Env and luciferase activator) with "target cells" (expressing CD4, CCR5 wild type or a selection of well-described mutations, and luciferase reporter), was used as fusion readout. Receptor expression was evaluated by ELISA and fluorescence microscopy. On CCR5 WT, Maraviroc and Aplaviroc inhibited fusion with high potencies (EC 50 values of 91 and 501 nM, respectively), whereas removal of key residues for both antagonists (Glu283Ala) or Maraviroc alone (Tyr251Ala) prevented fusion inhibition, establishing this assay as suitable for screening of HIV entry inhibitors. Both ligands inhibited HIV fusion on signaling-deficient CCR5 mutations (Tyr244Ala and Trp248Ala). Moreover, the steric hindrance CCR5 mutation (Gly286Phe) impaired fusion, presumably by a direct hindrance of gp120 interaction. Finally, the efficacy switch mutation (Leu203Phe) - converting small-molecule antagonists/inverse agonists to full agonists biased toward G-protein activation - uncovered that also small-molecule agonists can function as direct HIV-1 cell entry inhibitors. Importantly, no agonist-induced receptor internalization was observed for this mutation. Our studies of the pharmacodynamic requirements for HIV-1 fusion inhibitors highlight the possibility of future development of biased ligands with selective targeting of the HIV-CCR5 interaction without interfering with the normal functionality of CCR5.

  16. CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101 preferentially inhibit drug-bound CCR5 infection and restore drug sensitivity of Maraviroc-resistant HIV-1 in primary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Latinovic, Olga; Reitz, Marvin; Le, Nhut M.; Foulke, James S.; Faetkenheuer, Gerd; Lehmann, Clara; Redfield, Robert R.; Heredia, Alonso

    2011-03-01

    R5 HIV-1 strains resistant to the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc (MVC) can use drug-bound CCR5. We demonstrate that MVC-resistant HIV-1 exhibits delayed kinetics of coreceptor engagement and fusion during drug-bound versus free CCR5 infection of cell lines. Antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of CCR5 had greater antiviral activity against MVC-bound compared to MVC-free CCR5 infection. However, in PBMCs, only ECL2 CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, inhibited infection by MVC resistant HIV-1 more potently with MVC-bound than with free CCR5. In addition, HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, restored the antiviral activity of MVC against resistant virus in PBMCs. In flow cytometric studies, CCR5 binding by the HGS mAbs, but not by 2D7, was increased when PBMCs were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC increases exposure of the relevant epitope. Thus, HGS004 and HGS101 have antiviral mechanisms distinct from 2D7 and could help overcome MVC resistance.

  17. The CCR5-antagonist Maraviroc reverses HIV-1 latency in vitro alone or in combination with the PKC-agonist Bryostatin-1.

    PubMed

    López-Huertas, María Rosa; Jiménez-Tormo, Laura; Madrid-Elena, Nadia; Gutiérrez, Carolina; Rodríguez-Mora, Sara; Coiras, Mayte; Alcamí, José; Moreno, Santiago

    2017-05-24

    A potential strategy to cure HIV-1 infection is to use latency reversing agents (LRAs) to eliminate latent reservoirs established in resting CD4+ T (rCD4+) cells. As no drug has been shown to be completely effective, finding new drugs and combinations are of increasing importance. We studied the effect of Maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist that activates NF-κB, on HIV-1 replication from latency. HIV-1-latency models based on CCL19 or IL7 treatment, before HIV-1 infection were used. Latently infected primary rCD4+ or central memory T cells were stimulated with MVC alone or in combination with Bryostatin-1, a PKC agonist known to reverse HIV-1 latency. MVC 5 μM and 0.31 μM were chosen for further studies although other concentrations of MVC also increased HIV-1 replication. MVC was as efficient as Bryostatin-1 in reactivating X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. However, the combination of MVC and Bryostatin-1 was antagonistic, probably because Bryostatin-1 reduced CCR5 expression levels. Although HIV-1 reactivation had the same tendency in both latency models, statistical significance was only achieved in IL7-treated cells. These data suggest that MVC should be regarded as a new LRA with potency similar as Bryostatin-1. Further studies are required to describe the synergistic effect of MVC with other LRAs.

  18. A Simplified Technique for Evaluating Human "CCR5" Genetic Polymorphism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falteisek, Lukáš; Cerný, Jan; Janštová, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    To involve students in thinking about the problem of AIDS (which is important in the view of nondecreasing infection rates), we established a practical lab using a simplified adaptation of Thomas's (2004) method to determine the polymorphism of HIV co-receptor CCR5 from students' own epithelial cells. CCR5 is a receptor involved in inflammatory…

  19. A Simplified Technique for Evaluating Human "CCR5" Genetic Polymorphism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falteisek, Lukáš; Cerný, Jan; Janštová, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    To involve students in thinking about the problem of AIDS (which is important in the view of nondecreasing infection rates), we established a practical lab using a simplified adaptation of Thomas's (2004) method to determine the polymorphism of HIV co-receptor CCR5 from students' own epithelial cells. CCR5 is a receptor involved in inflammatory…

  20. Maraviroc Clinical Test (MCT) as an alternative tool to decide CCR5-antagonists prescription in naïve HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Genebat, Miguel; de Pablo-Bernal, Rebeca S; Pulido, Ildefonso; Jiménez-Mejías, Manuel E; Martínez, Onofre; Pacheco, Yolanda M; Raffi-El-Idrissi Benhia, Mohammed; Abad, María Antonia; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Leal, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to analyze the virological response to a combined antiretroviral therapy started after Maraviroc Clinical Test (MCT) in naïve HIV-infected patients. Forty-one patients were exposed to MCT, based on an 8-day MVC monotherapy. If undetectability or a viral load reduction >1 log10 HIV-RNA copies/ml was achieved, a MVC-containing cART was prescribed. Forty patients showed a positive MCT; undetectability after 48weeks on cART was achieved in 34/41 (82.9%) patients. The result of MCT was compared with a genotypic tropism method and with Trofile®, showing 10.7% and 18.75% discordance rates, respectively. MCT is a reliable tool to decide CCR5-antagonists prescription, also in the naïve scenario where most patients show a virological response to MVC independently the tropism result reported by genotypic or phenotypic methods.

  1. Cenicriviroc, a Novel CCR5 (R5) and CCR2 Antagonist, Shows In Vitro Activity against R5 Tropic HIV-2 Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Visseaux, Benoit; Charpentier, Charlotte; Collin, Gilles; Bertine, Mélanie; Peytavin, Gilles; Damond, Florence; Matheron, Sophie; Lefebvre, Eric; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Descamps, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Background Maraviroc activity against HIV-2, a virus naturally resistant to different HIV-1 antiretroviral drugs, has been recently demonstrated. The aim of this study was to assess HIV-2 susceptibility to cenicriviroc, a novel, once-daily, dual CCR5 and CCR2 antagonist that has completed Phase 2b development in HIV-1 infection. Methods Cenicriviroc phenotypic activity has been tested using a PBMC phenotypic susceptibility assay against four R5-, one X4- and one dual-tropic HIV-2 clinical primary isolates. All isolates were obtained by co-cultivation of PHA-activated PBMC from distinct HIV-2-infected CCR5-antagonist-naïve patients included in the French HIV-2 cohort and were previously tested for maraviroc susceptibility using the same protocol. HIV-2 tropism was determined by phenotypic assay using Ghost(3) cell lines. Results Regarding the 4 R5 HIV-2 clinical isolates tested, effective concentration 50% EC50 for cenicriviroc were 0.03, 0.33, 0.45 and 0.98 nM, similar to those observed with maraviroc: 1.13, 0.58, 0.48 and 0.68 nM, respectively. Maximum percentages of inhibition (MPI) of cenicriviroc were 94, 94, 93 and 98%, similar to those observed with maraviroc (93, 90, 82, 100%, respectively). The dual- and X4-tropic HIV-2 strains were resistant to cenicriviroc with EC50 >1000 nM and MPI at 33% and 4%, respectively. Conclusions In this first study assessing HIV-2 susceptibility to cenicriviroc, we observed an in vitro activity against HIV-2 R5-tropic strains similar to that observed with maraviroc. Thus, cenicriviroc may offer a once-daily treatment opportunity in the limited therapeutic arsenal for HIV-2. Clinical studies are warranted. PMID:26247470

  2. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael; Umana, Pablo; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linkers, stable molecules could be obtained in amounts that were within the same range as or no less than 4-fold lower than those observed with monoclonal antibodies in transient expression assays. In contrast to monospecific CCR5 antibodies, bispecific antibody derivatives block two alternative docking sites of CCR5-tropic HIV strains on the CCR5 coreceptor. Consequently, these molecules showed 18- to 57-fold increased antiviral activities compared to the parent antibodies. Most importantly, one prototypic tetravalent CCR5 antibody had antiviral activity against virus strains resistant to the single parental antibodies. In summary, physical linkage of two CCR5 antibodies targeting different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5 resulted in tetravalent, bispecific antibodies with enhanced antiviral potency against wild-type and CCR5 antibody-resistant HIV-1 strains. PMID:21300827

  3. Antagonists of the human CCR5 receptor as anti-HIV-1 agents. Part 2: structure-activity relationships for substituted 2-Aryl-1-[N-(methyl)-N-(phenylsulfonyl)amino]-4-(piperidin-1-yl)butanes.

    PubMed

    Finke, P E; Meurer, L C; Oates, B; Mills, S G; MacCoss, M; Malkowitz, L; Springer, M S; Daugherty, B L; Gould, S L; DeMartino, J A; Siciliano, S J; Carella, A; Carver, G; Holmes, K; Danzeisen, R; Hazuda, D; Kessler, J; Lineberger, J; Miller, M; Schleif, W A; Emini, E A

    2001-01-22

    (2S)-2-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1-[N-(methyl)-N-(phenylsulfonyl)amino]-4-[spiro(2,3-dihydrobenzthiophene-3,4'-piperidin-1'-yl)]butane S-oxide (3) has been identified as a potent CCR5 antagonist lead structure having an IC50 = 35 nM. Herein, we describe the structure-activity relationship studies directed toward the requirement for and optimization of the C-2 phenyl fragment. The phenyl was found to be important for CCR5 antagonism and substitution was limited to small moieties at the 3-position (13 and 16: X= H, 3-F, 3-Cl, 3-Me).

  4. The Chemokine Receptor CCR5, a Therapeutic Target for HIV/AIDS Antagonists, Is Critical for Recovery in a Mouse Model of Japanese Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Larena, Maximilian; Regner, Matthias; Lobigs, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis is a severe central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory disease caused by the mosquito-borne flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). In the current study we have investigated the immune responses against JEV in mice lacking expression of the chemokine receptor CCR5, which functions in activation and chemotaxis of leukocytes during infection. We show that CCR5 serves as a host antiviral factor against Japanese encephalitis, with CCR5 deficiency markedly increasing mortality, and viral burden in the CNS. Humoral immune responses, which are essential in recovery from JEV infection, were of similar magnitude in CCR5 sufficient and deficient mice. However, absence of CCR5 resulted in a multifaceted deficiency of cellular immune responses characterized by reduced natural killer and CD8+ T cell activity, low splenic cellularity, and impaired trafficking of leukocytes to the brain. Interestingly, adoptive transfer of immune spleen cells, depleted of B lymphocytes, increased resistance of CCR5-deficient recipient mice against JEV regardless of whether the cells were obtained from CCR5-deficient or wild-type donor mice, and only when transferred at one but not at three days post-challenge. This result is consistent with a mechanism by which CCR5 expression enhances lymphocyte activation and thereby promotes host survival in Japanese encephalitis. PMID:23028638

  5. Study on CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingping; Deng, Riqiang; Wu, Wenyan

    2012-03-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor of human chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a key target in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection process due to its major involvement in binding to the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 and facilitating virus entry into the cells. The identification of naturally occurring CCR5 mutations (especially CCR5 delta-32) has allowed us to address the CCR5 molecule as a promising target to prevent or resist HIV infection in vivo. To obtain high-affinity peptides that can be used to block CCR5, CCR5 analogs with high conformational similarity are required. In this study, two recombinant proteins named CCR5 N-Linker-E2 and CCR5 mN-E1-E2 containing the fragments of the CCR5 N-terminal, the first extracellular loop or the second extracellular loop are cloned from a full-length human CCR5 cDNA. The recombinant human CCR5 analogs with self-cleavage activity of the intein Mxe or Ssp in the vector pTwinI were then produced with a high-yield expression and purification system in Escherichia coli. Experiments of extracellular epitope-activity identification (such as immunoprecipitation and indirective/competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) confirmed the close similarity between the epitope activity of the CCR5 analogs and that of the natural CCR5, suggesting the applicability of the recombinant CCR5 analogs as antagonists of the chemokine ligands. Subsequent screening of high-affinity peptides from the phage random-peptides library acquired nine polypeptides, which could be used as CCR5 peptide antagonists. The CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides elucidated in this paper provide us with a basis for further study of the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 infection.

  6. CCR5Δ32 mutation and HIV infection: basis for curative HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Allers, Kristina; Schneider, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is expressed on potential human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) target cells and serves as the predominant co-receptor for viral entry during initial transmission and through the early stages of infection. A homozygous Δ32 mutation in the CCR5 gene prevents CCR5 cell surface expression and thus confers resistance to infection with CCR5-tropic HIV strains. Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells from a CCR5Δ32/Δ32 donor was previously successful in eliminating HIV from the recipient's immune system, suggesting that targeted CCR5 disruption can lead to an HIV cure. Therefore, intense work is currently being carried out on CCR5 gene-editing tools to develop curative HIV therapy. Here, we review the natural function of CCR5, the progress made on CCR5 gene editing to date and discuss the current limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapamycin causes down-regulation of CCR5 and accumulation of anti-HIV beta-chemokines: an approach to suppress R5 strains of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Heredia, A; Amoroso, A; Davis, C; Le, N; Reardon, E; Dominique, J K; Klingebiel, E; Gallo, R C; Redfield, R R

    2003-09-02

    Propagation of R5 strains of HIV-1 on CD4 lymphocytes and macrophages requires expression of the CCR5 coreceptor on the cell surface. Individuals lacking CCR5 (CCR5 Delta 32 homozygous genotype) are phenotypically normal and resistant to infection with HIV-1. CCR5 expression on lymphocytes depends on signaling through the IL-2 receptor. By FACS analysis we demonstrate that rapamycin (RAPA), a drug that disrupts IL-2 receptor signaling, reduces CCR5 surface expression on T cells at concentrations as low as 1 nM. In addition, lower concentrations of RAPA (0.01 nM) were sufficient to reduce CCR5 surface expression on maturing monocytes. PCR analysis on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) showed that RAPA interfered with CCR5 expression at the transcriptional level. Reduced expression of CCR5 on PBMCs cultured in the presence of RAPA was associated with increased extracellular levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha and MIP-1 beta. In infectivity assays, RAPA suppressed the replication of R5 strains of HIV-1 both in PBMC and macrophage cultures. In total PBMC cultures, RAPA-mediated inhibition of CCR5-using strains of HIV-1 occurred at 0.01 nM, a concentration of drug that is approximately 103 times lower than therapeutic through levels of drug in renal transplant recipients. In addition, RAPA enhanced the antiviral activity of the CCR5 antagonist TAK-779. These results suggest that low concentrations of RAPA may have a role in both the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  8. Neurological Response to cART vs. cART plus Integrase Inhibitor and CCR5 Antagonist Initiated during Acute HIV

    PubMed Central

    Valcour, Victor G.; Spudich, Serena S.; Sailasuta, Napapon; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Fletcher, James L. K.; Kroon, Eugene D. M. B.; Jagodzinski, Linda L.; Allen, Isabel E.; Adams, Collin L.; Prueksakaew, Peeriya; Slike, Bonnie M.; Hellmuth, Joanna M.; Kim, Jerome H.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare central nervous system (CNS) outcomes in participants treated during acute HIV infection with standard combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) vs. cART plus integrase inhibitor and CCR5 antagonist (cART+). Design 24-week randomized open-label prospective evaluation. Method Participants were evaluated then randomized to initiate cART (efavirenz, tenofovir, and either emtricitabine or lamivudine) vs. cART+ (cART plus raltegravir and maraviroc) during acute HIV and re-evaluated at 4, 12 and 24 weeks. We examined plasma and CSF cytokines, HIV RNA levels, neurological and neuropsychological findings, and brain MRS across groups and compared to healthy controls. Results At baseline, 62 participants were in Fiebig stages I-V. Randomized groups were similar for mean age (27 vs. 25, p = 0.137), gender (each 94% male), plasma log10 HIV RNA (5.4 vs. 5.6, p = 0.382), CSF log10 HIV RNA (2.35 vs. 3.31, p = 0.561), and estimated duration of HIV (18 vs. 17 days, p = 0.546). Randomized arms did not differ at 24 weeks by any CNS outcome. Combining arms, all measures concurrent with antiretroviral treatment improved, for example, neuropsychological testing (mean NPZ-4 of -0.408 vs. 0.245, p<0.001) and inflammatory markers by MRS (e.g. mean frontal white matter (FWM) choline of 2.92 vs. 2.84, p = 0.045) at baseline and week 24, respectively. Plasma neopterin (p<0.001) and interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) (p = 0.007) remained elevated in participants compared to controls but no statistically significant differences were seen in CSF cytokines compared to controls, despite individual variability among the HIV-infected group. Conclusions A 24-week course of cART+ improved CNS related outcomes, but was not associated with measurable differences compared to standard cART. PMID:26555069

  9. Neurological Response to cART vs. cART plus Integrase Inhibitor and CCR5 Antagonist Initiated during Acute HIV.

    PubMed

    Valcour, Victor G; Spudich, Serena S; Sailasuta, Napapon; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Fletcher, James L K; Kroon, Eugene D M B; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Allen, Isabel E; Adams, Collin L; Prueksakaew, Peeriya; Slike, Bonnie M; Hellmuth, Joanna M; Kim, Jerome H; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2015-01-01

    To compare central nervous system (CNS) outcomes in participants treated during acute HIV infection with standard combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) vs. cART plus integrase inhibitor and CCR5 antagonist (cART+). 24-week randomized open-label prospective evaluation. Participants were evaluated then randomized to initiate cART (efavirenz, tenofovir, and either emtricitabine or lamivudine) vs. cART+ (cART plus raltegravir and maraviroc) during acute HIV and re-evaluated at 4, 12 and 24 weeks. We examined plasma and CSF cytokines, HIV RNA levels, neurological and neuropsychological findings, and brain MRS across groups and compared to healthy controls. At baseline, 62 participants were in Fiebig stages I-V. Randomized groups were similar for mean age (27 vs. 25, p = 0.137), gender (each 94% male), plasma log10 HIV RNA (5.4 vs. 5.6, p = 0.382), CSF log10 HIV RNA (2.35 vs. 3.31, p = 0.561), and estimated duration of HIV (18 vs. 17 days, p = 0.546). Randomized arms did not differ at 24 weeks by any CNS outcome. Combining arms, all measures concurrent with antiretroviral treatment improved, for example, neuropsychological testing (mean NPZ-4 of -0.408 vs. 0.245, p<0.001) and inflammatory markers by MRS (e.g. mean frontal white matter (FWM) choline of 2.92 vs. 2.84, p = 0.045) at baseline and week 24, respectively. Plasma neopterin (p<0.001) and interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) (p = 0.007) remained elevated in participants compared to controls but no statistically significant differences were seen in CSF cytokines compared to controls, despite individual variability among the HIV-infected group. A 24-week course of cART+ improved CNS related outcomes, but was not associated with measurable differences compared to standard cART.

  10. Short Communication: HIV-1 Variants That Use Mouse CCR5 Reveal Critical Interactions of gp120's V3 Crown with CCR5 Extracellular Loop 1.

    PubMed

    Platt, Emily J; Durnin, James P; Kabat, David

    2015-10-01

    The CCR5 coreceptor amino terminus and extracellular (ECL) loops 1 and 2 have been implicated in HIV-1 infections, with species differences in these regions inhibiting zoonoses. Interactions of gp120 with CD4 and CCR5 reduce constraints on metastable envelope subunit gp41, enabling gp41 conformational changes needed for infection. We previously selected HIV-1JRCSF variants that efficiently use CCR5(Δ18) with a deleted amino terminus or CCR5(HHMH) with ECL2 from an NIH/Swiss mouse. Unexpectedly, the adaptive gp120 mutations were nearly identical, suggesting that they function by weakening gp120's grip on gp41 and/or by increasing interactions with ECL1. To analyze this and further wean HIV-1 from human CCR5, we selected variants using CCR5(HMMH) with murine ECL1 and 2 sequences. HIV-1JRCSF mutations adaptive for CCR5(Δ18) and CCR5(HHMH) were generally maladaptive for CCR5(HMMH), whereas the converse was true for CCR5(HMMH) adaptations. The HIV-1JRCSF variant adapted to CCR5(HMMH) also weakly used intact NIH/Swiss mouse CCR5. Our results strongly suggest that HIV-1JRCSF makes functionally critical contacts with human ECL1 and that adaptation to murine ECL1 requires multiple mutations in the crown of gp120's V3 loop.

  11. A genotypic method for determining HIV-2 coreceptor usage enables epidemiological studies and clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Döring, Matthias; Borrego, Pedro; Büch, Joachim; Martins, Andreia; Friedrich, Georg; Camacho, Ricardo Jorge; Eberle, Josef; Kaiser, Rolf; Lengauer, Thomas; Taveira, Nuno; Pfeifer, Nico

    2016-12-20

    CCR5-coreceptor antagonists can be used for treating HIV-2 infected individuals. Before initiating treatment with coreceptor antagonists, viral coreceptor usage should be determined to ensure that the virus can use only the CCR5 coreceptor (R5) and cannot evade the drug by using the CXCR4 coreceptor (X4-capable). However, until now, no online tool for the genotypic identification of HIV-2 coreceptor usage had been available. Furthermore, there is a lack of knowledge on the determinants of HIV-2 coreceptor usage. Therefore, we developed a data-driven web service for the prediction of HIV-2 coreceptor usage from the V3 loop of the HIV-2 glycoprotein and used the tool to identify novel discriminatory features of X4-capable variants. Using 10 runs of tenfold cross validation, we selected a linear support vector machine (SVM) as the model for geno2pheno[coreceptor-hiv2], because it outperformed the other SVMs with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.95. We found that SVMs were highly accurate in identifying HIV-2 coreceptor usage, attaining sensitivities of 73.5% and specificities of 96% during tenfold nested cross validation. The predictive performance of SVMs was not significantly different (p value 0.37) from an existing rules-based approach. Moreover, geno2pheno[coreceptor-hiv2] achieved a predictive accuracy of 100% and outperformed the existing approach on an independent data set containing nine new isolates with corresponding phenotypic measurements of coreceptor usage. geno2pheno[coreceptor-hiv2] could not only reproduce the established markers of CXCR4-usage, but also revealed novel markers: the substitutions 27K, 15G, and 8S were significantly predictive of CXCR4 usage. Furthermore, SVMs trained on the amino-acid sequences of the V1 and V2 loops were also quite accurate in predicting coreceptor usage (AUCs of 0.84 and 0.65, respectively). In this study, we developed geno2pheno[coreceptor-hiv2], the first online tool for the prediction of HIV-2 coreceptor

  12. Editing CCR5: a novel approach to HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Tatjana I; Mussolino, Claudio; Bloom, Kristie; Cathomen, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a life-threatening disorder caused by infection of individuals with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Entry of HIV-1 into target cells depends on the presence of two surface proteins on the cell membrane: CD4, which serves as the main receptor, and either CCR5 or CXCR4 as a co-receptor. A limited number of people harbor a genomic 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5∆32), leading to expression of a truncated gene product that provides resistance to HIV-1 infection in individuals homozygous for this mutation. Moreover, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation with CCR5∆32 donor cells seems to confer HIV-1 resistance to the recipient as well. However, since Δ32 donors are scarce and allogeneic HSC transplantation is not exempt from risks, the development of gene editing tools to knockout CCR5 in the genome of autologous cells is highly warranted. Targeted gene editing can be accomplished with designer nucleases, which essentially are engineered restriction enzymes that can be designed to cleave DNA at specific sites. During repair of these breaks, the cellular repair pathway often introduces small mutations at the break site, which makes it possible to disrupt the ability of the targeted locus to express a functional protein, in this case CCR5. Here, we review the current promise and limitations of CCR5 gene editing with engineered nucleases, including factors affecting the efficiency of gene disruption and potential off-target effects.

  13. Inefficient entry of vicriviroc-resistant HIV-1 via the inhibitor-CCR5 complex at low cell surface CCR5 densities

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Pavel; Ray, Neelanjana; Klasse, Per Johan; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Doms, Robert W.; Lee, Benhur; Moore, John P.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 variants resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as vicriviroc (VVC) have modified Env complexes that can use both the inhibitor-bound and -free forms of the CCR5 co-receptor to enter target cells. However, entry via the inhibitor-CCR5 complex is inefficient in some, but not all, cell types, particularly cell lines engineered to express CCR5. We investigated the effect of increasing CCR5 expression, and hence the density of the inhibitor-CCR5 complex when a saturating inhibitor (VVC) concentration was present, by using 293-Affinofile cells, in which CCR5 expression is up-regulated by the transcriptional activator, ponasterone. When CCR5 expression was low, the resistant virus entered the target cells to a lesser extent when VVC was present than absent. However, at a higher CCR5 level, there was much less entry inhibition at a constant, saturating VVC concentration. We conclude that the relative decrease in entry of a VVC-resistant virus in some cell types results from its less efficient use of the VVC-CCR5 complex, and that increasing the CCR5 expression level can compensate for this inefficiency. PMID:19303620

  14. The CCL5/CCR5 axis promotes metastasis in basal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco; Pestell, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that the CCL5/CCR5 axis is active in patients affected by an aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Using preclinical models, we have demonstrated that CCR5 promotes breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic potential, while CCR5 inhibition abrogates them. Thus, CCR5 antagonists may constitute an alternative therapeutic approach for patients affected by metastatic basal breast cancer. PMID:23734321

  15. The simultaneous blockade of chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5 and CXCR3 by a non-peptide chemokine receptor antagonist protects mice from dextran sodium sulfate-mediated colitis.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, Hirotake; Ueha, Satoshi; Kurachi, Makoto; Matsushima, Kouji; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Blumberg, Richard S; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2005-08-01

    Chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5 and CXCR3 are involved in the regulation of macrophage- and T cell-mediated immune responses and in the migration and activation of these cells. In order to determine whether blockade of these chemokine receptors modulates intestinal inflammation, we investigated here the effect of a non-peptide chemokine receptor antagonist, TAK-779 (N,N-dimethyl-N-[4-[[[2-(4-methylphenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5H-benzocyclohepten-8-yl]carbonyl]amino]benzyl]-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-aminium chloride), in mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced experimental colitis. C57BL/6 mice were fed 5% DSS in their drinking water for up to 7 days with or without the administration of TAK-779. The severity of inflammation in the colon was assessed by clinical signs and histological examination. Infiltration of inflammatory cells into the mucosa was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, and the expression of cytokine and chemokine mRNAs in tissues was quantitated by reverse transcription-PCR. During DSS-induced colitis, the recruitment of monocytes/macrophages into the colonic mucosa and the induction of proinflammatory cytokines correlated with the severity of intestinal inflammation. The onset of clinical signs and histopathologic features were delayed in animals treated with TAK-779. The expression of CCR2, CCR5 and CXCR3 mRNAs was inhibited in the TAK-779-treated mice. Consistent with these results, infiltration of monocytes/macrophages into the lamina propria was almost completely inhibited and the expression of colonic IL-1beta and IL-6 was significantly decreased in the TAK-779-treated mice. The blockade of CCR2, CCR5 and CXCR3 prevents murine experimental colitis by inhibiting the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the mucosa. Therefore, chemokines and their receptors may be therapeutic targets for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Common promoter deletion is associated with 3.9-fold differential transcription of ovine CCR5 and reduced proviral level of ovine progressive pneumonia virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor that regulates immune cell recruitment in inflammation and serves as a coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A human CCR5 coding deletion (termed delta-32) results in strong resistance to HIV infection, and polymorphisms in CCR5 regulatory regions have been ...

  17. CCR5 promoter activity correlates with HIV disease progression by regulating CCR5 cell surface expression and CD4 T cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anjali; Punke, Erin B; Sedano, Melina; Beauchamp, Bethany; Patel, Rima; Hossenlopp, Cassady; Alozie, Ogechika K; Gupta, Jayanta; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Garg, Himanshu

    2017-03-22

    CCR5 is the major co-receptor for HIV and polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene as well as promoter region that alter cell surface expression have been associated with disease progression. We determined the relationship between CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CD4 decline and other immunopathological features like immune activation and CD4+ T cell apoptosis in HIV patients. CCR5 promoter haplotype HHC was significantly associated with higher CD4 counts in patients. The relative promoter activity (RPA) of each haplotype was determined in vitro and combined promoter activity based on both alleles (CRPA) was assigned to each patients. Interestingly, CCR5 CRPA correlated inversely with CD4 counts and CD4:CD8 ratio specifically in viremic patients. In normal individuals, the CRPA correlated with the number of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood suggesting an effect on CCR5 expression. In a subset of high viremic patients harboring R5 tropic HIV, there was a strong correlation between CCR5 CRPA and both CD4 counts and CD4 T cell apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that, CCR5 promoter polymorphisms correlate with CD4 T cell loss possibly by regulating CD4 T cell apoptosis in HIV patients. Furthermore, assigning CRPAs to each patient is a new method of translating genotype to phenotype.

  18. An altered and more efficient mechanism of CCR5 engagement contributes to macrophage tropism of CCR5-using HIV-1 Envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Sterjovski, Jasminka; Roche, Michael; Churchill, Melissa J.; Ellett, Anne; Farrugia, William; Gray, Lachlan R.; Cowley, Daniel; Poumbourios, Pantelis; Lee, Benhur; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Cunningham, Anthony L.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    While CCR5 is the principal coreceptor used by macrophage (M)-tropic HIV-1, not all primary CCR5-using (R5) viruses enter macrophages efficiently. Here, we used functionally-diverse R5 envelope (Env) clones to characterize virus-cell interactions important for efficient CCR5-mediated macrophage entry. The magnitude of macrophage entry by Env-pseudotyped reporter viruses correlated with increased immunoreactivity of CD4-induced gp120 epitopes, increased ability to scavenge low levels of cell-surface CCR5, reduced sensitivity to the CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc, and increased dependence on specific residues in the CCR5 ECL2 region. These results are consistent with an altered and more efficient mechanism of CCR5 engagement. Structural studies revealed potential alterations within the gp120 V3 loop, the gp41 interaction sites at the gp120 C- and N-termini, and within the gp120 CD4 binding site which may directly or indirectly lead to more efficient CCR5-usage. Thus, enhanced gp120-CCR5 interactions may contribute to M-tropism of R5 HIV-1 strains through different structural mechanisms. PMID:20570309

  19. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, James M; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4(+) T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. However, the effect of CCR5 conformations on other cell types and on the process of down-modulation remains unclear. We used mAbs, some already shown to detect distinct CCR5 conformations, to compare the behavior of CCR5 on in vitro generated human T cell blasts, monocytes and MDMs and CHO-CCR5 transfectants. All human cells express distinct antigenic forms of CCR5 not detected on CHO-CCR5 cells. The recognizable populations of CCR5 receptors exhibit different patterns of down-modulation on T lymphocytes compared with myeloid cells. On T cell blasts, CCR5 is recognized by all antibodies and undergoes rapid chemokine-mediated internalization, whereas on monocytes and MDMs, a pool of CCR5 molecules is recognized by a subset of antibodies and is not removed from the cell surface. We demonstrate that this cell surface-retained form of CCR5 responds to prolonged treatment with more-potent chemokine analogs and acts as an HIV-1 coreceptor. Our findings indicate that the regulation of CCR5 is highly specific to cell type and provide a potential explanation for the observation that native chemokines are less-effective HIV-entry inhibitors on macrophages compared with T lymphocytes.

  20. The dual CCR5 and CCR2 inhibitor cenicriviroc does not redistribute HIV into extracellular space: implications for plasma viral load and intracellular DNA decline.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Victor G; Hassounah, Said; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Oliveira, Maureen; Lefebvre, Eric; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Cenicriviroc is a potent antagonist of the chemokine coreceptors 5 and 2 (CCR5/CCR2) and blocks HIV-1 entry. The CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc has been shown in tissue culture to be able to repel cell-free virions from the cell surface into extracellular space. We hypothesized that cenicriviroc might exhibit a similar effect, and tested this using clinical samples from the Phase IIb study 652-2-202, by measuring rates of intracellular DNA decline. We also monitored viral RNA levels in culture fluids. We infected PM-1 cells with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 BaL in the presence or absence of inhibitory concentrations of cenicriviroc (20 nM) or maraviroc (50 nM) or controls. Viral load levels and p24 were measured by ELISA, quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR at 4 h post-infection. Frozen PBMC DNA samples from 30 patients with virological success in the Phase IIb study were studied, as were early and late reverse transcript levels. Docking studies compared binding between cenicriviroc/CCR5 and maraviroc/CCR5. Unlike maraviroc, cenicriviroc did not cause an increase in the amount of virus present in culture fluids at 4 h compared with baseline. The use of cenicriviroc did, however, result in lower levels of intracellular viral DNA after 4 h. Structural modelling indicates that cenicriviroc binds more deeply than maraviroc to the hydrophobic pocket of CCR5, providing an explanation for the absence of viral rebound with cenicriviroc. In contrast to maraviroc, cenicriviroc does not repel virus back into extracellular space. Differences in results may be due to superior binding of cenicriviroc to CCR5 compared with maraviroc. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Allosteric Model of Maraviroc Binding to CC Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5)*

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Perez, Javier; Rueda, Patricia; Alcami, Jose; Rognan, Didier; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard; Kellenberger, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Maraviroc is a nonpeptidic small molecule human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry inhibitor that has just entered the therapeutic arsenal for the treatment of patients. We recently demonstrated that maraviroc binding to the HIV-1 coreceptor, CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), prevents it from binding the chemokine CCL3 and the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 by an allosteric mechanism. However, incomplete knowledge of ligand-binding sites and the lack of CCR5 crystal structures have hampered an in-depth molecular understanding of how the inhibitor works. Here, we addressed these issues by combining site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) with homology modeling and docking. Six crystal structures of G-protein-coupled receptors were compared for their suitability for CCR5 modeling. All CCR5 models had equally good geometry, but that built from the recently reported dimeric structure of the other HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4 bound to the peptide CVX15 (Protein Data Bank code 3OE0) best agreed with the SDM data and discriminated CCR5 from non-CCR5 binders in a virtual screening approach. SDM and automated docking predicted that maraviroc inserts deeply in CCR5 transmembrane cavity where it can occupy three different binding sites, whereas CCL3 and gp120 lie on distinct yet overlapped regions of the CCR5 extracellular loop 2. Data suggesting that the transmembrane cavity remains accessible for maraviroc in CCL3-bound and gp120-bound CCR5 help explain our previous observation that the inhibitor enhances dissociation of preformed ligand-CCR5 complexes. Finally, we identified residues in the predicted CCR5 dimer interface that are mandatory for gp120 binding, suggesting that receptor dimerization might represent a target for new CCR5 entry inhibitors. PMID:21775441

  2. A topical microbicide gel formulation of CCR5 antagonist maraviroc prevents HIV-1 vaginal transmission in humanized RAG-hu mice.

    PubMed

    Neff, C Preston; Kurisu, Theresa; Ndolo, Thomas; Fox, Kami; Akkina, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    For prevention of HIV infection many currently licensed anti-HIV drugs and new ones in the pipeline show potential as topically applied microbicides. While macaque models have been the gold standard for in vivo microbicide testing, they are expensive and sufficient numbers are not available. Therefore, a small animal model that facilitates rapid evaluation of potential candidates for their preliminary efficacy is urgently needed in the microbicide field. We previously demonstrated that RAG-hu humanized mouse model permits HIV-1 mucosal transmission via both vaginal and rectal routes and that oral pre-exposure chemo-prophylactic strategies could be tested in this system. Here in these proof-of-concept studies, we extended this system for topical microbicide testing using HIV-1 as the challenge virus. Maraviroc, a clinically approved CCR5 inhibitor drug for HIV treatment, was formulated as a microbicide gel at 5 mM concentration in 2.2% hydroxyl ethyl cellulose. Female RAG-hu mice were challenged vaginally with HIV-1 an hour after intravaginal application of the maraviroc gel. Our results showed that maraviroc gel treated mice were fully protected against vaginal HIV-1 challenge in contrast to placebo gel treated mice which all became infected. These findings highlight the utility of the humanized mouse models for microbicide testing and, together with the recent data from macaque studies, suggest that maraviroc is a promising candidate for future microbicide clinical trials in the field.

  3. Antagonists of the human CCR5 receptor as anti-HIV-1 agents. Part 4: synthesis and structure-activity relationships for 1-[N-(methyl)-N-(phenylsulfonyl)amino]-2-(phenyl)-4-(4-(N-(alkyl)-N-(benzyloxycarbonyl)amino)piperidin-1-yl)butanes.

    PubMed

    Finke, P E; Oates, B; Mills, S G; MacCoss, M; Malkowitz, L; Springer, M S; Gould, S L; DeMartino, J A; Carella, A; Carver, G; Holmes, K; Danzeisen, R; Hazuda, D; Kessler, J; Lineberger, J; Miller, M; Schleif, W A; Emini, E A

    2001-09-17

    (2S)-2-(3-Chlorophenyl)-1-[N-(methyl)-N-(phenylsulfonyl)amino]-4-[spiro(2,3-dihydrobenzthiophene-3,4'-piperidin-1'-yl)]butane S-oxide (1b) has been identified as a potent CCR5 antagonist having an IC50=10 nM. Herein, structure-activity relationship studies of non-spiro piperidines are described, which led to the discovery of 4-(N-(alkyl)-N-(benzyloxycarbonyl)amino)piperidine derivatives (3-5) as potent CCR5 antagonists.

  4. Identification of New Agonists and Antagonists of the Insect Odorant Receptor Co-Receptor Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sisi; Luetje, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Insects detect attractive and aversive chemicals using several families of chemosensory receptors, including the OR family of olfactory receptors, making these receptors appealing targets for the control of insects. Insect ORs are odorant-gated ion channels, comprised of at least one common subunit (the odorant receptor co-receptor subunit, Orco) and at least one variable odorant specificity subunit. Each of the many ORs of an insect species is activated or inhibited by an unique set of odorants that interact with the variable odorant specificity subunits, making the development of OR directed insect control agents complex and laborious. However, several N-,2-substituted triazolothioacetamide compounds (VUAA1, VU0450667 and VU0183254) were recently shown to act directly on the highly conserved Orco subunit, suggesting that broadly active compounds can be developed. We have explored the chemical space around the VUAA1 structure in order to identify new Orco ligands. Principal Findings We screened ORs from several insect species, using heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes and an electrophysiological assay, with a panel of 22 compounds structurally related to VUAA1. By varying the nitrogen position in the pyridine ring and altering the moieties decorating the phenyl ring, we identified two new agonists and a series of competitive antagonists. Screening smaller compounds, similar to portions of the VUAA1 structure, also yielded competitive antagonists. Importantly, we show that Orco antagonists inhibit odorant activation of ORs from several insect species. Detailed examination of one antagonist demonstrated inhibition to be through a non-competitive mechanism. Conclusions A similar pattern of agonist and antagonist sensitivity displayed by Orco subunits from different species suggests a highly conserved binding site structure. The susceptibility to inhibition of odorant activation by Orco antagonism is conserved across disparate insect species

  5. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  6. Targeting spare CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) as a principle to inhibit HIV-1 entry.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun; Colin, Philippe; Staropoli, Isabelle; Lima-Fernandes, Evelyne; Ferret, Cécile; Demir, Arzu; Rogée, Sophie; Hartley, Oliver; Randriamampita, Clotilde; Scott, Mark G H; Marullo, Stefano; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard; Brelot, Anne

    2014-07-04

    CCR5 binds the chemokines CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 and is the major coreceptor for HIV-1 entry into target cells. Chemokines are supposed to form a natural barrier against human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, we showed that their antiviral activity is limited by CCR5 adopting low-chemokine affinity conformations at the cell surface. Here, we investigated whether a pool of CCR5 that is not stabilized by chemokines could represent a target for inhibiting HIV infection. We exploited the characteristics of the chemokine analog PSC-RANTES (N-α-(n-nonanoyl)-des-Ser(1)-[l-thioprolyl(2), l-cyclohexylglycyl(3)]-RANTES(4-68)), which displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that native chemokines fail to prevent high-affinity binding of PSC-RANTES, analog-mediated calcium release (in desensitization assays), and analog-mediated CCR5 internalization. These results indicate that a pool of spare CCR5 may bind PSC-RANTES but not native chemokines. Improved recognition of CCR5 by PSC-RANTES may explain why the analog promotes higher amounts of β-arrestin 2·CCR5 complexes, thereby increasing CCR5 down-regulation and HIV-1 inhibition. Together, these results highlight that spare CCR5, which might permit HIV-1 to escape from chemokines, should be targeted for efficient viral blockade. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. ERK1-Based Pathway as a New Selective Mechanism To Modulate CCR5 with Natural Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Venuti, Assunta; Pastori, Claudia; Siracusano, Gabriel; Riva, Agostino; Sciortino, Maria Teresa; Lopalco, Lucia

    2015-10-01

    Natural human Abs, recognizing an epitope within the first extramembrane loop of CCR5 (the main HIV coreceptor), induce a long-lasting internalization (48 h) of the protein, whereas all known CCR5 modulating molecules show a short-term kinetics (60-90 min). Despite extensive studies on the regulation of CCR5 signaling cascades, which are the effect of concomitant CCR5 internalization by exogenous stimuli such as Abs, downstream signaling continues to be poorly understood. In this article, we report a hitherto unrecognized mechanism of CCR5 modulation mediated by G protein-dependent ERK1 activity. We further demonstrate that ERK1 is localized mainly in the cytoplasmic compartment and that it interacts directly with the CCR5 protein, thus provoking possible CCR5 degradation with a subsequent de novo synthesis, and that re-expression of CCR5 on the cell membrane required several days. In contrast, the RANTES treatment induces a recovery of the receptor on the cell membrane in short-term kinetics without the involvement of de novo protein synthesis. The said new pathway could be relevant not only to better understand the molecular basis of all pathologic conditions in which CCR5 is involved but also to generate new tools to block viral infections, such as the use of recombinant Abs.

  8. The first report of CCR5 delta 32 mutant in Thai injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Ruchusatsawat, N; Vongsheree, S; Thaisri, H; Phutiprawan, T

    2000-06-01

    CCR5, a chemokine receptor, is the principal coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1 which is the most important variant for viral transmission. It has been demonstrated that a homozygous genotype of a 32-bp deletion in CCR5 gene (delta32CCR5) shows a high degree of resistance to HIV-1 infection. To demonstrate that delta32CCR5 does exist in Thai natives, the CCR5 genotypes and allelic frequencies in 860 Thai injecting drug users (IDUs) were determined by PCR and DNA sequencing. Of these, six (0.7%) were CCR5/delta32CCR5 heterozygotes and no homozygote was found. The overall delta32CCR5 allelic frequency was 0.0035 and in HIV-1 seronegative (n = 490) and seropositive (n = 370) IDUs were 0.0051 and 0.0004, respectively, which were not significantly different (p = 0.3776). Here we report that the delta32CCR5 does exist in Thai IDUs as it is present in other human races. Such low allelic frequency may indicate that this mutation does not attribute a significant role in HIV-1 transmission in Thai IDUs.

  9. A pièce de resistance: how HIV-1 escapes small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Moore, John P.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Small molecule inhibitors targeting the CCR5 coreceptor represent a new class of drugs for treating HIV-1 infection. Maraviroc has received regulatory approvals, and vicriviroc is in phase 3 trials. Understanding how resistance to these drugs develops and is diagnosed is essential to guide clinical practice. We review what has been learned from in vitro resistance studies, and how this relates to what is being seen, or can be anticipated, in clinical studies. Recent findings The principal resistance pathway in vitro involves continued use of CCR5 in an inhibitor-insensitive manner; the resistant viruses recognize the inhibitor-CCR5 complex, as well as free CCR5. Switching to use the CXCR4 coreceptor is rare. The principal genetic pathway involves accumulating 2–4 sequence changes in the gp120 V3 region, but a non-V3 pathway is also known. The limited information available from clinical studies suggests that a similar escape process is followed in vivo. However, the most common change associated with virologic failure involves expansion of pre-existing, CXCR4-using viruses that are insensitive to CCR5 inhibitors. Summary HIV-1 escapes small molecule CCR5 inhibitors by continuing to use CCR5 in an inhibitor-insensitive manner, or evades them by expanding naturally insensitive, CXCR4-using variants. PMID:19339950

  10. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-08-05

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5(-/-) mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4(+) T-cells from wild type or CCR5(-/-) mice into RAG-1(-/-). CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4(+) and CD11b(+) leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs.

  11. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5−/− mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4+ T-cells from wild type or CCR5−/− mice into RAG-1−/−. CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4+ and CD11b+ leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs. PMID:27492684

  12. Reduced Frequencies and Activation of Regulatory T Cells After the Treatment of HIV-1-Infected Individuals with the CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc Are Associated with a Reduction in Viral Loads Rather Than a Direct Effect of the Drug on Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Joedicke, Jara J; Dirks, Miriam; Esser, Stefan; Verheyen, Jens; Dittmer, Ulf

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and they frequently express the chemokine receptor CCR5. We therefore investigated whether antiretroviral treatment with the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc affected Tregs in chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1-infected patients with high viral loads had elevated frequencies of activated Tregs in the peripheral blood compared with healthy controls. In patients successfully treated with antiretroviral drugs (undetectable viral loads), the frequency and the activation status of Tregs were comparable with healthy controls without any specific effect related to the treatment with Maraviroc. These results indicate that the control of viral replication in general rather than a direct binding of Maraviroc to CCR5-positive Tregs influences Treg responses in successfully treated chronically HIV-1-infected individuals.

  13. CCR5 Disruption in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using CRISPR/Cas9 Provides Selective Resistance of Immune Cells to CCR5-tropic HIV-1 Virus.

    PubMed

    Kang, HyunJun; Minder, Petra; Park, Mi Ae; Mesquitta, Walatta-Tseyon; Torbett, Bruce E; Slukvin, Igor I

    2015-12-15

    The chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) serves as an HIV-1 co-receptor and is essential for cell infection with CCR5-tropic viruses. Loss of functional receptor protects against HIV infection. Here, we report the successful targeting of CCR5 in GFP-marked human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using CRISPR/Cas9 with single and dual guide RNAs (gRNAs). Following CRISPER/Cas9-mediated gene editing using a single gRNA, 12.5% of cell colonies demonstrated CCR5 editing, of which 22.2% showed biallelic editing as determined by a Surveyor nuclease assay and direct sequencing. The use of dual gRNAs significantly increased the efficacy of CCR5 editing to 27% with a biallelic gene alteration frequency of 41%. To ensure the homogeneity of gene editing within cells, we used single cell sorting to establish clonal iPSC lines. Single cell-derived iPSC lines with homozygous CCR5 mutations displayed the typical characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and differentiated efficiently into hematopoietic cells, including macrophages. Although macrophages from both wild-type and CCR5-edited iPSCs supported CXCR4-tropic virus replication, macrophages from CCR5-edited iPSCs were uniquely resistant to CCR5-tropic virus challenge. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying iPSC technology for the study of the role of CCR5 in HIV infection in vitro, and generation of HIV-resistant cells for potential therapeutic applications.

  14. Development and characterization of a novel single-cycle recombinant-virus assay to determine human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coreceptor tropism.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Jeannette M; Huang, Wei; Fransen, Signe; Limoli, Kay; Toma, Jonathan; Wrin, Terri; Chappey, Colombe; Kiss, Linda D B; Paxinos, Ellen E; Petropoulos, Christos J

    2007-02-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains require either the CXCR4 or CCR5 chemokine receptor to efficiently enter cells. Blocking viral binding to these coreceptors is an attractive therapeutic target. Currently, several coreceptor antagonists are being evaluated in clinical trials that require characterization of coreceptor tropism for enrollment. In this report, we describe the development of an automated and accurate procedure for determining HIV-1 coreceptor tropism (Trofile) and its validation for routine laboratory testing. HIV-1 pseudoviruses are generated using full-length env genes derived from patient virus populations. Coreceptor tropism is determined by measuring the abilities of these pseudovirus populations to efficiently infect CD4+/U87 cells expressing either the CXCR4 or CCR5 coreceptor. Viruses exclusively and efficiently infecting CXCR4+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated X4-tropic. Conversely, viruses exclusively and efficiently infecting CCR5+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated R5-tropic. Viruses capable of infecting both CXCR4+/CD4+/U87 and CCR5+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated dual/mixed-tropic. Assay accuracy and reproducibility were established by evaluating the tropisms of well-characterized viruses and the variability among replicate results from samples tested repeatedly. The viral subtype, hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus coinfection, and the plasma viral load did not affect assay performance. Minority subpopulations with alternate tropisms were reliably detected when present at 5 to 10%. The plasma viral load above which samples can be amplified efficiently in the Trofile assay is 1,000 copies per ml of plasma. Trofile has been automated for high-throughput use; it can be used to identify patients most likely to benefit from treatment regimens that include a coreceptor inhibitor and to monitor patients on treatment for the emergence of resistant virus populations that switch coreceptor tropism.

  15. Development and Characterization of a Novel Single-Cycle Recombinant-Virus Assay To Determine Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coreceptor Tropism▿

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, Jeannette M.; Huang, Wei; Fransen, Signe; Limoli, Kay; Toma, Jonathan; Wrin, Terri; Chappey, Colombe; Kiss, Linda D. B.; Paxinos, Ellen E.; Petropoulos, Christos J.

    2007-01-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains require either the CXCR4 or CCR5 chemokine receptor to efficiently enter cells. Blocking viral binding to these coreceptors is an attractive therapeutic target. Currently, several coreceptor antagonists are being evaluated in clinical trials that require characterization of coreceptor tropism for enrollment. In this report, we describe the development of an automated and accurate procedure for determining HIV-1 coreceptor tropism (Trofile) and its validation for routine laboratory testing. HIV-1 pseudoviruses are generated using full-length env genes derived from patient virus populations. Coreceptor tropism is determined by measuring the abilities of these pseudovirus populations to efficiently infect CD4+/U87 cells expressing either the CXCR4 or CCR5 coreceptor. Viruses exclusively and efficiently infecting CXCR4+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated X4-tropic. Conversely, viruses exclusively and efficiently infecting CCR5+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated R5-tropic. Viruses capable of infecting both CXCR4+/CD4+/U87 and CCR5+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated dual/mixed-tropic. Assay accuracy and reproducibility were established by evaluating the tropisms of well-characterized viruses and the variability among replicate results from samples tested repeatedly. The viral subtype, hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus coinfection, and the plasma viral load did not affect assay performance. Minority subpopulations with alternate tropisms were reliably detected when present at 5 to 10%. The plasma viral load above which samples can be amplified efficiently in the Trofile assay is 1,000 copies per ml of plasma. Trofile has been automated for high-throughput use; it can be used to identify patients most likely to benefit from treatment regimens that include a coreceptor inhibitor and to monitor patients on treatment for the emergence of resistant virus populations that switch coreceptor tropism. PMID:17116663

  16. Solution Structure of LC4 Transmembrane Segment of CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2011-01-01

    CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a specific co-receptor allowing the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The LC4 region in CCR5 is required for HIV-1 entry into the cells. In this study, the solution structure of LC4 in SDS micelles was elucidated by using standard 1H two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and fluorescdence quenching. The LC4 structure adopts two helical structures, whereas the C-terminal part remains unstructured. The positions in which LC4 binds to the HIV-1 inhibitory peptide LC5 were determined by docking calculations in addition to NMR data. The poses showed the importance of the hydrophobic interface of the assembled structures. The solution structure of LC4 elucidated in the present work provides a structural basis for further studies on the HIV-1 inhibitory function of the LC4 region. PMID:21647380

  17. CCR5 deficiency accelerates lipopolysaccharide-induced astrogliosis, amyloid-beta deposit and impaired memory function.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chul Ju; Park, Mi Hee; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Yun, Na Young; Oh, Sang Yeon; Song, Ju Kyung; Seo, Hyun Ok; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-03-15

    Chemokine receptors are implicated in inflammation and immune responses. Neuro-inflammation is associated with activation of astrocyte and amyloid-beta (Aβ) generations that lead to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous our study showed that deficiency of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) results in activation of astrocytes and Aβ deposit, and thus memory dysfunction through increase of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. CCR5 knockout mice were used as an animal model with memory dysfunction. For the purpose LPS was injected i.p. daily (0.25 mg/kg/day). The memory dysfunctions were much higher in LPS-injected CCR5 knockout mice compared to CCR5 wild type mice as well as non-injected CCR5 knockout mice. Associated with severe memory dysfuction in LPS injected CCR5 knockout mice, LPS injection significant increase expression of inflammatory proteins, astrocyte activation, expressions of β-secretase as well as Aβ deposition in the brain of CCR5 knockout mice as compared with that of CCR5 wild type mice. In CCR5 knockout mice, CCR2 expressions were high and co-localized with GFAP which was significantly elevated by LPS. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) which ligands of CCR2 also increased by LPS injection, and increment of MCP-1 expression is much higher in CCR5 knockout mice. BV-2 cells treated with CCR5 antagonist, D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA) and cultured astrocytes isolated from CCR5 knockout mice treated with LPS (1 μg/ml) and CCR2 antagonist, decreased the NF-ĸB activation and Aβ level. These findings suggest that the deficiency of CCR5 enhances response of LPS, which accelerates to neuro-inflammation and memory impairment.

