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Sample records for cd40 ligand-treated human

  1. Bidirectional regulation of human B cell responses by CD40-CD40 ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, T; McIlraith, M J; Grammer, A C; Miura, Y; Attrep, J F; Shimaoka, Y; Lipsky, P E

    1997-05-15

    Positive and negative effects of CD40 ligation on human B cell function were suggested by the observation that mAb to CD40 ligand partially blocked the suppressive influences of anti-CD3-stimulated control CD4+ T cells, as well as the B cell stimulatory effects of anti-CD3 activated mitomycin C-treated CD4+ T cells. To examine the negative effects of CD40 ligation in greater detail, B cells were cultured with anti-CD3 activated mitomycin C-treated CD4+ T cells that expressed optimal levels of CD40 ligand; additional recombinant human CD40 ligand significantly suppressed Ig production, but not proliferation. In contrast, when B cells were stimulated with SAC (formalinized Cowan I strain Staphylococcus aureus) and IL-2 in the absence of T cells, small amounts of recombinant CD40 ligand-stimulated Ig production, whereas larger quantities directly suppressed Ig secretion. The suppressive action of CD40 ligation on Ig production was most apparent after initial B cell activation. Moreover, IgD-memory B cells were significantly more sensitive to inhibition by CD40 ligation than IgD+ naive B cells. Engagement of CD40 not only suppressed Ig secretion by IgD- memory B cells, but also expression of CD38. Finally, activated B cells acquired the capacity to down-regulate CD40 ligand expression by stimulated CD4+ T cells more effectively than resting B cells. These results indicate that during T cell-B cell collaboration, engagement of CD40 can influence Ig production both positively and negatively, depending on the density of CD40 ligand as well as the stage of B cell activation and differentiation.

  2. Levels of human platelet-derived soluble CD40 ligand depend on haplotypes of CD40LG-CD40-ITGA2.

    PubMed

    Aloui, Chaker; Prigent, Antoine; Tariket, Sofiane; Sut, Caroline; Fagan, Jocelyne; Cognasse, Fabrice; Chakroun, Tahar; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Increased circulating soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) is commonly associated with inflammatory disorders. We aimed to investigate whether gene polymorphisms in CD40LG, CD40 and ITGA2 are associated with a propensity to secrete sCD40L; thus, we examined this issue at the level of human platelets, the principal source of sCD40L. We performed single polymorphism and haplotype analyses to test for the effect of twelve polymorphisms across the CD40LG, CD40 and ITGA2 genes in blood donors. ITGA2 presented a positive association with rs1126643, with a significant modification in sCD40L secretion (carriers of C allele, P =  0.02), unlike the investigated CD40LG and CD40 polymorphisms. One CD40LG haplotype (TGGC) showing rs975379 (C/T), rs3092952 (A/G), rs3092933 (A/G) and rs3092929 (A/C) was associated with increased sCD40L levels (1.906 μg/L (95% CI: 1.060 to 2.751); P = 0.000009). The sCD40L level was associated with the inter-chromosomal CD40LG/CD40/ITGA2 haplotype (ATC), displaying rs3092952 (A/G), rs1883832 (C/T) and rs1126643 (C/T), with increased sCD40L levels (P = 0.0135). Our results help to decipher the genetic role of CD40LG, CD40 and ITGA2 with regard to sCD40L levels found in platelet components. Given the crucial role of sCD40L, this haplotype study in a transfusion model may be helpful to further determine the role of haplotypes in inflammatory clinical settings. PMID:27094978

  3. Levels of human platelet-derived soluble CD40 ligand depend on haplotypes of CD40LG-CD40-ITGA2

    PubMed Central

    Aloui, Chaker; Prigent, Antoine; Tariket, Sofiane; Sut, Caroline; Fagan, Jocelyne; Cognasse, Fabrice; Chakroun, Tahar; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Increased circulating soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) is commonly associated with inflammatory disorders. We aimed to investigate whether gene polymorphisms in CD40LG, CD40 and ITGA2 are associated with a propensity to secrete sCD40L; thus, we examined this issue at the level of human platelets, the principal source of sCD40L. We performed single polymorphism and haplotype analyses to test for the effect of twelve polymorphisms across the CD40LG, CD40 and ITGA2 genes in blood donors. ITGA2 presented a positive association with rs1126643, with a significant modification in sCD40L secretion (carriers of C allele, P = 0.02), unlike the investigated CD40LG and CD40 polymorphisms. One CD40LG haplotype (TGGC) showing rs975379 (C/T), rs3092952 (A/G), rs3092933 (A/G) and rs3092929 (A/C) was associated with increased sCD40L levels (1.906 μg/L (95% CI: 1.060 to 2.751); P = 0.000009). The sCD40L level was associated with the inter-chromosomal CD40LG/CD40/ITGA2 haplotype (ATC), displaying rs3092952 (A/G), rs1883832 (C/T) and rs1126643 (C/T), with increased sCD40L levels (P = 0.0135). Our results help to decipher the genetic role of CD40LG, CD40 and ITGA2 with regard to sCD40L levels found in platelet components. Given the crucial role of sCD40L, this haplotype study in a transfusion model may be helpful to further determine the role of haplotypes in inflammatory clinical settings. PMID:27094978

  4. Analysis of CD40-CD40 ligand interactions in the regulation of human B cell function.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, P E; Attrep, J F; Grammer, A C; McIlraith, M J; Nishioka, Y

    1997-04-01

    CD40-CD40 ligand interactions play an essential role in T cell/B cell collaboration. The data presented in this review have served to widen the scope of CD40-CD40 ligand interactions to include initial activation, proliferation, differentiation, and isotype switching of B cells, as well as subsequent downregulation of B cell function. Moreover, CD40 ligand expression by activated B cells is likely to play an essential role in facilitating ongoing responses of stimulated B cells maturing in germinal centers. Finally, CD40 expression by activated T cells may also play an important role in regulating the function of helper T cells within germinal centers. In summary, emerging data have expanded the role of CD40-CD40 ligand interaction during T cell/B cell collaboration and have emphasized its potential to regulate many of the functions of both partners in this essential interaction involved in antibody production.

  5. Chromosomal localization of the gene for human B-cell antigen CD40

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, N.; Geha, R. ); Ramesh, V.; Gusella, J.F. )

    1993-05-01

    CD40 is a surface glycoprotein expressed on all human B lymphocytes and plays an important role in B-cell development, growth, and differentiation. Anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies cause isotype switching in B cells treated with IL-4. CD40 is a member of a family of proteins that include low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor, TNF receptor, and the antigen Fas. The ligand for CD40 had been recently identified and had been assigned to the X chromosome. Using a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, the authors now show that CD40 maps to human chromosome 20.

  6. Functional Antagonism of Human CD40 Achieved by Targeting a Unique Species-Specific Epitope.

    PubMed

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Suri, Anish; Krystek, Stanley R; Tamura, James; Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Kuhn, Robert; Carroll, Karen; Fleener, Catherine; Ryseck, Rolf; Cheng, Lin; An, Yongmi; Drew, Philip; Grant, Steven; Suchard, Suzanne J; Nadler, Steven G; Bryson, James W; Sheriff, Steven

    2016-07-17

    Current clinical anti-CD40 biologic agents include both antagonist molecules for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and agonist molecules for immuno-oncology, yet the relationship between CD40 epitope and these opposing biological outcomes is not well defined. This report describes the identification of potent antagonist domain antibodies (dAbs) that bind to a novel human CD40-specific epitope that is divergent in the CD40 of nonhuman primates. A similarly selected anti-cynomolgus CD40 dAb recognizing the homologous epitope is also a potent antagonist. Mutagenesis, biochemical, and X-ray crystallography studies demonstrate that the epitope is distinct from that of CD40 agonists. Both the human-specific and cynomolgus-specific molecules remain pure antagonists even when formatted as bivalent Fc-fusion proteins, making this an attractive therapeutic format for targeting hCD40 in autoimmune indications. PMID:27216500

  7. The CD40 ligand expressed by human B cells costimulates B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; Bergman, M C; Miura, Y; Fujita, K; Davis, L S; Lipsky, P E

    1995-05-15

    The possibility that activated B cells might express a ligand for CD40 that was of functional importance for B cell responses was examined by using highly purified human peripheral blood B cells, as well as a variety of B lymphoblastoid cell lines and hybridomas. Following stimulation with the combination of a calcium ionophore and a phorbol ester, human B cells bound a soluble fusion protein containing the extracellular portion of CD40 and the Fc region of IgG1 (CD40.Ig). A variety of B cell lines and hybridomas also bound CD40.Ig, either constitutively or after activation. In addition, CD40.Ig specifically immunoprecipitated a 33-kDa glycoprotein from surface 125I-labeled activated B cells. The nucleotide sequence of the coding region of the CD40 ligand mRNA amplified by RT-PCR from activated T cells and B cell lines was identical. The CD40 ligand expressed on human B cells was important functionally because homotypic aggregation of CD40 ligand-expressing B cells was inhibited by the CD40.Ig construct. Additionally, RNA and DNA synthesis as well as Ig production by polyclonally activated, highly purified peripheral B cells and a variety of B cell lines were inhibited significantly by the CD40.Ig construct. Finally, B cell lines expressing the CD40 ligand induced Ig production from resting normal B cells in a CD40-dependent manner. These results indicate that human B cells express a ligand for CD40 that is identical with that expressed by activated T cells and that the B cell-expressed CD40 ligand plays an important role in facilitating responses of activated B cells.

  8. CD40 signaling in human dendritic cells is initiated within membrane rafts

    PubMed Central

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Azocar, Olga; Servet-Delprat, Christine; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Gerlier, Denis; Manié, Serge

    2000-01-01

    Despite CD40’s role in stimulating dendritic cells (DCs) for efficient specific T-cell stimulation, its signal transduction components in DCs are still poorly documented. We show that CD40 receptors on human monocyte-derived DCs associate with sphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich plasma membrane microdomains, termed membrane rafts. Following engagement, CD40 utilizes membrane raft-associated Lyn Src family kinase, and possibly other raft-associated Src family kinases, to initiate tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular substrates. CD40 engagement also leads to a membrane raft-restricted recruitment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 3 and, to a lesser extent, TRAF2, to CD40’s cytoplasmic tail. Thus, the membrane raft structure plays an integral role in proximal events of CD40 signaling in DCs. We demonstrate that stimulation of Src family kinase within membrane rafts initiates a pathway implicating ERK activation, which leads to interleukin (IL)-1α/β and IL-1Ra mRNA production and contributes to p38-dependent IL-12 mRNA production. These results provide the first evidence that membrane rafts play a critical role in initiation of CD40 signaling in DCs, and delineate the outcome of CD40-mediated pathways on cytokine production. PMID:10880443

  9. CD40-CD40 ligand (CD154) engagement is required but not sufficient for modulating MHC class I, ICAM-1 and Fas expression and proliferation of human non-small cell lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Shiroko, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Sugiyama, Y; Egilmez, N K; Chen, F A; Bankert, R B

    2001-05-15

    To determine the possible functional significance of CD40 expression on human non-small cell lung carcinomas and to assess the potential of CD40 as a therapeutic target, 18 lung tumor cell lines were established from biopsy tissues and were monitored for phenotypic changes on the cell surface and alterations in tumor cell proliferation after the ligation of CD40 with a trimeric fusion protein complex of CD40 ligand (CD40Lt). CD40 cross-linking resulted in up to a 6-fold increase in the surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, Fas and intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 in a subset of tumors expressing the highest levels of CD40. Suppression of tumor proliferation was seen after the ligation of CD40 on CD40Lt-responsive cell lines. The suppression was dose dependent, reversible and resulted from a delay of the tumor cells entering S-phase. No change in the cell phenotype or in proliferation were observed in CD40-negative tumors or in tumors expressing moderate-to-low levels of CD40 after incubation with CD40Lt. CD40-negative tumors transfected with the CD40 gene expressed high levels of CD40 on their surface, but were also unresponsive to CD40Lt cross-linking of CD40. Our data establish that CD40 is required (but not sufficient) for transducing a signal that results in phenotypic changes in human lung tumors and suppression in their proliferation. We conclude that CD40 on non-small cell lung tumors may represent a potential therapeutic target, but only on a subset of the CD40+ tumors.

  10. Ligation of CD40 influences the function of human Ig-secreting B cell hybridomas both positively and negatively.

    PubMed

    Bergman, M C; Attrep, J F; Grammer, A C; Lipsky, P E

    1996-05-01

    The effect of ligation of CD40 on the proliferation and Ig secretion of a battery of human Ig-secreting hybridomas was examined to determine the regulatory activity of this surface molecule on B cells after initial activation. B cell hybridomas were generated by fusing activated peripheral blood B cells with SPAZ-4, a non-Ig-secreting fusion partner, and were cloned before analysis. All hybridomas expressed CD40 comparably. These hybridomas were stimulated with either recombinant baculovirus-expressed membrane-bound CD40L or a soluble murine CD40L/CD8 construct in the presence or the absence of various cytokines. Concentrations of CD40L that saturated 40 to 100% of CD40 induced initial homotypic aggregation followed by Fas (CD95)-independent apoptosis, with resultant decreases in growth and Ig secretion. Concentrations of CD40L that saturated 15 to 25% of CD40 also stimulated aggregation of all hybridomas. However, proliferation and Ig secretion of 9 of 13 IgM-secreting hybridomas, but none of 14 IgG- or IgA-secreting hybridomas, were enhanced by these concentrations of CD40L. These responses were independent of interactions mediated by the adhesion pair CD1la/CD18-CD54. These results indicate that the impact of CD40 ligation on human Ig-secreting hybridomas varies with the extent of CD40 engagement and depending on whether the hybridoma derived from an activated B cell that had previously undergone switch recombination.

  11. Characterization of ASKP1240, a Fully Human Antibody Targeting Human CD40 With Potent Immunosuppressive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Okimura, K; Maeta, K; Kobayashi, N; Goto, M; Kano, N; Ishihara, T; Ishikawa, T; Tsumura, H; Ueno, A; Miyao, Y; Sakuma, S; Kinugasa, F; Takahashi, N; Miura, T

    2014-01-01

    Blocking the CD40–CD154 interaction is reported to be effective for transplantation management and autoimmune disease models in rodents and nonhuman primates. However, clinical trials with anti-CD154 mAbs were halted because of high incidence of thromboembolic complications. Thus, we generated and characterized a fully human anti-CD40 mAb ASKP1240, as an alternative to anti-CD154 mAb. In vitro ASKP1240 concentration-dependently inhibited human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation induced by soluble CD154. In addition, ASKP1240 did not destabilize platelet thrombi under physiological high shear conditions while mouse anti-human CD154 mAb (mu5C8) did. And ASKP1240 itself did not activate platelet and endothelial cells. In vivo administration of ASKP1240 (1 or 10 mg/kg, intravenously) to cynomolgus monkeys, weekly for 3 weeks, significantly attenuated both delayed-type hypersensitivity and specific antibody formation evoked by tetanus toxoid. The immunosuppressive effect was well correlated with the CD40 receptor saturation. Thus, these results suggest that ASKP1240 is immunosuppressive but not prothromboembolic, and as such appears to be a promising therapeutic candidate for the management of solid organ transplant rejection and autoimmune diseases therapy. PMID:24731050

  12. Human genetics in rheumatoid arthritis guides a high-throughput drug screen of the CD40 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M

    2013-05-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10(-9)). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10(-9)), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA-approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in

  13. Human Genetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Guides a High-Throughput Drug Screen of the CD40 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A.; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10−9). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10−9), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA–approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in

  14. Interleukin-10 induces immunoglobulin G isotype switch recombination in human CD40-activated naive B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Upon activation, B lymphocytes can change the isotype of the antibody they express by immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype switch recombination. In previous studies on the regulation of human IgG expression, we demonstrated that interleukin 10 (IL-10) could stimulate IgG1 and IgG3 secretion by human CD40-activated naive (sIgD+) tonsillar B cells. To assess whether IL-10 actually promotes the DNA recombination underlying switching to these isotypes, we examined the effect of IL-10 on the generation of reciprocal products that form DNA circles as by-products of switch recombination. The content of reciprocal products characteristic of mu-gamma recombination was elevated after culture of CD40-activated tonsillar sIgD+ B cells with either IL-4 or IL-10, although high levels of IgG secretion were observed only with IL-10. Unlike IL-4, IL-10 did not induce reciprocal products of mu-epsilon and gamma-epsilon switch recombination. These results demonstrate that IL- 10 promotes both switching to gamma and IgG secretion. PMID:8642297

  15. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF{kappa}B in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong | Alexis, Neil E. |; Chen Xian |; Bromberg, Philip A. |; Peden, David B. ||

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF{kappa}B were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NF{kappa}B activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NF{kappa}B activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NF{kappa}B.

  16. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NFkappaB in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weidong; Alexis, Neil E; Chen, Xian; Bromberg, Philip A; Peden, David B

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NFkappaB were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NFkappaB activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NFkappaB activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NFkappaB activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NFkappaB activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NFkappaB.

  17. Rosuvastatin Attenuates CD40L-Induced Downregulation of Extracellular Matrix Production in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells via TRAF6-JNK-NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Yuan-Li; Sun, Wei; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    CD40L and statins exhibit pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects, respectively. They are both pleiotropic and can regulate extracellular matrix (ECM) degeneration in an atherosclerotic plaque. Statins can decrease both the CD40 expression and the resulting inflammation. However, the effects of CD40L and stains on atherosclerotic plaque ECM production and the underlying mechanisms are not well established. Moreover, prolyl-4-hydroxylase α1 (P4Hα1) is involved in collagen synthesis but its correlations with CD40L and statins are unknown. In the present study, CD40L suppressed P4Hα1 expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with insignificant changes in MMP2 expression and negative enzymatic activity of MMP9. CD40L increased TRAF6 expression, JNK phosphorylation, NF-κB nuclear translocation as well as DNA binding. Furthermore, silencing TRAF6, JNK or NF-κB genes abolished CD40L-induced suppression of P4Hα1. Lower NF-κB nuclear import rates were observed when JNK or TRAF6 silenced HASMCs were stimulated with CD40L compared to HASMCs with active JNK or TRAF6. Together, these results indicate that CD40L suppresses P4Hα1 expression in HASMCs by activating the TRAF6-JNK- NF-κB pathway. We also found that rosuvastatin inhibits CD40L-induced activation of the TRAF6-JNK- NF-κB pathway, thereby significantly rescuing the CD40L stimulated P4Hα1 inhibition. The results from this study will help find potential targets for stabilizing vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27120457

  18. Human Anti-CD40 Antibody and Poly IC:LC Adjuvant Combination Induces Potent T Cell Responses in the Lung of Non-Human Primates1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Elizabeth A; Liang, Frank; Lindgren, Gustaf; Sandgren, Kerrie J; Quinn, Kylie M; Darrah, Patricia A; Koup, Richard A; Seder, Robert A; Kedl, Ross M; Loré, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Non-live vaccine platforms that induce potent cellular immune responses in mucosal tissue would have broad application for vaccines against infectious diseases and tumors. Induction of cellular immunity could be optimized by targeted activation of multiple innate and co-stimulatory signaling pathways, such as CD40 or toll-like receptors (TLRs). In this study, we evaluated immune activation and elicitation of T cell responses in non-human primates (NHPs) after immunization with peptide antigens adjuvanted with an agonistic αCD40Ab, with or without the TLR3 ligand poly IC:LC. We found that intravenous administration of the αCD40Ab induced rapid and transient innate activation characterized by IL-12 production and upregulated co-stimulatory and lymph node homing molecules on dendritic cells. Using fluorescently-labeled Abs for in vivo tracking, the αCD40Ab bound to all leucocytes, except T cells, and disseminated to multiple organs. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were significantly enhanced when the αCD40Ab was co-administered with poly IC:LC compared to either adjuvant given alone and were almost exclusively compartmentalized to the lung. Notably, antigen-specific T cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage were sustained at ~5–10%. These data indicate that systemic administration of αCD40Ab may be particularly advantageous for vaccines and/or therapies requiring T cell immunity in the lung. PMID:26123354

  19. Involvement of Rac in thromboxane A2‑induced human platelet activation: regulation of sCD40 ligand release and PDGF‑AB secretion.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Yasunari; Doi, Tomoaki; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Iida, Yuko; Akamatsu, Shigeru; Kondo, Akira; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Yamamoto, Naohiro; Mizutani, Jun; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Iida, Hiroki; Kozawa, Osamu; Ogura, Shinji

    2014-07-01

    We have previously shown that glycoprotein Ib/IX/V activation stimulates the release of the soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) via the generation of thromboxane A2 from human platelets. In the present study, the role of Rac, which is a member of the Rho family, was investigated in the thromboxane A2‑stimulated release of platelet‑derived growth factor (PDGF)‑AB and sCD40L in human platelets. U46619, a thromboxane receptor agonist, stimulated the activation of Rac time‑dependently in human platelets, and NSC23766, a selective inhibitor of the Rac‑guanine nucleotide exchange factor interaction, reduced the U46619‑induced platelet aggregation. NSC23766 markedly suppressed the U46619‑induced p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation. The thromboxane A2‑induced release of PDGF‑AB and sCD40L was significantly suppressed by NSC23766 in a dose‑dependent manner. In addition, NSC23766 reduced the sCD40L release stimulated by ristocetin, a glycoprotein Ib/IX/V activator. These results indicate that Rac regulates the thromboxane A2‑induced stimulation of PDGF‑AB secretion and sCD40L release via the p38 MAP kinase in human platelets.

  20. MicroRNA-145 regulates platelet-derived growth factor-induced human aortic vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration by targeting CD40

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yumei; Huang, Jiangnan; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Zhong, Yuanli; Xia, Mingjie; Wang, Hui; Jiao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the expression of microRNA (miR)-145 in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the effect of miR-145 in the biological behavior and expression of CD40 in VSMCs. Cells were treated with either miR-145 or miR-145 inhibitor. Cell proliferation was analyzed by a colony formation assay and a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Cell migration and invasion were assessed using a transwell assay, an invasion assay, and a wound healing assay. A luciferase reporter assay was used to detect the interaction between miR-145 and CD40. Expression of α-SMA, calponin, osteopontin (OPN), epiregulin, activator protein-1 (AP-1) and CD40 was measured using real-time RT-PCR for mRNA levels and Western blotting for protein levels. Overexpression of miR-145 significantly inhibited VSMC proliferation, invasion and migration. Furthermore, OPN, epiregulin, AP-1 and CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein levels was down-regulated by overexpression of miR-145. However, α-SMA and calponin expression at the mRNA and protein levels was up-regulated by overexpression of miR-145. In addition, the luciferase reporter assay showed that CD40 may be a direct target gene of miR-145 in VSMC initiation and development. Moreover, these data demonstrate that the up-regulation of CD40 is critical for miR-145-mediated inhibitory effects on platelet-derived growth factor-induced cell proliferation and migration in human VSMCs. In summary, CD40, a direct target of miR-145, reverses the inhibitory effects of miR-145. These results suggest that the specific modulation of miR-145 in human VSMCs may be an attractive approach for the treatment of proliferative vascular diseases. PMID:27186305

  1. Valproic Acid Inhibits the Release of Soluble CD40L Induced by Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Donna C.; Schifitto, Giovanni; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART), a majority of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV) infected individuals continually develop HIV – Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistent with this notion, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) are elevated in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV infected, cognitively impaired individuals, and that excess sCD40L can contribute to blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability in vivo, thereby signifying the importance of this inflammatory mediator in the pathogenesis of HAND. Here we demonstrate that the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) efavirenz (EFV) induces the release of circulating sCD40L in both HIV infected individuals and in an in vitro suspension of washed human platelets, which are the main source of circulating sCD40L. Additionally, EFV was found to activate glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) in platelets, and we now show that valproic acid (VPA), a known GSK3β inhibitor, was able to attenuate the release of sCD40L in HIV infected individuals receiving EFV, and in isolated human platelets. Collectively these results have important implications in determining the pro-inflammatory role that some antiretroviral regimens may have. The use of antiretrovirals remains the best strategy to prevent HIV-associated illnesses, including HAND, however these drugs have clear limitations to this end, and thus, these results underscore the need to develop adjunctive therapies for HAND that can also minimize the undesired negative effects of the antiretrovirals. PMID:23555843

  2. Modulation of neuronal differentiation by CD40 isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Huayu; Obregon, Demian; Lou, Deyan; Ehrhart, Jared; Fernandez, Frank; Silver, Archie; Tan Jun

    2008-05-02

    Neuron differentiation is a complex process involving various cell-cell interactions, and multiple signaling pathways. We showed previously that CD40 is expressed and functional on mouse and human neurons. In neurons, ligation of CD40 protects against serum withdrawal-induced injury and plays a role in survival and differentiation. CD40 deficient mice display neuron dysfunction, aberrant neuron morphologic changes, and associated gross brain abnormalities. Previous studies by Tone and colleagues suggested that five isoforms of CD40 exist with two predominant isoforms expressed in humans: signal-transducible CD40 type I and a C-terminal truncated, non-signal-transducible CD40 type II. We hypothesized that differential expression of CD40 isoform type I and type II in neurons may modulate neuron differentiation. Results show that adult wild-type, and CD40{sup -/-} deficient mice predominantly express CD40 type I and II isoforms. Whereas adult wild-type mice express mostly CD40 type I in cerebral tissues at relatively high levels, in age and gender-matched CD40{sup -/-} mice CD40 type I expression was almost completely absent; suggesting a predominance of the non-signal-transducible CD40 type II isoform. Younger, 1 day old wild-type mice displayed less CD40 type I, and more CD40 type II, as well as, greater expression of soluble CD40 (CD40L/CD40 signal inhibitor), compared with 1 month old mice. Neuron-like N2a cells express CD40 type I and type II isoforms while in an undifferentiated state, however once induced to differentiate, CD40 type I predominates. Further, differentiated N2a cells treated with CD40 ligand express high levels of neuron specific nuclear protein (NeuN); an effect reduced by anti-CD40 type I siRNA, but not by control (non-targeting) siRNA. Altogether these data suggest that CD40 isoforms may act in a temporal fashion to modulate neuron differentiation during brain development. Thus, modulation of neuronal CD40 isoforms and CD40 signaling may

  3. Activation of human B cells by the agonist CD40 antibody CP-870,893 and augmentation with simultaneous toll-like receptor 9 stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Erica L; Mick, Rosemarie; Rüter, Jens; Vonderheide, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    Background CD40 activation of antigen presenting cells (APC) such as dendritic cells (DC) and B cells plays an important role in immunological licensing of T cell immunity. Agonist CD40 antibodies have been previously shown in murine models to activate APC and enhance tumor immunity; in humans, CD40-activated DC and B cells induce tumor-specific T cells in vitro. Although clinical translation of these findings for patients with cancer has been previously limited due to the lack of a suitable and available drug, promising clinical results are now emerging from phase I studies of the agonist CD40 monoclonal antibody CP-870,893. The most prominent pharmacodynamic effect of CP-870,893 infusion is peripheral B cell modulation, but direct evidence of CP-870,893-mediated B cell activation and the potential impact on T cell reactivity has not been reported, despite increasing evidence that B cells, like DC, regulate cellular immunity. Methods Purified total CD19+ B cells, CD19+ CD27+ memory, or CD19+ CD27neg subsets from peripheral blood were stimulated in vitro with CP-870,893, in the presence or absence of the toll like receptor 9 (TLR9) ligand CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN). B cell surface molecule expression and cytokine secretion were evaluated using flow cytometry. Activated B cells were used as stimulators in mixed lymphocyte reactions to evaluate their ability to induce allogeneic T cell responses. Results Incubation with CP-870,893 activated B cells, including both memory and naïve B cells, as demonstrated by upregulation of CD86, CD70, CD40, and MHC class I and II. CP-870,893-activated B cells induced T cell proliferation and T cell secretion of effector cytokines including IFN-gamma and IL-2. These effects were increased by TLR9 co-stimulation via a CpG ODN identical in sequence to a well-studied clinical grade reagent. Conclusion The CD40 mAb CP-870,893 activates both memory and naïve B cells and triggers their T cell stimulatory capacity. Simultaneous TLR9

  4. Manipulated microenvironment in human papilloma virus-infected epithelial cells: is the CD40-CD154 pathway beneficial for host or virus?

    PubMed

    Shimauchi, Takatoshi; Piguet, Vincent

    2014-12-01

    In this issue, Tummers et al. (2014) demonstrate that high-risk human papilloma viruses (hrHPVs) attenuate the magnitude of responses to CD40 ligation and the epithelial cells' (ECs) capacity to attract leukocytes. These results suggest that hrHPVs can escape from host immune surveillance by modulating pro-inflammatory responses in infected ECs, resulting in persistent infections and potential carcinogenesis.