  18. CCR5 deficiency accelerates lipopolysaccharide-induced astrogliosis, amyloid-beta deposit and impaired memory function

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Yun, Na Young; Oh, Sang Yeon; Song, Ju Kyung; Seo, Hyun Ok; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are implicated in inflammation and immune responses. Neuro-inflammation is associated with activation of astrocyte and amyloid-beta (Aβ) generations that lead to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous our study showed that deficiency of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) results in activation of astrocytes and Aβ deposit, and thus memory dysfunction through increase of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. CCR5 knockout mice were used as an animal model with memory dysfunction. For the purpose LPS was injected i.p. daily (0.25 mg/kg/day). The memory dysfunctions were much higher in LPS-injected CCR5 knockout mice compared to CCR5 wild type mice as well as non-injected CCR5 knockout mice. Associated with severe memory dysfuction in LPS injected CCR5 knockout mice, LPS injection significant increase expression of inflammatory proteins, astrocyte activation, expressions of β-secretase as well as Aβ deposition in the brain of CCR5 knockout mice as compared with that of CCR5 wild type mice. In CCR5 knockout mice, CCR2 expressions were high and co-localized with GFAP which was significantly elevated by LPS. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) which ligands of CCR2 also increased by LPS injection, and increment of MCP-1 expression is much higher in CCR5 knockout mice. BV-2 cells treated with CCR5 antagonist, D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA) and cultured astrocytes isolated from CCR5 knockout mice treated with LPS (1 μg/ml) and CCR2 antagonist, decreased the NF-ĸB activation and Aβ level. These findings suggest that the deficiency of CCR5 enhances response of LPS, which accelerates to neuro-inflammation and memory impairment. PMID:26910914

  19. The Effects of the Recombinant CCR5 T4 Lysozyme Fusion Protein on HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qingwen; Chen, Hong; Wang, Xingxia; Zhao, Liandong; Xu, Qingchen; Wang, Huijuan; Li, Guanyu; Yang, Xiaofan; Ma, Hongming; Wu, Haoquan; Ji, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Background Insertion of T4 lysozyme (T4L) into the GPCR successfully enhanced GPCR protein stability and solubilization. However, the biological functions of the recombinant GPCR protein have not been analyzed. Methods We engineered the CCR5-T4L mutant and expressed and purified the soluble recombinant protein using an E.coli expression system. The antiviral effects of this recombinant protein in THP-1 cell lines, primary human macrophages, and PBMCs from different donors were investigated. We also explored the possible mechanisms underlying the observed antiviral effects. Results Our data showed the biphasic inhibitory and promotion effects of different concentrations of soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L protein on R5 tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection in THP-1 cell lines, human macrophages, and PBMCs from clinical isolates. We demonstrated that soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L acts as a HIV-1 co-receptor, interacts with wild type CCR5, down-regulates the surface CCR5 expression in human macrophages, and interacts with CCL5 to inhibit macrophage migration. Using binding assays, we further determined that recombinant CCR5-T4L and [125I]-CCL5 compete for the same binding site on wild type CCR5. Conclusions Our results suggest that recombinant CCR5-T4L protein marginally promotes HIV-1 infection at low concentrations and markedly inhibits infection at higher concentrations. This recombinant protein may be helpful in the future development of anti-HIV-1 therapeutic agents. PMID:26154172

  20. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism by single and triplicate HIV-1 RNA and DNA sequencing in patients undergoing successful first-line antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Meini, Genny; Rossetti, Barbara; Bianco, Claudia; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Sighinolfi, Laura; Monno, Laura; Castagna, Antonella; Rozera, Gabriella; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Zazzi, Maurizio; De Luca, Andrea; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Armignacco, O.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Viale, P.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Antinori, A.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; Antinori, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; d'Arminio Monforte, A; De Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Girardi, E.; Gianotti, N.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Rusconi, S.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Cicconi, P.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Angarano, G.; Monno, L.; Santoro, C.; Maggiolo, F.; Suardi, C.; Viale, P.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P.E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Mazzotta, F.; Lo Caputo, S.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Bonfanti, P.; Caramma, I.; Castelli, A. P.; Galli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Rizzardini, G.; Puoti, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Castagna, A.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Cicconi, P.; Marchetti, G.; Mussini, C.; Puzzolante, C.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; Guida, M. G.; Gargiulo, M.; Baldelli, F.; Francisci, D.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Cauda, R.; Andreoni, M.; Antinori, A.; Vullo, V.; Cingolani, A.; d'Avino, A.; Ammassari, A.; Gallo, L.; Nicastri, E.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A.; Mura, M. S.; Madeddu, G.; Caramello, P.; Di Perri, G.; Orofino, G. C.; Bonora, S.; Sciandra, M.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Maraviroc has been shown to be effective in patients harbouring CCR5-tropic HIV-1. While this CCR5 antagonist has initially been used in salvage therapy, its excellent safety profile makes it ideal for antiretroviral treatment simplification strategies in patients with suppressed plasma viraemia. The aim of this study was to compare HIV-1 tropism as detected in baseline plasma RNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) DNA prior to first-line therapy and to analyse tropism evolution while on successful treatment. Methods HIV-1 tropism was determined using triplicate genotypic testing combined with geno2pheno[coreceptor] analysis at a 10% false positive rate in 42 patients. Paired pre-treatment plasma RNA and PBMC DNA and two subsequent PBMC DNA samples (the first obtained after reaching undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA and the second after at least 2 years of suppression of plasma viraemia) were evaluated. Results Coreceptor tropism was completely concordant in paired pre-treatment RNA and DNA, with 26.2% of HIV-1 sequences predicted to be non-CCR5-tropic. During follow-up, coreceptor tropism switches were detected in 4 (9.5%) patients without any preferential direction. Although false positive rate discrepancies within triplicates were common, the rate of discordance of coreceptor tropism assignment among triplicate results in this mostly CCR5-tropic dataset was only 2.1%, questioning the added value of triplicate testing compared with single testing. Conclusions HIV-1 coreceptor tropism changes during virologically successful first-line treatment are infrequent. HIV-1 DNA analysis may thus support the choice of a CCR5 antagonist in treatment switch strategies; however, maraviroc treatment outcome data are required to confirm this option. PMID:24155059

  1. TALEN-Mediated Knockout of CCR5 Confers Protection Against Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingjie; Li, Juan; Shi, Xuanling; Jia, Wenxu; Wen, Yi; Hu, Xiongbing; Zhuang, Fengfeng; Xi, Jianzhong; Zhang, Linqi

    2017-02-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) represents a valuable tool for genomic engineering due to its single-nucleotide precision, high nuclease activity, and low cytotoxicity. We report here systematic design and characterization of 28 novel TALENs targeting multiple regions of CCR5 gene (CCR5-TALEN) which encodes the co-receptor critical for entry of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1). By systemic characterization of these CCR5-TALENs, we have identified one (CCR5-TALEN-515) with higher nuclease activity, specificity, and lower cytotoxicity compared with zinc-finger nuclease (CCR5-ZFN) currently undergoing clinical trials. Sequence analysis of target cell line GHOST-CCR5-CXCR4 and human primary CD4 T cells showed that the double-strand breaks at the TALEN targeted sites resulted in truncated or nonfunctional CCR5 proteins thereby conferring protection against HIV-1 infection in vitro. None of the CCR5-TALENs had detectable levels of off-target nuclease activity against the homologous region in CCR2 although substantial level was identified for CCR5-ZFN in the primary CD4 T cells. Our results suggest that the CCR5-TALENs identified here are highly functional nucleases that produce protective genetic alterations to human CCR5. Application of these TALENs directly to the primary CD4 T cells and CD34 hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) of infected individuals could help to create an immune system resistant to HIV-1 infection, recapitulating the success of "Berlin patient" and serving as an essential first step towards a "functional" cure of AIDS.

  2. Linkage of the CCR5 Delta 32 mutation with a functional polymorphism of CD45RA.

    PubMed

    Liao, H X; Montefiori, D C; Patel, D D; Lee, D M; Scott, W K; Pericak-Vance, M; Haynes, B F

    2000-07-01

    A 32-bp deletion in CCR5 (CCR5 Delta 32) confers to PBMC resistance to HIV-1 isolates that use CCR5 as a coreceptor. To study this mutation in T cell development, we have screened 571 human thymus tissues for the mutation. We identified 72 thymuses (12.6%) that were heterozygous and 2 (0.35%) that were homozygous for the CCR5 Delta 32 mutation. We found that thymocyte development was normal in both CCR5 Delta 32 heterozygous and homozygous thymuses. In 3% of thymuses we identified a functional polymorphism of CD45RA, in which cortical and medullary thymocytes failed to down-regulate the 200- and 220-kDa CD45RA isoforms during T cell development. Moreover, we found an association of this CD45 functional polymorphism in thymuses with the CCR5 Delta 32 mutation (p = 0.00258). In vitro HIV-1 infection assays with CCR5-using primary isolates demonstrated that thymocytes with the heterozygous CCR5 Delta 32 mutation produced less p24 than did CCR5 wild-type thymocytes. However, the functional CD45RA polymorphism did not alter the susceptibility of thymocytes to HIV-1 infection. Taken together, these data demonstrate association of the CCR5 Delta 32 mutation with a polymorphism in an as yet unknown gene that is responsible for the ability to down-regulate the expression of high m.w. CD45RA isoforms. Although the presence of the CCR5 Delta 32 mutation down-regulates HIV-1 infection of thymocytes, the functional CD45RA polymorphism does not alter the susceptibility of thymocytes to HIV-1 infection in vitro.

  3. A Novel Role for the Receptor of the Complement Cleavage Fragment C5a, C5aR1, in CCR5-Mediated Entry of HIV into Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E; Aliberti, Julio; Groeneweg, Sander; Köhl, Jörg; Chougnet, Claire A

    2016-04-01

    The complement system is an ancient pattern recognition system that becomes activated during all stages of HIV infection. Previous studies have shown that C5a can enhance the infection of monocyte-derived macrophages and T cells indirectly through the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the attraction of dendritic cells. C5a exerts its multiple biologic functions mainly through activation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1). Here, we assessed the role of C5aR1 as an enhancer of CCR5-mediated HIV infection. We determined CCR5 and C5aR1 heterodimer formation in myeloid cells and the impact of C5aR1 blockade on HIV entry and genomic integration. C5aR1/CCR5 heterodimer formation was identified by immunoprecipitation and western blotting. THP-1 cells and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were infected by R5 laboratory strains or HIV pseudotyped for the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) envelope. Levels of integrated HIV were measured by quantitative PCR after targeting of C5aR1 by a C5aR antagonist, neutralizing C5aR1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or hC5a. C5aR1 was also silenced by specific siRNA prior to viral entry. We found that C5aR1 forms heterodimers with the HIV coreceptor CCR5 in myeloid cells. Targeting C5aR1 significantly decreased integration by R5 viruses but not by VSV-pseudotyped viruses, suggesting that C5aR1 is critical for viral entry. The level of inhibition achieved with C5aR1-blocking reagents was comparable to that of CCR5 antagonists. Mechanistically, C5aR1 targeting decreased CCR5 expression. MDM from CCR5Δ32 homozygous subjects expressed levels of C5aR1 similar to CCR5 WT individuals, suggesting that mere C5aR1 expression is not sufficient for HIV infection. HIV appeared to preferentially enter THP-1 cells expressing high levels of both C5aR1 and CCR5. Targeted reduction of C5aR1 expression in such cells reduced HIV infection by ~50%. Our data thus suggest that C5aR1 acts as an enhancer of CCR5-mediated HIV entry into

  4. Pace of Coreceptor Tropism Switch in HIV-1-Infected Individuals after Recent Infection.

    PubMed

    Arif, Muhammad Shoaib; Hunter, James; Léda, Ana Rachel; Zukurov, Jean Paulo Lopes; Samer, Sadia; Camargo, Michelle; Galinskas, Juliana; Kallás, Esper Georges; Komninakis, Shirley Vasconcelos; Janini, Luiz Mario; Sucupira, Maria Cecilia; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie

    2017-10-01

    HIV-1 entry into target cells influences several aspects of HIV-1 pathogenesis, including viral tropism, HIV-1 transmission and disease progression, and response to entry inhibitors. The evolution from CCR5- to CXCR4-using strains in a given human host is still unpredictable. Here we analyzed timing and predictors for coreceptor evolution among recently HIV-1-infected individuals. Proviral DNA was longitudinally evaluated in 66 individuals using Geno2pheno[coreceptor] Demographics, viral load, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell counts, CCR5Δ32 polymorphisms, GB virus C (GBV-C) coinfection, and HLA profiles were also evaluated. Ultradeep sequencing was performed on initial samples from 11 selected individuals. A tropism switch from CCR5- to CXCR4-using strains was identified in 9/49 (18.4%) individuals. Only a low baseline false-positive rate (FPR) was found to be a significant tropism switch predictor. No minor CXCR4-using variants were identified in initial samples of 4 of 5 R5/non-R5 switchers. Logistic regression analysis showed that patients with an FPR of >40.6% at baseline presented a stable FPR over time whereas lower FPRs tend to progressively decay, leading to emergence of CXCR4-using strains, with a mean evolution time of 27.29 months (range, 8.90 to 64.62). An FPR threshold above 40.6% determined by logistic regression analysis may make it unnecessary to further determine tropism for prediction of disease progression related to emergence of X4 strains or use of CCR5 antagonists. The detection of variants with intermediate FPRs and progressive FPR decay over time not only strengthens the power of Geno2pheno in predicting HIV tropism but also indirectly confirms a continuous evolution from earlier R5 variants toward CXCR4-using strains.IMPORTANCE The introduction of CCR5 antagonists in the antiretroviral arsenal has sparked interest in coreceptors utilized by HIV-1. Despite concentrated efforts, viral and human host features predicting tropism switch are still

  5. Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cells transplantation and genetic modification of CCR5 m303/m303 mutant patient for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilzadeh, Abdolreza; Farshbaf, Alieh; Erfanmanesh, Maryam

    2015-03-01

    HIV and AIDS is one of the biggest challenges all over the world. There are an approximately 34 million people living with the virus, and a large number of them become infected each year. Although there are some antiviral drugs for HIV viral load reduction, they are not sufficient. There is no cure for AIDS. Nowadays natural resistance or immunity has absorbed attentions. Because in some HIV positive patients progression trend is slow or even they indicate resistance to AIDS. One of the most interesting approaches in this category is CCR5 gene. CCR5 is a main cc-chemokine co-receptor that facilitates HIV-1 entry to macrophage and CD4(+) T cells. To now, many polymorphisms have been known by CCR5 gene that produces a truncated protein with no function. So, HIV-1 could not entry to immune-cells and the body resistant to HIV/AIDS. Δ32/Δ32 and m303/m303 homozygotes are example of mutations that could create this resistance mechanism. There is a new treatment, such as Hematopoietic Stem Cell transplantation (HSCT) in Berlin and Boston patients for Δ32/Δ32 mutation. It could eliminate co-receptor antagonist and highly-active-anti retroviral therapy (HAART) drugs problems such as toxicity, low safety and side-effects. Now there, the aim of this hypothesis will be evaluation of a new mutation CCR5 m303/m303 as autologous HSCT. This novel hypothesis indicates that autologous HSCT for m303/m303 could be effective treatment for anyone HIV/AIDS affected patient worldwide.

  6. Genotyping of the CCR5 chemokine receptor by isothermal NASBA amplification and differential probe hybridization.

    PubMed

    Romano, J W; Tetali, S; Lee, E M; Shurtliff, R N; Wang, X P; Pahwa, S; Kaplan, M H; Ginocchio, C C

    1999-11-01

    The human CCR5 chemokine receptor functions as a coreceptor with CD4 for infection by macrophage-tropic isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A mutated CCR5 allele which encodes a protein that does not function as a coreceptor for HIV-1 has been identified. Thus, expression of the wild-type and/or mutation allele is relevant to determining the infectability of patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and affects disease progression in vivo. We developed a qualitative CCR5 genotyping assay using NASBA, an isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology. The method involves three enzymes and two oligonucleotides and targets the CCR5 mRNA, which is expressed in PBMC at a copy number higher than 2, the number of copies of DNA present encoding the gene. The single oligonucleotide set amplifies both alleles, and genotyping is achieved by separate hybridizations of wild-type- and mutation-specific probes directly to the single-stranded RNA amplification product. Assay sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated with RNAs produced in vitro from plasmid clones bearing the DNA encoding each allele. No detectable cross-reactivity between wild-type and mutation probes was found, and 50 copies of each allele were readily detectable. Analysis of patient samples found that 20% were heterozygous and 1% were homozygous for the CCR5 mutation. Thus, NASBA is a sensitive and specific means of rapidly determining CCR5 genotype and provides several technical advantages over alternative assay systems.

  7. Genotyping of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor by Isothermal NASBA Amplification and Differential Probe Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Joseph W.; Tetali, Surya; Lee, Eun Mi; Shurtliff, Roxanne N.; Wang, Xue Ping; Pahwa, Savita; Kaplan, Mark H.; Ginocchio, Christine C.

    1999-01-01

    The human CCR5 chemokine receptor functions as a coreceptor with CD4 for infection by macrophage-tropic isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A mutated CCR5 allele which encodes a protein that does not function as a coreceptor for HIV-1 has been identified. Thus, expression of the wild-type and/or mutation allele is relevant to determining the infectibility of patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and affects disease progression in vivo. We developed a qualitative CCR5 genotyping assay using NASBA, an isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology. The method involves three enzymes and two oligonucleotides and targets the CCR5 mRNA, which is expressed in PBMC at a copy number higher than 2, the number of copies of DNA present encoding the gene. The single oligonucleotide set amplifies both alleles, and genotyping is achieved by separate hybridizations of wild-type- and mutation-specific probes directly to the single-stranded RNA amplification product. Assay sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated with RNAs produced in vitro from plasmid clones bearing the DNA encoding each allele. No detectable cross-reactivity between wild-type and mutation probes was found, and 50 copies of each allele were readily detectable. Analysis of patient samples found that 20% were heterozygous and 1% were homozygous for the CCR5 mutation. Thus, NASBA is a sensitive and specific means of rapidly determining CCR5 genotype and provides several technical advantages over alternative assay systems. PMID:10548593

  8. Quantifying CD4/CCR5 Usage Efficiency of HIV-1 Env Using the Affinofile System.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicholas E; Lee, Benhur

    2016-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into target cells involves the interaction of the HIV envelope (Env) with both a primary receptor (CD4) and a coreceptor (CXCR4 or CCR5). The relative efficiency with which a particular Env uses these receptors is a major component of cellular tropism in the context of entry and is related to a variety of pathological Env phenotypes (Chikere et al. Virology 435:81-91, 2013). The protocols outlined in this chapter describe the use of the Affinofile system, a 293-based dual-inducible cell line that expresses up to 25 distinct combinations of CD4 and CCR5, as well as the associated Viral Entry Receptor Sensitivity Assay (VERSA) metrics used to summarize the CD4/CCR5-dependent infectivity results. This system allows for high-resolution profiling of CD4 and CCR5 usage efficiency in the context of unique viral phenotypes.

  9. CCR5 Expression Levels in HIV-Uninfected Women Receiving Hormonal Contraception.

    PubMed

    Sciaranghella, Gaia; Wang, Cuiwei; Hu, Haihong; Anastos, Kathryn; Merhi, Zaher; Nowicki, Marek; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Cohen, Mardge; Golub, Elizabeth T; Watts, D Heather; Alter, Galit; Young, Mary A; Tsibris, Athe M N

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity increases as receptor/coreceptor expression levels increase. We determined peripheral CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 expression levels in HIV-uninfected women who used depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA; n = 32), the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD; n = 27), oral contraceptive pills (n = 32), or no hormonal contraception (n = 33). The use of LNG-IUD increased the proportion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that expressed CCR5; increases in the magnitude of T-cell subset CCR5 expression were observed with DMPA and LNG-IUD use (P < .01 for all comparisons). LNG-IUD and, to a lesser extent, DMPA use were associated with increased peripheral T-cell CCR5 expression.

  10. CCR5 as a natural and modulated target for inhibition of HIV.

    PubMed

    Burke, Bryan P; Boyd, Maureen P; Impey, Helen; Breton, Louis R; Bartlett, Jeffrey S; Symonds, Geoff P; Hütter, Gero

    2013-12-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of target cells requires CD4 and a co-receptor, predominantly the chemokine receptor CCR5. CCR5-delta32 homozygosity results in a truncated protein providing natural protection against HIV infection-this without detrimental effects to the host-and transplantation of CCR5-delta32 stem cells in a patient with HIV ("Berlin patient") achieved viral eradication. As a more feasible approach gene-modification strategies are being developed to engineer cellular resistance to HIV using autologous cells. We have developed a dual therapeutic anti-HIV lentiviral vector (LVsh5/C46) that down-regulates CCR5 and inhibits HIV-1 fusion via cell surface expression of the gp41-derived peptide, C46. This construct, effective against multiple strains of both R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1, is being tested in Phase I/II trials by engineering HIV-resistant hematopoietic cells.

  11. HEK293T Cells Are Heterozygous for CCR5 Delta 32 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chunxia; Jia, Xiaopeng; Lu, Lingling; Ma, Ping; Wei, Min

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and a co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the target CD4+ cells. CCR5 delta 32 deletion is a loss-of-function mutation, resistant to HIV-1 infection. We tried to induce the CCR5 delta 32 mutation harnessing the genome editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, CRISPR and CRISPR associated protein 9, Cas9) in the commonly used cell line human embryonic kidney HEK 293T cells. Surprisingly, we found that HEK293T cells are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32 mutation, in contrast to the wild type CCR5 cells, human acute T cell leukemia cell line Jurkat and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 cells. This finding indicates that at least one human cell line is heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 mutation. We also found that in PCR amplification, wild type CCR5 DNA and mutant delta 32 DNA can form mismatched heteroduplex and move slowly in gel electrophoresis.

  12. Distribution of the mutated delta 32 allele of the CCR5 gene in a Sicilian population.

    PubMed

    Sidoti, A; D'Angelo, R; Rinaldi, C; De Luca, G; Pino, F; Salpietro, C; Giunta, D E; Saltalamacchia, F; Amato, A

    2005-06-01

    The CCR5 gene encodes a cell-surface chemokine receptor molecule that serves as a co-receptor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A mutation in this gene may alter the expression or the function of the protein product, thereby altering chemokine binding and/or signalling or HIV-1 infection of cells that normally express CCR5 protein. Individuals homozygous for a 32-bp deletion allele of CCR5 (CCR5 delta32), heritable as a Mendelian trait, are relatively resistant to HIV-1 infection. The CCR5 delta32 mutation is present in the Caucasian population at different frequencies. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of truncated alleles of the CCR5 delta32 gene in a Sicilian population, as the interpopulation variation in CCR5 delta32 frequency may be a significant factor in the prediction of AIDS endemicity in future studies. We examined 901 healthy individuals from several Sicilian provinces. We found a mean (+/- standard deviation) delta32 allele frequency (fr) of 0.04 +/- 0.012. The highest value was observed in the province of Messina, with a mean delta32 allele frequency of 0.06 +/- 0.024, where we collected samples from a cohort of 114 HIV-1-infected individuals. The observed frequency amongst these patients was quite low (fr = 0.03 +/- 0.031) compared to the healthy population, although the difference was not statistically significant.

  13. HEK293T Cells Are Heterozygous for CCR5 Delta 32 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chunxia; Jia, Xiaopeng; Lu, Lingling; Ma, Ping; Wei, Min

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and a co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the target CD4+ cells. CCR5 delta 32 deletion is a loss-of-function mutation, resistant to HIV-1 infection. We tried to induce the CCR5 delta 32 mutation harnessing the genome editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, CRISPR and CRISPR associated protein 9, Cas9) in the commonly used cell line human embryonic kidney HEK 293T cells. Surprisingly, we found that HEK293T cells are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32 mutation, in contrast to the wild type CCR5 cells, human acute T cell leukemia cell line Jurkat and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 cells. This finding indicates that at least one human cell line is heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 mutation. We also found that in PCR amplification, wild type CCR5 DNA and mutant delta 32 DNA can form mismatched heteroduplex and move slowly in gel electrophoresis. PMID:27042825

  14. Analysis of CCR5 and SDF-1 genetic variants and HIV infection in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Padh, Harish

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 infection and progression exhibits interindividual variation. The polymorphism in the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, the principal coreceptors for HIV-1 and their ligands like SDF-1 have a profound effect in altering the HIV-1 disease progression rate. A single nucleotide polymorphism designated SDF1-3'UTR-801G-A has been associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection or delayed progression to AIDS. In this study, the SDF1-3'A polymorphism, CCR5∆32 polymorphism and CCR5 promoter polymorphism at positions 58934 G/T, 59029 G/A, 59353 T/C, 59356 C/T, 59402 A/G and 59653 C/T were analysed in Indian population. The polymorphisms in HIV-1 patients and healthy individuals were evaluated by conventional PCR, RFLP-PCR and direct sequencing techniques. The CCR5∆32 mutant allele was found to be almost absent in Indian population. The analysis of the CCR5-59356C/T polymorphism revealed a trend towards an association of the C allele with an increased risk of HIV-1 infection. The frequency of allele CCR5-59356C was higher in HIV-1 patients (100%) as compared to healthy control subjects (89%, P = 0.003). The correlation of SDF1-3'A and CCR5 promoter CCR5-58934G/T, CCR5-59029G/A, CCR5-59353T/C, CCR5-59402 A/G and CCR5-59653C/T polymorphisms and protection to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS was found to be nonsignificant. Nine haplotypes with more than 1% frequency were detected but were not significant in their protective role against HIV. Comparative analysis with global populations showed a noteworthy difference in CCR5 and SDF-1 polymorphisms' frequency distribution, indicating the ethnic variability of Indians. Although susceptibility to infections cannot be completely dependent on one or few genetic variants, it is important to remember that SDF-1 and CCR5 variants have been correlated globally with HIV-1 infection and disease progression. In the light of that, higher frequency of SDF-1 variants in the Indian population is noteworthy.

  15. Dengue virus requires the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 for replication and infection development.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rafael E; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Queiroz, Ana Luiza; Cisalpino, Daniel; Marques, Pedro E; Pacca, Carolina C; Fagundes, Caio T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Nogueira, Maurício L; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2015-08-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people worldwide yearly. Currently, there is no vaccine or specific treatment available. Further investigation on dengue pathogenesis is required to better understand the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. The chemokine system has been implicated in dengue pathogenesis, although the specific role of chemokines and their receptors remains elusive. Here we describe the role of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 in Dengue virus (DENV-2) infection. In vitro experiments showed that CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication in human and mouse macrophages. DENV-2 infection induces the expression of CCR5 ligands. Incubation with an antagonist prevents CCR5 activation and reduces DENV-2 positive-stranded (+) RNA inside macrophages. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of DENV-2 infection we found that CCR5(-/-) mice were resistant to lethal infection, presenting at least 100-fold reduction of viral load in target organs and significant reduction in disease severity. This phenotype was reproduced in wild-type mice treated with CCR5-blocking compounds. Therefore, CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication and disease development. Targeting CCR5 might represent a therapeutic strategy for dengue fever. These data bring new insights on the association between viral infections and the chemokine receptor CCR5. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. CCR5 Gene Disruption via Lentiviral Vectors Expressing Cas9 and Single Guided RNA Renders Cells Resistant to HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Di; Kimata, Jason T.; Zhou, Paul

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, is a major target for drug and genetic intervention against HIV-1. Genetic intervention strategies have knocked down CCR5 expression levels by shRNA or disrupted the CCR5 gene using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) or Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN). In the present study, we silenced CCR5 via CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) and single guided RNAs (sgRNAs). We constructed lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs. We show that a single round transduction of lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs into HIV-1 susceptible human CD4+ cells yields high frequencies of CCR5 gene disruption. CCR5 gene-disrupted cells are not only resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1, including transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 isolates, but also have selective advantage over CCR5 gene-undisrupted cells during R5-tropic HIV-1 infection. Importantly, using T7 endonuclease I assay we did not detect genome mutations at potential off-target sites that are highly homologous to these CCR5 sgRNAs in stably transduced cells even at 84 days post transduction. Thus we conclude that silencing of CCR5 via Cas9 and CCR5-specific sgRNAs could be a viable alternative strategy for engineering resistance against HIV-1. PMID:25541967

  17. CCR5 gene disruption via lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and single guided RNA renders cells resistant to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiming; Ye, Chaobaihui; Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Di; Kimata, Jason T; Zhou, Paul

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, is a major target for drug and genetic intervention against HIV-1. Genetic intervention strategies have knocked down CCR5 expression levels by shRNA or disrupted the CCR5 gene using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) or Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN). In the present study, we silenced CCR5 via CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) and single guided RNAs (sgRNAs). We constructed lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs. We show that a single round transduction of lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs into HIV-1 susceptible human CD4+ cells yields high frequencies of CCR5 gene disruption. CCR5 gene-disrupted cells are not only resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1, including transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 isolates, but also have selective advantage over CCR5 gene-undisrupted cells during R5-tropic HIV-1 infection. Importantly, using T7 endonuclease I assay we did not detect genome mutations at potential off-target sites that are highly homologous to these CCR5 sgRNAs in stably transduced cells even at 84 days post transduction. Thus we conclude that silencing of CCR5 via Cas9 and CCR5-specific sgRNAs could be a viable alternative strategy for engineering resistance against HIV-1.

  18. CCR2, CCR5, and CXCL12 variation and HIV/AIDS in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Mehlotra, Rajeev K; Hall, Noemi B; Bruse, Shannon E; John, Bangan; Blood Zikursh, Melinda J; Stein, Catherine M; Siba, Peter M; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphisms in chemokine receptors, serving as HIV co-receptors, and their ligands are among the well-known host genetic factors associated with susceptibility to HIV infection and/or disease progression. Papua New Guinea (PNG) has one of the highest adult HIV prevalences in the Asia-Pacific region. However, information regarding the distribution of polymorphisms in chemokine receptor (CCR5, CCR2) and chemokine (CXCL12) genes in PNG is very limited. In this study, we genotyped a total of nine CCR2-CCR5 polymorphisms, including CCR2 190G >A, CCR5 -2459G >A and Δ32, and CXCL12 801G >A in PNG (n=258), North America (n=184), and five countries in West Africa (n=178). Using this data, we determined previously characterized CCR5 haplotypes. In addition, based on the previously reported associations of CCR2 190, CCR5 -2459, CCR5 open reading frame, and CXCL12 801 genotypes with HIV acquisition and/or disease progression, we calculated composite full risk scores, considering both protective as well as susceptibility effects of the CXCL12 801 AA genotype. We observed a very high frequency of the CCR5 -2459A allele (0.98) in the PNG population, which together with the absence of Δ32 resulted in a very high frequency of the HHE haplotype (0.92). These frequencies were significantly higher than in any other population (all P-values<0.001). Regardless of whether we considered the CXCL12 801 AA genotype protective or susceptible, the risk scores were significantly higher in the PNG population compared with any other population (all P-values<0.001). The results of this study provide new insights regarding CCR5 variation in the PNG population, and suggest that the collective variation in CCR2, CCR5, and CXCL12 may increase the risk of HIV/AIDS in a large majority of Papua New Guineans.

  19. Persistence of dual-tropic HIV-1 in an individual homozygous for the CCR5 Delta 32 allele.

    PubMed

    Gorry, Paul R; Zhang, Chengsheng; Wu, Sam; Kunstman, Kevin; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Phair, John; Wolinsky, Steven; Gabuzda, Dana

    2002-05-25

    Entry of HIV-1 into a cell happens only after viral envelope glycoproteins have bound to CD4 and a chemokine receptor. Generally, macrophage-tropic strains use CCR5, and T cell-line-tropic strains use CXCR4 as coreceptors for virus entry. Dual-tropic viruses can use both CCR5 and CXCR4. About 1% of white people are homozygous for a non-functional CCR5 allele, containing a 32 base pair deletion (CCR5 Delta 32). We studied the persistence of dual-tropic HIV-1 in an individual homozygous for this deletion. Our results suggest that structural features of the HIV-1 envelope linked to CCR5 tropism could confer a selective advantage in vivo.

  20. Homozygous delta 32 deletion of the CCR-5 chemokine receptor gene in an HIV-1-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Balotta, C; Bagnarelli, P; Violin, M; Ridolfo, A L; Zhou, D; Berlusconi, A; Corvasce, S; Corbellino, M; Clementi, M; Clerici, M; Moroni, M; Galli, M

    1997-08-01

    Recent research has found that entry of non-syncytium-inducing (NSI), monocyte-macrophage-tropic HIV-1 isolates requires binding to both CD4 and CCR5 receptors, and that delta 32/delta 32 homozygous individuals are protected against infection. To analyse the polymorphism of CCR-5 gene in HIV-1-infected and uninfected subjects. CCR-5 sequences were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from DNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Samples from 152 HIV-1-infected subjects and 122 uninfected controls were tested for the detection of the 32 base-pair deletion. HIV-1 phenotype was determined by viral isolation and MT-2 evaluation. The wild-type/delta 32 heterozygous and delta 32/delta 32 homozygous conditions were represented in 10.7 and 0.8% of healthy controls and in 9.8 and 0.7% of HIV-1-infected subjects, respectively. Of note, the delta 32/delta 32 deletion of the CCR-5 gene was detected by PCR and sequencing confirmed in a patient with progressive infection harbouring a clade B virus with SI phenotype. delta 32/delta 32 homozygosity for the CCR-5 gene does not confer absolute protection against HIV-1 infection, suggesting that either macrophage-tropic viral strains could use coreceptors other than CCR-5 or infect independently of the presence of a functional CCR-5 coreceptor. Alternatively, primary infection sustained by T-cell-tropic isolates, although exceptional, may occur.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Leukocidin LukED and HIV-1 gp120 Target Different Sequence Determinants on CCR5.

    PubMed

    Tam, Kayan; Schultz, Megan; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Vanwalscappel, Bénédicte; Horton, Joshua; Alonzo, Francis; Wu, Beili; Landau, Nathaniel R; Torres, Victor J

    2016-12-13

    Leukocidin ED (LukED) is a bicomponent pore-forming toxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus that lyses host cells by targeting the chemokine receptors CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), CXCR1, CXCR2, and DARC. In addition to its role as a receptor for LukED, CCR5 is the major coreceptor for primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and has been extensively studied. To compare how LukED and HIV-1 target CCR5, we analyzed their respective abilities to use CCR5/CCR2b chimeras to mediate cytotoxicity and virus entry. These analyses showed that the second and third extracellular loops (ECL) of CCR5 are necessary and sufficient for LukED to target the receptor and promote cell lysis. In contrast, the second ECL of CCR5 is necessary but not sufficient for HIV-1 infectivity. The analysis of CCR5 point mutations showed that glycine-163 is critical for HIV-1 infectivity, while arginine-274 and aspartic acid-276 are critical for LukED cytotoxicity. Point mutations in ECL2 diminished both HIV-1 infectivity and LukED cytotoxicity. Treatment of cells with LukED did not interfere with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 infectivity, demonstrating that LukED and the viral envelope glycoprotein use nonoverlapping sites on CCR5. Analysis of point mutations in LukE showed that amino acids 64 to 69 in the rim domain are required for CCR5 targeting and cytotoxicity. Taking the results together, this study identified the molecular basis by which LukED targets CCR5, highlighting the divergent molecular interactions evolved by HIV-1 and LukED to interact with CCR5.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus Leukocidin LukED and HIV-1 gp120 Target Different Sequence Determinants on CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Kayan; Schultz, Megan; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Vanwalscappel, Bénédicte; Horton, Joshua; Alonzo, Francis; Wu, Beili

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leukocidin ED (LukED) is a bicomponent pore-forming toxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus that lyses host cells by targeting the chemokine receptors CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), CXCR1, CXCR2, and DARC. In addition to its role as a receptor for LukED, CCR5 is the major coreceptor for primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and has been extensively studied. To compare how LukED and HIV-1 target CCR5, we analyzed their respective abilities to use CCR5/CCR2b chimeras to mediate cytotoxicity and virus entry. These analyses showed that the second and third extracellular loops (ECL) of CCR5 are necessary and sufficient for LukED to target the receptor and promote cell lysis. In contrast, the second ECL of CCR5 is necessary but not sufficient for HIV-1 infectivity. The analysis of CCR5 point mutations showed that glycine-163 is critical for HIV-1 infectivity, while arginine-274 and aspartic acid-276 are critical for LukED cytotoxicity. Point mutations in ECL2 diminished both HIV-1 infectivity and LukED cytotoxicity. Treatment of cells with LukED did not interfere with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 infectivity, demonstrating that LukED and the viral envelope glycoprotein use nonoverlapping sites on CCR5. Analysis of point mutations in LukE showed that amino acids 64 to 69 in the rim domain are required for CCR5 targeting and cytotoxicity. Taking the results together, this study identified the molecular basis by which LukED targets CCR5, highlighting the divergent molecular interactions evolved by HIV-1 and LukED to interact with CCR5. PMID:27965453

  3. Protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV challenge by an orally delivered CCR5 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Springer, Martin S; Marx, Preston A; Dufour, Jason; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P

    2005-12-01

    Pre-exposure oral prophylaxis with antiviral drugs is a potential method for preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We show that oral delivery of CMPD167, a small molecule that binds to the CCR5 coreceptor, for 10-14 d can protect a substantial proportion of macaques from vaginal infection with a CCR5-using virus (SHIV-162P3). The macaques that became infected despite receiving CMPD167 had reduced plasma viremia levels during the earliest stages of infection.

  4. The frequency of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 Δ 32 mutation in Iranian populations.

    PubMed

    Zare-Bidaki, Mohammad; Karimi-Googheri, Masoud; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Zainodini, Nahid; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi

    2015-04-01

    Evidence showed that chemokines serve as pro-migratory factors for immune cells. CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5, as the main CC chemokines subfamily members, activate immune cells through binding to CC chemokine receptor 5 or CCR5. Macrophages, NK cells and T lymphocytes express CCR5 and thus, affected CCR5 expression or functions could be associated with altered immune responses. Deletion of 32 base pairs (Δ 32) in the exon 1 of the CCR5 gene, which is known as CCR5 Δ 32 mutation causes down regulation and malfunction of the molecule. Furthermore, it has been evidenced that three polymorphisms in the promoter region of CCR5 modulate its expression. Altered CCR5 expression in microbial infection and immune related diseases have been reported by several researchers but the role of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 Δ 32 mutation in Iranian patients suffering from these diseases are controversial. Due to the fact that Iranian people have different genetic backgrounds compared to other ethnics, hence, CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 32 mutation association with the diseases may be different in Iranian patients. Therefore, this review addresses the most recent information regarding the prevalence as well as association of the mutation and polymorphisms in Iranian patients with microbial infection and immune related diseases as along with normal population.

  5. CCL5/RANTES contributes to hypothalamic insulin signaling for systemic insulin responsiveness through CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Szu-Yi; Ajoy, Reni; Changou, Chun Austin; Hsieh, Ya-Ting; Wang, Yang-Kao; Hoffer, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by metabolic disorders. CCL5/RANTES, and its receptor CCR5 are known to contribute to neuronal function as well as to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, atherosclerosis and metabolic changes after HIV infection. Herein, we found that the lack of CCR5 or CCL5 in mice impaired regulation of energy metabolism in hypothalamus. Immunostaining and co-immunoprecipitation revealed the specific expression of CCR5, associated with insulin receptors, in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Both ex vivo stimulation and in vitro tissue culture studies demonstrated that the activation of insulin, and PI3K-Akt pathways were impaired in CCR5 and CCL5 deficient hypothalamus. The inhibitory phosphorylation of insulin response substrate-1 at Ser302 (IRS-1S302) but not IRS-2, by insulin was markedly increased in CCR5 and CCL5 deficient animals. Elevating CCR5/CCL5 activity induced GLUT4 membrane translocation and reduced phospho-IRS-1S302 through AMPKα-S6 Kinase. Blocking CCR5 using the antagonist, MetCCL5, abolished the de-phosphorylation of IRS-1S302 and insulin signal activation. In addition, intracerebroventricular delivery of MetCCL5 interrupted hypothalamic insulin signaling and elicited peripheral insulin responsiveness and glucose intolerance. Taken together, our data suggest that CCR5 regulates insulin signaling in hypothalamus which contributes to systemic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. PMID:27898058

  6. CCL5/RANTES contributes to hypothalamic insulin signaling for systemic insulin responsiveness through CCR5.

    PubMed

    Chou, Szu-Yi; Ajoy, Reni; Changou, Chun Austin; Hsieh, Ya-Ting; Wang, Yang-Kao; Hoffer, Barry

    2016-11-29

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by metabolic disorders. CCL5/RANTES, and its receptor CCR5 are known to contribute to neuronal function as well as to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, atherosclerosis and metabolic changes after HIV infection. Herein, we found that the lack of CCR5 or CCL5 in mice impaired regulation of energy metabolism in hypothalamus. Immunostaining and co-immunoprecipitation revealed the specific expression of CCR5, associated with insulin receptors, in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Both ex vivo stimulation and in vitro tissue culture studies demonstrated that the activation of insulin, and PI3K-Akt pathways were impaired in CCR5 and CCL5 deficient hypothalamus. The inhibitory phosphorylation of insulin response substrate-1 at Ser302 (IRS-1(S302)) but not IRS-2, by insulin was markedly increased in CCR5 and CCL5 deficient animals. Elevating CCR5/CCL5 activity induced GLUT4 membrane translocation and reduced phospho-IRS-1(S302) through AMPKα-S6 Kinase. Blocking CCR5 using the antagonist, (Met)CCL5, abolished the de-phosphorylation of IRS-1(S302) and insulin signal activation. In addition, intracerebroventricular delivery of (Met)CCL5 interrupted hypothalamic insulin signaling and elicited peripheral insulin responsiveness and glucose intolerance. Taken together, our data suggest that CCR5 regulates insulin signaling in hypothalamus which contributes to systemic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism.

  7. Inflammation-induced hepatocellular carcinoma is dependent on CCR5 in mice.

    PubMed

    Barashi, Neta; Weiss, Ido D; Wald, Ori; Wald, Hanna; Beider, Katia; Abraham, Michal; Klein, Shiri; Goldenberg, Daniel; Axelrod, Jonathan; Pikarsky, Eli; Abramovitch, Rinat; Zeira, Evelyne; Galun, Eithan; Peled, Amnon

    2013-09-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an inflammation-induced cancer, which is the third-leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. We investigated the role of the chemokine receptors, CCR5 and CCR1, in regulating inflammation and tumorigenesis in an inflammation-induced HCC model in mice. Multidrug resistance 2 gene (Mdr2)-knockout (Mdr2-KO) mice spontaneously develop chronic cholestatic hepatitis and fibrosis that is eventually followed by HCC. We generated two new strains from the Mdr2-KO mouse, the Mdr2:CCR5 and the Mdr2:CCR1 double knockouts (DKOs), and set out to compare inflammation and tumorigenesis among these strains. We found that in Mdr2-KO mice lacking the chemokine receptor, CCR5 (Mdr2:CCR5 DKO mice), but not CCR1 (Mdr2:CCR1 DKO), macrophage recruitment and trafficking to the liver was significantly reduced. Furthermore, in the absence of CCR5, reduced inflammation was also associated with reduced periductal accumulation of CD24(+) oval cells and abrogation of fibrosis. DKO mice for Mdr2 and CCR5 exhibited a significant decrease in tumor incidence and size. Our results indicate that CCR5 has a critical role in both the development and progression of liver cancer. Therefore, we propose that a CCR5 antagonist can serve for HCC cancer prevention and treatment. © 2013 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  8. B-1 cells promote immunosurveillance against murine melanoma in host absence of CCR5: new perspective in autologous vaccination therapy.

    PubMed

    Vivanco, Bruno C; Viana, Jacqueline D; Perez, Elisabeth C; Konno, Fabiana T C; Guereschi, Marcia G; Xander, Patricia; Keller, Alexandre C; Lopes, José D

    2014-11-01

    Autologous vaccination with tumor-primed dendritic cells increases immune response against tumor, which seems to be improved in host absence of CCR5. Because B-1 lymphocytes modulate the activity of different immune cells, we decided to study their influence in the resistance against murine B16F10 melanoma in a CCR5 deprived environment. Adoptive transfer of peritoneal B-1 CCR5(+/+) lymphocytes to CCR5(-/-) animals inhibited the establishment of lung metastasis and melanoma cell growth, in comparison to saline-treated CCR5(-/-) mice. In loco cell analysis demonstrated that the adoptive transfer of B-1 CCR5(+/+) lymphocytes to CCR5 deficient host was associated with a more intense influx of T CD8(+) to tumor site, indicating that the presence of CCR5(+/+) B-1 cells in the tumor environment induces the migration of T CD8 CCR5(-/-) cells to the implantation site. To corroborate this idea, CCR5(-/-) mice were injected with non B-1 peritoneal cells from wild type (WT) mice before B16F10 inoculation. In this regimen, CCR5(-/-) mice were not protected from tumor growth reinforcing the idea that, in host absence of CCR5, B-1 cells are essential to confer tumor resistance. This work indicates that, in the host absence of CCR5, naive B-1 cells may activate CD8T lymphocytes thereby promoting tumor resistance. Our results strongly suggest that autologous vaccination with B-1 lymphocytes in combination with CCR5 antagonists can be an alternative approach to tumor therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Preclinical development and qualification of ZFN-mediated CCR5 disruption in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    DiGiusto, David L; Cannon, Paula M; Holmes, Michael C; Li, Lijing; Rao, Anitha; Wang, Jianbin; Lee, Gary; Gregory, Philip D; Kim, Kenneth A; Hayward, Samuel B; Meyer, Kathleen; Exline, Colin; Lopez, Evan; Henley, Jill; Gonzalez, Nancy; Bedell, Victoria; Stan, Rodica; Zaia, John A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy for HIV-1 infection is a promising alternative to lifelong combination antiviral drug treatment. Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is the coreceptor required for R5-tropic HIV-1 infection of human cells. Deletion of CCR5 renders cells resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1 infection, and the potential for cure has been shown through allogeneic stem cell transplantation with naturally occurring homozygous deletion of CCR5 in donor hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC). The requirement for HLA-matched HSPC bearing homozygous CCR5 deletions prohibits widespread application of this approach. Thus, a strategy to disrupt CCR5 genomic sequences in HSPC using zinc finger nucleases was developed. Following discussions with regulatory agencies, we conducted IND-enabling preclinical in vitro and in vivo testing to demonstrate the feasibility and (preclinical) safety of zinc finger nucleases-based CCR5 disruption in HSPC. We report here the clinical-scale manufacturing process necessary to deliver CCR5-specific zinc finger nucleases mRNA to HSPC using electroporation and the preclinical safety data. Our results demonstrate effective biallelic CCR5 disruption in up to 72.9% of modified colony forming units from adult mobilized HSPC with maintenance of hematopoietic potential in vitro and in vivo. Tumorigenicity studies demonstrated initial product safety; further safety and feasibility studies are ongoing in subjects infected with HIV-1 (NCT02500849@clinicaltrials.gov).

  10. Preclinical development and qualification of ZFN-mediated CCR5 disruption in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    DiGiusto, David L; Cannon, Paula M; Holmes, Michael C; Li, Lijing; Rao, Anitha; Wang, Jianbin; Lee, Gary; Gregory, Philip D.; Kim, Kenneth A; Hayward, Samuel B; Meyer, Kathleen; Exline, Colin; Lopez, Evan; Henley, Jill; Gonzalez, Nancy; Bedell, Victoria; Stan, Rodica; Zaia, John A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy for HIV-1 infection is a promising alternative to lifelong combination antiviral drug treatment. Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is the coreceptor required for R5-tropic HIV-1 infection of human cells. Deletion of CCR5 renders cells resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1 infection, and the potential for cure has been shown through allogeneic stem cell transplantation with naturally occurring homozygous deletion of CCR5 in donor hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC). The requirement for HLA-matched HSPC bearing homozygous CCR5 deletions prohibits widespread application of this approach. Thus, a strategy to disrupt CCR5 genomic sequences in HSPC using zinc finger nucleases was developed. Following discussions with regulatory agencies, we conducted IND-enabling preclinical in vitro and in vivo testing to demonstrate the feasibility and (preclinical) safety of zinc finger nucleases-based CCR5 disruption in HSPC. We report here the clinical-scale manufacturing process necessary to deliver CCR5-specific zinc finger nucleases mRNA to HSPC using electroporation and the preclinical safety data. Our results demonstrate effective biallelic CCR5 disruption in up to 72.9% of modified colony forming units from adult mobilized HSPC with maintenance of hematopoietic potential in vitro and in vivo. Tumorigenicity studies demonstrated initial product safety; further safety and feasibility studies are ongoing in subjects infected with HIV-1 (NCT02500849@clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:27900346

  11. Design and Elaboration of a Tractable Tricyclic Scaffold To Synthesize Druglike Inhibitors of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4), Antagonists of the C-C Chemokine Receptor Type 5 (CCR5), and Highly Potent and Selective Phosphoinositol-3 Kinase δ (PI3Kδ) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schwehm, Carolin; Kellam, Barrie; Garces, Aimie E; Hill, Stephen J; Kindon, Nicholas D; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Li, Jin; Macdonald, Simon J F; Rowedder, James E; Stoddart, Leigh A; Stocks, Michael J

    2017-02-23

    A novel molecular scaffold has been synthesized, and its incorporation into new analogues of biologically active molecules across multiple target classes will be discussed. In these studies, we have shown use of the tricyclic scaffold to synthesize potent inhibitors of the serine peptidase DPP-4, antagonists of the CCR5 receptor, and highly potent and selective PI3K δ isoform inhibitors. We also describe the predicted physicochemical properties of the resulting inhibitors and conclude that the tractable molecular scaffold could have potential application in future drug discovery programs.

  12. HIV-1 CCR5 gene therapy will fail unless it is combined with a suicide gene

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J.

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has successfully turned Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from a deadly pathogen into a manageable chronic infection. ART is a lifelong therapy which is both expensive and toxic, and HIV can become resistant to it. An alternative to lifelong ART is gene therapy that targets the CCR5 co-receptor and creates a population of genetically modified host cells that are less susceptible to viral infection. With generic mathematical models we show that gene therapy that only targets the CCR5 co-receptor fails to suppress HIV-1 (which is in agreement with current data). We predict that the same gene therapy can be markedly improved if it is combined with a suicide gene that is only expressed upon HIV-1 infection. PMID:26674113

  13. HIV-1 CCR5 gene therapy will fail unless it is combined with a suicide gene.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-12-17

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has successfully turned Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from a deadly pathogen into a manageable chronic infection. ART is a lifelong therapy which is both expensive and toxic, and HIV can become resistant to it. An alternative to lifelong ART is gene therapy that targets the CCR5 co-receptor and creates a population of genetically modified host cells that are less susceptible to viral infection. With generic mathematical models we show that gene therapy that only targets the CCR5 co-receptor fails to suppress HIV-1 (which is in agreement with current data). We predict that the same gene therapy can be markedly improved if it is combined with a suicide gene that is only expressed upon HIV-1 infection.

  14. Exploration of Bivalent Ligands Targeting Putative Mu Opioid Receptor and Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Arnatt, Christopher K.; Falls, Bethany A.; Yuan, Yunyun; Raborg, Thomas J.; Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; El-Hage, Nazira; Selley, Dana E.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Knapp, Pamela E.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Modern antiretroviral therapies have provided HIV-1 infected patients longer lifespans and better quality of life. However, several neurological complications are now being seen in these patients due to HIV-1 associated injury of neurons by infected microglia and astrocytes. In addition, these effects can be further exacerbated with opiate use and abuse. One possible mechanism for such potentiation effects of opiates is the interaction of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) with the chemokine receptor CCR5 (CCR5), a known HIV-1 co-receptor, to form MOR-CCR5 heterodimer. In an attempt to understand this putative interaction and its relevance to neuroAIDS, we designed and synthesized a series of bivalent ligands targeting the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer. To understand how these bivalent ligands may interact with the heterodimer, biological studies including calcium mobilization inhibition, binding affinity, HIV-1 invasion, and cell fusion assays were applied. In particular, HIV-1 infection assays using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, macrophages, and astrocytes revealed a notable synergy in activity for one particular bivalent ligand. Further, a molecular model of the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer was constructed, docked with the bivalent ligand, and molecular dynamics simulations of the complex was performed in a membrane-water system to help understand the biological observation. PMID:27720326

  15. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika; E-mail: hiokada@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1{sub IIIB} infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.

  16. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  17. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO 140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo. PMID:18519143

  18. Dating the origin of the CCR5-Delta32 AIDS-resistance allele by the coalescence of haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, J C; Reich, D E; Goldstein, D B; Shin, H D; Smith, M W; Carrington, M; Winkler, C; Huttley, G A; Allikmets, R; Schriml, L; Gerrard, B; Malasky, M; Ramos, M D; Morlot, S; Tzetis, M; Oddoux, C; di Giovine, F S; Nasioulas, G; Chandler, D; Aseev, M; Hanson, M; Kalaydjieva, L; Glavac, D; Gasparini, P; Kanavakis, E; Claustres, M; Kambouris, M; Ostrer, H; Duff, G; Baranov, V; Sibul, H; Metspalu, A; Goldman, D; Martin, N; Duffy, D; Schmidtke, J; Estivill, X; O'Brien, S J; Dean, M

    1998-01-01

    The CCR5-Delta32 deletion obliterates the CCR5 chemokine and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coreceptor on lymphoid cells, leading to strong resistance against HIV-1 infection and AIDS. A genotype survey of 4,166 individuals revealed a cline of CCR5-Delta32 allele frequencies of 0%-14% across Eurasia, whereas the variant is absent among native African, American Indian, and East Asian ethnic groups. Haplotype analysis of 192 Caucasian chromosomes revealed strong linkage disequilibrium between CCR5 and two microsatellite loci. By use of coalescence theory to interpret modern haplotype genealogy, we estimate the origin of the CCR5-Delta32-containing ancestral haplotype to be approximately 700 years ago, with an estimated range of 275-1,875 years. The geographic cline of CCR5-Delta32 frequencies and its recent emergence are consistent with a historic strong selective event (e.g. , an epidemic of a pathogen that, like HIV-1, utilizes CCR5), driving its frequency upward in ancestral Caucasian populations. PMID:9585595

  19. First report of a healthy Indian heterozygous for delta 32 mutant of HIV-1 co-receptor-CCR5 gene.

    PubMed

    Husain, S; Goila, R; Shahi, S; Banerjea, A

    1998-01-30

    The beta-chemokine receptor, CCR5, is a major co-receptor for macrophage tropic non-syncytia-inducing isolates of HIV-1. Recently a 32 bp homozygous deletion in the coding region of CCR5 has been reported in a very small percentage (< 1%) of Caucasian individuals who remain uninfected, despite multiple exposure to the wild-type virus. This mutant allele in the heterozygous form (CCR5/32 ccr5) was readily detected in a normal unrelated Caucasian population of European heritage with varying frequencies (13-20%). However, when a large number of the non-Caucasian population (261 Africans and 423 Asians) were screened for the presence of this deleted allele, not a single case of either homozygous or heterozygous mutant for delta 32 allele of CCR5 was detected. We screened 100 normal individuals and found a single heterozygous case with an identical 32 bp deletion in CCR5 gene reported earlier, the rest possessed wild-type alleles. This deleted gene was inherited in Mendelian fashion among the family members of this individual. Thus, the frequency of this deleted allele in India among unrelated normal individuals is likely to be very low (< 1%). We observed a moderate transdominant effect of this mutant allele in a fusion assay. Finally, we show a significant inhibition of fusion of cell membranes when the 176-bp region of CCR5 was used as an antisense.

  20. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template.

    PubMed

    Sather, Blythe D; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-30

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP-modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34(+) cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties.

  1. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template

    PubMed Central

    Sather, Blythe D.; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S.; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F.; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.; Rawlings, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4+ T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV) – mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP – modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34+ cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties. PMID:26424571

  2. Chemokine receptor CCR5 and CXCR4 might influence virus replication during IBDV infection.

    PubMed

    Ou, Changbo; Wang, Qiuxia; Yu, Yan; Zhang, Yanhong; Ma, Jinyou; Kong, Xianghui; Liu, Xingyou

    2017-03-27

    Both CCR5 and CXCR4 are important chemokine receptors and take vital role in migration, development and distribution of T cells, however, whether they will influence the process of T cell infiltration into bursa of Fabricius during infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) infection is unclear. In the current study, CCR5 and CXCR4 antagonists, Maraviroc and AMD3100, were administrated into chickens inoculated with IBDV, and the gene levels of IBDV VP2, CCR5, CXCR4 and related cytokines were determined by real-time PCR. The results showed that large number of T cells began to migrate into the bursae on Day 3 post infection with IBDV and the mRNA of chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 began to increase on Day 1. Moreover, antagonist treatments have increased the VP2, CCR5 and CXCR4 gene transcriptions and influenced on the gene levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, TGF-β4, MHC-I and MDA5. In conclusion, the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 might influence virus replication during IBDV infection and further study would focus on the interaction between chemokine receptors and their ligands.

  3. CCR5 blockade for neuroinflammatory diseases--beyond control of HIV.

    PubMed

    Martin-Blondel, Guillaume; Brassat, David; Bauer, Jan; Lassmann, Hans; Liblau, Roland S

    2016-02-01

    Chemokine receptors have been implicated in a wide range of CNS inflammatory diseases and have important roles in the recruitment and positioning of immune cells within tissues. Among them, the chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) can be targeted by maraviroc, a readily available and well-tolerated drug that was developed for the treatment of HIV. Correlative evidence implicates the CCR5-chemokine axis in multiple sclerosis, Rasmussen encephalitis, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, and infectious diseases, such as cerebral malaria and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. On the basis of this evidence, we postulate in this Review that CCR5 antagonists, such as maraviroc, offer neuroprotective benefits in settings in which CCR5 promotes deleterious neuroinflammation, particularly in diseases in which CD8(+) T cells seem to play a pivotal role.

  4. Cytokine-induced killer cells interact with tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells via CCR5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Yong Guk; Kim, Ji Sung; Park, Eun Jae; Kim, Boyeong; Park, Ki Hwan; Kang, Jong Soon; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2016-08-10

    The antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells can be increased by co-culturing them with tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells (tDCs); this phenomenon has been studied mainly at the population level. Using time-lapse imaging, we examined how CIK cells gather information from tDCs at the single-cell level. tDCs highly expressed CCL5, which bound CCR5 expressed on CIK cells. tDCs strongly induced migration of Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells, but not that of Ccr5(-/-) CIK cells or Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells treated with the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc. Individual tDCs contacted Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells more frequently and lengthily than with Ccr5(-/-) CIK cells. Consequently, tDCs increased the antitumor activity of Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells in vitro and in vivo, but did not increase that of Ccr5(-/-) CIK cells. Taken together, our data provide insight into the mechanism of CIK cell activation by tDCs at the single-cell level.

  5. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Biscone, Mark J.; Miamidian, John L.; Muchiri, John M.; Baik, Sarah S.W.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Reeves, Jacqueline D. . E-mail: jreeves@MonogramBio.com

    2006-07-20

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner.

  6. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of a Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5) Antagonist to Decrease the Occurrence of Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in HIV-Infection: The CADIRIS Study

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-Madero, Juan G.; Ellenberg, Susan; Rassool, Mohammed S.; Tierney, Ann; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo F.; López-Martínez, Alondra; Piñeirúa-Menéndez, Alicia; Montaner, Luis J.; Azzoni, Livio; Benítez, César Rivera; Sereti, Irini; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; Mosqueda-Gómez, Juan L.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Sanne, Ian; Lederman, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS) is a common complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients. IRIS is associated with an increased risk of hospitalization and death. We ascertained whether CCR5 blockade using maraviroc reduces the risk of IRIS. Methods The CADIRIS study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial that accrued subjects from five clinical sites in Mexico and one in South Africa between November 2009 and January 2012, and followed them for one year. The primary outcome was occurrence of IRIS by 24 weeks. HIV-infected adults, naïve to ART, with CD4 cells <100/μL, and HIVRNA >1,000 copies/mL were eligible. We screened 362 subjects; 279 met inclusion criteria, 3 refused participation, and 276 were randomized. Participants received maraviroc 600 mg twice daily or placebo added to an ART regimen that included tenofovir, emtricitabine, and efavirenz for 48 weeks. Findings There were 276 patients randomized (140 received maraviroc and 136 placebo). There was no difference in the time to IRIS events between treatment arms (HR 1·08, 95% CI (0·66, 1·77), log-rank test p=0·743). In total, 64 (23%) patients had IRIS events, 33 (24%) in the maraviroc arm and 31 (23%) in the placebo arm (p=0·88). Interpretation Maraviroc had no significant effect on frequency, time or severity of IRIS events after ART initiation. Including a CCR5 inhibitor in an initial treatment regimen does not confer a meaningful protection from the occurrence of IRIS in persons with advanced HIV infection. Funding The trial was funded as investigator initiated research by Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov. ID: NCT00988780 (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00988780) PMID:26366430

  7. Molecular docking and 3D QSAR studies on 1-amino-2-phenyl-4-(piperidin-1-yl)-butanes based on the structural modeling of human CCR5 receptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Liu, Hong; Niu, Chunying; Luo, Cheng; Luo, Xiaomin; Shen, Jianhua; Chen, Kaixian; Jiang, Hualiang

    2004-12-01

    In the present study, we have used an approach combining protein structure modeling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, automated docking, and 3D QSAR analyses to investigate the detailed interactions of CCR5 with their antagonists. Homology modeling and MD simulation were used to build the 3D model of CCR5 receptor based on the high-resolution X-ray structure of bovine rhodopsin. A series of 64 CCR5 antagonists, 1-amino-2-phenyl-4-(piperidin-1-yl)-butanes, were docked into the putative binding site of the 3D model of CCR5 using the docking method, and the probable interaction model between CCR5 and the antagonists were obtained. The predicted binding affinities of the antagonists to CCR5 correlate well with the antagonist activities, and the interaction model could be used to explain many mutagenesis results. All these indicate that the 3D model of antagonist-CCR5 interaction is reliable. Based on the binding conformations and their alignment inside the binding pocket of CCR5, three-dimensional structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) analyses were performed on these antagonists using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity analysis (CoMSIA) methods. Both CoMFA and CoMSIA provide statistically valid models with good correlation and predictive power. The q(2)(r(cross)(2)) values are 0.568 and 0.587 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively. The predictive ability of these models was validated by six compounds that were not included in the training set. Mapping these models back to the topology of the active site of CCR5 leads to a better understanding of antagonist-CCR5 interaction. These results suggest that the 3D model of CCR5 can be used in structure-based drug design and the 3D QSAR models provide clear guidelines and accurate activity predictions for novel antagonist design.

  8. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C

    PubMed Central

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y.; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R.; Heider, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients. PMID:27126912

  9. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R; Heider, Dominik

    2016-04-29

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients.

  10. Chemokine receptor CCR5 genotype influences the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in human PBL-SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Picchio, G R; Gulizia, R J; Mosier, D E

    1997-09-01

    Individuals homozygous for a 32-bp deletion (delta 32) in the CCR5 gene encoding the coreceptor for macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are resistant to virus infection, and heterozygous individuals show some slowing of disease progression. The impact of the CCR5 genotype on HIV-1 infection was assessed in vitro and in the human PBL-SCID (hu-PBL-SCID) model. Cells and hu-PBL-SCID mice from CCR5 delta 32/delta 32 donors were resistant to infection with macrophage-tropic HIV-1 and showed slower replication of dual-tropic HIV-1. hu-PBL-SCID mice derived from CCR5 delta 32/+ heterozygotes showed delayed replication of macrophage-tropic HIV-1 despite a small and variable effect of heterozygosity on viral replication in vitro. The level of CCR5 expression appears to limit replication of macrophage-tropic and dual-tropic HIV-1 strains in vivo.

  11. Investigation of Inhibition Mechanism of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 by Micro-second Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Yurtsever, Mine; Durdagi, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) belongs to G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and plays an important role in treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since HIV uses CCR5 protein as a co-receptor. Recently, the crystal structure of CCR5-bound complex with an approved anti-retroviral drug (maroviroc) was resolved. During the crystallization procedure, amino acid residues (i.e., Cys224, Arg225, Asn226 and Glu227) at the third intra-cellular loop were replaced by the rubredoxin for stability reasons. In the current study, we aimed to understand the impact of the incorporated rubredoxin on the conformations of TM domains of the target protein. For this reason, rubredoxin was deleted from the crystal structure and the missing amino acids were engineered. The resultant structure was subjected to long (μs) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to shed light into the inhibitory mechanism. The derived model structure displayed a significant deviation in the cytoplasmic domain of TM5 and IC3 in the absence of rubredoxin. The principal component analyses (PCA) and MD trajectory analyses revealed important structural and dynamical differences at apo and holo forms of the CCR5. PMID:26299310

  12. CCR5/CD4/CXCR4 oligomerization prevents HIV-1 gp120IIIB binding to the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Barroso, Rubén; Dyrhaug, Sunniva Y.; Navarro, Gemma; Lucas, Pilar; Soriano, Silvia F.; Vega, Beatriz; Costas, Coloma; Muñoz-Fernández, M. Ángeles; Santiago, César; Frade, José Miguel Rodríguez; Franco, Rafael; Mellado, Mario

    2014-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR4, the respective cell surface coreceptors of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains, both form heterodimers with CD4, the principal HIV-1 receptor. Using several resonance energy transfer techniques, we determined that CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 formed heterotrimers, and that CCR5 coexpression altered the conformation of both CXCR4/CXCR4 homodimers and CD4/CXCR4 heterodimers. As a result, binding of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120IIIB to the CD4/CXCR4/CCR5 heterooligomer was negligible, and the gp120-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for HIV-1 entry were prevented. CCR5 reduced HIV-1 envelope-induced CD4/CXCR4-mediated cell-cell fusion. In nucleofected Jurkat CD4 cells and primary human CD4+ T cells, CCR5 expression led to a reduction in X4 HIV-1 infectivity. These findings can help to understand why X4 HIV-1 strains infection affect T-cell types differently during AIDS development and indicate that receptor oligomerization might be a target for previously unidentified therapeutic approaches for AIDS intervention. PMID:24778234

  13. CCR5/CD4/CXCR4 oligomerization prevents HIV-1 gp120IIIB binding to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Barroso, Rubén; Dyrhaug, Sunniva Y; Navarro, Gemma; Lucas, Pilar; Soriano, Silvia F; Vega, Beatriz; Costas, Coloma; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Santiago, César; Rodríguez Frade, José Miguel; Franco, Rafael; Mellado, Mario

    2014-05-13

    CCR5 and CXCR4, the respective cell surface coreceptors of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains, both form heterodimers with CD4, the principal HIV-1 receptor. Using several resonance energy transfer techniques, we determined that CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 formed heterotrimers, and that CCR5 coexpression altered the conformation of both CXCR4/CXCR4 homodimers and CD4/CXCR4 heterodimers. As a result, binding of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120IIIB to the CD4/CXCR4/CCR5 heterooligomer was negligible, and the gp120-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for HIV-1 entry were prevented. CCR5 reduced HIV-1 envelope-induced CD4/CXCR4-mediated cell-cell fusion. In nucleofected Jurkat CD4 cells and primary human CD4(+) T cells, CCR5 expression led to a reduction in X4 HIV-1 infectivity. These findings can help to understand why X4 HIV-1 strains infection affect T-cell types differently during AIDS development and indicate that receptor oligomerization might be a target for previously unidentified therapeutic approaches for AIDS intervention.

  14. Involvement of Spinal CCR5/PKCγ Signaling Pathway in the Maintenance of Cancer-Induced Bone Pain.

    PubMed

    Hang, Li-Hua; Li, Shu-Na; Dan, Xiang; Shu, Wei-Wei; Luo, Hong; Shao, Dong-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is a challenging medical problem that considerably influences cancer patients' quality of life. Currently, few treatments have been developed to conquer CIBP because of a poor understanding of the potential mechanisms. Our previous work has proved that spinal RANTES (a major ligand for CCR5) was involved in the maintenance of CIBP. In this study, we attempted to investigate whether spinal CCR5 and its downstream PKCγ pathway is involved in the maintenance of CIBP. Inoculation of Walker 256 cells into the tibia could induce a marked mechanical allodynia with concomitant upregulation of spinal CCR5 and p-PKCγ expression from day 6 to day 15 after inoculation. Spinal CCR5 was prominently expressed in microglia, and mechanical allodynia was attenuated by intrathecal injection of DAPTA (a specific antagonist of CCR5) with downregulation of spinal CCR5 and p-PKCγ expression levels at day 15 in inoculated rats. Pre-intrathecal injection of RANTES could reverse the anti-allodynia effects of DAPTA. Intrathecal administration of GF109203X (an inhibitor of PKC) could alleviate mechanical allodynia as well as decrease of spinal p-PKCγ expression level, but no influence on spinal CCR5 level. Our findings suggest that CCR5/PKCγ signaling pathway in microglia may contribute to the maintenance of CIBP in rats.

  15. Role of CCR5, CCR2 and SDF-1 gene polymorphisms in a population of HIV-1 infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Mazzucchelli, R; Corvasce, S; Violin, M; Riva, C; Bianchi, R; Dehò, L; Velleca, R; Cibella, J; Bada, M; Moroni, M; Galli, M; Balotta, C

    2001-01-01

    The finding that in addition to CD4 molecule HIV-1 uses, CCR5 or CXCR4 receptors to enter target cells prompted the research to identify polymorphisms in coreceptor genes affecting disease progression. In this study we analyzed the prevalence of CCR5-delta32, CCR2-641 and SDF1-3'A alleles in a highly selected group of 42 Long-Term Nonprogressors (LTNPs) compared to 112 subjects with a typical course of HIV-1 infection (TPs) and 117 healthy controls (HCs). In addition, we correlated CCR5, CCR2 and SDF-1 genotypes with molecular indexes of HIV-1 replication, cell-free RNA and both unspliced (US) and multiply spliced (MS) intracellular transcripts, to investigate the role of the mutant alleles in determining a long-term nonprogressive course of HIV-1 disease. Our results indicate a significantly higher prevalence of CCR5-delta32 allele in LTNPs compared to TPs (p=0.0434), while the proportions of CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A alleles were comparable between the two groups. However, SDF-1 wild type LTNP subjects showed significantly lower levels of HIV-1 genomic RNA, US and MS transcripts than SDF1-3'A heterozygous ones (p=0.0021, 0.016, 0.0031, respectively), whereas both CCR5 and CCR2 wild type individuals had similar rates of viral replication compared to CCR5-delta32 and CCR2-64I heterozygous ones. CCR5, CCR2 and SDF-1 combined genotypes were also studied and this analysis did not identify a specific protective cluster of alleles in LTNPs. Taken together, our results indicate that genetic background involving CCR5, CCR2 and SDF-1 alleles may play a limited role in the natural history of HIV-1 infection.

  16. Identification of potential CCR5 inhibitors through pharmacophore-based virtual screening, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Shu, Mao; Wang, Yuanqiang; Hu, Yong; Wang, Yuanliang; Luo, Yanfeng; Lin, Zhihua

    2016-10-18

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), a member of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), plays a vital role in inflammatory responses to infection. Alterations in the expression of CCR5 have been correlated with disease progression in many types of cancers. The idea of using CCR5 as a target for therapeutic intervention has been demonstrated to prevent disease progression. To date, only a few compounds have been reported as CCR5 inhibitors. In this study, a series of CCR5 antagonists were used to construct pharmacophore models. Then the optimal model was utilized as a 3D query to identify novel chemical entities from structural databases. After refinement by molecular docking, drug-likeness analysis, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) and binding free energy analysis, three potential inhibitors (25, 29 and 45) were identified. MD simulations suggested that the screened compounds retained the important common binding mode known for CCR5 inhibitors (maraviroc and nifeviroc), which occupied the bottom of a pocket and stabilized the conformation of CCR5. During the binding process, van der Waals interactions provided the substantial driving force. The most favorable contributions were from Tyr37, Trp86, Tyr89, Tyr108, Phe109, Phe112, Gln194, Thr195, Ile198, Trp248, Tyr251, Leu255, Thr259, Met279, Glu283 and Met287. The above results suggest that the hybrid strategy would provide a basis for rational drug design.

  17. Response to Vicriviroc in Treatment-Experienced Subjects Using an Enhanced Sensitivity Co-receptor Tropism Assay: Reanalysis of AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5211

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhaohui; Gulick, Roy M.; Krambrink, Amy; Coakley, Eoin; Hughes, Michael D.; Han, Dong; Flexner, Charles; Wilkin, Timothy J.; Skolnik, Paul R.; Greaves, Wayne L.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Reeves, Jacqueline D.

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced sensitivity Trofile assay was used to re-test co-receptor usage at study screening and entry for the 118 ACTG A5211 treatment-experienced subjects who had CCR5-tropic (R5) virus by the original Trofile assay at study screening. Among 90 vicriviroc recipients, a significantly (P<0.001) greater mean reduction in HIV-1 RNA was observed in 72 subjects with R5 virus versus 15 subjects reclassified with dual/mixed-tropic viruses at screening: −1.11 vs. −0.09 (day 14), −1.91 vs. −0.57 (week 24) log10 copies/mL, respectively. Results suggest that the enhanced sensitivity assay is a better screening tool for determining patient eligibility for CCR5 antagonist therapy. PMID:19874179

  18. Infection of macrophages and dendritic cells with primary R5-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inhibited by natural polyreactive anti-CCR5 antibodies purified from cervicovaginal secretions.

    PubMed

    Eslahpazir, Jobin; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Bouhlal, Hicham; Hocini, Hakim; Carbonneil, Cédric; Grésenguet, Gérard; Mbopi Kéou, François-Xavier; LeGoff, Jérôme; Saïdi, Héla; Requena, Mary; Nasreddine, Nadine; de Dieu Longo, Jean; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Bélec, Laurent

    2008-05-01

    Heterosexual contact is the primary mode of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) transmission worldwide. The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major coreceptor that is associated with the mucosal transmission of R5-tropic HIV-1 during sexual intercourse. The CCR5 molecule is thus a target for antibody-based therapeutic strategies aimed at blocking HIV-1 entry into cells. We have previously demonstrated that polyreactive natural antibodies (NAbs) from therapeutic preparations of immunoglobulin G and from human breast milk contain NAbs directed against CCR5. Such antibodies inhibit the infection of human macrophages and T lymphocytes by R5-tropic isolates of HIV in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that human immunoglobulins from the cervicovaginal secretions of HIV-seronegative or HIV-seropositive women contain NAbs directed against the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. Natural affinity-purified anti-CCR5 antibodies bound to CCR5 expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells and further inhibited the infection of macrophages and dendritic cells with primary and laboratory-adapted R5-tropic HIV but not with X4-tropic HIV. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies moderately inhibited R5-tropic HIV transfer from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to autologous T cells. Our results suggest that mucosal anti-CCR5 antibodies from healthy immunocompetent donors may hamper the penetration of HIV and may be suitable for use in the development of novel passive immunotherapy regimens in specific clinical settings of HIV infection.

  19. Infection of Macrophages and Dendritic Cells with Primary R5-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Inhibited by Natural Polyreactive Anti-CCR5 Antibodies Purified from Cervicovaginal Secretions▿

    PubMed Central

    Eslahpazir, Jobin; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Bouhlal, Hicham; Hocini, Hakim; Carbonneil, Cédric; Grésenguet, Gérard; Kéou, François-Xavier Mbopi; LeGoff, Jérôme; Saïdi, Héla; Requena, Mary; Nasreddine, Nadine; de Dieu Longo, Jean; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Bélec, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Heterosexual contact is the primary mode of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) transmission worldwide. The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major coreceptor that is associated with the mucosal transmission of R5-tropic HIV-1 during sexual intercourse. The CCR5 molecule is thus a target for antibody-based therapeutic strategies aimed at blocking HIV-1 entry into cells. We have previously demonstrated that polyreactive natural antibodies (NAbs) from therapeutic preparations of immunoglobulin G and from human breast milk contain NAbs directed against CCR5. Such antibodies inhibit the infection of human macrophages and T lymphocytes by R5-tropic isolates of HIV in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that human immunoglobulins from the cervicovaginal secretions of HIV-seronegative or HIV-seropositive women contain NAbs directed against the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. Natural affinity-purified anti-CCR5 antibodies bound to CCR5 expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells and further inhibited the infection of macrophages and dendritic cells with primary and laboratory-adapted R5-tropic HIV but not with X4-tropic HIV. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies moderately inhibited R5-tropic HIV transfer from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to autologous T cells. Our results suggest that mucosal anti-CCR5 antibodies from healthy immunocompetent donors may hamper the penetration of HIV and may be suitable for use in the development of novel passive immunotherapy regimens in specific clinical settings of HIV infection. PMID:18353923

  20. Protective effect of CCR5 Delta-32 allele against HIV-1 in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Aguirre, Jesús A; Cázarez-Salazar, Silvestre G; Ochoa-Ramírez, Luis A; Acosta-Cota, Selene de J; Zamora-Gómez, Román; Najar-Reyes, Guilermi M; Villarreal-Escamilla, Perla; Osuna-Ramírez, Ignacio; Díaz-Camacho, Sylvia P; Sánchez-Zazueta, Jorge G; Ríos-Tostado, Juan J; Velarde-Félix, Jesús S

    2013-09-01

    C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is known for its role as a co-receptor for HIV-1 infection. Some individuals possess a 32 bp deletion, known as Delta-32 allele which has been reported to confer resistance to HIV-1 infection. In order to estimate the distribution of Delta-32 allele of CCR5 gene, 1034 mestizo individuals from the Northwest of Mexico, including 385 HIV-1-infected individuals, 472 healthy controls and 177 uninfected female sex workers; were examined by allele-specific PCR. There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of Delta-32 allele between HIV-1 positive and healthy individuals (OR= 1.1, p= 0.6). However, we found a significantly reduced prevalence of CCR5 Delta-32 heterozygous genotype in female patients (OR= 0.084, 95% CI= 0.011 - 0.630, p= 0.002), as well as in allele frequency, compared to male patients. Furthermore, we observed an inverse relationship between allele frequency and the risk of HIV-1 transmission and AIDS progression among female healthy controls, sex workers and HIV-1 infected groups. Our findings support previous data showing Delta-32 as a genetic protective factor against HIV-1 infection in Mexican women, as well as in women from other populations.

  1. Class B β-arrestin2-dependent CCR5 signalosome retention with natural antibodies to CCR5.

    PubMed

    Venuti, Assunta; Pastori, Claudia; Pennisi, Rosamaria; Riva, Agostino; Sciortino, Maria Teresa; Lopalco, Lucia

    2016-12-23

    CCR5 stimulation with natural ligands, such as RANTES, classically induces short-term internalization with transient activation of β-arrestins and rapidly recycling on the cell surface. Here we discovered that, in T cells, natural CCR5 antibodies induce a CCR5-negative phenotype with the involvement of β-arrestin2, which leads to the formation of a stable CCR5 signalosome with both β-arrestin2 and ERK1. The activation of β-arrestin2 is necessary to CCR5 signaling for the signalosome formation and stabilization. When all stimuli were washed out, β-arrestin1 silencing favors the activity of β-arrestin2 for the CCR5 signalosome retention. Interestingly, CCR5 turn from Class A trafficking pattern, normally used for its internalization with natural modulating molecules (i.e. RANTES), into a long lasting Class B type specifically induced by stimulation with natural anti-CCR5 antibodies. This new CCR5 pathway is relevant not only to study in depth the molecular basis of all pathologies where CCR5 is involved but also to generate new antidody-based therapeutics.

  2. Class B β-arrestin2-dependent CCR5 signalosome retention with natural antibodies to CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Venuti, Assunta; Pastori, Claudia; Pennisi, Rosamaria; Riva, Agostino; Sciortino, Maria Teresa; Lopalco, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    CCR5 stimulation with natural ligands, such as RANTES, classically induces short-term internalization with transient activation of β-arrestins and rapidly recycling on the cell surface. Here we discovered that, in T cells, natural CCR5 antibodies induce a CCR5-negative phenotype with the involvement of β-arrestin2, which leads to the formation of a stable CCR5 signalosome with both β-arrestin2 and ERK1. The activation of β-arrestin2 is necessary to CCR5 signaling for the signalosome formation and stabilization. When all stimuli were washed out, β-arrestin1 silencing favors the activity of β-arrestin2 for the CCR5 signalosome retention. Interestingly, CCR5 turn from Class A trafficking pattern, normally used for its internalization with natural modulating molecules (i.e. RANTES), into a long lasting Class B type specifically induced by stimulation with natural anti-CCR5 antibodies. This new CCR5 pathway is relevant not only to study in depth the molecular basis of all pathologies where CCR5 is involved but also to generate new antidody-based therapeutics. PMID:28008933

  3. CXCR6-Mediated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVagmSab Entry into Sabaeus African Green Monkey Lymphocytes Implicates Widespread Use of Non-CCR5 Pathways in Natural Host Infections.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Katherine S; Yi, Yanjie; Elliott, Sarah T C; Romero, Dino; Jacquelin, Beatrice; Hahn, Beatrice H; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Collman, Ronald G

    2017-02-15

    African green monkeys (AGM) and sooty mangabeys (SM) are well-studied natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) that do not progress to AIDS when infected with their species-specific viruses. Natural hosts of SIV express very low levels of the canonical entry coreceptor CCR5, and recent studies have shown that CCR5 is dispensable for SIV infection of SM in vivo and that blocking of CCR5 does not prevent ex vivo infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from SM or vervet AGM. In both hosts, CXCR6 is an efficient entry pathway in vitro Here we investigated the use of species-matched CXCR6 and other alternative coreceptors by SIVagmSab, which infects sabaeus AGM. We cloned sabaeus CD4 and 10 candidate coreceptors. Species-matched CXCR6, CCR5, and GPR15 mediated robust entry into transfected cells by pseudotypes carrying SIVagmSab92018ivTF Env, with lower-level entry through GPR1 and APJ. We cloned genetically divergent env genes from the plasma of two wild-infected sabaeus AGM and found similar patterns of coreceptor use. Titration experiments showed that CXCR6 and CCR5 were more efficient than other coreceptors when tested at limiting CD4/coreceptor levels. Finally, blocking of CXCR6 with its ligand CXCL16 significantly inhibited SIVagmSab replication in sabaeus PBMC and had a greater impact than did the CCR5 blocker maraviroc, confirming the use of CXCR6 in primary lymphocyte infection. These data suggest a new paradigm for SIV infection of natural host species, whereby a shared outcome of virus-host coevolution is the use of CXCR6 or other alternative coreceptors for entry, which may direct SIV toward CD4(+) T cell subsets and anatomical sites that support viral replication without disrupting immune homeostasis and function.

  4. Prediction of HIV-1 coreceptor usage (tropism) by sequence analysis using a genotypic approach.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Saleta; Kaiser, Rolf; Lübke, Nadine; Thielen, Alexander; Schuelter, Eugen; Heger, Eva; Däumer, Martin; Reuter, Stefan; Esser, Stefan; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Pfister, Herbert; Oette, Mark; Lengauer, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is the first licensed antiretroviral drug from the class of coreceptor antagonists. It binds to the host coreceptor CCR5, which is used by the majority of HIV strains in order to infect the human immune cells (Fig. 1). Other HIV isolates use a different coreceptor, the CXCR4. Which receptor is used, is determined in the virus by the Env protein (Fig. 2). Depending on the coreceptor used, the viruses are classified as R5 or X4, respectively. MVC binds to the CCR5 receptor inhibiting the entry of R5 viruses into the target cell. During the course of disease, X4 viruses may emerge and outgrow the R5 viruses. Determination of coreceptor usage (also called tropism) is therefore mandatory prior to administration of MVC, as demanded by EMA and FDA. The studies for MVC efficiency MOTIVATE, MERIT and 1029 have been performed with the Trofile assay from Monogram, San Francisco, U.S.A. This is a high quality assay based on sophisticated recombinant tests. The acceptance for this test for daily routine is rather low outside of the U.S.A., since the European physicians rather tend to work with decentralized expert laboratories, which also provide concomitant resistance testing. These laboratories have undergone several quality assurance evaluations, the last one being presented in 2011. For several years now, we have performed tropism determinations based on sequence analysis from the HIV env-V3 gene region (V3). This region carries enough information to perform a reliable prediction. The genotypic determination of coreceptor usage presents advantages such as: shorter turnover time (equivalent to resistance testing), lower costs, possibility to adapt the results to the patients' needs and possibility of analysing clinical samples with very low or even undetectable viral load (VL), particularly since the number of samples analysed with VL < 1000 copies/μl roughly increased in the last years (Fig. 3). The main steps for tropism testing (Fig. 4) demonstrated in

  5. Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage (Tropism) by Sequence Analysis using a Genotypic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Saleta; Kaiser, Rolf; Lübke, Nadine; Thielen, Alexander; Schuelter, Eugen; Heger, Eva; Däumer, Martin; Reuter, Stefan; Esser, Stefan; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Pfister, Herbert; Oette, Mark; Lengauer, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is the first licensed antiretroviral drug from the class of coreceptor antagonists. It binds to the host coreceptor CCR5, which is used by the majority of HIV strains in order to infect the human immune cells (Fig. 1). Other HIV isolates use a different coreceptor, the CXCR4. Which receptor is used, is determined in the virus by the Env protein (Fig. 2). Depending on the coreceptor used, the viruses are classified as R5 or X4, respectively. MVC binds to the CCR5 receptor inhibiting the entry of R5 viruses into the target cell. During the course of disease, X4 viruses may emerge and outgrow the R5 viruses. Determination of coreceptor usage (also called tropism) is therefore mandatory prior to administration of MVC, as demanded by EMA and FDA. The studies for MVC efficiency MOTIVATE, MERIT and 1029 have been performed with the Trofile assay from Monogram, San Francisco, U.S.A. This is a high quality assay based on sophisticated recombinant tests. The acceptance for this test for daily routine is rather low outside of the U.S.A., since the European physicians rather tend to work with decentralized expert laboratories, which also provide concomitant resistance testing. These laboratories have undergone several quality assurance evaluations, the last one being presented in 20111. For several years now, we have performed tropism determinations based on sequence analysis from the HIV env-V3 gene region (V3)2. This region carries enough information to perform a reliable prediction. The genotypic determination of coreceptor usage presents advantages such as: shorter turnover time (equivalent to resistance testing), lower costs, possibility to adapt the results to the patients' needs and possibility of analysing clinical samples with very low or even undetectable viral load (VL), particularly since the number of samples analysed with VL<1000 copies/μl roughly increased in the last years (Fig. 3). The main steps for tropism testing (Fig. 4) demonstrated in

  6. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection of primary CD4+ T-cells by gene editing of CCR5 using adenovirus-delivered CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang; Guan, Xinmeng; Du, Tao; Jin, Wei; Wu, Biao; Liu, Yalan; Wang, Ping; Hu, Bodan; Griffin, George E; Shattock, Robin J; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-08-01

    CCR5 serves as an essential coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry, and individuals with a CCR5(Δ32) variant appear to be healthy, making CCR5 an attractive target for control of HIV-1 infection. The CRISPR/Cas9, which functions as a naturally existing adaptive immune system in prokaryotes, has been recently harnessed as a novel nuclease system for genome editing in mammalian cells. Although CRISPR/Cas9 can be readily delivered into cell lines, due to the large size of the Cas9 protein, efficient delivery of CCR5-targeting CRISPR/Cas9 components into primary cells, including CD4(+) T-cells, the primary target for HIV-1 infection in vivo, remains a challenge. In the current study, following design of a panel of top-ranked single-guided RNAs (sgRNAs) targeting the ORF of CCR5, we demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9 can efficiently mediate the editing of the CCR5 locus in cell lines, resulting in the knockout of CCR5 expression on the cell surface. Next-generation sequencing revealed that various mutations were introduced around the predicted cleavage site of CCR5. For each of the three most effective sgRNAs that we analysed, no significant off-target effects were detected at the 15 top-scoring potential sites. More importantly, by constructing chimeric Ad5F35 adenoviruses carrying CRISPR/Cas9 components, we efficiently transduced primary CD4(+) T-lymphocytes and disrupted CCR5 expression, and the positively transduced cells were conferred with HIV-1 resistance. To our knowledge, this is the first study establishing HIV-1 resistance in primary CD4(+) T-cells utilizing adenovirus-delivered CRISPR/Cas9.

  7. An extended CCR5-ECL2 peptide forms a helix that binds HIV-1 gp120 through non-specific hydrophobic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Naama; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Scherf, Tali; Anglister, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 serves as a co-receptor for the Human Immunodefficiency Virus type-1, HIV-1. The CCR5 N-terminal segment, the second extracellular loop (ECL2) and the transmembrane helices have been implicated in binding the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Peptides corresponding to the sequence of the putative ECL2 as well as peptides containing the ECL1 and ECL3 were found to inhibit HIV-1 infection. The aromatic residues in the C-terminal half of an ECL2 peptide were shown to interact with gp120. In the present study we determined that in aqueous buffer the segment Q188-Q194 in an elongated ECL2 peptide (R168 to K197) forms an amphiphilic helix, which corresponds to the beginning of the fifth transmembrane helix in the crystal structure of CCR5. Two dimensional Saturation Transfer Difference NMR spectroscopy and dynamic filtering studies revealed the involvement of Y187, F189, W190 and F193 of the helical segment, in the interaction with gp120. The crystal structure of CCR5 shows that the aromatic side chains of F189, W190 and F193 point away from the binding pocket and interact with the membrane or with an adjacent CCR5 molecule and therefore, could not interact with gp120 in the intact CCR5 receptor. We conclude that these three aromatic residues of ECL2 peptides interact with gp120 through hydrophobic interactions not representative of the interactions of the intact CCR5 receptor. The HIV-1 inhibition by ECL2 peptides as well as by ECL1 and ECL3 peptides and peptides corresponding to ECL2 of CXCR4, which serves as an alternative HIV-1 co-receptor, suggests that there is a hydrophobic surface in the envelope spike that could be a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. PMID:25703038

  8. More about the Viking hypothesis of origin of the delta32 mutation in the CCR5 gene conferring resistance to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard; Dieterlen, Florent

    2003-11-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 constitutes the major coreceptor for the HIV-1, because a mutant allele of the CCR5 gene named delta32 was shown to provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection. In the present study the frequency of the delta32 allele was collected in 36 European populations and in Cyprus, and the highest allele frequencies were found in Nordic countries. We constructed an allele map of delta32 frequencies in Europe; the map is in accordance to the Vikings hypothesis of the origin of the mutation and his dissemination during the eighth to the tenth centuries.

  9. Frequency of the CCR5 delta 32 mutant allele in HIV-1-positive patients, female sex workers, and a normal population in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Yan, Y P; Shieh, B; Lee, C M; Lin, R Y; Chen, Y M

    1997-12-01

    A specific 32-nucleotide deletion mutant of the CCR5 gene (Accr5), the coreceptor gene for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), can effectively suppress the transmission and pathogenesis of the virus. Individuals homozygous for the delta ccr5 allele resist primary macrophage-tropic HIV-1 infection, despite multiple high-risk sexual exposures. This gene deletion is relatively common among Caucasians but uncommon among Africans, Asians, and South Americans. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to determine the frequency of the delta ccr5 allele in a Taiwanese population with diverse health status and social backgrounds. Subjects included 24 HIV-1-infected persons in the northern and southern parts of Taiwan; 131 HIV-1 high-risk, licensed female sex workers in the northern part of the island (21% of whom were aborigines); and 187 unrelated, healthy, HIV-1-negative individuals in southern Taiwan. PCR with primers encompassing the entire CCR5 gene was used to explore possible deletions at regions other than the 32-nucleotide area in the female sex workers. No ccr5 deletions were detected, indicating that they are rare or absent in the Taiwanese population. This finding implies that delta ccr5 is not likely to be part of the defense against the spread of HIV-1-infection in Taiwanese.

  10. Functional analysis of naturally occurring mutations in the open reading frame of CCR5 in HIV-infected Chinese patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiu-Ying; Lee, Shui-Shan; Wong, Ka-Hing; Chan, Kenny C W; Ng, Fai; Chan, Chris C S; Han, Dan; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Ng, Mun-Hon; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2005-04-15

    We studied polymorphism of the HIV coreceptor CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 5 in 1099 Chinese adults residing in Hong Kong, including 785 HIV-negative healthy donors and 314 HIV-positive patients. Ten mutants in the CCR5 open reading frame were identified, 7 of which were nonsynonymous. The frequencies of these alleles did not show a significant difference between HIV patients and healthy controls. G106R, Delta32, R223Q, 299(FS), and S336I were cloned from prevalent mutant genes, and their effects on HIV infection were analyzed by a series of in vitro experiments to determine their transcription levels, expression levels, conformational changes, and HIV coreceptor function. R223Q is the most prevalent CCR5 mutant in ethnic Chinese, with a frequency of 0.046, which does not affect HIV infection in vitro, however. The S336I mutant also does not affect its transcription, expression, or HIV coreceptor function. Similar to 299(FS), the mutant G106R located in the third transmembrane domain results in diminished HIV coreceptor function in vitro through conformation changes in ECL2.

  11. Gene Editing of CCR5 in Autologous CD4 T Cells of Persons Infected with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Tebas, Pablo; Stein, David; Tang, Winson W.; Frank, Ian; Wang, Shelley Q.; Lee, Gary; Spratt, S. Kaye; Surosky, Richard T.; Giedlin, Martin A.; Nichol, Geoff; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Ando, Dale G.; Kalos, Michael; Collman, Ronald G.; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Plesa, Gabriela; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND CCR5 is the major coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We investigated whether site-specific modification of the gene (“gene editing”) — in this case, the infusion of autologous CD4 T cells in which the CCR5 gene was rendered permanently dysfunctional by a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) — is safe. METHODS We enrolled 12 patients in an open-label, nonrandomized, uncontrolled study of a single dose of ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells. The patients had chronic aviremic HIV infection while they were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Six of them underwent an interruption in antiretroviral treatment 4 weeks after the infusion of 10 billion autologous CD4 T cells, 11 to 28% of which were genetically modified with the ZFN. The primary outcome was safety as assessed by treatment-related adverse events. Secondary outcomes included measures of immune reconstitution and HIV resistance. RESULTS One serious adverse event was associated with infusion of the ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells and was attributed to a transfusion reaction. The median CD4 T-cell count was 1517 per cubic millimeter at week 1, a significant increase from the preinfusion count of 448 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). The median concentration of CCR5-modified CD4 T cells at 1 week was 250 cells per cubic millimeter. This constituted 8.8% of circulating peripheral-blood mononuclear cells and 13.9% of circulating CD4 T cells. Modified cells had an estimated mean half-life of 48 weeks. During treatment interruption and the resultant viremia, the decline in circulating CCR5-modified cells (−1.81 cells per day) was significantly less than the decline in unmodified cells (−7.25 cells per day) (P = 0.02). HIV RNA became undetectable in one of four patients who could be evaluated. The blood level of HIV DNA decreased in most patients. CONCLUSIONS CCR5-modified autologous CD4 T-cell infusions are safe within the limits of this study. (Funded by the National

  12. Gene editing of CCR5 in autologous CD4 T cells of persons infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Tebas, Pablo; Stein, David; Tang, Winson W; Frank, Ian; Wang, Shelley Q; Lee, Gary; Spratt, S Kaye; Surosky, Richard T; Giedlin, Martin A; Nichol, Geoff; Holmes, Michael C; Gregory, Philip D; Ando, Dale G; Kalos, Michael; Collman, Ronald G; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Plesa, Gabriela; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H

    2014-03-06

    CCR5 is the major coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We investigated whether site-specific modification of the gene ("gene editing")--in this case, the infusion of autologous CD4 T cells in which the CCR5 gene was rendered permanently dysfunctional by a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)--is safe. We enrolled 12 patients in an open-label, nonrandomized, uncontrolled study of a single dose of ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells. The patients had chronic aviremic HIV infection while they were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Six of them underwent an interruption in antiretroviral treatment 4 weeks after the infusion of 10 billion autologous CD4 T cells, 11 to 28% of which were genetically modified with the ZFN. The primary outcome was safety as assessed by treatment-related adverse events. Secondary outcomes included measures of immune reconstitution and HIV resistance. One serious adverse event was associated with infusion of the ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells and was attributed to a transfusion reaction. The median CD4 T-cell count was 1517 per cubic millimeter at week 1, a significant increase from the preinfusion count of 448 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). The median concentration of CCR5-modified CD4 T cells at 1 week was 250 cells per cubic millimeter. This constituted 8.8% of circulating peripheral-blood mononuclear cells and 13.9% of circulating CD4 T cells. Modified cells had an estimated mean half-life of 48 weeks. During treatment interruption and the resultant viremia, the decline in circulating CCR5-modified cells (-1.81 cells per day) was significantly less than the decline in unmodified cells (-7.25 cells per day) (P=0.02). HIV RNA became undetectable in one of four patients who could be evaluated. The blood level of HIV DNA decreased in most patients. CCR5-modified autologous CD4 T-cell infusions are safe within the limits of this study. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others

  13. Common promoter deletion is associated with 3.9-fold differential transcription of ovine CCR5 and reduced proviral level of ovine progressive pneumonia virus.

    PubMed

    White, S N; Mousel, M R; Reynolds, J O; Lewis, G S; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M

    2009-10-01

    Chemokine (C-C motif) Receptor 5 (CCR5) is a chemokine receptor that regulates immune cell recruitment in inflammation and serves as a coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A human CCR5 coding deletion (termed delta-32) results in strong resistance to HIV infection, and sequence variants in CCR5 regulatory regions have been implicated in delayed progression to acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Both ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV), also known as maedi-visna, and HIV are macrophage-tropic lentiviruses, have similar genomic structures, and cause lifelong persistent host infection, suggesting CCR5 may have a role in regulating OPPV provirus levels. Therefore, the ovine CCR5 genomic sequence was determined, and sequence variants were obtained from the open reading frame and surrounding regulatory sites. One CCR5 variant contained a 4-base deletion within a binding site for octamer transcription factors in the promoter region. A test for differential transcription from each allele in heterozygous animals showed a 3.9-fold transcription difference (P < 0.0001). OPPV proviral levels were also measured in 351 naturally exposed Rambouillet, Polypay and Columbia sheep. Deletion homozygotes showed reduced OPPV proviral levels among these animals (P < 0.01). The association of this CCR5 promoter deletion with OPPV levels will need to be validated in additional populations before the deletion can be recommended for widespread use in marker-assisted selection. However, because of the large impact on transcription and because CCR5 has roles in inflammation, recruitment of effector cells, and cell-mediated immunity, this deletion may play a role in the control of infections of many diverse pathogens of sheep.

  14. Analysis of the CCR5 gene coding region diversity in five South American populations reveals two new non-synonymous alleles in Amerindians and high CCR5*D32 frequency in Euro-Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) molecule is an important co-receptor for HIV. The effect of the CCR5*D32 allele in susceptibility to HIV infection and AIDS disease is well known. Other alleles than CCR5*D32 have not been analysed before, neither in Amerindians nor in the majority of the populations all over the world. We investigated the distribution of the CCR5 coding region alleles in South Brazil and noticed a high CCR5*D32 frequency in the Euro-Brazilian population of the Paraná State (9.3%), which is the highest thus far reported for Latin America. The D32 frequency is even higher among the Euro-Brazilian Mennonites (14.2%). This allele is uncommon in Afro-Brazilians (2.0%), rare in the Guarani Amerindians (0.4%) and absent in the Kaingang Amerindians and the Oriental-Brazilians. R223Q is common in the Oriental-Brazilians (7.7%) and R60S in the Afro-Brazilians (5.0%). A29S and L55Q present an impaired response to β-chemokines and occurred in Afro- and Euro-Brazilians with cumulative frequencies of 4.4% and 2.7%, respectively. Two new non-synonymous alleles were found in Amerindians: C323F (g.3729G > T) in Guarani (1.4%) and Y68C (g.2964A > G) in Kaingang (10.3%). The functional characteristics of these alleles should be defined and considered in epidemiological investigations about HIV-1 infection and AIDS incidence in Amerindian populations. PMID:21637640

  15. The CCL3L1-CCR5 genotype influences the development of AIDS, but not HIV susceptibility or the response to HAART

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Stanton, Jennifer; Kim, Eun - Young; Kunstman, Kevin; Phair, John; Jacobson, Lisa P; Wolinsky, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    A selective advantage against infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS is associated with differences in the genes relevant to immunity and virus replication. The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), the principal coreceptor for HIV, and its chemokine ligands, including CCL3L1, influences the CD4+ target cells susceptibility to infection. The CCL3L1 gene is in a region of segmental duplication on the q-arm of human chromosome 17. Increased numbers of CCL3L1 gene copies that affect the gene expression phenotype might have substantial protective effects. Here we show that the population-specific CCL3L1 gene copy number and the CCR5 {Delta}32 protein-inactivating deletion that categorizes the CCL3L1-CCR5 genotype do not influence HIV/AIDS susceptibility or the robustness of immune recovery after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

  16. Crucial involvement of the CCL3-CCR5 axis-mediated fibroblast accumulation in colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Soichiro; Baba, Tomohisa; Shinagawa, Kei; Matsushima, Kouji; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2014-09-15

    Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases often develop colon carcinoma. Combined treatment of azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) recapitulates colitis-associated cancer in mice. AOM/DSS-induced tumor formation was reduced in CCL3- or its specific receptor, CCR5-deficient mice despite the presence of a massive infiltration of inflammatory cells. However, AOM/DSS-induced type I collagen-positive fibroblast accumulation in the colon was reduced in CCL3- or CCR5-deficient mice. This was associated with depressed expression of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), which is expressed mainly by fibroblasts. Moreover in vitro, CCL3 induced fibroblasts to proliferate and to enhance HB-EGF expression. Furthermore, CCR5 blockade reduced tumor formation together with reduced fibroblast accumulation and HB-EGF expression, even when administered after the development of multiple colon tumors. Thus, CCL3-CCR5-mediated fibroblast accumulation may be required, in addition to leukocyte infiltration, to induce full-blown colitis-associated carcinogenesis. Our studies shed light on a therapeutic potential of CCR5 antagonist for patients with colitis-associated cancer.

  17. The BMP coreceptor RGMb promotes while the endogenous BMP antagonist noggin reduces neurite outgrowth and peripheral nerve regeneration by modulating BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi H E; Brenner, Gary J; Omura, Takao; Samad, Omar A; Costigan, Michael; Inquimbert, Perrine; Niederkofler, Vera; Salie, Rishard; Sun, Chia Chi; Lin, Herbert Y; Arber, Silvia; Coppola, Giovanni; Woolf, Clifford J; Samad, Tarek A

    2011-12-14

    Repulsive guidance molecule b (RGMb) is a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) coreceptor and sensitizer of BMP signaling, highly expressed in adult dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used a murine RGMb knock-out to gain insight into the physiological role of RGMb in the DRG, and address whether RGMb-mediated modulation of BMP signaling influences sensory axon regeneration. No evidence for altered development of the PNS and CNS was detected in RGMb(-/-) mice. However, both cultured neonatal whole DRG explants and dissociated DRG neurons from RGMb(-/-) mice exhibited significantly fewer and shorter neurites than those from wild-type littermates, a phenomenon that could be fully rescued by BMP-2. Moreover, Noggin, an endogenous BMP signaling antagonist, inhibited neurite outgrowth in wild-type DRG explants from naive as well as nerve injury-preconditioned mice. Noggin is downregulated in the DRG after nerve injury, and its expression is highly correlated and inversely associated with the known regeneration-associated genes, which are induced in the DRG by peripheral axonal injury. We show that diminished BMP signaling in vivo, achieved either through RGMb deletion or BMP inhibition with Noggin, retarded early axonal regeneration after sciatic nerve crush injury. Our data suggest a positive modulatory contribution of RGMb and BMP signaling to neurite extension in vitro and early axonal regrowth after nerve injury in vivo and a negative effect of Noggin.

  18. Increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy by modulating the CCR2/CCR5 chemokine axes

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Kelli A.; Belt, Brian A.; Figueroa, Nathania M.; Murthy, Aditi; Patel, Ankit; Kim, Minsoo; Lord, Edith M.; Linehan, David C.; Gerber, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Although radiotherapy (RT) is widely used to control tumor growth across many cancer types, there is a relatively high incidence of RT failure exhibited by tumor recurrence, therefore a clear need exists to achieve improved effectiveness of RT. The RT-elicited immune response largely impacts the efficacy of RT and includes immune cells that kill tumor cells, but also immunosuppressive cells, which dampen anti-tumor immunity. Using murine models in which syngeneic tumor cell lines (Colon38, Glioma261, Line1) are grown intramuscularly and treated with 15 Gy local RT, we assessed the effects of RT on both the systemic and intratumoral immune response. Here we demonstrate that RT stimulates increased production of two chemokines, CCL2 and CCL5, at the tumor site. Further, that this leads to increased CCR2+ CCR5+ monocytes in circulation and subsequently alters the intratumoral immune infiltrate favoring the largely immunosuppressive CCR2+ CCR5+ monocytes. Importantly, a CCR2/CCR5 antagonist administered daily (15 mg/kg subcutaneously) starting two days prior to RT reduces both circulating and intratumoral monocytes resulting in increased efficacy of RT in radioresponsive tumors. Overall, these data have important implications for the mechanism of RT and present a means to improve RT efficacy across many cancer types. PMID:27852031

  19. Efficient Modification of the CCR5 Locus in Primary Human T Cells With megaTAL Nuclease Establishes HIV-1 Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Paul, Biswajit; Sather, Blythe D; Younan, Patrick M; Sommer, Karen; Kowalski, John P; Hale, Malika; Stoddard, Barry; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Rawlings, David J

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring 32-base pair deletion of the HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5 has demonstrated protection against HIV infection of human CD4+ T cells. Recent genetic engineering approaches using engineered nucleases to disrupt the gene and mimic this mutation show promise for HIV therapy. We developed a megaTAL nuclease targeting the third extracellular loop of CCR5 that we delivered to primary human T cells by mRNA transfection. The CCR5 megaTAL nuclease established resistance to HIV in cell lines and disrupted the expression of CCR5 on primary human CD4+ T cells with a high efficiency, achieving up to 80% modification of the locus in primary cells as measured by molecular analysis. Gene-modified cells engrafted at levels equivalent to unmodified cells when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Furthermore, genetically modified CD4+ cells were preferentially expanded during HIV-1 infection in vivo in an immunodeficient mouse model. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of targeting CCR5 in primary T cells using an engineered megaTAL nuclease, and the potential to use gene-modified cells to reconstitute a patient's immune system and provide protection from HIV infection. PMID:27741222

  20. A study of the molecular mechanism of binding kinetics and long residence times of human CCR5 receptor small molecule allosteric ligands

    PubMed Central

    Swinney, David C; Beavis, Paul; Chuang, Kai-Ting; Zheng, Yue; Lee, Ina; Gee, Peter; Deval, Jerome; Rotstein, David M; Dioszegi, Marianna; Ravendran, Palani; Zhang, Jun; Sankuratri, Surya; Kondru, Rama; Vauquelin, Georges

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The human CCR5 receptor is a co-receptor for HIV-1 infection and a target for anti-viral therapy. A greater understanding of the binding kinetics of small molecule allosteric ligand interactions with CCR5 will lead to a better understanding of the binding process and may help discover new molecules that avoid resistance. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Using [3H] maraviroc as a radioligand, a number of different binding protocols were employed in conjunction with simulations to determine rate constants, kinetic mechanism and mutant kinetic fingerprints for wild-type and mutant human CCR5 with maraviroc, aplaviroc and vicriviroc. KEY RESULTS Kinetic characterization of maraviroc binding to the wild-type CCR5 was consistent with a two-step kinetic mechanism that involved an initial receptor–ligand complex (RA), which transitioned to a more stable complex, R'A, with at least a 13-fold increase in affinity. The dissociation rate from R'A, k−2, was 1.2 × 10−3 min−1. The maraviroc time-dependent transition was influenced by F85L, W86A, Y108A, I198A and Y251A mutations of CCR5. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The interaction between maraviroc and CCR5 proceeded according to a multi-step kinetic mechanism, whereby initial mass action binding and later reorganizations of the initial maraviroc–receptor complex lead to a complex with longer residence time. Site-directed mutagenesis identified a kinetic fingerprint of residues that affected the binding kinetics, leading to the conclusion that allosteric ligand binding to CCR5 involved the rearrangement of the binding site in a manner specific to each allosteric ligand. PMID:24628038

  1. Could FIV zoonosis responsible of the breakdown of the pathocenosis which has reduced the European CCR5-Delta32 allele frequencies?