  5. The role of CD40 ligand in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yazdany, J; Davis, J

    2004-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L, also known as CD154 or gp39) is a member of the tumor necrosis superfamily of transmembrane proteins. The interaction of CD40L on activated T cells with its receptor, CD40 on B cells, is necessary for normal immune function, including B cell differentiation, germinal center formation, and antibody isotype switching. Abnormal expression of CD40L in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may contribute to autoantibody production and disease pathogenesis. Although murine models of monoclonal antibodies directed against CD40L initially showed promise, human trials either have failed to demonstrate efficacy or have been associated with adverse events. This review will summarize in vitro and murine model data and human clinical trials involving anti-CD40L monoclonal antibody.

  6. A New Mechanism of NK Cell Cytotoxicity Activation: The CD40CD40 Ligand Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Ennio; Ruggiero, Giuseppina; Terrazzano, Giuseppe; Palomba, Carmen; Manzo, Ciro; Fontana, Silvia; Spits, Hergen; Kärre, Klas; Zappacosta, Serafino

    1997-01-01

    NK recognition is regulated by a delicate balance between positive signals initiating their effector functions, and inhibitory signals preventing them from proceeding to cytolysis. Knowledge of the molecules responsible for positive signaling in NK cells is currently limited. We demonstrate that IL-2–activated human NK cells can express CD40 ligand (CD40L) and that recognition of CD40 on target cells can provide an activation pathway for such human NK cells. CD40-transfected P815 cells were killed by NK cell lines expressing CD40L, clones and PBLderived NK cells cultured for 18 h in the presence of IL-2, but not by CD40L-negative fresh NK cells. Cross-linking of CD40L on IL-2–activated NK cells induced redirected cytolysis of CD40-negative but Fc receptor-expressing P815 cells. The sensitivity of human TAP-deficient T2 cells could be blocked by anti-CD40 antibodies as well as by reconstitution of TAP/MHC class I expression, indicating that the CD40-dependent pathway for NK activation can be downregulated, at least in part, by MHC class I molecules on the target cells. NK cell recognition of CD40 may be important in immunoregulation as well as in immune responses against B cell malignancies. PMID:9182676

  7. Cell enrichment-free massive ex-vivo expansion of peripheral CD20⁺ B cells via CD40-CD40L signals in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Sik; Byun, Nari; Chung, Hyunwoo; Kim, Hyun-Je; Kim, Jong-Min; Chun, Taehoon; Lee, Won-Woo; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2016-04-22

    Non-human primates (NHPs) are valuable as preclinical resources that bridge the gap between basic science and clinical application. B cells from NHPs have been utilized for the development of B-cell targeted drugs and cell-based therapeutic modalities; however, few studies on the ex-vivo expansion of monkey B cells have been reported. In this study, we developed a highly efficient ex-vivo expansion protocol for monkey B cells resulting in 99% purity without the requirement for prior cell-enrichment procedures. To this end, monkey peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated for 12 days with cells constitutively expressing monkey CD40L in expansion medium optimized for specific and massive expansion of B cells. The B cells expansion rates obtained were 2-5 times higher than those previously reported in humans, with rates ranging from 7.9 to 16.6 fold increase. Moreover, expanded B cells sustained high expression of co-stimulatory molecules including CD83 and CD86 until day 12 of culture, and the simple application of a brief centrifugation resulted in a CD20(+) B cell purity rate of greater than 99%. Furthermore, small amounts of CD3(+)CD20(+)BT-like cells were generated and CD16 was expressed at moderate levels on expanded B cells. Thus, the establishment of this protocol provides a method to produce quantities of homogeneous, mature B cells in numbers sufficient for the in vitro study of B cell immunity as well as for the development of B cell-diagnostic tools and cell-based therapeutic modalities.

  8. Impaired NFAT and NFκB activation are involved in suppression of CD40 ligand expression by Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol in human CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L.F.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2013-11-15

    We have previously reported that Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, suppresses CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression by activated mouse CD4{sup +} T cells. CD40L is involved in pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of Δ{sup 9}-THC-mediated suppression of CD40L expression using peripheral blood human T cells. Pretreatment with Δ{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in human CD4{sup +} T cells activated by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level, as determined by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that Δ{sup 9}-THC suppressed the DNA-binding activity of both NFAT and NFκB to their respective response elements within the CD40L promoter. An assessment of the effect of Δ{sup 9}-THC on proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling induced by anti-CD3/CD28 showed significant impairment in the rise of intracellular calcium, but no significant effect on the phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β. Collectively, these findings identify perturbation of the calcium-NFAT and NFκB signaling cascade as a key mechanistic event by which Δ{sup 9}-THC suppresses human T cell function. - Highlights: • Δ{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in activated human CD4+ T cells. • Δ{sup 9}-THC suppressed DNA-binding activity of NFAT and NFκB. • Δ{sup 9}-THC impaired elevation of intracellular Ca2+. • Δ{sup 9}-THC did not affect phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β.

  9. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated disruption of the CD40 ligand-induced activation of primary human B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Haitian Crawford, Robert B. Kaplan, Barbara L.F. Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2011-09-15

    Suppression of the primary antibody response is particularly sensitive to suppression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in mice; however, surprisingly little is known concerning the effects of TCDD on humoral immunity or B cell function in humans. Results from a limited number of previous studies, primarily employing in vitro activation models, suggested that human B cell effector function is suppressed by TCDD. The present study sought to extend these findings by investigating, in primary human B cells, the effects of TCDD on several critical stages leading to antibody secretion including activation and plasmacytic differentiation using an in vitro CD40 ligand activation model. These studies revealed important differences in the response of human and mouse B cells to TCDD, the most striking being altered expression of plasmacytic differentiation regulators, B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 and paired box protein 5, in mouse but not human B cells. The activation of human B cells was profoundly impaired by TCDD, as evidenced by decreased expression of activation markers CD80, CD86, and CD69. The impaired activation correlated with decreased cell viability, which prevented the progression of human B cells toward plasmacytic differentiation. TCDD treatment also attenuated the early activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and Akt signaling in human B cells. Collectively, the present study provided experimental evidence for novel mechanisms by which TCDD impairs the effector function of primary human B cells. - Highlights: > In this study primary human and mouse B cell toxicity to TCDD was compared. > TCDD altered the expression of Blimp-1 and Pax5 in mouse but not human B cells. > TCDD markedly suppressed human B cell activation as characterized by CD80, CD86 and CD69 expression. > TCDD inhibited ERK, p38, and Akt phosphorylation in human B cells.

  10. Involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B in platelet CD40 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hachem, Ahmed; Yacoub, Daniel; Zaid, Younes; Mourad, Walid; Merhi, Yahye

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). Given that platelets contain NF-{kappa}B, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo

  11. gamma/delta T lymphocytes express CD40 ligand and induce isotype switching in B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    T cells expressing gamma/delta T cell receptors home to epithelial tissue and may play a role in immunity to infectious agents and foreign antigens. In an effort to understand the role of gamma/delta T cells in directing B cell responses, we investigated the capacity of human gamma/delta T cells to express CD40 ligand (CD40L) and to drive immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype switching in B cells. A multiple step purification procedure resulted in the recovery of highly pure populations of peripheral blood CD4-CD8- gamma/delta T cells. Neither CD40L surface expression nor CD40L mRNA were detected in unstimulated gamma/delta T cells. Stimulation with phorbol ester and ionomycin induced CD40L mRNA and surface CD40L expression by gamma/delta T cells. Both the percentage of CD40L+ cells and the cell surface density of CD40L were significantly lower in gamma/delta T cells compared to unselected T cells. We further demonstrated that in the presence of neutralizing monoclonal antibody to interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), gamma/delta T cells could induce IgE synthesis in B cells, albeit to a lesser extent than unselected T cells. Furthermore, IgE synthesis driven by gamma/delta T cells was inhibited by monoclonal antibody to CD40L. These observations demonstrate that activated gamma/delta T cells express CD40L and can induce isotype switching in B cells. PMID:7869041

  12. Enhancing Antitumor Efficacy of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Through Constitutive CD40L Expression

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Kevin J; Seinstra, Beatrijs A; Nikhamin, Yan; Yeh, Raymond; Usachenko, Yelena; van Leeuwen, Dayenne G; Purdon, Terence; Pegram, Hollie J; Brentjens, Renier J

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with genetically modified T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a promising therapy for patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, CAR-modified T cells (CAR T cells) have mostly failed in patients with solid tumors or low-grade B-cell malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia with bulky lymph node involvement. Herein, we enhance the antitumor efficacy of CAR T cells through the constitutive expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154). T cells genetically modified to constitutively express CD40L (CD40L-modified T cells) demonstrated increased proliferation and secretion of proinflammatory TH1 cytokines. Further, CD40L-modified T cells augmented the immunogenicity of CD40+ tumor cells by the upregulated surface expression of costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86), adhesion molecules (CD54, CD58, and CD70), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules (Class I and HLA-DR), and the Fas-death receptor (CD95). Additionally, CD40L-modified T cells induced maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 by monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Finally, tumor-targeted CD19-specific CAR/CD40L T cells exhibited increased cytotoxicity against CD40+ tumors and extended the survival of tumor-bearing mice in a xenotransplant model of CD19+ systemic lymphoma. This preclinical data supports the clinical application of CAR T cells additionally modified to constitutively express CD40L with anticipated enhanced antitumor efficacy. PMID:25582824

  13. Analysis of the association between CD40 and CD40 ligand polymorphisms and systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible role of CD40 and CD40 ligand (CD40LG) genes in the susceptibility and phenotype expression of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods In total, 2,670 SSc patients and 3,245 healthy individuals from four European populations (Spain, Germany, The Netherlands, and Italy) were included in the study. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CD40 (rs1883832, rs4810485, rs1535045) and CD40LG (rs3092952, rs3092920) were genotyped by using a predesigned TaqMan allele-discrimination assay technology. Meta-analysis was assessed to determine whether an association exists between the genetic variants and SSc or its main clinical subtypes. Results No evidence of association between CD40 and CD40LG genes variants and susceptibility to SSc was observed. Similarly, no significant statistical differences were observed when SSc patients were stratified by the clinical subtypes, the serologic features, and pulmonary fibrosis. Conclusions Our results do not suggest an important role of CD40 and CD40LG gene polymorphisms in the susceptibility to or clinical expression of SSc. PMID:22731751

  14. Genomic structure and chromosomal mapping of the murine CD40 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, J.C.; Chang, R.; Howard, M.; Cockayne, D.A. ); Torres, R.; Clark, E.A. ); Kozak, C.A. )

    1992-12-15

    The B cell-associated surface molecule, CD40, is likely to play a central role in the expansion of Ag-stimulated B cells, and their interaction with activated Th cells. In this study the authors have isolated genomic clones of murine CD40 from a mouse liver genomic DNA library. Comparison with the murine CD40 cDNA sequence revealed the presence of nine exons that together contain the entire murine CD40 coding region, and span approximately 16.3 kb of genomic DNA. The intron/exon structure of the CD40 gene resembles that of the low affinity nerve growth factor receptor gene, a close homolog of both human and murine CD40. In both cases the functional domains of the receptor molecules are separated onto different exons throughout the genes. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that murine CD40 is a single copy gene that maps in the distal region of mouse chromosome 2. 58 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Systemic Agonistic Anti-CD40 Treatment of Tumor-Bearing Mice Modulates Hepatic Myeloid-Suppressive Cells and Causes Immune-Mediated Liver Damage.

    PubMed

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Ma, Chi; Duffy, Austin G; Eggert, Tobias; Hawk, Nga; Kleiner, David E; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2015-05-01

    Immune-stimulatory mAbs are currently being evaluated as antitumor agents. Although overall toxicity from these agents appears to be moderate, liver toxicities have been reported and are not completely understood. We studied the effect of systemic CD40 antibody treatment on myeloid cells in the spleen and liver. Naïve and tumor-bearing mice were treated systemically with agonistic anti-CD40 antibody. Immune cell subsets in the liver and spleen, serum transaminases, and liver histologies were analyzed after antibody administration. Nox2(-/-), Cd40(-/-), and bone marrow chimeric mice were used to study the mechanism by which agonistic anti-CD40 mediates its effects in vivo. Suppressor function of murine and human tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) was studied upon CD40 ligation. Agonistic CD40 antibody caused liver damage within 24 hours after injection in two unrelated tumor models and mice strains. Using bone marrow chimeras, we demonstrate that CD40 antibody-induced hepatitis in tumor-bearing mice was dependent on the presence of CD40-expressing hematopoietic cells. Agonistic CD40 ligation-dependent liver damage was induced by the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, agonistic CD40 antibody resulted in increased CD80-positive and CD40-positive liver CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) immature myeloid cells. CD40 ligation on tumor-induced murine and human CD14(+)HLA-DR(low) peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with cancer reduced their immune suppressor function. Collectively, agonistic CD40 antibody treatment activated tumor-induced myeloid cells, caused myeloid-dependent hepatotoxicity, and ameliorated the suppressor function of murine and human MDSC. Collectively, our data suggest that CD40 may mature immunosuppressive myeloid cells and thereby cause liver damage in mice with an accumulation of tumor-induced hepatic MDSC. PMID:25637366

  16. Systemic Agonistic Anti-CD40 Treatment of Tumor-Bearing Mice Modulates Hepatic Myeloid-Suppressive Cells and Causes Immune-Mediated Liver Damage.

    PubMed

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Ma, Chi; Duffy, Austin G; Eggert, Tobias; Hawk, Nga; Kleiner, David E; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2015-05-01

    Immune-stimulatory mAbs are currently being evaluated as antitumor agents. Although overall toxicity from these agents appears to be moderate, liver toxicities have been reported and are not completely understood. We studied the effect of systemic CD40 antibody treatment on myeloid cells in the spleen and liver. Naïve and tumor-bearing mice were treated systemically with agonistic anti-CD40 antibody. Immune cell subsets in the liver and spleen, serum transaminases, and liver histologies were analyzed after antibody administration. Nox2(-/-), Cd40(-/-), and bone marrow chimeric mice were used to study the mechanism by which agonistic anti-CD40 mediates its effects in vivo. Suppressor function of murine and human tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) was studied upon CD40 ligation. Agonistic CD40 antibody caused liver damage within 24 hours after injection in two unrelated tumor models and mice strains. Using bone marrow chimeras, we demonstrate that CD40 antibody-induced hepatitis in tumor-bearing mice was dependent on the presence of CD40-expressing hematopoietic cells. Agonistic CD40 ligation-dependent liver damage was induced by the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, agonistic CD40 antibody resulted in increased CD80-positive and CD40-positive liver CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) immature myeloid cells. CD40 ligation on tumor-induced murine and human CD14(+)HLA-DR(low) peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with cancer reduced their immune suppressor function. Collectively, agonistic CD40 antibody treatment activated tumor-induced myeloid cells, caused myeloid-dependent hepatotoxicity, and ameliorated the suppressor function of murine and human MDSC. Collectively, our data suggest that CD40 may mature immunosuppressive myeloid cells and thereby cause liver damage in mice with an accumulation of tumor-induced hepatic MDSC.

  17. Disruption of CD40-CD40 ligand interactions results in an enhanced susceptibility to Leishmania amazonensis infection.

    PubMed

    Soong, L; Xu, J C; Grewal, I S; Kima, P; Sun, J; Longley, B J; Ruddle, N H; McMahon-Pratt, D; Flavell, R A

    1996-03-01

    To study the role of CD40 ligand (CD40L) in the host immune responses against intracellular pathogens, we infected CD40L knockout (CD40L-/-) mice with Leishmania amazonensis. Although wild-type mice were susceptible to infection and developed progressive ulcerative lesions, tissue parasite burdens in CD40L-/- mice were significantly higher. This heightened susceptibility to infection was associated with an impaired T cell and macrophage activation and altered inflammatory response, as reflected by low levels of IFN gamma, lymphotoxin-tumor necrosis factor (LT-TNF), and nitric oxide (NO) production. Furthermore, CD40L-/- mice failed to generate a protective immune response after immunization. These results indicate an essential role of cognate CD40-CD40L interactions in the generation of cellular immune responses against an intracellular parasite.

  18. Interruption of classic CD40L-CD40 signalling but not of the novel CD40L-Mac-1 interaction limits arterial neointima formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Willecke, F; Tiwari, S; Rupprecht, B; Wolf, D; Hergeth, S; Hoppe, N; Dufner, B; Schulte, L; Anto Michel, N; Bukosza, N; Marchini, T; Jäckel, M; Stachon, P; Hilgendorf, I; Zeschky, K; Schleicher, R; Langer, H F; von Zur Muhlen, C; Bode, C; Peter, K; Zirlik, A

    2014-08-01

    The co-stimulatory immune molecule CD40L figures prominently in a variety of inflammatory conditions including arterial disease. Recently, we made the surprising finding that CD40L mediates atherogenesis independently of its classic receptor CD40 via a novel interaction with the leukocyte integrin Mac-1. Here, we hypothesised that selective blockade of the CD40L-Mac-1 interaction may also retard restenosis. We induced neointima formation in C57/BL6 mice by ligation of the left carotid artery. Mice were randomised to daily intraperitoneal injections of either cM7, a small peptide selectively inhibiting the CD40L-Mac-1 interaction, scM7, a scrambled control peptide, or saline for 28 days. Interestingly, cM7-treated mice developed neointima of similar size compared with mice receiving the control peptide or saline as assessed by computer-assisted analysis of histological cross sections. These data demonstrate that the CD40L-Mac-1 interaction is not required for the development of restenosis. In contrast, CD40-deficient mice subjected to carotid ligation in parallel, developed significantly reduced neointimal lesions compared with respective wild-type controls (2872 ± 843 µm² vs 35469 ± 11870 µm²). Flow cytometry in CD40-deficient mice revealed reduced formation of platelet-granulocyte and platelet-inflammatory monocyte- aggregates. In vitro, supernatants of CD40-deficient platelet-leukocyte aggregates attenuated proliferation and increased apoptosis of smooth muscle cells. Unlike in the setting of atherosclerosis, CD40L mediates neointima formation via its classic receptor CD40 rather than via its recently described novel interaction with Mac-1. Therefore, selective targeting of CD40L-Mac-1 binding does not appear to be a favorable strategy to fight restenosis.

  19. Modulation of Single-Cell IgG Secretion Frequency and Rates in Human Memory B Cells by CpG DNA, CD40L, IL-21 and Cell Division∥

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Alicia D.; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Brown, Miguel A.; Murphy, Alison J.; Coca, Mircea N.; Hyrien, Ollivier; Pellegrin, Tina; Mosmann, Tim; Zand, Martin S.

    2009-01-01

    During the recall response by CD27+ IgG class switched human memory B cells, total IgG secreted is a function of (1) the number of IgG secreting cells (IgG-SC) and (2) the secretion rate of each cell. Here we report the quantitative ELISPOT method (qELISPOT) for simultaneous estimation of single cell IgG secretion rates and secreting cell frequencies in human B cell populations. We found that CD27+ IgMneg memory B cells activated with CpG and cytokines had considerable heterogeneity in the IgG secretion rates, with two major secretion rate subpopulations. B cell receptor cross-linking reduced the frequency of cells with high per-cell IgG secretion rates, with a parallel decrease in CD27hi B cell blasts. Increased cell death may account for the BCR-stimulated reduction in high-rate IgG-SC CD27hi B cell blasts. In contrast, the addition of IL-21 to CD40L +IL-4 activated human memory B cells induced a high-rate IgG-SC population in B cells with otherwise low per-cell IgG secretion rates. The profiles of human B cell IgG secretion rates followed the same biphasic distribution and range irrespective of division class. This, along with the presence of non-IgG-producing, dividing B cells in CpG+ck-activated B memory B cell populations, is suggestive of an “On/Off switch” regulating IgG secretion. Finally, these data support a mixture model of IgG secretion in which IgG secreted over time is modulated by the frequency of IgG secreting cells and the distribution of their IgG secretion rates. This is an author-produced version of a manuscript accepted for publication in The Journal of Immunology (The JI). The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. (AAI), publisher of The JI, holds the copyright to this manuscript. This version of the manuscript has not yet been copyedited or subjected to editorial proofreading by The JI; hence, it may differ from the final version published in The JI (online and in print). AAI (The JI) is not liable for errors or omissions in this

  20. Immune response is an important aspect of the antitumor effect produced by a CD40L-encoding oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Diaconu, Iulia; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hirvinen, Mari L M; Escutenaire, Sophie; Ugolini, Matteo; Pesonen, Saila K; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Kanerva, Anna; Loskog, Angelica S I; Eliopoulos, Aristides G; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus is an attractive platform for immunotherapy because virus replication is highly immunogenic and not subject to tolerance. Although oncolysis releases tumor epitopes and provides costimulatory danger signals, arming the virus with immunostimulatory molecules can further improve efficacy. CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) induces apoptosis of tumor cells and triggers several immune mechanisms, including a T-helper type 1 (T(H)1) response, which leads to activation of cytotoxic T cells and reduction of immunosuppression. In this study, we constructed a novel oncolytic adenovirus, Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L, which features a chimeric Ad5/3 capsid for enhanced tumor transduction, a human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter for tumor selectivity, and human CD40L for increased efficacy. Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo via oncolytic and apoptotic effects, and (Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L)-mediated oncolysis resulted in enhanced calreticulin exposure and HMGB1 and ATP release, which were suggestive of immunogenicity. In two syngeneic mouse models, murine CD40L induced recruitment and activation of antigen-presenting cells, leading to increased interleukin-12 production in splenocytes. This effect was associated with induction of the T(H)1 cytokines IFN-γ, RANTES, and TNF-α. Tumors treated with Ad5/3-CMV-mCD40L also displayed an enhanced presence of macrophages and cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells but not B cells. Together, our findings show that adenoviruses coding for CD40L mediate multiple antitumor effects including oncolysis, apoptosis, induction of T-cell responses, and upregulation of T(H)1 cytokines.

  1. Soluble CD40 Ligand in Sera of Subjects Exposed to Leishmania infantum Infection Reduces the Parasite Load in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Fabrícia Alvisi; Barreto, Aline Silva; Bomfim, Lays G. S.; Leite, Talita Rebeca S.; dos Santos, Priscila Lima; de Almeida, Roque Pacheco; da Silva, Ângela Maria; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Reed, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Background While CD40L is typically a membrane glycoprotein expressed on activated T cells and platelets that binds and activates CD40 on the surface on antigen presenting cells, a soluble derivative (sCD40L) that appears to retain its biological activity after cleavage from cell membrane also exists. We recently reported that sCD40L is associated with clinical resolution of visceral leishmaniasis and protection against the disease. In the present study we investigated if this sCD40L is functional and exerts anti-parasitic effect in L. infantum-infected macrophages. Methodology/Principal Findings Macrophages from normal human donors were infected with L. infantum promastigotes and incubated with either sera from subjects exposed to L. infantum infection, monoclonal antibodies against human CD40L, or an isotype control antibody. We then evaluated infection by counting the number of infected cells and the number of parasites in each cell. We also measured a variety of immune modulatory cytokines in these macrophage culture supernatants by Luminex assay. The addition of sCD40L, either recombinant or from infected individuals’ serum, decreased both the number of infected macrophages and number of intracellular parasites. Moreover, this treatment increased the production of IL-12, IL-23, IL-27, IL-15, and IL1β such that negative correlations between the levels of these cytokines with both the infection ratio and number of intracellular parasites were observed. Conclusions/Significance sCD40L from sera of subjects exposed to L. infantum is functional and improves both the control of parasite and production of inflamatory cytokines of infected macrophages. Although the mechanisms involved in parasite killing are still unclear and require further exploration, these findings indicate a protective role of sCD40L in visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:26488744

  2. CD40 upregulation is independent of HHV-8 in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, M M; Biddolph, S; Lucas, S B; Howells, D D; Picton, S; McGee, J O; O'Leary, J J

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is now acknowledged as the infective cofactor in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma. The mode by which HHV-8 causes Kaposi's sarcoma is unresolved and it is probable that it acts in conjunction with other factors including cytokines, anti-apoptosis proteins, and cell surface receptors. CD40, a cell membrane receptor belonging to the tumour necrosis factor receptor super family, promotes B cell survival and is expressed constitutively on endothelial cells. It is upregulated on cytokine treatment and has been documented recently in Kaposi's sarcoma. Because the HHV-8 genome contains cytokine homologues, this study investigated whether CD40 expression in Kaposi's sarcoma correlated with HHV-8 status, using a unique set of HHV-8 positive and negative specimens. METHODS: Twenty one paraffin wax embedded samples of Kaposi's sarcoma were selected, of which 18 were screened for the presence of HHV-8 using both conventional solution phase and TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR). CD40 immunohistochemistry was assessed using a biotinylated amplification system. Staining was scored semiquantitatively. RESULTS: The results indicated that the expression of CD40 is independent of viral status, being present in both HHV-8 positive and negative specimens. CONCLUSIONS: This suggests that HHV-8 promotes Kaposi's sarcoma cell survival following infection by mechanisms other than those involving CD40. PMID:10439837

  3. TNF receptor-associated factor-3 signaling mediates activation of p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase, cytokine secretion, and Ig production following ligation of CD40 on human B cells.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; Swantek, J L; McFarland, R D; Miura, Y; Geppert, T; Lipsky, P E

    1998-08-01

    CD40 engagement induces a variety of functional outcomes following association with adaptor molecules of the TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF) family. Whereas TRAF2, -5, and -6 initiate NF-kappaB activation, the outcomes of TRAF3-initiated signaling are less characterized. To delineate CD40-induced TRAF3-dependent events, Ramos B cells stably transfected with a dominant negative TRAF3 were stimulated with membranes expressing recombinant CD154/CD40 ligand. In the absence of TRAF3 signaling, activation of p38 and control of Ig production were abrogated, whereas Jun N-terminal kinase activation and secretion of IL-10, lymphotoxin-alpha, and TNF-alpha were partially blocked. By contrast, induction of apoptosis, activation of NF-kappaB, generation of granulocyte-macrophage CSF, and up-regulation of CD54, MHC class II, and CD95 were unaffected by the TRAF3 dominant negative. Together, these results indicate that TRAF3 initiates independent signaling pathways via p38 and JNK that are associated with specific functional outcomes.

  4. Tumor-induced senescent T cells promote the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors by human monocytes/macrophages through a mechanism that involves Tim-3 and CD40L

    PubMed Central

    Ramello, M C; Tosello Boari, J; Canale, F P; Mena, H A; Negrotto, S; Gastman, B; Gruppi, A; Acosta Rodríguez, E V; Montes, C L

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors are infiltrated by immune cells where macrophages and senescent T cells are highly represented. Within the tumor microenvironment, a cross-talk between the infiltrating cells may occur conditioning the characteristic of the in situ immune response. Our previous work showed that tumors induce senescence of T cells, which are powerful suppressors of lympho-proliferation. In this study, we report that Tumor-Induced Senescent (TIS)-T cells may also modulate monocyte activation. To gain insight into this interaction, CD4+ or CD8+TIS-T or control-T cells were co-incubated with autologous monocytes under inflammatory conditions. After co-culture with CD4+ or CD8+TIS-T cells, CD14+ monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) exhibit a higher expression of CD16+ cells and a reduced expression of CD206. These Mo/Ma produce nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; however, TIS-T cells do not modify phagocyte capacity of Mo/Ma. TIS-T modulated-Mo/Ma show a higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1β and IL-6) and angiogenic factors (MMP-9, VEGF-A and IL-8) and a lower IL-10 and IP-10 secretion than monocytes co-cultured with controls. The mediator(s) present in the supernatant of TIS-T cell/monocyte-macrophage co-cultures promote(s) tubulogenesis and tumor-cell survival. Monocyte-modulation induced by TIS-T cells requires cell-to-cell contact. Although CD4+ shows different behavior from CD8+TIS-T cells, blocking mAbs against T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin protein 3 and CD40 ligand reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors production, indicating that these molecules are involved in monocyte/macrophage modulation by TIS-T cells. Our results revealed a novel role for TIS-T cells in human monocyte/macrophage modulation, which may have deleterious consequences for tumor progression. This modulation should be considered to best tailor the immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:25375372

  5. Tumor-induced senescent T cells promote the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors by human monocytes/macrophages through a mechanism that involves Tim-3 and CD40L.