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background In Europe, the north-south downhill cline frequency of the chemokine receptor CCR5 allele with a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Δ32) raises interesting questions for evolutionary biologists. We had suggested first that, in the past, the European colonizers, principally Romans, might have been instrumental of a progressively decrease of the frequencies southwards. Indeed, statistical analyses suggested strong negative correlations between the allele frequency and historical parameters including the colonization dates by Mediterranean civilisations. The gene flows from colonizers to native populations were extremely low but colonizers are responsible of the spread of several diseases suggesting that the dissemination of parasites in naive populations could have induced a breakdown rupture of the fragile pathocenosis changing the balance among diseases. The new equilibrium state has been reached through a negative selection of the null allele. Results Most of the human diseases are zoonoses and cat might have been instrumental in the decrease of the allele frequency, because its diffusion through Europe was a gradual process, due principally to Romans; and that several cat zoonoses could be transmitted to man. The possible implication of a feline lentivirus (FIV) which does not use CCR5 as co-receptor is discussed. This virus can infect primate cells in vitro and induces clinical signs in macaque. Moreover, most of the historical regions with null or low frequency of CCR5-Δ32 allele coincide with historical range of the wild felid species which harbor species-specific FIVs. Conclusion We proposed the hypothesis that the actual European CCR5 allelic frequencies are the result of a negative selection due to a disease spreading. A cat zoonosis, could be the most plausible hypothesis. Future studies could provide if CCR5 can play an antimicrobial role in FIV pathogenesis. Moreover, studies of ancient DNA could provide more evidences regarding the implications of

  2. Ribosomal frameshifting in the CCR5 mRNA is regulated by miRNAs and the NMD pathway

    PubMed Central

    Belew, Ashton Trey; Meskauskas, Arturas; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Advani, Vivek M.; Sulima, Sergey O.; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Shapiro, Bruce A.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Programmed –1 ribosomal frameshift (–1 PRF) signals redirect translating ribosomes to slip back one base on messenger RNAs. Although well characterized in viruses, how these elements may regulate cellular gene expression is not understood. Here we describe a –1 PRF signal in the human mRNA encoding CCR5, the HIV-1 co-receptor. CCR5 mRNA-mediated –1 PRF is directed by an mRNA pseudoknot, and is stimulated by at least two microRNAs. Mapping the mRNA–miRNA interaction suggests that formation of a triplex RNA structure stimulates –1 PRF. A –1 PRF event on the CCR5 mRNA directs translating ribosomes to a premature termination codon, destabilizing it through the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. At least one additional mRNA decay pathway is also involved. Functional –1 PRF signals that seem to be regulated by miRNAs are also demonstrated in mRNAs encoding six other cytokine receptors, suggesting a novel mode through which immune responses may be fine-tuned in mammalian cells. PMID:25043019

  3. Global distribution of the CCR5 gene 32-basepair deletion.

    PubMed

    Martinson, J J; Chapman, N H; Rees, D C; Liu, Y T; Clegg, J B

    1997-05-01

    A mutant allele of the beta-chemokine receptor gene CCR5 bearing a 32-basepair (bp) deletion (denoted delta ccr5) which prevents cell invasion by the primary transmitting strain of HIV-1 has recently been characterized. Homozygotes for the mutation are resistant to infection, even after repeated high-risk exposures, but this resistance appears not to be total, as isolated cases of HIV-positive deletion homozygotes are now emerging. The consequence of the heterozygous state is not clear, but it may delay the progression to AIDS in infected individuals. A gene frequency of approximately 10% was found for delta ccr5 in populations of European descent, but no mutant alleles were reported in indigenous non-European populations. As the total number of non-European samples surveyed was small in comparison with the Europeans the global distribution of this mutation is far from clear. We have devised a rapid PCR assay for delta ccr5 and used it to screen 3,342 individuals from a globally-distributed range of populations. We find that delta ccr5 is not confined to people of European descent but is found at frequencies of 2-5% throughout Europe, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent (Fig. 1). Isolated occurrences are seen elsewhere throughout the world, but these most likely represent recent European gene flow into the indigenous populations. The inter-population differences in delta ccr5 frequency may influence the pattern of HIV transmission and so will need to be incorporated into future predictions of HIV levels.

  4. HIV coreceptor tropism determination and mutational pattern identification

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui-Shuang; Yin, Jason; Leng, Fei; Teng, Rui-Fang; Xu, Chao; Xia, Xia-Yu; Pan, Xian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the early stages of infection, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) generally selects CCR5 as the primary coreceptor for entering the host cell. As infection progresses, the virus evolves and may exhibit a coreceptor-switch to CXCR4. Accurate determination coreceptor usage and identification key mutational patterns associated tropism switch are essential for selection of appropriate therapies and understanding mechanism of coreceptor change. We developed a classifier composed of two coreceptor-specific weight matrices (CMs) based on a full-scale dataset. For this classifier, we found an AUC of 0.97, an accuracy of 95.21% and an MCC of 0.885 (sensitivity 92.92%; specificity 95.54%) in a ten-fold cross-validation, outperforming all other methods on an independent dataset (13% higher MCC value than geno2pheno and 15% higher MCC value than PSSM). A web server (http://spg.med.tsinghua.edu.cn/CM.html) based on our classifier was provided. Patterns of genetic mutations that occur along with coreceptor transitions were further identified based on the score of each sequence. Six pairs of one-AA mutational patterns and three pairs of two-AA mutational patterns were identified to associate with increasing propensity for X4 tropism. These mutational patterns offered new insights into the mechanism of coreceptor switch and aided in monitoring coreceptor switch. PMID:26883082

  5. Performance comparison of next-generation sequencing platforms for determining HIV-1 coreceptor use

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Stéphanie; Nicot, Florence; Jeanne, Nicolas; Delfour, Olivier; Carcenac, Romain; Lefebvre, Caroline; Cazabat, Michelle; Sauné, Karine; Delobel, Pierre; Izopet, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    The coreceptor used by HIV-1 must be determined before a CCR5 antagonist, part of the arsenal of antiretroviral drugs, is prescribed because viruses that enter cells using the CXCR4 coreceptor are responsible for treatment failure. HIV-1 tropism is also correlated with disease progression and so must be determined for virological studies. Tropism can be determined by next-generation sequencing (NGS), but not all of these new technologies have been fully validated for use in clinical practice. The Illumina NGS technology is used in many laboratories but its ability to predict HIV-1 tropism has not been evaluated while the 454 GS-Junior (Roche) is used for routine diagnosis. The genotypic prediction of HIV-1 tropism is based on sequencing the V3 region and interpreting the results with an appropriate algorithm. We compared the performances of the MiSeq (Illumina) and 454 GS-Junior (Roche) systems with a reference phenotypic assay. We used clinical samples for the NGS tropism predictions and assessed their ability to quantify CXCR4-using variants. The data show that the Illumina platform can be used to detect minor CXCR4-using variants in clinical practice but technical optimization are needed to improve quantification. PMID:28186189

  6. CCL3L1-CCR5 Genotype Improves the Assessment of AIDS Risk in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Hemant; Agan, Brian K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; O'Connell, Robert J.; Camargo, Jose F.; He, Weijing; Delmar, Judith; Phelps, Kenneth R.; Crawford, George; Clark, Robert A.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Ahuja, Sunil K.

    2008-01-01

    Background Whether vexing clinical decision-making dilemmas can be partly addressed by recent advances in genomics is unclear. For example, when to initiate highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during HIV-1 infection remains a clinical dilemma. This decision relies heavily on assessing AIDS risk based on the CD4+ T cell count and plasma viral load. However, the trajectories of these two laboratory markers are influenced, in part, by polymorphisms in CCR5, the major HIV coreceptor, and the gene copy number of CCL3L1, a potent CCR5 ligand and HIV-suppressive chemokine. Therefore, we determined whether accounting for both genetic and laboratory markers provided an improved means of assessing AIDS risk. Methods and Findings In a prospective, single-site, ethnically-mixed cohort of 1,132 HIV-positive subjects, we determined the AIDS risk conveyed by the laboratory and genetic markers separately and in combination. Subjects were assigned to a low, moderate or high genetic risk group (GRG) based on variations in CCL3L1 and CCR5. The predictive value of the CCL3L1-CCR5 GRGs, as estimated by likelihood ratios, was equivalent to that of the laboratory markers. GRG status also predicted AIDS development when the laboratory markers conveyed a contrary risk. Additionally, in two separate and large groups of HIV+ subjects from a natural history cohort, the results from additive risk-scoring systems and classification and regression tree (CART) analysis revealed that the laboratory and CCL3L1-CCR5 genetic markers together provided more prognostic information than either marker alone. Furthermore, GRGs independently predicted the time interval from seroconversion to CD4+ cell count thresholds used to guide HAART initiation. Conclusions The combination of the laboratory and genetic markers captures a broader spectrum of AIDS risk than either marker alone. By tracking a unique aspect of AIDS risk distinct from that captured by the laboratory parameters, CCL3L1-CCR5 genotypes

  7. Gating function of isoleucine-116 in TM-3 (position III:16/3.40) for the activity state of the CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)

    PubMed Central

    Steen, A; Sparre-Ulrich, A H; Thiele, S; Guo, D; Frimurer, T M; Rosenkilde, M M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A conserved amino acid within a protein family indicates a significance of the residue. In the centre of transmembrane helix (TM)-5, position V:13/5.47, an aromatic amino acid is conserved among class A 7TM receptors. However, in 37% of chemokine receptors – a subgroup of 7TM receptors – it is a leucine indicating an altered function. Here, we describe the significance of this position and its possible interaction with TM-3 for CCR5 activity. Experimental Approach The effects of [L203F]-CCR5 in TM-5 (position V:13/5.47), [I116A]-CCR5 in TM-3 (III:16/3.40) and [L203F;G286F]-CCR5 (V:13/5.47;VII:09/7.42) were determined in G-protein-and β-arrestin-coupled signalling. Computational modelling monitored changes in amino acid conformation. Key Results [L203F]-CCR5 increased the basal level of G-protein coupling (20–70% of Emax) and β-arrestin recruitment (50% of Emax) with a threefold increase in agonist potency. In silico, [I116A]-CCR5 switched χ1-angle in [L203F]-CCR5. Furthermore, [I116A]-CCR5 was constitutively active to a similar degree as [L203F]-CCR5. Tyr244 in TM-6 (VI:09/6.44) moved towards TM-5 in silico, consistent with its previously shown function for CCR5 activation. On [L203F;G286F]-CCR5 the antagonist aplaviroc was converted to a superagonist. Conclusions and Implications The results imply that an aromatic amino acid in the centre of TM-5 controls the level of receptor activity. Furthermore, Ile116 acts as a gate for the movement of Tyr244 towards TM-5 in the active state, a mechanism proposed previously for the β2-adrenoceptor. The results provide an understanding of chemokine receptor function and thereby information for the development of biased and non-biased antagonists and inverse agonists. PMID:24328926

  8. Characterization of the "CCR5" Chemokine Receptor Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of retroviruses is an essential topic of modern cell biology instruction. Furthermore, the process of HIV viral entry into the cell is a question of great interest in basic and clinical biology. This paper describes how students can easily recover their own DNA, amplify a portion of the "CCR5" chemokine receptor gene, characterize…

  9. Characterization of the "CCR5" Chemokine Receptor Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of retroviruses is an essential topic of modern cell biology instruction. Furthermore, the process of HIV viral entry into the cell is a question of great interest in basic and clinical biology. This paper describes how students can easily recover their own DNA, amplify a portion of the "CCR5" chemokine receptor gene, characterize…

  10. Partial Agonist and Biased Signaling Properties of the Synthetic Enantiomers J113863/UCB35625 at Chemokine Receptors CCR2 and CCR5.

    PubMed

    Corbisier, Jenny; Huszagh, Alexandre; Galés, Céline; Parmentier, Marc; Springael, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-13

    Biased agonism at G protein-coupled receptors constitutes a promising area of research for the identification of new therapeutic molecules. In this study we identified two novel biased ligands for the chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5 and characterized their functional properties. We showed that J113863 and its enantiomer UCB35625, initially identified as high affinity antagonists for CCR1 and CCR3, also bind with low affinity to the closely related receptors CCR2 and CCR5. Binding of J113863 and UCB35625 to CCR2 or CCR5 resulted in the full or partial activation of the three Gi proteins and the two Go isoforms. Unlike chemokines, the compounds did not activate G12 Binding of J113863 to CCR2 or CCR5 also induced the recruitment of β-arrestin 2, whereas UCB35625 did not. UCB35625 induced the chemotaxis of L1.2 cells expressing CCR2 or CCR5. In contrast, J113863 induced the migration of L1.2-CCR2 cells but antagonized the chemokine-induced migration of L1.2-CCR5 cells. We also showed that replacing the phenylalanine 3.33 in CCR5 TM3 by the corresponding histidine of CCR2 converts J113863 from an antagonist for cell migration and a partial agonist in other assays to a full agonist in all assays. Further analyses indicated that F3.33H substitution strongly increased the activation of G proteins and β-arrestin 2 by J113863. These results highlight the biased nature of the J113863 and UCB35625 that act either as antagonist, partial agonist, or full agonist according to the receptor, the enantiomer, and the signaling pathway investigated.

  11. Relevance of CCL3/CCR5 axis in oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Moreira Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna; Sobral, Lays Martin; Queiroz-Junior, Celso Martins; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Leopoldino, Andréia Machado; Russo, Remo Castro; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2017-08-01

    The chemokine CCL3 is a chemotactic cytokine crucial for inflammatory cell recruitment in homeostatic and pathological conditions. CCL3 might stimulate cancer progression by promoting leukocyte accumulation, angiogenesis and tumour growth. The expression of CCL3 and its receptors CCR1 and CCR5 was demonstrated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), but their role was not defined. Here, the functions of CCL3 were assessed using a model of chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis with 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Lineages of OSCC were used to analyse the effects of CCL3 in vitro. The 4NQO-induced lesions exhibited increased expression of CCL3, CCR1 and CCR5. CCL3(-/-) and CCR5(-/-) mice presented reduced incidence of tongue tumours compared to wild-type (WT) and CCR1(-/-) mice. Consistently, attenuated cytomorphological atypia and reduced cell proliferation were observed in lesions of CCL3(-/-) and CCR5(-/-) mice. OSCC from CCL3(-/-) mice exhibited lower infiltration of eosinophils and reduced expression of Egf, Fgf1, Tgf-β1, Vegfa, Vegfb, Itga-4, Vtn, Mmp-1a, Mmp-2 and Mmp-9 than WT mice. In vitro, CCL3 induced invasion and production of CCL5, IL-6, MMP -2, -8, -9. Blockage of CCL3 in vitro using α-CCL3 or Evasin-1 (a CCL3-binding protein) impaired tumour cell invasion. In conclusion, CCL3/CCR5 axis has pro-tumourigenic effects in oral carcinogenesis. The induction of inflammatory and angiogenic pathways and eosinophils recruitment appear to be the underlying mechanism explaining these effects. These data reveal potential protective effects of CCL3 blockade in oral cancer.

  12. Attenuation of rodent neuropathic pain by an orally active peptide, RAP-103, which potently blocks CCR2- and CCR5-mediated monocyte chemotaxis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Padi, Satyanarayana S V; Shi, Xiang Q; Zhao, Yuan Q; Ruff, Michael R; Baichoo, Noel; Pert, Candace B; Zhang, Ji

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine signaling is important in neuropathic pain, with microglial cells expressing CCR2 playing a well-established key role. DAPTA, a HIV gp120-derived CCR5 entry inhibitor, has been shown to inhibit CCR5-mediated monocyte migration and to attenuate neuroinflammation. We report here that as a stabilized analog of DAPTA, the short peptide RAP-103 exhibits potent antagonism for both CCR2 (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] 4.2 pM) and CCR5 (IC50 0.18 pM) in monocyte chemotaxis. Oral administration of RAP-103 (0.05-1 mg/kg) for 7 days fully prevents mechanical allodynia and inhibits the development of thermal hyperalgesia after partial ligation of the sciatic nerve in rats. Administered from days 8 to 12, RAP-103 (0.2-1 mg/kg) reverses already established hypersensitivity. RAP-103 relieves behavioral hypersensitivity, probably through either or both CCR2 and CCR5 blockade, because by using genetically deficient animals, we demonstrated that in addition to CCR2, CCR5 is also required for the development of neuropathic pain. Moreover, RAP-103 is able to reduce spinal microglial activation and monocyte infiltration, and to inhibit inflammatory responses evoked by peripheral nerve injury that cause chronic pain. Our findings suggest that targeting CCR2/CCR5 should provide greater efficacy than targeting CCR2 or CCR5 alone, and that dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist RAP-103 has the potential for broad clinical use in neuropathic pain treatment. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An extended CCR5 ECL2 peptide forms a helix that binds HIV-1 gp120 through non-specific hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Abayev, Meital; Moseri, Adi; Tchaicheeyan, Oren; Kessler, Naama; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Scherf, Tali; Anglister, Jacob

    2015-05-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) serves as a co-receptor for HIV-1. The CCR5 N-terminal segment, the second extracellular loop (ECL2) and the transmembrane helices have been implicated in binding the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Peptides corresponding to the sequence of the putative ECL2 as well as peptides containing extracellular loops 1 and 3 (ECL1 and ECL3) were found to inhibit HIV-1 infection. The aromatic residues in the C-terminal half of an ECL2 peptide were shown to interact with gp120. In the present study, we found that, in aqueous buffer, the segment Q188-Q194 in an elongated ECL2 peptide (R168-K197) forms an amphiphilic helix, which corresponds to the beginning of the fifth transmembrane helix in the crystal structure of CCR5. Two-dimensional saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy and dynamic filtering studies revealed involvement of Y187, F189, W190 and F193 of the helical segment in the interaction with gp120. The crystal structure of CCR5 shows that the aromatic side chains of F189, W190 and F193 point away from the binding pocket and interact with the membrane or with an adjacent CCR5 molecule, and therefore could not interact with gp120 in the intact CCR5 receptor. We conclude that these three aromatic residues of ECL2 peptides interact with gp120 through hydrophobic interactions that are not representative of the interactions of the intact CCR5 receptor. The HIV-1 inhibition by ECL2 peptides, as well as by ECL1 and ECL3 peptides and peptides corresponding to ECL2 of CXCR4, which serves as an alternative HIV-1 co-receptor, suggests that there is a hydrophobic surface in the envelope spike that could be a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. The structures and NMR data of ECL2S (Q186-T195) were deposited under Protein Data Bank ID 2mzx and BioMagResBank ID 25505. © 2015 FEBS.

  14. Blockade of the chemokine receptor, CCR5, reduces the growth of orthotopically injected colon cancer cells via limiting cancerassociated fibroblast accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Yamato; Sasaki, Soichiro; Mukaida, Naofumi; Baba, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) accumulate at tumor sites through the interaction between a chemokine, CCL3, and its receptor, CCR5, in the late phase of colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Here we examined the effect of a CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, on tumor growth arising from the orthotopic injection of mouse or human colon cancer cell lines into the cecal wall by focusing on CAFs. Orthotopic injection of either cell line caused tumor formation together with leukocyte infiltration and fibroblast accumulation. Concomitant oral administration of maraviroc reduced tumor formation with few effects on leukocyte infiltration. In contrast, maraviroc reduced the intratumor number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive fibroblasts, which express epidermal growth factor, a crucial growth factor for colon cancer cell growth. These observations suggest that maraviroc or other CCR5 antagonists might act as novel anti-CRC drugs to dampen CAFs, an essential cell component for tumor progression. PMID:27340784

  15. A genotypic HIV-1 proviral DNA coreceptor tropism assay: characterization in viremic subjects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-1 coreceptor tropism testing is used to evaluate eligibility for CCR5 antagonist therapy. However, HIV-1 RNA-based tests are not suitable for virologically suppressed patients, therefore the use of proviral DNA tropism testing has been investigated. We describe a novel proviral DNA-based genotypic tropism assay and compare its performance to that of a sensitive HIV-1 RNA-based genotypic test. Methods Tropism was determined using HIV-1 plasma RNA and proviral DNA from 42 paired samples from patients with plasma viral loads ≥1000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL. Proviral DNA sample types included whole blood, separated peripheral blood mononuclear cells resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline and peripheral blood mononuclear cells resuspended in spun plasma. The HIV-1 envelope V3 region was PCR-amplified, sequenced in triplicate, and analyzed for tropism with the geno2pheno algorithm using a 10% false-positive rate (FPR). Results Amplicons were obtained from proviral DNA and plasma RNA in 41/42 samples. Tropism predictions were highly concordant (93%–98%) between proviral DNA and plasma RNA, regardless of the proviral DNA isolation method. Non-R5 proviral DNA results were obtained for 100% of patients with detectable non-R5 plasma HIV-1 RNA results. Geno2pheno FPRs for proviral DNA and plasma RNA were highly correlated (Spearman rho = 0.86). Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that proviral DNA tropism determinations from whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were highly concordant with plasma HIV-1 RNA tropism determinations. This assay may be useful for screening virologically suppressed patients for CCR5-antagonist eligibility and for research purposes. PMID:24904682

  16. Combination of the CCL5-Derived Peptide R4.0 with Different HIV-1 Blockers Reveals Wide Target Compatibility and Synergic Cobinding to CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Secchi, Massimiliano; Vassena, Lia; Morin, Sébastien; Schols, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    R4.0, a synthetic CCL5/RANTES-derived peptide, exerts potent anti-HIV-1 activity via its nonactivating interaction with CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor. CCR5 chronic activation may promote undesirable inflammatory effects and enhance viral infection; thus, receptor antagonism is a necessary requisite. HIV-1 gp120, CCL5, and maraviroc dock on CCR5 by sharing two receptor sites: the N terminus and the second extracellular loop. In combination studies, R4.0, CCL5, and maraviroc exhibited concomitant interactions with CCR5 and promoted synergic inhibition of HIV-1 in acute-infection assays. Furthermore, various degrees of additive/synergic HIV-1 inhibition were observed when R4.0 was tested in combination with drugs and lead compounds directed toward different viral targets (gp120, gp41, reverse transcriptase, and protease). In combination with tenofovir, R4.0 provides cross-clade synergic inhibition of primary HIV-1 isolates. Remarkably, an in vitro-generated maraviroc-resistant R5 HIV-1 strain was inhibited by R4.0 comparably to the wild-type strain, suggesting the presence of viral resistance barriers similar to those reported for CCL5. Overall, R4.0 appears to be a promising lead peptide with potential for combination in anti-HIV-1 therapy and in microbicide development to prevent sexual HIV-1 transmission. PMID:25114130

  17. Impact of Delta 32-CCR5 heterozygosity on HIV-1 genetic evolution and variability--a study of 4 individuals infected with closely related HIV-1 strains.

    PubMed

    Chalmet, Kristen; Van Wanzeele, Filip; Demecheleer, Els; Dauwe, Kenny; Pelgrom, Jolanda; Van Der Gucht, Bea; Vogelaers, Dirk; Plum, Jean; Stuyver, Lieven; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Verhofstede, Chris

    2008-09-30

    A cluster of four patients acutely infected with a genetically almost identical virus, allowed us to investigate genetic variability and disease progression in early HIV-1 infection with minimal interference of virus specific factors. Two of the patients were heterozygous for the 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 coreceptor gene. Both showed a slower disease progression with lower viral load levels and a reduced rate of genetic evolution compared to the patients with normal CCR5 alleles. During 3 years of treatment-free follow-up, the mean pairwise genetic distance increased with 1.45% and 1.58% in the two patients with a 32-bp deletion allele compared to 3.05% and 3.57% in the two patients with normal CCR5 alleles. The observed relation between slower disease progression and a reduced evolutionary rate illustrates the influence of the virus replicative capacity, here most possibly hampered by the CCR5 heterozygosity in two of the four individuals, on the genetic evolution of the virus in the host.

  18. Combination of the CCL5-derived peptide R4.0 with different HIV-1 blockers reveals wide target compatibility and synergic cobinding to CCR5.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Massimiliano; Vassena, Lia; Morin, Sébastien; Schols, Dominique; Vangelista, Luca

    2014-10-01

    R4.0, a synthetic CCL5/RANTES-derived peptide, exerts potent anti-HIV-1 activity via its nonactivating interaction with CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor. CCR5 chronic activation may promote undesirable inflammatory effects and enhance viral infection; thus, receptor antagonism is a necessary requisite. HIV-1 gp120, CCL5, and maraviroc dock on CCR5 by sharing two receptor sites: the N terminus and the second extracellular loop. In combination studies, R4.0, CCL5, and maraviroc exhibited concomitant interactions with CCR5 and promoted synergic inhibition of HIV-1 in acute-infection assays. Furthermore, various degrees of additive/synergic HIV-1 inhibition were observed when R4.0 was tested in combination with drugs and lead compounds directed toward different viral targets (gp120, gp41, reverse transcriptase, and protease). In combination with tenofovir, R4.0 provides cross-clade synergic inhibition of primary HIV-1 isolates. Remarkably, an in vitro-generated maraviroc-resistant R5 HIV-1 strain was inhibited by R4.0 comparably to the wild-type strain, suggesting the presence of viral resistance barriers similar to those reported for CCL5. Overall, R4.0 appears to be a promising lead peptide with potential for combination in anti-HIV-1 therapy and in microbicide development to prevent sexual HIV-1 transmission.

  19. CCR5 knockout suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung Mun; Han, Sang Bae; Oh, Ki Wan; Son, Dong Ju; Yun, Jae Suk; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease in which myelin in the spinal cord is damaged. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is implicated in immune cell migration and cytokine release in central nervous system (CNS). We investigated whether CCR5 plays a role in MS progression using a murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), in CCR5 deficient (CCR5−/−) mice. CCR5−/− and CCR5+/+ (wild-type) mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 (MOG35-55) followed by pertussis toxin, after which EAE paralysis was scored for 28 days. We found that clinical scoring and EAE neuropathology were lower in CCR5−/− mice than CCR5+/+ mice. Immune cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, B cell, NK cell and macrophages) infiltration and astrocytes/microglial activation were attenuated in CCR5−/− mice. Moreover, levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ and MCP-1 cytokine levels were decreased in CCR5−/− mice spinal cord. Myelin basic protein (MBP) and CNPase were increased while NG2 and O4 were decreased in CCR5−/− mice, indicating that demyelination was suppressed by CCR5 gene deletion. These findings suggest that CCR5 is likely participating in demyelination in the spinal cord the MS development, and that it could serve as an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of MS. PMID:26985768

  20. CCR5 knockout suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Sun Mi; Park, Mi Hee; Yun, Hyung Mun; Han, Sang Bae; Oh, Ki Wan; Son, Dong Ju; Yun, Jae Suk; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-03-29

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease in which myelin in the spinal cord is damaged. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is implicated in immune cell migration and cytokine release in central nervous system (CNS). We investigated whether CCR5 plays a role in MS progression using a murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), in CCR5 deficient (CCR5-/-) mice. CCR5-/- and CCR5+/+ (wild-type) mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 (MOG35-55) followed by pertussis toxin, after which EAE paralysis was scored for 28 days. We found that clinical scoring and EAE neuropathology were lower in CCR5-/- mice than CCR5+/+ mice. Immune cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, B cell, NK cell and macrophages) infiltration and astrocytes/microglial activation were attenuated in CCR5-/- mice. Moreover, levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ and MCP-1 cytokine levels were decreased in CCR5-/- mice spinal cord. Myelin basic protein (MBP) and CNPase were increased while NG2 and O4 were decreased in CCR5-/- mice, indicating that demyelination was suppressed by CCR5 gene deletion. These findings suggest that CCR5 is likely participating in demyelination in the spinal cord the MS development, and that it could serve as an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of MS.

  1. Frequency of the delta ccr5 deletion allele in the urban Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Passos, G A; Picanço, V P

    1998-04-01

    Studies on screening genes conferring resistance to HIV-1 and AIDS onset have shown a direct relationship between a 32 base pair (bp) deletion in the CCR5 beta-chemokine receptor gene (delta ccr5 mutant allele) and long survival of HIV-1 infected individuals bearing this mutation. These findings led to an interest in studies of delta ccr5 allele distribution in human populations. In the present study, polymerase chain reactions (PCR) in genomic DNA samples, using specific CCR5 oligonucleotide primers surrounding the breakpoint deletion, detected a 193-bp product from the normal CCR5 allele and a 161-bp product from the 32-bp deletion allele. In an investigation of the urban Brazilian population we detected a 93% frequency of normal CCR5/CCR5 homozygous individuals and a 7% frequency of CCR5/delta ccr5 heterozygous individuals. The frequency of the delta ccr5 mutant allele in this population is 0.035; however, no homozygous delta ccr5 individual has been detected thus far. This is the first evidence for the contribution of the delta ccr5 allele to the genetic background of the urban Brazilian population, which is characterized by intense ethnic admixture. These findings open perspectives for further studies on the relationship between delta ccr5 allele frequency and AIDS onset in high-risk HIV-1 exposures individuals.

  2. Use of four next-generation sequencing platforms to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism.

    PubMed

    Archer, John; Weber, Jan; Henry, Kenneth; Winner, Dane; Gibson, Richard; Lee, Lawrence; Paxinos, Ellen; Arts, Eric J; Robertson, David L; Mimms, Larry; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 coreceptor tropism assays are required to rule out the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior treatment with CCR5 antagonists. Phenotypic (e.g., Trofile™, Monogram Biosciences) and genotypic (e.g., population sequencing linked to bioinformatic algorithms) assays are the most widely used. Although several next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are available, to date all published deep sequencing HIV-1 tropism studies have used the 454™ Life Sciences/Roche platform. In this study, HIV-1 co-receptor usage was predicted for twelve patients scheduled to start a maraviroc-based antiretroviral regimen. The V3 region of the HIV-1 env gene was sequenced using four NGS platforms: 454™, PacBio® RS (Pacific Biosciences), Illumina®, and Ion Torrent™ (Life Technologies). Cross-platform variation was evaluated, including number of reads, read length and error rates. HIV-1 tropism was inferred using Geno2Pheno, Web PSSM, and the 11/24/25 rule and compared with Trofile™ and virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. Error rates related to insertions/deletions (indels) and nucleotide substitutions introduced by the four NGS platforms were low compared to the actual HIV-1 sequence variation. Each platform detected all major virus variants within the HIV-1 population with similar frequencies. Identification of non-R5 viruses was comparable among the four platforms, with minor differences attributable to the algorithms used to infer HIV-1 tropism. All NGS platforms showed similar concordance with virologic response to the maraviroc-based regimen (75% to 80% range depending on the algorithm used), compared to Trofile (80%) and population sequencing (70%). In conclusion, all four NGS platforms were able to detect minority non-R5 variants at comparable levels suggesting that any NGS-based method can be used to predict HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

  3. Inhibition of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain by Targeting a Mu Opioid Receptor/Chemokine Receptor5 Heteromer (MOR-CCR5).

    PubMed

    Akgün, Eyup; Javed, Muhammad I; Lunzer, Mary M; Powers, Michael D; Sham, Yuk Y; Watanabe, Yoshikazu; Portoghese, Philip S

    2015-11-12

    Chemokine release promotes cross-talk between opioid and chemokine receptors that in part leads to reduced efficacy of morphine in the treatment of chronic pain. On the basis of the possibility that a MOR-CCR5 heteromer is involved in such cross-talk, we have synthesized bivalent ligands (MCC series) that contain mu opioid agonist and CCR5 antagonist pharmacophores linked through homologous spacers (14-24 atoms). When tested on lipopolysaccharide-inflamed mice, a member of the series (MCC22; 3e) with a 22-atom spacer exhibited profound antinociception (i.t. ED50 = 0.0146 pmol/mouse) that was 2000× greater than morphine. Moreover, MCC22 was ~3500× more potent than a mixture of mu agonist and CCR5 antagonist monovalent ligands. These data strongly suggest that MCC22 acts by bridging the protomers of a MOR-CCR5 heteromer having a TM5,6 interface. Molecular simulation studies are consistent with such bridging. This study supports the MOR-CCR5 heteromer as a novel target for the treatment of chronic pain.

  4. CCR5 in recruitment and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Umansky, Viktor; Blattner, Carolin; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Utikal, Jochen

    2017-04-05

    Malignant melanoma is characterized by the development of chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment, leading to the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Using ret transgenic mouse melanoma model, we found a significant migration of MDSCs expressing C-C chemokine receptor (CCR)5 into primary tumors and metastatic lymph nodes, which was correlated with tumor progression. An increased CCR5 expression on MDSCs was associated with elevated concentrations of CCR5 ligands in melanoma microenvironment. In vitro experiments showed that the upregulation of CCR5 expression on CD11b(+)Gr1(+) immature myeloid cells was induced by CCR5 ligands, IL-6, GM-CSF, and other inflammatory factors. Furthermore, CCR5(+) MDSCs infiltrating melanoma lesions displayed a stronger immunosuppressive pattern than their CCR5(-) counterparts. Targeting CCR5/CCR5 ligand signaling via a fusion protein mCCR5-Ig, which selectively binds and neutralizes all three CCR5 ligands, increased the survival of tumor-bearing mice. This was associated with a reduced migration and immunosuppressive potential of tumor MDSCs. In melanoma patients, circulating CCR5(+) MDSCs were increased as compared to healthy donors. Like in melanoma-bearing mice, we observed an enrichment of these cells and CCR5 ligands in tumors as compared to the peripheral blood. Our findings define a critical role for CCR5 not only in the recruitment but also in the activation of MDSCs in tumor lesions, suggesting that novel strategies of melanoma treatment could be based on blocking CCR5/CCR5 ligand interactions.

  5. CCR5 deficiency increased susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide-induced acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Park, Mi Hee; Hwang, Chul Ju; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Yoon, Hae Suk; Yoon, Do Young; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-05-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) regulates leukocyte chemotaxis and activation, and its deficiency exacerbates development of nephritis. Therefore, we investigated the role of CCR5 during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury. CCR5-deficient (CCR5-/-) and wild-type (CCR5+/+) mice, both aged about 10 months, had acute renal injury induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (10 mg/kg). Compared with CCR5+/+ mice, CCR5-/- mice showed increased mortality and renal injury, including elevated creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels, following LPS challenge. Compared to CCR5+/+ mice, CCR5-/- mice also exhibited greater increases in the serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β following LPS challenge. Furthermore, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils, expression of intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and the number of apoptotic cells were more greatly increased by LPS treatment in CCR5-/- mice than in CCR5+/+ mice. The concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β were also significantly increased in the kidney of CCR5-/- mice after LPS challenge. Moreover, primary kidney cells from CCR5-/- mice showed greater increases in TNF-α production and p38 MAP kinase activation following treatment with LPS compared with that observed in the cells from CCR5+/+ mice. LPS-induced TNF-α production and apoptosis in the primary kidney cells from CCR5-/- mice were inhibited by treatment with p38 MAP kinase inhibitor. These results suggest that CCR5 deficiency increased the production of TNF-α following LPS treatment through increased activation of the p38 pathway in the kidney, resulting in renal apoptosis and leukocyte infiltration and led to exacerbation of LPS-induced acute kidney injury.

  6. CCR5 in cancer immunotherapy: More than an "attractive" receptor for T cells.

    PubMed

    González-Martín, Alicia; Mira, Emilia; Mañes, Santos

    2012-01-01

    Despite intensive study, the role of CCR5 in cancer remains elusive. We showed that CCR5 expression by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is necessary to boost anti-tumor responses by optimizing helper-dependent CD8+ T cell priming. Our findings could have implications for cancer treatment in patients with defective CCR5 expression.

  7. HIV-1 Tropism Dynamics and Phylogenetic Analysis from Longitudinal Ultra-Deep Sequencing Data of CCR5- and CXCR4-Using Variants

    PubMed Central

    Sede, Mariano M.; Moretti, Franco A.; Laufer, Natalia L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Coreceptor switch from CCR5 to CXCR4 is associated with HIV disease progression. The molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying the CCR5 to CXCR4 switch are the focus of intense recent research. We studied the HIV-1 tropism dynamics in relation to coreceptor usage, the nature of quasispecies from ultra deep sequencing (UDPS) data and their phylogenetic relationships. Methods Here, we characterized C2-V3-C3 sequences of HIV obtained from 19 patients followed up for 54 to 114 months using UDPS, with further genotyping and phylogenetic analysis for coreceptor usage. HIV quasispecies diversity and variability as well as HIV plasma viral load were measured longitudinally and their relationship with the HIV coreceptor usage was analyzed. The longitudinal UDPS data were submitted to phylogenetic analysis and sampling times and coreceptor usage were mapped onto the trees obtained. Results Although a temporal viral genetic structuring was evident, the persistence of several viral lineages evolving independently along the infection was statistically supported, indicating a complex scenario for the evolution of viral quasispecies. HIV X4-using variants were present in most of our patients, exhibiting a dissimilar inter- and intra-patient predominance as the component of quasispecies even on antiretroviral therapy. The viral populations from some of the patients studied displayed evidences of the evolution of X4 variants through fitness valleys, whereas for other patients the data favored a gradual mode of emergence. Conclusions CXCR4 usage can emerge independently, in multiple lineages, along the course of HIV infection. The mode of emergence, i.e. gradual or through fitness valleys seems to depend on both virus and patient factors. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that, besides becoming dominant after population-level switches, minor proportions of X4 viruses might exist along the infection, perhaps even at early stages of it. The fate of these minor

  8. CCR5 and CXCR3 Are Dispensable for Liver Infiltration, but CCR5 Protects against Virus-Induced T-Cell-Mediated Hepatic Steatosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Holst, P. J.; Orskov, C.; Qvortrup, K.; Christensen, J. P.; Thomsen, A. R.

    2007-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR3 are important molecules in regulating the migration of activated lymphocytes. Thus, the majority of tissue-infiltrating T cells found in the context of autoimmune conditions and viral infections express CCR5 and CXCR3, and the principal chemokine ligands are expressed within inflamed tissues. Accordingly, intervention studies have pointed to nonredundant roles of these receptors in models of allograft rejection, viral infection, and autoimmunity. In spite of this, considerable controversy exists, with many studies failing to support a role for CCR5 or CXCR3 in disease pathogenesis. One possible explanation is that different chemokine receptors may take over in the absence of any individual receptor, thus rendering individual receptors redundant. We have attempted to address this issue by analyzing CCR5−/−, CXCR3−/−, and CCR5/CXCR3−/− mice with regard to virus-induced liver inflammation, generation and recruitment of effector cells, virus control, and immunopathology. Our results indicate that CCR5 and CXCR3 are largely dispensable for tissue infiltration and virus control. In contrast, the T-cell response is accelerated in CCR5−/− and CCR5/CXCR3−/− mice and the absence of CCR5 is associated with the induction of CD8+ T-cell-mediated immunopathology consisting of marked hepatic microvesicular steatosis. PMID:17626099

  9. HIV biological variability unveiled: frequent isolations and chimeric receptors reveal unprecedented variation of coreceptor use.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Antonsson, Liselotte; Shi, Yu; Karlsson, Anders; Albert, Jan; Leitner, Thomas; Olde, Björn; Owman, Christer; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2003-12-05

    To follow the evolution of coreceptor use in HIV-1-infected individuals with varying rates of disease progression. The coreceptor use of 278 sequential HIV-1 isolates from 23 individuals was tested by infection of two human cell lines, U87.CD4 and GHOST(3), expressing CD4 and CCR1, CCR2b, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR4, CXCR6 or BOB. Differences in coreceptor use were further dissected by testing chimeric coreceptors constructed by exchanging successively larger parts of CCR5 for corresponding regions of CXCR4. Three patterns of coreceptor use were distinguished: no evolution, evolution to CXCR4 use, and fluctuation. No evolution with stable CCR5 use (R5 phenotype) was linked to slow progression over 8-10 years in four patients. CXCR4-using virus was present from the onset (five patients) or appeared during clinical progression in all other patients, while taking zidovudine or didanosine monotherapy. The fluctuating pattern of coreceptor use, defined as reappearance of virus with R5 phenotype, was observed in five patients and, interestingly, followed initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy in three of these. Monotropic R5 or X4 viruses were more selective in chimeric receptor use than R5X4 or multitropic viruses. Most importantly, the efficiency of chimeric receptor use increased over time. The increase in efficiency of chimeric receptor use allows a new interpretation of evolution of HIV-1 coreceptor use. Evolution could be a continuous process that may lead to changes in the way a coreceptor is used, with the potential of profound alteration in signalling at that receptor.

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis induces CCR5-dependent transfer of infectious HIV-1 from oral keratinocytes to permissive cells

    PubMed Central

    Giacaman, Rodrigo A; Asrani, Anil C; Gebhard, Kristin H; Dietrich, Elizabeth A; Vacharaksa, Anjalee; Ross, Karen F; Herzberg, Mark C

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic infection with HIV occurs infrequently through the oral route. The frequency of occurrence may be increased by concomitant bacterial infection of the oral tissues, since co-infection and inflammation of some cell types increases HIV-1 replication. A putative periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis selectively up-regulates expression of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 on oral keratinocytes. We, therefore, hypothesized that P. gingivalis modulates the outcome of HIV infection in oral epithelial cells. Results Oral and tonsil epithelial cells were pre-incubated with P. gingivalis, and inoculated with either an X4- or R5-type HIV-1. Between 6 and 48 hours post-inoculation, P. gingivalis selectively increased the infectivity of R5-tropic HIV-1 from oral and tonsil keratinocytes; infectivity of X4-tropic HIV-1 remained unchanged. Oral keratinocytes appeared to harbor infectious HIV-1, with no evidence of productive infection. HIV-1 was harbored at highest levels during the first 6 hours after HIV exposure and decreased to barely detectable levels at 48 hours. HIV did not appear to co-localize with P. gingivalis, which increased selective R5-tropic HIV-1 trans infection from keratinocytes to permissive cells. When CCR5 was selectively blocked, HIV-1 trans infection was reduced. Conclusion P. gingivalis up-regulation of CCR5 increases trans infection of harbored R5-tropic HIV-1 from oral keratinocytes to permissive cells. Oral infections such as periodontitis may, therefore, increase risk for oral infection and dissemination of R5-tropic HIV-1. PMID:18371227

  11. Expression of CCR5, CXCR4 and DC-SIGN in Cervix of HIV-1 Heterosexually Infected Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Lopez-Guillen, Paulo; Vazquez-Guillen, Jose Manuel; Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo C; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G; Ramirez-Pineda, Antonio; Amaya-Garcia, Patricia Irene; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Background: A number of studies have demonstrated that receptor and co-receptor expression levels which may affect viral entry, promoting cervical HIV infection. The aim was to evaluate the expression levels of CCR5, CXCR4and DC-SIGN mRNA in a sample of heterosexually HIV infected Mexican women. Methods: We enrolled twenty-six HIV heterosexual infected women attending a local infectious diseases medical unit.RNA was isolated from the cervix and gene expression analysis was performed using real-time PCR. Results: Expression rates for mRNA of CCR5 (median 1.82; range 0.003–2934) were higher than those observed for CXCR4 (0.79; 0.0061–3312) and DC-SIGN (0.33; 0.006–532) receptors (p < 0.05). A high correlation was found between the mRNA expression levels of these three receptors (rs = 0.52 to 0.85, p < 0.01). Conclusion: Levels of expression of the tested chemokine receptors in the cervix are different from each other and alsovary from woman to woman, and seem to support the suggestion that chemokine receptor expression in genital tissues may be playing a role in the HIV transmission. PMID:23115608

  12. HIV co-receptor tropism prediction remains stable over time in treatment-naïve patients.

    PubMed

    Philip, Keir Ej; Macartney, Malcolm J; Conibear, Tim Cr; Smith, Colette J; Marshall, Neal; Johnson, Margaret A; Haque, Tanzina; Webster, Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    HIV co-receptor tropism determination is essential before prescribing the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc. British HIV Association guidelines suggest tropism testing may remain valid for only 90 days in antiretroviral-naïve patients. We aimed to determine the accuracy of this figure. Tropism was assessed in 26 antiretroviral-naïve patients with ongoing viral replication, sampled yearly from first clinic visit. The V3 region of HIV-1 was sequenced in triplicate, then tropism predicted using the Geno2Pheno system. Baseline tropism prediction remained valid for a median of 52 months (range 7-81). For 19/26 individuals baseline tropism remained unchanged throughout a median of 54 months follow-up; 18 R5 tropic and 1 X4 tropic. In seven patients (27%) baseline tropism switched at least once (range 1-4 switches) during follow-up; however, their baseline tropism prediction remained valid for a median of 45 months. Co-receptor tropism in treatment-naïve patients with ongoing viral replication appears highly stable over time, suggesting that baseline genotypic tropism prediction may be valid for a longer duration in patients delaying ART initiation. In this study, baseline tropism prediction remained valid for a median of 52 months, suggesting current guidelines recommending repeat testing after 90 days may be excessively conservative in their assessment of tropism stability. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Decreased HIV Type 1 Transcription in CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygotes During Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C.; Lada, Steven M.; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R.; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Pillai, Satish K.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P = .035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P = .013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2–long terminal repeat circular DNA (P = .013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2 = 0.136; P = .002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5. PMID:24935955

  14. Decreased HIV type 1 transcription in CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes during suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Pillai, Satish K

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P=.035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P=.013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2-long terminal repeat circular DNA (P=.013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2=0.136; P=.002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5.

  15. Impact of heterozygosity for the chemokine receptor CCR5 32-bp-deleted allele on plasma virus load and CD4 T lymphocytes in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus-infected children at 8 years of age.

    PubMed

    Buseyne, F; Janvier, G; Teglas, J P; Ivanoff, S; Burgard, M; Bui, E; Mayaux, M J; Blanche, S; Rouzioux, C; Rivière, Y

    1998-10-01

    The CCR5 gene encodes one of the major human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coreceptors. A 32-bp deletion in this gene (delta ccr5) is associated with relative resistance to disease progression in heterozygous HIV-1-infected persons. The effect of this mutation on virologic and immunologic parameters was determined in a cohort of 45 perinatally HIV-1-infected children prospectively followed after 5 years of age. At a median age of 8.3 years, heterozygous children had significantly lower virus load than homozygous children (median, 3.3 vs. 4.1 log copies/mL, P < .009) and higher percentages of CD4 T cells (median, 26% vs. 17%, P < .07). However, there was no discernible influence of the CCR5 genotype on the percentages of CD8 T cells (P < .27) or on HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activities (P < .65). There was a trend for lower rates of progression to AIDS (CDC stage C) in heterozygous children. These data confirm a major role for the CCR5 coreceptor in HIV-1 pathogenesis in children.

  16. Influence of nucleotide polymorphisms in the CCR2 gene and the CCR5 promoter on the expression of cell surface CCR5 and CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Shieh, B; Liau, Y E; Hsieh, P S; Yan, Y P; Wang, S T; Li, C

    2000-09-01

    Polymorphisms in the CCR2 gene (CCR2-64I) and the CCR5 promoter (pCCR5-59029G) have been correlated with slower HIV-1 disease progression. How these polymorphisms influence the rate of AIDS progression has remained unclear. We have therefore investigated whether these nucleotide polymorphisms will reduce the expression levels of surface CCR5 and CXCR4, and thus lead to slower AIDS progression. For this, a cohort of Chinese volunteers in Taiwan was subjected to the determination of CCR2 and pCCR5 genotypes followed by analysis of the surface CCR5 and CXCR4 expression on five cell types derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by flow cytometry. Several significant associations were detected between genotypes and expression levels of the proteins. The most important finding was that an increased number of CD4(+) cells expressing CCR5 correlated with pCCR5-59029A homozygosity without the interference of both the CCR2-64 and the CCR5 delta 32 (deleted 32 bp) mutations (P: = 0.0453), which is consistent with the previous data on the association of the genotype to AIDS progression. Since different genetic polymorphisms co-exist in human beings, the rate of AIDS progression as well as the risk of rheumatoid arthritis may be governed by the interplay of the array of nucleotide changes and their affected proteins.

  17. Peptide and protein-based inhibitors of HIV-1 co-receptors

    PubMed Central

    von Recum, Horst A; Pokorski, Jonathan K

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) afflicts an estimated 30 million people globally, making it a continuing pandemic. Despite major research efforts, the rate of new infections has remained relatively static over time. This article reviews an emerging strategy for the treatment of HIV, the inhibition of the co-receptors necessary for HIV entry, CCR5 and CXCR4. The aim of this article is to highlight potential therapeutics derived from peptides and proteins that show particular promise in HIV treatment. Molecules that act on CCR5, CXCR4 or on both receptors will be discussed herein. PMID:23856897

  18. Increased number of CCR5+ CD4 T cells among south Indian adults probably associated with the low frequency of X4 phenotype of HIV-1 in India.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Sandeep; Kannangai, Rajesh; Vijayakumar, Theophilus S; Subramanian, Swaminathan; Abraham, Oriapadickal C; Rupali, Priscilla; Jesudason, Mary V; Sridharan, Gopalan

    2002-09-01

    The shift of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from nonsyncytium inducing strains (NSI/R5) to syncytium inducing strains (SI/X4) seen in subtype B infections during progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is less frequently reported in subtype C. NSI and SI strains differ in the co-receptor they utilize to infect a T-cell. We postulated that a larger pool of CD4 T cells expressing CCR5 would be present among individuals in the Indian population. To validate this hypothesis, we estimated the percentage of CD4 cells expressing CCR5 or CXCR4 molecules among healthy south Indian adults and HIV infected individuals. HIV-1 infected and uninfected adult volunteers, belonging to the four southern states of India with Tamil/Malayalam/Kannada or Telugu as their spoken language were prospectively recruited. A two colour flowcytometry examination of the blood sample was done using the following monoclonals; anti-CD45 (FITC)/CD14 (PE), anti IgG1 (FITC)/IgG2a (PE), anti-CD3 (FITC)/CD4 (PE), anti-CD3 (FITC)/CD8 (PE), anti-CD4 (FITC) and anti CCR5 (PE) or anti CXCR4 (PE). In the healthy population (n = 30) studied, 24.6 per cent of CD4 T cells expressed CCR5 and the percentage of CD4 T cells expressing CXCR4 was 80.4. Among the HIV infected individuals (n = 51) the percentage of CD4 T cells expressing CCR5 and CXCR4 was 26.8 and 78.7 per cent respectively. The percentage of CD4 cells expressing CCR5 and CXCR4 in both the HIV uninfected and infected adults was significantly higher in the south Indian population than in the West. The larger pool of CCR5 positive CD4 cells probably allows for the R5 HIV strain to have a replication advantage over X4 HIV strains. This may explain the lack of shift in the viral phenotype during disease progression and also the perceived rapid progression of the disease in India compared to the West.

  19. Temporary CXCR3 and CCR5 Antagonism Following Vaccination Enhances Memory CD8 T Cell Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Zhang, Nan; Tian, Miaomiao; Ran, Zihan; Zhu, Mingjun; Zhu, Haiyan; Han, Fangting; Yin, Juan; Zhong, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Although current vaccination strategies have been successful at preventing a variety of human diseases, attempts at vaccinating against some pathogens such as AIDS and tuberculosis (TB) have been more problematic, largely because abnormally high numbers of antigen-specific CD8 + T cells are required for protection. This study assessed the effect on host immune response of temporarily dampening the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 after vaccination by administration of TAK-779, a small-molecule CXCR3 and CCR5 antagonist commonly used to inhibit HIV infection. Our results showed that use of TAK-779 enhanced memory CD8 + T cell immune responses both qualitatively and quantitatively. Treatment with TAK-779 following vaccination of an influenza virus antigen resulted in enhanced memory generation, with more CD8 + CD127 + memory precursors and fewer terminally differentiated effector CD8 + CD69 + T cells. These memory T cells were able to become IFN-γ–secreting effector cells when re-encountering the same antigen, which can further enhance the efficacy of vaccination. The mice vaccinated in the presence of TAK-779 were better protected upon influenza virus challenge than the controls. These results show that vaccination, while temporarily inhibiting chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 by TAK-779, could be a promising strategy to generate large numbers of protective memory CD8 + T cells. PMID:27447731

  20. Temporary CXCR3 and CCR5 antagonism following vaccination enhances memory CD8 T cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Zhang, Nan; Tian, Miaomiao; Ran, Zihan; Zhu, Mingjun; Zhu, Haiyan; Han, Fangting; Yin, Juan; Zhong, Jiang

    2016-07-06

    Although current vaccination strategies have been successful at preventing a variety of human diseases, attempts at vaccinating against some pathogens such as AIDS and tuberculosis (TB) have been more problematic, largely in that abnormally high numbers of antigen specific CD8+ T cells are required for protection. This study assessed the effect of temporarily dampening the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and CCR5 after vaccination on host immune responses by the administration of TAK-779, a small molecule CXCR3 and CCR5 antagonists commonly used to inhibit HIV infection. Our results showed that the use of TAK-779 enhanced memory CD8+ T cell immune responses both qualitatively and quantitatively. Treatment with TAK-779 following vaccination of an influenza virus antigen resulted in enhanced memory generation with more CD8+CD127+ memory precursor and fewer terminally differentiated effector CD8+CD69+ T cells. These memory T cells were able to become IFN-γ-secreting effector cells when re-encountered the same antigen, which can further enhance the efficacy of vaccination. The mice vaccinated in the presence of TAK-779 were better protected upon influenza virus challenge than the control. These results showed that vaccination while temporarily inhibiting chemokine receptor CXCR3 and CCR5 by TAK-779 could be a promising strategy to generate large number of protective memory CD8+ T cells.

  1. AMD3100, a small molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 entry via the CXCR4 co-receptor.

    PubMed

    Donzella, G A; Schols, D; Lin, S W; Esté, J A; Nagashima, K A; Maddon, P J; Allaway, G P; Sakmar, T P; Henson, G; De Clercq, E; Moore, J P

    1998-01-01

    The bicyclam AMD3100 (formula weight 830) blocks HIV-1 entry and membrane fusion via the CXCR4 co-receptor, but not via CCR5. AMD3100 prevents monoclonal antibody 12G5 from binding to CXCR4, but has no effect on binding of monoclonal antibody 2D7 to CCR5. It also inhibits binding of the CXC-chemokine, SDF-1alpha, to CXCR4 and subsequent signal transduction, but does not itself cause signaling and has no effect on RANTES signaling via CCR5. Thus, AMD3100 prevents CXCR4 functioning as both a HIV-1 co-receptor and a CXC-chemokine receptor. Development of small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry is feasible.

  2. Effects of genetic variants of CCR5 chemokine receptors on oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanyel, C R; Cincin, Z B; Gokcen-Rohlig, B; Bektas-Kayhan, K; Unur, M; Cakmakoglu, B

    2013-11-18

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of genetic variants of the chemokine C-C motif receptor (CCR5) in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). A total of 127 patients diagnosed with OSCC and 104 healthy individuals were included in the study. The polymorphisms CCR5 59029 and CCR5-delta32 were assessed with the polymerase chain reaction-restricted fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method from peripheral blood samples of both groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and patient groups for CCR5 59029 A/G genotypes (P < 0.01). Individuals carrying the CCR5 59029 G allele (GG +AG genotypes) had a 2.84-fold increased risk for OSCC (P < 0.0001), and the CCR5 59029 AA genotype frequency was higher in the control group than in the patient group (P < 0.0001). The CCR5-delta 32 genotype frequencies did not differ significantly between controls and cases (P > 0.05). CCR5 59029 GG and CCR5-delta32 DD + ID genotype frequencies were significantly increased in Grade II-III OSCC patients compared with Grade I-II OSCC patients. In conclusion, these results suggested that the G allele of the CCR5 59029 polymorphism might be a risk factor due to the loss of receptor function that might cause increased inflammation leading to the development of OSCC.

  3. Variants of CCR5, which are permissive for HIV-1 infection, show distinct functional responses to CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5

    PubMed Central

    Dong, H-F; Wigmore, K; Carrington, MN; Dean, M; Turpin, JA; Howard, OMZ

    2006-01-01

    CCR5 is one of the primary coreceptors for Env-mediated fusion between cells and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Analyses of CCR5 variants in cohorts of HIV-1 high-risk individuals led to the identification of multiple single amino-acid substitutions, which may have functional consequences. This study focused on eight naturally occurring allelic variants located between amino-acid residues 60 and 334 of CCR5. All studied allelic variants were highly expressed on the cell surface of HEK-293 cells and permissive for HIV-1 infection. Variant G301V showed 3.5-fold increase in 50% effective concentration (EC50) for CCL4 (MIP 1beta) in a competitive binding assay. There was also a significant reduction in CCL5 (RANTES) EC50 for the R223Q, A335V and Y339F variants. The most unexpected functional abnormality was exhibited by the R60S variant that exhibited a loss of ligand-induced desensitization in chemotaxis assays, but showed normal CCL4 and CCL5 binding avidity. This mutation is located in the first intracellular loop, a domain that has not previously been shown to be involved in receptor desensitization. In conclusion, our results support earlier studies showing that these naturally occurring point mutations do not limit HIV-1 infection, and indicated that single amino-acid changes can have unexpected functional consequences. PMID:16015368

  4. Frequency of CCR5 delta-32 mutation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive and HIV-exposed seronegative individuals and in general population of Medellin, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Díaz, F J; Vega, J A; Patiño, P J; Bedoya, G; Nagles, J; Villegas, C; Vesga, R; Rugeles, M T

    2000-01-01

    Repeated exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not always result in seroconversion. Modifications in coreceptors for HIV entrance to target cells are one of the factors that block the infection. We studied the frequency of Delta-32 mutation in ccr5 gene in Medellin, Colombia. Two hundred and eighteen individuals distributed in three different groups were analyzed for Delta-32 mutation in ccr5 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR): 29 HIV seropositive (SP), 39 exposed seronegative (ESN) and 150 individuals as a general population sample (GPS). The frequency of the Delta-32 mutant allele was 3.8% for ESN, 2.7% for GPS and 1.7% for SP. Only one homozygous mutant genotype (Delta-32/Delta-32) was found among the ESN (2.6%). The heterozygous genotype (ccr5/Delta-32) was found in eight GPS (5.3%), in one SP (3.4%) and in one ESN (2.6%). The differences in the allelic and genotypic frequencies among the three groups were not statistically significant. A comparison between the expected and the observed genotypic frequencies showed that these frequencies were significantly different for the ESN group, which indirectly suggests a protective effect of the mutant genotype (Delta-32/Delta-32). Since this mutant genotype explained the resistance of infection in only one of our ESN persons, different mechanisms of protection must be playing a more important role in this population.

  5. Use of a Small Molecule CCR5 Inhibitor in Macaques to Treat Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection or Prevent Simian–Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Klasse, Per Johan; Ketas, Thomas J.; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Piatak, Michael; Kunstman, Kevin; Kuhmann, Shawn E.; Marx, Preston A.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dufour, Jason; Mefford, Megan; Pandrea, Ivona; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Doms, Robert W.; DeMartino, Julie A.; Siciliano, Salvatore J.; Lyons, Kathy; Springer, Martin S.; Moore, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fuses with cells after sequential interactions between its envelope glycoproteins, CD4 and a coreceptor, usually CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) or CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4). CMPD 167 is a CCR5-specific small molecule with potent antiviral activity in vitro. We show that CMPD 167 caused a rapid and substantial (4–200-fold) decrease in plasma viremia in six rhesus macaques chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains SIVmac251 or SIVB670, but not in an animal infected with the X4 simian–human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), SHIV-89.6P. In three of the SIV-infected animals, viremia reduction was sustained. In one, there was a rapid, but partial, rebound and in another, there was a rapid and complete rebound. There was a substantial delay (>21 d) between the end of therapy and the onset of full viremia rebound in two animals. We also evaluated whether vaginal administration of gel-formulated CMPD 167 could prevent vaginal transmission of the R5 virus, SHIV-162P4. Complete protection occurred in only 2 of 11 animals, but early viral replication was significantly less in the 11 CMPD 167-recipients than in 9 controls receiving carrier gel. These findings support the development of small molecule CCR5 inhibitors as antiviral therapies, and possibly as components of a topical microbicide to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. PMID:14623909

  6. Phenotypic Co-receptor Tropism in Perinatally HIV-Infected Youth Failing Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Agwu, Allison L.; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Eshleman, Susan H.; Patel, Kunjal; Huang, Wei; Burchett, Sandra K.; Siberry, George K.; Van Dyke, Russell B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children and youth are often heavily treatment-experienced, with resultant antiretroviral (ARV) resistance and limited treatment options. For those with virologic failure (VF), new agents such as CCR5 (R5) antagonists may be useful; however, reports of R5 antagonist susceptibility in children have mostly relied on genotypic testing, which may not accurately reflect the phenotypic tropism of the viral populations. We characterized phenotypic co-receptor usage among PHIV children and youth with VF on ARV treatment (ART) to identify predictors of CXCR4 (X4) tropism which preclude R5 antagonist use. Methods Plasma samples with >1,000 HIV RNA copies/mL were obtained from 73 PHIV-infected ART-treated children and youth (age 9–21 years) enrolled in the multi-center Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. Samples were analyzed using the Trofile™ phenotypic assay. Multiple logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with detectable X4-tropism. Results Tropism results were obtained for 59 (81%) of the 73 children and youth; 32 (54%) had X4-tropism. Persistent viremia (≥80% of HIV RNA measurements >400 copies/mL) was associated with detectable X4-tropism (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 6.6, 95% CI 1.4, 31.4), while longer cumulative nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) use was associated with lower risk of X4-tropism (aOR 0.6, 95% CI 0.5, 0.9). Conclusions Using a phenotypic assay, >50% of PHIV children and youth with VF had X4-tropism, similar to that in treatment-experienced adults, and higher than the 30% reported for children using genotypic assays. Persistent viremia and shorter NRTI exposure are associated with X4-tropism in children and youth and may help target phenotypic testing to those most likely to benefit from R5 antagonist. PMID:27078121

  7. Phenotypic Coreceptor Tropism in Perinatally HIV-infected Youth Failing Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Agwu, Allison L; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Eshleman, Susan H; Patel, Kunjal; Huang, Wei; Burchett, Sandra K; Siberry, George K; Van Dyke, Russell B

    2016-07-01

    Perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children and youth are often heavily treatment-experienced, with resultant antiretroviral resistance and limited treatment options. For those with virologic failure (VF), new agents such as CCR5 (R5) antagonists may be useful; however, reports of R5 antagonist susceptibility in children have mostly relied on genotypic testing, which may not accurately reflect the phenotypic tropism of the viral populations. We characterized phenotypic coreceptor usage among PHIV children and youth with VF on antiretroviral treatment to identify predictors of CXCR4 (X4) tropism which preclude R5 antagonist use. Plasma samples with >1000 HIV RNA copies/mL were obtained from 73 PHIV antiretroviral treatment-treated children and youth (age 9-21 years) enrolled in the multicenter Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. Samples were analyzed using the Trofile phenotypic assay. Multiple logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with detectable X4 tropism. Tropism results were obtained for 59 (81%) of the 73 children and youth; 32 (54%) had X4-tropism. Persistent viremia (≥80% of HIV RNA measurements >400 copies/mL) was associated with detectable X4 tropism (adjusted odds ratio: 6.6, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 31.4), while longer cumulative nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor use was associated with lower risk of X4 tropism (adjusted odds ratio: 0.6, 95% confidence interval: 0.5, 0.9). Using a phenotypic assay, >50% of PHIV children and youth with VF had X4 tropism, similar to that in experienced adults, and higher than the 30% reported for children using genotypic assays. Persistent viremia and shorter nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor exposure are associated with X4-tropism in children and youth and may help target phenotypic testing to those most likely to benefit from R5 antagonist.

  8. Marked differences in CCR5 expression and activation levels in two South African populations.

    PubMed

    Picton, Anabela C P; Shalekoff, Sharon; Paximadis, Maria; Tiemessen, Caroline T

    2012-08-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is pivotal in determining an individual's susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and rate of disease progression. To establish whether population-based differences exist in cell surface expression of CCR5 we evaluated the extent of CCR5 expression across all peripheral blood cell types in individuals from two populations, South African Africans (SAA) and South African Caucasians (SAC). Significant differences in CCR5 expression, both in number of CCR5 molecules per cell (density) and the percentage of CCR5-expressing cells, were observed between the two study groups, within all cell subsets. Most notably, the percentage of all CCR5(+) cell subsets was significantly lower in SAC compared with SAA individuals (P < 0·01) among natural killer (NK) -cell subsets (CD56(+) , CD16(+) CD56(+) and CD56(dim) ) whereas CCR5 density was significantly higher in SAC compared with SAA individuals in CCR5(+) CD8(+) T-cell subsets and CCR5(+) NK-cell subsets (CD56(+) , CD16(+) CD56(+) and CD56(dim) ) (all P < 0·05). These relationships were maintained after exclusion of CCR5Δ32 heterozygous individuals (n = 7) from the SAC dataset. The SAA individuals exhibited significantly higher cell activation levels, as measured by HLA-DR expression, than SAC individuals in CD4(+) T-cell subsets (P = 0·002) and CD56(+) NK-cell subsets (P < 0·001). This study serves to demonstrate that ethnically divergent populations show marked differences in both cell activation and CCR5 expression, which are likely to impact on both susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and the rate of HIV-1 disease progression. © 2012 The Authors. Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Sequential CCR5-Tropic HIV-1 Reactivation from Distinct Cellular Reservoirs following Perturbation of Elite Control

    PubMed Central

    Watters, Sarah A.; Mlcochova, Petra; Maldarelli, Frank; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Pillay, Deenan; Gupta, Ravindra K.

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV Elite Controllers may reveal insights into virus persistence given they harbour small reservoir sizes, akin to HIV non-controllers treated early with combination antiretroviral therapy. Both groups of patients represent the most promising candidates for interventions aimed at sustained remission or ‘cure’. Analytic treatment interruption (ATI) in the latter group leads to stochastic rebound of virus, though it is unclear whether loss of elite control is also associated with similar rebound characteristics. Methods We studied three discrete periods of virus rebound during myeloma related immune disruption over 2.5 years in an elite controller who previously underwent autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in the absence of any antiretroviral therapy. Single genome sequencing of the V1-V4 region of env in PBMC and plasma was performed and phylogenies reconstructed. Average pairwise distance (APD) was calculated and non-parametric methods used to assess compartmentalisation. Coreceptor usage was predicted based on genotypic algorithms. Results 122 single genome sequences were obtained (median 26 sequences per rebound). The initial rebounding plasma env sequences following ASCT represented two distinct lineages, and clustered with proviral DNA sequences isolated prior to ASCT. One of the lineages was monophyletic, possibly indicating reactivation from clonally expanded cells. The second rebound occurred 470 days after spontaneous control of the first rebound and was phylogenetically distinct from the first, confirmed by compartmentalisation analysis, with a different cellular origin rather than ongoing replication. By contrast, third rebound viruses clustered with second rebound viruses, with evidence for ongoing evolution that was associated with lymphopenia and myeloma progression. Following ASCT a shift in tropism from CXCR4-tropic viruses to a CCR5-tropic population was observed to persist through to the third rebound. Conclusions Our data

  10. CCR5 is a suppressor for cortical plasticity and hippocampal learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Miou; Greenhill, Stuart; Huang, Shan; Silva, Tawnie K; Sano, Yoshitake; Wu, Shumin; Cai, Ying; Nagaoka, Yoshiko; Sehgal, Megha; Cai, Denise J; Lee, Yong-Seok; Fox, Kevin; Silva, Alcino J

    2016-01-01

    Although the role of CCR5 in immunity and in HIV infection has been studied widely, its role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory is not understood. Here, we report that decreasing the function of CCR5 increases MAPK/CREB signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and hippocampus-dependent memory in mice, while neuronal CCR5 overexpression caused memory deficits. Decreasing CCR5 function in mouse barrel cortex also resulted in enhanced spike timing dependent plasticity and consequently, dramatically accelerated experience-dependent plasticity. These results suggest that CCR5 is a powerful suppressor for plasticity and memory, and CCR5 over-activation by viral proteins may contribute to HIV-associated cognitive deficits. Consistent with this hypothesis, the HIV V3 peptide caused LTP, signaling and memory deficits that were prevented by Ccr5 knockout or knockdown. Overall, our results demonstrate that CCR5 plays an important role in neuroplasticity, learning and memory, and indicate that CCR5 has a role in the cognitive deficits caused by HIV. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20985.001 PMID:27996938

  11. CCR5-CCL Axis in PDL during Orthodontic Biophysical Force Application.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Yoo, H I; Kim, S H

    2015-12-01

    Tooth movement by application of orthodontic biophysical force primarily reflects the role of soluble molecules released from the periodontal ligament (PDL). Thus far, many factors have been reported to be involved in orthodontic tooth movement (OTM), but key molecules that orchestrate responses of periodontal tissues to biophysical force are still enigmatic. In this in vivo study, in which the upper first molars in rats were moved, differential display-polymerase chain reaction revealed that CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) level was differentially increased during OTM. Strong immunoreactivity for CCR5 was found in the PDL undergoing force application. Moreover, the in vitro compression or tension force application to primary cultured human PDL cells increased the expression of CCR5 and CCR5 ligands. In vitro tension force on human PDL cells did not induce RANKL, an osteoclastogenesis-inducing factor, but did induce the upregulation of IL12, an osteoclast inhibitory factor, and osteoblast differentiation factors, including Runx2, which was attenuated under tension by CCR5 gene silencing whereas augmented with CCR5 ligands. In contrast, in vitro compression force did not induce the expression of osteoprotegerin, a decoy receptor for RANKL and Runx2, but did induce the upregulation of RANKL, which was attenuated under compression by CCR5 gene silencing. These results suggest that the CCR5-CCR5 ligands axis in PDL cells may play a crucial role in the remodeling of periodontal tissues and can be a therapeutic target for achieving efficient OTM.

  12. CCR5 is a suppressor for cortical plasticity and hippocampal learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Miou; Greenhill, Stuart; Huang, Shan; Silva, Tawnie K; Sano, Yoshitake; Wu, Shumin; Cai, Ying; Nagaoka, Yoshiko; Sehgal, Megha; Cai, Denise J; Lee, Yong-Seok; Fox, Kevin; Silva, Alcino J

    2016-12-20

    Although the role of CCR5 in immunity and in HIV infection has been studied widely, its role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory is not understood. Here, we report that decreasing the function of CCR5 increases MAPK/CREB signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and hippocampus-dependent memory in mice, while neuronal CCR5 overexpression caused memory deficits. Decreasing CCR5 function in mouse barrel cortex also resulted in enhanced spike timing dependent plasticity and consequently, dramatically accelerated experience-dependent plasticity. These results suggest that CCR5 is a powerful suppressor for plasticity and memory, and CCR5 over-activation by viral proteins may contribute to HIV-associated cognitive deficits. Consistent with this hypothesis, the HIV V3 peptide caused LTP, signaling and memory deficits that were prevented by Ccr5 knockout or knockdown. Overall, our results demonstrate that CCR5 plays an important role in neuroplasticity, learning and memory, and indicate that CCR5 has a role in the cognitive deficits caused by HIV.

  13. Haplotypes in CCR5-CCR2, CCL3 and CCL5 are associated with natural resistance to HIV-1 infection in a Colombian cohort.

    PubMed

    Vega, Jorge A; Villegas-Ospina, Simón; Aguilar-Jiménez, Wbeimar; Rugeles, María T; Bedoya, Gabriel; Zapata, Wildeman

    2017-06-01

    Variants in genes encoding for HIV-1 co-receptors and their natural ligands have been individually associated to natural resistance to HIV-1 infection. However, the simultaneous presence of these variants has been poorly studied. To evaluate the association of single and multilocus haplotypes in genes coding for the viral co-receptors CCR5 and CCR2, and their ligands CCL3 and CCL5, with resistance or susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Nine variants in CCR5-CCR2, two SNPs in CCL3 and two in CCL5 were genotyped by PCR-RFLP in 35 seropositive (cases) and 49 HIV-1-exposed seronegative Colombian individuals (controls). Haplotypes were inferred using the Arlequin software, and their frequency in individual or combined loci was compared between cases and controls by the chi-square test. A p' value ;0.05 after Bonferroni correction was considered significant. Homozygosis of the human haplogroup (HH) E was absent in controls and frequent in cases, showing a tendency to susceptibility. The haplotypes C-C and T-T in CCL3 were associated with susceptibility (p'=0.016) and resistance (p';0.0001) to HIV-1 infection, respectively. Finally, in multilocus analysis, the haplotype combinations formed by HHC in CCR5-CCR2, T-T in CCL3 and G-C in CCL5 were associated with resistance (p'=0.006). Our results suggest that specific combinations of variants in genes from the same signaling pathway can define an HIV-1 resistant phenotype. Despite our small sample size, our statistically significant associations suggest strong effects; however, these results should be further validated in larger cohorts.

  14. Different Pathogenesis of CCR5-Using Primary HIV-1 Isolates from Non-Switch and Switch Virus Patients in Human Lymphoid Tissue Ex Vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iarlsson, Ingrid; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Chen. Silvia; Karlsson, Anders; Albert, Jan; Fenyol, Eva Maria; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2005-01-01

    CCR5-utilizing HIV-1 variants (R5) typically transmit infection and dominate its early stages, whereas emergence of CXCR4-using (X4 or R5X4) HIV-1 is often associated with disease progression. However, such a switch in co-receptor usage can only be detected in approximately onehalf of HIV-infected patients (switch virus patients), and progression to immunodeficiency may also occur in patients without detectable switch in co-receptor usage (non-switch virus patients). Here, we used a system of ex vivo-infected tonsillar tissue to compare the pathogenesis of sequential primary R5 HIV-1 isolates from the switch and non-switch patients. Inoculation of ex vivo tissue with these R5 isolates resulted in viral replication and CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cell depletion. The levels of such depletion by HIV-1 isolated from non-switch virus patients were significantly higher than those by R5 HIV-1 isolates from switch virus patients. T cell depletion seemed to be controlled by viral factors and did not significantly vary between tissues from different donors. In contrast, viral replication did not correlate with the switch status of the patients; in tissues fiom different donors it varied 30-fold and seemed to be controlled by a combination of viral and tissue factors. Nevertheless, replication-level hierarchy among sequential isolates remained constant in tissues from various donors. Viral load in vivo was higher in switch virus patients compared to non-switch virus patients. The high cytopathogenicity of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells by R5 HIV-1 isolates from non-switch virus patients may explain the steady decline of CD4(+) T cells in the absence of CXCR4 using virus; elimination of target cells by these isolates may limit their own replication in vivo.

  15. Different Pathogenesis of CCR5-Using Primary HIV-1 Isolates from Non-Switch and Switch Virus Patients in Human Lymphoid Tissue Ex Vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iarlsson, Ingrid; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Chen. Silvia; Karlsson, Anders; Albert, Jan; Fenyol, Eva Maria; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2005-01-01

    CCR5-utilizing HIV-1 variants (R5) typically transmit infection and dominate its early stages, whereas emergence of CXCR4-using (X4 or R5X4) HIV-1 is often associated with disease progression. However, such a switch in co-receptor usage can only be detected in approximately onehalf of HIV-infected patients (switch virus patients), and progression to immunodeficiency may also occur in patients without detectable switch in co-receptor usage (non-switch virus patients). Here, we used a system of ex vivo-infected tonsillar tissue to compare the pathogenesis of sequential primary R5 HIV-1 isolates from the switch and non-switch patients. Inoculation of ex vivo tissue with these R5 isolates resulted in viral replication and CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cell depletion. The levels of such depletion by HIV-1 isolated from non-switch virus patients were significantly higher than those by R5 HIV-1 isolates from switch virus patients. T cell depletion seemed to be controlled by viral factors and did not significantly vary between tissues from different donors. In contrast, viral replication did not correlate with the switch status of the patients; in tissues fiom different donors it varied 30-fold and seemed to be controlled by a combination of viral and tissue factors. Nevertheless, replication-level hierarchy among sequential isolates remained constant in tissues from various donors. Viral load in vivo was higher in switch virus patients compared to non-switch virus patients. The high cytopathogenicity of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells by R5 HIV-1 isolates from non-switch virus patients may explain the steady decline of CD4(+) T cells in the absence of CXCR4 using virus; elimination of target cells by these isolates may limit their own replication in vivo.

  16. HIV coreceptors: from discovery and designation to new paradigms and promise.

    PubMed

    Alkhatib, Ghalib; Berger, Edward A

    2007-10-15

    Just over a decade ago, the specific chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 were identified as the essential coreceptors that function along with CD4 to enable human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry into target cells. The coreceptor discoveries immediately provided a molecular explanation for the distinct tropisms of different HIV-1 isolates for different CD4-positive target cell types, and revealed fundamentally new insights into host and viral factors influencing HIV transmission and disease. The sequential 2-step mechanism by which the HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) interacts first with CD4, then with coreceptor, revealed a major mechanism by which conserved Env epitopes are protected from antibody-mediated neutralization. The Env-coreceptor interaction has become a major target for the development of novel antiviral strategies to treat and prevent HIV infection.

  17. Sensitive Cell-Based Assay for Determination of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coreceptor Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jan; Vazquez, Ana C.; Winner, Dane; Gibson, Richard M.; Rhea, Ariel M.; Rose, Justine D.; Wylie, Doug; Henry, Kenneth; Wright, Alison; King, Kevin; Archer, John; Poveda, Eva; Soriano, Vicente; Robertson, David L.; Olivo, Paul D.; Arts, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    CCR5 antagonists are a powerful new class of antiretroviral drugs that require a companion assay to evaluate the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior to use in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. In this study, we have developed, characterized, verified, and prevalidated a novel phenotypic test to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism (VERITROP) based on a sensitive cell-to-cell fusion assay. A proprietary vector was constructed containing a near-full-length HIV-1 genome with the yeast uracil biosynthesis (URA3) gene replacing the HIV-1 env coding sequence. Patient-derived HIV-1 PCR products were introduced by homologous recombination using an innovative yeast-based cloning strategy. The env-expressing vectors were then used in a cell-to-cell fusion assay to determine the presence of R5 and/or non-R5 HIV-1 variants within the viral population. Results were compared with (i) the original version of Trofile (Monogram Biosciences, San Francisco, CA), (ii) population sequencing, and (iii) 454 pyrosequencing, with the genotypic data analyzed using several bioinformatics tools, i.e., the 11/24/25 rule, Geno2Pheno (2% to 5.75%, 3.5%, or 10% false-positive rate [FPR]), and webPSSM. VERITROP consistently detected minority non-R5 variants from clinical specimens, with an analytical sensitivity of 0.3%, with viral loads of ≥1,000 copies/ml, and from B and non-B subtypes. In a pilot study, a 73.7% (56/76) concordance was observed with the original Trofile assay, with 19 of the 20 discordant results corresponding to non-R5 variants detected using VERITROP and not by the original Trofile assay. The degree of concordance of VERITROP and Trofile with population and deep sequencing results depended on the algorithm used to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism. Overall, VERITROP showed better concordance with deep sequencing/Geno2Pheno at a 0.3% detection threshold (67%), whereas Trofile matched better with population sequencing (79%). However, 454

  18. CCR5 small interfering RNA ameliorated joint inflammation in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Yang, Pingting; Fang, Fang; Ding, Shuang; Xiao, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is found in inflamed synovium of RA patients and is necessary for formation of RA. We aimed to check whether delivery of CCR5-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) via electroporation suppresses local inflammation in arthritis rats. Vectors encoding siRNA that target CCR5 or negative control siRNA were constructed for gene silencing and the silencing effects of suppressing CCR5 expression in synovium examined by western blot. The vector with strongest effect was delivered into the knee joint of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats by the in vivo electroporation method 7, 10, 13, and 16 days after immunization with Complete Freund's adjuvant. During an observation of 28 days, behavior, paw swelling, arthritis and histopathologic scoring were estimated. The expression level of CCR5 in synovium was evaluated by western blot and real-time PCR. Anti-CCR5 D1 siRNA was effectively inhibited CCR5 expression in vitro. Moreover, delivery of the siRNA into inflammatory joint also suppressed the expression of CCR5 in vivo and markedly suppressed paw swelling and inflammation. Local electroporation of anti-CCR5 siRNA into the left inflamed joints could achieve the silencing of CCR5 gene and alleviate local inflammation just in the knee joint injected with siRNA other than the opposite joint. Inhibition of CCR5 expression may provide a potential for treatment of RA.

  19. Genetic variation at the chemokine receptors CCR5/CCR2 in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    González, P; Alvarez, R; Batalla, A; Reguero, J R; Alvarez, V; Astudillo, A; Cubero, G I; Cortina, A; Coto, E

    2001-06-01

    Our objective was to examine the association between myocardial infarction (MI) and two DNA-polymorphisms at the proinflammatory chemokine receptors CCR2 (I64V) and CCR5 (32 bp deletion, (Delta)ccr5), defining if these polymorphisms influence the age for the onset of MI. A total of 214 patients with an age at the first MI episode <55 years, 96 patients that suffered the first MI episode when older than 60 years, and 360 population controls were polymerase chain reaction genotyped for the CCR2-V64I and CCR5-Delta32/wt polymorphisms. Patients and controls were male from the same Caucasian population (Asturias, northern Spain). The frequency of the Deltaccr5 allele was significantly higher in controls compared to patients <55 years (P = 0.004), or in patients >60 years compared to patients <55 years (P = 0.002). Taking the patients >60 years as the reference group, non-carriers of the (Delta)ccr5-allele would have a three-fold higher risk of suffering an episode of MI at <55 years of age (OR = 3.06; 95% CI = 1.46-6.42). Gene and genotype frequencies for the CCR2 polymorphism did not differ between patients <55 years and controls or patients >60 years. Our data suggest that the variation at the CCR5 gene could modulate the age at the onset of MI. Patients carrying the (Delta)ccr5-allele would be protected against an early episode of MI. CCR5 and the CCR5-ligands are expressed by cells in the arteriosclerotic plaque. Thus, the protective role of (Delta)ccr5 could be a consequence of an attenuated inflammatory response, that would determine a slower progression of the arteriosclerotic lesion among (Delta)ccr5-carriers. Our work suggests that the pharmacological blockade of CCR5 could be a valuable therapy in the treatment of MI.

  20. Highly Accurate Structure-Based Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage Suggests Intermolecular Interactions Driving Tropism.

    PubMed

    Kieslich, Chris A; Tamamis, Phanourios; Guzman, Yannis A; Onel, Melis; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry into host cells is mediated by interactions between the V3-loop of viral glycoprotein gp120 and chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4, collectively known as HIV-1 coreceptors. Accurate genotypic prediction of coreceptor usage is of significant clinical interest and determination of the factors driving tropism has been the focus of extensive study. We have developed a method based on nonlinear support vector machines to elucidate the interacting residue pairs driving coreceptor usage and provide highly accurate coreceptor usage predictions. Our models utilize centroid-centroid interaction energies from computationally derived structures of the V3-loop:coreceptor complexes as primary features, while additional features based on established rules regarding V3-loop sequences are also investigated. We tested our method on 2455 V3-loop sequences of various lengths and subtypes, and produce a median area under the receiver operator curve of 0.977 based on 500 runs of 10-fold cross validation. Our study is the first to elucidate a small set of specific interacting residue pairs between the V3-loop and coreceptors capable of predicting coreceptor usage with high accuracy across major HIV-1 subtypes. The developed method has been implemented as a web tool named CRUSH, CoReceptor USage prediction for HIV-1, which is available at http://ares.tamu.edu/CRUSH/.

  1. Amino- and Carboxyl-Terminal CCR5 Mutations in Brazilian HIV-1-Infected Women and Homology Model of p.L55Q CCR5 Mutant.

    PubMed

    Costa, Giselle Calasans de Souza; Nunes, Marcio Roberto T; Jesus, Jaqueline Goes; Novaes, Thiago; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Sousa Júnior, Edivaldo Costa; Santos, Edson de Souza; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Zanette, Dalila Luciola; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Junior

    2015-07-01

    Genetic factors from an HIV-1 host can affect the rate of progression to AIDS and HIV infection. To investigate the frequency of mutations in the CCR5 gene, HIV-1 samples from infected women and uninfected individuals were selected for sequencing of the CCR5 gene regions encoding the N- and C-terminal protein domains. Physicochemical CCR5 modeling and potential protein domain analysis were performed in order to evaluate the impact of the mutations found in the properties and structure of CCR5. The p.L55Q mutation in the N-terminal protein domain was observed only in uninfected individuals, with an allelic frequency of 1.8%. Physicochemical analysis revealed that the p.L55Q mutation magnified the flexibility and accessibility profiles and the modeling of CCR5 structures showed resulting in a small deviation to the right, as well as a hydrophobic to hydrophilic property alteration. The p.L55Q mutation also resulted in a slight modification of the electrostatic load of this region. Additionally, three novel silent mutations were found at the C-terminal coding region among HIV-1-infected women. The results suggest that the p.L55Q mutation might alter CCR5 conformation. Further studies should be conducted to verify the role of this mutation in HIV-1 susceptibility.

  2. Experimental Infection with Schistosoma mansoni in CCR5-Deficient Mice Is Associated with Increased Disease Severity, as CCR5 Plays a Role in Controlling Granulomatous Inflammation▿

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Adriano L. S.; Souza, Patrícia R. S.; Pereira, Cíntia A.; Fernandes, Adriana; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Russo, Remo C.; Vieira, Leda Q.; Corrêa, Ary; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Negrão-Corrêa, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    The plasma level of the chemokine CCL3 is elevated in patients with chronic severe schistosomiasis mansoni. We have previously shown that CCL3−/− mice with experimental infection showed diminished pathology and worm burden compared to those of wild-type (WT) mice. To elucidate further the role of CC chemokines during schistosomiasis mansoni infection, we evaluated the course of infection in C57BL/6J mice deficient in CCR5, one of the receptors for CCL3. The CCR5 deficiency proved to be remarkably deleterious to the host, since mortality rates reached 70% at 14 weeks postinfection in CCR5−/− mice and 19% in WT mice. The increased lethality was not associated with an increased parasite burden, since similar numbers of eggs and adult worms were found in mice from both groups. Liver granulomas of chronically infected CCR5−/− mice were larger and showed greater numbers of cells and collagen deposition than liver granulomas from WT mice. This was associated with higher levels of production of intereleukin-5 (IL-5), IL-13, CCL3, and CCL5 in infected CCR5−/− mice than in infected WT mice. Moreover, at 8 weeks after infection, just before changes in pathology and mortality, the numbers of FoxP3-positive cells were lower in liver granulomas of CCR5−/− mice than in WT mice. In conclusion, the CCR5 deletion is deleterious to mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni, and this is associated with enhanced fibrosis and granulomatous inflammation. PMID:21263020

  3. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a Potent, Orally Bioavailable, and Selective Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 with Broad-Spectrum Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony; Perros, Manos

    2005-01-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades and diverse geographic origin (geometric mean 90% inhibitory concentration of 2.0 nM). Maraviroc was active against 200 clinically derived HIV-1 envelope-recombinant pseudoviruses, 100 of which were derived from viruses resistant to existing drug classes. There was little difference in the sensitivity of the 200 viruses to maraviroc, as illustrated by the biological cutoff in this assay (= geometric mean plus two standard deviations [SD] of 1.7-fold). The mechanism of action of maraviroc was established using cell-based assays, where it blocked binding of viral envelope, gp120, to CCR5 to prevent the membrane fusion events necessary for viral entry. Maraviroc did not affect CCR5 cell surface levels or associated intracellular signaling, confirming it as a functional antagonist of CCR5. Maraviroc has no detectable in vitro cytotoxicity and is highly selective for CCR5, as confirmed against a wide range of receptors and enzymes, including the hERG ion channel (50% inhibitory concentration, >10 μM), indicating potential for an excellent clinical safety profile. Studies in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models predicted maraviroc to have human pharmacokinetics consistent with once- or twice-daily dosing following oral administration. Clinical trials are ongoing to further investigate the potential of using maraviroc for the treatment of HIV-1 infection and AIDS. PMID:16251317

  4. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a potent, orally bioavailable, and selective small-molecule inhibitor of chemokine receptor CCR5 with broad-spectrum anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony; Perros, Manos

    2005-11-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades and diverse geographic origin (geometric mean 90% inhibitory concentration of 2.0 nM). Maraviroc was active against 200 clinically derived HIV-1 envelope-recombinant pseudoviruses, 100 of which were derived from viruses resistant to existing drug classes. There was little difference in the sensitivity of the 200 viruses to maraviroc, as illustrated by the biological cutoff in this assay (= geometric mean plus two standard deviations [SD] of 1.7-fold). The mechanism of action of maraviroc was established using cell-based assays, where it blocked binding of viral envelope, gp120, to CCR5 to prevent the membrane fusion events necessary for viral entry. Maraviroc did not affect CCR5 cell surface levels or associated intracellular signaling, confirming it as a functional antagonist of CCR5. Maraviroc has no detectable in vitro cytotoxicity and is highly selective for CCR5, as confirmed against a wide range of receptors and enzymes, including the hERG ion channel (50% inhibitory concentration, >10 microM), indicating potential for an excellent clinical safety profile. Studies in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models predicted maraviroc to have human pharmacokinetics consistent with once- or twice-daily dosing following oral administration. Clinical trials are ongoing to further investigate the potential of using maraviroc for the treatment of HIV-1 infection and AIDS.

  5. Essential roles of the interaction between cancer cell-derived chemokine, CCL4, and intra-bone CCR5-expressing fibroblasts in breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Soichiro; Baba, Tomohisa; Nishimura, Tatsunori; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi; Gotoh, Noriko; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    From a murine breast cancer cell line, 4T1, we established a subclone, 4T1.3, which consistently metastasizes to bone upon its injection into the mammary fat pad. 4T1.3 clone exhibited similar proliferation rate and migration capacity as the parental clone. However, the intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused larger tumors than that of the parental cells, accompanied with increases in fibroblast, but not osteoclast or osteoblast numbers. 4T1.3 clone displayed an enhanced expression of a chemokine, CCL4, but not its specific receptor, CCR5. CCL4 shRNA-transfection of 4T1.3 clone had few effects on its in vitro properties, but reduced the tumorigenicity arising from the intra-bone injection. Moreover, intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused smaller tumors in mice deficient in CCR5 or those receiving CCR5 antagonist than in wild-type mice. The reduced tumor formation was associated with attenuated accumulation of CCR5-positive fibroblasts expressing connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN2. Tumor cell-derived CCL4 could induce fibroblasts to express CTGF/CCN2, which could support 4T1.3 clone proliferation under hypoxic culture conditions. Thus, the CCL4-CCR5 axis can contribute to breast cancer metastasis to bone by mediating the interaction between cancer cells and fibroblasts in bone cavity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CCR5Delta32 genotype is associated with outcome in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Muntinghe, Friso L H; Gross, Sascha; Bakker, Stephan J L; Landman, Gijs W D; van der Harst, Pim; Bilo, Henk J G; Navis, Gerjan; Zuurman, Mike W

    2009-11-01

    To test whether the genetic variant CCR5Delta32 in the CC-chemokine receptor 5, which is known to lead to CCR5 deficiency, is associated with mortality in type 2 diabetes patients. We examined the effect of presence or absence of the CCR5Delta32 on overall and cardiovascular mortality risk in the Zwolle Outpatient Diabetes project Integrating Available Care (ZODIAC) cohort, a type 2 diabetes patient cohort. We studied 756 patients with a mean duration of follow-up of 5.4 (+/- 1.4) years. 194 patients died during follow up of which 83 were cardiovascular deaths. 144 subjects (19%) carried the CCR5Delta32 deletion. CCR5Delta32 carriers had an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.62 (95%CI: 0.40-0.96; p=0.03) for all-cause mortality and 0.63 (95%CI: 0.33-1.19; p=0.16) for cardiovascular mortality. The presence of CCR5Delta32 is associated with better survival in type 2 diabetes patients. These data suggest that it is worthwhile to explore the protective potential of pharmacological blockade of CCR5 in type 2 diabetic patients.

  7. Immune Subversion by Mycobacterium tuberculosis through CCR5 Mediated Signaling: Involvement of IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Das, Shibali; Banerjee, Sayantan; Majumder, Saikat; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Goswami, Avranil; Halder, Kuntal; Chakraborty, Urmita; Pal, Nishith K.; Majumdar, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is characterized by severe immunosuppression of the host macrophages, resulting in the loss of the host protective immune responses. During Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, the pathogen modulates C-C Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5) to enhance IL-10 production, indicating the possible involvement of CCR5 in regulation of the host immune response. Here, we found that Mycobacterium infection significantly increased CCR5 expression in macrophages there by facilitating the activation of its downstream signaling. These events culminated in up-regulation of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 production, which was further associated with the down-regulation of macrophage MHC-II expression along with the up-regulation of CCR5 expression via engagement of STAT-3 in a positive feedback loop. Treatment of macrophages with CCR5 specific siRNA abrogated the IL-10 production and restored MHCII expression. While, in vivo CCR5 silencing was also effective for the restoration of host immune responses against tuberculosis. This study demonstrated that CCR5 played a very critical role for the immune subversion mechanism employed by the pathogen. PMID:24695099

  8. Critical roles of chemokine receptor CCR5 in regulating glioblastoma proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lanfu; Wang, Yuan; Xue, Yafei; Lv, Wenhai; Zhang, Yufu; He, Shiming

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent malignant primary brain tumor in adults and exhibits a spectrum of aberrantly aggressive phenotype. Tumor cell proliferation and invasion are critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Recent studies have shown that the chemokine CCL5 and its receptor CCR5 play important roles in tumor invasion and metastasis. Nonetheless, the roles of the CCR5 in GBM still remain unclear. The present study provides the evidence that the chemokine receptor CCR5 is highly expressed and associated with poor prognosis in human GBM. Mechanistically, CCL5-CCR5 mediates activation of Akt, and subsequently induces proliferation and invasive responses in U87 and U251 cells. Moreover, down-regulation of CCR5 significantly inhibited the growth of glioma in U87 tumor xenograft mouse model. Finally, high CCR5 expression in GBM is correlated with increased p-Akt expression in patient samples. Together, these findings suggest that the CCR5 is a critical molecular event associated with gliomagenesis.

  9. CCR5 Δ 32 mutation is not prevalent in Iranians with chronic HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Khorramdelazad, Hossein; Hakimizadeh, Elham; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Rezayati, Mohammadtaghi; Sendi, Hossein; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi

    2013-06-01

    CCR5 is an important chemokine receptor involved in the recruitment of specific anti-viral immune cells (e.g., NK cells and T cytotoxic cells) to the liver. Previous studies indicated that the Δ 32 mutation in CCR5 gene led to inactivation of CCR5. Several conflicting studies have suggested that this mutation may be associated with either recovery or persistence of HBV infection. The main purpose of this study was to compare the frequency of the Δ 32 mutation within the CCR5 gene in a group of patients infected chronically with HBV with healthy individuals from South-East of Iran. Sixty patients with chronic HBV infection as well as 300 age-, and sex-match healthy individuals were enrolled in this study. Gap-PCR was applied to determine the frequency of CCR5 Δ 32 mutation in both groups. The results demonstrated that none of the patients infected with HBV carried the CCR5 Δ 32 mutation while, 3 (1%) of the healthy individuals were found to be heterozygotic for this mutation. The CCR5 Δ 32 mutation is not a prevalent mutation in either the patients infected chronically with HBV or their health counterparts in the South-East region of Iran. This may be attributed to either different genetic settings of the investigated population or lack of any significant correlation between this mutation and HBV pathogenicity.

  10. The CCR5 deletion mutation fails to protect against multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennetts, B H; Teutsch, S M; Buhler, M M; Heard, R N; Stewart, G J

    1997-11-01

    Recent advances in the understanding and identification of chemokines and their receptors have provided evidence for their consideration as candidate loci with respect to genetic susceptibility/resistance to MS. Increased levels of the chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha, have been demonstrated in the cerebrospinal fluid of both patients with MS and mice with EAE, and anti-MIP-1 alpha antibodies have been shown to prevent EAE. Recently, a common deletion mutation in the gene for the major receptor for MIP-1 alpha, chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has been described. Homozygotes for the mutation fail to express this receptor. Moreover, homozygotes are highly protected against HIV infection this has potential implications for the cell entry of infectious agents in other multifactorial disease where a viral component may be involved. In view of these aspects, a group of 120 unrelated Australian relapsing remitting MS and 168 unrelated control subjects were screened for the CCR5 delta 32 mutation. There was no significant difference in the allele frequency of CCR5 delta 32 gene between the MS patients (0.1125) and the control population (0.0921). The presence of two CCR5 delta 32 homozygotes in the MS patients indicates that the absence of CCR5 is not protective against MS. These data suggest that CCR5 is not an essential component in MS expression, though this may be due to redundancy in the chemokine system where different chemokine receptors may substitute for CCR5 when it is absent.

  11. CCR5 (chemokine receptor-5) DNA-polymorphism influences the severity of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zapico, I; Coto, E; Rodríguez, A; Alvarez, C; Torre, J C; Alvarez, V

    2000-01-01

    Chemokines are critical for the inflammatory process in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The chemokine receptor-5 (CCR5) mediates chemotaxis by CC-chemokines and is expressed by lymphocytes with the Th1 phenotype and monocyte/macrophages. A 32 bp deletion in the CCR5 (CCR5-delta 32 allele) abolishes receptor expression in homozygotes, while CCR5-delta 32 carriers would express less receptor than wild-type homozygotes. This polymorphism is related to the resistance to HIV-1 infection and progression towards AIDS. We hypothesized that the CCR5-delta 32 allele may modulate the severity of disease in RA. A total of 160 RA-patients (71 and 89 with severe and non-severe phenotypes, respectively) and 500 healthy individuals from the same Caucasian population (Asturias, northern Spain) were genotyped. Carriers of the CCR5-delta 32 allele were at a significantly higher frequency (P = 0.012) in non-severe compared to severe patients (17% vs 4%). Our results suggest that the CCR5-delta 32 polymorphism is a genetic marker related to the severity of RA.

  12. CCR5 down-regulates osteoclast function in orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Andrade, I; Taddei, S R A; Garlet, G P; Garlet, T P; Teixeira, A L; Silva, T A; Teixeira, M M

    2009-11-01

    During orthodontic tooth movement, there is local production of chemokines and an influx of leukocytes into the periodontium. CCL5 plays an important role in osteoclast recruitment and activation. This study aimed to investigate whether the CCR5-receptor influences these events and, consequently, orthodontic tooth movement. An orthodontic appliance was placed in wild-type mice (WT) and CCR5-deficient mice (CCR5(-/-)). The expression of mediators involved in bone remodeling was evaluated in periodontal tissues by Real-time PCR. The number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and the expression of cathepsin K, RANKL, and MMP13 were significantly higher in CCR5(-/-). Meanwhile, the expression of two osteoblastic differentiation markers, RUNX2 and osteocalcin, and that of bone resorption regulators, IL-10 and OPG, were lower in CCR5(-/-). Analysis of the data also showed that CCR5(-/-) exhibited a greater amount of tooth movement after 7 days of mechanical loading. The results suggested that CCR5 might be a down-regulator of alveolar bone resorption during orthodontic movement.

  13. CCR5 deletion protects against inflammation-associated mortality in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Muntinghe, Friso L H; Verduijn, Marion; Zuurman, Mike W; Grootendorst, Diana C; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Luttropp, Karin; Nordfors, Louise; Lindholm, Bengt; Brandenburg, Vincent; Schalling, Martin; Stenvinkel, Peter; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W; Krediet, Raymond T; Navis, Gerjan; Dekker, Friedo W

    2009-07-01

    The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for various proinflammatory chemokines, and a deletion variant of the CCR5 gene (CCR5 Delta 32) leads to deficiency of the receptor. We hypothesized that CCR5 Delta 32 modulates inflammation-driven mortality in patients with ESRD. We studied the interaction between CCR5 genotype and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in 603 incident dialysis patients from the multicenter, prospective NEtherlands COoperative Study on the Adequacy of Dialysis (NECOSAD) cohort. CCR5 genotype and hsCRP levels were both available for 413 patients. During 5 yr of follow-up, 170 patients died; 87 from cardiovascular causes. Compared with the reference group of patients who had the wild-type CCR5 genotype and hsCRP 10 mg/L (n = 108) had an increased risk for mortality (HR: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.29 to 2.58). However, those carrying the deletion allele with hsCRP > 10 mg/L (n = 25) had a mortality rate similar to the reference group; this seemingly protective effect of the CCR5 deletion was even more pronounced for cardiovascular mortality. We replicated these findings in an independent Swedish cohort of 302 ESRD patients. In conclusion, the CCR5 Delta 32 polymorphism attenuates the adverse effects of inflammation on overall and cardiovascular mortality in ESRD.

  14. Role of the chemokine receptor CCR5-dependent host defense system in Neospora caninum infections.

    PubMed

    Abe, Chisa; Tanaka, Sachi; Nishimura, Maki; Ihara, Fumiaki; Xuan, Xuenan; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-06

    Neospora caninum, a Toxoplasma gondii-like obligate intracellular parasite, causes abortion in cattle and neurological signs in canines. To understand neosporosis better, studies on host cell migration and host immune responses during the early phase of infection are important. Although the C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) plays a crucial role in immune cell migration, the role played by it in protective immunity against N. caninum is poorly understood. CCR5(-/-) mice were used to investigate their sensitivity levels to N. caninum infection and their ability to activate immune cells against this parasite. Increased mortality and neurological impairment were observed in the N. caninum-infected CCR5(-/-) mice. In comparison with wild-type mice, CCR5(-/-) mice experienced poor migration of dendritic cells and natural killer T cells to the site of infection. Dendritic cells in an in vitro culture from CCR5(-/-) mice could not be activated upon infection with N. caninum. Furthermore, higher levels of IFN-γ and CCL5 expression, which are associated with brain tissue damage, were observed in the brain tissue of CCR5(-/-) mice during the acute phase of the infection, while there was no significant difference in the parasite load between the wild-type and CCR5(-/-) animals. Additionally, a primary microglia culture from CCR5(-/-) mice showed lower levels of IL-6 and IL-12 production against N. caninum parasites. Our findings show that migration and activation of immune cells via CCR5 is required for controlling N. caninum parasites during the early phase of the infection.

  15. A single amino acid change and truncated TM are sufficient for simian immunodeficiency virus to enter cells using CCR5 in a CD4-independent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bonavia, A.; Bullock, B.T.; Gisselman, K.M.; Margulies, B.J.; Clements, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Entry of HIV and SIV into susceptible cells is mediated by CD4 and chemokine receptors, which act as coreceptors. To study cell entry of SIV, we constructed a cell line, xKLuSIV, derived from non-susceptible human K562 cells, that express the firefly luciferase reporter gene under control of a minimal SIV long terminal repeat (LTR). Using these susceptible cells, we studied the entry of a well-characterized molecularly cloned macrophage-tropic SIV. xKLuSIV cells that express rhesus macaque CD4 and/or the rhesus chemokine receptor CCR5 are susceptible to infection with the macrophage-tropic, neurovirulent strain SIV/17E-Fr, but only xKLuSIV cells expressing both CCR5 and CD4 were susceptible to infection by the macrophage-tropic, non-neurovirulent strain SIV/17E-Cl. CCR5-dependent, CD4-independent infection by SIV/17E-Fr was abrogated by pre-incubation of the cells with AOP-RANTES, a ligand for CCR5. In addition to viral entry occurring by a CD4-independent mechanism, neutralization of SIV/17E-Fr with rhesus mAbs from 3 different neutralization groups blocked entry into xKLuSIV cells by both CD4-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Triggering the env glycoprotein of SIV-17EFr with soluble CD4 had no significant effect in infectivity, but triggering of the same glycoprotein of SIV/17E-Cl allowed it to enter cells in a CD4-independent fashion. Using mutant molecular clones, we studied the determinants for CD4 independence, all of which are confined to the env gene. We report here that truncation of the TM at amino acid 764 and changing a single amino acid (R751G) in the SIV envelope transmembrane protein (TM) conferred the observed CD4-independent phenotype. Our data suggest that the envelope from the neurovirulent SIV/17E-Fr interacts with CCR5 in a CD4-independent manner, and changes in the TM protein of this virus are important components that contribute to neurovirulence in SIV. PMID:16061266

  16. Synergistic Combinations of the CCR5 Inhibitor VCH-286 with Other Classes of HIV-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Asin-Milan, Odalis; Sylla, Mohamed; El-Far, Mohamed; Belanger-Jasmin, Geneviève; Haidara, Alpha; Blackburn, Julie; Chamberland, Annie

    2014-01-01

    Here, we evaluated the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of the experimental CCR5 inhibitor VCH-286 as a single agent or in combination with various classes of HIV-1 inhibitors. Although VCH-286 used alone had highly inhibitory activity, paired combinations with different drug classes led to synergistic or additive interactions. However, combinations with other CCR5 inhibitors led to effects ranging from synergy to antagonism. We suggest that caution should be exercised when combining CCR5 inhibitors in vivo. PMID:25267674

  17. TROCAI (Tropism Coreceptor Assay Information): a New Phenotypic Tropism Test and Its Correlation with Trofile Enhanced Sensitivity and Genotypic Approaches▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Serna, Alejandro; Leal, Manuel; Genebat, Miguel; Abad, Maria Antonia; Garcia-Perganeda, Antonio; Ferrando-Martinez, Sara; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel

    2010-01-01

    The only clinically validated assay available to determine HIV tropism is Trofile, an assay that possesses some limitations. Our first aim was to develop a new phenotypic tropism test (TROCAI [tropism coreceptor assay information]) and to categorize results generated by this test according to the virological response to a short-term exposure to the CCR5 receptor antagonist maraviroc (maraviroc clinical test). Our second aim was to compare TROCAI results to those obtained by Trofile enhanced sensitivity (ES) and to different genotypic algorithms. TROCAI assayed HIV tropism in 33 HIV-infected patient viral isolates obtained from a modified coculture, followed by multiple infection cycles of indicator cells. TROCAI obtained a reportable result in all patients with viral loads of >500 HIV RNA copies/ml and in 3/6 patients with <500 HIV RNA copies/ml (30/33 patients, 91.9%). Patients who responded to maraviroc had an X4-using virus proportion in indicator cell supernatant of 0 to 0.41%. Hence, we used the threshold of 0.5% to categorize TROCAI results as R5 (<0.5%) or dual/mixed (>0.5%). The concordance between TROCAI and Trofile (ES) was 22/24 (91.6%), and with genotypic approaches it was 22/26 (84.6%). TROCAI results, which were categorized in this study by the maraviroc clinical test, could be used as a test in addition to those currently used to select patients for treatment with CCR5 antagonists. PMID:20943871

  18. Distribution of the CCR5 gene 32-basepair deletion in 11 Chinese populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunyu; Fu, Songbin; Xue, Yali; Wang, Qi; Huang, Xiaoyi; Wang, Baiqiu; Liu, An; Ma, Linlin; Yu, Yang; Shi, Rongqian; Lv, Fuqu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Wenhong; Ai, Qionghua; Xu, Fang; Huang, Chengbin; Chen, Baibin; Kang, Xianghua; Sun, Yanyang; Zhang, Guiyin; Li, Pu

    2002-09-01

    A mutant allele of the chemokine receptor gene CCR5 bearing a 32-basepair deletion (delta 32CCR5) could increase the resistance to HIV-1 infection or delayed progression to AIDS. The frequency of this mutation is higher in Europeans than in Asians. To investigate the distribution of this polymorphism in China, 715 individuals from 11 Chinese populations were screened by PCR, including the Han and 10 other ethnic groups. The delta 32CCR5 gene was found in 16 individuals from 5 ethnic groups. All of them were heterozygous. The frequency of the mutant alleles of delta 32CCR5 is low in China and reflects (or might reflect) ancestral gene flow from Europe to Chinese ethnic groups and recent intermarriage within the ethnic groups.