    PubMed

    Ramello, M C; Tosello Boari, J; Canale, F P; Mena, H A; Negrotto, S; Gastman, B; Gruppi, A; Acosta Rodríguez, E V; Montes, C L

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors are infiltrated by immune cells where macrophages and senescent T cells are highly represented. Within the tumor microenvironment, a cross-talk between the infiltrating cells may occur conditioning the characteristic of the in situ immune response. Our previous work showed that tumors induce senescence of T cells, which are powerful suppressors of lympho-proliferation. In this study, we report that Tumor-Induced Senescent (TIS)-T cells may also modulate monocyte activation. To gain insight into this interaction, CD4+ or CD8+TIS-T or control-T cells were co-incubated with autologous monocytes under inflammatory conditions. After co-culture with CD4+ or CD8+TIS-T cells, CD14+ monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) exhibit a higher expression of CD16+ cells and a reduced expression of CD206. These Mo/Ma produce nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; however, TIS-T cells do not modify phagocyte capacity of Mo/Ma. TIS-T modulated-Mo/Ma show a higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1β and IL-6) and angiogenic factors (MMP-9, VEGF-A and IL-8) and a lower IL-10 and IP-10 secretion than monocytes co-cultured with controls. The mediator(s) present in the supernatant of TIS-T cell/monocyte-macrophage co-cultures promote(s) tubulogenesis and tumor-cell survival. Monocyte-modulation induced by TIS-T cells requires cell-to-cell contact. Although CD4+ shows different behavior from CD8+TIS-T cells, blocking mAbs against T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin protein 3 and CD40 ligand reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors production, indicating that these molecules are involved in monocyte/macrophage modulation by TIS-T cells. Our results revealed a novel role for TIS-T cells in human monocyte/macrophage modulation, which may have deleterious consequences for tumor progression. This modulation should be considered to best tailor the immunotherapy against cancer.

  6. Humoral immune responses in CD40 ligand-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Individuals with X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome fail to express functional CD40 ligand (CD40L) and, as a consequence, are incapable of mounting protective antibody responses to opportunistic bacterial infections. To address the role of CD40L in humoral immunity, we created, through homologous recombination, mice deficient in CD40L expression. These mice exhibited no gross developmental deficiencies or health abnormalities and contained normal percentages of B and T cell subpopulations. CD40L-deficient mice did display selective deficiencies in humoral immunity; basal serum isotype levels were significantly lower than observed in normal mice, and IgE was undetectable. Furthermore, the CD40L-deficient mice failed to mount secondary antigen- specific responses to immunization with a thymus-dependent antigen, trinitrophenol-conjugated keyhole limpet hemocyanin (TNP-KLH). By contrast, the CD40L-deficient mice produced antigen-specific antibody of all isotypes except IgE in response to the thymus-independent antigen, DNP-Ficoll. These results underscore the requirement of CD40L for T cell-dependent antibody responses. Moreover, Ig class switching to isotypes other than IgE can occur in vivo in the absence of CD40L, supporting the notion that alternative B cell signaling pathways regulate responses to thymus-independent antigens. PMID:7964465

  7. CD40 agonist antibody mediated improvement of chronic Cryptosporidium infection in patients with X-linked hyper IgM syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHM) is a combined immune deficiency disorder caused by mutations in CD40 ligand. We tested CP-870,893, a human CD40 agonist monoclonal antibody, in the treatment of two XHM patients with biliary Cryptosporidiosis. CP-870,893 activated B cells and APCs in vitro, restori...

  8. Multimeric soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) efficiently enhances HIV specific cellular immune responses during DNA prime and boost with attenuated poxvirus vectors MVA and NYVAC expressing HIV antigens.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carmen E; Nájera, José L; Sánchez, Raquel; Jiménez, Victoria; Esteban, Mariano

    2009-05-21

    The attenuated poxvirus vectors MVA and NYVAC are now in clinical trials against HIV/AIDS. Due to the vectors restricted replication capacity in human cells, approaches to enhance their immunogenicity are highly desirable. Here, we have analyzed the ability of a soluble form of hexameric CD40L (sCD40L) to stimulate specific immune responses to HIV antigens when inoculated in mice during priming with DNA and in the booster with MVA or NYVAC, expressing the vectors HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B. Our findings revealed that sCD40L in DNA/poxvirus combination enhanced the magnitude about 2-fold (DNA-B/MVA-B) and 4-fold (DNA-B/NYVAC-B), as well as the breath of the HIV antigen specific cellular immune responses. sCD40L was necessary in both prime and boost inoculations triggering a potent polarization of the Th response towards a Th1 type. In DNA-B/NYVAC-B regime the addition of sCD40L significantly enhanced the humoral immune response against HIV gp160, but not in DNA-B/MVA-B combination. These findings provided evidence for the immunostimulatory benefit of sCD40L when DNA and the poxvirus vectors MVA and NYVAC are used as immunogens.

  9. Clinical disease upregulates expression of CD40 and CD40 ligand on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cattle naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD40 and CD40L interactions have costimulatory effects that are part of a complex series of events in host cellular and humoral immune responses and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in expression of CD40 and CD40L on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolat...

  10. Complexes between nuclear factor-κB p65 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 are key actors in inducing activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and immunoglobulin A production in CD40L plus interleukin-10-treated human blood B cells.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, S; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Richard, Y; Pozzetto, B; Cogné, M; Cognasse, F; Garraud, O

    2011-11-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor pathway plays an important role in many biological phenomena. STAT3 transcription is triggered by cytokine-associated signals. Here, we use isolated human B cells to analyse the role of STAT3 in interleukin (IL)-10 induced terminal B cell differentiation and in immunoglobulin (Ig)A production as a characteristic readout of IL-10 signalling. We identified optimal conditions for inducing in-vitro IgA production by purified blood naive B cells using IL-10 and soluble CD40L. We show that soluble CD40L consistently induces the phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 but not of STAT3, while IL-10 induces the phosphorylation of STAT3 but not of NF-κB p65. Interestingly, while soluble CD40L and IL-10 were synergistic in driving the terminal maturation of B cells into IgA-producing plasma cells, they did not co-operate earlier in the pathway with regard to the transcription factors NF-κB p65 or STAT3. Blocking either NF-κB p65 or STAT3 profoundly altered the production of IgA and mRNA for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme strictly necessary for Ig heavy chain recombination. Finally, the STAT3 pathway was directly activated by IL-10, while IL-6, the main cytokine otherwise known for activating the STAT3 pathway, did not appear to be involved in IL-10-induced-STAT3 activation. Our results suggest that STAT3 and NF-κB pathways co-operate in IgA production, with soluble CD40L rapidly activating the NF-κB pathway, probably rendering STAT3 probably more reactive to IL-10 signalling. This novel role for STAT3 in B cell development reveals a potential therapeutic or vaccine target for eliciting IgA humoral responses at mucosal interfaces.

  11. CD40 ligand immunotherapy in cancer: an efficient approach.

    PubMed

    Kuwashima, N; Kageyama, S; Eto, Y; Urashima, M

    2001-01-01

    Cancer cells do not elicit a clinically sufficient anti-tumor immune response that results in tumor rejection. Recently, many investigators have been trying to enhance anti-tumor immunity and encouraging results have been reported. This review will discuss current anti-cancer immunotherapy; interleukin-2 therapy, tumor vaccine secreting Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, dendritic cells fused with tumor cells, and CD40 ligand immunotherapy. Moreover, we introduce our two kinds of CD40 ligand immuno-genetherapy; (1) oral CD40 ligand gene therapy against lymphoma using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (published in BLOOD 2000), (2) cancer vaccine transfected with CD40 ligand ex vivo for neuroblastoma (unpublished). Both approaches resulted in a high degree of protection against the tumor progression and they are simple and safe in the murine system.

  12. CD40 ligand immunotherapy in cancer: an efficient approach.

    PubMed

    Kuwashima, N; Kageyama, S; Eto, Y; Urashima, M

    2001-01-01

    Cancer cells do not elicit a clinically sufficient anti-tumor immune response that results in tumor rejection. Recently, many investigators have been trying to enhance anti-tumor immunity and encouraging results have been reported. This review will discuss current anti-cancer immunotherapy; interleukin-2 therapy, tumor vaccine secreting Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, dendritic cells fused with tumor cells, and CD40 ligand immunotherapy. Moreover, we introduce our two kinds of CD40 ligand immuno-genetherapy; (1) oral CD40 ligand gene therapy against lymphoma using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (published in BLOOD 2000), (2) cancer vaccine transfected with CD40 ligand ex vivo for neuroblastoma (unpublished). Both approaches resulted in a high degree of protection against the tumor progression and they are simple and safe in the murine system. PMID:11911421

  13. Dendritic cells induce Tc1 cell differentiation via the CD40/CD40L pathway in mice after exposure to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Liang-Jian; Deng, Ting-Ting; Wang, Qin; Qiu, Shi-Lin; Liang, Yi; He, Zhi-Yi; Zhang, Jian-Quan; Bai, Jing; Li, Mei-Hua; Deng, Jing-Min; Liu, Guang-Nan; Liu, Ji-Feng; Zhong, Xiao-Ning

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic cells and CD8(+) T cells participate in the pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, including emphysema, but little is known of the involvement of the CD40/CD40L pathway. We investigated the role of the CD40/CD40L pathway in Tc1 cell differentiation induced by dendritic cells in a mouse model of emphysema, and in vitro. C57BL/6J wild-type and CD40(-/-) mice were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) or not (control), for 24 wk. In vitro experiments involved wild-type and CD40(-/-) dendritic cells treated with CS extract (CSE) or not. Compared with the control groups, the CS mice (both wild type and CD40(-/-)) had a greater percentage of lung dendritic cells and higher levels of major histocompatability complex (MHC) class I molecules and costimulatory molecules CD40 and CD80. Relative to the CS CD40(-/-) mice, the CS wild type showed greater signs of lung damage and Tc1 cell differentiation. In vitro, the CSE-treated wild-type cells evidenced more cytokine release (IL-12/p70) and Tc1 cell differentiation than did the CSE-treated CD40(-/-) cells. Exposure to cigarette smoke increases the percentage of lung dendritic cells and promotes Tc1 cell differentiation via the CD40/CD40L pathway. Blocking the CD40/CD40L pathway may suppress development of emphysema in mice exposed to cigarette smoke. PMID:27448664

  14. CD40 and B cell antigen receptor dual triggering of resting B lymphocytes turns on a partial germinal center phenotype

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Phenotypic alterations occur when resting human B lymphocytes become germinal center (GC) cells. These include the induction of surface CD38, CD95 (FAS/APO-1), and carboxy-peptidase-M (CPM), a recently described GC marker. However, the factors that govern the in vivo induction of these surface molecules on B cells remain unknown. Here, we purified resting (CD38-) human B lymphocytes from tonsils in an attempt to establish culture conditions resulting in the induction of these three GC markers. We show that interferon (IFN) alpha or IFN- gamma, as well as antibodies against the B cell antigen receptor (BCR), could induce CD38 on resting B lymphocytes, a phenomenon further enhanced by CD40 stimulation. Concomitantly, CD95 was upregulated by CD40 ligation and, to a lesser extent, by IFN-gamma. By contrast, CPM expression could be upregulated only through BCR triggering. This CPM induction was specifically enhanced by CD19 or CD40 ligation. CD40 + BCR stimulation of resting B cells with CD40 ligand-transfected fibroblastic cells in the presence of cross-linked anti-BCR monoclonal antibodies resulted in the coexpression of CD38, CD95, and CPM. As GC cells, these cells also expressed CD71, CD80 (B7.1), and CD86 (B7.2), but not CD24. However, CD10+ or CD44- B cells could not be detected in these culture conditions, suggesting that yet other signals are required for the induction of these GC markers. Consistent with a GC phenotype, CD40 + BCR-stimulated cells exhibited reduced viability when cultured for 20 h in the absence of stimulus. These results first demonstrate that cotriggering of resting B cells through BCR and CD40 induces both phenotypic and functional GC features. They also show that IFN and CD19 triggering of resting B cells specifically modulate the expression of GC markers. PMID:8551247

  15. Preliminary evidence for a matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2)-dependent shedding of soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) from activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Reinboldt, Stephan; Wenzel, Folker; Rauch, Bernhard H; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Grandoch, Maria; Fischer, Jens W; Weber, Artur-Aron

    2009-09-01

    Platelets are the major source of soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) in the blood. It has been demonstrated that CD40L is cleaved from the surface of activated platelets to release sCD40L. However, the enzyme involved in sCD40L shedding has not been identified yet. Using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors of serine, cysteine, aspartate, or metalloproteinases, preliminary evidence is presented for the hypothesis that matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) might be the protease, primarily responsible for CD40L cleavage from platelet surface. PMID:19811225

  16. CD40 Blockade Combines with CTLA4Ig and Sirolimus To Produce Mixed Chimerism in an MHC-defined Rhesus Macaque Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Page, Andrew; Srinivasan, Swetha; Singh, Karnail; Russell, Maria; Hamby, Kelly; Deane, Taylor; Sen, Sharon; Stempora, Linda; Leopardi, Frank; Price, Andrew A.; Strobert, Elizabeth; Reimann, Keith A.; Kirk, Allan D.; Larsen, Christian P.; Kean, Leslie S.

    2011-01-01

    In murine models, T-cell costimulation blockade of the CD28:B7 and CD154:CD40 pathways synergistically promotes immune tolerance after transplantation. While CD28 blockade has been successfully translated to the clinic, translation of blockade of the CD154:CD40 pathway has been less successful, in large part due to thromboembolic complications associated with anti-CD154 antibodies. Translation of CD40 blockade has also been slow, in part due to the fact that synergy between CD40 blockade and CD28 blockade had not yet been demonstrated in either primate models or humans. Here we show that a novel, non-depleting CD40 monoclonal antibody, 3A8, can combine with combined CTLA4Ig and sirolimus in a well-established primate bone marrow chimerism-induction model. Prolonged engraftment required the presence of all three agents during maintenance therapy, and resulted in graft acceptance for the duration of immunosuppressive treatment, with rejection resulting upon immunosuppression withdrawal. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that upregulation of CD95 expression on both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells correlated with rejection, suggesting that CD95 may be a robust biomarker of graft loss. These results are the first to demonstrate prolonged chimerism in primates treated with CD28/mTOR blockade and non-depletional CD40 blockade, and support further investigation of combined costimulation blockade targeting the CD28 and CD40 pathways. PMID:21929643

  17. CD40 Expression in Fibrocytes Is Induced by TSH: Potential Synergistic Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mester, Tünde; Raychaudhuri, Nupur; Gillespie, Erin F.; Chen, Hong; Smith, Terry J.; Douglas, Raymond S.

    2016-01-01

    Context Fibrocytes appear to participate in inflammation and tissue remodeling in patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO). These patients have increased frequencies of circulating TSH receptor (TSHR)- and CD40-positive fibrocytes, suggesting TSHR and CD40 may play roles in proinflammatory cytokine production, which ultimately leads to orbital inflammation and tissue remodeling. Objective To investigate the potential interactions between the TSHR and CD40 signaling pathways and their roles in IL-6 and TNF-α production. Design and Outcome Measures CD40 expression on fibrocytes was assessed using flow cytometry; IL-6 and TNF-α protein release using Luminex technology; increased IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA abundance, using real-time PCR; TSH- and CD40 ligand (CD40L)-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in fibrocytes, by western blot analysis; TSHR-CD40 protein-protein interaction, using co-immunoprecipitation, and CD40-TSHR co-localization, using immunocytochemistry. Results TSH enhances CD40 expression at a pre-translational level in fibrocytes. Production of IL-6 and TNF-α after costimulation with TSH and CD40L was greater than that after TSH or CD40L stimulation alone. TSH and CD40L costimulation also resulted in greater Akt phosphorylation. Akt and nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors significantly reduced cytokine production after TSH and CD40L costimulation. TSHR and CD40L are colocalized on the cell surface and form a complex. Conclusions TSHR and CD40 in fibrocytes appear to be physically and functionally related. TSH stimulates CD40 production on the fibrocyte surface. Cytokine expression upon simultaneous stimulation of TSHR and CD40 is greater than levels achieved with TSH or CD40L alone. Increased expression of CD40 by TSH is a potential mechanism for this process. PMID:27631497

  18. The CD40 ligand. At the center of the immune universe?

    PubMed

    Grewal, I S; Flavell, R A

    1997-02-01

    For several years, the primary function of CD40 ligand (CD40L) has been believed to be in regulation of contact-dependent, CD40-CD40L-mediated signals between B- and T-cells, which are essential for the regulation of thymus-dependent (TD) humoral immune responses. Recently, a flurry of reports indicate that CD40 is expressed by variety of cell types other than B-cells that include dendritic cells, follicular dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. These studies show that CD40-CD40L interactions are important in inflammatory process. For the past few years, through the availability of CD40L-knockout mice, new data have emerged to support the belief that CD40L has many more functions than its role in TD humoral immunity. CD40L-deficient mice have provided significant information towards our understanding of the in vivo role of CD40L. The current picture that emerges indicates that CD40-CD40L interactions mediate many cell-mediated immune responses and T-cell-mediated effector functions that are required for proper functioning of the host defense system. This article focuses on the in vivo role of the CD40L in regulation of cell-mediated effector functions.

  19. Functional CD40 ligand is expressed by T cells in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, K P; Nishioka, Y; Lipsky, P E; Thomas, R

    1997-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40-L), a member of the tumor necrosis family of transmembrane glycoproteins, is rapidly and transiently expressed on the surface of recently activated CD4+ T cells. Interactions between CD40-L and CD40 induce B cell immunoglobulin production as well as monocyte activation and dendritic cell differentiation. Since these features characterize rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the expression and function of CD40-L in RA was examined. Freshly isolated RA peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) T cells expressed CD40-L mRNA as well as low level cell surface CD40-L. An additional subset of CD4+ RA SF T cells upregulated cell surface CD40-L expression within 15 min of in vitro activation even in the presence of cycloheximide, but soluble CD40-L was not found in SF. CD40-L expressed by RA T cells was functional, since RA PB and SF T cells but not normal PB T cells stimulated CD40-L-dependent B cell immunoglobulin production and dendritic cell IL-12 expression in the absence of prolonged in vitro T cell activation. In view of the diverse proinflammatory effects of CD40-L, this molecule is likely to play a central role in the perpetuation of rheumatoid synovitis. Of importance, blockade of CD40-L may prove highly effective as a disease modifying therapy for RA. PMID:9410920

  20. The Signaling Role of CD40 Ligand in Platelet Biology and in Platelet Component Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Aoui, Chaker; Prigent, Antoine; Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Pozzetto, Bruno; Richard, Yolande; Cognasse, Fabrice; Laradi, Sandrine; Garraud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a transmembrane molecule of crucial interest in cell signaling in innate and adaptive immunity. It is expressed by a variety of cells, but mainly by activated T-lymphocytes and platelets. CD40L may be cleaved into a soluble form (sCD40L) that has a cytokine-like activity. Both forms bind to several receptors, including CD40. This interaction is necessary for the antigen specific immune response. Furthermore, CD40L and sCD40L are involved in inflammation and a panoply of immune related and vascular pathologies. Soluble CD40L is primarily produced by platelets after activation, degranulation and cleavage, which may present a problem for transfusion. Soluble CD40L is involved in adverse transfusion events including transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Although platelet storage designed for transfusion occurs in sterile conditions, platelets are activated and release sCD40L without known agonists. Recently, proteomic studies identified signaling pathways activated in platelet concentrates. Soluble CD40L is a good candidate for platelet activation in an auto-amplification loop. In this review, we describe the immunomodulatory role of CD40L in physiological and pathological conditions. We will focus on the main signaling pathways activated by CD40L after binding to its different receptors. PMID:25479079

  1. CD40 is a prognostic marker in primary cutaneous malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    van den Oord, J. J.; Maes, A.; Stas, M.; Nuyts, J.; Battocchio, S.; Kasran, A.; Garmyn, M.; De Wever, I.; De Wolf-Peeters, C.

    1996-01-01

    CD40 is a receptor at the surface of B lymphocytes with important functions in the immune response. CD40 has also been found on a variety of carcinoma and melanoma cell lines where it has been suggested to serve as a possible receptor for mitogenic signals. We studied the expression and distribution of CD40 in paraffin sections of 71 uniformly treated malignant melanomas (MMs) with a long clinical follow-up using well known monoclonal antibodies. For comparison, 71 benign nevi were also studied. Common acquired nevi occasionally expressed CD40 in nests or single cells at the dermo-epidermal junction; no immunoreactivity was observed in the dermal part of acquired nevi, and all Spitz' nevi were entirely negative. One-third of large congenital nevi expressed CD40 in small clusters of heavily pigmented, epithelioid cells, corresponding to so-called proliferative nodules. In 41 of 71 MMs, CD40 was expressed in single or clustered neoplastic melanocytes; 9 cases showed CD40 expression only in the radial growth phase, and in 32 cases, the vertical growth phase showed CD40 expression. The same staining pattern was obtained with other anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies, directed to different epitopes of the CD40 molecule. In 29 of 32 MMs showing CD40 in the vertical growth phase, expression of the CD40 ligand (CD40L) was studied; in 13 of these 29, CD40L was found in the same tumor areas that expressed CD40. Analysis of 28 metastases from 24 MM patients showed in the majority of cases a similar, scattered or nodular staining pattern as observed in the primary tumor. Patients expressing CD40 in the vertical growth phase of their MM did not differ significantly from CD40-negative patients with respect to any of the known prognostic parameters but showed a significantly shorter tumor-free survival. Patients with CD40+ CD40L+ MM tended to have a shorter tumor-free survival than those lacking CD40L. We conclude that CD40 represents a novel prognostic parameter in primary cutaneous

  2. Lipid rafts regulate cellular CD40 receptor localization in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Min; Wang Qing; Zhu Huilian; Ma Jing; Hou Mengjun; Tang Zhihong; Li Juanjuan; Ling Wenhua

    2007-09-28

    Cholesterol enriched lipid rafts are considered to function as platforms involved in the regulation of membrane receptor signaling complex through the clustering of signaling molecules. In this study, we tested whether these specialized membrane microdomains affect CD40 localization in vitro and in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that upon CD40 ligand stimulation, endogenous and exogenous CD40 receptor is rapidly mobilized into lipid rafts compared with unstimulated HAECs. Efficient binding between CD40L and CD40 receptor also increases amounts of CD40 protein levels in lipid rafts. Deficiency of intracellular conserved C terminus of the CD40 cytoplasmic tail impairs CD40 partitioning in raft. Raft disorganization after methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin treatment diminishes CD40 localization into rafts. In vivo studies show that elevation of circulating cholesterol in high-cholesterol fed rabbits increases the cholesterol content and CD40 receptor localization in lipid rafts. These findings identify a physiological role for membrane lipid rafts as a critical regulator of CD40-mediated signal transduction and raise the possibility that certain pathologic conditions may be treated by altering CD40 signaling with drugs affecting its raft localization.

  3. CD40L induces functional tunneling nanotube networks exclusively in dendritic cells programmed by mediators of type-1 immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zaccard, Colleen R.; Watkins, Simon C.; Kalinski, Pawel; Fecek, Ronald J.; Yates, Aarika L.; Salter, Russell D.; Ayyavoo, Velpandi; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Mailliard, Robbie B.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DC) to mediate CD4+ T cell help for cellular immunity is guided by instructive signals received during DC maturation, and the resulting pattern of DC responsiveness to the Th signal, CD40L. Furthermore, the professional transfer of antigenic information from migratory DC to lymph node-residing DC is critical for the effective induction of cellular immune responses. Here we report that, in addition to their enhanced IL-12p70 producing capacity, human DC matured in the presence of inflammatory mediators of type-1 immunity (DC1) are uniquely programmed to form networks of tunneling nanotube-like structures in response to CD40L-expressing Th cells or recombinant CD40L. This immunologic process of DC ‘reticulation’ facilitates intercellular trafficking of endosome-associated vesicles and Ag, but also pathogens such HIV-1, and is regulated by the opposing roles of IFN-γ and IL-4. The initiation of DC reticulation represents a novel helper function of CD40L and a superior mechanism of intercellular communication possessed by DC1, as well as a target for exploitation by pathogens to enhance direct cell-to-cell spread. PMID:25548234

  4. Potential role of soluble CD40 in the humoral immune response impairment of uraemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Contin, Cécile; Pitard, Vincent; Delmas, Yahsou; Pelletier, Nadège; Defrance, Thierry; Moreau, Jean-François; Merville, Pierre; Déchanet-Merville, Julie

    2003-01-01

    CD40/CD154 interaction is essential for both humoral and cellular immune response. We investigated whether this interaction could be altered in patients with kidney failure who are known to present an impaired immune response. To that aim, we measured the levels of the soluble form of CD40 (sCD40), which is known to interfere with CD40/CD154 interaction, in 43 chronic renal failure patients, 162 hemodialysed patients, and 83 healthy donors. Uraemic and haemodialysed patients presented a three- and fivefold increase, respectively, of the antagonist soluble form of CD40 in their serum, when compared to healthy subjects. Serum sCD40 levels correlated with those of creatinine in uraemic non-haemodialysed patients. While sCD40 is widely excreted in urine of healthy individuals, it is not eliminated by dialysis sessions on classic membranes. The return to a normal kidney function in nine haemodialysed patients who received renal transplantation, leads to a rapid decrease of serum sCD40 levels. This natural sCD40 exhibited multimeric forms and was able to inhibit immunoglobulin production by CD154-activated B lymphocytes in vitro. Furthermore, the positive correlation we observed between the serum levels of sCD40 and the deficient response to hepatitis B vaccination in uraemic patients suggests that sCD40 also compromises the humoral response in vivo. PMID:12941150

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi infection induces the expression of CD40 in murine cardiomyocytes favoring CD40 ligation-dependent production of cardiopathogenic IL-6.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Mariela Alejandra Moreno; Casasco, Agustina; González, Mariela; Postan, Miriam; Corral, Ricardo Santiago; Petray, Patricia Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    The inflammatory response in the myocardium is an important aspect of the pathogenesis of Chagas' heart disease raised by Trypanosoma cruzi. CD40, a transmembrane type I receptor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family, is expressed in a broad spectrum of cell types and is crucial in several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Activation of CD40 through ligation to CD40L (CD154) induces multiple effects, including the secretion of proinflammatory molecules. In the present study, we examined the ability of T. cruzi to trigger the expression of CD40 in cardiac myocytes in vitro and in a murine model of chagasic cardiomyopathy. Our results indicate, for the first time, that T. cruzi is able to induce the expression of CD40 in HL-1 murine cardiomyocytes. Moreover, ligation of CD40 receptor upregulated interleukin-6 (IL-6), associated with inflammation. Furthermore, the induction of this costimulatory molecule was demonstrated in vivo in myocardium of mice infected with T. cruzi. This suggests that CD40-bearing cardiac muscle cells could interact with CD40L-expressing lymphocytes infiltrating the heart, thus contributing to inflammatory injury in chagasic cardiomyopathy.

  6. Increased levels of the CD40:CD40 ligand dyad in the cerebrospinal fluid of rats with vitamin B12(cobalamin)-deficient central neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Veber, Daniela; Mutti, Elena; Galmozzi, Enrico; Cedrola, Sabrina; Galbiati, Stefania; Morabito, Alberto; Tredici, Giovanni; La Porta, Caterina A; Scalabrino, Giuseppe

    2006-07-01

    The levels of the soluble (s) CD40:sCD40 ligand (L) dyad, which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha:TNF-alpha-receptor superfamily, are significantly increased in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but not the serum of cobalamin (Cbl)-deficient (Cbl-D) rats. They were normalized or significantly reduced after treatment with Cbl, transforming growth factor-beta1 or S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and the normal myelin ultrastructure of the spinal cord was concomitantly restored. The concomitance of the two beneficial effects of these treatments strongly suggests that the increases in CSF sCD40:sCD40L levels may participate in the pathogenesis of purely myelinolytic Cbl-D central neuropathy in the rat. In keeping with this, an anti-CD40 treatment prevented myelin lesions.