  19. Delta 32 deletion of CCR5 gene and association with asthma or atopy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, T J; Walley, A J; Pease, J E; Venables, P J; Wiltshire, S; Williams, T J; Cookson, W O

    2000-10-28

    The CCR5-delta32 deletion polymorphism (CCR5-delta32) was investigated for linkage and association to asthma and atopy using two panels of nuclear families containing 1284 individuals. No statistically significant linkage to asthma/wheeze or atopy was observed in either of the two panels of families. Multiallelic transmission disequilibrium tests (TDT) of the combined data found no significant association for atopy (52 independent alleles transmitted, 51 non-transmitted) or asthma/wheeze (39 transmitted, 44 non-transmitted). Although functional evidence might suggest that CCR5 is a good candidate gene for atopic asthma, this study provides no genetic evidence from CCR5-delta32 polymorphism to support this hypothesis.

  20. CCR5 as a potential target in cancer therapy: inhibition or stimulation?

    PubMed

    González-Martin, Alicia; Mira, Emilia; Mañes, Santos

    2012-11-01

    Extensive evidence implicates CCR5 and its ligands in the biology of tumors, although there is considerable controversy regarding the role of this chemokine receptor in cancer progression. The discrepancies between the pro- and anti-tumor effects of CCR5 might derive from its expression by cell types with opposing functions in tumor progression and the context in which tumors originate. We propose that CCR5 is necessary for optimal activation of the adaptive immune response to tumors, and for the success of certain immunotherapeutic strategies. Since efficient activation of T cell responses has broad implications in the success of some chemoand radiotherapy protocols, activation of CCR5, rather than its inhibition, might provide new therapeutic opportunities for cancer treatment.

  1. Analysis of the CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) delta-32 polymorphism in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rector, A; Vermeire, S; Thoelen, I; Keyaerts, E; Struyf, F; Vlietinck, R; Rutgeerts, P; Van Ranst, M

    2001-03-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are complex multifactorial traits involving both environmental and genetic factors. Recent studies have shown the important role of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including RANTES, in IBD. RANTES is the natural ligand for the CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5). The chromosomal location of the CCR5 gene on 3p21 coincides with an IBD-susceptibility locus identified by genome-wide scanning. A 32-bp deletion (A32) in the CCR5 gene results in a nonfunctional receptor and is found with high frequency in Caucasians. In this study, we investigated the presence of the CCR5delta32 allele in a large cohort of IBD patients and in a healthy control population. Blood samples were obtained from 538 unselected IBD cases (433 unrelated IBD patients: 289 CD, 142 UC, 2 indeterminate colitis; 105 affected first-degree relatives) and 135 unaffected first-degree family members. Of the IBD patients, 36% had familial IBD with at least two members being affected. There were no significant differences in the CCR5delta32 mutation frequency between IBD patients and healthy controls, nor between CD and UC patients. There was no correlation between the CCR5delta32 genotype and the age at IBD-diagnosis, the frequency of surgical intervention, or disease localization. Only the association between CCR5delta32 homozygosity and the presence of anal lesions in CD patients was statistically significant (P=0.007). Analysis by the transmission/disequilibrium test showed no significant transmission distortion to the probands or their clinically silent siblings. Based on these results, it is unlikely that the CCR5delta32 allele is an important marker for predisposition to IBD.

  2. Ccr5 deficiency regulates the proliferation and trafficking of natural killer cells under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ido D; Shoham, Hadas; Wald, Ori; Wald, Hanna; Beider, Katia; Abraham, Michal; Barashi, Neta; Galun, Eithan; Nagler, Arnon; Peled, Amnon

    2011-06-01

    Chemokines were shown to govern the trafficking of immune cells and may also play important roles in the survival and activation of these cells. We report here that under physiological conditions, the bone marrow (BM), spleen, blood and liver of Ccr5, but not of Ccr1-deficient mice, contain reduced numbers of NK cells. NK cells in the BM of Ccr5-deficient mice proliferate to a lesser extent compared to WT mice. Furthermore, spleen NK cells derived from Ccr5-deficient mice that were transplanted into irradiated recipients failed to proliferate in the host. Ccr5, but not Ccr1-deficient NK cells, failed to migrate in vitro in response to RANTES and MIP-1β but not MIP-1β or SDF-1 and had reduced activation, lower expression levels of NK cell markers and a slightly reduced capacity to adhere to target cells and stimulate their killing. Using the polyI:C mouse model for NK trafficking, we found that in the absence of Ccr5, but not Ccr1, NK cells failed to accumulate in the liver. In contrast, using the influenza viral infection as a model to evaluate NK cell proliferation, we found that Ccr5-deficient NK cells in the BM had a higher proliferation rate than WT NK cells. These results suggest a role for Ccr5 in NK cell proliferation and circulation under physiological conditions and a complex role for Ccr5 in determining the fate of NK cells under pathological conditions. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Effect of female genital schistosomiasis and anti-schistosomal treatment on monocytes, CD4+ T-cells and CCR5 expression in the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Kleppa, Elisabeth; Ramsuran, Veron; Zulu, Siphosenkosi; Karlsen, Gunn Hege; Bere, Alfred; Passmore, Jo-Ann S; Ndhlovu, Patricia; Lillebø, Kristine; Holmen, Sigve D; Onsrud, Mathias; Gundersen, Svein Gunnar; Taylor, Myra; Kjetland, Eyrun F; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2014-01-01

    Schistosoma haematobium is a waterborne parasite that may cause female genital schistosomiasis (FGS), characterized by genital mucosal lesions. There is clinical and epidemiological evidence for a relationship between FGS and HIV. We investigated the impact of FGS on HIV target cell density and expression of the HIV co-receptor CCR5 in blood and cervical cytobrush samples. Furthermore we evaluated the effect of anti-schistosomal treatment on these cell populations. The study followed a case-control design with post treatment follow-up, nested in an on-going field study on FGS. Blood and cervical cytobrush samples were collected from FGS negative and positive women for flow cytometry analyses. Urine samples were investigated for schistosome ova by microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). FGS was associated with a higher frequency of CD14+ cells (monocytes) in blood (11.5% in FGS+ vs. 2.2% in FGS-, p = 0.042). Frequencies of CD4+ cells expressing CCR5 were higher in blood samples from FGS+ than from FGS- women (4.7% vs. 1.5%, p = 0.018). The CD14+ cell population decreased significantly in both compartments after anti-schistosomal treatment (p = 0.043). Although the frequency of CD4+ cells did not change after treatment, frequencies of CCR5 expression by CD4+ cells decreased significantly in both compartments (from 3.4% to 0.5% in blood, p = 0.036; and from 42.4% to 5.6% in genital samples, p = 0.025). The results support the hypothesis that FGS may increase the risk of HIV acquisition, not only through damage of the mucosal epithelial barrier, but also by affecting HIV target cell populations, and that anti-schistosomal treatment can modify this.

  4. Stromal down-regulation of macrophage CD4/CCR5 expression and NF-κB activation mediates HIV-1 non-permissiveness in intestinal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ruizhong; Meng, Gang; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Clapham, Paul R; Grams, Jayleen; Novak, Lea; Kappes, John C; Smythies, Lesley E; Smith, Phillip D

    2011-05-01

    Tissue macrophages are derived exclusively from blood monocytes, which as monocyte-derived macrophages support HIV-1 replication. However, among human tissue macrophages only intestinal macrophages are non-permissive to HIV-1, suggesting that the unique microenvironment in human intestinal mucosa renders lamina propria macrophages non-permissive to HIV-1. We investigated this hypothesis using blood monocytes and intestinal extracellular matrix (stroma)-conditioned media (S-CM) to model the exposure of newly recruited monocytes and resident macrophages to lamina propria stroma, where the cells take up residence in the intestinal mucosa. Exposure of monocytes to S-CM blocked up-regulation of CD4 and CCR5 expression during monocyte differentiation into macrophages and inhibited productive HIV-1 infection in differentiated macrophages. Importantly, exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages simultaneously to S-CM and HIV-1 also inhibited viral replication, and sorted CD4+ intestinal macrophages, a proportion of which expressed CCR5+, did not support HIV-1 replication, indicating that the non-permissiveness to HIV-1 was not due to reduced receptor expression alone. Consistent with this conclusion, S-CM also potently inhibited replication of HIV-1 pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein, which provides CD4/CCR5-independent entry. Neutralization of TGF-β in S-CM and recombinant TGF-β studies showed that stromal TGF-β inhibited macrophage nuclear translocation of NF-κB and HIV-1 replication. Thus, the profound inability of intestinal macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is likely the consequence of microenvironmental down-regulation of macrophage HIV-1 receptor/coreceptor expression and NF-κB activation.

  5. CCR5 Targeted Cell Therapy for HIV and Prevention of Viral Escape

    PubMed Central

    Hütter, Gero; Bodor, Josef; Ledger, Scott; Boyd, Maureen; Millington, Michelle; Tsie, Marlene; Symonds, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-delta 32 (CCR5-d32) homozygous stem cells in an HIV infected individual in 2008, led to a sustained virus control and probably eradication of HIV. Since then there has been a high degree of interest to translate this approach to a wider population. There are two cellular ways to do this. The first one is to use a CCR5 negative cell source e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to copy the initial finding. However, a recent case of a second allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-d32 homozygous stem cells suffered from viral escape of CXCR4 quasi-species. The second way is to knock down CCR5 expression by gene therapy. Currently, there are five promising techniques, three of which are presently being tested clinically. These techniques include zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9), transcription activator-like effectors nuclease (TALEN), short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and a ribozyme. While there are multiple gene therapy strategies being tested, in this review we reflect on our current knowledge of inhibition of CCR5 specifically and whether this approach allows for consequent viral escape. PMID:26225991

  6. CCR5 Targeted Cell Therapy for HIV and Prevention of Viral Escape.

    PubMed

    Hütter, Gero; Bodor, Josef; Ledger, Scott; Boyd, Maureen; Millington, Michelle; Tsie, Marlene; Symonds, Geoff

    2015-07-27

    Allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-delta 32 (CCR5-d32) homozygous stem cells in an HIV infected individual in 2008, led to a sustained virus control and probably eradication of HIV. Since then there has been a high degree of interest to translate this approach to a wider population. There are two cellular ways to do this. The first one is to use a CCR5 negative cell source e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to copy the initial finding. However, a recent case of a second allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-d32 homozygous stem cells suffered from viral escape of CXCR4 quasi-species. The second way is to knock down CCR5 expression by gene therapy. Currently, there are five promising techniques, three of which are presently being tested clinically. These techniques include zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9), transcription activator-like effectors nuclease (TALEN), short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and a ribozyme. While there are multiple gene therapy strategies being tested, in this review we reflect on our current knowledge of inhibition of CCR5 specifically and whether this approach allows for consequent viral escape.

  7. Is the CCR5 Δ 32 mutation associated with immune system-related diseases?

    PubMed

    Ghorban, Khodayar; Dadmanesh, Maryam; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Momeni, Mohammad; Zare-Bidaki, Mohammad; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Kennedy, Derek

    2013-06-01

    Hypersensitivity and autoimmunity are the main features of immune system-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), multiple sclerosis (MS), and asthma. It has been established that chemokines play key roles in the activation and regulation of immune cell migration which is important in the pathogenesis of the diseases mentioned. CC chemokines receptor 5 or CCR5 is a receptor for RANTES, MIP-1α, and MIP-1β and is expressed by several immune cells including NK cells, T lymphocytes, and macrophages. It plays key roles in the regulation of migration and activation of the immune cells during immune responses against microbe and self-antigens during autoimmunity and hypersensitivity disorders. Therefore, any alteration in the sequence of CCR5 gene or in its expression could be associated with immune system-related diseases. Previous studies revealed that a 32-base pair deletion (Δ 32) in exon 1 of the CCR5 gene led to downregulation of the gene. Previous studies demonstrated that not only CCR5 expression was altered in autoimmune and hypersensitivity disorders, but also that the mutation is associated with the diseases. This review addresses the recent information regarding the association of the CCR5 Δ 32 mutation in immune-related diseases including T2D with and without nephropathy, MS, and asthma. Based on the collected data, it seems that the CCR5 Δ 32 mutation can be considered as a risk factor for MS, but not asthma and T2D with and without nephropathy.

  8. Distribution of the CCR5delta32 allele (gene variant CCR5) in Rondônia, Western Amazonian region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Josileide Duarte; Santos, Marlene Guimarães; de França, Andonai Krauze; Delani, Daniel; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Casseb, Almeida Andrade; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Engracia, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Since around 1723, on the occasion of its initial colonization by Europeans, Rondonia has received successive waves of immigrants. This has been further swelled by individuals from northeastern Brazil, who began entering at the beginning of the twentieth century. The ethnic composition varies across the state according to the various sites of settlement of each wave of immigrants. We analyzed the frequency of the CCR5Δ32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in five sample sets from the population. Four were collected in Porto Velho, the state capital and the site of several waves of migration. Of these, two, from the Hospital de Base were comprised of HB Mothers and HB Newborns presenting allele frequencies of 3.5% and 3.1%, respectively, a third from the peri-urban neighborhoods of Candelária/Bate-Estaca (1.8%), whereas a fourth, from the Research Center on Tropical Medicine/CEPEM (0.6%), was composed of malaria patients under treament. The fifth sample (3.4%) came from the inland Quilombola village of Pedras Negras. Two homozygous individuals (CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32) were detected among the HB Mother samples. The frequency of this allele was heterogeneous and higher where the European inflow was more pronounced. The presence of the allele in Pedras Negras revealed European miscegenation in a community largely comprising Quilombolas.

  9. Distribution of the CCR5delta32 allele (gene variant CCR5) in Rondônia, Western Amazonian region, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Farias, Josileide Duarte; Santos, Marlene Guimarães; de França, Andonai Krauze; Delani, Daniel; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Casseb, Almeida Andrade; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Engracia, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Since around 1723, on the occasion of its initial colonization by Europeans, Rondonia has received successive waves of immigrants. This has been further swelled by individuals from northeastern Brazil, who began entering at the beginning of the twentieth century. The ethnic composition varies across the state according to the various sites of settlement of each wave of immigrants. We analyzed the frequency of the CCR5Δ32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in five sample sets from the population. Four were collected in Porto Velho, the state capital and the site of several waves of migration. Of these, two, from the Hospital de Base were comprised of HB Mothers and HB Newborns presenting allele frequencies of 3.5% and 3.1%, respectively, a third from the peri-urban neighborhoods of Candelária/Bate-Estaca (1.8%), whereas a fourth, from the Research Center on Tropical Medicine/CEPEM (0.6%), was composed of malaria patients under treament. The fifth sample (3.4%) came from the inland Quilombola village of Pedras Negras. Two homozygous individuals (CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32) were detected among the HB Mother samples. The frequency of this allele was heterogeneous and higher where the European inflow was more pronounced. The presence of the allele in Pedras Negras revealed European miscegenation in a community largely comprising Quilombolas. PMID:22481870

  10. An aptamer that neutralizes R5 strains of HIV-1 binds to core residues of gp120 in the CCR5 binding site

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Carla; Forzan, Mario; Sproat, Brian; Pantophlet, Ralph; McGowan, Ian; Burton, Dennis; James, William

    2015-01-01

    We have previously isolated nucleic acid ligands (aptamers) that bind the surface envelope glycoprotein, gp120, of HIV-1, and neutralize infection of diverse sub-types of virus. Our earlier studies have identified the overall structure of one of these aptamers, B40, and have indicated that it binds to gp120 in a manner that competes with that of the HIV-1 co-receptor, CCR5, and select “CD4i” antibodies with epitopes overlapping this region. Here, we sought to map the B40 binding site on gp120 more precisely by analysing its interaction with a panel of alanine substitution mutants of gp120. Furthermore, we tested our hypothesis concerning the structure of the 40 nucleotide functional core of the aptamer by the solid-phase synthesis of truncated and chemically modified derivatives. The results confirm our structural predictions and demonstrate that aptamer B40 neutralizes a diverse range of HIV-1 isolates as a result of binding to relatively conserved residues on gp120 at the heart of the CCR5-binding site. These structural insights may provide the basis for the development of potential antiviral agents with high specificity and robustness. PMID:18799178

  11. Distribution of the CCR5 gene 32-basepair deletion in West Europe. A hypothesis about the possible dispersion of the mutation by the Vikings in historical times.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, G

    2001-09-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 constitutes the major coreceptor for the macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. A mutant allele of the CCR5 gene named Delta32 was shown to provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection by HIV. The frequency of the Delta32 allele was collected in 7328 noninfected unrelated individuals from 31 different European populations, and in Cyprus, Turkey, Daghestan, and North-Africa. The Delta32 allele was found in all populations studied, with a mean frequency of about 8.0%. A north to south gradient correlating latitude with Delta32 allelic frequencies was found (r = 0.795, p < 10(-9)), with highest allele frequencies in Nordic countries. We hypothesized that the Delta32 allele was disseminated in Europe by the Vikings during the eighth to the tenth centuries, because the most elevated values of this variant are actually found in their actual populations, and because they raided during the corresponding period in most European countries.

  12. Low-cost simultaneous detection of CCR5-delta32 and HLA-B*5701 alleles in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients by selective multiplex endpoint PCR.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Andrea; Meini, Genny; Materazzi, Angelo; Vicenti, Ilaria; Saladini, Francesco; Zazzi, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Host genetic traits impact susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, disease progression as well as antiretroviral drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Remarkable examples include a 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 coreceptor molecule (CCR5-delta32) impairing attachment of monocytotropic HIV-1 to the host cell membrane and the HLA-B*5701 allele, strongly associated with a potentially fatal hypersensitivity reaction triggered by abacavir, a nucleoside inhibitor of HIV reverse transcriptase. We developed a simple selective multiplex endpoint PCR method for simultaneous analysis of both genetic traits. Two primers were designed for amplification of a region surrounding the CCR5 32-bp deletion site. One common forward primer and two reverse primers with different 3' termini targeting the HLA-B*570101 and HLA-B*570102 alleles were designed for HLA-B*5701 analysis. A panel of 110 reference DNA samples typed in the HLA-B locus was used for development and blind validation of the assay. All the 45 HLA-B*5701 positive and the 55 HLA-B*5701 negative samples were correctly identified. The CCR5-delta32 allele was readily detected in 7 samples and did not interfere with detection of HLA-B*5701 while providing an internal amplification control. Multiplex PCR products were easily identified in agarose gels with no background noise. This simple and low-cost end-point selective multiplex PCR can conveniently screen HIV patients for the protective CCR5-delta32 allele and the risk of developing abacavir hypersensitivity reaction.

  13. CCR5 Polymorphism as a Protective Factor for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Hepatitis B Virus-Infected Iranian Patients

    PubMed

    Abdolmohammadi, Reza; Shahbazi Azar, Saleh; Khosravi, Ayyoob; Shahbazi, Majid

    2016-10-01

    The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) delta 32 allele results in a nonfunctional form of the chemokine receptor and has been implicated in a variety of immune-mediated diseases. CCR5Δ32 may also predispose one to chronic liver disease or be linked with resistance to HBV infection.This study was undertaken to investigate any association between CCR5 polymorphism with resistance to hepatitis B or susceptibility to HBV infection. A total of 812 Iranian individuals were enrolled into two groups: HBV infected cases (n=357), who were HBsAg-positive, and healthy controls (n=455). We assessed polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene using specific CCR5 oligonucleotide primers surrounding the breakpoint deletion. Genotype distributions of the HBV infected cases and healthy controls were determined and compared. The CCR5/CCR5 (WW) and CCR5/ CCR5Δ32 (W/D) genotypes were found in (98%) and (2%) of HBV infected cases, respectively. The CCR5 Δ32/ Δ32genotype was not found in HBV infected cases. Genotype distributions of CCR5 in healthy controls were W/W genotype in (87.3%), W/D genotype in (11.2%) and D/D genotype in (1.5%). Heterozygosity for CCR5/ CCR5Δ32 (W/D) in healthy controls was greater than in HBV infected cases (11.2% vs 2%, p < 0.001). W/D and D/D genotypes were more prominent in healthy controls than in HBV infected cases. This study provides evidence that the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism may have a protective effect in resistance to HBV infection at least in the Iranian population.

  14. CCR5 Polymorphism as a Protective Factor for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Hepatitis B Virus-Infected Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdolmohammadi, Reza; Azar, Saleh Shahbazi; Khosravi, Ayyoob; Shahbazi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) delta 32 allele results in a nonfunctional form of the chemokine receptor and has been implicated in a variety of immune-mediated diseases. CCR5Δ32 may also predispose one to chronic liver disease or be linked with resistance to HBV infection. This study was undertaken to investigate any association between CCR5 polymorphism with resistance to hepatitis B or susceptibility to HBV infection. A total of 812 Iranian individuals were enrolled into two groups: HBV infected cases (n=357), who were HBsAg-positive, and healthy controls (n=455). We assessed polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene using specific CCR5 oligonucleotide primers surrounding the breakpoint deletion. Genotype distributions of the HBV infected cases and healthy controls were determined and compared. The CCR5/CCR5 (WW) and CCR5/CCR5Δ32 (W/D) genotypes were found in (98%) and (2%) of HBV infected cases, respectively. The CCR5 Δ32/Δ32genotype was not found in HBV infected cases. Genotype distributions of CCR5 in healthy controls were W/W genotype in (87.3%), W/D genotype in (11.2%) and D/D genotype in (1.5%). Heterozygosity for CCR5/CCR5Δ32 (W/D) in healthy controls was greater than in HBV infected cases (11.2% vs 2%, p < 0.001). W/D and D/D genotypes were more prominent in healthy controls than in HBV infected cases. This study provides evidence that the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism may have a protective effect in resistance to HBV infection at least in the Iranian population. PMID:27892677

  15. Reanalysis of Coreceptor Tropism in HIV-1–Infected Adults Using a Phenotypic Assay with Enhanced Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Mathew Bidwell; Leduc, Robert; Skowron, Gail; Su, Zhaohui; Chan, Ellen S.; Heera, Jayyant; Chapman, Doug; Spritzler, John; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Gulick, Roy M.; Coakley, Eoin

    2011-01-01

    The enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay (TF-ES; Monogram Biosciences) was used to retest coreceptor tropism samples from 4 different cohorts of HIV-1–infected patients. Nine percent to 26% of patients with CCR5-tropic virus by the original Trofile assay had CXCR4-using virus by TF-ES. Lower CD4 cell counts were associated with CXCR4-using virus in all cohorts. PMID:21427401

  16. Establishment of mouse leukemia cell lines expressing human CD4/CCR5 using lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Jing; ZhuGe, Fu-Yan; Zeng, Chang-Chun; He, Jin-Yang; Tan, Ning; Liang, Juan

    2017-04-01

    A low-cost rodent model of HIV infection and which presents high application value is an effective tool to investigate HIV infection and pathogenesis. However, development of such a small animal model has been hampered by the unsuitability of rodent cells for HIV-1 replication given that the retrovirus HIV-1 has high selectivity to its host cell. Our study used the mouse leukemia cell lines L615 and L1210 that were induced by murine leukemia virus and transfected with hCD4/CCR5 loaded-lentiviral vector. Lentiviral vectors containing the genes hCD4/CCR5 under the transcriptional control of cytomegalovirus promoter were designed. Transfection efficiencies of human CD4 and CCR5 in L615 and L1210 cells were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot assay. Results showed that hCD4 and CCR5 proteins were expressed on the cell surface, demonstrating that the L615 and L1210 cells were humanized and that they possess the characteristics necessary for HIV infection of human host cells. Moreover, the sensitivity of human CD4/CCR5 transgenic mouse cells to HIV infection was confirmed by RT-PCR and ELISA. Mouse leukemia cell lines that could express hCD4 and CCR5 were thus established to facilitate normal entry of HIV-1 so that a human CD4/CCR5 transgenic mice cell model can be used to investigate the transmission and pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS and potential antiviral drugs against this disease.

  17. A simple structure-based model for the prediction of HIV-1 co-receptor tropism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 enters host cells through interaction of its V3 loop (which is part of the gp120 protein) with the host cell receptor CD4 and one of two co-receptors, namely CCR5 or CXCR4. Entry inhibitors binding the CCR5 co-receptor can prevent viral entry. As these drugs are only available for CCR5-using viruses, accurate prediction of this so-called co-receptor tropism is important in order to ensure an effective personalized therapy. With the development of next-generation sequencing technologies, it is now possible to sequence representative subpopulations of the viral quasispecies. Results Here we present T-CUP 2.0, a model for predicting co-receptor tropism. Based on our recently published T-CUP model, we developed a more accurate and even faster solution. Similarly to its predecessor, T-CUP 2.0 models co-receptor tropism using information of the electrostatic potential and hydrophobicity of V3-loops. However, extracting this information from a simplified structural vacuum-model leads to more accurate and faster predictions. The area-under-the-ROC-curve (AUC) achieved with T-CUP 2.0 on the training set is 0.968±0.005 in a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. When applied to an independent dataset, T-CUP 2.0 has an improved prediction accuracy of around 3% when compared to the original T-CUP. Conclusions We found that it is possible to model co-receptor tropism in HIV-1 based on a simplified structure-based model of the V3 loop. In this way, genotypic prediction of co-receptor tropism is very accurate, fast and can be applied to large datasets derived from next-generation sequencing technologies. The reduced complexity of the electrostatic modeling makes T-CUP 2.0 independent from third-party software, making it easy to install and use. PMID:25120583

  18. Polymorphism of CC chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5 in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Herfarth, H; Pollok-Kopp, B; Göke, M; Press, A; Oppermann, M

    2001-06-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestine that is characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration and a predominant Th1 lymphocyte response. We tested the hypothesis that CC chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5 might be important in the regulation of the intestinal immune response in this disease, and we speculated that carriers of a defective 32 base pair deletion mutant of CCR5, CCR5Delta32, which results in a non-functional receptor, might be protected from CD. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) gene frequencies of CCR5Delta32 and of CCR2-641 (replacement of valine-64 by isoleucine in the CCR2 gene) in healthy controls (n=346) and in CD patients (n=235) were determined. In CD patients, subgroup phenotypic analyses were performed according to the Vienna classification. The overall gene frequency of CCR5Delta32 (9.8%) and CCR2-641 (7.6%) in CD patients did not deviate significantly from healthy controls (9.2 and 8.2%, respectively), nor did we observe a significant deviation from the predicted Hardy-Weinberg distribution. No significant differences in the CD phenotype classification for the different CCR5 and CCR2 alleles were observed, except for a trend to disease sparing of the upper gastrointestinal tract (carrier frequency 0 versus 19.6%, Delta=1 9.6%, P=0.079) as well as a more stricturing disease behaviour (23.5 versus 16.2%, Delta=7.3%, P=0.136) in carriers of the mutant CCR5Delta32 allele. These results indicate that the different CCR5 but not CCR2 alleles may influence disease behaviour and thereby contribute to the observed heterogeneity of CD. However, the associations observed are limited and await replication in other datasets. CCR2 and CCR5 polymorphisms are unlikely to be important determinants of overall disease susceptibility.

  19. Potent Synergistic Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Effects Using Combinations of the CCR5 Inhibitor Aplaviroc with Other Anti-HIV Drugs▿

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Hirotomo; Steinberg, Seth M.; Koh, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Kenji; Takaoka, Yoshikazu; Tamamura, Hirokazu; Fujii, Nobutaka; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Aplaviroc (AVC), an experimental CCR5 inhibitor, potently blocks in vitro the infection of R5-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (R5-HIV-1) at subnanomolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Although maraviroc is presently clinically available, further studies are required to determine the role of CCR5 inhibitors in combinations with other drugs. Here we determined anti-HIV-1 activity using combinations of AVC with various anti-HIV-1 agents, including four U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, two CCR5 inhibitors (TAK779 and SCH-C) and two CXCR4 inhibitors (AMD3100 and TE14011). Combination effects were defined as synergistic or antagonistic when the activity of drug A combined with B was statistically greater or less, respectively, than the additive effects of drugs A and A combined and drugs B and B combined by using the Combo method, described in this paper, which provides (i) a flexible choice of interaction models and (ii) the use of nonparametric statistical methods. Synergistic effects against R5-HIV-1Ba-L and a 50:50 mixture of R5-HIV-1Ba-L and X4-HIV-1ERS104pre (HIV-1Ba-L/104pre) were seen when AVC was combined with zidovudine, nevirapine, indinavir, or enfuvirtide. Mild synergism and additivity were observed when AVC was combined with TAK779 and SCH-C, respectively. We also observed more potent synergism against HIV-1Ba-L/104pre when AVC was combined with AMD3100 or TE14011. The data demonstrate a tendency toward greater synergism with AVC plus either of the two CXCR4 inhibitors compared to the synergism obtained with combinations of AVC and other drugs, suggesting that the development of effective CXCR4 inhibitors may be important for increasing the efficacies of CCR5 inhibitors. PMID:18378711

  20. CCR5 polymorphism and plague resistance in natural populations of the black rat in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Tollenaere, C; Rahalison, L; Ranjalahy, M; Rahelinirina, S; Duplantier, J-M; Brouat, C

    2008-12-01

    Madagascar remains one of the world's largest plague foci. The black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague in rural areas. This species is highly susceptible to plague in plague-free areas (low-altitude regions), whereas rats from the plague focus areas (central highlands) have evolved a disease-resistance polymorphism. We used the candidate gene CCR5 to investigate the genetic basis of plague resistance in R. rattus. We found a unique non-synonymous substitution (H184R) in a functionally important region of the gene. We then compared (i) CCR5 genotypes of dying and surviving plague-challenged rats and (ii) CCR5 allelic frequencies in plague focus and plague-free populations. Our results suggested a higher prevalence of the substitution in resistant animals compared to susceptible individuals, and a tendency for higher frequencies in plague focus areas compared to plague-free areas. Therefore, the CCR5 polymorphism may be involved in Malagasy black rat plague resistance. CCR5 and other undetermined plague resistance markers may provide useful biological information about host evolution and disease dynamics.

  1. Distribution of the HIV resistance CCR5-Delta32 allele among Egyptians and Syrians.

    PubMed

    Salem, Abdel-Halim; Batzer, Mark A

    2007-03-01

    A mutant allele of the beta-chemokine receptor gene CCR5 bearing a 32-basepair (bp) deletion that prevents cell invasion by the primary transmitting strain of HIV-1 has recently been characterized. Individuals homozygous for the mutation are resistant to infection, even after repeated high-risk exposure, but this resistance appears not absolute, as isolated cases of HIV-positive deletion homozygotes are emerging. The consequence of the heterozygous state is not clear, but it may delay the progression to AIDS in infected individuals. In order to evaluate the frequency distribution of CCR5-Delta32 polymorphism among Egyptians, a total of 200 individuals (154 from Ismailia and 46 from Sinai) were tested. Only two heterozygous individuals from Ismailia carried the CCR5-Delta32 allele (0.6%), and no homozygous (Delta32/Delta32) individuals were detected among the tested samples. The presence of the CCR5-Delta32 allele among Egyptians may be attributed to the admixture with people of European descent. Thus we conclude that the protective deletion CCR5-Delta32 is largely absent in the Egyptian population.

  2. CCR5 deficiency predisposes to fatal outcome in influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Falcon, A; Cuevas, M T; Rodriguez-Frandsen, A; Reyes, N; Pozo, F; Moreno, S; Ledesma, J; Martínez-Alarcón, J; Nieto, A; Casas, I

    2015-08-01

    Influenza epidemics affect all age groups, although children, the elderly and those with underlying medical conditions are the most severely affected. Whereas co-morbidities are present in 50% of fatal cases, 25-50% of deaths are in apparently healthy individuals. This suggests underlying genetic determinants that govern infection severity. Although some viral factors that contribute to influenza disease are known, the role of host genetic factors remains undetermined. Data for small cohorts of influenza-infected patients are contradictory regarding the potential role of chemokine receptor 5 deficiency (CCR5-Δ32 mutation, a 32 bp deletion in the CCR5 gene) in the outcome of influenza virus infection. We tested 171 respiratory samples from influenza patients (2009 pandemic) for CCR5-Δ32 and evaluated its correlation with patient mortality. CCR5-Δ32 patients (17.4%) showed a higher mortality rate than WT individuals (4.7%; P = 0.021), which indicates that CCR5-Δ32 patients are at higher risk than the normal population of a fatal outcome in influenza infection.

  3. Genotypes of CCR2 and CCR5 chemokine receptors in human myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Gharizadeh, Baback; Hjelmström, Peter; Pirskanen, Ritva; Nyrén, Pål; Lefvert, Ann-Kari; Ghaderi, Mehran

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association of human autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG) with two DNA polymorphisms of the chemokine receptors CCR5-Delta 32 and CCR2-64I. CCR2 and CCR5 interact primarily with the human CC family ligands CCL2 (formerly called monocyte chemoattractant protein; MCP-1), CCL3 and CCL4 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha and -1 beta; MIP-1 alpha/beta), and their main function is to recruit leukocytes from circulation into the tissues, thus playing an important role in human inflammatory disorders. A PCR-based genotyping method was used to determine the genetic variation at the CCR5 gene and an automated real-time Pyrosequencing technology was employed for the analysis of G right curved arrow A point mutation at the CCR2 gene. Results obtained from 158 patients and 272 healthy controls demonstrate no evidence of association between genetic variants of CCR2 and CCR5 with MG and its clinical manifestations. CCR2-64I and CCR5-Delta 32 genotypes are thus unlikely to be involved in protection or predisposition to MG.

  4. Prevalence of mutant CCR5 allele in Slovenian HIV-1-infected and non-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Poljak, M; Tomazic, J; Seme, K; Maticic, M; Vidmar, L

    1998-02-01

    A 32 bp deletion in the CCR5 gene designated CCR5 delta 32 has been identified recently as the cellular basis for resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in some individuals which remained non-infected despite a repeated exposure to this virus. The prevalence of this deletion was examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on 51 HIV-1-infected and 385 non-infected individuals from all parts of Slovenia. 84.4% of the the HIV-1-infected and 83.2% of the non-infected individuals were homozygous for wild type CCR5, and 19.6% and 16.3%, respectively, were heterozygous. No homozygous mutant genotype was observed among the HIV-1-infected patients. Of the non-infected individuals, 2 women (0.5%) were found to harbour the CCR5 delta 32/CCR5 delta 32 genotype only, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest prevalence of this particular genotype found among Caucasians to date.

  5. Genetic polymorphism of chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5 in Swedish cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Biying; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gharizadeh, Baback; Sadat, Mehdi; Gambelunghe, Giovanni; Hallmans, Göran; Dillner, Joakim; Wallin, Keng-Ling; Ghaderi, Mehran

    2006-01-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that orchestrate leukocyte trafficking in tissues, thus, playing an important role in regulation of immunological processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer with two DNA polymorphisms of the chemokine receptors CCR5-delta32 and CCR2-64I. The study material consisted of 50 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) cases and 50 of age and sampling-date matched controls, 100 invasive cervix cancer cases and 100 of their corresponding matched disease-free controls. Pyrosequencing was employed to genotype the CCR2-64I polymorphism. CCR5-delta32 was genotyped using standard PCR fragment length analysis. The frequencies of CCR2 and CCR5 genotypes from 150 patients and 150 healthy controls were representative of the general population according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium analysis. Risk association was computed with conditional logistic regression analysis. HPV-positive individuals with the rare CCR5deelta32/delta32 genotype have a risk of 4.58 (CI = 0.40-52.64, p-value = 0.045) compare to HPV negative group. The delta-32 mutation on the CCR locus is imperceptibly associated with increased risk of HPV infection. In total, cervical neoplasia was not associated with genetic polymorphism of CCR2 and CCR5.

  6. Anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 augments monocyte chemotaxis towards CCR5 chemokines.

    PubMed

    Madera, Laurence; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-08-28

    Innate defense regulator (IDR) peptides are a class of immunomodulators which enhance and modulate host innate immune responses against microbial pathogens. While IDR-mediated protection against a range of bacterial pathogens is dependent on enhanced monocyte recruitment to the site of infection, the mechanisms through which they increase monocyte trafficking remain unclear. In this study, anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 was shown to enhance monocyte chemotaxis towards chemokines CCL3 and CCL5. This enhancement correlated with the selective upregulation of CCR5 surface expression by peptide-treated monocytes. It was found that IDR-1002 enhancement of monocyte chemotaxis was fully dependent on CCR5 function. Furthermore, IDR-1002 enhanced chemokine-induced monocyte p38 MAPK phosphorylation in a CCR5-dependent fashion. Overall, these results indicate that peptide IDR-1002 can selectively influence monocyte recruitment by host chemokines through the regulation of chemokine receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Frequency of the CCR5-delta 32 chemokine receptor gene mutation in the Lebanese population.

    PubMed

    Karam, W; Jurjus, R; Khoury, N; Khansa, H; Assad, C; Zalloua, P; Jurjus, A

    2004-01-01

    A direct correlation between HIV infection and mutation in the chemokine receptor (CCR5) gene has been established. However, such correlation has never been investigated in Lebanon. We report the frequency of the CCR5-delta 32 mutation in a random sample of 209 healthy, HIV-1 seronegative Lebanese aged 19-68. Overall, 4.8% were heterozygous for the mutation. Homozygosity was absent from our sample. The frequency for the CCR5-delta 32 allele was 2.5%. Distribution of the mutation was unaffected by sex, age, religion or educational level. The frequency in the Lebanese population is consistent with that in the origin of the mutation in northern Europe. This could be attributed to a gene flow into the Middle East from northern Europe.

  8. CCR5 chemokine receptor genotype frequencies among Puerto Rican HIV-1-seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, S; Tirado, G; Revuelta, G; Yamamura, Y; Lu, Y; Nerurkar, V R; Yanagihara, R

    1998-01-01

    Some individuals remain uninfected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), despite multiple sexual contacts with subjects with confirmed HIV-1 infection. Several studies have confirmed that individuals who are homozygous for a 32 base pair (bp) deletion mutation in the chemokine receptor gene CCR5, designated as delta 32/ delta 32, are protected against HIV-1 infection. Heterozygotes of the same chemokine receptor deletion mutation are, however, not protected from acquiring HIV-1 infection but seemingly have slower progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndromes (AIDS). Genotype frequencies of the delta 32 CCR5 mutation vary markedly among different ethnic groups; heterozygosity is found in approximately 15% of Caucasians, about 5-7% of Hispanics and African Americans and 1% or less of Asians. The ethnic background of Puerto Ricans is highly complex and usually includes admixture of Caucasian, Caribbean Indian and African traits to a varying extent. This study was conducted to examine the frequencies of the delta 32 CCR5 mutation among Puerto Ricans who are infected with HIV-1. Samples were received from different geographical regions of the island. Of 377 samples tested, 94.2% were wild type (non-deletion mutant) homozygotes, 5.8% were delta 32 CCR5 heterozygotes, and none were delta 32 CCR5 homozygotes. The incidence of CCR5 delta 32/w heterozygous mutation among Puerto Ricans seems to be somewhat lower than what was reported with US Hispanics. Some age and gender associated bias of the mutation frequency were observed with the study population, the reason for which is unclear at present.

  9. Interfering with CCL5/CCR5 at the Tumor-Stroma Interface.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Bria, Emilio

    2016-04-11

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Halama et al. (2016) further advance chemokine interference as a therapeutic option for cancer by demonstrating the effect of CCR5 blockade in reshaping macrophage polarization toward an anti-tumor functional state in patient-derived tumor models and liver metastases of colorectal cancer patients.

  10. Enhanced CCR5+/CCR3+ T helper cell ratio in patients with active cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Freutel, S; Gaffal, E; Zahn, S; Bieber, T; Tüting, T; Wenzel, J

    2011-10-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is characterized by enhanced interferon α (IFNα) levels in serum and in tissue. Since IFNα promotes a Th1-biased immune response, we hypothesized that a Th1-associated chemokine receptor profile should be a typical finding in patients with active CLE. Therefore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from patients with different CLE subsets (n = 15), healthy controls (n = 13) and patients under immunotherapy with IFNα (n = 7). T helper cells were analysed by flow cytometry for the expression of the chemokines receptor CCR5, indicative for Th1 cells, and of CCR3, indicating Th2. In addition, intracellular levels of the type I IFN-inducible MxA protein were measured. Patients with widespread active CLE skin lesions had a significantly increased expression of CCR5, whereas expression of CCR3 was decreased when compared with healthy controls. MxA expression was significantly enhanced in all investigated CLE subtypes, with the highest levels in patients with widespread skin lesions. The enhanced CCR5/CCR3 ratio closely correlated with the MxA levels in peripheral lymphocytes and with disease activity. Our analyses revealed that active CLE is associated with a systemic type I IFN effect that appears to induce a shift towards a Th1-associated chemokine receptor profile. The CCR5/CCR3 T-helper cell ratio might therefore represent an indirect marker for the disease activity in CLE.

  11. Association analysis of a CCR5 variant with ewe lifetime production.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A deletion in the promoter region of CCR5 associates with a 50% reduction in proviral concentration (log10 env copies/microgram DNA) of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in sheep blood. Because OPP provirus blood concentrations correlate with the degree of histological lesions in affected ti...

  12. Association analysis of a CCR5 variant with ewe lifetime production in 3 breeds of sheep.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A deletion in the promoter region of CCR5 associates with a 50% reduction in proviral concentration (log10 env copies/microgram DNA) of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in blood. Nearly half of all flocks in the U.S. have at least one sheep infected with OPPV. Because OPP provirus concentr...

  13. Absence of Association between CCR5 rs333 Polymorphism and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Perim, Aparecida de Lourdes; Ozawa, Patricia Midori Murobushi; Freire Vitiello, Glauco Akelinghton; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder that originates from one single hematopoietic precursor committed to B- or T-cell lineage. Ordinarily, these cells express CCR5 chemokine receptor, which directs the immune response to a cellular pattern and is involved in cancer pathobiology. The genetic rs333 polymorphism of CCR5 (Δ32), results in a diminished receptor expression, thus leading to impaired cell trafficking. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of CCR5 chemokine receptor rs333 polymorphism in the pathogenesis of ALL. The genotype distribution was studied in 79 patients and compared with 80 control subjects, in a childhood population of Southern Brazil. Genotyping was performed using DNA samples amplified by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). The homozygous (Δ32/Δ32) deletion was not observed in any subject involved in the study. Heterozygous genotype was not associated with ALL risk (OR 0.7%; 95% CI 0.21–2.32; P > 0.05), nor recurrence status of ALL (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.13–5.48; P > 0.05). This work demonstrated, for the first time, no significant differences in the frequency of the CCR5/Δ32 genotype between ALL and control groups, indicating no effect of this genetic variant on the ALL susceptibility and recurrence risk. PMID:24822066

  14. IFN-α-Induced Upregulation of CCR5 Leads to Expanded HIV Tropism In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Cheryl A.; Keir, Mary E.; McCune, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic immune activation and inflammation (e.g., as manifest by production of type I interferons) are major determinants of disease progression in primate lentivirus infections. To investigate the impact of such activation on intrathymic T-cell production, we studied infection of the human thymus implants of SCID-hu Thy/Liv mice with X4 and R5 HIV. X4 HIV was observed to infect CD3−CD4+CD8−CXCR4+CCR5− intrathymic T-cell progenitors (ITTP) and to abrogate thymopoiesis. R5 HIV, by contrast, first established a nonpathogenic infection of thymic macrophages and then, after many weeks, began to replicate in ITTP. We demonstrate here that the tropism of R5 HIV is expanded and pathogenicity enhanced by upregulation of CCR5 on these key T-cell progenitors. Such CCR5 induction was mediated by interferon-α (IFN-α) in both thymic organ cultures and in SCID-hu mice, and antibody neutralization of IFN-α in R5 HIV-infected SCID-hu mice inhibited both CCR5 upregulation and infection of the T-cell progenitors. These observations suggest a mechanism by which IFN-α production may paradoxically expand the tropism of R5 HIV and, in so doing, accelerate disease progression. PMID:20174557

  15. Reanalysis of coreceptor tropism in HIV-1-infected adults using a phenotypic assay with enhanced sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Timothy J; Goetz, Mathew Bidwell; Leduc, Robert; Skowron, Gail; Su, Zhaohui; Chan, Ellen S; Heera, Jayyant; Chapman, Doug; Spritzler, John; Reeves, Jacqueline D; Gulick, Roy M; Coakley, Eoin

    2011-04-01

    The enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay (TF-ES; Monogram Biosciences) was used to retest coreceptor tropism samples from 4 different cohorts of HIV-1-infected patients. Nine percent to 26% of patients with CCR5-tropic virus by the original Trofile assay had CXCR4-using virus by TF-ES. Lower CD4 cell counts were associated with CXCR4-using virus in all cohorts. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.

  16. HIV-1 adaptation to low levels of CCR5 results in V3 and V2 loop changes that increase envelope pathogenicity, CCR5 affinity and decrease susceptibility to Maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Garg, Himanshu; Lee, Raphael T C; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-06-01

    Variability in CCR5 levels in the human population is suggested to affect virus evolution, fitness and the course of HIV disease. We previously demonstrated that cell surface CCR5 levels directly affect HIV Envelope mediated bystander apoptosis. In this study, we attempted to understand HIV evolution in the presence of low levels of CCR5, mimicking the limiting CCR5 levels inherent to the host. HIV-1 adaptation in a T cell line expressing low levels of CCR5 resulted in two specific mutations; N302Y and E172K. The N302Y mutation led to accelerated virus replication, increase in Maraviroc IC50 and an increase in Envelope mediated bystander apoptosis in low CCR5 expressing cells. Analysis of subtype B sequences showed that N302Y is over-represented in CXCR4 tropic viruses in comparison to CCR5 tropic isolates. Considering the variability in CCR5 levels between individuals, our findings have implications for virus evolution, MVC susceptibility as well as HIV pathogenesis.

  17. Differential evolution of a CXCR4-using HIV-1 strain in CCR5wt/wt and CCR5∆32/∆32 hosts revealed by longitudinal deep sequencing and phylogenetic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Le, Anh Q; Taylor, Jeremy; Dong, Winnie; McCloskey, Rosemary; Woods, Conan; Danroth, Ryan; Hayashi, Kanna; Milloy, M-J; Poon, Art F Y; Brumme, Zabrina L

    2015-12-03

    Rare individuals homozygous for a naturally-occurring 32 base pair deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5∆32/∆32) are resistant to infection by CCR5-using ("R5") HIV-1 strains but remain susceptible to less common CXCR4-using ("X4") strains. The evolutionary dynamics of X4 infections however, remain incompletely understood. We identified two individuals, one CCR5wt/wt and one CCR5∆32/∆32, within the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study who were infected with a genetically similar X4 HIV-1 strain. While early-stage plasma viral loads were comparable in the two individuals (~4.5-5 log10 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml), CD4 counts in the CCR5wt/wt individual reached a nadir of <20 CD4 cells/mm(3) within 17 months but remained >250 cells/mm(3) in the CCR5∆32/∆32 individual. Ancestral phylogenetic reconstructions using longitudinal envelope-V3 deep sequences suggested that both individuals were infected by a single transmitted/founder (T/F) X4 virus that differed at only one V3 site (codon 24). While substantial within-host HIV-1 V3 diversification was observed in plasma and PBMC in both individuals, the CCR5wt/wt individual's HIV-1 population gradually reverted from 100% X4 to ~60% R5 over ~4 years whereas the CCR5∆32/∆32 individual's remained consistently X4. Our observations illuminate early dynamics of X4 HIV-1 infections and underscore the influence of CCR5 genotype on HIV-1 V3 evolution.

  18. Differential evolution of a CXCR4-using HIV-1 strain in CCR5wt/wt and CCR5∆32/∆32 hosts revealed by longitudinal deep sequencing and phylogenetic reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anh Q.; Taylor, Jeremy; Dong, Winnie; McCloskey, Rosemary; Woods, Conan; Danroth, Ryan; Hayashi, Kanna; Milloy, M.-J.; Poon, Art F. Y.; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2015-01-01

    Rare individuals homozygous for a naturally-occurring 32 base pair deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5∆32/∆32) are resistant to infection by CCR5-using (“R5”) HIV-1 strains but remain susceptible to less common CXCR4-using (“X4”) strains. The evolutionary dynamics of X4 infections however, remain incompletely understood. We identified two individuals, one CCR5wt/wt and one CCR5∆32/∆32, within the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study who were infected with a genetically similar X4 HIV-1 strain. While early-stage plasma viral loads were comparable in the two individuals (~4.5–5 log10 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml), CD4 counts in the CCR5wt/wt individual reached a nadir of <20 CD4 cells/mm3 within 17 months but remained >250 cells/mm3 in the CCR5∆32/∆32 individual. Ancestral phylogenetic reconstructions using longitudinal envelope-V3 deep sequences suggested that both individuals were infected by a single transmitted/founder (T/F) X4 virus that differed at only one V3 site (codon 24). While substantial within-host HIV-1 V3 diversification was observed in plasma and PBMC in both individuals, the CCR5wt/wt individual’s HIV-1 population gradually reverted from 100% X4 to ~60% R5 over ~4 years whereas the CCR5∆32/∆32 individual’s remained consistently X4. Our observations illuminate early dynamics of X4 HIV-1 infections and underscore the influence of CCR5 genotype on HIV-1 V3 evolution. PMID:26631642

  19. HIV blocking antibodies following immunisation with chimaeric peptides coding a short N-terminal sequence of the CCR5 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chain, Benjamin M.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Gardener, Michelle; Tsang, Jhen; Wright, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is required for cellular entry by many strains of HIV, and provides a potential target for molecules, including antibodies, designed to block HIV transmission. This study investigates a novel approach to stimulate antibodies to CCR5. Rabbits were immunised with chimaeric peptides which encode a short fragment of the N-terminal sequence of CCR5, as well as an unrelated T cell epitope from Tetanus toxoid. Immunisation with these chimaeric peptides generates a strong antibody response which is highly focused on the N-terminal CCR5 sequence. The antibody to the chimaeric peptide containing an N-terminal methionine also recognises the full length CCR5 receptor on the cell surface, albeit at higher concentrations. Further comparison of binding to intact CCR5 with binding to CCR5 peptide suggest that the receptor specific antibody generated represents a very small fragment of the total anti-peptide antibody. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the N-terminal peptide in the context of the intact receptor has a different structure to that of the synthetic peptide. Finally, the antibody was able to block HIV infection of macrophages in vitro. Thus results of this study suggest that N-terminal fragments of CCR5 may provide potential immunogens with which to generate blocking antibodies to this receptor, while avoiding the dangers of including T cell auto-epitopes. PMID:18765264

  20. The chemokine receptor CCR5 deletion mutation is associated with MS in HLA-DR4-positive Russians.

    PubMed

    Favorova, O O; Andreewski, T V; Boiko, A N; Sudomoina, M A; Alekseenkov, A D; Kulakova, O G; Slanova, A V; Gusev, E I

    2002-11-26

    The authors studied the possible association between the presence of a 32-base pair deletion allele in CC chemokine receptor 5 gene [3p21] (CCR5 Delta 32 allele) and the occurrence of MS. The presence of CCR5 Delta 32 homozygotes among patients with MS indicates that the absence of CCR5 did not protect against MS. Moreover, the CCR5 Delta 32 mutation was associated with MS in HLA-DR4-positive Russians (p(corr) < 0.001, odds ratio [OR] = 25.0). The (CCR5 Delta 32,DR4)-positive phenotype was negatively associated with early MS onset (at ages < or = 18 years) (p = 0.0115, OR = 0.1).