  7. CD40 Generation 2.5 Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment Attenuates Doxorubicin-induced Nephropathy and Kidney Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Aaron J; Yeh, Steve T; Hung, Gene; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Mullick, Adam E

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical data suggest CD40 activation contributes to renal inflammation and injury. We sought to test whether upregulation of CD40 in the kidney is a causative factor of renal pathology and if reduction of renal CD40 expression, using antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting CD40, would be beneficial in mouse models of glomerular injury and unilateral ureter obstruction. Administration of a Generation 2.5 CD40 ASO reduced CD40 mRNA and protein levels 75–90% in the kidney. CD40 ASO treatment mitigated functional, transcriptional, and pathological endpoints of doxorubicin-induced nephropathy. Experiments using an activating CD40 antibody revealed CD40 is primed in kidneys following doxorubicin injury or unilateral ureter obstruction and CD40 ASO treatment blunted CD40-dependent renal inflammation. Suborgan fractionation and imaging studies demonstrated CD40 in glomeruli before and after doxorubicin administration that becomes highly enriched within interstitial and glomerular foci following CD40 activation. Such foci were also sites of ASO distribution and activity and may be predominately comprised from myeloid cells as bone marrow CD40 deficiency sharply attenuated CD40 antibody responses. These studies suggest an important role of interstitial renal and/or glomerular CD40 to augment kidney injury and inflammation and demonstrate that ASO treatment could be an effective therapy in such disorders. PMID:26623936

  8. HOIL-1L Interacting Protein (HOIP) Is Essential for CD40 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hostager, Bruce S.; Kashiwada, Masaki; Colgan, John D.; Rothman, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    CD40 is a cell surface receptor important in the activation of antigen-presenting cells during immune responses. In macrophages and dendritic cells, engagement of CD40 by its ligand CD154 provides signals critical for anti-microbial and T cell-mediated immune responses, respectively. In B cells, CD40 signaling has a major role in regulating cell proliferation, antibody production, and memory B cell development. CD40 engagement results in the formation of a receptor-associated complex that mediates activation of NF-κB, stress-activated protein kinases, and other signaling molecules. However, the mechanisms that link CD40 to these signaling events have been only partially characterized. Known components of the CD40 signaling complex include members of the TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF) family of proteins. We previously showed that the TRAF family member TRAF2 mediates recruitment of HOIL-1L-interacting protein (HOIP) to the cytoplasmic domain of CD40, suggesting that HOIP has a role in the CD40 signaling pathway. To determine the role of HOIP in CD40 signaling, we used somatic cell gene targeting to generate mouse B cell lines deficient in HOIP. We found that the CD40-induced upregulation of CD80 and activation of germline immunoglobulin epsilon transcription were defective in HOIP-deficient cells. We also found that the CD40-mediated activation of NF-κB and c-Jun kinase was impaired. Recruitment of IκB kinase proteins to the CD40 signaling complex was undetectable in HOIP-deficient cells, potentially explaining the defect in NF-κB activation. Restoration of HOIP expression reversed the defects in cellular activation and signaling. These results reveal HOIP as a key component of the CD40 signaling pathway. PMID:21829693

  9. Mechanism and functional impact of CD40 ligand-induced von Willebrand factor release from endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Möller, Kerstin; Adolph, Oliver; Grünow, Jennifer; Elrod, Julia; Popa, Miruna; Ghosh, Subhajit; Schwarz, Manuel; Schwale, Chrysovalandis; Grässle, Sandra; Huck, Volker; Bruehl, Claus; Wieland, Thomas; Schneider, Stefan W; Nobiling, Rainer; Wagner, Andreas H; Hecker, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Co-stimulation via CD154 binding to CD40, pivotal for both innate and adaptive immunity, may also link haemostasis to vascular remodelling. Here we demonstrate that human platelet-bound or recombinant soluble CD154 (sCD154) elicit the release from and tethering of ultra-large (UL) von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimers to the surface of human cultured endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to shear stress. This CD40-mediated ULVWF multimer release from the Weibel-Palade bodies was triggered by consecutive activation of TRAF6, the tyrosine kinase c-Src and phospholipase Cγ1 followed by inositol-1,4,5 trisphosphate-mediated calcium mobilisation. Subsequent exposure to human washed platelets caused ULVWF multimer-platelet string formation on the EC surface in a shear stress-dependent manner. Platelets tethered to these ULVWF multimers exhibited P-selectin on their surface and captured labelled monocytes from the superfusate. When exposed to shear stress and sCD154, native ECs from wild-type but not CD40 or vWF-deficient mice revealed a comparable release of ULVWF multimers to which murine washed platelets rapidly adhered, turning P-selectin-positive and subsequently capturing monocytes from the perfusate. This novel CD154-provoked ULVWF multimer-platelet string formation at normal to fast flow may contribute to vascular remodelling processes requiring the perivascular or intravascular accumulation of pro-inflammatory macrophages such as arteriogenesis or atherosclerosis.

  10. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8(+) and CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4(+) T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections. PMID:27077111

  11. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8+ and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4+ T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8+ or CD4+ T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections. PMID:27077111

  12. Stratification of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients based on soluble CD40L longitudinal changes.

    PubMed

    Napoleão, Patrícia; Cabral, Luís B P; Selas, Mafalda; Freixo, Cláudia; Monteiro, Maria do Céu; Criado, Maria Begoña; Costa, Marina C; Enguita, Francisco J; Viegas-Crespo, Ana Maria; Saldanha, Carlota; Carmo, Miguel Mota; Ferreira, Rui Cruz; Pinheiro, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Involvement of soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) in thrombosis and inflammation on the context of coronary artery disease is currently being revised. In that perspective, we had studied the association of sCD40L with markers of platelet activation and markers of endothelial and vascular function. On that cohort, a stratification of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) 1 month after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was observed based on concentrations of sCD40L. The study intended to identify the groups of AMI patients with different profiles of sCD40L concentrations and verify how medication, clinical evolution, biochemical data, and markers of regulation of endothelial function at genetic (endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms) and post-transcriptional levels (circulating microRNAs) affect sCD40L serum levels. Lower quartiles of sCD40L (<2.3 ng/mL) were associated with higher concentrations of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), high frequency of G894T polymorphism, and altered expression of a set of microRNAs assumed to be involved in the regulation of endothelial and cardiac function and myocardium hypertrophy, relative to patients in sCD40L upper quartiles. A characteristic sCD40L variation pattern in STEMI patients was identified. Low levels of sCD40L 1 month after PCI distinguish STEMI patients with worse prognosis, a compromised cardiac healing, and a persistent endothelial dysfunction, as given by the association between sCD40L, NT-proBNP, G894T polymorphism, and specific profile of miRNA expression. These results suggest sCD40L could have a prognostic value in STEMI patients. PMID:27172386

  13. T cell-expressed CD40L potentiates the bone anabolic activity of intermittent PTH treatment.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jerid W; Li, Jau-Yi; Walker, Lindsey D; Tyagi, Abdul Malik; Reott, Michael A; Yu, Mingcan; Adams, Jonathan; Weitzmann, M Neale; Pacifici, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    T cells are known to potentiate the bone anabolic activity of intermittent parathyroid hormone (iPTH) treatment. One of the involved mechanisms is increased T cell secretion of Wnt10b, a potent osteogenic Wnt ligand that activates Wnt signaling in stromal cells (SCs). However, additional mechanisms might play a role, including direct interactions between surface receptors expressed by T cells and SCs. Here we show that iPTH failed to promote SC proliferation and differentiation into osteoblasts (OBs) and activate Wnt signaling in SCs of mice with a global or T cell-specific deletion of the T cell costimulatory molecule CD40 ligand (CD40L). Attesting to the relevance of T cell-expressed CD40L, iPTH induced a blunted increase in bone formation and failed to increase trabecular bone volume in CD40L(-/-) mice and mice with a T cell-specific deletion of CD40L. CD40L null mice exhibited a blunted increase in T cell production of Wnt10b and abrogated CD40 signaling in SCs in response to iPTH treatment. Therefore, expression of the T cell surface receptor CD40L enables iPTH to exert its bone anabolic activity by activating CD40 signaling in SCs and maximally stimulating T cell production of Wnt10b.

  14. A subset of CD4+ memory T cells contains preformed CD40 ligand that is rapidly but transiently expressed on their surface after activation through the T cell receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Signaling through surface CD40 is essential for selecting B cells that have mutated their immunoglobulin variable region genes in germinal centers and is an important signal in the early stages of antibody responses to T cell-dependent antigens. It is shown that a subset of CD45RO+, CD4+ T cells isolated from human tonsil contains preformed 30- 35-kD ligand for CD40. This is expressed on their surfaces within 5 min of their antigen-receptor complexes interacting with CD3 epsilon antibodies bound to ox erythrocytes. This surface expression does not require de novo protein synthesis and lasts for only 1-2 h. Preformed CD40 ligand (CD40L) was not detected in any CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells, but > 90% of all CD4+ T cells from the tonsil can be induced to express large amounts of CD40L on culture with phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore ionomycin. This expression of CD40L starts between 1 and 2 h, peaks at 6 h, and remains at a high level for > 20 h. It is totally prevented by adding a concentration of cycloheximide that inhibits CD25 synthesis by these activated cells. While CD3 epsilon antibody bound to ox red cells is a good inducer of surface expression of CD40L, it is a much less potent inducer of CD40L synthesis than phorbol myristate acetate with ionomycin. Immunohistological analysis of tonsil sections shows that cells containing CD40L are located mainly in the outer zone of germinal centers and the margins of the T zones that are rich in dendritic cells (interdigitating cells). The distribution of these cells is consistent with: (a) their interaction in T zones with B cells that have taken up and processed antigen and (b) their involvement in B cell selection in germinal centers. PMID:7699321

  15. In vivo CD40 ligation can induce T-cell-independent antitumor effects that involve macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lum, Hillary D; Buhtoiarov, Ilia N; Schmidt, Brian E; Berke, Gideon; Paulnock, Donna M; Sondel, Paul M; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L

    2006-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated T cell-independent antitumor and antimetastatic effects of CD40 ligation that involved natural killer (NK) cells. As CD40 molecules are expressed on the surface of macrophages (Mphi), we hypothesized that Mphi may also serve as antitumor effector cells when activated by CD40 ligation. Progression of subcutaneous NXS2 murine neuroblastomas was delayed significantly by agonistic CD40 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD40 mAb) therapy in immunocompetent A/J mice, as well as in T and B cell-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Although NK cells can be activated by anti-CD40 mAb, anti-CD40 mAb treatment also induced a significant antitumor effect in SCID/beige mice in the absence of T and NK effector cells, even when noncytolytic NK cells and polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) were depleted. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with anti-CD40 mAb resulted in enhanced expression of cytokines and cell surface activation markers, as well as Mphi-mediated tumor inhibition in A/J mice, C57BL/6 mice, and SCID/beige mice, as measured in vitro. A role for Mphi was shown by reduction in the antitumor effect of anti-CD40 mAb when Mphi functions were inhibited in vivo by silica. In addition, activation of peritoneal Mphi by anti-CD40 mAb resulted in survival benefits in mice bearing intraperitoneal tumors. Taken together, our results show that anti-CD40 mAb immunotherapy of mice can inhibit tumor growth in the absence of T cells, NK cells, and PMN through the involvement of activated Mphi.

  16. Protective immunity induced by tumor vaccines requires interaction between CD40 and its ligand, CD154.

    PubMed

    Mackey, M F; Gunn, J R; Ting, P P; Kikutani, H; Dranoff, G; Noelle, R J; Barth, R J

    1997-07-01

    Interactions between CD40 and its ligand, CD154 (CD40L, gp39), have been shown to play a central role in the regulation of humoral immunity. Recent evidence suggests that this ligand-receptor pair also plays an important role in the induction of cell-mediated immune responses, including those directed against viral pathogens, intracellular parasites, and alloantigens. The contribution of this ligand-receptor pair to the development of protective immunity against syngeneic tumors was evaluated by blocking the in vivo function of CD154 or by studying tumor resistance in mice genetically deficient in CD40 expression (CD40-/-). In the former case, anti-CD154 monoclonal antibody treatment inhibited the generation of protective immune responses after the administration of three potent tumor vaccines: irradiated MCA 105, MCA 105 admixed with Corynebacterium parvum adjuvant, and irradiated B16 melanoma cells transduced with the gene for granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Confirmation of the role of CD40/CD154 interactions in tumor immunity was provided by the overt tumor susceptibility in CD40-deficient mice as compared to that in CD40+/+ mice. In this case, wild-type but not CD40-deficient mice could be readily protected against live TS/A tumor challenge by preimmunization with TS/A admixed with C. parvum. These findings suggest a critical role for CD40/CD154 interactions in the induction of cellular immunity by tumor vaccines and may have important implications for future approaches to cell-based cancer therapies. PMID:9205055

  17. Monocytes and T cells cooperate to favor normal and follicular lymphoma B-cell growth: role of IL-15 and CD40L signaling.

    PubMed

    Epron, G; Ame-Thomas, P; Le Priol, J; Pangault, C; Dulong, J; Lamy, T; Fest, T; Tarte, K

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) has been extensively studied for its role in the survival and proliferation of NK and T cells through a unique mechanism of trans-presentation by producer cells. Conversely, whereas activated B cells have been described as IL-15-responding cells, the cellular and molecular context sustaining this effect remains unexplored. In this study, we found that, whereas human B cells could not respond to soluble IL-15, monocytes and lymphoid tissue-derived macrophages but not stromal cells efficiently trans-present IL-15 to normal B cells and cooperate with T-cell-derived CD40L to promote IL-15-dependent B-cell proliferation. Furthermore, CD40L signaling triggers a Src-independent upregulation of STAT5 expression and favors a Src-dependent phosphorylation of STAT5 in response to IL-15. In follicular lymphoma (FL), immunohistochemical studies reported a strong relationship between malignant B cells, infiltrating macrophages and T cells. We show here an overexpression of IL-15 in purified tumor-associated macrophages, and STAT5A in purified tumor B cells. Moreover, FL B cells respond to IL-15 trans-presented by monocytes/macrophages, in particular, in the presence of CD40L-mediated signaling. This cooperation between IL-15 and CD40L reinforces the importance of tumor microenvironment and unravels a mechanism of FL growth that should be considered if using IL-15 as a drug in this disease.

  18. Soluble CD40 ligand stimulates CD40-dependent activation of the β2 integrin Mac-1 and protein kinase C zeda (PKCζ) in neutrophils: implications for neutrophil-platelet interactions and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Yu, Shiyong; Song, Zifang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Wang, Cuiping; Yan, Jinchuan; Wu, Fusheng; Nanda, Anil; Granger, D Neil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has revealed an essential involvement of soluble CD40L (sCD40L) in inflammation and vascular disease. Activated platelets are the major source of sCD40L, which has been implicated in platelet and leukocyte activation, although its exact functional impact on leukocyte-platelet interactions and the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We aimed to determine the impact and the mechanisms of sCD40L on neutrophils. We studied neutrophil interactions with activated, surface-adherent platelets as a model for leukocyte recruitment to the sites of injury. Our data show that CD40L contributes to neutrophil firm adhesion to and transmigration across activated surface-adherent platelets, possibly through two potential mechanisms. One involves the direct interaction of ligand-receptor (CD40L-CD40), i.e., platelet surface CD40L interaction with neutrophil CD40; another involves an indirect mechanism, i.e. soluble CD40L stimulates activation of the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils and thereby further promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration. Activation of the integrin Mac-1 is known to be critical for mediating neutrophil adhesion and migration. sCD40L activated Mac-1 in neutrophils and enhanced neutrophil-platelet interactions in wild-type neutrophils, but failed to elicit such responses in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Furthermore, our data show that the protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ) is critically required for sCD40L-induced Mac-1 activation and neutrophil adhesive function. sCD40L strongly stimulated the focal clustering of Mac-1 (CD11b) and the colocalization of Mac-1 with PKCζ in wild-type neutrophils, but had minimal effect in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Blocking PKCζ completely inhibited sCD40L-induced neutrophil firm adhesion. Moreover, sCD40L strongly stimulates neutrophil oxidative burst via CD40-dependent activation of PI3K/NF-KB, but independent of Mac-1 and PKCζ. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the

  19. T Cell Cancer Therapy Requires CD40-CD40L Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor and Inducible Nitric-Oxide-Synthase-Producing Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Zilio, Serena; Desantis, Giacomo; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Ugel, Stefano; Sasso, Maria Stella; Qualls, Joseph E; Kratochvill, Franz; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Ries, Carola H; Runza, Valeria; Hoves, Sabine; Bilocq, Amélie M; Bindea, Gabriela; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Galon, Jérôme; Murray, Peter J; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-09-12

    Effective cancer immunotherapy requires overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments. We found that local nitric oxide (NO) production by tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells is important for adoptively transferred CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells to destroy tumors. These myeloid cells are phenotypically similar to inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2)- and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-producing dendritic cells (DC), or Tip-DCs. Depletion of immunosuppressive, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R)-dependent arginase 1(+) myeloid cells enhanced NO-dependent tumor killing. Tumor elimination via NOS2 required the CD40-CD40L pathway. We also uncovered a strong correlation between survival of colorectal cancer patients and NOS2, CD40, and TNF expression in their tumors. Our results identify a network of pro-tumor factors that can be targeted to boost cancer immunotherapies.

  20. T Cell Cancer Therapy Requires CD40-CD40L Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor and Inducible Nitric-Oxide-Synthase-Producing Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Zilio, Serena; Desantis, Giacomo; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Ugel, Stefano; Sasso, Maria Stella; Qualls, Joseph E; Kratochvill, Franz; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Ries, Carola H; Runza, Valeria; Hoves, Sabine; Bilocq, Amélie M; Bindea, Gabriela; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Galon, Jérôme; Murray, Peter J; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-09-12

    Effective cancer immunotherapy requires overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments. We found that local nitric oxide (NO) production by tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells is important for adoptively transferred CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells to destroy tumors. These myeloid cells are phenotypically similar to inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2)- and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-producing dendritic cells (DC), or Tip-DCs. Depletion of immunosuppressive, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R)-dependent arginase 1(+) myeloid cells enhanced NO-dependent tumor killing. Tumor elimination via NOS2 required the CD40-CD40L pathway. We also uncovered a strong correlation between survival of colorectal cancer patients and NOS2, CD40, and TNF expression in their tumors. Our results identify a network of pro-tumor factors that can be targeted to boost cancer immunotherapies. PMID:27622331

  1. Preparation of anti-CD40 antibody modified magnetic PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Kan, Bing; Gou, MaLing; Zhang, Juan; Guo, Gang; Huang, Ning; Zhao, Xia; Qian, ZhiYong

    2011-04-01

    Antibody modified magnetic polymeric microspheres have potential biomedical application. In this paper, anti-CD40 antibody modified magnetic poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG-PCL, PCEC) microspheres were prepared. First, PCL-PEG-PCL triblock copolymer was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization, followed by reaction with succinic anhydride, creating carboxylated PCL-PEG-PCL copolymer. Then, magnetite nanoparticles were encapsulated into carboxylated PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres, forming magnetic PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres with carboxyl group on their surface. Catalyzed by EDC/NHS, the anti-CD40 antibody was linked to these magnetic PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres, thus forming anti-CD40 modified PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres. These anti-CD40 antibody modified magnetic PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres may have potential application in cell separation. PMID:21702366

  2. p62 regulates CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages through interaction with TRAF6

    SciTech Connect

    Seibold, Kristina; Ehrenschwender, Martin

    2015-08-14

    CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family. Activation-induced recruitment of adapter proteins, so-called TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) to the cytoplasmic tail of CD40 triggers signaling cascades important in the immune system, but has also been associated with excessive inflammation in diseases such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Especially, pro-inflammatory nuclear factor κB (NFκB) signaling emanating from CD40-associated TRAF6 appears to be a key pathogenic driving force. Consequently, targeting the CD40-TRAF6 interaction is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy, but the underlying molecular machinery of this signaling axis is to date poorly understood. Here, we identified the multifunctional adaptor protein p62 as a critical regulator in CD40-mediated NFκB signaling via TRAF6. CD40 activation triggered formation of a TRAF6-p62 complex. Disturbing this interaction tremendously reduced CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages, while TRAF6-independent signaling pathways remained unaffected. This highlights p62 as a potential target in hyper-inflammatory, CD40-associated pathologies. - Highlights: • CD40 activation triggers interaction of the adapter protein TRAF6 with p62. • TRAF6-p62 interaction regulates CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages. • Defective TRAF6-p62 interaction reduces CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages.

  3. Chorioamnionitis is associated with increased CD40L expression on cord blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Sitaru, Ana-Gabriela; Speer, Christian P; Holzhauer, Susanne; Obergfell, Achim; Walter, Ulrich; Grossmann, Ralf

    2005-12-01

    Chorioamnionitis (CA) is a severe infection responsible not only for premature birth but also for many severe neonatal diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of CD40L and P-selectin on platelets and the plasma levels of their soluble forms in the umbilical cord blood in infants with documented chorioamnionitis. Umbilical cord blood samples were obtained from 10 healthy term newborns, 10 non-infected preterm infants, 10 preterm infants with premature rupture of membranes and 9 preterm infants with clinical and histological CA. The expression of CD40L and P-selectin on platelets was analyzed by flow cytometry. Soluble P-selectin (sCD62P), soluble CD40L (sCD40L) and interleukine-6 (IL-6) were measured in plasma by ELISA assays. Neonates with CA had significantly higher percentages of platelets expressing CD40L in basal conditions (5.3 +/- 2.9% vs. 1.6 +/- 0.7% and in non-infected preterm infants p < 0.05), while the percentages of P-selectin positive platelets were similar among all groups. In contrast, the level of sP-selectin was higher in infants with CA (222 +/- 128 ng/ml vs. 104 +/- 71 ng/ml in non-infected preterm infants, p < 0.05) but no differences were found in the levels of sCD40L. As expected, the levels of IL-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine were significantly higher in samples obtained from preterm neonates whose mothers had also elevated inflammatory parameters. Our observations suggest that platelets are involved in the complex inflammatory pathogenesis of CA. Neither P-selectin expression on cord blood platelets nor plasma sP-selectin or sCD40L were suitable platelet markers in CA, whereas CD40L was significantly elevated in histologically proven CA.

  4. Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF{alpha}) regulates CD40 expression through SMAR1 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kamini; Sinha, Surajit; Malonia, Sunil Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2010-01-08

    CD40 plays an important role in mediating inflammatory response and is mainly induced by JAK/STAT phosphorylation cascade. TNF{alpha} is the key cytokine that activates CD40 during inflammation and tumorigenesis. We have earlier shown that SMAR1 can repress the transcription of Cyclin D1 promoter by forming a HDAC1 dependent repressor complex. In this study, we show that SMAR1 regulates the transcription of NF-{kappa}B target gene CD40. SMAR1 recruits HDAC1 and forms a repressor complex on CD40 promoter and keeps its basal transcription in check. Further, we show that TNF{alpha} stimulation induces SMAR1 phosphorylation at Ser-347 and promotes its cytoplasmic translocation, thus releasing its negative effect. Concomitantly, TNF{alpha} induced phosphorylation of STAT1 at Tyr-701 by JAK1 facilitates its nuclear translocation and activation of CD40 through p300 recruitment and core Histone-3 acetylation. Thus, TNF{alpha} mediated regulation of CD40 expression occurs by dual phosphorylation of SMAR1 and STAT1.

  5. Potent antitumor immunity generated by a CD40-targeted adenoviral vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hangalapura, Basav N; Oosterhoff, Dinja; de Groot, Jan; Boon, Louis; Tüting, Thomas; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J; Gerritsen, Winald R; van Beusechem, Victor W; Pereboev, Alexander; Curiel, David T; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2011-09-01

    In situ delivery of tumor-associated antigen (TAA) genes into dendritic cells (DC) has great potential as a generally applicable tumor vaccination approach. Although adenoviruses (Ad) are an attractive vaccine vehicle in this regard, Ad-mediated transduction of DCs is hampered by the lack of expression of the Ad receptor CAR on the DC surface. DC activation also requires interaction of CD40 with its ligand CD40L to generate protective T-cell-mediated tumor immunity. Therefore, to create a strategy to target Ads to DCs in vivo, we constructed a bispecific adaptor molecule with the CAR ectodomain linked to the CD40L extracellular domain via a trimerization motif (CFm40L). By targeting Ad to CD40 with the use of CFm40L, we enhanced both transduction and maturation of cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. Moreover, we improved transduction efficiency of DCs in lymph node and splenic cell suspensions in vitro and in skin and vaccination site-draining lymph nodes in vivo. Furthermore, CD40 targeting improved the induction of specific CD8(+) T cells along with therapeutic efficacy in a mouse model of melanoma. Taken together, our findings support the use of CD40-targeted Ad vectors encoding full-length TAA for in vivo targeting of DCs and high-efficacy induction of antitumor immunity.

  6. A novel CD40LG deletion causes the hyper-IgM syndrome with normal CD40L expression in a 6-month-old child.

    PubMed

    López-Herrera, Gabriela; Maravillas-Montero, José Luis; Vargas-Hernández, Alexander; Berrón-Ruíz, Laura; Ramírez-Sánchez, Emmanuel; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco Javier; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo

    2015-05-01

    The X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHIGM) is the most common form of HIGM. Patients are clinically diagnosed on the basis of recurrent sinopulmonary infections, accompanied with low levels of IgG and IgA, normal to elevated levels of IgM, and the presence of peripheral B cells. Here, we have reported a novel deletion of four nucleotides in CD40LG exon 3, c.375_378delCAAA, which led to a frameshift mutation with a premature stop codon, p.Asn101*126. The deletion resulted in a truncated protein, in which majority of the extracellular domain was lost. However, detection of surface CD40L was still possible as the intracellular, transmembrane, and part of the extracellular domains were not affected. This indicated that this mutation did not affect protein stability and that immunodetection of CD40L expression is not enough for the diagnosis of XHIGM. Our study strongly suggests that genetic diagnosis for XHIGM should always be performed when clinical data support this diagnosis and CD40L protein is present.

  7. Gene expression and TB pathogenesis in rhesus macaques: TR4, CD40, CD40L, FAS (CD95), and TNF are host genetic markers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells that are associated with severity of TB lesions.

    PubMed

    Roodgar, Morteza; Ross, Cody T; Tarara, Ross; Lowenstine, Linda; Dandekar, Satya; Smith, David Glenn

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) pathologic lesions in rhesus macaques resemble those in humans. The expression levels of several host TB candidate genes in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of six rhesus macaques experimentally infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis were quantified pre-infection and at several dates post-infection. Quantitative measures of TB histopathology in the lungs including: granuloma count, granuloma size, volume of granulomatous and non-granulomatous lesions, and direct bacterial load, were used as the outcomes of a multi-level Bayesian regression model in which expression levels of host genes at various dates were used as predictors. The results indicate that the expression levels of TR4, CD40, CD40L, FAS (CD95) and TNF in PBMC were associated with quantitative measures of the severity of TB histopathologic lesions in the lungs of the study animals. Moreover, no reliable association between the expression levels of IFNE in PBMCs and the severity of TB lesions in the lungs of the study animals was found. In conclusion, PBMC expression profiles derived from the above-listed host genes might be appropriate biomarkers for probabilistic diagnosis and/or prognosis of TB severity in rhesus macaques.

  8. CD40 ligand and tdTomato-armed vaccinia virus for induction of antitumor immune response and tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, S; Ahonen, M; Diaconu, I; Hirvinen, M; Karttunen, Å; Vähä-Koskela, M; Hemminki, A; Cerullo, V

    2014-02-01

    Oncolytic vaccinia virus is an attractive platform for immunotherapy. Oncolysis releases tumor antigens and provides co-stimulatory danger signals. However, arming the virus can improve efficacy further. CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) can induce apoptosis of tumor cells and it also triggers several immune mechanisms. One of these is a T-helper type 1 (Th1) response that leads to activation of cytotoxic T-cells and reduction of immune suppression. Therefore, we constructed an oncolytic vaccinia virus expressing hCD40L (vvdd-hCD40L-tdTomato), which in addition features a cDNA expressing the tdTomato fluorochrome for detection of virus, potentially important for biosafety evaluation. We show effective expression of functional CD40L both in vitro and in vivo. In a xenograft model of bladder carcinoma sensitive to CD40L treatment, we show that growth of tumors was significantly inhibited by the oncolysis and apoptosis following both intravenous and intratumoral administration. In a CD40-negative model, CD40L expression did not add potency to vaccinia oncolysis. Tumors treated with vvdd-mCD40L-tdtomato showed enhanced efficacy in a syngenic mouse model and induced recruitment of antigen-presenting cells and lymphocytes at the tumor site. In summary, oncolytic vaccinia virus coding for CD40L mediates multiple antitumor effects including oncolysis, apoptosis and induction of Th1 type T-cell responses.

  9. Soluble CD40L in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: relation to microvascular complications and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    El-Asrar, Mohamed A; Adly, Amira Am; Ismail, Eman A

    2012-12-01

    CD40-soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) interactions might constitute an important mediator for vascular inflammation that initiates diabetic microangiopathy. Little is known about the relation between sCD40L and glycemic control. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate sCD40L levels in patients with type 1 diabetes and its relation to microvascular complications and metabolic control. Sixty patients with type 1 diabetes were compared with 30 healthy control subjects. Detailed medical history, thorough clinical examination, and laboratory assessment of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, glycemic control, and the presence of microvascular complications were performed. Measurement of serum sCD40L levels was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of microvascular complications. Serum sCD40L levels were significantly elevated in patients with type 1 diabetes in both groups compared with healthy controls (p < 0.001). Patients with microvascular complications had higher serum sCD40L concentrations than non-complicated cases (median, 13 000 vs. 450 pg/mL; p < 0.001). Serum sCD40L cutoff value of 530 pg/mL was able to differentiate complicated from non-complicated cases (p < 0.001). Patients with microalbuminuria or peripheral neuropathy showed higher levels of sCD40L when compared with patients without these complications (p < 0.05). Serum sCD40L levels were positively correlated with hemoglobin A1c and urinary albumin excretion (p < 0.001). We suggest that serum sCD40L levels are elevated in type 1 diabetes, particularly in patients with microvascular complications and a significant correlation with glycemic control exists. Therefore, measurement of serum sCD40L levels in poorly controlled patients would help to identify those at high risk of developing microvascular complications.