  1. Interleukin 10 Increases CCR5 Expression and HIV Infection in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sozzani, Silvano; Ghezzi, Silvia; Iannolo, Gioacchino; Luini, Walter; Borsatti, Alessandro; Polentarutti, Nadia; Sica, Antonio; Locati, Massimo; Mackay, Charles; Wells, Timothy N.C.; Biswas, Priscilla; Vicenzi, Elisa; Poli, Guido; Mantovani, Alberto

    1998-01-01

    The immunosuppressive and antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 10 selectively upregulates the expression of the CC chemokine receptors CCR5, 2, and 1 in human monocytes by prolonging their mRNA half-life. IL-10–stimulated monocytes display an increased number of cell surface receptors for, and better chemotactic responsiveness to, relevant agonists than do control cells. In addition, IL-10–stimulated monocytes are more efficiently infected by HIV BaL. This effect was associated to the enhancement of viral entry through CCR5. These data add support to an emerging paradigm in which pro- and antiinflammatory molecules exert reciprocal and opposing influence on chemokine agonist production and receptor expression. PMID:9449724

  2. Distribution of CCR5-delta 32 gene deletion across the Russian part of Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Yudin, N S; Vinogradov, S V; Potapova, T A; Naykova, T M; Sitnikova, V V; Kulikov, I V; Khasnulin, V I; Konchuk, C; Vloschinskii, P E; Ivanov, S V; Kobzev, V F; Romaschenko, A G; Voevoda, M I

    1998-06-01

    32-bp inactivating deletion in the beta-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) gene, common in Nothern European populations, is associated with reduced HIV-1 transmission risk and delayed disease progression. We have studied the deletion distribution in many populations in Eurasia by polymerase chain reaction analysis of 531 DNA samples representing West and East Siberian, Central Asian, and Far Eastern parts of Russia. An unusually high frequency (11.1%) of the deleted variant in natives of West Siberia, of Finno-Ugrian descent, was observed. Furthermore, the deletion was infrequent in indigenous populations of Central Asia, East Siberia, the Russian Far East, and Canada. We conclude that the delta(ccr5) distribution is limited primarily to Europeans and related western Siberian Finno-Ugrian populations, with a sharp negative gradient toward the east along the territory of Russian Asia.

  3. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies in HIV-infection and -exposure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Natural antibodies constitute a first-line of defence against pathogens; they may also play other roles in immune regulation and homeostasis, through their ability to bind host antigens, surface molecules and receptors. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies can be decisive in preventing HIV infection in mucosal tissues and offer prompt and effective protection just at major sites of virus entry. Among natural anti-CCR5 antibodies, IgG and IgA to the ECL1 domain have been shown to block HIV effectively and durably without causing harm to the host. Their biological properties and their uncommon generation in subsets of HIV-infected and HIV-exposed individuals (so called ESN) will be introduced and discussed, with the aim at exploiting their potential in therapy and prevention. PMID:21284903

  4. CCR5 Blockade Suppresses Melanoma Development Through Inhibition of IL-6-Stat3 Pathway via Upregulation of SOCS3.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiu; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand how tumor cells can escape immune surveillance mechanisms and thus develop antitumor therapies, it is critically important to investigate the mechanisms by which the immune system interacts with the tumor microenvironment. In our current study, we found that chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) neutralization resulted in reduced melanoma tumor size, decreased percentage of CD11b+ Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and increased proportion of cluster of differentiation (CD)3+ T cells in tumor tissues. Suppressive activity of MDSCs on CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cell proliferation is significantly inhibited by anti-CCR5 antibody. CCR5 blockade also suppresses interleukin (IL)-6 induction, which in turn deactivates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in tumors. Furthermore, the suppressed B16 tumor growth induced by CCR5 blockade is abolished with additional administration of recombinant IL-6. CCR5 blockade also induces suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) upregulations, and anti-CCR5 antibody fails to suppress expression of phospho-Stat3 (p-Stat3), matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), and IL-6 in cells transfected with SOCS3 short-interfering RNA (SiRNA). All these data suggest that CCR5 blockade suppresses melanoma development through inhibition of IL-6-Stat3 pathway via upregulation of SOCS3.

  5. Lack of Correlation Between the CCR5-Δ32 Mutation and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Khorramdelazad, Hossein; Mortazavi, Yousef; Momeni, Mohammad; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Khandany, Behjat Kalantary; Moogooei, Mozhgan; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein

    2015-03-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are crucially important in the pathogenesis of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a specific chemokine receptor for CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), CCL4 and CCL5 which all play key roles in identifying cancer properties and localization of leukemia cells. It has been demonstrated that the known mutation in CCR5 gene (CCR5-Δ32) leads to mal-expression of the receptor and affect its function. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of CCR5-Δ32 mutation within Iranian AML patients. In this study, blood samples were obtained from 60 AML patients and 300 healthy controls. The CCR5-Δ32 mutation was evaluated using Gap-PCR technique. Our results showed that CCR5-Δ32 mutation was not found in the patients, while three out of the controls had hetrozygotic form of this mutation. The rest of studied samples had the wild form of the gene. According to these findings, it can probably be concluded that the CCR5-Δ32 is not associated with susceptibility to AML in Iranian patients.

  6. CCL5 and CCR5 Interaction Promotes Cell Motility in Human Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shih-Chia; Wang, Po-Chuan; Ou, Wen-Chieh; Chou, Wen-Yi; Shen, Yung-Shuen; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is characterized by a high malignant and metastatic potential. CCL5 (previously called RANTES) was originally recognized as a product of activated T cells, and plays a crucial role in the migration and metastasis of human cancer cells. It has been reported that the effect of CCL5 is mediated via CCR receptors. However, the effect of CCL5 on migration activity and integrin expression in human osteosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we found that CCL5 increased the migration and expression of αvβ3 integrin in human osteosarcoma cells. Stimulation of cells with CCL5 increased CCR5 but not CCR1 and CCR3 expression. CCR5 mAb, inhibitor, and siRNA reduced the CCL5-enhanced the migration and integrin up-regulation of osteosarcoma cells. Activations of MEK, ERK, and NF-κB pathways after CCL5 treatment were demonstrated, and CCL5-induced expression of integrin and migration activity was inhibited by the specific inhibitor and mutant of MEK, ERK, and NF-κB cascades. In addition, over-expression of CCL5 shRNA inhibited the migratory ability and integrin expression in osteosarcoma cells. Conclusions/Significance CCL5 and CCR5 interaction acts through MEK, ERK, which in turn activates NF-κB, resulting in the activations of αvβ3 integrin and contributing the migration of human osteosarcoma cells. PMID:22506069

  7. Abnormal immune response of CCR5-deficient mice to ocular infection with herpes simplex virus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Daniel J.J.; Ash, John; Lane, Thomas E.; Kuziel, William A.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection elicits a strong inflammatory response that is associated with production of the β chemokines CCL3 and CCL5, which share a common receptor, CCR5. To gain insight into the role of these molecules in ocular immune responses, we infected the corneas of WT and CCR5-deficient (CCR5-/-) mice with HSV-1 and measured inflammatory parameters. In the absence of CCR5, the early infiltration of neutrophils into the cornea was diminished. Associated with this aberrant leukocyte recruitment, neutrophils in CCR5-/- mice were restricted to the stroma whereas in wild type mice these cells trafficked to the stroma and epithelial layers of the infected cornea. Virus titers and cytokine/chemokine levels in the infected tissue of these mice were similar for the first 5 days after infection. However, by day 7 post-infection, the CCR5-/- mice showed a significant elevation in the chemokines CCL2, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10 in the trigeminal ganglion and brain stem as well as a significant increase in viral burden. The increase in chemokine expression was associated with an increase in the infiltration of CD4 and/or CD8 T cells into the trigeminal ganglion and brain stem of CCR5-/- mice. Surprisingly, even though infected CCR5-/- mice were less efficient at controlling the progression of virus replication, there was no difference in mortality. These results suggest that, although CCR5 plays a role in regulating leukocyte trafficking and control of virus burden, compensatory mechanisms are involved in preventing mortality following HSV-1 infection. PMID:16476970

  8. Abnormal immune response of CCR5-deficient mice to ocular infection with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Carr, Daniel J J; Ash, John; Lane, Thomas E; Kuziel, William A

    2006-03-01

    Ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection elicits a strong inflammatory response that is associated with production of the beta chemokines CCL3 and CCL5, which share a common receptor, CCR5. To gain insight into the role of these molecules in ocular immune responses, the corneas of wild-type (WT) and CCR5-deficient (CCR5-/-) mice were infected with HSV-1 and inflammatory parameters were measured. In the absence of CCR5, the early infiltration of neutrophils into the cornea was diminished. Associated with this aberrant leukocyte recruitment, neutrophils in CCR5-/- mice were restricted to the stroma, whereas in WT mice, these cells trafficked to the stroma and epithelial layers of the infected cornea. Virus titres and cytokine/chemokine levels in the infected tissue of these mice were similar for the first 5 days after infection. However, by day 7 post-infection, the CCR5-/- mice showed a significant elevation in the chemokines CCL2, CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10 in the trigeminal ganglion and brainstem, as well as a significant increase in virus burden. The increase in chemokine expression was associated with an increase in the infiltration of CD4 and/or CD8 T cells into the trigeminal ganglion and brainstem of CCR5-/- mice. Surprisingly, even though infected CCR5-/- mice were less efficient at controlling the progression of virus replication, there was no difference in mortality. These results suggest that, although CCR5 plays a role in regulating leukocyte trafficking and control of virus burden, compensatory mechanisms are involved in preventing mortality following HSV-1 infection.

  9. CCR5 Is Involved in Interruption of Pregnancy in Mice Infected with Toxoplasma gondii during Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Maki; Umeda, Kousuke; Suwa, Masayuki; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2017-09-01

    Toxoplasmosis can cause abortion in pregnant humans and other animals; however, the mechanism of abortion remains unknown. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is essential for host defense against Toxoplasma gondii infection. To investigate the relationship between CCR5 and abortion in toxoplasmosis, we inoculated wild-type and CCR5-deficient (CCR5(-/-)) mice with T. gondii tachyzoites intraperitoneally on day 3 of pregnancy (embryonic day 3 [E3]). The pregnancy rate decreased as pregnancy progressed in infected wild-type mice. Histopathologically, no inflammatory lesions were observed in the fetoplacental tissues. Although wild-type mice showed a higher parasite burden at the implantation sites than did CCR5(-/-) mice at E6 (3 days postinfection [dpi]), T. gondii antigen was detected only in the uterine tissue and not in the fetoplacental tissues. At E8 (5 dpi), the embryos in infected wild-type mice showed poor development compared with those of infected CCR5(-/-) mice, and apoptosis was observed in poorly developed embryos. Compared to uninfected mice, infected wild-type mice showed increased CCR5 expression at the implantation site at E6 and E8. Furthermore, analyses of mRNA expression in the uterus of nonpregnant and pregnant mice suggested that a lack of the CCR5 gene and the downregulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and CCL3 expression at E6 (3 dpi) are important factors for the maintenance of pregnancy following T. gondii infection. These results suggested that CCR5 signaling is involved in embryo loss in T. gondii infection during early pregnancy and that apoptosis is associated with embryo loss rather than direct damage to the fetoplacental tissues. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Do human polyoma viruses and human immunodeficiency virus share common co-receptors?

    PubMed

    Borissov, Kalin; Tsekov, Iliya; Gavazova, Rayna; Kalvatchev, Zlatko; Argirova, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Host and/or viral factors involved in human polyomavirus (HPoV) infection in persons living with HIV remain unknown. A hypothesis is outlined suggesting the importance of the co-receptors CCR5, CCR2, and CXCR4 not only for HIV, but also for HPoV. Functionally capable receptors coded by wild-type (wt) genotypes could facilitate internalization of HPoV in the cell resulting in brain and/or kidney infection/s in HIV infected individuals. Forty-nine Bulgarians with HIV, all treated by HAART, without neurological and/or kidney disorders, were tested for JCV and BKV and genotyped for CCR5 (CCR5del32), CCR2 (CCR2-64I), and CXCR4 (SDF1-3'A). In 27/49 (55.1%) individuals a co-infection with HPoV was identified-BKV in 12/49 (24.5%), JCV-in another 12/49 (24.5%), and both viruses-in 3/49 (6.1%). A high frequency of wt CCR5 was found in patients with HPoV (91.7% for BKV and JCV and in 100% with both viruses). V/V of CCR2 was presented in 75% for BKV and JCV and in 66.7% for BKV plus JCV. SDF1-3'G/G predominated in JCV infected patients (75%), while G/A and A/A genotypes were more frequent in patients with BKV (41.7%). Also, 21/22 (95.4%) persons without HPoV infection were heterozygous for SDF1 and CCR2. The number of individuals bearing wt of all co-receptors in the group of persons not infected with HPoV was lower (P = 0.03) than that with polymorphism/s in one or two genes (SDF1 and CCR2) in the same group. The results suggest a probable role of co-receptors used by HIV to facilitate infection with HPoV.

  11. Elucidating a Key Anti-HIV-1 and Cancer-Associated Axis: The Structure of CCL5 (Rantes) in Complex with CCR5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-06-01

    CCL5 (RANTES) is an inflammatory chemokine which binds to chemokine receptor CCR5 and induces signaling. The CCL5:CCR5 associated chemotactic signaling is of critical biological importance and is a potential HIV-1 therapeutic axis. Several studies provided growing evidence for the expression of CCL5 and CCR5 in non-hematological malignancies. Therefore, the delineation of the CCL5:CCR5 complex structure can pave the way for novel CCR5-targeted drugs. We employed a computational protocol which is primarily based on free energy calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, and report, what is to our knowledge, the first computationally derived CCL5:CCR5 complex structure which is in excellent agreement with experimental findings and clarifies the functional role of CCL5 and CCR5 residues which are associated with binding and signaling. A wealth of polar and non-polar interactions contributes to the tight CCL5:CCR5 binding. The structure of an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop in complex with CCR5 has recently been derived through a similar computational protocol. A comparison between the CCL5 : CCR5 and the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop : CCR5 complex structures depicts that both the chemokine and the virus primarily interact with the same CCR5 residues. The present work provides insights into the blocking mechanism of HIV-1 by CCL5.

  12. Possible involvement of distinct phylogenetic clusters of HIV-1 variants in the discrepancies between coreceptor tropism predictions based on viral RNA and proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Hiroshi; Sudo, Koji; Hasegawa, Naoki; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Tomohisa; Iketani, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Iwata, Satoshi; Kato, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    The coreceptor tropism testing should be conducted prior to commencing a regimen containing a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV-1 infection. For aviremic patients on long antiretroviral therapy, proviral DNA is often used instead of viral RNA in genotypic tropism testing. However, the tropism predictions from RNA and DNA are sometimes different. We examined the cause of the discrepancies between HIV-1 tropism predictions based on viral RNA and proviral DNA. The nucleotide sequence of the env C2V3C3 region was determined using pair samples of plasma RNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 50 HIV-1 subtype B-infected individuals using population-based sequencing. The samples with discrepant tropism assessments between RNA and DNA were further analyzed using deep sequencing, followed by phylogenetic analysis. The tropism was assessed using the algorithm geno2pheno with a false-positive rate cutoff of 10 %. In population-based sequencing, five of 50 subjects showed discrepant tropism predictions between their RNA and DNA samples: four exhibited R5 tropism in RNA and X4 tropism in DNA, while one exhibited the opposite pattern. In the deep sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, three subjects had single clusters comprising of RNA- and DNA-derived sequences that were a mixture of R5 and X4 sequences. The other two subjects had two and three distinct phylogenetic clusters of sequences, respectively, each of which was dominated by R5 or X4 sequences; sequences of the R5-dominated cluster were mostly found in RNA, while sequences of the X4-dominated cluster were mostly in DNA. Some of HIV-1 tropism discrepancies between viral RNA and proviral DNA seem to be caused by phylogenetically distinct clusters which resides in plasma and cells in different frequencies. Our findings suggest that the tropism testing using PBMC DNA or deep sequencing may be required when the viral load is not suppressed or rebounds in the course of a CCR5 antagonist-containing regimen.

  13. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins.

  14. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES.

    PubMed

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-20

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins.

  15. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins. PMID:26585937

  16. Distribution of CCR5-Delta 32 and CCR2-64I alleles in an Argentine Amerindian population.

    PubMed

    Mangano, A; Theiler, G; Sala, L; Capucchio, M; Fainboim, L; Sen, L

    2001-08-01

    In order to evaluate the frequency distributions of CCR5-Delta 32 and CCR2-64I polymorphisms in an Amerindian population, we tested a total of 42 Chiriguanos individuals that are aboriginal inhabitants of the north west of Argentina. Only one carried the CCR5-Delta 32 allele (0.0238), while 17 out of 35 carried the CCR2-64I mutation, including one homozygous for the mutated allele (0.2571). Although the cohort studied is considered highly endogamic, the HLA genotyping revealed that 8 out of 42 subjects had a gene flow from Caucasian populations. The only heterozygous CCR5+/Delta 32 found and three heterozygous CCR2+/64I belonged to the admix group. In conclusion, the protective deletion CCR5-Delta 32 is practically absent in Chiriguanos whereas the CCR2-64I allele is highly frequent.

  17. C-C chemokine receptor type five (CCR5): An emerging target for the control of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Barmania, Fatima; Pepper, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    When HIV was initially discovered as the causative agent of AIDS, many expected to find a vaccine within a few years. This has however proven to be elusive; it has been approximately 30 years since HIV was first discovered, and a suitable vaccine is still not in effect. In 2009, a paper published by Hutter et al. reported on a bone marrow transplant performed on an HIV positive individual using stem cells that were derived from a donor who was homozygous for a mutation in the CCR5 gene known as CCR5 delta-32 (Δ32) (Hütter et al., 2009). The HIV positive individual became HIV negative and remained free of viral detection after transplantation despite having halted anti-retroviral (ARV) treatment. This review will focus on CCR5 as a key component in HIV immunity and will discuss the role of CCR5 in the control of HIV infection.

  18. Peptide ligands selected with CD4-induced epitopes on native dualtropic HIV-1 envelope proteins mimic extracellular coreceptor domains and bind to HIV-1 gp120 independently of coreceptor usage.

    PubMed

    Dervillez, Xavier; Klaukien, Volker; Dürr, Ralf; Koch, Joachim; Kreutz, Alexandra; Haarmann, Thomas; Stoll, Michaela; Lee, Donghan; Carlomagno, Teresa; Schnierle, Barbara; Möbius, Kalle; Königs, Christoph; Griesinger, Christian; Dietrich, Ursula

    2010-10-01

    During HIV-1 entry, binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cellular CD4 receptor triggers conformational changes resulting in exposure of new epitopes, the highly conserved CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes that are essential for subsequent binding to chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4. Due to their functional conservation, CD4i epitopes represent attractive viral targets for HIV-1 entry inhibition. The aim of the present study was to select peptide ligands for CD4i epitopes on native dualtropic (R5X4) HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins by phage display. Using CD4-activated retroviral particles carrying Env from the R5X4 HIV-1 89.6 strain as the target, we performed screenings of random peptide phage libraries under stringent selection conditions. Selected peptides showed partial identity with amino acids in the extracellular domains of CCR5/CXCR4, including motifs rich in tyrosines and aspartates at the N terminus known to be important for gp120 binding. A synthetic peptide derivative (XD3) corresponding to the most frequently selected phages was optimized for Env binding on peptide arrays. Interestingly, the optimized peptide could bind specifically to gp120 derived from HIV-1 strains with different coreceptor usage, competed with binding of CD4i-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) 17b, and interfered with entry of both a CCR5 (R5)-tropic and a CXCR4 (X4)-tropic Env pseudotyped virus. This peptide ligand therefore points at unique properties of CD4i epitopes shared by gp120 with different coreceptor usage and could thus serve to provide new insight into the conserved structural details essential for coreceptor binding for further drug development.

  19. Partial protective effect of CCR5-Delta 32 heterozygosity in a cohort of heterosexual Italian HIV-1 exposed uninfected individuals.

    PubMed

    Trecarichi, Enrico M; Tumbarello, Mario; de Gaetano Donati, Katleen; Tamburrini, Enrica; Cauda, Roberto; Brahe, Christina; Tiziano, Francesco D

    2006-09-25

    Despite multiple sexual exposure to HIV-1 virus, some individuals remain HIV-1 seronegative (exposed seronegative, ESN). The mechanisms underlying this resistance remain still unclear, although a multifactorial pathogenesis can be hypothesised. Although several genetic factors have been related to HIV-1 resistance, the homozigosity for a mutation in CCR5 gene (the 32 bp deletion, i.e. CCR5-Delta32 allele) is presently considered the most relevant one. In the present study we analysed the genotype at CCR5 locus of 30 Italian ESN individuals (case group) who referred multiple unprotected heterosexual intercourse with HIV-1 seropositive partner(s), for at least two years. One hundred and twenty HIV-1 infected patients and 120 individuals representative of the general population were included as control groups. Twenty percent of ESN individuals had heterozygous CCR5-Delta 32 genotype, compared to 7.5% of HIV-1 seropositive and 10% of individuals from the general population, respectively. None of the analysed individuals had CCR5-Delta 32 homozygous genotype. Sequence analysis of the entire open reading frame of CCR5 was performed in all ESN subjects and no polymorphisms or mutations were identified. Moreover, we determined the distribution of C77G variant in CD45 gene, which has been previously related to HIV-1 infection susceptibility. The frequency of the C77G variant showed no significant difference between ESN subjects and the two control groups. In conclusion, our data show a significantly higher frequency of CCR5-Delta 32 heterozygous genotype (p = 0.04) among the Italian heterosexual ESN individuals compared to HIV-1 seropositive patients, suggesting a partial protective role of CCR5-Delta 32 heterozygosity in this cohort.

  20. Frequency analysis of the delta32ccr5 HIV resistance allele in a medieval plague mass grave.

    PubMed

    Kremeyer, Barbara; Hummel, Susanne; Herrmann, Bernd

    2005-03-01

    The 32 basepair deletion in the gene for the human chemokine receptor CCR5 (delta32ccr5) conferring resistance against HIV-1 infection is present in Caucasian populations. The mutant allele is believed to have originated by a single mutational event in historic times and to have reached its present population frequency of an average 10 % in Europe through selective pressure by a pathogenic agent. Because of their great impact on European populations, the medieval Plague epidemics have been considered as a possible candidate. To test this hypothesis, we studied the delta32ccr5-frequency in 35 individuals from a mass grave containing victims of the 14th century Plague pandemic in Lübeck, Northern Germany, and compared them to the frequency in a control group from the same burial site, dating from the time before the first Plague pandemic. If the delta32ccr5 allele conferred an at least partial resistance against the medieval Plague, its frequency would be expected to be lower in those that died in the pandemic, than it was in the local population before the arrival of the Plague. The CCR5 locus could be typed successfully for 14 Plague victims and for 20 individuals from the medieval control group. We found a delta32ccr5 allelic frequency of 14.2% and 12.5%, respectively. The difference between these figures is not statistically significant. Furthermore, they are comparable to the delta32ccr5 frequency for nowadays Northern Europe. We therefore conclude that the medieval Plague pandemic has not contributed to an increase in the allelic frequency of the mutant delta32ccr5 allele and that, if there has been a positive selection of this allele, it is likely to have occurred before the 14th century and thus before the arrival of the Plague in Europe.

  1. Lefty Blocks a Subset of TGFβ Signals by Antagonizing EGF-CFC Coreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Simon K; Olale, Felix; Brivanlou, Ali H

    2004-01-01

    Members of the EGF-CFC family play essential roles in embryonic development and have been implicated in tumorigenesis. The TGFβ signals Nodal and Vg1/GDF1, but not Activin, require EGF-CFC coreceptors to activate Activin receptors. We report that the TGFβ signaling antagonist Lefty also acts through an EGF-CFC-dependent mechanism. Lefty inhibits Nodal and Vg1 signaling, but not Activin signaling. Lefty genetically interacts with EGF-CFC proteins and competes with Nodal for binding to these coreceptors. Chimeras between Activin and Nodal or Vg1 identify a 14 amino acid region that confers independence from EGF-CFC coreceptors and resistance to Lefty. These results indicate that coreceptors are targets for both TGFβ agonists and antagonists and suggest that subtle sequence variations in TGFβ signals result in greater ligand diversity. PMID:14966532

  2. Lefty blocks a subset of TGFbeta signals by antagonizing EGF-CFC coreceptors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Simon K; Olale, Felix; Brivanlou, Ali H; Schier, Alexander F

    2004-02-01

    Members of the EGF-CFC family play essential roles in embryonic development and have been implicated in tumorigenesis. The TGFbeta signals Nodal and Vg1/GDF1, but not Activin, require EGF-CFC coreceptors to activate Activin receptors. We report that the TGFbeta signaling antagonist Lefty also acts through an EGF-CFC-dependent mechanism. Lefty inhibits Nodal and Vg1 signaling, but not Activin signaling. Lefty genetically interacts with EGF-CFC proteins and competes with Nodal for binding to these coreceptors. Chimeras between Activin and Nodal or Vg1 identify a 14 amino acid region that confers independence from EGF-CFC coreceptors and resistance to Lefty. These results indicate that coreceptors are targets for both TGFbeta agonists and antagonists and suggest that subtle sequence variations in TGFbeta signals result in greater ligand diversity.

  3. CCR5 and CCR3 expression on T CD3+ lymphocytes from HIV/Leishmania co-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Nigro, L; Rizzo, M L; Vancheri, C; La Rosa, R; Mastruzzo, C; Tomaselli, V; Ragusa, A; Manuele, R; Cacopardo, B

    2007-12-01

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) are membrane-bound proteins involved in HIV-1 entry into susceptible cells. All T lymphocyte subsets display CCR5 and CCR3 on their membrane surface. T helper 1 cells are known to express CCR5 but not CCR3, and most of T cells expressing CCR3 are T helper 2. This study aimed to assess the expression of CCR5 and CCR3 on peripheral blood CD3+ T lymphocytes of HIV-Leishmania co-infected individuals. A total of 36 subjects were enrolled; nine had HIV-Leishmania co-infection; nine were HIV-infected without Leishmania, nine had visceral leishmaniasis without HIV co-infection and nine were healthy blood donors. HIV-Leishmania co-infected subjects showed a significantly higher rate of CCR5+CD3+ T lymphocytes in comparison with the other studied groups. The higher rate of CD3+ T-cells expressing CCR5 found in HIV-Leishmania co-infected subjects may be related to the role of Leishmania as an enhancer of the progression to AIDS.

  4. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5(+) regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, E C; Hamilton, M J; Young, A; Wadsworth, B J; LePard, N E; Lee, H N; Firmino, N; Collier, J L; Bennewith, K L

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C-C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80(+) macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5(+) Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth.

  5. Is the CCR5-59029-G/G genotype a protective factor for cardiomyopathy in Chagas disease?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mestre, M T; Montagnani, S; Layrisse, Z

    2004-07-01

    Investigated were two CCR5 gene polymorphisms, the CCR5 Delta 32 deletion and the pCCR5 59029 A-->G promoter point mutation, in 107 ethnically mixed Venezuelan patients serologically positive for Trypanosoma cruzi (34 asymptomatic, 38 arrhythmic, 35 cardiomyopathic). No difference in the distribution of CCR5 Delta 32 among asymptomatic and symptomatic patients was found. We have observed an increase of the 59029-G phenotype among asymptomatic compared with symptomatic chagasic patients (68% vs. 58%), in agreement with previously reported data (57% vs. 31%). This frequency difference, although not statistically significant, is more marked when the 59029-G allele is present in homozygous form. However, a similar distribution of the G/G genotype is present among asymptomatic patients and patients with heart failure. Because it has been reported that the 59029G/G genotype associates with lower CCR5 expression, 37% of our T. cruzi-infected patients with heart failure are genetically predisposed to express low levels of CCR5 on the surface of CD8(+) T cells, contrary to what would be expected if an inflammatory response is required for severe cardiac damage. If confirmed, the possible protection that might be conferred by the G/G genotype may be due to the existence of other genes in linkage disequilibria.

  6. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5+ regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, E. C.; Hamilton, M. J.; Young, A.; Wadsworth, B. J.; LePard, N. E.; Lee, H. N.; Firmino, N.; Collier, J. L.; Bennewith, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C–C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C–C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80+ macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5+ Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth. PMID:27471618

  7. Induction of Simian AIDS in Infant Rhesus Macaques Infected with CCR5- or CXCR4-Utilizing Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Viruses Is Associated with Distinct Lesions of the Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, R. A.; Canfield, Don R.; Esser, Ursula; Adamson, Lourdes A.; Brown, Charles R.; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Gardner, Murray B.; Harouse, Janet M.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Newborn rhesus macaques were infected with two chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) strains which contain unique human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env genes and exhibit distinct phenotypes. Infection with either the CCR5-specific SHIVSF162P3 or the CXCR4-utilizing SHIVSF33A resulted in clinical manifestations consistent with simian AIDS. Most prominent in this study was the detection of severe thymic involution in all SHIVSF33A-infected infants, which is very similar to HIV-1-induced thymic dysfunction in children who exhibit a rapid pattern of disease progression. In contrast, SHIVSF162P3 induced only a minor disruption in thymic morphology. Consistent with the distribution of the coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5 within the thymus, the expression of SHIVSF162P3 was restricted to the thymic medulla, whereas SHIVSF33A was preferentially detected in the cortex. This dichotomy of tissue tropism is similar to the differential tropism of HIV-1 isolates observed in the reconstituted human thymus in SCID-hu mice. Accordingly, our results show that the SHIV-monkey model can be used for the molecular dissection of cell and tissue tropisms controlled by the HIV-1 env gene and for the analysis of mechanisms of viral immunopathogenesis in AIDS. Furthermore, these findings could help explain the rapid progression of disease observed in some HIV-1-infected children. PMID:14747577

  8. Prevention of vaginal SHIV transmission in rhesus macaques through inhibition of CCR5.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Michael M; Veazey, Ronald S; Offord, Robin; Mosier, Donald E; Dufour, Jason; Mefford, Megan; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Salkowitz, Janelle R; Rodriguez, Benigno; Blauvelt, Andrew; Hartley, Oliver

    2004-10-15

    Topical agents, such as microbicides, that can protect against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission are urgently needed. Using a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV SF162), which is tropic for the chemokine receptor CCR5, we report that topical application of high doses of PSC-RANTES, an amino terminus-modified analog of the chemokine RANTES, provided potent protection against vaginal challenge in rhesus macaques. These experimental findings have potentially important implications for understanding vaginal transmission of HIV and the design of strategies for its prevention.

  9. Interleukin-24, RANTES and CCR5 gene polymorphisms are not associated with chronic adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Savarrio, L; Donati, M; Carr, C; Kinane, D F; Berglundh, T

    2007-04-01

    Cytokines, such as interleukin-10, and related genetic polymorphisms, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible correlation between chronic periodontitis and genetic polymorphisms coding for two interleukin-10 related chemokines [interleukin-24 and regulated on activation, normal T cells expressed and secreted (RANTES)] as well as a RANTES receptor [CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)]. A single-blind, two-centre, case-controlled study was carried out with test patients from the Clinic of Periodontics, Göteborg University, and from the Department of Periodontology, Glasgow University, and control subjects from the undergraduate clinics of both schools. Blood samples were collected from 106 patients (56 women and 50 men, mean age 51.7 yr) with generalized, severe chronic periodontitis and from 69 periodontally healthy subjects (37 women and 32 men, mean age 53.3 yr). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to identify the genetic coding for interleukin-24, RANTES and CCR5. Genotype and allele frequencies were compared between the test and control groups using Fischer's exact test at the 5% level of significance. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with chronic periodontitis and control subjects, regarding genotype distribution or allele frequency, irrespective of smoking status, in the combined Glasgow and Gothenburg cohort or in the specific location cohorts. The allele frequencies for healthy and control subjects for RANTES gave a p-value of 0.80 (allele G was 58.8% in healthy subjects and and 54.4% in subjects with periodontitis), for interleukin-24 the p-value was 0.90 (allele T was 56.2% in healthy subjects and and 54.9% in subjects with periodontitis) and for CCR5 the p-value was 0.90 (the wild-type allele was 85% in healthy subjects and and 82.7% in subjects with periodontitis). The interleukin-24, RANTES and CCR5 polymorphisms investigated are not

  10. Virus entry via the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and FPRL1 differs by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype.

    PubMed

    Nedellec, R; Coetzer, M; Shimizu, N; Hoshino, H; Polonis, V R; Morris, L; Mårtensson, U E A; Binley, J; Overbaugh, J; Mosier, D E

    2009-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infects target cells by binding to CD4 and a chemokine receptor, most commonly CCR5. CXCR4 is a frequent alternative coreceptor (CoR) in subtype B and D HIV-1 infection, but the importance of many other alternative CoRs remains elusive. We have analyzed HIV-1 envelope (Env) proteins from 66 individuals infected with the major subtypes of HIV-1 to determine if virus entry into highly permissive NP-2 cell lines expressing most known alternative CoRs differed by HIV-1 subtype. We also performed linear regression analysis to determine if virus entry via the major CoR CCR5 correlated with use of any alternative CoR and if this correlation differed by subtype. Virus pseudotyped with subtype B Env showed robust entry via CCR3 that was highly correlated with CCR5 entry efficiency. By contrast, viruses pseudotyped with subtype A and C Env proteins were able to use the recently described alternative CoR FPRL1 more efficiently than CCR3, and use of FPRL1 was correlated with CCR5 entry. Subtype D Env was unable to use either CCR3 or FPRL1 efficiently, a unique pattern of alternative CoR use. These results suggest that each subtype of circulating HIV-1 may be subject to somewhat different selective pressures for Env-mediated entry into target cells and suggest that CCR3 may be used as a surrogate CoR by subtype B while FPRL1 may be used as a surrogate CoR by subtypes A and C. These data may provide insight into development of resistance to CCR5-targeted entry inhibitors and alternative entry pathways for each HIV-1 subtype.

  11. CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygosity, HIV-1 Reservoir Size, and Lymphocyte Activation in Individuals Receiving Long-term Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hanhauser, Emily; Harrison, Linda J; Palmer, Christine D; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Jost, Stephanie; Bosch, Ronald J; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a case-controlled study of the associations of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reservoir size, lymphocyte activation, and CCR5 expression in 114 CCR5(Δ32/WT) and 177 wild-type CCR5 AIDS Clinical Trials Group participants receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Overall, no significant differences were found between groups for any of these parameters. However, higher levels of CCR5 expression correlated with lower amounts of cell-associated HIV-1 RNA. The relationship between CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity, CCR5 expression, and markers of HIV-1 persistence is likely to be complex and may be influenced by factors such as the duration of ART.

  12. Role of Naturally Occurring Basic Amino Acid Substitutions in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype E Envelope V3 Loop on Viral Coreceptor Usage and Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kayoko; Sato, Hironori; Takebe, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    To assess the role of naturally occurring basic amino acid substitutions in the V3 loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype E on viral coreceptor usage and cell tropism, we have constructed a panel of chimeric viruses with mutant V3 loops of HIV-1 subtype E in the genetic background of HIV-1LAI. The arginine substitutions naturally occurring at positions 8, 11, and 18 of the V3 loop in an HIV-1 subtype E X4 strain were systematically introduced into that of an R5 strain to generate a series of V3 loop mutant chimera. These chimeric viruses were employed in virus infectivity assays using HOS-CD4 cells expressing either CCR5 or CXCR4, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, T-cell lines, or macrophages. The arginine substitution at position 11 of the V3 loop uniformly caused the loss of infectivity in HOS-CD4-CCR5 cells, indicating that position 11 is critical for utilization of CCR5. CXCR4 usage was conferred by a minimum of two arginine substitutions, regardless of combination, whereas arginine substitutions at position 8 and 11 were required for T-cell line tropism. Nonetheless, macrophage tropism was not conferred by the V3 loop of subtype E R5 strain per se. We found that the specific combinations of amino acid changes in HIV-1 subtype E env V3 loop are critical for determining viral coreceptor usage and cell tropism. However, the ability to infect HOS-CD4 cells through either CXCR4 or CCR5 is not necessarily correlated with T-cell or macrophage tropism, suggesting that cellular tropism is not dictated solely by viral coreceptor utilization. PMID:10364300

  13. Induction of HIV-Blocking Anti-CCR5 IgA in Peyers's Patches without Histopathological Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Pastori, Claudia; Diomede, Lorenzo; Venuti, Assunta; Fisher, Gregory; Jarvik, Jonathan; Bomsel, Morgane; Sanvito, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chemokine receptor CCR5 is essential for HIV infection and is thus a potential target for vaccine development. However, because CCR5 is a host protein, generation of anti-CCR5 antibodies requires the breaking of immune tolerance and thus carries the risk of autoimmune responses. In this study, performed in mice, we compared 3 different immunogens representing surface domains of murine CCR5, 4 different adjuvants, and 13 different immunization protocols, with the goal of eliciting HIV-blocking activity without inducing autoimmune dysfunction. In all cases the CCR5 sequences were presented as fusions to the Flock House virus (FHV) capsid precursor protein. We found that systemic immunization and mucosal boosting elicited CCR5-specific antibodies and achieved consistent priming in Peyer's patches, where most cells showed a phenotype corresponding to activated B cells and secreted high levels of IgA, representing up to one-third of the total HIV-blocking activity. Histopathological analysis revealed mild to moderate chronic inflammation in some tissues but failed in reporting signs of autoimmune dysfunction associated with immunizations. Antisera against immunogens representing the N terminus and extracellular loops 1 and 2 (Nter1 and ECL1 and ECL2) of CCR5 were generated. All showed specific anti-HIV activity, which was stronger in the anti-ECL1 and -ECL2 sera than in the anti-Nter sera. ECL1 and ECL2 antisera induced nearly complete long-lasting CCR5 downregulation of the receptor, and especially, their IgG-depleted fractions prevented HIV infection in neutralization and transcytosis assays. In conclusion, the ECL1 and ECL2 domains could offer a promising path to achieve significant anti-HIV activity in vivo. IMPORTANCE The study was the first to adopt a systematic strategy to compare the immunogenicities of all extracellular domains of the CCR5 molecule and to set optimal conditions leading to generation of specific antibodies in the mouse model. There

  14. Long-lasting CCR5 internalization by antibodies in a subset of long-term nonprogressors: a possible protective effect against disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Pastori, Claudia; Weiser, Barbara; Barassi, Claudia; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Ghezzi, Silvia; Longhi, Renato; Calori, Giliola; Burger, Harold; Kemal, Kimdar; Poli, Guido; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lopalco, Lucia

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to HIV-1 does not necessarily result in infection and progression toward disease, thus suggesting that the control of viral infection may be achieved. Antibodies to CCR5 have been detected in HIV-exposed but uninfected subjects (ESNs); thus, these antibodies could be involved in HIV protection. To assess whether anti-CCR5 antibodies may also contribute to slow HIV disease progression, we searched for anti-CCR5 antibodies in 497 subjects, including 85 long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs), 70 progressors, 135 HIV+ patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and 207 seronegative donors. We found anti-CCR5 antibodies in a fraction of the LTNPs(23.5%) but not in the other populations studied (P < .001). These antibodies recognized a conformational epitope within the first extramembrane loop of CCR5, and they induced a stable and long-lasting downregulation of CCR5 on the surface of T lymphocytes, which inhibited HIV entry. In addition, CD4+ lymphocytes from LTNPs having anti-CCR5 antibodies are resistance to R5 strains of HIV-1. Follow-up studies showed that the loss of anti-CCR5 antibodies occurred in some subjects, and this loss was significantly associated with a progression toward disease, whereas subjects who retained anti-CCR5 Abs maintained their LTNP status. Induction of anti-CCR5 Abs could be relevant to vaccine design and therapeutics. PMID:16522810

  15. CCR5 Knockout Prevents Neuronal Injury and Behavioral Impairment Induced in a Transgenic Mouse Model by a CXCR4-using HIV-1 Glycoprotein 1201

    PubMed Central

    Maung, Ricky; Hoefer, Melanie M.; Sanchez, Ana B.; Sejbuk, Natalia E.; Medders, Kathryn E.; Desai, Maya K.; Catalan, Irene C.; Dowling, Cari C.; de Rozieres, Cyrus M.; Garden, Gwenn A.; Russo, Rossella; Roberts, Amanda J.; Williams, Roy; Kaul, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 associated dementia. Here we show that genetic ablation of CCR5 prevents microglial activation and neuronal damage in a transgenic model of HIV-associated brain injury induced by a CXCR4-utilizing viral envelope gp120. The CCR5 knockout (KO) also rescues spatial learning and memory in gp120-transgenic (tg) mice. However, the CCR5KO does not abrogate astrocytosis, indicating it can occur independently from neuronal injury and behavioral impairment. To further characterize the neuroprotective effect of CCR5-deficiency we performed a genome –wide gene expression analysis of brains from HIVgp120tg mice expressing or lacking CCR5 and non-transgenic controls. Comparison with a human brain microarray study reveals that brains of HIVgp120tg mice and HIV patients with neurocognitive impairment share numerous differentially regulated genes. Furthermore, brains of CCR5 wild-type (WT) and CCR5KO gp120tg mice express markers of an innate immune response. One of the most significantly up-regulated factors is the acute phase protein lipocalin-2 (LCN2). Using cerebrocortical cell cultures, we find that LCN2 is neurotoxic in a CCR5-dependent fashion while inhibition of CCR5 alone is not sufficient to abrogate neurotoxicity of a CXCR4-utilizing gp120. However, the combination of pharmacological CCR5 blockade and LCN2 protects neurons from toxicity of a CXCR4-utilizing gp120 thus recapitulating the finding in CCR5-deficient gp120tg mouse brain. Altogether, our study provides evidence for an indirect pathological role of CCR5 and a novel protective effect of LCN2 in combination with inhibition of CCR5 in HIV-associated brain injury. PMID:25031461

  16. Lack of CCR5 modifies glial phenotypes and population of the nigral dopaminergic neurons, but not MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Young; Lee, Myung Koo; Hong, Jin Tae

    2013-01-01

    Constitutive expression of C-C chemokine receptor (CCR) 5 has been detected in astrocytes, microglia and neurons, but its physiological roles in the central nervous system are obscure. The bidirectional interactions between neuron and glial cells through CCR5 and its ligands were thought to be crucial for maintaining normal neuronal activities. No study has described function of CCR5 in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. In order to examine effects of CCR5 on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration, we employed CCR5 wild type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. Immunostainings for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) exhibited that CCR5 KO mice had lower number of TH-positive neurons even in the absence of MPTP. Difference in MPTP (15mg/kg×4 times, 2hr interval)-mediated loss of TH-positive neurons was subtle between CCR5 WT and KO mice, but there was larger dopamine depletion, behavioral impairments and microglial activation in CCR5 deficient mice. Intriguingly, CCR5 KO brains contained higher immunoreactivity for monoamine oxidase (MAO) B which was mainly localized within astrocytes. In agreement with upregulation of MAO B, concentration of MPP+ was higher in the substantia nigra and striatum of CCR5 KO mice after MPTP injection. We found remarkable activation of p38 MAPK in CCR5 deficient mice, which positively regulates MAO B expression. These results indicate that CCR5 deficiency modifies the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal system and bidirectional interaction between neurons and glial cells via CCR5 might be important for dopaminergic neuronal survival.

  17. Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Δ32 Genetic Analysis Using Multiple Specimen Types and the NucliSens Basic Kit†

    PubMed Central

    Tetali, Suryakumari; Lee, Eun Mi; Kaplan, Mark H.; Romano, Joseph W.; Ginocchio, Christine C.

    2001-01-01

    Resistance to HIV-1 infection and delayed disease progression have been associated with a 32-bp deletion (Δ32) in the gene encoding the CCR5 chemokine receptor. In the present study we describe the modification of a nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA)-based CCR5 genotyping assay for a NucliSens Basic Kit (Organon Teknika, Durham, N.C.) format using a new target-specific sandwich oligonucleotide detection methodology. The new method permitted the use of generic electrochemiluminescent probes supplied in the NucliSens Basic Kit, whereas the original NASBA method required expensive target-specific ruthenium detection probes. The Basic Kit CCR5 Δ32 genotypic analysis was in 100% concordance with both the original NASBA assay and DNA PCR results. This study also evaluated the use of multiple specimen types, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), whole blood, dried blood spots, buccal scrapings, and plasma, for CCR5 genotype analysis. The sensitivities of the three assays were comparable when PBMC or whole blood was the specimen source. In contrast, when dried blood spots, buccal scrapings, or plasma was used as the sample source, the sensitivity of DNA PCR was 80.95, 42.8, or 0%, respectively, compared to 100% sensitivity obtained with the original NASBA and Basic Kit NASBA assays. Our study indicates that the NucliSens Basic Kit NASBA assay is very sensitive and specific for CCR5 Δ32 genotyping using multiple sample types. PMID:11527812

  18. Evolution of the CCR5 Delta32 mutation based on haplotype variation in Jewish and Northern European population samples.

    PubMed

    Klitz, W; Brautbar, C; Schito, A M; Barcellos, L F; Oksenberg, J R

    2001-05-01

    The chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) serves as a fusion cofactor for macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. In addition, CCR5 has been shown to mediate the entry of poxviruses into target cells. Individuals homozygous for the Delta32 deletion-mutation have no surface expression of CCR5 and are highly protected against HIV-1 infection. To gain insights into the evolution of the mutation in modern populations, the relatively high frequency of the Delta32-ccr5 allele in some European and Jewish populations is explored here by examining haplotypes of 3p21.3 constructed of five polymorphic marker loci surrounding CCR5. By sampling Ashkenazi, non-Ashkenazi and non-Jewish populations, we utilize the natural experiment that occurred as a consequence of the Jewish Diaspora, and demonstrate that a single mutation was responsible for all copies of Delta32. This mutation must have moved from Northern European populations to the Ashkenazi Jews where evidence suggests that Delta32 carriers of both groups were favored by repeated occurrence of epidemic small pox beginning in the 8th century AD.

  19. Genetic variation at the CCR5/CCR2 gene cluster and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Soto-Sánchez, Javier; Santos-Juanes, Jorge; Coto-Segura, Pablo; Coto, Eliecer; Díaz, Marta; Rodríguez, Isabel; Alvarez, Victoria

    2010-05-01

    Inflammation plays a major role in psoriasis (Ps). The variation at several genes that encode components of the inflammatory pathways have been linked to the risk for Ps. Our objective was to examine the association between Ps and three polymorphisms at the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CCR2. A total of 382 Ps patients and 500 healthy controls from Spain were genotyped for the CCR5-32bp deletion (DeltaCCR5), the rs1799988 (CCR5 promoter), and the CCR2-I64V (rs1799864) polymorphisms. Allele and genotype frequencies did not differ between patients and controls for any of the three polymorphisms. However, the frequency of the CCR2-64I carriers was significantly higher in the patients who developed arthritis (n=81) compared to patients without arthritis (p=0.0007). Our work suggests that the genetic variation at the CCR2/CCR5 genes did not contribute to the risk for Ps, but CCR2 polymorphisms could modulate the risk for arthritis in patients with psoriasis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of the CCR-5/MIP-1 α Axis in the Pathogenesis of Rocio Virus Encephalitis in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, Juliana H.; França, Rafael F. O.; Oliveira, Carlo J. F.; de Aquino, Maria T. P.; Farias, Kleber J. S.; Machado, Paula R. L.; de Oliveira, Thelma F. M.; Yokosawa, Jonny; Soares, Edson G.; da Silva, João S.; da Fonseca, Benedito A. L.; Figueiredo, Luiz T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Rocio virus (ROCV) caused an outbreak of human encephalitis during the 1970s in Brazil and its immunopathogenesis remains poorly understood. CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a chemokine receptor that binds to macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1 α). Both molecules are associated with inflammatory cells migration during infections. In this study, we demonstrated the importance of the CCR5 and MIP-1 α, in the outcome of viral encephalitis of ROCV-infected mice. CCR5 and MIP-1 α knockout mice survived longer than wild-type (WT) ROCV-infected animals. In addition, knockout mice had reduced inflammation in the brain. Assessment of brain viral load showed mice virus detection five days post-infection in wild-type and CCR5−/− mice, while MIP-1 α−/− mice had lower viral loads seven days post-infection. Knockout mice required a higher lethal dose than wild-type mice as well. The CCR5/MIP-1 α axis may contribute to migration of infected cells to the brain and consequently affect the pathogenesis during ROCV infection. PMID:24080631

  1. Chemokine receptor CCR5 Delta 32 genetic analysis using multiple specimen types and the NucliSens Basic Kit.

    PubMed

    Tetali, S; Lee, E M; Kaplan, M H; Romano, J W; Ginocchio, C C

    2001-09-01

    Resistance to HIV-1 infection and delayed disease progression have been associated with a 32-bp deletion (Delta32) in the gene encoding the CCR5 chemokine receptor. In the present study we describe the modification of a nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA)-based CCR5 genotyping assay for a NucliSens Basic Kit (Organon Teknika, Durham, N.C.) format using a new target-specific sandwich oligonucleotide detection methodology. The new method permitted the use of generic electrochemiluminescent probes supplied in the NucliSens Basic Kit, whereas the original NASBA method required expensive target-specific ruthenium detection probes. The Basic Kit CCR5 Delta32 genotypic analysis was in 100% concordance with both the original NASBA assay and DNA PCR results. This study also evaluated the use of multiple specimen types, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), whole blood, dried blood spots, buccal scrapings, and plasma, for CCR5 genotype analysis. The sensitivities of the three assays were comparable when PBMC or whole blood was the specimen source. In contrast, when dried blood spots, buccal scrapings, or plasma was used as the sample source, the sensitivity of DNA PCR was 80.95, 42.8, or 0%, respectively, compared to 100% sensitivity obtained with the original NASBA and Basic Kit NASBA assays. Our study indicates that the NucliSens Basic Kit NASBA assay is very sensitive and specific for CCR5 Delta32 genotyping using multiple sample types.

  2. Reappraisal of the historical selective pressures for the CCR5-Delta32 mutation.

    PubMed

    Duncan, S R; Scott, S; Duncan, C J

    2005-03-01

    HIV strains are unable to enter macrophages that carry the CCR5-Delta32 deletion; the average frequency of this allele is 10% in European populations. A mathematical model based on the changing demography of Europe from 1000 to 1800 AD demonstrates how plague epidemics, 1347 to 1670, could have provided the selection pressure that raised the frequency of the mutation to the level seen today. It is suggested that the original single mutation appeared over 2500 years ago and that persistent epidemics of a haemorrhagic fever that struck at the early classical civilisations served to force up the frequency to about 5x10(-5) at the time of the Black Death in 1347.

  3. Extracellular disulfide bridges serve different purposes in two homologous chemokine receptors, CCR1 and CCR5.

    PubMed

    Rummel, Pia C; Thiele, Stefanie; Hansen, Lærke S; Petersen, Trine P; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander H; Ulven, Trond; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2013-09-01

    In addition to the 7 transmembrane receptor (7TM)-conserved disulfide bridge between transmembrane (TM) helix 3 and extracellular loop (ECL)-2, chemokine receptors (CCR) contain a disulfide bridge between the N terminus and what previously was believed to be ECL-3. Recent crystal and NMR structures of the CXC chemokine receptors (CXCR) CXCR4 and CXCR1, combined with structural analysis of all endogenous chemokine receptors indicate that this chemokine receptor-conserved bridge in fact connects the N terminus to the top of TM-7. By employing chemokine ligands that mainly target extracellular receptor regions and small-molecule ligands that predominantly interact with residues in the main binding crevice, we show that the 7TM-conserved bridge is essential for all types of ligand-mediated activation, whereas the chemokine-conserved bridge is dispensable for small-molecule activation in CCR1. However, in striking contrast to previous studies in other chemokine receptors, high-affinity CCL3 chemokine binding was maintained in the absence of either bridge. In the highly related CCR5, a completely different dependency was observed as neither activation nor binding of the same chemokines was retained in the absence of either bridge. In contrast, both bridges were dispensable for activation by the same small molecules. This indicates that CCR5 activity is independent of extracellular regions, whereas in CCR1 the preserved folding of ECL-2 is necessary for activation. These results indicate that conserved structural features in a receptor subgroup do not necessarily provide specific traits for the whole subgroup but rather provide unique traits to the single receptors.

  4. The Geographic Spread of the CCR5 Δ32 HIV-Resistance Allele

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Alison P; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2005-01-01

    The Δ32 mutation at the CCR5 locus is a well-studied example of natural selection acting in humans. The mutation is found principally in Europe and western Asia, with higher frequencies generally in the north. Homozygous carriers of the Δ32 mutation are resistant to HIV-1 infection because the mutation prevents functional expression of the CCR5 chemokine receptor normally used by HIV-1 to enter CD4+ T cells. HIV has emerged only recently, but population genetic data strongly suggest Δ32 has been under intense selection for much of its evolutionary history. To understand how selection and dispersal have interacted during the history of the Δ32 allele, we implemented a spatially explicit model of the spread of Δ32. The model includes the effects of sampling, which we show can give rise to local peaks in observed allele frequencies. In addition, we show that with modest gradients in selection intensity, the origin of the Δ32 allele may be relatively far from the current areas of highest allele frequency. The geographic distribution of the Δ32 allele is consistent with previous reports of a strong selective advantage (>10%) for Δ32 carriers and of dispersal over relatively long distances (>100 km/generation). When selection is assumed to be uniform across Europe and western Asia, we find support for a northern European origin and long-range dispersal consistent with the Viking-mediated dispersal of Δ32 proposed by G. Lucotte and G. Mercier. However, when we allow for gradients in selection intensity, we estimate the origin to be outside of northern Europe and selection intensities to be strongest in the northwest. Our results describe the evolutionary history of the Δ32 allele and establish a general methodology for studying the geographic distribution of selected alleles. PMID:16216086

  5. The saponin DT-13 inhibits gastric cancer cell migration through down-regulation of CCR5-CCL5 axis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sen-Sen; Fan, Wei; Sun, Li; Li, Fang-Fang; Zhao, Ren-Ping; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Yu, Bo-Yang; Yuan, Sheng-Tao

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of DT-13 on gastric cancer cell migration, and to explore the possible mechanisms underlying the anti-metastasis activity of DT-13. Growth inhibition of DT-13 was analyzed by the MTT assay. Cell migration was measured by the scratch-wound assay and transwell double chamber assay. To investigate the possible mechanisms underlying the anti-metastasis activity of DT-13, chemokine receptors that are involved in cancer metastasis (CCR2, CCR5, CCR7, CXCR4, and CXCR6) were detected by conventional PCR. The effect of DT-13 on CCR5 and CXCR4 expression was further evaluated by quantitative PCR and Western blot, respectively. The secretion of CCL5 (ligand of CCR5) and SDF-1 (ligand of CXCR4) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). DT-13 inhibited BGC-823 and HGC-27 cell growth in a dose dependent manner, and the estimated IC50 value for 24 h treatment was 23.5 ± 5.1 μmol·L(-1) for BGC-823 cells and 35.6 ± 7.6 μmol·L(-1) for HGC-27 cells. DT-13 also significantly decreased gastric cancer cell migration. DT-13 significantly decreased the gene expression of CCR5 in both BGC-823 and HGC-27 gastric cancer cells, and moderately reduced the expression of CXCR4. Similar to the results of gene expression, significant down-regulation of CCR5 protein was observed, but CXCR4 protein levels were much less affected. CCL5 secretion, but not SDF-1 production, was inhibited by DT-13. DT-13 inhibited gastric cancer cell migration by down-regulation of the CCR5-CCL5 axis. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Heterozygosity for CCR5-Delta32 but not CCR2b-64I protects against certain intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ashton, L J; Stewart, G J; Biti, R; Law, M; Cooper, D A; Kaldor, J M

    2002-04-01

    To determine the association between CCR5 and CCR2b genotype and the clinical manifestation of first and subsequent AIDS-defining illnesses (ADIs). The distribution of ADIs was examined by CCR5 and CCR2b genotype in a subset of homosexual men enrolled in the Sydney AIDS Prospective Study. The expected number of ADIs was calculated from rates observed in the same tertiary hospital over the same period. Information on initial ADI was collected for 117 homosexual men diagnosed with AIDS before January 1998. Of these individuals, 17 were heterozygous for the CCR5-Delta32 mutation and 11 were heterozygous for CCR2b-64I. The number of observed cases of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), toxoplasmosis, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and cryptosporidiosis reported as a first ADI was substantially fewer in people heterozygous for the CCR5-Delta32 mutation than for those without the mutation, despite similar age, CD4 T-cell count at AIDS diagnosis, year of AIDS diagnosis and receipt of antiretroviral treatment. In addition, among individuals heterozygous for CCR5-Delta32 there were fewer cases of PCP, toxoplasmosis, MAC, and cryptosporidiosis observed as subsequent ADIs compared to the number expected, based on rates measured in the same hospital during the same period (seven observed vs. 24 expected, RR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.01-0.6). The distribution of first and subsequent ADIs did not differ from the number expected in individuals heterozygous for the CCR2b-64I mutation. Results from this study show that heterozygosity for CCR5-Delta32 but not CCR2b-64I appears to protect against opportunistic infections.

  7. CCR2+CCR5+ T Cells Produce Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and Osteopontin in the Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Wakiro; Tomita, Atsuko; Ichikawa, Daijyu; Lin, Youwei; Kishida, Hitaru; Miyake, Sachiko; Ogawa, Masafumi; Okamoto, Tomoko; Murata, Miho; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the CNS that is presumably mediated by CD4+ autoimmune T cells. Although both Th1 and Th17 cells have the potential to cause inflammatory CNS pathology in rodents, the identity of pathogenic T cells remains unclear in human MS. Given that each Th cell subset preferentially expresses specific chemokine receptors, we were interested to know whether T cells defined by a particular chemokine receptor profile play an active role in the pathogenesis of MS. In this article, we report that CCR2+CCR5+ T cells constitute a unique population selectively enriched in the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients during relapse but not in patients with other neurologic diseases. After polyclonal stimulation, the CCR2+CCR5+ T cells exhibited a distinct ability to produce matrix metalloproteinase-9 and osteopontin, which are involved in the CNS pathology of MS. Furthermore, after TCR stimulation, the CCR2+CCR5+ T cells showed a higher invasive potential across an in vitro blood–brain barrier model compared with other T cells. Of note, the CCR2+CCR5+ T cells from MS patients in relapse are reactive to myelin basic protein, as assessed by production of IFN-γ. We also demonstrated that the CCR6−, but not the CCR6+, population within CCR2+CCR5+ T cells was highly enriched in the cerebrospinal fluid during MS relapse (p < 0.0005) and expressed higher levels of IFN-γ and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Taken together, we propose that autoimmune CCR2+CCR5+CCR6− Th1 cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:23071279

  8. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 allele in Brazilian populations: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Carvalho, Wlisses Henrique Veloso; de Moura, Ronald Rodrigues; Coelho, Antonio Victor Campos; Crovella, Sergio; Guimarães, Rafael Lima

    2016-09-01

    The CCR5 is a chemokine receptor widely expressed by several immune cells that are engaged in inflammatory responses. Some populations have individuals exhibiting a 32bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) that produces a truncated non-functional protein not expressed on the cell surface. This polymorphism, known to be associated with susceptibility to infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as osteomyelitis, pre-eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematous, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and HIV/AIDS, is more commonly found in European populations with average frequency of 10%. However, it is also possible to observe a significant frequency in other world populations, such as the Brazilian one. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of CCR5-delta32 genetic association studies in Brazilian populations throughout the country to estimate the frequency of this polymorphism. We also compared CCR5-delta32 frequencies across Brazilian regions. The systematic literature reviewed studies involving delta32 allele in Brazilian populations published from 1995 to 2015. Among the reviewed literature, 25 studies including 30 Brazilian populations distributed between the North, Northeast, South and Southeast regions were included in our meta-analysis. We observed an overall allelic frequency of 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), that was considered moderate and, notably, higher than some European populations, such as Cyprus (2.8%), Italy (3%) and Greece (2.4%). Regarding the regional frequency comparisons between North-Northeast (N-NE) and South-Southeast (S-SE) regions, we observed an allelic frequency of 3% (95%-CI, 0.02-0.04) and 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), respectively. The populations from S-SE regions had a slightly higher CCR5-delta32 frequency than N-NE regions (OR=1.41, p=0.002). Although there are several studies about the CCR5-delta32 polymorphism and its effect on the immune response of some infectious diseases, this report is the first meta

  9. Evaluating plague and smallpox as historical selective pressures for the CCR5-Delta 32 HIV-resistance allele.

    PubMed

    Galvani, Alison P; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2003-12-09

    The high frequency, recent origin, and geographic distribution of the CCR5-Delta 32 deletion allele together indicate that it has been intensely selected in Europe. Although the allele confers resistance against HIV-1, HIV has not existed in the human population long enough to account for this selective pressure. The prevailing hypothesis is that the selective rise of CCR5-Delta 32 to its current frequency can be attributed to bubonic plague. By using a population genetic framework that takes into account the temporal pattern and age-dependent nature of specific diseases, we find that smallpox is more consistent with this historical role.

  10. Association study of CCR5 delta 32 polymorphism among the HLA-DRB1 Caucasian population in Northern Paraná, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Amarante, Marla Karine; Voltarelli, Julio Cesar; Aoki, Mateus Nobrega; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Ehara Watanabe, Maria Angelica

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines are important determinants of early inflammatory response. The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) delta 32 variant results in a nonfunctional form of the chemokine receptor and has been implicated in a variety of immune-mediated diseases. In the present study, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) samples, using specific CCR5 oligonucleotide primers surrounding the breakpoint deletion, detected a 225-basepair (bp) product from the normal CCR5 allele and a 193-bp product from the 32 bp deletion allele. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II (DRB1) typing was performed by PCR-sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP). The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of HLA-DRB1 and CCR5 genetic polymorphisms. To evaluate the frequency distributions of CCR5 delta 32 polymorphisms in a Brazilian population and their association with allelic distribution of HLA genes, DRB1; a total of 120 Caucasian individuals from northern Paraná, Brazil, were tested. The CCR5/CCR5 genotype was found in 108 individuals (90%) and only one carried the CCR5 delta 32 allele homozygous genotype (0.0238), while 12 (10%) carried the CCR5 delta 32 allele heterozygous genotype. The observed frequency for the CCR5 delta 32 allele was 0.05 in the population studied. The results revealed a CCR5 delta 32 allele occurrence with HLA-DRB1(*)01 and DRB1(*)04 (P<0.05). It is possible that HLA-DRB1(*)01 and DRB1(*)04 alleles could be associated with the delta 32-bp deletion of CCR5.

  11. A Group of V3 Sequences from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype E Non-Syncytium-Inducing, CCR5-Using Variants Are Resistant to Positive Selection Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Shiino, Teiichiro; Kato, Kayoko; Kodaka, Noriko; Miyakuni, Tuyoshi; Takebe, Yutaka; Sato, Hironori

    2000-01-01

    In a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individual, immune-pressure-mediated positive selection operates to maintain the antigenic polymorphism on the gp120 third variable (V3) loop. Recently, we suggested on the basis of sequencing C2/V3 segments from an HIV-1 subtype E-infected family that a V3 sequence lineage group of the non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) variants (group 1) was relatively resistant to positive selection pressure (35). To better understand the relationship between the intensity of positive selection pressure and cell tropism of the virus, we determined the linkage between each V3 genotype and its function of directing coreceptor preference and MT2 cell tropism. The biological characterization of a panel of V3 recombinant viruses showed that all of the group 1 V3 sequences could confer an NSI/CCR5-using (NSI/R5) phenotype on HIV-1LAI, whereas the group 2 V3 sequence, which was more positively charged than the group 1 sequence, dictated mainly a syncytium-inducing, CXCR4-using (SI/X4) phenotype. Phylogenetic analysis of C2/V3 sequences encoding group 1 or 2 V3 suggested that the variants carrying group 1 V3 are the ancestors of the intrafamilial infection and persisted in the family, while the variants carrying group 2 V3 evolved convergently from the group 1 V3 variants during disease progression in the individuals. Finally, a statistical test showed that the V3 sequence that could dictate an NSI/R5 phenotype had a synonymous substitution rate significantly higher than the nonsynonymous substitution rate. These data suggest that V3 sequences of the subtype E NSI/R5 variants are more resistant to positive selection pressure than those of the SI/X4 variants. PMID:10627516

  12. Coreceptor usage of Chinese HIV-1 and impact of X4/DM transmission clusters among recently infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Kexin; Li, Wei; Fang, Kun; Musa, Taha Hussein; Song, Yue; Du, Guoping; Gao, Rong; Guo, Yan; Yan, Wenjuan; Xuan, Yang; Zhong, Ping; Wei, Pingmin

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the current frequency of HIV-1 coreceptor usage in China and assess the candidacy of CCR5 antagonists for treatment of HIV infections. In addition, we aimed to evaluate the potential of X4/DM virus transmission in recently infected men who have sex with men (MSM) individuals.Viral tropism testing was performed on samples from 399 MSM individuals and on 2408 available Chinese HIV-1 V3 sequences downloaded from the Los Alamos database using Geno2pheno and WebPSSM in combination. The transmission clusters were evaluated using pol sequences from 291 recently infected MSM with a maximum likelihood, maximum pairwise distance, and Bayesian inference.A higher prevalence of X4/DM viruses was observed in individuals infected with CRF01_AE strains than with subtype B (27.8% vs 12.2%, P < 0.001) and CRF07_BC/CRF08_BC/C (27.8% vs 1.0%, P < 0.001). Seven clusters containing only X4/DM viruses were detected in 40 transmission clusters. No significant difference in proportions between clustered X4/DM viruses and R5 viruses was found (P = 0.683).The high proportion of CXCR4 usage for CRF01_AE strains may result in the loss of susceptibility to maraviroc since CRF01_AE has become the most prevalent strains in China. The high prevalence of X4/DM viruses among recently CRF01_AE-infected individuals may be attributed to the stochasticity of HIV transmission, which implied that the early viral tropism screening and treatment would be the key for controlling the epidemic of CRF01_AE strains in China.

  13. Coreceptor usage of Chinese HIV-1 and impact of X4/DM transmission clusters among recently infected men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Kexin; Li, Wei; Fang, Kun; Musa, Taha Hussein; Song, Yue; Du, Guoping; Gao, Rong; Guo, Yan; Yan, Wenjuan; Xuan, Yang; Zhong, Ping; Wei, Pingmin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To characterize the current frequency of HIV-1 coreceptor usage in China and assess the candidacy of CCR5 antagonists for treatment of HIV infections. In addition, we aimed to evaluate the potential of X4/DM virus transmission in recently infected men who have sex with men (MSM) individuals. Viral tropism testing was performed on samples from 399 MSM individuals and on 2408 available Chinese HIV-1 V3 sequences downloaded from the Los Alamos database using Geno2pheno and WebPSSM in combination. The transmission clusters were evaluated using pol sequences from 291 recently infected MSM with a maximum likelihood, maximum pairwise distance, and Bayesian inference. A higher prevalence of X4/DM viruses was observed in individuals infected with CRF01_AE strains than with subtype B (27.8% vs 12.2%, P < 0.001) and CRF07_BC/CRF08_BC/C (27.8% vs 1.0%, P < 0.001). Seven clusters containing only X4/DM viruses were detected in 40 transmission clusters. No significant difference in proportions between clustered X4/DM viruses and R5 viruses was found (P = 0.683). The high proportion of CXCR4 usage for CRF01_AE strains may result in the loss of susceptibility to maraviroc since CRF01_AE has become the most prevalent strains in China. The high prevalence of X4/DM viruses among recently CRF01_AE-infected individuals may be attributed to the stochasticity of HIV transmission, which implied that the early viral tropism screening and treatment would be the key for controlling the epidemic of CRF01_AE strains in China. PMID:27684870

  14. The role of the alternative coreceptor GPR15 in SIV tropism for human cells.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Miriam; Marzi, Andrea; Urbanczyk, Andreas; Bertram, Stephanie; Fisch, Tanja; Nehlmeier, Inga; Gnirss, Kerstin; Karsten, Christina B; Palesch, David; Münch, Jan; Chiodi, Francesca; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Steffen, Imke

    2012-11-10

    Many SIV isolates can employ the orphan receptor GPR15 as coreceptor for efficient entry into transfected cell lines, but the role of endogenously expressed GPR15 in SIV cell tropism is largely unclear. Here, we show that several human B and T cell lines express GPR15 on the cell surface, including the T/B cell hybrid cell line CEMx174, and that GPR15 expression is essential for SIV infection of CEMx174 cells. In addition, GPR15 expression was detected on subsets of primary human CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD19(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), respectively. However, GPR15(+) PBMCs were not efficiently infected by HIV and SIV, including cells from individuals homozygous for the defective Δ32 ccr5 allele. These results suggest that GPR15 is coexpressed with CD4 on PBMCs but that infection of CD4(+), GPR15(+) cells is not responsible for the well documented ability of SIV to infect CCR5(-) blood cells.

  15. Determinants for Sensitivity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coreceptor CXCR4 to the Bicyclam AMD3100

    PubMed Central

    Labrosse, Béatrice; Brelot, Anne; Heveker, Nikolaus; Sol, Nathalie; Schols, Dominique; De Clercq, Erik; Alizon, Marc

    1998-01-01

    The bicyclam AMD3100 is a potent and selective inhibitor of the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2). It was recently demonstrated that the compound inhibited HIV entry through CXCR4 but not through CCR5. Selectivity of AMD3100 for CXCR4 was further indicated by its lack of effect on HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection mediated by the CCR5, CCR3, Bonzo, BOB, and US28, coreceptors. AMD3100 completely blocked HIV-1 infection mediated by a mutant CXCR4 bearing a deletion of most of the amino-terminal extracellular domain. In contrast, relative resistance to AMD3100 was conferred by different single amino acid substitutions in the second extracellular loop (ECL2) or in the adjacent membrane-spanning domain, TM4. Only substitutions of a neutral residue for aspartic acid and of a nonaromatic residue for phenylalanine (Phe) were associated with drug resistance. This suggests a direct interaction of AMD3100 with these amino acids rather than indirect effects of their mutation on the CXCR4 structure. The interaction of aspartic acids of ECL2 and TM4 with AMD3100 is consistent with the positive charge of bicyclams, which might block HIV-1 entry by preventing electrostatic interactions between CXCR4 and the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120. Other features of AMD3100 must account for its high antiviral activity, in particular the presence of an aromatic linker between the cyclam units. This aromatic group might engage in hydrophobic interactions with the Phe-X-Phe motifs of ECL2 or TM4. These results confirm the importance of ECL2 for the HIV coreceptor activity of CXCR4. PMID:9658078

  16. X4-tropic human immunodeficiency virus IIIB utilizes CXCR4 as coreceptor, as distinct from R5X4-tropic viruses.

    PubMed

    Islam, Salequl; Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Adnan, Nihad; Tanaka, Atsushi; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2013-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses initiate infections via CCR5 coreceptors and then change their tropism to C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), this change being associated with rapid disease progression. HIV-1IIIB, a widely described pure X4-tropic strain, is distinct from R5X4-tropic viruses. In this study, the requirement for amino terminal regions (NTRs) of CXCR4 for entry of HIV-1IIIB virus into host cells was examined and compared to that of R5X4-tropic viruses. CXCR4 and its deletion mutant (CXCR4ΔNTR23; first 23 amino acids removed from NTR) were amplified to examine their coreceptor activities. NP-2/CD4/CXCR4 and NP-2/CD4/CXCR4ΔNTR23 cell lines were prepared accordingly. Indirect immune fluorescence assay (IFA), PCR, and reverse transcriptase (RT) activity were used to compare the process of infection of host cells by HIV-1IIIB virus, one R5-tropic and five other R5X4-tropic viruses. All the R5X4-tropic HIVs were found to utilize both CCR5 and CXCR4 but unable to use CXCR4ΔNTR23 as coreceptors. In contrast, X4-tropic HIV-1IIIB was found to preferentially infect through CXCR4ΔNTR23. Viral antigens in infected NP-2/CD4/CXCR4ΔNTR23 cells were detected by IFA and confirmed by detection of proviral DNA and by performing RT assays on the spent cell-supernatants. In dual tropic viruses, deletion of 23 amino acids from NTR abrogates the coreceptor activity of CXCR4. This observation demonstrates that NTR of CXCR4 have an obligatory coreceptor role for dual tropic viruses. However, HIV-1IIIB may have different requirements for NTR than R5X4 viruses or may infect host cells independent of NTR of CXCR4.

  17. Effects of sequence changes in the HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide on CCR5 inhibitor resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Johan Klasse, Per; Moore, John P.

    2012-07-05

    A rare pathway of HIV-1 resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as Vicriviroc (VCV) involves changes solely in the gp41 fusion peptide (FP). Here, we show that the G516V change is critical to VCV resistance in PBMC and TZM-bl cells, although it must be accompanied by either M518V or F519I to have a substantial impact. Modeling VCV inhibition data from the two cell types indicated that G516V allows both double mutants to use VCV-CCR5 complexes for entry. The model further identified F519I as an independent determinant of preference for the unoccupied, high-VCV affinity form of CCR5. From inhibitor-free reversion cultures, we also identified a substitution in the inner domain of gp120, T244A, which appears to counter the resistance phenotype created by the FP substitutions. Examining the interplay of these changes will enhance our understanding of Env complex interactions that influence both HIV-1 entry and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors.

  18. A Linear Epitope in the N-Terminal Domain of CCR5 and Its Interaction with Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Chain, Benny; Arnold, Jack; Akthar, Samia; Brandt, Michael; Davis, David; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Lapp, Thabo; Ji, Changhua; Sankuratri, Surya; Zhang, Yanjing; Govada, Lata; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Chayen, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    The CCR5 receptor plays a role in several key physiological and pathological processes and is an important therapeutic target. Inhibition of the CCR5 axis by passive or active immunisation offers one very selective strategy for intervention. In this study we define a new linear epitope within the extracellular domain of CCR5 recognised by two independently produced monoclonal antibodies. A short peptide encoding the linear epitope can induce antibodies which recognise the intact receptor when administered colinear with a tetanus toxoid helper T cell epitope. The monoclonal antibody RoAb 13 is shown to bind to both cells and peptide with moderate to high affinity (6x10^8 and 1.2x107 M-1 respectively), and binding to the peptide is enhanced by sulfation of tyrosines at positions 10 and 14. RoAb13, which has previously been shown to block HIV infection, also blocks migration of monocytes in response to CCR5 binding chemokines and to inflammatory macrophage conditioned medium. A Fab fragment of RoAb13 has been crystallised and a structure of the antibody is reported to 2.1 angstrom resolution. PMID:26030924

  19. HIV-1 envelope, integrins and co-receptor use in mucosal transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Cicala, Claudia; Arthos, James; Fauci, Anthony S

    2011-01-27

    It is well established that HIV-1 infection typically involves an interaction between the viral envelope protein gp120/41 and the CD4 molecule followed by a second interaction with a chemokine receptor, usually CCR5 or CXCR4. In the early stages of an HIV-1 infection CCR5 using viruses (R5 viruses) predominate. In some viral subtypes there is a propensity to switch to CXCR4 usage (X4 viruses). The receptor switch occurs in ~ 40% of the infected individuals and is associated with faster disease progression. This holds for subtypes B and D, but occurs less frequently in subtypes A and C. There are several hypotheses to explain the preferential transmission of R5 viruses and the mechanisms that lead to switching of co-receptor usage; however, there is no definitive explanation for either. One important consideration regarding transmission is that signaling by R5 gp120 may facilitate transmission of R5 viruses by inducing a permissive environment for HIV replication. In the case of sexual transmission, infection by HIV requires the virus to breach the mucosal barrier to gain access to the immune cell targets that it infects; however, the immediate events that follow HIV exposure at genital mucosal sites are not well understood. Upon transmission, the HIV quasispecies that is replicating in an infected donor contracts through a "genetic bottleneck", and often infection results from a single infectious event. Many details surrounding this initial infection remain unresolved. In mucosal tissues, CD4(+) T cells express high levels of CCR5, and a subset of these CD4(+)/CCR5(high) cells express the integrin α₄β₇, the gut homing receptor. CD4(+)/CCR5(high)/ α4β7(high) T cells are highly susceptible to infection by HIV-1 and are ideal targets for an efficient productive infection at the point of transmission. In this context we have demonstrated that the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 binds to α₄β₇ on CD4(+) T cells. On CD4(+)/CCR5(high)/ α4β7(high) T cells,

  20. African Ancestry Influences CCR5 –2459G>A Genotype-Associated Virologic Success of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheruvu, Vinay K.; Igo, Robert P.; Jurevic, Richard J.; Serre, David; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Mehlotra, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In a North American, HIV-positive, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-treated, adherent cohort of self-identified white and black patients, we previously observed that chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) –2459G>A genotype had a strong association with time to achieve virologic success (TVLS) in black but not in white patients. Methods Using 128 genome-wide ancestry informative markers, we performed a quantitative assessment of ancestry in these patients (n = 310) to determine (1) whether CCR5 –2459G>A genotype is still associated with TVLS of HAART when ancestry, not self-identified race, is considered and (2) whether this association is influenced by varying African ancestry. Results We found that the interaction between CCR5 –2459G>A genotype and African ancestry (≤0.125 vs. ≥0.425 and <0.71 vs. ≥0.71) was significantly associated with TVLS (GG compared with AA, P = 0.044 and 0.018, respectively). Furthermore, the association between CCR5 –2459G>A genotype and TVLS was stronger in patients with African ancestry ≥0.71 than in patients with African ancestry ≥0.452, in both Kaplan-Meier (log-rank P = 0.039 and 0.057, respectively, for AA, GA, and GG) and Cox proportional hazards regression (relative hazard for GG compared with AA 2.59 [95% CI, 1.27–5.22; P = 0.01] and 2.26 [95% CI, 1.18–4.32; P = 0.01], respectively) analyses. Conclusions We observed that the association between CCR5 –2459G>A genotype and TVLS of HAART increased with stronger African ancestry. Understanding the genomic mechanisms by which African ancestry influences this association is critical, and requires further studies. PMID:24714069

  1. R5 HIV productively infects Langerhans cells, and infection levels are regulated by compound CCR5 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Gulden, Forrest O; Sugaya, Makoto; McNamara, David T; Borris, Debra L; Lederman, Michael M; Orenstein, Jan M; Zimmerman, Peter A; Blauvelt, Andrew

    2003-07-08

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are suspected to be initial targets for HIV after sexual exposure (by becoming infected or by capturing virus). Here, productive R5 HIV infection of LC ex vivo and LC-mediated transmission of virus to CD4+ T cells were both found to depend on CCR5. By contrast, infection of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and transfer of infection from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to CD4+ T cells were mediated by CCR5-dependent as well as DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin-dependent pathways. Furthermore, in 62 healthy individuals, R5 HIV infection levels in LCs ex vivo were associated with CCR5 genotype. Specifically, genotyping for ORF Delta 32 revealed that LCs isolated from ORF Delta 32/wt individuals were significantly less susceptible to HIV when compared with LCs isolated from ORFwt/wt individuals (P = 0.016). Strikingly, further genetic analyses of the A-2459G CCR5 promoter polymorphism in ORF Delta 32/wt heterozygous individuals revealed that LCs isolated from -2459A/G + ORF Delta 32/wt individuals were markedly less susceptible to HIV than were LCs from -2459A/A + ORF Delta 32/wt individuals (P = 0.012). Interestingly, these genetic susceptibility data in LCs parallel those of genetic susceptibility studies performed in cohorts of HIV-infected individuals. Thus, we suggest that CCR5-mediated infection of LCs, and not capture of virus by LCs, provides a biologic basis for understanding certain aspects of host genetic susceptibility to initial HIV infection.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection. PMID:12709027

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection.

  4. Induction of copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase by CCL5/CCR5 activation causes tumour necrosis factor-alpha and reactive oxygen species production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Ding, Li; Huang, Jin; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Junping; Guo, Baoyu

    2009-09-01

    Using two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we found that copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD, SOD-1) was induced in constructed CCR5 stably transfected HEK 293 cells, but not in mock cells, treated with CCL5. CCL5-induced SOD-1 expression was also confirmed in HEK 293-CCR5 cells and CCR5-positive granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced human macrophages and murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. CCL5 and CCR5 interaction induced SOD-1 expression mainly via MEK-ERK activation. In addition, we provided evidence that upregulation of SOD-1 by CCL5/CCR5 activation occurred in parallel with the increased release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitric oxide and production of intracellular reactive oxygen species as well as enhanced nuclear factor-kappaB transcriptional activity in CCR5-positive RAW264.7 cells. Conversely, the MEK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 significantly inhibited SOD-1 expression with the decrease of these biological responses. More importantly, inhibition of SOD-1 activity by disulfiram also strongly inhibited the CCL5-induced biological effects. These data suggest that SOD-1 mediates CCR5 activation by CCL5 and that pharmacological modulation of SOD-1 may be beneficial to CCR5-associated diseases.

  5. Maximal T cell-mediated antitumor responses rely upon CCR5 expression in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    González-Martín, Alicia; Gómez, Lucio; Lustgarten, Joseph; Mira, Emilia; Mañes, Santos

    2011-08-15

    Immune responses against cancer rely upon leukocyte trafficking patterns that are coordinated by chemokines. CCR5, the receptor for chemotactic chemokines MIP1alpha, MIP1beta, and RANTES (CCL3, CCL4, CCL5), exerts major regulatory effects on CD4(+)- and CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity. Although CCR5 and its ligands participate in the response to various pathogens, its relevance to tumoral immune control has been debated. Here, we report that CCR5 has a specific, ligand-dependent role in optimizing antitumor responses. In adoptive transfer studies, efficient tumor rejection required CCR5 expression by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. CCR5 activation in CD4(+) cells resulted in CD40L upregulation, leading to full maturation of antigen-presenting cells and enhanced CD8(+) T-cell crosspriming and tumor infiltration. CCR5 reduced chemical-induced fibrosarcoma incidence and growth, but did not affect the onset or progression of spontaneous breast cancers in tolerogenic Tg(MMTV-neu) mice. However, CCR5 was required for TLR9-mediated reactivation of antineu responses in these mice. Our results indicate that CCR5 boosts T-cell responses to tumors by modulating helper-dependent CD8(+) T-cell activation.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of a CCR5 inhibitor in rhesus macaques following vaginal, rectal and oral application

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, R. Karl; Lowry, Deborah; Boyd, Peter; Geer, Leslie; Veazey, Ronald S.; Goldman, Laurie; Klasse, P. J.; Shattock, Robin J.; Moore, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study measured and compared the pharmacokinetics of CMPD167, a small molecule antiretroviral CCR5 inhibitor with potential as an HIV microbicide, following vaginal, rectal and oral administration in rhesus macaques. Methods A vaginal hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) gel, a rectal HEC gel, a silicone elastomer matrix-type vaginal ring and an oral solution, each containing CMPD167, were prepared and administered to rhesus macaques pretreated with Depo-Provera. CMPD167 concentrations in vaginal fluid, vaginal tissue (ring only), rectal fluid and blood plasma were quantified by HPLC–mass spectrometry. Results CMPD167 concentrations measured in rectal fluid, vaginal fluid and blood plasma were highly dependent on both the route of administration and the formulation type. Although rectal and vaginal fluid concentrations were highest when CMPD167 was administered locally (via either gel or ring), lower concentrations of the drug were also measured in these compartments following administration at the remote mucosal site or orally. CMPD167 levels in the vaginal and rectal fluid following oral administration were relatively low compared with local administration. Conclusions The study provides clear evidence for vaginal–rectal and rectal–vaginal drug transfer pathways and suggests that oral pre-exposure prophylaxis with CMPD167 may be less efficacious at preventing sexual transmission of HIV-1 than topically applied products. PMID:24381072

  7. The Black Death and AIDS: CCR5-Delta32 in genetics and history.

    PubMed

    Cohn, S K; Weaver, L T

    2006-08-01

    Black Death and AIDS are global pandemics that have captured the popular imagination, both attracting extravagant hypotheses to account for their origins and geographical distributions. Medical scientists have recently attempted to connect these two great pandemics. Some argue that the Black Death of 1346-52 was responsible for a genetic shift that conferred a degree of resistance to HIV 1 infection, that this shift was almost unique to European descendents, and that it mirrors the intensity of Black Death mortality within Europe. Such a hypothesis is not supported by the historical evidence: the Black Death did not strike Europe alone but spread from the east, devastating regions such as China, North Africa, and the Middle East as much or even more than Europe. Further, in Europe its levels of mortality do not correspond with the geographic distribution of the proportion of descendents with this CCR5 gene. If anything, the gradient of Black Death mortality sloped in the opposite direction from that of present-day genotypes: the heaviest casualties were in the Mediterranean, the very regions whose descendents account for the lowest incidences of the HIV-1 resistant allele. We argue that closer collaboration between historians and scientists is needed to understand the selective pressures on genetic mutation, and the possible triggers for changes in genetic spatial frequencies over the past millennia. This requires care and respect for each other's methods of evaluating data.

  8. Downregulation of CCR5 inhibits the proliferation and invasion of cervical cancer cells and is regulated by microRNA-107.

    PubMed

    Che, Li-Fan; Shao, Su-Fang; Wang, Li-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer is among the most prevalent forms of cancer worldwide. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is hypothesized to be a key functional protein involved in tumorigenesis. However, the role of CCR5 in cervical cancer remains unclear. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression levels of CCR5 in human cervical carcinoma tissues. Furthermore, a small interfering RNA was employed to knockdown CCR5 in HeLa and C33A cells. MTT, colony formation and Transwell assays were performed to determine the effects of this knockdown on cell viability, proliferation and invasion. In addition, micro RNA (miR)-107 was identified as a potential candidate regulator of CCR5 using miR prediction algorithms, and the effects of miR-107 and its antisense miR on CCR5 mRNA expression were determined. The results of the present study indicated that CCR5 is overexpressed in human cervical cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues, and its downregulation inhibits cervical cancer cell growth and proliferation. Furthermore, the downregulation of CCR5 appears to suppress cervical cancer cell invasion. Finally, the tumor suppressor miR-107 was able to directly target CCR5 and inhibit its expression. These results suggest that the upregulation of CCR5, which is inhibited by miR-107, may play a carcinogenic role in cervical cancer and could provide a novel therapeutic target in the future.

  9. Assessment of the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of maraviroc, a novel CCR5 antagonist, in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Samantha; van der Ryst, Elna; Rosario, Maria C; Ridgway, Caroline E; Medhurst, Christine G; Taylor-Worth, Richard J; Muirhead, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of single and multiple oral doses of maraviroc in healthy volunteers. Methods Three double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation studies with either single or multiple doses of maraviroc were conducted in healthy volunteers. Plasma and urine samples were collected to investigate the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc and evaluate any changes with respect to dose and duration/frequency of dosing. Safety and toleration of maraviroc were also assessed. Results Maraviroc is rapidly absorbed following oral administration, and plasma Tmax is achieved within 0.5–4.0 h postdose. Steady-state plasma concentrations are achieved after 7 consecutive days of dosing. Although the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc is nonproportional over the dose range studied (3–1200 mg), the degree of nonproportionality is small at clinically relevant doses. Renal clearance is approximately 10–12 l h−1 and appears unaffected by increasing maraviroc doses. Maraviroc does not significantly modulate the activity of CYP2D6 or CYP3A4 at clinically relevant doses. There were no serious adverse events in any of these studies, and doses up to 900 mg were generally well tolerated, with postural hypotension being the dose-limiting event. There was no pattern or dose relationship observed with maraviroc with regard to laboratory abnormalities, including hepatic transaminases. No clinically significant increases in QTc were noted at clinically relevant doses. Conclusions Maraviroc is absorbed into the systemic circulation and reaches steady state by day 7 of multiple dosing. It does not significantly influence the activity of major drug-metabolizing enzymes and is well tolerated at clinically relevant doses, with most adverse events being mild or moderate. PMID:18333861

  10. Coreceptor gene imprinting governs thymocyte lineage fate

    PubMed Central

    Adoro, Stanley; McCaughtry, Thomas; Erman, Batu; Alag, Amala; Van Laethem, François; Park, Jung-Hyun; Tai, Xuguang; Kimura, Motoko; Wang, Lie; Grinberg, Alex; Kubo, Masato; Bosselut, Remy; Love, Paul; Singer, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    Immature thymocytes are bipotential cells that are signalled during positive selection to become either helper- or cytotoxic-lineage T cells. By tracking expression of lineage determining transcription factors during positive selection, we now report that the Cd8 coreceptor gene locus co-opts any coreceptor protein encoded within it to induce thymocytes to express the cytotoxic-lineage factor Runx3 and to adopt the cytotoxic-lineage fate, findings we refer to as ‘coreceptor gene imprinting'. Specifically, encoding CD4 proteins in the endogenous Cd8 gene locus caused major histocompatibility complex class II-specific thymocytes to express Runx3 during positive selection and to differentiate into CD4+ cytotoxic-lineage T cells. Our findings further indicate that coreceptor gene imprinting derives from the dynamic regulation of specific cis Cd8 gene enhancer elements by positive selection signals in the thymus. Thus, for coreceptor-dependent thymocytes, lineage fate is determined by Cd4 and Cd8 coreceptor gene loci and not by the specificity of T-cell antigen receptor/coreceptor signalling. This study identifies coreceptor gene imprinting as a critical determinant of lineage fate determination in the thymus. PMID:22036949

  11. [The HIV-infection outbreak in the town Lys'va (Perm region): homozygote genotype CCR5 delta32/CCR5 delta32 provides the high level of the persistence in the parenteral transmission of the virus].

    PubMed

    Riabov, G S; Kazennova, E V; Korepanova, L B; Mal'tseva, E A; Zhalnin, V V; Krasnikova, L A; Zverev, S Ia; Pokrovskiĭ, V V; Bobkov, A F; Weber, J N

    2002-01-01

    Specific features of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission among injecting drug users were studied on HIV infection outbreak in Lysva, the Perm region. During the period from November 1998 to March 2000, 32 injecting drug users infected with the subtype A HIV-1 variant originating from the same source, were found in this town. To understand the role of the CCR5 delta 32 mutation in parenteral transmission of HIV-1 the distribution of the mutant CCR5 delta 32 allele in HIV-infected and in non-infected but HIV-exposed drug users (n = 74) was analysed. The percentage of the homozygous CCR5 delta 32 genotype among HIV-exposed individuals (4/74, 5.4%) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the analogous rate for healthy blood donors in Russia (1/163, 0.6%). Thus, the homozygosity for this mutant allele confers a high resistance level to HIV even in parenteral transmission.

  12. Possible contribution of chemokine receptor CCR2 and CCR5 polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of chronic spontaneous autoreactive urticaria.

    PubMed

    Brzoza, Z; Grzeszczak, W; Rogala, B; Trautsolt, W; Moczulski, D

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune mechanisms play a role in the pathophysiology of chronic urticaria. As the genetic background of autoimmunity is well proven, the role of genetics in chronic urticaria is hypothesised. 153 unrelated chronic spontaneous urticaria patients with a positive result of autologous serum skin test were included into the study, as were 115 healthy volunteers as control group. In all subjects we analysed CCR2 G190A and CCR5 d32 polymorphisms. We noticed higher prevalence of CCR2 A allele as well as lower frequency of CCR5 d32 in chronic urticaria group in comparison to control group, with borderline statistical significance. Additionally, we assumed haplotype Gd statistically significant negative chronic urticaria association with tendency to higher frequency of Aw haplotype in this group. The results of our study imply the role of autoimmune components in chronic urticaria pathogenesis and present chronic urticaria as possibly genetically related disorder. Copyright © 2012 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated CCR5 Ablation in Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Confers HIV-1 Resistance In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Yang, Huan; Gao, Yang; Chen, Zeyu; Xie, Liangfu; Liu, Yulin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Xiaobao; Li, Hanwei; Lai, Weifeng; He, Yuan; Yao, Anzhi; Ma, Liying; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Chengyan; Chen, Hu; Deng, Hongkui

    2017-08-02

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with a naturally occurring CCR5 mutation confers a loss of detectable HIV-1 in the patient, making ablation of the CCR5 gene in HSCs an ideal therapy for an HIV-1 cure. Although CCR5 disruption has been attempted in CD4(+) T cells and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), efficient gene editing with high specificity and long-term therapeutic potential remains a major challenge for clinical translation. Here, we established a CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system in human CD34(+) HSPCs and achieved efficient CCR5 ablation evaluated in long-term reconstituted NOD/Prkdc(scid)/IL-2Rγ(null) mice. The CCR5 disruption efficiency in our system remained robust in secondary transplanted repopulating hematopoietic cells. More importantly, an HIV-1 resistance effect was observed as indicated by significant reduction of virus titration and enrichment of human CD4(+) T cells. Hence, we successfully established a CRISPR/Cas9 mediated CCR5 ablating system in long-term HSCs, which confers HIV-1 resistance in vivo. Our study provides evidence for translating CCR5 gene-edited HSC transplantation for an HIV cure to the clinic. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic Susceptibility to Cardiac and Digestive Clinical Forms of Chronic Chagas Disease: Involvement of the CCR5 59029 A/G Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Amanda Priscila; Bernardo, Cássia Rubia; Camargo, Ana Vitória da Silveira; Ronchi, Luiz Sérgio; Borim, Aldenis Albaneze; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara Cássia; de Campos Júnior, Eumildo; Castiglioni, Lílian; Netinho, João Gomes; Cavasini, Carlos Eugênio; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of chronic Chagas disease include the cardiac form of the disease and the digestive form. Not all the factors that act in the variable clinical course of this disease are known. This study investigated whether the CCR5Δ32 (rs333) and CCR5 59029 A/G (promoter region—rs1799987) polymorphisms of the CCR5 gene are associated with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease and with the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD). The antibodies anti-T. cruzi were identified by ELISA. PCR and PCR-RFLP were used to identify the CCR5Δ32 and CCR5 59029 A/G polymorphisms. The chi-square test was used to compare variables between groups. There was a higher frequency of the AA genotype in patients with CCHD compared with patients with the digestive form of the disease and the control group. The results also showed a high frequency of the AG genotype in patients with the digestive form of the disease compared to the other groups. The results of this study show that the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism does not seem to influence the different clinical manifestations of Chagas disease but there is involvement of the CCR5 59029 A/G polymorphism in susceptibility to the different forms of chronic Chagas disease. Besides, these polymorphisms do not influence left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with CCHD. PMID:26599761

  15. Genetic variations in the receptor-ligand pair CCR5 and CCL3L1 are important determinants of susceptibility to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jane C; Shimizu, Chisato; Gonzalez, Enrique; Kulkarni, Hemant; Patel, Sukeshi; Shike, Hiroko; Sundel, Robert S; Newburger, Jane W; Ahuja, Sunil K

    2005-07-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an enigmatic, self-limited vasculitis of childhood that is complicated by development of coronary-artery aneurysms. The high incidence of KD in Asian versus European populations prompted a search for genetic polymorphisms that are differentially distributed among these populations and that influence KD susceptibility. Here, we demonstrate a striking, inverse relationship between the worldwide distribution of CCR5- Delta 32 allele and the incidence of KD. In 164 KD patient-parent trios, 4 CCR5 haplotypes including the CCR5- Delta 32 allele were differentially transmitted from heterozygous parents to affected children. However, the magnitude of the reduced risk of KD associated with the CCR5- Delta 32 allele and certain CCR5 haplotypes was significantly greater in individuals who also possessed a high copy number of the gene encoding CCL3L1, the most potent CCR5 ligand. These findings, derived from the largest genetic study of any systemic vasculitis, suggest a central role of CCR5-CCL3L1 gene-gene interactions in KD susceptibility and the importance of gene modifiers in infectious diseases.

  16. Peripheral blood T4 cell surface CCR5 density as a marker of activity in rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Portalès, Pierre; Fabre, Sylvie; Vincent, Thierry; Desmetz, Caroline; Réant, Brigitte; Noël, Danièle; Clot, Jacques; Jorgensen, Christian; Corbeau, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The chemokine (C-C motif) receptor CCR5 and its ligand CCL5 play key roles in the intra-articular recruitment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, using quantitative cytofluorometry, we followed T4 cell surface CCR5 density in 27 subjects with RA before and after treatment with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab. We observed low T4 cell surface CCR5 densities before treatment, which correlated positively with disease activity, as determined using a disease activity score evaluated on 28 joints (DAS 28), and negatively with CCL5 mRNA concentrations in PBMC, contrasting with a high proportion of intracellular CCR5 molecules, a pattern compatible with ligand-induced CCR5 internalization. At 3 months post-treatment, CCL5 mRNA expression in PBMC declined, whereas T4 cell surface CCR5 densities increased proportionally to the decrease in DAS 28. Thus, peripheral blood T4 cell surface CCR5 density is a good surrogate marker of RA activity and of the efficiency of anti-CD20 therapy. PMID:19740335

  17. CCR5-delta 32 allele is associated with the risk of developing multiple sclerosis in the Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Majid; Ebadi, Hamid; Fathi, Davood; Roshandel, Danial; Mahamadhoseeni, Mana; Rashidbaghan, Azam; Mahammadi, Narges; Mahammadi, Mahammad Reza; Zamani, Mahdi

    2009-12-01

    The 32-base pair deletion on the C-C chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5-delta 32) is known as a protective allele against immune system disorders. We have studied this variation in Iranian multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and healthy controls. DNA samples were prepared from the whole blood of 254 patients with MS and 380 healthy controls. We amplified the fragment including the CCR5-delta 32 polymorphism and visualized the products in a documentation system after agarose gel electrophoresis. Data were analysed using one-way ANOVA and Fisher's exact tests with SPSS-v13 and STATA-v8 software. The delta 32 allele was more frequent in MS patients when compared with controls (OR = 2.3, P < 0.0001). Also, we found a significant difference in the frequency of the delta 32/delta 32 genotype among patients and controls (OR = 7.4, P < 0.001). The mean age at onset and progression index was not significantly different between patients with various genotypes. According to our study, the delta 32 allele of the CCR5 gene might be a predisposing factor for MS development in the Iranian population. However, there were no associations between this polymorphism and the clinical course of the disease in this study.

  18. Catalytic antibody light chain capable of cleaving a chemokine receptor CCR-5 peptide with a high reaction rate constant.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, Yukie; Hifumi, Emi; Tsuruhata, Kumi; Fujinami, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Uda, Taizo

    2004-04-20

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb), ECL2B-2, was obtained by immunizing a peptide possessing a part of a sequence of a chemokine receptor, CCR-5, which is present as a membrane protein on the macrophage surface, and which plays an important role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. From the DNA and the deduced amino acid sequences of the light and heavy chains of ECL2B-2 MAb, molecular modeling was conducted to calculate the steric conformation of the antibody. Modeling suggested that the structure of ECL2B-2 could possess one or two catalytic triad(s), composed of Asp(1), Ser(27a) (or Ser(27e)), and His(93) (or His(27d)), in the light chain of ECL2B-2. The three amino acid residues, Asp(1), Ser(27a), and His(93), are identical to those of catalytic antibody light chains such as VIPase and i41SL1-2. The light chain of ECL2B-2 MAb degraded the antigenic peptide CCR-5 within about 100 h. Surprisingly, the light chain had a very high catalytic reaction rate constant (k(cat)) of 2.23 min(-1), which is greater by factors of tens to hundreds than those of natural catalytic antibodies obtained previously. The heavy chain of ECL2B-2 MAb, which has no catalytic triad because of a lack of His residue, did not degrade the CCR-5 peptide.

  19. Splenic differentiation and emergence of CCR5+CXCL9+CXCL10+ monocyte-derived dendritic cells in the brain during cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Hirako, Isabella C.; Ataide, Marco A.; Faustino, Lucas; Assis, Patricia A.; Sorensen, Elizabeth W.; Ueta, Hisashi; Araújo, Natalia M.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Luster, Andrew D.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells have an important role in immune surveillance. After being exposed to microbial components, they migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and activate T lymphocytes. Here we show that during mouse malaria, splenic inflammatory monocytes differentiate into monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MO-DCs), which are CD11b+F4/80+CD11c+MHCIIhighDC-SIGNhighLy6c+ and express high levels of CCR5, CXCL9 and CXCL10 (CCR5+CXCL9/10+ MO-DCs). We propose that malaria-induced splenic MO-DCs take a reverse migratory route. After differentiation in the spleen, CCR5+CXCL9/10+ MO-DCs traffic to the brain in a CCR2-independent, CCR5-dependent manner, where they amplify the influx of CD8+ T lymphocytes, leading to a lethal neuropathological syndrome. PMID:27808089

  20. Role of CCR5 and its ligands in the control of vascular inflammation and leukocyte recruitment required for acute excitotoxic seizure induction and neural damage

    PubMed Central

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Chekmasova, Alena; Marusich, Elena; Agrawal, Lokesh; Strayer, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Chemokines may play a role in leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during neuroinflammation and other neuropathological processes, such as epilepsy. We investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5 in seizures. We used a rat model based on intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA) administration. Four months before KA injection, adult rats were given femoral intramarrow inoculations of SV (RNAiR5-RevM10.AU1), which carries an interfering RNA (RNAi) against CCR5, plus a marker epitope (AU1), or its monofunctional RNAi-carrying homologue, SV(RNAiR5). This treatment lowered expression of CCR5 in circulating cells. In control rats, seizures induced elevated expression of CCR5 ligands MIP-1α and RANTES in the microvasculature, increased BBB leakage and CCR5+ cells, as well as neuronal loss, inflammation, and gliosis in the hippocampi. Animals given either the bifunctional or the monofunctional vector were largely protected from KA-induced seizures, neuroinflammation, BBB damage, and neuron loss. Brain CCR5 mRNA was reduced. Rats receiving RNAiR5-bearing vectors showed far greater repair responses: increased neuronal proliferation, and decreased production of MIP-1α and RANTES. Controls received unrelated SV(BUGT) vectors. Decrease in CCR5 in circulating cells strongly protected from excitotoxin-induced seizures, BBB leakage, CNS injury, and inflammation, and facilitated neurogenic repair.—Louboutin, J.-P., Chekmasova, A., Marusich, E., Agrawal, L., Strayer, D. S. Role of CCR5 and its ligands in the control of vascular inflammation and leukocyte recruitment required for acute excitotoxic seizure induction and neural damage. PMID:20940264

  1. Coreceptor Tropism Can Be Influenced by Amino Acid Substitutions in the gp41 Transmembrane Subunit of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Toma, Jonathan; Fransen, Signe; Stawiski, Eric; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Whitcomb, Jeannette M.; Parkin, Neil; Petropoulos, Christos J.

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the third variable region (V3) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) is a major determinant of coreceptor tropism. Other regions in the surface gp120 subunit of Env can modulate coreceptor tropism in a manner that is not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated the effect of env determinants outside of V3 on coreceptor usage through the analysis of (i) patient-derived env clones that differ in coreceptor tropism, (ii) chimeric env sequences, and (iii) site-directed mutants. The introduction of distinct V3 sequences from CXCR4-using clones into an R5-tropic env backbone conferred the inefficient use of CXCR4 in some but not all cases. Conversely, in many cases, X4- and dual-tropic env backbones containing the V3 sequences of R5-tropic clones retained the ability to use CXCR4, suggesting that sequences outside of the V3 regions of these CXCR4-using clones were responsible for CXCR4 use. The determinants of CXCR4 use in a set of dual-tropic env sequences with V3 sequences identical to those of R5-tropic clones mapped to the gp41 transmembrane (TM) subunit. In one case, a single-amino-acid substitution in the fusion peptide of TM was able to confer CXCR4 use; however, TM substitutions associated with CXCR4 use varied among different env sequences. These results demonstrate that sequences in TM can modulate coreceptor specificity and that env sequences other than that of V3 may facilitate efficient CXCR4-mediated entry. We hypothesize that the latter plays an important role in the transition from CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor use. PMID:18353956

  2. The impact of CCR5-Δ32 deletion on C-reactive protein levels and cardiovascular disease: Results from the Danish Blood Donor Study.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Khoa M; Pedersen, Ole B; Petersen, Mikkel S; Sørensen, Erik; Sørensen, Cecilie J; Kaspersen, Kathrine A; Larsen, Margit H; Møller, Bjarne; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Ullum, Henrik; Erikstrup, Christian

    2015-09-01

    The C-C chemokine receptor 5-Δ32 deletion (CCR5-Δ32) has been associated with lower levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), but the effect on cardiovascular diseases is uncertain. This study addresses the impact of CCR5-Δ32 on the risk of low-grade inflammation and hospitalization with cardiovascular diseases in a large cohort of blood donors. Genotyping of 15,206 healthy participants from The Danish Blood Donor Study for CCR5-Δ32 was performed and combined with CRP measurements and questionnaire data. Cardiovascular disease diagnoses were identified by ICD-10 codes in the Danish National Patient Registry. CCR5-Δ32-carriers had a higher risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases when compared with wild-type homozygotes (hazard ratio = 1.35, 95%-confidence interval: 1.00-1.87). CRP levels were unaffected by the CCR5-Δ32 deletion. In this cohort, carriers of the CCR5-Δ32 deletion had normal CRP levels but a borderline significant increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evidence for recent selection of the CCR5-delta 32 deletion from differences in its frequency between Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews.

    PubMed

    Maayan, S; Zhang, L; Shinar, E; Ho, J; He, T; Manni, N; Kostrikis, L G; Neumann, A U

    2000-08-01

    Recent studies have shown higher frequencies of the CCR5-delta 32 allele and the CCR5-delta 32/delta 32 genotype, which confers protection against HIV infection, in northern Europe as compared to Mediterranean countries. Here, we analyse the prevalence of CCR5-delta 32 in 922 HIV seronegative blood donors in Israel to verify its frequency in Jews of Ashkenazi and Sephardi origin. A significant difference (P < 0.001) was found between the CCR5-delta 32 allele frequency in Ashkenazi (13.8%) vs (4.9%) Jews. In contrast, no significant difference was observed in the frequency of the CCR2-641 mutation between Ashkenazi (9.2%) and Sephardi (13.4%) Jews. Using the Island model we calculate that a minimal genetic migration rate of 3% per generation would have been necessary if the higher CCR5-delta 32 prevalence in Ashkenazi is to be fully explained by mixing with the indigenous north-European populations. This putative migration rate is 20-fold higher than that currently estimated from other genes, and would correspond to a non-realistic minimal current admixture of 80%. Thus, our results suggest that a positive selection process for CCR5-delta 32 should have occurred in northern Europe at most a 1000 years ago, after the Ashkenazi Jews separated from their Sephardi kin and moved to north Europe.

  4. Allo-immunization elicits CCR5 antibodies, SDF-1 chemokines, and CD8-suppressor factors that inhibit transmission of R5 and X4 HIV-1 in women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Underwood, J; Vaughan, R; Harmer, A; Doyle, C; Lehner, T

    2002-09-01

    Studies in humans suggest that allo-immunization induces CC-chemokines, CD8-suppressor factors (SF) and anti-HIV immunity. Here we report that allo-immunization with unmatched leucocytes from partners of women with recurrent spontaneous abortion elicits specific antibodies to the CCR5 receptor. Such antibodies inhibit replication of M-tropic HIV-1 (R5) and MIP-1beta-mediated chemotaxis. These CCR5 antibodies were also found in the sera of multiparous women that were naturally immunized by semi-allogeneic fetal antigens. The specificity of these antibodies was demonstrated by adsorption with CCR5 transfected HEK-293 cells, a baculovirus CCR5 preparation and a peptide of the