  10. miRNA-145 inhibits VSMC proliferation by targeting CD40

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xin; Li, Dai; Chen, Min; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Bikui; Wu, Tian; Guo, Ren

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated functions of miR-145 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) phenotypes and vascular diseases. In this study, we aim to determine whether CD40 is involved in miR-145 mediated switch of VSMC phenotypes. In cultured VSMCs, the effects of miR-145 and CD40 on TNF-α, TGF-β, and Homocysteine (Hcy) induced cell proliferation were evaluated by over-expression of miR-145 or by siRNA-mediated knockdown of CD40. We also used ultrasound imaging to explore the effect of miR-145 on carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) in atherosclerotic cerebral infarction (ACI) patients. The results showed 50 ng/mL TNF-α, 5 ng/mL TGF-β, and 500 μmol/L Hcy significantly increased the expression of CD40, both at mRNA and protein levels, and also induced the proliferation of VSMCs. We found that over-expression of miR-145 significantly inhibited the expression of CD40 and the differentiation of VSMCs, and over-expression of miR-145 decreased IL-6 levels in VSMC supernatants. In ACI patients, the lower expression of miR-145 was associated with thicker CIMT and higher levels of plasma IL-6. Our results suggest that the miR-145/CD40 pathway is involved in regulating VSMC phenotypes in TNF-α, TGF-β, and Hcy induced VSMCs proliferation model. Targeting miR-145/CD40 might be a useful strategy for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:27731400

  11. Generation of Functional CLL-Specific Cord Blood CTL Using CD40-Ligated CLL APC

    PubMed Central

    Decker, William K.; Shah, Nina; Xing, Dongxia; Lapushin, Ruth; Li, Sufang; Robinson, Simon N.; Yang, Hong; Parmar, Simrit; Halpert, Matthew M.; Keating, Michael J.; Gribben, John G.; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Wierda, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Though remissions have been observed following allo-HSCT for the treatment of CLL, many CLL patients are ineligible for transplant due to the lack of HLA-compatible donors. The use of umbilical cord blood (UCB) permits transplantation of many patients who lack HLA-compatible donors due to reduced requirements for stringent HLA matching between graft and recipient; however, disease relapse remains a concern with this modality. The generation of CLL-specific CTL from UCB T-cells, primed and expanded against the leukemic clone, might enhance the GVL effect and improve outcomes with UCB transplantation. Here we report the generation of functional, CLL-specific CTL using CD40-ligated CLL cells to prime partially-HLA matched UCB T-cells. Functionality and specificity were demonstrated by immune synapse assay, IFN-γ ELISpot, multi-parametric intracellular cytokine flow cytometry, and 51Cr release assay. The use of patient-specific, non-CLL controls demonstrated the generation of both alloantigen and CLL-specific responses. Subsequently, we developed a clinically-applicable procedure permitting separation of alloreactive CTL from leukemia-specific CTL. Leukemia-specific CTL were able to mediate in vivo killing of CLL in humanized mice without concurrent or subsequent development of xenoGVHD. Our results demonstrate that generation of CLL-specific effectors from UCB is feasible and practical, and the results support further exploration of this strategy as a treatment modality for CLL. PMID:23284688

  12. APE/Ref-1 makes fine-tuning of CD40-induced B cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Merluzzi, Sonia; Gri, Giorgia; Gattei, Valter; Pagano, Michele; Pucillo, Carlo

    2008-08-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/Redox factor-1, a multifunctional DNA base excision repair and redox regulation enzyme, plays an important role in oxidative signalling, transcription factor regulation, and cell cycle control. Recently, we have demonstrated that following the triggering of CD40 on B cells, APE/Ref-1 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and regulates the activity of B cell-specific transcription factors. In the present paper we investigate whether APE/Ref-1 plays a role in controlling CD40-mediated B cell proliferation too. We demonstrate a concurrent increase in proliferation and decrease in apoptosis of primary mouse B cells activated by CD40 cross-linking and transfected with functional APE/Ref-1 antisense oligonucleotide. Moreover, we provide evidence that a redox-mediated signalling mechanism is involved in this process and we propose that APE/Ref-1, controlling the intracellular redox state, may also affect the cell cycle by inducing nucleus-cytoplasm redistribution of p21. Together, these findings suggest that APE/Ref-1 could act as a negative regulator in an adaptive response to elevated ROS levels following CD40 cross-linking. Considering the important role of ROS and APE/Ref-1 in CD40-mediated B cell proliferation, our data will contribute to understand the mechanisms of tumor escape and suggest APE/Ref-1 as a novel target for tumor therapeutic approaches.

  13. CD40 Stimulation Obviates Innate Sensors and Drives T Cell Immunity in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Katelyn T; Vonderheide, Robert H

    2016-06-21

    Cancer immunotherapies are more effective in tumors with robust T cell infiltrates, but mechanisms to convert T cell-devoid tumors with active immunosuppression to those capable of recruiting T cells remain incompletely understood. Here, using genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), we demonstrate that a single dose of agonistic CD40 antibody with chemotherapy rendered PDA susceptible to T cell-dependent destruction and potentiated durable remissions. CD40 stimulation caused a clonal expansion of T cells in the tumor, but the addition of chemotherapy optimized myeloid activation and T cell function. Although recent data highlight the requirement for innate sensors in cancer immunity, these canonical pathways-including TLRs, inflammasome, and type I interferon/STING-played no role in mediating the efficacy of CD40 and chemotherapy. Thus, CD40 functions as a non-redundant mechanism to convert the tumor microenvironment immunologically. Our data provide a rationale for a newly initiated clinical trial of CD40 and chemotherapy in PDA. PMID:27292635

  14. Activated T cells induce expression of B7/BB1 on normal or leukemic B cells through a CD40-dependent signal

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Cognate interactions between antigen-presenting B and T cells play crucial roles in immunologic responses. T cells that have been activated via the crosslinking of CD3 are able to induce B cell proliferation and immunoglobulin secretion in a major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted and contact-dependent manner. We find that such activated human CD4+ T cells, but not control Ig- treated T cells, may induce normal or leukemic B cells to express B7/BB1 and significantly higher levels of CD54 intercellular adhesion molecule 1 via a process that also requires direct cell-cell contact. To discern what cell surface molecule(s) may be responsible for signalling B cells to express B7/BB1, we added various monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for T or B cell accessory molecules or control mAbs to cocultures of alpha-CD3-activated T cells and resting B cells. We find that only alpha-CD40 mAbs can significantly inhibit the increased expression of B7/BB1, suggesting that the ligand for CD40 expressed on activated T cells may be an important inducer of B7/BB1 expression. Subsequent experiments in fact demonstrate that alpha-CD40 mAbs, but not control mAbs, induce changes in B cell phenotype similar to those induced by activated T cells when the mAbs are presented on Fc gamma RII (CDw32)-expressing L cells. These phenotypic changes have significant effects on B cell function. Whereas chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells normally are very poor stimulators in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs), CLL-B cells preactivated via CD40 crosslinking are significantly better presenters of alloantigen, affecting up to 30-fold-greater stimulation of T cell proliferation than that induced by control treated or nontreated CLL-B cells. Similarly, the MLR of T cells stimulated by allogeneic nonleukemic B cells can be enhanced significantly if the stimulator B cells are preactivated via CD40 crosslinking. The enhanced MLR generated by such preactivated B cells may be inhibited

  15. CD40 Ligand and GMCSF Coexpression Enhance the Immune Responses and Protective Efficacy of PCV2 Adenovirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Delong; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Wang, Zhenyu; Chang, Lingling; Zhao, Xiaomin; Tong, Dewen

    2016-04-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) capsid protein (Cap) is the major structural protein that is responsible for neutralizing antibodies development and protective immunity, thus it is usually used to develop vaccines against porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD). Porcine CD40 ligand (CD40L) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) have positive immunostimulatory effects on immunocytes and have been applied in vaccine efficacy improvement as attractive adjuvant cytokines, respectively. However, whether these two cytokines can produce synergistic effect in vaccines still need to be further studied. In this study, porcine CD40L and GMCSF were inserted into recombinant adenoviruses to test the immunogenicity of PCV2 adenovirus vaccine in mice. Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence assay showed that Ad-Cap, Ad-CD40L-Cap, Ad-Cap-GMCSF, and Ad-CD40L-Cap-GMCSF were successfully constructed. Indirect ELISA and virus neutralizing assay showed that CD40L and GMCSF could enhance humoral immune responses, and PCV2 Cap-specific antibody titer and neutralizing activities were significantly higher in Ad-CD40L-Cap-GMCSF group than that in the other groups that just inserted either porcine CD40L or GMCSF in recombinant adenoviruses. Moreover, lymphocyte proliferation assay and cytokine release assay showed that CD40L and GMCSF enhanced the cellular immune responses of Ad-Cap, and had synergistic effects in lymphocyte proliferative activities and Th1-type cytokine production. Following PCV2 challenge, the viral loads in lungs of Ad-CD40L-Cap-GMCSF group were significantly lower compared with Ad-Cap, Ad-CD40L-Cap, and Ad-Cap-GMCSF group. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that CD40L and GMCSF could synergistically enhance the protective immune responses of PCV2 adenovirus vaccine, which would be used as a potent vaccine for the prevention and control of PCVAD. PMID:26982652

  16. Novel insights into anti-CD40/CD154 immunotherapy in transplant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, David F; Ford, Mandy L

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the CD40-CD154 costimulatory pathway and its critical role in the adaptive immune response, there has been considerable interest in therapeutically targeting this interaction with monoclonal antibodies in transplantation. Unfortunately, initial promise in animal models gave way to disappointment in clinical trials following a number of thromboembolic complications. However, recent mechanistic studies have identified the mechanism of these adverse events, as well as detailed a myriad of interactions between CD40 and CD154 on a wide variety of immune cell types and the critical role of this pathway in generating both humoral and cell-mediated alloreactive responses. This has led to resurgence in interest and the potential resurrection of anti-CD154 and anti-CD40 antibodies as clinically viable therapeutic options.

  17. CD40-Activated B Cell Cancer Vaccine Improves Second Clinical Remission and Survival in Privately Owned Dogs with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Krick, Erika; Coughlin, Christina M.; Overley, Beth; Gregor, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based active immunotherapy for cancer is a promising novel strategy, with the first dendritic cell (DC) vaccine achieving regulatory approval for clinical use last year. Manufacturing remains arduous, especially for DC vaccines, and the prospect of using cell-based immunotherapy in the adjuvant setting or in combination with chemotherapy remains largely untested. Here, we used a comparative oncology approach to test the safety and potential efficacy of tumor RNA-loaded, CD40-activated B cells in privately owned dogs presenting with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), a clinical scenario that represents not only a major problem in veterinary medicine but also a bona fide spontaneous animal model for the human condition. When administered to NHL dogs in remission after induction chemotherapy, CD40-B cells electroporated ex vivo with autologous tumor RNA safely stimulated immunity in vivo. Although chemotherapy plus CD40-B vaccination did not improve time-to-progression or lymphoma-specific survival compared to dogs treated with chemotherapy alone, vaccination potentiated the effects of salvage therapy and improved the rate of durable second remissions as well as subsequent lymphoma-specific survival following salvage therapy. Several of these relapsed dogs are now long-term survivors and free of disease for more than a year. Overall, these clinical and immunological results suggest that cell-based CD40 cancer vaccination is safe and synergizes with chemotherapy to improve clinical outcome in canine NHL. More broadly, our findings underscore the unique value of clinical investigations in tumor-bearing companion animals. PMID:21904611

  18. KLF10 Mediated Epigenetic Dysregulation of Epithelial CD40/CD154 Promotes Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Abigail A; Khan, Zaraq; Zheng, Ye; Correa, Luiz F; Zanfagnin, Valentina; Shenoy, Chandra C; Schoolmeester, John K; Saadalla, Abdulrahman M; El-Nashar, Sherif; Famuyide, Abimbola O; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Hawse, John R; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Daftary, Gaurang S

    2016-09-01

    Endometriosis is a highly prevalent, chronic, heterogeneous, fibro-inflammatory disease that remains recalcitrant to conventional therapy. We previously showed that loss of KLF11, a transcription factor implicated in uterine disease, results in progression of endometriosis. Despite extensive homology, co-expression, and human disease association, loss of the paralog Klf10 causes a unique inflammatory, cystic endometriosis phenotype in contrast to fibrotic progression seen with loss of Klf11. We identify here for the first time a novel role for KLF10 in endometriosis. In an animal endometriosis model, unlike wild-type controls, Klf10(-/-) animals developed cystic lesions with massive immune infiltrate and minimal peri-lesional fibrosis. The Klf10(-/-) disease progression phenotype also contrasted with prolific fibrosis and minimal immune cell infiltration seen in Klf11(-/-) animals. We further found that lesion genotype rather than that of the host determined each unique disease progression phenotype. Mechanistically, KLF10 regulated CD40/CD154-mediated immune pathways. Both inflammatory as well as fibrotic phenotypes are the commonest clinical manifestations in chronic fibro-inflammatory diseases such as endometriosis. The complementary, paralogous Klf10 and Klf11 models therefore offer novel insights into the mechanisms of inflammation and fibrosis in a disease-relevant context. Our data suggests that divergence in underlying gene dysregulation critically determines disease-phenotype predominance rather than the conventional paradigm of inflammation being precedent to fibrotic scarring. Heterogeneity in clinical progression and treatment response are thus likely from disparate gene regulation profiles. Characterization of disease phenotype-associated gene dysregulation offers novel approaches for developing targeted, individualized therapy for recurrent and recalcitrant chronic disease. PMID:27488034

  19. Nanovesicle-targeted Kv1.3 knockdown in memory T cells suppresses CD40L expression and memory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chimote, Ameet A; Hajdu, Peter; Kottyan, Leah C; Harley, John B; Yun, Yeoheung; Conforti, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Ca(2+) signaling controls activation and effector functions of T lymphocytes. Ca(2+) levels also regulate NFAT activation and CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression in T cells. CD40L in activated memory T cells binds to its cognate receptor, CD40, on other cell types resulting in the production of antibodies and pro-inflammatory mediators. The CD40L/CD40 interaction is implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders and CD40L is widely recognized as a therapeutic target. Ca(2+) signaling in T cells is regulated by Kv1.3 channels. We have developed lipid nanoparticles that deliver Kv1.3 siRNAs (Kv1.3-NPs) selectively to CD45RO(+) memory T cells and reduce the activation-induced Ca(2+) influx. Herein we report that Kv1.3-NPs reduced NFAT activation and CD40L expression exclusively in CD45RO(+) T cells. Furthermore, Kv1.3-NPs suppressed cytokine release and induced a phenotype switch of T cells from predominantly memory to naïve. These findings indicate that Kv1.3-NPs operate as targeted immune suppressive agents with promising therapeutic potentials.

  20. Reproducibility over time and effect of low-dose aspirin on soluble P-selectin and soluble CD40 ligand.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Vanessa; Nardi, Michael A; Elbaum, Lindsay; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2015-07-01

    Platelet markers [soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) and soluble p selectin (sPselectin)] are associated with platelet activation and cardiovascular events. We sought to investigate the reproducibility of these markers over time and the effect of low-dose aspirin on sCD40L and sPselectin in plasma and serum. Following an overnight fast, 40 healthy volunteers had weekly phlebotomy and were administered aspirin 81 mg/day between weeks 3 and 4. Reproducibility over time was assessed by coefficient of variation (CV) and inter-class correlation coefficient. Correlation between markers was assessed using Pearson r statistic. Difference between levels pre- and post-aspirin was measured with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Data are presented as median (interquartile range). sCD40L and sPselectin measurements were reproducible over time in plasma and serum (CV < 10 %). Measurement of sCD40L and sPselectin in plasma correlated with levels in serum before aspirin and after aspirin. There was no significant correlation between sCD40L and sPselectin. After 1-week of aspirin 81 mg/day, there was a reduction in sCD40L and sPselectin in serum and plasma, respectively. Soluble CD40L and sPselectin are independent markers that are reproducible over time in both plasma and sera and are reduced by 1-week of low-dose aspirin.

  1. INVOLVEMENT OF TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4 AND MAPK PATHWAYS IN LPS-INDUCED CD40 EXPRESSION IN MONOCYTIC CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CD40 is a co-stimulatory surface molecule actively expressed on mature dendritic cells (DC). Recent studies suggest that endotoxin (LPS) inhalation induces DC maturation in the airways of healthy volunteers. To characterize the effect of LPS on CD40 expression and underlying mech...

  2. Abnormal germinal center reactions in systemic lupus erythematosus demonstrated by blockade of CD154-CD40 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grammer, Amrie C.; Slota, Rebecca; Fischer, Randy; Gur, Hanan; Girschick, Hermann; Yarboro, Cheryl; Illei, Gabor G.; Lipsky, Peter E.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the role of CD154-CD40 interactions in the B cell overactivity exhibited by patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), CD19+ peripheral B cells were examined before and after treatment with humanized anti-CD154 mAb (BG9588, 5c8). Before treatment, SLE patients manifested activated B cells that expressed CD154, CD69, CD38, CD5, and CD27. Cells expressing CD38, CD5, or CD27 disappeared from the periphery during treatment with anti-CD154 mAb, and cells expressing CD69 and CD154 disappeared from the periphery during the post-treatment period. Before treatment, active-SLE patients had circulating CD38bright Ig-secreting cells that were not found in normal individuals. Disappearance of this plasma cell subset during treatment was associated with decreases in anti–double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) Ab levels, proteinuria, and SLE disease activity index. Consistent with this finding, peripheral B cells cultured in vitro spontaneously proliferated and secreted Ig in a manner that was inhibited by anti-CD154 mAb. Finally, the CD38+/++IgD+, CD38+++, and CD38+IgD– B cell subsets present in the peripheral blood also disappeared following treatment with humanized anti-CD154. Together, these results indicate that patients with active lupus nephritis exhibit abnormalities in the peripheral B cell compartment that are consistent with intensive germinal center activity, are driven via CD154-CD40 interactions, and may reflect or contribute to the propensity of these patients to produce autoantibodies. PMID:14617752

  3. Abnormal germinal center reactions in systemic lupus erythematosus demonstrated by blockade of CD154-CD40 interactions.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Amrie C; Slota, Rebecca; Fischer, Randy; Gur, Hanan; Girschick, Hermann; Yarboro, Cheryl; Illei, Gabor G; Lipsky, Peter E

    2003-11-01

    To determine the role of CD154-CD40 interactions in the B cell overactivity exhibited by patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), CD19+ peripheral B cells were examined before and after treatment with humanized anti-CD154 mAb (BG9588, 5c8). Before treatment, SLE patients manifested activated B cells that expressed CD154, CD69, CD38, CD5, and CD27. Cells expressing CD38, CD5, or CD27 disappeared from the periphery during treatment with anti-CD154 mAb, and cells expressing CD69 and CD154 disappeared from the periphery during the post-treatment period. Before treatment, active-SLE patients had circulating CD38 (bright) Ig-secreting cells that were not found in normal individuals. Disappearance of this plasma cell subset during treatment was associated with decreases in anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) Ab levels, proteinuria, and SLE disease activity index. Consistent with this finding, peripheral B cells cultured in vitro spontaneously proliferated and secreted Ig in a manner that was inhibited by anti-CD154 mAb. Finally, the CD38(+/++)IgD(+), CD38(+++), and CD38(+)IgD(-) B cell subsets present in the peripheral blood also disappeared following treatment with humanized anti-CD154. Together, these results indicate that patients with active lupus nephritis exhibit abnormalities in the peripheral B cell compartment that are consistent with intensive germinal center activity, are driven via CD154-CD40 interactions, and may reflect or contribute to the propensity of these patients to produce autoantibodies.

  4. Association of CD40 with rheumatoid arthritis confirmed in a large UK case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Gisela; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Ke, Xiayi; Wilson, Anthony G; Bax, Deborah E; Morgan, Ann W; Emery, Paul; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Thomson, Wendy; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Objective A recent meta-analysis of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in populations of European descent reported novel associations of markers mapping to the CD40, CCL21 and CDK6 genes with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility while a large-scale, case-control association study in a Japanese population identified association with multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CD244 gene. The aim of the current study was to validate these potential RA susceptibility markers in a UK population. Methods A total of 4 SNPs (rs4810485 in CD40, rs2812378 in CCL21, rs42041 in CDK6 and rs6682654 in CD244) were genotyped in a UK cohort comprising 3962 UK patients with RA and 3531 healthy controls using the Sequenom iPlex platform. Genotype counts in patients and controls were analysed with the χ2 test using Stata. Results Association to the CD40 gene was robustly replicated (p=2×10−4, OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.93) and modest evidence was found for association with the CCL21 locus (p=0.04, OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.16). However, there was no evidence for association of rs42041 (CDK6) and rs6682654 (CD244) with RA susceptibility in this UK population. Following a meta-analysis including the original data, association to CD40 was confirmed (p=7.8×10−8, OR 0.87 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.92). Conclusion In this large UK cohort, strong association of the CD40 gene with susceptibility to RA was found, and weaker evidence for association with RA in the CCL21 locus. PMID:19435719

  5. Involvement of the cytoplasmic cysteine-238 of CD40 in its up-regulation of CD23 expression and its enhancement of TLR4-triggered responses.

    PubMed

    Nadiri, Amal; Jundi, Malek; El Akoum, Souhad; Hassan, Ghada S; Yacoub, Daniel; Mourad, Walid

    2015-11-01

    CD40, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, plays a key role in both adaptive and innate immunity. Engagement of CD40 with its natural trimeric ligand or with cross-linked antibodies results in disulfide-linked CD40 (dl-CD40) homodimer formation, a process mediated by the cysteine-238 residues of the cytoplasmic tail of CD40. The present study was designed to elucidate the biological relevance of cysteine-238-mediated dl-CD40 homodimers to the expression of CD23 on B cells and to investigate its possible involvement in the innate response. Our results indicate that cysteine-238-mediated dl-CD40 homodimerization is required for CD40-induced activation of PI3-kinase/Akt signaling and the subsequent CD23 expression, as inhibition of dl-CD40 homodimer formation through a point mutation-approach specifically impairs these responses. Interestingly, cysteine-238-mediated dl-CD40 homodimers are also shown to play a crucial role in Toll-like receptor 4-induced CD23 expression, further validating the importance of this system in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses. This process also necessitates the activation of the PI3-kinase/Akt cascade. Thus, our results highlight new roles for CD40 and cysteine-238-mediated CD40 homodimers in cell biology and identify a potential new target for therapeutic strategies against CD40-associated chronic inflammatory diseases.

  6. Stimulation through CD40 and TLR-4 Is an Effective Host Directed Therapy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nargis; Pahari, Susanta; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Aqdas, Mohammad; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among all infectious diseases. Failure of Bacillus Calmette Guerin as a vaccine and serious side-effects and toxicity due to long-term TB drug regime are the major hurdles associated with TB control. The problem is further compounded by the emergence of drug-resistance strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Consequently, it demands a serious attempt to explore safer and superior treatment approaches. Recently, an improved understanding of host–pathogen interaction has opened up new avenues for immunotherapy for treating TB. Although, dendritic cells (DCs) show a profound role in generating immunity against Mtb, their immunotherapeutic potential needs to be precisely investigated in controlling TB. Here, we have devised an approach of bolstering DCs efficacy against Mtb by delivering signals through CD40 and TLR-4 molecules. We found that DCs triggered through CD40 and TLR-4 showed increased secretion of IL-12, IL-6, and TNF-α. It also augmented autophagy. Interestingly, CD40 and TLR-4 stimulation along with the suboptimal dose of anti-TB drugs significantly fortified their efficacy to kill Mtb. Importantly, animals treated with the agonists of CD40 and TLR-4 boosted Th1 and Th17 immunity. Furthermore, it amplified the pool of memory CD4 T cells as well as CD8 T cells. Furthermore, substantial reduction in the bacterial burden in the lungs was observed. Notably, this adjunct therapy employing immunomodulators and chemotherapy can reinvigorate host immunity suppressed due to drugs and Mtb. Moreover, it would strengthen the potency of drugs in curing TB. PMID:27729911

  7. An essential role for gp39, the ligand for CD40, in thymic selection.

    PubMed

    Foy, T M; Page, D M; Waldschmidt, T J; Schoneveld, A; Laman, J D; Masters, S R; Tygrett, L; Ledbetter, J A; Aruffo, A; Claassen, E; Xu, J C; Flavell, R A; Oehen, S; Hedrick, S M; Noelle, R J

    1995-11-01

    The interactions between CD40 on B cells and its ligand gp39 on activated T helper cells are known to be essential for the development of thymus-dependent humoral immunity. However, CD40 is also functionally expressed on thymic epithelial cells and dendritic cells, suggesting that gp39-CD40 interactions may also play a role in thymic education, the process by which self-reactive cells are deleted from the T cell repertoire. Six systems of negative selection were studied for their reliance on gp39-CD40 interactions to mediate negative selection. In all cases, when the antigen/superantigen was endogenously expressed (in contrast to exogenously administered), negative selection was blocked by loss of gp39 function. Specifically, blockade of gp39-CD40 interactions prevented the deletion of thymocytes expressing V beta 3, V beta 11, and V beta 12, specificities normally deleted in BALB/c mice because of the endogenous expression of minor lymphocyte-stimulating determinants. Independent verification of a role of gp39 in negative selection was provided by studies in gp39-deficient mice where alterations in T cell receptor (TCR) V beta expression were also observed. Studies were also performed in the AND TCR transgenic (Tg) mice, which bear the V alpha 11, V beta 3 TCR and recognize both pigeon cytochrome c (PCC)/IEk and H-2As. Neonatal administration of anti-gp39 to AND TCR Tg mice that endogenously express H-2As or endogenously produce PCC prevented the deletion of TCR Tg T cells. In contrast, deletion mediated by high-dose PCC peptide antigen (administered exogenously) in AND TCR mice was unaltered by administration of anti-gp39. In addition, deletion by Staphylococcus enterotoxin B in conventional mice was also unaffected by anti-gp39 administration. gp39 expression was induced on thymocytes by mitogens or by antigen on TCR Tg thymocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis of B7-2 expression in the thymus indicated that, in the absence of gp39, B7-2 expression was

  8. Potential predictive role of chemotherapy-induced changes of soluble CD40 ligand in untreated advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Oronzo; Porcelli, Letizia; Graziano, Giusi; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Signorile, Michele; Scarpa, Aldo; Lorusso, Vito; Silvestris, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma lacks predictive biomarkers. CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. CD40-sCD40L interaction is considered to contribute to the promotion of tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serum sCD40L as a predictor in metastatic pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 27 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients treated with FOLFIRINOX (21 patients) or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combination (six patients). The sCD40L level was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline, at first evaluation (all patients), and at time to progression (18 patients). The radiological response was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, Version 1.1. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre-post treatment sCD40L levels with respect to clinical response, while Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for the correlation between sCD40L and CA19.9 pre- and post-treatment. The Kruskal-Wallis test was also conducted for further comparisons. We observed a statistically significant reduction in the sCD40L level after 3 months of treatment in patients with partial response (11,718.05±7,097.13 pg/mL vs 4,689.42±5,409.96 pg/mL; P<0.01). Conversely, in patients with progressive disease, the biomarker statistically increased in the same time (9,351.51±7,356.91 pg/mL vs 22,282.92±11,629.35 pg/mL; P<0.01). This trend of sCD40L was confirmed in 18 patients at time to progression after the first evaluation. No differences were recorded within the stable disease group. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the sCD40L and CA19.9 pre-post treatment variation percentage (Pearson's correlation coefficient =0.52; P<0.05). Our data suggest a possible predictive role of sCD40L in pancreatic cancer patients, similar to CA19.9. PMID:27555786

  9. Potential predictive role of chemotherapy-induced changes of soluble CD40 ligand in untreated advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Oronzo; Porcelli, Letizia; Graziano, Giusi; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Signorile, Michele; Scarpa, Aldo; Lorusso, Vito; Silvestris, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma lacks predictive biomarkers. CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. CD40–sCD40L interaction is considered to contribute to the promotion of tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serum sCD40L as a predictor in metastatic pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 27 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients treated with FOLFIRINOX (21 patients) or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combination (six patients). The sCD40L level was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline, at first evaluation (all patients), and at time to progression (18 patients). The radiological response was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, Version 1.1. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre–post treatment sCD40L levels with respect to clinical response, while Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used for the correlation between sCD40L and CA19.9 pre- and post-treatment. The Kruskal–Wallis test was also conducted for further comparisons. We observed a statistically significant reduction in the sCD40L level after 3 months of treatment in patients with partial response (11,718.05±7,097.13 pg/mL vs 4,689.42±5,409.96 pg/mL; P<0.01). Conversely, in patients with progressive disease, the biomarker statistically increased in the same time (9,351.51±7,356.91 pg/mL vs 22,282.92±11,629.35 pg/mL; P<0.01). This trend of sCD40L was confirmed in 18 patients at time to progression after the first evaluation. No differences were recorded within the stable disease group. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the sCD40L and CA19.9 pre–post treatment variation percentage (Pearson’s correlation coefficient =0.52; P<0.05). Our data suggest a possible predictive role of sCD40L in pancreatic cancer patients, similar to CA19.9. PMID:27555786

  10. Autocrine stimulation of IL-10 is critical to the enrichment of IL-10-producing CD40(hi)CD5(+) regulatory B cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Jun Ho; Han, Hee Dong; Kim, A-Ram; Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Hyun Woo; Park, Young Hwan; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, Min Bum; Park, Yeong Min; Kim, Hyung Sik; Kim, Young Mi; You, Ji Chang; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2015-01-01

    IL-10-producing B (Breg) cells regulate various immune responses. However, their phenotype remains unclear. CD40 expression was significantly increased in B cells by LPS, and the Breg cells were also enriched in CD40(hi)CD5(+) B cells. Furthermore, CD40 expression on Breg cells was increased by IL-10, CD40 ligand, and B cell-activating factor, suggesting that CD40(hi) is a common phenotype of Breg cells. LPS-induced CD40 expression was largely suppressed by an anti-IL-10 receptor antibody and in IL-10(-/-)CD5(+)CD19(+) B cells. The autocrine effect of IL-10 on the CD40 expression was largely suppressed by an inhibitor of JAK/STAT3. In vivo, the LPS treatment increased the population of CD40(hi)CD5(+) Breg cells in mice. However, the population of CD40(hi)CD5(+) B cells was minimal in IL-10(-/-) mice by LPS. Altogether, our findings show that Breg cells are largely enriched in CD40(hi)CD5(+) B cells and the autocrine effect of IL-10 is critical to the formation of CD40(hi)CD5(+) Breg cells.

  11. A Genetically Engineered Adenovirus Vector Targeted to CD40 Mediates Transduction of Canine Dendritic Cells and Promotes Antigen-Specific Immune Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Erin E.; Nakayama, Masaharu; Smith, Bruce F.; Bird, R. Curtis; Muminova, Zhanat; Strong, Theresa; Timares, Laura; Korokhov, Nikolay; O'Neill, Ann Marie; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Tani, Kenzaburo; Curiel, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Targeting viral vectors encoding tumor-associated antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo is likely to enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapeutic cancer vaccines. We have previously shown that genetic modification of adenovirus (Ad) 5 to incorporate CD40 ligand (CD40L) rather than native fiber allows selective transduction and activation of DCs in vitro. Here, we examine the capacity of this targeted vector to induce immune responses to the tumor antigen CEA in a stringent in vivo canine model. CD40-targeted Ad5 transduced canine DCs via the CD40-CD40L pathway in vitro, and following vaccination of healthy dogs, CD40-targeted Ad5 induced strong anti-CEA cellular and humoral responses. These data validate the canine model for future translational studies and suggest targeting of Ad5 vectors to CD40 for in vivo delivery of tumor antigens to DCs is a feasible approach for successful cancer therapy. PMID:19786146

  12. Immunoliposome co-delivery of bufalin and anti-CD40 antibody adjuvant induces synergetic therapeutic efficacy against melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Yuan, Jiani; Yang, Qian; Cao, Wei; Zhou, Xuanxuan; Xie, Yanhua; Tu, Honghai; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Siwang

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes constitute one of the most popular nanocarriers for improving the delivery and efficacy of agents in cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate immunoliposome co-delivery of bufalin and anti-CD40 to induce synergetic therapeutic efficacy while eliminating systemic side effects. Bufalin liposomes (BFL) conjugated with anti-CD40 antibody (anti-CD40-BFL) showed enhanced cytotoxicity compared with bufalin alone. In a mouse B16 melanoma model, intravenous injection of anti-CD40-BFL achieved smaller tumor volume than did treatment with BFL (average: 117 mm3 versus 270 mm3, respectively); the enhanced therapeutic efficacy through a caspase-dependent pathway induced apoptosis, which was confirmed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-Fluorescein nick end labeling and Western blot assay. Meanwhile, anti-CD40-BFL elicited unapparent body-weight changes and a significant reduction in serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, interferon-γ, and hepatic enzyme alanine transaminase, suggesting minimized systemic side effects. This may be attributed to the mechanism by which liposomes are retained within the tumor site for an extended period of time, which is supported by the following biodistribution and flow cytometric analyses. Taken together, the results demonstrated a highly promising strategy for liposomal vehicle transport of anti-CD40 plus bufalin that can be used to enhance antitumor effects via synergetic systemic immunity while blocking systemic toxicity. PMID:25506218

  13. Class II-targeted antigen is superior to CD40-targeted antigen at stimulating humoral responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Frleta, D; Demian, D; Wade, W F

    2001-02-01

    We examined the efficacy of using monoclonal antibodies to target antigen (avidin) to different surface molecules expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC). In particular, we targeted CD40 to test whether the "adjuvant" properties of CD40 signaling combined with targeted antigen would result in enhanced serologic responses. We targeted avidin to class II as a positive control and to CD11c as a negative control. These surface proteins represent an ensemble of surface molecules that signal upon ligation and that are expressed on professional APC, in particular dendritic cells (DC). We observed that targeting class II molecules on APC was superior to targeting CD40, or CD11c. However, CD40 and CD11c could function as targets for antigen bound monoclonal antibodies under certain conditions. Interestingly, inclusion of anti-CD40 mAb with the targeting anti-class II-targeted antigens negatively affects humoral response, suggesting that CD40 signaling under certain conditions may suppress processing and/or presentation of targeted antigen. PMID:11360928

  14. Inhibition of B-cell death does not restore T-cell-dependent immune responses in CD40-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Jesús; Díez, Miguel A; Muñiz, María; Buelta, Luis; Núñez, Gabriel; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Merino, Ramón

    2003-01-01

    Signalling through CD40 is essential for the development of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses, germinal centres and B-cell memory against T-dependent antigens. In addition, engagement of CD40 in B cells promotes cell survival by inducing the expression of anti-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family of cell-death regulators. In the present study we analysed whether T-dependent immune responses can be developed in mice deficient in CD40 if the anti-apoptotic activity mediated by the engagement of CD40 in B cells is compensated by the constitutive over-expression of anti-apoptotic genes of the bcl-2 family. We showed that the over-expression of either hbcl-2 or hbcl-xL transgenes in B cells is not sufficient to restore IgG antibody responses and germinal centre formation in CD40-deficient mice. These results indicate that CD40 functions, other than those mediated through survival, are required for the establishment of T-dependent B-cell responses. PMID:12871216

  15. The Serum Levels of the Soluble Factors sCD40L and CXCL1 Are Not Indicative of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Pateisky, Petra; Pils, Dietmar; Kuessel, Lorenz; Szabo, Ladislaus; Walch, Katharina; Obwegeser, Reinhard; Wenzl, René; Yotova, Iveta

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a benign but troublesome gynecological condition, characterized by endometrial-like tissue outside the uterine cavity. Lately, the discovery and validation of noninvasive diagnostic biomarkers for endometriosis is one of the main priorities in the field. As the disease elicits a chronic inflammatory reaction, we focused our interest on two factors well known to be involved in inflammation and neoplastic processes, namely, soluble CD40 Ligand and CXCL1, and asked whether differences in the serum levels of sCD40L and CXCL1 in endometriosis patients versus controls can serve as noninvasive disease markers. A total of n = 60 women were included in the study, 31 endometriosis patients and 29 controls, and the serum levels of sCD40L and CXCL1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overall, there were no statistically significant differences in the levels of expression of both sCD40L and CXCL1 between patients and controls. This study adds useful clinical data showing that the serum levels of the soluble factors sCD40L and CXCL1 are not associated with endometriosis and are not suitable as biomarkers for disease diagnosis. However, we found a trend toward lower levels of sCD40L in the deep infiltrating endometriosis subgroup making it a potentially interesting target worth further investigation. PMID:27190986

  16. Mycobacterium-Specific γ9δ2 T Cells Mediate Both Pathogen-Inhibitory and CD40 Ligand-Dependent Antigen Presentation Effects Important for Tuberculosis Immunity.

    PubMed

    Abate, Getahun; Spencer, Charles T; Hamzabegovic, Fahreta; Blazevic, Azra; Xia, Mei; Hoft, Daniel F

    2016-02-01

    Numerous pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, can activate human γ9δ2 T cells to proliferate and express effector mechanisms. γ9δ2 T cells can directly inhibit the growth of intracellular mycobacteria and may also act as antigen-presenting cells (APC). Despite evidence for γδ T cells having the capacity to function as APC, the mechanisms involved and importance of these effects on overall tuberculosis (TB) immunity are unknown. We prepared M. tuberculosis-specific γ9δ2 T cell lines to study their direct protective effects and APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells. The direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria were measured, and the enhancing effects on proliferative and effector responses of αβ T cells assessed. Furthermore, the importance of cell-to-cell contact and soluble products for γ9δ2 T cell effector responses and APC functions were investigated. We demonstrate, in addition to direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria, the following: (i) γ9δ2 T cells enhance the expansion of M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells and increase the ability of αβ T cells to inhibit intracellular mycobacteria; (ii) although soluble mediators are critical for the direct inhibitory effects of γ9δ2 T cells, their APC functions do not require soluble mediators; (iii) the APC functions of γ9δ2 T cells involve cell-to-cell contact that is dependent on CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) interactions; and (iv) fully activated CD4(+) αβ T cells and γ9δ2 T cells provide similar immune enhancing/APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific T cells. These effector and helper effects of γ9δ2 T cells further indicate that these T cells should be considered important new targets for new TB vaccines.

  17. Phase I study of the CD40 agonist antibody CP-870,893 combined with carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Vonderheide, Robert H; Burg, Jennifer M; Mick, Rosemarie; Trosko, Jennifer A; Li, Dongguang; Shaik, M Naveed; Tolcher, Anthony W; Hamid, Omid

    2013-01-01

    CD40 is a cell-surface molecule that critically regulates immune responses. CP-870,893 is a fully human, CD40-specific agonist monoclonal antibody (mAb) exerting clinical antineoplastic activity. Here, the safety of CP-870,893 combined with carboplatin and paclitaxel was assessed in a Phase I study. Patients with advanced solid tumors received standard doses of paclitaxel and carboplatin on day 1 followed by either 0.1 mg/Kg or 0.2 mg/Kg CP-870,893 on day 3 (Schedule A) or day 8 (Schedule B), repeated every 21 d. The primary objective was to determine safety and maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of CP-870,893. Secondary objectives included the evaluation of antitumor responses, pharmacokinetics and immune modulation. Thirty-two patients were treated with CP-870,893, 16 patients on each schedule. Two dose-limiting toxicities were observed (grade 3 cytokine release and transient ischemic attack), each at the 0.2 mg/Kg dose level, which was estimated to be the MTD. The most common treatment-related adverse event was fatigue (81%). Of 30 evaluable patients, 6 (20%) exhibited partial responses constituting best responses as defined by RECIST. Following CP-870,893 infusion, the peripheral blood manifested an acute depletion of B cells associated with upregulation of immune co-stimulatory molecules. T-cell numbers did not change significantly from baseline, but transient tumor-specific T-cell responses were observed in a small number of evaluable patients. The CD40 agonist mAb CP-870,893, given on either of two schedules in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin, was safe for patients affected with advanced solid tumors. Biological and clinical responses were observed, providing a rationale for Phase II studies.

  18. CD40 engagement on dendritic cells, but not on B or T cells, is required for long-term control of murine gammaherpesvirus 68.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Francesca; Shea, Ashley; Inglis, Chandra; Lee, Lian Ni; Sarawar, Sally R

    2008-11-01

    CD4 T cells are not essential for primary clearance of replicating murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) but are required for effective long-term control. The virus reactivates in the lungs of major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient (CII-/-) mice that lack functional CD4 T cells. CD40 ligand (CD40L) is upregulated on activated CD4 T cells, and it is thought that CD40-CD40L interactions are an important component of CD4 T-cell help. Our previous studies have shown that agonistic antibodies to CD40 can substitute for CD4 T-cell function in the long-term control of MHV-68. In the present study, we sought to identify the CD40-positive cell type mediating this effect. To address this question, we adoptively transferred MHV-68 peptide-pulsed CII(-/-) dendritic cells (DC) that had been treated with an agonistic antibody to CD40 into MHV-68-infected CII(-/-) recipients. Viral reactivation was significantly lower in mice injected with anti-CD40-treated DC than in those injected with control DC or in mice that did not receive any DC. However, in similar experiments with B cells, anti-CD40 treatment had no effect. We also investigated the requirement for CD40 expression on T cells by adoptive transfer of T cells from CD40(+/+) or CD40(-/-) mice into T-cell-deficient recipients that were subsequently infected with MHV-68. The results showed that CD40 expression on T cells is not necessary for preventing viral reactivation. Taken together, our data suggest that CD40 engagement on DC, but not on T or B cells, is essential for effective long-term control of MHV-68.

  19. CD40: Novel Association with Crohn's Disease and Replication in Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Alcina, Antonio; Teruel, María; Díaz-Gallo, Lina M.; Gómez-García, María; López-Nevot, Miguel A.; Rodrigo, Luis; Nieto, Antonio; Cardeña, Carlos; Alcain, Guillermo; Díaz-Rubio, Manuel; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Fernandez, Oscar; Arroyo, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Background A functional polymorphism located at −1 from the start codon of the CD40 gene, rs1883832, was previously reported to disrupt a Kozak sequence essential for translation. It has been consistently associated with Graves' disease risk in populations of different ethnicity and genetic proxies of this variant evaluated in genome-wide association studies have shown evidence of an effect in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility. However, the protective allele associated with Graves' disease or rheumatoid arthritis has shown a risk role in MS, an effect that we aimed to replicate in the present work. We hypothesized that this functional polymorphism might also show an association with other complex autoimmune condition such as inflammatory bowel disease, given the CD40 overexpression previously observed in Crohn's disease (CD) lesions. Methodology Genotyping of rs1883832C>T was performed in 1564 MS, 1102 CD and 969 ulcerative colitis (UC) Spanish patients and in 2948 ethnically matched controls by TaqMan chemistry. Principal Findings The observed effect of the minor allele rs1883832T was replicated in our independent Spanish MS cohort [p = 0.025; OR (95% CI) = 1.12 (1.01–1.23)]. The frequency of the minor allele was also significantly higher in CD patients than in controls [p = 0.002; OR (95% CI) = 1.19 (1.06–1.33)]. This increased predisposition was not detected in UC patients [p = 0.5; OR (95% CI) = 1.04 (0.93–1.17)]. Conclusion The impact of CD40 rs1883832 on MS and CD risk points to a common signaling shared by these autoimmune conditions. PMID:20634952

  20. Induction of myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes ex vivo by CD40-activated B cells loaded with myeloma tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Ki; Nguyen Pham, Thanh-Nhan; Nguyen Hoang, Tuyet Minh; Kang, Hyun-Kyu; Jin, Chun-Ji; Nam, Jong-Hee; Chung, Sang-Young; Choi, So-Jin-Na; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Chung, Ik-Joo; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung

    2009-11-01

    We investigated to establish CD40-activated B cells (CD40-B cells) as alternative antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for the induction of myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). To generate CD40-B cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were co-cultured with CD40L-transfected J558 cells in the presence of IL-4, insulin, transferrin, and cyclosporine for 14 days, and pulsed with myeloma lysates. The CD40-B cells consistently expressed high levels of CD80, CD86, CD54, CCR7, and HLA-DR. The CD40-B cells produced IL-12, IFN-gamma, and IL-6 during the culture period, but not IL-10. In addition, the CD40-B cells showed potent allogeneic T-cell stimulatory capacities that depended on the dose ratio and had the potential to polarize naïve T cells into Th1 subsets. The CD40-B cells loaded with tumor lysates induced strong target-specific CTLs, based on large numbers of IFN-gamma secreting cells and higher cytotoxic activity against target cells compared to the CD40-B cells without the tumor lysates. These results suggest that CD40-B cells loaded with myeloma lysates might provide alternative APCs for cellular immunotherapy in patients with myeloma. PMID:19277657

  1. Excess soluble CD40L contributes to blood brain barrier permeability in vivo: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Donna C; Hirschman, Michael P; Sun, Anita; Singh, Meera V; Kasischke, Karl; Maggirwar, Sanjay B

    2012-01-01

    Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L) are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1) positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking.

  2. Anthocyanins and their physiologically relevant metabolites alter the expression of IL‐6 and VCAM‐1 in CD40L and oxidized LDL challenged vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Hiren P.; Czank, Charles; Raheem, Saki; Zhang, Qingzhi; Botting, Nigel P.; Cassidy, Aedín

    2015-01-01

    Scope In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that dietary anthocyanins modulate cardiovascular disease risk; however, given anthocyanins extensive metabolism, it is likely that their degradation products and conjugated metabolites are responsible for this reported bioactivity. Methods and results Human vascular endothelial cells were stimulated with either oxidized LDL (oxLDL) or cluster of differentiation 40 ligand (CD40L) and cotreated with cyanidin‐3‐glucoside and 11 of its recently identified metabolites, at 0.1, 1, and 10 μM concentrations. Protein and gene expression of IL‐6 and VCAM‐1 was quantified by ELISA and RT‐qPCR. In oxLDL‐stimulated cells the parent anthocyanin had no effect on IL‐6 production, whereas numerous anthocyanin metabolites significantly reduced IL‐6 protein levels; phase II conjugates of protocatechuic acid produced the greatest effects (>75% reduction, p ≤ 0.05). In CD40L‐stimulated cells the anthocyanin and its phase II metabolites reduced IL‐6 protein production, where protocatechuic acid‐4‐sulfate induced the greatest reduction (>96% reduction, p ≤ 0.03). Similarly, the anthocyanin and its metabolites reduced VCAM‐1 protein production, with ferulic acid producing the greatest effect (>65% reduction, p ≤ 0.04). Conclusion These novel data provide evidence to suggest that anthocyanin metabolites are bioactive at physiologically relevant concentrations and have the potential to modulate cardiovascular disease progression by altering the expression of inflammatory mediators. PMID:25787755

  3. Latent virus infection upregulates CD40 expression facilitating enhanced autoimmunity in a model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Casiraghi, Costanza; Citlali Márquez, Ana; Shanina, Iryna; Steven Horwitz, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been identified as a putative environmental trigger of multiple sclerosis (MS) by multiple groups working worldwide. Previously, we reported that when experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice latently infected with murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (γHV-68), the murine homolog to EBV, a disease more reminiscent of MS developed. Specifically, MS-like lesions developed in the brain that included equal numbers of IFN-γ producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and demyelination, none of which is observed in MOG induced EAE. Herein, we demonstrate that this enhanced disease was dependent on the γHV-68 latent life cycle and was associated with STAT1 and CD40 upregulation on uninfected dendritic cells. Importantly, we also show that, during viral latency, the frequency of regulatory T cells is reduced via a CD40 dependent mechanism and this contributes towards a strong T helper 1 response that resolves in severe EAE disease pathology. Latent γ-herpesvirus infection established a long-lasting impact that enhances subsequent adaptive autoimmune responses. PMID:26356194

  4. Impaired Tumor Antigen Processing by Immunoproteasome-expressing CD40-Activated B cells and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen S.; Zeng, Wanyong; Sasada, Tetsuro; Su, Mei; Choi, Jaewon; Drakoulakos, Donna; Kang, Yoon-Joong; Brusic, Vladimir; Wu, Catherine; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2012-01-01

    Professional APCs, such as dendritic cells, are routinely used in vitro for the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for tumor antigens. In addition to dendritic cells, CD40-activated B cells and variant K562 leukemic cells can be readily transfected with nucleic acids for in vitro and in vivo antigen presentation. However, the expression of immunoproteasome components in dendritic cells may preclude display of tumor antigens such as Mart1/MelanA. Here, we use three target epitopes, two derived from tumor antigens [Mart126–34 (M26) and Cyp1B1239–247 (Cyp239)] and one derived from the Influenza A viral antigen [FluM158–66 (FluM58)], to demonstrate that CD40-activated B cells, like dendritic cells, have a limited capability to process certain tumor antigens. In contrast, the K562 HLA-A*0201 transfectant efficiently processes and presents M26 and Cyp239 as well as the influenza FluM58 epitopes to T cells. These results demonstrate that the choice of target APC for gene transfer of tumor antigens may be limited by the relative efficacy of proteasome components to process certain tumor epitopes. Importantly, K562 can be exploited as an artificial APC, efficient in processing both M26 and Cyp239 epitopes and presumably, by extension, other relevant tumor antigens. PMID:21400024

  5. CTLA4Ig prevents alloantibody formation following nonhuman primate islet transplantation using the CD40-specific antibody 3A8.

    PubMed

    Badell, I R; Russell, M C; Cardona, K; Shaffer, V O; Turner, A P; Avila, J G; Cano, J A; Leopardi, F V; Song, M; Strobert, E A; Ford, M L; Pearson, T C; Kirk, A D; Larsen, C P

    2012-07-01

    Islet transplantation to treat type 1 diabetes has been limited in part by toxicities of current immunosuppression and recipient humoral sensitization. Blockade of the CD28/CD80/86 and CD40/CD154 pathways has shown promise to remedy both these limitations, but translation has been hampered by difficulties in translating CD154-directed therapies. Prior CD40-directed regimens have led to prolonged islet survival, but fail to prevent humoral allosensitization. We therefore evaluated the addition of CTLA4Ig to a CD40 blockade-based regimen in nonhuman primate (NHP) alloislet transplantation. Diabetic rhesus macaques were transplanted allogeneic islets using the CD40-specific antibody 3A8, basiliximab induction, and sirolimus with or without CTLA4Ig maintenance therapy. Allograft survival was determined by fasting blood glucose levels and flow cytometric techniques were used to test for donor-specific antibody (DSA) formation. CTLA4Ig plus 3A8, basiliximab and sirolimus was well tolerated and induced long-term islet allograft survival. The addition of CTLA4Ig prevented DSA formation, but did not facilitate withdrawal of the 3A8-based regimen. Thus, CTLA4Ig combines with a CD40-specific regimen to prevent DSA formation in NHPs, and offers a potentially translatable calcineurin inhibitor-free protocol inclusive of a single investigational agent for use in clinical islet transplantation without relying upon CD154 blockade. PMID:22458552

  6. Agonistic Anti-CD40 Enhances the CD8+ T Cell Response during Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zickovich, Julianne M.; Meyer, Susan I.; Yagita, Hideo; Obar, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens are capable of inducing vigorous CD8+ T cell responses. However, we do not entirely understand the factors driving the generation of large pools of highly protective memory CD8+ T cells. Here, we studied the generation of endogenous ovalbumin-specific memory CD8+ T cells following infection with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Listeria monocytogenes (LM). VSV infection resulted in the generation of a large ovalbumin-specific memory CD8+ T cell population, which provided minimal protective immunity that waned with time. In contrast, the CD8+ T cell population of LM-ova provided protective immunity and remained stable with time. Agonistic CD40 stimulation during CD8+ T cell priming in response to VSV infection enabled the resultant memory CD8+ T cell population to provide strong protective immunity against secondary infection. Enhanced protective immunity by agonistic anti-CD40 was dependent on CD70. Agonistic anti-CD40 not only enhanced the size of the resultant memory CD8+ T cell population, but enhanced their polyfunctionality and sensitivity to antigen. Our data suggest that immunomodulation of CD40 signaling may be a key adjuvant to enhance CD8+ T cell response during development of VSV vaccine strategies. PMID:25166494

  7. PU.1 Expression in T Follicular Helper Cells Limits CD40L-Dependent Germinal Center B Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Awe, Olufolakemi; Hufford, Matthew M; Wu, Hao; Pham, Duy; Chang, Hua-Chen; Jabeen, Rukhsana; Dent, Alexander L; Kaplan, Mark H

    2015-10-15

    PU.1 is an ETS family transcription factor that is important for the development of multiple hematopoietic cell lineages. Previous work demonstrated a critical role for PU.1 in promoting Th9 development and in limiting Th2 cytokine production. Whether PU.1 has functions in other Th lineages is not clear. In this study, we examined the effects of ectopic expression of PU.1 in CD4(+) T cells and observed decreased expression of genes involved with the function of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, including Il21 and Tnfsf5 (encoding CD40L). T cells from conditional mutant mice that lack expression of PU.1 in T cells (Sfpi1(lck-/-)) demonstrated increased production of CD40L and IL-21 in vitro. Following adjuvant-dependent or adjuvant-independent immunization, we observed that Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice had increased numbers of Tfh cells, increased germinal center B cells (GCB cells), and increased Ab production in vivo. This correlated with increased expression of IL-21 and CD40L in Tfh cells from Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice compared with control mice. Finally, although blockade of IL-21 did not affect GCB cells in Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice, anti-CD40L treatment of immunized Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice decreased GCB cell numbers and Ag-specific Ig concentrations. Together, these data indicate an inhibitory role for PU.1 in the function of Tfh cells, germinal centers, and Tfh-dependent humoral immunity.

  8. Role of platelet CD40 ligand for endothelial cell-monocyte interaction in the presence of flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Andreas H.; Schwarz, Manuel; König, Gerd; Hecker, Markus

    2014-11-01

    CD40 ligand (CD154)-induced ultra-large von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimer-mediated endothelial cell-platelet-monocyte interaction may play an important role in adaptive and maladaptive vascular remodeling processes. Here we analyzed the impact of and conditions favouring the deposition of these multimers on the endothelial cell (EC) surface by way of CD40-CD154 co-stimulation in settings mimicking different forms of blood flow. Upon exposure to low oscillatory shear stress and sCD154, a release of vWF multimers comparable to histamine stimulation was monitored on the EC surface in a string-like fashion. Moreover, ex vivo perfused carotid arteries of wild type mice at low laminar shear stress rates showed a luminal release of vWF as ultra-large vWF multimers (ULVWF) upon stimulation with sCD154 which was absent in blood vessels of CD40 knockout mice. The observed CD40- and flow-dependent vWF release from intact endothelial cells and subsequent vWF multimer formation may facilitate adhesion and subsequent activation of circulating platelets at atherosclerotic predilection sites, which are characterized by disturbed flow patterns. This in turn may amplify endothelial cell-monocyte interaction, thus possibly initiating or promoting early atherosclerotic lesion formation.

  9. Transformation of the tumour microenvironment by a CD40 agonist antibody correlates with improved responses to PD-L1 blockade in a mouse orthotopic pancreatic tumour model

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Stefanie; Sulikowski, Michal G.; Martin, Philip; Brown, Lee; Lewis, Arthur; Davies, Gareth; Morrow, Michelle; Wilkinson, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of recently developed chemotherapy regimens, survival times for pancreatic cancer patients remain poor. These patients also respond poorly to immune checkpoint blockade therapies (anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-L1, anti-PD-1), which suggests the presence of additional immunosuppressive mechanisms in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment (TME). CD40 agonist antibodies (αCD40) promote antigen presenting cell (APC) maturation and enhance macrophage tumouricidal activity, and may therefore alter the pancreatic TME to increase sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade. Here, we test whether αCD40 transforms the TME in a mouse syngeneic orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer, to increase sensitivity to PD-L1 blockade. We found that whilst mice bearing orthotopic Pan02 tumours responded poorly to PD-L1 blockade, αCD40 improved overall survival. αCD40 transformed the TME, upregulating Th1 chemokines, increasing cytotoxic T cell infiltration and promoting formation of an immune cell-rich capsule separating the tumour from the normal pancreas. Furthermore, αCD40 drove systemic APC maturation, memory T cell expansion, and upregulated tumour and systemic PD-L1 expression. Combining αCD40 with PD-L1 blockade enhanced anti-tumour immunity and improved overall survival versus either monotherapy. These data provide further support for the potential of combining αCD40 with immune checkpoint blockade to promote anti-tumour immunity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26918344

  10. A novel, blocking, Fc-silent anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody prolongs nonhuman primate renal allograft survival in the absence of B cell depletion.

    PubMed

    Cordoba, F; Wieczorek, G; Audet, M; Roth, L; Schneider, M A; Kunkler, A; Stuber, N; Erard, M; Ceci, M; Baumgartner, R; Apolloni, R; Cattini, A; Robert, G; Ristig, D; Munz, J; Haeberli, L; Grau, R; Sickert, D; Heusser, C; Espie, P; Bruns, C; Patel, D; Rush, J S

    2015-11-01

    CD40-CD154 pathway blockade prolongs renal allograft survival in nonhuman primates (NHPs). However, antibodies targeting CD154 were associated with an increased incidence of thromboembolic complications. Antibodies targeting CD40 prolong renal allograft survival in NHPs without thromboembolic events but with accompanying B cell depletion, raising the question of the relative contribution of B cell depletion to the efficacy of anti-CD40 blockade. Here, we investigated whether fully silencing Fc effector functions of an anti-CD40 antibody can still promote graft survival. The parent anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody HCD122 prolonged allograft survival in MHC-mismatched cynomolgus monkey renal allograft transplantation (52, 22, and 24 days) with accompanying B cell depletion. Fc-silencing yielded CFZ533, an antibody incapable of B cell depletion but still able to potently inhibit CD40 pathway activation. CFZ533 prolonged allograft survival and function up to a defined protocol endpoint of 98-100 days (100, 100, 100, 98, and 76 days) in the absence of B cell depletion and preservation of good histological graft morphology. CFZ533 was well-tolerated, with no evidence of thromboembolic events or CD40 pathway activation and suppressed a gene signature associated with acute rejection. Thus, use of the Fc-silent anti-CD40 antibody CFZ533 appears to be an attractive approach for preventing solid organ transplant rejection.

  11. Thyrotropin Receptor and CD40 Mediate Interleukin-8 Expression in Fibrocytes: Implications for Thyroid-Associated Ophthalmopathy (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Raymond S.; Mester, Tünde; Ginter, Anna; Kim, Denise S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To better understand the pathogenesis of thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO) through elucidating the role of thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) and CD40 in the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in peripheral blood fibrocytes. Fibrocytes infiltrate the orbit of patients with TAO, where they differentiate into fibroblasts. Fibrocyte precursors occur with increased frequency in the peripheral blood expressing TSHR and CD40 in TAO patients. We hypothesize that in vitro derived fibrocytes and peripheral blood fibrocyte precursors express proinflammatory chemoattractant molecules including IL-8 initiated by TSHR and CD40 signaling. Since nearly all TAO patients express activating antibodies to TSHR, this is particularly relevant for activation of peripheral blood fibrocytes. Methods: TSHR and CD40 expression on peripheral blood fibrocytes was determined by flow cytometry. IL-8 RNA was quantitated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. IL-8 protein production was measured by Luminex and flow cytometry. Thyroid-stimulating hormone and CD40 ligand–stimulated phosphorylation of Akt in peripheral blood fibrocytes was studied by flow cytometry. Results: Both TSHR- and CD40-mediated signaling lead to IL-8 expression in mature fibrocytes. Fibrocyte precursors assayed directly from circulating peripheral blood demonstrate intracellular IL-8 expression with addition of thyroid-stimulating hormone or CD40 ligand. TSHR- and CD40-induced IL-8 production is mediated by Akt phosphorylation. Conclusions: Peripheral blood TSHR+ and CD40+ fibrocytes express IL-8 and may promote the recruitment of inflammatory cells, mitogenesis, and tissue remodeling in TAO. TSHR- and CD40-mediated IL-8 signaling is mediated by Akt. Delineating the molecular mechanisms of fibrocyte immune function may provide potential therapeutic targets for TAO. PMID:25411513

  12. Selective IAP inhibition results in sensitization of unstimulated but not CD40-stimulated chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jianguo; Laing, Naomi; Oates, Melanie; Lin, Ke; Johnson, Gillian; Pettitt, Andrew R

    2014-12-01

    Despite recent advances in therapy, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) remains incurable and new treatment strategies are therefore urgently required. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are over-expressed in CLL, suggesting both a role in disease pathogenesis and the potential for therapeutic targeting. To explore these questions, we evaluated the effects on primary CLL cells of AZD5582, a novel potent and selective inhibitor of IAPs. AZD5582 at nanomolar concentrations induced extensive degradation of cIAP-1 and cIAP-2, but minimally of X chromosome-linked IAP (XIAP). However, these effects of AZD5582 produced little or no direct cytotoxicity, nor did they sensitize CLL cells to p53-dependent killing by fludarabine or p53-independent killing by dexamethasone. In contrast, AZD5582 significantly enhanced apoptosis induced by the death receptor (DR) agonist tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Importantly, killing by TRAIL plus AZD5582 was independent of adverse prognostic features including TP53 deletion which is strongly associated with chemoresistance in CLL. Coculture experiments involving transfected mouse fibroblasts expressing human CD40L (CD154) to mimic the effect of T cells at sites of tissue involvement showed that CD40 stimulation almost completely prevented the killing of CLL cells by TRAIL plus AZD5582 despite up-regulating TRAIL receptors 1 and 2. In conclusion, our findings confirm the rate-limiting, upstream involvement of IAPs in the extrinsic but not intrinsic apoptotic pathway of CLL cells and suggest that drug combinations that simultaneously activate DRs and inhibit IAPs may have therapeutic potential in patients with CLL who have failed T-cell-depleting chemotherapy.

  13. Increased CD40 Expression Enhances Early STING-Mediated Type I Interferon Response and Host Survival in a Rodent Malaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiangyu; Wu, Jian; Lin, Meng; Sun, Wenxiang; He, Xiao; Gowda, Channe; Bolland, Silvia; Long, Carole A.; Wang, Rongfu; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Both type I interferon (IFN-I) and CD40 play a significant role in various infectious diseases, including malaria and autoimmune disorders. CD40 is mostly known to function in adaptive immunity, but previous observations of elevated CD40 levels early after malaria infection of mice led us to investigate its roles in innate IFN-I responses and disease control. Using a Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis N67 and C57BL/6 mouse model, we showed that infected CD40-/- mice had reduced STING and serum IFN-β levels day-2 post infection, higher day-4 parasitemia, and earlier deaths. CD40 could greatly enhance STING-stimulated luciferase signals driven by the IFN-β promoter in vitro, which was mediated by increased STING protein levels. The ability of CD40 to influence STING expression was confirmed in CD40-/- mice after malaria infection. Substitutions at CD40 TRAF binding domains significantly decreased the IFN-β signals and STING protein level, which was likely mediated by changes in STING ubiquitination and degradation. Increased levels of CD40, STING, and ISRE driven luciferase signal in RAW Lucia were observed after phagocytosis of N67-infected red blood cells (iRBCs), stimulation with parasite DNA/RNA, or with selected TLR ligands [LPS, poly(I:C), and Pam3CSK4]. The results suggest stimulation of CD40 expression by parasite materials through TLR signaling pathways, which was further confirmed in bone marrow derived dendritic cells/macrophages (BMDCs/BMDMs) and splenic DCs from CD40-/-, TLR3-/- TLR4-/-, TRIF-/-, and MyD88-/- mice after iRBC stimulation or parasite infection. Our data connect several signaling pathways consisting of phagocytosis of iRBCs, recognition of parasite DNA/RNA (possibly GPI) by TLRs, elevated levels of CD40 and STING proteins, increased IFN-I production, and longer host survival time. This study reveals previously unrecognized CD40 function in innate IFN-I responses and protective pathways in infections with malaria strains that induce a strong

  14. Multivalent porous silicon nanoparticles enhance the immune activation potency of agonistic CD40 antibody.

    PubMed

    Gu, Luo; Ruff, Laura E; Qin, Zhengtao; Corr, Maripat; Hedrick, Stephen M; Sailor, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    One of the fundamental paradigms in the use of nanoparticles to treat disease is to evade or suppress the immune system in order to minimize systemic side effects and deliver sufficient nanoparticle quantities to the intended tissues. However, the immune system is the body's most important and effective defense against diseases. It protects the host by identifying and eliminating foreign pathogens as well as self-malignancies. Here we report a nanoparticle engineered to work with the immune system, enhancing the intended activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs). We show that luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles (LPSiNPs), each containing multiple copies of an agonistic antibody (FGK45) to the APC receptor CD40, greatly enhance activation of B cells. The cellular response to the nanoparticle-based stimulators is equivalent to a 30-40 fold larger concentration of free FGK45. The intrinsic near-infrared photoluminescence of LPSiNPs is used to monitor degradation and track the nanoparticles inside APCs.

  15. Severe congenital neutropenia or hyper-IgM syndrome? A novel mutation of CD40 ligand in a patient with severe neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Ramyar, Asghar; Pan-Hammarstrom, Qiang; Hammarstrom, Lennart

    2008-01-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) and CD40 ligand deficiency (CD40LD) are two primary immunodeficiency diseases caused by different underlying genetic defects. In this report, we present a case who clinically presented as a SCN patient, but subsequent mutation analysis of this patient was compatible with CD40LD. The patient is a 3-year-old boy, who was referred to our center because of pneumonia, oral and anal ulcers, and periodontitis. As severe consistent neutropenia and maturation arrest in the myeloid series were observed in the bone marrow, a diagnosis of SCN was made. However, no mutations were found in the ELA2 and HAX1 genes. As functional T cell defects were observed, we suspected CD40LD. DNA sequencing showed a 17-base pair deletion in the CD40L gene. Although the patient did not have a decreased serum level of IgA, and his serum IgM level was within the normal range, the diagnosis of CD40LD was confirmed, suggesting that CD40LD should be suspected in any male patient with recurrent infections and neutropenia. PMID:18594157

  16. Expression of CD40 is a positive prognostic factor of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guoqi; Ni, Huiyun; Zou, Linqing; Wang, Shukui; Tian, Fuliang; Liu, Hong; Cho, William C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the expression level of CD40 and its role in the prognosis of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who were treated with rituximab-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone). Design and methods The immunohistochemical expressions of CD40 in 186 well-characterized DLBCL patients were evaluated by tissue microarrays, thereby revealing the relationship of the molecule CD40 with known tumor, patient-related variables, and survival rates. Results The results showed that CD40 expressions were not statistically different between the germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) type and the non-GCB type. We also analyzed the relationships of CD40 expression with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in DLBCL patients who were uniformly treated with R-CHOP. A low expression of CD40 compared to high expression is related to poor OS and PFS. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the CD40 level at onset acts as an independent prognostic predictor of DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP. PMID:27382316

  17. CD40-TNF activation in mice induces extended sickness behavior syndrome co-incident with but not dependent on activation of the kynurenine pathway.

    PubMed

    Cathomas, Flurin; Fuertig, Rene; Sigrist, Hannes; Newman, Gregory N; Hoop, Vanessa; Bizzozzero, Manuela; Mueller, Andreas; Luippold, Andreas; Ceci, Angelo; Hengerer, Bastian; Seifritz, Erich; Fontana, Adriano; Pryce, Christopher R

    2015-11-01

    The similarity between sickness behavior syndrome (SBS) in infection and autoimmune disorders and certain symptoms in major depressive disorder (MDD), and the high co-morbidity of autoimmune disorders and MDD, constitutes some of the major evidence for the immune-inflammation hypothesis of MDD. CD40 ligand-CD40 immune-activation is important in host response to infection and in development of autoimmunity. Mice given a single intra-peritoneal injection of CD40 agonist antibody (CD40AB) develop SBS for 2-3days characterized by weight loss and increased sleep, effects that are dependent on the cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Here we report that CD40AB also induces behavioral effects that extend beyond acute SBS and co-occur with but are not mediated by kynurenine pathway activation and recovery. CD40AB led to decreased saccharin drinking (days 1-7) and decreased Pavlovian fear conditioning (days 5-6), and was without effect on physical fatigue (day 5). These behavioral effects co-occurred with increased plasma and brain levels of kynurenine and its metabolites (days 1-7/8). Co-injection of TNF blocker etanercept with CD40AB prevented each of SBS, reduced saccharin drinking, and kynurenine pathway activation in plasma and brain. Repeated oral administration of a selective indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitor blocked activation of the kynurenine pathway but was without effect on SBS and saccharin drinking. This study provides novel evidence that CD40-TNF activation induces deficits in saccharin drinking and Pavlovian fear learning and activates the kynurenine pathway, and that CD40-TNF activation of the kynurenine pathway is not necessary for induction of the acute or extended SBS effects.

  18. Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule enhances CD40 signaling in B cells and augments the plasma cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Hiroaki; Rothstein, Thomas L

    2009-08-01

    Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule (FAIM) was cloned as a mediator of Fas resistance that is highly evolutionarily conserved but contains no known effector motifs. In this study, we report entirely new functions of FAIM that regulate B cell signaling and differentiation. FAIM acts to specifically enhance CD40 signaling for NF-kappaB activation, IRF-4 expression, and BCL-6 down-regulation in vitro, but has no effect on its own or in conjunction with LPS or anti-Ig stimulation. In keeping with its effects on IRF-4 and BCL-6, FAIM overexpression augments the plasma cell compartment in vivo. These results indicate that FAIM is a new player on the field of B cell differentiation and acts as a force multiplier for a series of events that begins with CD40 engagement and ends with plasma cell differentiation.

  19. Targeting the HA2 subunit of influenza A virus hemagglutinin via CD40L provides universal protection against diverse subtypes.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Hashem, A M; Chen, Z; Li, C; Doyle, T; Zhang, Y; Yi, Y; Farnsworth, A; Xu, K; Li, Z; He, R; Li, X; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    The influenza viral hemagglutinin (HA) is comprised of two subunits. Current influenza vaccine predominantly induces neutralizing antibodies (Abs) against the HA1 subunit, which is constantly evolving in unpredictable fashion. The other subunit, HA2, however, is highly conserved but largely shielded by the HA head domain. Thus, enhancing immune response against HA2 could potentially elicit broadly inhibitory Abs. We generated a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) encoding secreted fusion protein, consisting of codon-optimized HA2 subunit of influenza A/California/7/2009(H1N1) virus fused to a trimerized form of murine CD40L, and determined its ability of inducing protective immunity upon intranasal administration. We found that mice immunized with this recombinant viral vaccine were completely protected against lethal challenge with divergent influenza A virus subtypes including H1N1, H3N2, and H9N2. Codon-optimization of HA2 as well as the use of CD40L as a targeting ligand/molecular adjuvant were indispensable to enhance HA2-specific mucosal IgA and serum IgG levels. Moreover, induction of HA2-specific T-cell responses was dependent on CD40L, as rAd secreting HA2 subunit without CD40L failed to induce any significant levels of T-cell cytokines. Finally, sera obtained from immunized mice were capable of inhibiting 13 subtypes of influenza A viruses in vitro. These results provide proof of concept for a prototype HA2-based universal influenza vaccine. PMID:25052763

  20. Generation of a soluble recombinant trimeric form of bovine CD40L and its potential use as a vaccine adjuvant in cows.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Julien; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Farnir, Frédéric; Dufrasne, Isabelle; Mainil, Jacques; Galleni, Moreno; Lekeux, Pierre; Bureau, Fabrice; Fiévez, Laurence

    2015-11-15

    Vaccination is the most cost-effective way to control infectious diseases in cattle. However, many infectious diseases leading to severe economical losses worldwide still remain for which a really effective and safe vaccine is not available. These diseases are most often due to intracellular pathogens such as bacteria or viruses, which are, by their localization, protected from antibiotics and/or CD4(+) T cell-dependent humoral responses. We therefore postulated that strategies leading to induction of not only CD4(+) T cell responses but also CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against infected cells should be privileged in the development of new vaccines against problematic intracellular pathogens in bovines. CD40 signaling in antigen-presenting cells may lead to the induction of robust CD4-independent CTL responses and several studies, especially in mice, have used CD40 stimulation to promote CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity. For example, we have recently shown that immunization of mice with heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus (HKSA) and agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies elicits strong CTL responses capable of protecting mice from subsequent staphylococcal mastitis. Unfortunately, there is at present no tool available to efficiently stimulate CD40 in cattle. In this study, we therefore first produced a soluble recombinant trimeric form of the natural bovine CD40 ligand (sboCD40LT). We then observed that sboCD40LT was able to potently stimulate bovine cells in vitro. Finally, we provide evidence that immunization of cows with sboCD40LT combined with HKSA was able to significantly increase the number of both HKSA-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the draining lymph nodes. In conclusion, we suggest that this new molecular tool could help in the development of vaccine strategies against bovine diseases caused by intracellular pathogens.

  1. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and CCL2 production in CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity in a model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    MALON, JENNIFER T.; MADDULA, SWATHI; BELL, HARMONY; CAO, LING

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to play a pro-nociceptive role after peripheral nerve injury upon its release from primary afferent neurons in preclinical models of neuropathic pain. We previously demonstrated a critical role for spinal cord microglial CD40 in the development of spinal nerve L5 transection (L5Tx)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Herein, we investigated whether CGRP is involved in the CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity. First, L5Tx was found to significantly induce CGRP expression in wild-type (WT) mice up to 14 days post-L5Tx. This increase in CGRP expression was reduced in CD40 knockout (KO) mice at day 14 post-L5Tx. Intrathecal injection of the CGRP antagonist CGRP8–37 significantly blocked L5Tx-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In vitro, CGRP induced glial IL-6 and CCL2 production, and CD40 stimulation added to the effects of CGRP in neonatal glia. Further, there was decreased CCL2 production in CD40 KO mice compared to WT mice 21 days post-L5Tx. However, CGRP8–37 did not significantly affect spinal cord CCL2 production following L5Tx in WT mice. Altogether, these data suggest that CD40 contributes to the maintenance of behavioral hypersensitivity following peripheral nerve injury in part through two distinct pathways, the enhancement of CGRP expression and spinal cord CCL2 production. PMID:22377050

  2. Vaccination with a Fusion Protein That Introduces HIV-1 Gag Antigen into a Multitrimer CD40L Construct Results in Enhanced CD8+ T Cell Responses and Protection from Viral Challenge by Vaccinia-Gag

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M.; Raffa, Francesca N.; Williams, Cindi-Ann; Kornbluth, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) is a membrane protein that is important for the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and DC-induced CD8+ T cell responses. To be active, CD40L must cluster CD40 receptors on responding cells. To produce a soluble form of CD40L that clusters CD40 receptors necessitates the use of a multitrimer construct. With this in mind, a tripartite fusion protein was made from surfactant protein D (SPD), HIV-1 Gag as a test antigen, and CD40L, where SPD serves as a scaffold for the multitrimer protein complex. This SPD-Gag-CD40L protein activated CD40-bearing cells and bone marrow-derived DCs in vitro. Compared to a plasmid for Gag antigen alone (pGag), DNA vaccination of mice with pSPD-Gag-CD40L induced an increased number of Gag-specific CD8+ T cells with increased avidity for major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted Gag peptide and improved vaccine-induced protection from challenge by vaccinia-Gag virus. The importance of the multitrimeric nature of the complex was shown using a plasmid lacking the N terminus of SPD that produced a single trimer fusion protein. This plasmid, pTrimer-Gag-CD40L, was only weakly active on CD40-bearing cells and did not elicit strong CD8+ T cell responses or improve protection from vaccinia-Gag challenge. An adenovirus 5 (Ad5) vaccine incorporating SPD-Gag-CD40L was much stronger than Ad5 expressing Gag alone (Ad5-Gag) and induced complete protection (i.e., sterilizing immunity) from vaccinia-Gag challenge. Overall, these results show the potential of a new vaccine design in which antigen is introduced into a construct that expresses a multitrimer soluble form of CD40L, leading to strongly protective CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:24227853

  3. Chimeric 2C10R4 anti-CD40 antibody therapy is critical for long-term survival of GTKO.hCD46.hTBM pig-to-primate cardiac xenograft.

    PubMed

    Mohiuddin, Muhammad M; Singh, Avneesh K; Corcoran, Philip C; Thomas, Marvin L; Clark, Tannia; Lewis, Billeta G; Hoyt, Robert F; Eckhaus, Michael; Pierson, Richard N; Belli, Aaron J; Wolf, Eckhard; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Phelps, Carol; Reimann, Keith A; Ayares, David; Horvath, Keith A

    2016-04-05

    Preventing xenograft rejection is one of the greatest challenges of transplantation medicine. Here, we describe a reproducible, long-term survival of cardiac xenografts from alpha 1-3 galactosyltransferase gene knockout pigs, which express human complement regulatory protein CD46 and human thrombomodulin (GTKO.hCD46.hTBM), that were transplanted into baboons. Our immunomodulatory drug regimen includes induction with anti-thymocyte globulin and αCD20 antibody, followed by maintenance with mycophenolate mofetil and an intensively dosed αCD40 (2C10R4) antibody. Median (298 days) and longest (945 days) graft survival in five consecutive recipients using this regimen is significantly prolonged over our recently established survival benchmarks (180 and 500 days, respectively). Remarkably, the reduction of αCD40 antibody dose on day 100 or after 1 year resulted in recrudescence of anti-pig antibody and graft failure. In conclusion, genetic modifications (GTKO.hCD46.hTBM) combined with the treatment regimen tested here consistently prevent humoral rejection and systemic coagulation pathway dysregulation, sustaining long-term cardiac xenograft survival beyond 900 days.

  4. Chimeric 2C10R4 anti-CD40 antibody therapy is critical for long-term survival of GTKO.hCD46.hTBM pig-to-primate cardiac xenograft.

    PubMed

    Mohiuddin, Muhammad M; Singh, Avneesh K; Corcoran, Philip C; Thomas, Marvin L; Clark, Tannia; Lewis, Billeta G; Hoyt, Robert F; Eckhaus, Michael; Pierson, Richard N; Belli, Aaron J; Wolf, Eckhard; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Phelps, Carol; Reimann, Keith A; Ayares, David; Horvath, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Preventing xenograft rejection is one of the greatest challenges of transplantation medicine. Here, we describe a reproducible, long-term survival of cardiac xenografts from alpha 1-3 galactosyltransferase gene knockout pigs, which express human complement regulatory protein CD46 and human thrombomodulin (GTKO.hCD46.hTBM), that were transplanted into baboons. Our immunomodulatory drug regimen includes induction with anti-thymocyte globulin and αCD20 antibody, followed by maintenance with mycophenolate mofetil and an intensively dosed αCD40 (2C10R4) antibody. Median (298 days) and longest (945 days) graft survival in five consecutive recipients using this regimen is significantly prolonged over our recently established survival benchmarks (180 and 500 days, respectively). Remarkably, the reduction of αCD40 antibody dose on day 100 or after 1 year resulted in recrudescence of anti-pig antibody and graft failure. In conclusion, genetic modifications (GTKO.hCD46.hTBM) combined with the treatment regimen tested here consistently prevent humoral rejection and systemic coagulation pathway dysregulation, sustaining long-term cardiac xenograft survival beyond 900 days. PMID:27045379

  5. Chimeric 2C10R4 anti-CD40 antibody therapy is critical for long-term survival of GTKO.hCD46.hTBM pig-to-primate cardiac xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Mohiuddin, Muhammad M.; Singh, Avneesh K.; Corcoran, Philip C.; Thomas III, Marvin L.; Clark, Tannia; Lewis, Billeta G.; Hoyt, Robert F.; Eckhaus, Michael; Pierson III, Richard N.; Belli, Aaron J.; Wolf, Eckhard; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Phelps, Carol; Reimann, Keith A.; Ayares, David; Horvath, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Preventing xenograft rejection is one of the greatest challenges of transplantation medicine. Here, we describe a reproducible, long-term survival of cardiac xenografts from alpha 1-3 galactosyltransferase gene knockout pigs, which express human complement regulatory protein CD46 and human thrombomodulin (GTKO.hCD46.hTBM), that were transplanted into baboons. Our immunomodulatory drug regimen includes induction with anti-thymocyte globulin and αCD20 antibody, followed by maintenance with mycophenolate mofetil and an intensively dosed αCD40 (2C10R4) antibody. Median (298 days) and longest (945 days) graft survival in five consecutive recipients using this regimen is significantly prolonged over our recently established survival benchmarks (180 and 500 days, respectively). Remarkably, the reduction of αCD40 antibody dose on day 100 or after 1 year resulted in recrudescence of anti-pig antibody and graft failure. In conclusion, genetic modifications (GTKO.hCD46.hTBM) combined with the treatment regimen tested here consistently prevent humoral rejection and systemic coagulation pathway dysregulation, sustaining long-term cardiac xenograft survival beyond 900 days. PMID:27045379

  6. Interleukin 21 Controls mRNA and MicroRNA Expression in CD40-Activated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Cecco, Loris; Capaia, Matteo; Zupo, Simona; Cutrona, Giovanna; Matis, Serena; Brizzolara, Antonella; Orengo, Anna Maria; Croce, Michela; Marchesi, Edoardo; Ferrarini, Manlio; Canevari, Silvana; Ferrini, Silvano

    2015-01-01

    Several factors support CLL cell survival in the microenvironment. Under different experimental conditions, IL21 can either induce apoptosis or promote CLL cell survival. To investigate mechanisms involved in the effects of IL21, we studied the ability of IL21 to modulate gene and miRNA expressions in CD40-activated CLL cells. IL21 was a major regulator of chemokine production in CLL cells and it modulated the expression of genes involved in cell movement, metabolism, survival and apoptosis. In particular, IL21 down-regulated the expression of the chemokine genes CCL4, CCL3, CCL3L1, CCL17, and CCL2, while it up-regulated the Th1-related CXCL9 and CXCL10. In addition, IL21 down-regulated the expression of genes encoding signaling molecules, such as CD40, DDR1 and PIK3CD. IL21 modulated a similar set of genes in CLL and normal B-cells (e.g. chemokine genes), whereas other genes, including MYC, TNF, E2F1, EGR2 and GAS-6, were regulated only in CLL cells. An integrated analysis of the miRNome and gene expression indicated that several miRNAs were under IL21 control and these could, in turn, influence the expression of potential target genes. We focused on hsa-miR-663b predicted to down-regulate several relevant genes. Transfection of hsa-miR-663b or its specific antagonist showed that this miRNA regulated CCL17, DDR1, PIK3CD and CD40 gene expression. Our data indicated that IL21 modulates the expression of genes mediating the crosstalk between CLL cells and their microenvironment and miRNAs may take part in this process. PMID:26305332

  7. Modulation of Cytokine Production by Drugs with Antiepileptic or Mood Stabilizer Properties in Anti-CD3- and Anti-CD40-Stimulated Blood In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Hajo; Schönherr, Jeremias; Petersein, Charlotte; Munzer, Alexander; Kirkby, Kenneth Clifford; Bauer, Katrin; Sack, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Increased cytokine production possibly due to oxidative stress has repeatedly been shown to play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Recent in vitro and animal studies of valproic acid (VPA) report antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, and suppression of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We tested the effect of drugs with antiepileptic or mood stabilizer properties, namely, primidone (PRM), carbamazepine (CBZ), levetiracetam (LEV), lamotrigine (LTG), VPA, oxcarbazepine (OXC), topiramate (TPM), phenobarbital (PB), and lithium on the production of the following cytokines in vitro: interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22, and TNF-α. We performed a whole blood assay with stimulated blood of 14 healthy female subjects. Anti-human CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3, combined with 5C3 antibody against CD40, was used as stimulant. We found a significant reduction of IL-1 and IL-2 levels with all tested drugs other than lithium in the CD3/5C3-stimulated blood; VPA led to a decrease in IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, and TNF-α production, which substantiates and adds knowledge to current hypotheses on VPA's anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:24757498

  8. Plasma Prostaglandin E2 Levels Correlated with the Prevention of Intravenous Immunoglobulin Resistance and Coronary Artery Lesions Formation via CD40L in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Wang, Chih-Lu; Yang, Kuender D.; Lo, Mao-Hung; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Li, Sung-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Background A form of systemic vasculitis, Kawasaki disease (KD) occurs most frequently in children under the age of five years old. Previous studies have found that Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) correlates with KD, although the related mechanisms are still unknown. CD40L may also be a marker of vasculitis in KD, so this study focuses on PGE2 and CD40L expression in KD. Materials and Methods This study consisted of a total of 144 KD patients, whose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)/coronary arterial lesion (CAL) formation resistance was evaluated. PGE2 levels were evaluated in vitro to study the effect of CD40L on CD4+ T lymphocytes. Results PGE2 levels significantly increased after IVIG treatment (p<0.05), especially in patients who responded to initial IVIG treatment (p = 0.004) and for patients without CAL formation (p = 0.016). Furthermore, an in vitro study revealed that IVIG acted as a trigger for PGE2 expression in the acute-stage mononuclear cells of KD patients. According to our findings, both IVIG and PGE2 can impede surface CD40L expressions on CD4+ T lymphocytes (p<0.05). Conclusions The results of this study are among the first to find that plasma PGE2 is correlated with the prevention of IVIG resistance and CAL formation through CD40L in KD. PMID:27525421

  9. CD40-induced aggregation of MHC class II and CD80 on the cell surface leads to an early enhancement in antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Clatza, Abigail; Bonifaz, Laura C; Vignali, Dario A A; Moreno, José

    2003-12-15

    Ligation of CD40 on B cells increases their ability to present Ag and to activate MHC class II (MHC-II)-restricted T cells. How this occurs is not entirely clear. In this study we demonstrate that CD40 ligation on Ag-presenting B cells (APC) for a short period between 30 min and 3 h has a rapid, augmenting effect on the ability of a B cell line and normal B cells to activate T cells. This is not due to alterations in Ag processing or to an increase in surface expression of CD80, CD86, ICAM-1, or MHC-II. This effect is particularly evident with naive, resting T lymphocytes and appears to be more pronounced under limiting Ag concentrations. Shortly after CD40 ligation on a B cell line, MHC-II and CD80 progressively accumulated in cholesterol-enriched microdomains on the cell surface, which correlated with an initial enhancement in their Ag presentation ability. Moreover, CD40 ligation induced a second, late, more sustained enhancement of Ag presentation, which correlates with a significant increase in CD80 expression by APC. Thus, CD40 signaling enhances the efficiency with which APC activate T cells by at least two related, but distinct, mechanisms: an early stage characterized by aggregation of MHC-II and CD80 clusters, and a late stage in which a significant increase in CD80 expression is observed. These results raise the possibility that one important role of CD40 is to contribute to the formation of the immunological synapse on the APC side.

  10. PPARα agonist fenofibrate attenuates TNF-α-induced CD40 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes via the SIRT1-dependent signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weirong; Lin, Qinqin; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Jiye; Ren, Feng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Ji, Meixi; Li, Yanxiang

    2013-06-10

    The ligand-activated transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) participates in the regulation of cellular inflammation. More recent studies indicated that sirtuin1 (SIRT1), a NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylase, regulates the inflammatory response in adipocytes. However, whether the role of PPARα in inflammation is mediated by SIRT1 remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of PPARα agonist fenofibrate on the expressions of SIRT1 and pro-inflammatory cytokine CD40 and underlying mechanisms in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We found that fenofibrate inhibited CD40 expression and up-regulated SIRT1 expression in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated adipocytes, and these effects of fenofibrate were reversed by PPARα antagonist GW6471. Moreover, SIRT1 inhibitors sirtinol/nicotinamide (NAM) or knockdown of SIRT1 could attenuate the effect of fenofibrate on TNF-α-induced CD40 expression in adipocytes. Importantly, NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) augmented the effect of fenofibrate on CD40 expression in adipocytes. Further study found that fenofibrate decreased the expression of acetylated-NF-κB p65 (Ac-NF-κB p65) in TNF-α-stimulated adipocytes, and the effect of fenofibrate was abolished by SIRT1 inhibition. In addition, fenofibrate up-regulated SIRT1 expression through AMPK in TNF-α-stimulated adipocytes. Taken together, these findings indicate that PPARα agonist fenofibrate inhibits TNF-α-induced CD40 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes via the SIRT1-dependent signaling pathway. -- Highlights: • Fenofibrate up-regulates SIRT1 expression in TNF-α-stimulated adipocytes. • Fenofibrate inhibits CD40 expression through SIRT1 in adipocytes. • The effects of fenofibrate on CD40 and SIRT1 expressions are dependent on PPARα. • Fenofibrate inhibits CD40 expression via SIRT1-dependent deacetylation of NF-κB. • Fenofibrate increases SIRT1 expression through PPARα and AMPK in adipocytes.

  11. Urocortin-1 Mediated Cardioprotection Involves XIAP and CD40-Ligand Recovery: Role of EPAC2 and ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    Ordóñez, Antonio; Smani, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    Aims Urocortin-1 (Ucn-1) is an endogenous peptide that protects heart from ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injuries. Ucn-1 is known to prevent cardiac cell death, but its role in the transcription of specific genes related to survival signaling pathway has not been fully defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular signaling implicated in the improvement of cardiac myocytes survival induced by Ucn-1. Methods and Results Ucn-1 administration before ischemia and at the onset of reperfusion, in rat hearts perfused in Langendorff system, fully recovered heart contractility and other hemodynamic parameters. Ucn-1 enhanced cell viability and decreased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in adult cardiac myocytes subjected to simulated I/R. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining indicated that Ucn-1 promoted cell survival and decreased cell necrosis through Epac2 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP) and ERK1/2 (extracellular signal–regulated kinases 1/2) activation. We determined that Ucn-1 shifted cell death from necrosis to apoptosis and activated caspases 9 and 3/7. Furthermore, mini-array, RT-qPCR and protein analyses of apoptotic genes showed that Ucn-1 upregulated the expression of CD40lg, Xiap and BAD in cells undergoing I/R, involving Epac2 and ERK1/2 activation. Conclusions Our data indicate that Ucn-1 efficiently protected hearts from I/R damage by increasing the cell survival and stimulated apoptotic genes, CD40lg, Xiap and BAD, overexpression through the activation of Epac2 and ERK1/2. PMID:26840743

  12. Lipopolysaccharide modulation of dendritic cells is insufficient to mature dendritic cells to generate CTLs from naive polyclonal CD8+ T cells in vitro, whereas CD40 ligation is essential.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, M; Beverley, P C

    2001-12-01

    Many cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses are dependent on the interactions between CD40 ligand on the helper CD4+ T cell and CD40 on the APC. Although CD40 triggering of dendritic cells (DC) has been shown to mature the DC by increasing the level of expression of costimulatory molecules and inducing IL-12 secretion, the precise mechanisms by which CD40-CD40 ligand interactions allow DC to drive CTL responses remain unknown. We have used an in vitro model in which naive polyclonal CD8+ T cells can be activated by bone marrow-derived DC to investigate factor(s) that are responsible for this CD40-dependent generation of CTLs. DC modulated with agonistic anti-CD40 mAb (aCD40) are able to generate Ag-specific CTL responses while DC modulated with the microbial stimulus LPS alone do not. We compared the Ag-presenting capacity, levels of costimulatory molecules, and release of cytokines and chemokines of DC modulated with aCD40 to that of DC modulated by LPS. None of the factors assayed account for the unique capacity of anti-CD40-matured DC to drive CTL but this model provides a simplified system for further investigation. Although we attempted to use an LPS-free system for these studies, we are unable to rule out the possibility that very low levels of endotoxin (<20 pg/ml) may synergize with CD40 ligation in the generation of CTLs. PMID:11714787

  13. RNA-transfected CD40-activated B cells induce functional T-cell responses against viral and tumor antigen targets: implications for pediatric immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Christina M; Vance, Barbara A; Grupp, Stephan A; Vonderheide, Robert H

    2004-03-15

    Vaccination with antigen-presenting cells (APCs) engineered to mimic mechanisms of immune stimulation represents a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. Dendritic cell vaccines have entered phase 3 testing in adult malignancies, but such vaccines in children have been limited. We demonstrate that CD40-activated B cells (CD40-B) transfected with RNA may serve as an alternative vaccine that can be generated from small blood volumes regardless of patient age. CD40-B from pediatric patients are efficient APCs and can be loaded with RNA as an antigenic payload, permitting simultaneous targeting of multiple antigenic epitopes without the necessity of HLA matching. For viral and tumor antigens, CD40-B/RNA technology induced cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from adults and children, which could be identified with peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramers. These CTLs secreted interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and killed targets in an MHC-restricted fashion. For pooled neuroblastoma RNA and autologous neuroblastoma RNA, CTLs that lysed neuroblastoma cell lines, including CTLs specific against the widely expressed tumor-antigen survivin, were generated. These findings support a novel platform for tumor-specific vaccine or adoptive immunotherapies in pediatric malignancies.

  14. The CD30 ligand and CD40 ligand regulate CD54 surface expression and release of its soluble form by cultured Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells.

    PubMed

    Gruss, H J; Scheffrahn, I; Hubinger, G; Duyster, J; Hermann, F

    1996-05-01

    The membrane-bound proteins CD30 ligand (CD30L), CD40L and 4-1BBL are members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily. They are expressed mainly by activated T cells. Primary and cultured Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (H-RS) cells, regarded as the malignant components of Hodgkin's disease (HD), display high levels of the counter-receptors for these ligands, ie CD30, CD40 and 4-1BB. CD30L and CD40L are known to share some biological activities that can be linked to the unbalanced secretion of cytokines seen in HD. In addition, cell contact-dependent molecules such as adhesion or activation antigens are critically involved in T cell/H-RS cell interactions. Primary and cultured H-RS cells frequently overexpress intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1/CD54), BB-1 (B7-1/CD80) and B70/B7-2 (CD86). Here we show that CD30L and CD40L, but not 4-1BBL upregulate CD54 expression by cultured H-RS cells on the mRNA and protein level, as a result of transcriptional gene activation. Furthermore, enhanced CD54 surface expression by these cells is accompanied by increased shedding of surface-bound CD54, as evidenced by high levels of the 82 kDa soluble (s) CD54 form detectable in culture supernatants after specific stimulation. Addition of CD30L in combination with CD40L to cultured H-RS cells additively enhanced CD54 surface expression and its shedding. These results may give a plausible explanation why sCD54 serum levels are increased in patients with HD.

  15. [Regulatory B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody inhibit CD4(+)T cell proliferation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Keng; Tao, Lei; Su, Jianbing; Zhang, Yueyang; Zou, Binhua; Wang, Yiyuan; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-09-01

    Objective To observe the immunosuppressive function of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in vitro after activated by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) and anti-CD40 mAb. Methods Mice splenic CD5(+)CD1d(high)B cells and CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells were sorted by flow cytometry. These B cells were first stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours, and then co-cultured with purified CD4(+)T cells. The interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression in the activated Bregs and other B cell subset, as well as the proliferation and interferon γ (IFN-γ) expression in the CD4(+) T cells activated by anti-CD3 mAb plus anti-CD28 mAb were determined by flow cytometry. Results CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN plus anti-CD40 mAb blocked the up-regulated CD4(+)T proliferation and significantly reduced the IFN-γ level. At the same time, activated CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells showed no inhibitory effect on CD4(+)T cells. Further study revealed that IL-10 expression in the CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells were much higher than that in the CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells after stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours. Conclusion CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb have immune inhibitory effects on CD4(+)T cell activation in vitro , which possibly due to IL-10 secretion. PMID:27609568

  16. Changes of soluble CD40 ligand in the progression of acute myocardial infarction associate to endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms and vascular endothelial growth factor but not to platelet CD62P expression.

    PubMed

    Napoleão, Patrícia; Monteiro, Maria do Céu; Cabral, Luís B P; Criado, Maria Begoña; Ramos, Catarina; Selas, Mafalda; Viegas-Crespo, Ana Maria; Saldanha, Carlota; Carmo, Miguel Mota; Ferreira, Rui Cruz; Pinheiro, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Reported in vitro data implicated soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) in endothelial dysfunction and angiogenesis. However, whether sCD40L could exert that influence in endothelial dysfunction and angiogenesis after injury in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the association of sCD40L with markers of platelet activation, endothelial, and vascular function during a recovery period early after AMI. To achieve this goal, the time changes of soluble, platelet-bound, and microparticle-bound CD40L levels over 1 month were assessed in AMI patients and correlated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) polymorphisms, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations, and platelet expression of P-selectin (CD62P). The association of soluble form, platelet-bound, and microparticle-bound CD40L with CD62P expression on platelets, a marker of platelet activation, was also assessed to evaluate the role of CD40L in the thrombosis, whereas the association with eNOS and VEGF was to evaluate the role of CD40L in vascular dysfunction. This work shows for the first time that time changes of sCD40L over 1 month after myocardial infarct onset were associated with G894T eNOS polymorphism and with the VEGF concentrations, but not to the platelet CD62P expression. These results indicate that, in terms of AMI pathophysiology, the sCD40L cannot be consider just as being involved in thrombosis and inflammation but also as having a relevant role in vascular and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26279254

  17. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles.

    PubMed

    Autio, Karoliina; Knuuttila, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Pesonen, Sari; Guse, Kilian; Parviainen, Suvi; Rajamäki, Minna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification.

  18. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles

    PubMed Central

    Autio, Karoliina; Knuuttila, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Pesonen, Sari; Guse, Kilian; Parviainen, Suvi; Rajamäki, Minna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification. PMID:27119092

  19. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles.

    PubMed

    Autio, Karoliina; Knuuttila, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Pesonen, Sari; Guse, Kilian; Parviainen, Suvi; Rajamäki, Minna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification. PMID:27119092

  20. Separate cis-trans Pathways Post-transcriptionally Regulate Murine CD154 (CD40 Ligand) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, B. JoNell; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Collins, Jane; Bloch, Donald; Bergeron, Alan; Henry, Brian; Terry, Benjamin M.; Zan, Moe; Mouland, Andrew J.; Rigby, William F. C.

    2008-01-01

    We report a role for CA repeats in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) in regulating CD154 expression. Human CD154 is encoded by an unstable mRNA; this instability is conferred in cis by a portion of its 3′-UTR that includes a polypyrimidine-rich region and CA dinucleotide repeat. We demonstrate similar instability activity with the murine CD154 3′-UTR. This instability element mapped solely to a conserved 100-base CU-rich region alone, which we call a CU-rich response element. Surprisingly, the CA dinucleotide-rich region also regulated reporter expression but at the level of translation. This activity was associated with poly(A) tail shortening and regulated by heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L levels. We conclude that the CD154 3′-UTR contains dual cis-acting elements, one of which defines a novel function for exonic CA dinucleotide repeats. These findings suggest a mechanism for the association of 3′-UTR CA-rich response element polymorphisms with CD154 overexpression and the subsequent risk of autoimmune disease. PMID:18640985

  1. CD40L induces matrix-metalloproteinase-9 but not tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 in cervical carcinoma cells: imbalance between NF-kappaB and STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Smola-Hess, S; Schnitzler, R; Hadaschik, D; Smola, H; Mauch, C; Krieg, T; Pfister, H

    2001-07-15

    Matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) are essentially required for tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Production of precursor enzymes is regulated on transcriptional level, while activation of the pro-enzymes is tightly controlled by posttranscriptional mechanisms. The enzyme activity can be blocked by specific tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs). In cervical carcinomas strong up-regulation of the type IV collagenase MMP-9 had been demonstrated. We show that activation of CD40, a receptor highly expressed on cervical carcinomas, induces MMP-9 in cervical carcinoma cells, whereas TIMP-1 production inhibiting MMP-9 activity was not affected. This gene induction pattern corresponded to the differential activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) regulating MMP-9, but not signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is involved in TIMP-1 gene regulation. Transient expression of the CD40-inducible NF-kappaB subunit p65 was sufficient for MMP-9 induction. Agents that suppressed CD40-mediated NF-kappaB activation also reduced MMP-9 induction, further supporting an important role of NF-kappaB in CD40-mediated MMP-9 induction. Our data suggest that CD40 expression in carcinoma cells might convert a CD40L-dependent immunological defense signal into a tumor-promoting signal. Selective CD40-mediated signaling through NF-kappaB but not STAT3 correlates to a shift of the balance between MMP-9 and TIMP-1 toward the protease.

  2. Significant mucosal sIgA production after a single oral or parenteral administration using in vivo CD40 targeting in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Ko; Chen, Chang-Hsin; Vuong, Christine N; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Waghela, Suryakant D; Mwangi, Waithaka; Bielke, Lisa R; Hargis, Billy M; Berghman, Luc R

    2016-10-01

    Many pathogens enter the host through mucosal surfaces and spread rapidly via the circulation. The most effective way to prevent disease is to establish mucosal and systemic immunity against the pathogen. However, current vaccination programs in poultry industry require repeated administrations of live-attenuated virus or large amounts (10 to 100μg) of antigen together with adjuvant to induce specific secretory IgA immune responses at the mucosal effector sites. In the present study, we show that a single administration of 0.4μg of oligopeptide complexed with an agonistic anti-chicken CD40 (chCD40) monoclonal antibody (Mab) effectively targets antigen-presenting cells of the bird's mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue in vivo, and induces peptide-specific secretory IgA (sIgA) in the trachea 7days post administration. Anti-chCD40 Mab-peptide complex was administered once to four-week old male Leghorns via various mucosal routes (orally, via cloacal drinking, or oculo-nasally) or via subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization. Immunization through any of the three mucosal induction routes induced significant peptide-specific mucosal sIgA responses 7 and 14days after immunization. Interestingly, s.c. injection of the complex also induced mucosal sIgA. Our data suggest in vivo targeting of CD40 as a potential adjuvant platform, particularly for the purpose of enhancing and speeding up mucosal vaccine responses in chickens, and potentially other food animals. This is the first study able to elicit specific sIgA immune responses in remote mucosal sites with a single administration of only 0.4μg of antigen. PMID:27663378

  3. Protein kinase R is a novel mediator of CD40 signaling and plays a critical role in modulating immunoglobulin expression during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Sheetal A; Zalinger, Zachary B; Johnson, Teresa R; Imani, Farhad

    2011-12-01

    Effective immunoglobulin responses play a vital role in protection against most pathogens. However, the molecular mediators and mechanisms responsible for signaling and selective expression of immunoglobulin types remain to be elucidated. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that protein kinase R (PKR) plays a crucial role in IgE responses to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in vitro. In this study, we show that PKR plays a critical role in IgG expression both in vivo and in vitro. PKR(-/-) mice show significantly altered serum IgG levels during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. IgG2a expression is particularly sensitive to a lack of PKR and is below the detection level in mock- or RSV-infected PKR(-/-) mice. Interestingly, we show that upon activation by anti-CD40 and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), B cells from PKR(-/-) mice show diminished major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD80, and CD86 levels on the cell surface compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Our data also show that PKR is necessary for optimal expression of adhesion molecules, such as CD11a and ICAM-1, that are necessary for homotypic aggregation of B cells. Furthermore, in this report we demonstrate for the first time that upon CD40 ligation, PKR is rapidly phosphorylated and activated, indicating that PKR is an early and novel downstream mediator of CD40 signaling pathways.

  4. MicroRNA-155 Mediates Augmented CD40 Expression in Bone Marrow Derived Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Symptomatic Lupus-Prone NZB/W F1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sheng; Yim, Lok Yan; Tam, Rachel Chun Yee; Chan, Albert; Lu, Liwei; Lau, Chak Sing; Chan, Vera Sau-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multi-organ autoimmune disease characterized by hyperactivated immune responses to self-antigens and persistent systemic inflammation. Previously, we reported abnormalities in circulating and bone marrow (BM)-derived plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) from SLE patients. Here, we aim to seek for potential regulators that mediate functional aberrations of pDCs in SLE. BM-derived pDCs from NZB/W F1 mice before and after the disease onset were compared for toll-like receptor (TLR) induced responses and microRNA profile changes. While pDCs derived from symptomatic mice were phenotypically comparable to pre-symptomatic ones, functionally they exhibited hypersensitivity to TLR7 but not TLR9 stimulation, as represented by the elevated upregulation of CD40, CD86 and MHC class II molecules upon R837 stimulation. Upregulated induction of miR-155 in symptomatic pDCs following TLR7 stimulation was observed. Transfection of miR-155 mimics in pre-symptomatic pDCs induced an augmented expression of Cd40, which is consistent with the increased CD40 expression in symptomatic pDCs. Overall, our results provide evidence for miR-155-mediated regulation in pDC functional abnormalities in SLE. Findings from this study contribute to a better understanding of SLE pathogenesis and ignite future interests in evaluating the molecular regulation in autoimmunity. PMID:27509492

  5. Agreement of skin test with IL-4 production and CD40L expression by T cells upon immunotherapy of subjects with systemic reactions to Hymenoptera stings.

    PubMed

    Urra, José M; Cabrera, Carmen M; Alfaya, Teresa; Feo-Brito, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Venom immunotherapy is the only curative intervention for subjects with Hymenoptera venom allergy who suffering systemic reactions upon bee or wasp stings. Venom immunotherapy can restore normal immunity against venom allergens, as well as providing to allergic subjects a lifetime tolerance against venoms. Nevertheless, it is necessary using safety assays to monitoring the development of tolerance in the VIT protocols to avoid fatal anaphylactic reactions. The purpose of this study was to assess the modifications in several markers of tolerance induction in subjects with Hymenoptera venom allergy undergoing immunotherapy. The studies were performed at baseline time and after six month of VIT. Intradermal skin tests, basophil activation tests, specific IgE levels; and the T-cell markers (IL-4 and IFN-γ producing cells; and expression of the surface activation markers CD40L and CTLA-4) were assayed. At six month of immunotherapy all parameters studied had significant alterations. All decreased, except the IFN-γ producing cells. In addition, modifications in intradermal skin test showed a significant correlation with both, CD40L expression on CD4 T lymphocytes (p=0.043) and IL-4 producing T lymphocytes (p=0.012). Neither basophil activation test nor serum levels of sIgE demonstrated any correlation with the immunological parameters studied nor among them. These results suggest that both IL-4 production and CD40L expression could be two good indicators of the beneficial effects of venom immunotherapy which translate into skin tests.

  6. T-cell help dependence of memory CD8+ T-cell expansion upon vaccinia virus challenge relies on CD40 signaling.

    PubMed

    Bedenikovic, Gregor; Crouse, Josh; Oxenius, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Due to their capacity to differentiate into long-lived memory cells, CD8(+) T cells are able to resolve subsequent infections faster than during the primary response. Among other factors, CD4(+) T cells play a crucial role during primary and secondary CD8(+) T-cell responses. However, the timing and mechanisms by which they influence CD8(+) T cells may differ in primary and secondary responses. Here, we demonstrate that during both primary and secondary vaccinia virus infection, CD4(+) T cells are necessary to promote CD8(+) T-cell responses. While CD4(+) T cells contributed to memory CD8(+) T-cell development, they were even more important during memory recall responses during challenge, as absence of CD4(+) T cells during challenge resulted in markedly decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. T-cell help during primary and secondary responses was mediated via CD40 signaling, with DCs being an integral part of that pathway. As opposed to primary CD8(+) T-cell responses where only a combination of agonistic CD40 signaling and provision of IL-2 could substitute for T-cell help, agonistic CD40 triggering alone was sufficient to rescue memory CD8(+) T-cell responses in absence of T-cell help in the context of vaccinia virus infection.

  7. Induction of functional CD154 (CD40 ligand) in neonatal T cells by cAMP-elevating agents

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, A; Mozo, L; Gayo, A; Simó, A; Gutiérrez, C

    2000-01-01

    A deficiency of neonatal T lymphocytes to express CD154 antigen in response to ionomycin and phorbol 12-myrsistate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation or after CD3 cross-linking has been described. In the present report we describe that CD45RA+ newborn cells are able to synthesize and express CD154 at similar or even higher levels than adult cells in response to ionomycin and cAMP-elevating agents which trigger the protein kinase A (PKA) -mediated metabolic pathway. Peak CD154 protein concentrations in newborn cells were found between 4 and 8 hr after stimulation with ionomycin and dibutyryl cAMP. These agents, however, did not induce expression of the early activation antigen CD69. Surface levels of CD154 did not correlate with specific mRNA concentration, indicating that dibutyryl cAMP up-regulates CD154 by acting at a post-transcriptional stage. The CD154 antigen induced by PKA activation of newborn cells was functional, since upon binding to CD40 on B lymphocytes in the presence of interleukin-4 (IL-4), it promoted immunoglobulin heavy-class switching to IgE. We also found a different pattern of cytokine production between neonatal and adult CD4+ T cells. In response to ionomycin and dibutyryl cAMP, cord blood cells were more prone than adult lymphocytes to secrete the T helper type 2-derived immunosuppressive cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. Taking into account that the feto–maternal environment is rich in cAMP-elevating agents, the reduced risk of graft versus host disease associated with cord blood trasplantation, as compared with the risk with adult bone marrow cell transplants, may be due to the bias of neonatal cells to differentiate towards the T helper type 2 functional cell subset. PMID:10929069

  8. BAFF upregulates CD28/B7 and CD40/CD154 expression and promotes mouse T and B cell interaction in vitro via BAFF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Song, Shan-shan; Shu, Jin-ling; Li, Ying; Wu, Yu-jing; Wang, Qing-tong; Chen, Jing-yu; Chang, Yan; Wu, Hua-xun; Zhang, Ling-ling; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Aim: B cell-activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF) is a member of TNF family and required for peripheral B cell survival and homeostasis. BAFF has been shown to promote the proliferation of T and B cells. In this study we examined whether and how BAFF mediated the interaction between mouse T and B cells in vitro. Methods: BAFF-stimulated B or T cells were co-cultured with T or B cells. The interactions between T and B cells were analyzed by measuring the expression of co-stimulatory molecules (CD28/CD80 or CD40/CD154), the proliferation and secretion of T and B cells and other factors. Two siRNAs against the transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) were used to identify the receptors responsible for the actions of BAFF. Results: BAFF-stimulated B cells significantly promoted the proliferation and activity of co-cultured T cells, and increased the percentages of CD4+CD28+ and CD4+CD154+ T cells. Similarly, BAFF-stimulated T cells significantly promoted the proliferation and activity of co-cultured B cells, and increased CD19+CD80+ and CD19+CD40+B cell subpopulations. BAFF-R siRNA-silenced B cells showed significantly lower expression of CD40 and CD80 than the control B cells. When the BAFF-R siRNA-silenced B cells were stimulated with BAFF, then co-cultured with T cells, the expression of CD28 and CD154 on T cells was not increased. TACI siRNA-silenced B cells exhibited higher expression of CD40 and CD80 than the control B cells. When the TACI siRNA-silenced B cells were stimulated with BAFF, then co-cultured with T cells, the expression of CD28 and CD154 on T cells was significantly increased. Conclusion: BAFF upregulates CD28/B7 and CD40/CD154 expression, and promotes the interactions between T and B cells in a BAFF-R-dependent manner. PMID:27180986

  9. In vivo CD40-gp39 interactions are essential for thymus-dependent humoral immunity. I. In vivo expression of CD40 ligand, cytokines, and antibody production delineates sites of cognate T-B cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    T-B cell interactions have a central role in the development of antibody responses. Upon activation, T helper (Th) cells express the ligand for CD40, gp39, which is essential for Th cell-dependent B cell activation. The cytokines produced by activated Th cells have a regulatory role in B cell differentiation. In this study, we investigated, using immunohistochemical techniques, the in vivo time course and localization of gp39 expression and cytokine production in relation to the specific antibody production. Both the immunization with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), a thymus-dependent (TD) antigen, and trinitrophenyl (TNP)-Ficoll, a thymus-independent type 2 (TI-2) antigen, induced Th cells to express gp39. The expression of gp39 was restricted to Th cells in the outer periarteriolar lymphocyte sheaths (outer-PALS) and around the terminal arterioles (TA). Incidentally, gp39+ Th cells were found in the corona of follicles, whereas gp39+ cells were never found in the germinal centers or marginal zones of the spleen. Maximum frequencies of gp39+ cells were observed 3 and 4 d after primary and secondary immunization with KLH. After injection of TNP-Ficoll, a marked increase in gp39+ cells was observed, confirming previous observations that activated T cells are involved in TI-2 antibody responses. Analysis of the in vivo cytokine production revealed that interleukin 2 (IL-2)-, IL-4- and interferon gamma (IFN- gamma)-producing cells (IFN-gamma-PC) developed according to similar kinetics as observed for gp39+ cells. IL-2-PC and IL-4-PC were present in higher frequencies as were IFN-gamma-PC in the immune response against TNP-KLH. Double staining experiments revealed gp39+ Th cells producing IL-2, IL-4, or IFN-gamma, suggesting that these cells were involved in both the initial activation as well as the differentiation process of B cells into antibody-forming cells. Dual immunohistochemical analysis revealed gp39+ T cells and cytokine-PC in close proximity to antigen

  10. Effects of Representative Glucocorticoids on TNFα– and CD40L–Induced NF-κB Activation in Sensor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cechin, Sirlene R.; Buchwald, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are an important class of anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive drugs. A crucial part of their anti-inflammatory action results from their ability to repress proinflammatory transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) upon binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Accordingly, sensor cells quantifying their effect on inflammatory signal-induced NF-κB activation can provide useful information regarding their potencies as well as their transrepression abilities. Here, we report results obtained on their effect in suppressing both the TNFα- and the CD40L-induced activation of NF-κB in sensor cells that contain an NF-κB–inducible SEAP construct. In these cells, we confirmed concentration-dependent NF-κB activation for both TNFα and CD40L at low nanomolar concentrations (EC50). Glucocorticoids tested included hydrocortisone, prednisolone, dexamethasone, loteprednol etabonate, triamcinolone acetonide, beclomethasone dipropionate, and clobetasol propionate. They all caused significant, but only partial inhibition of these activations in concentration-dependent manners that could be well described by sigmoid response-functions. Despite the limitations of only partial maximum inhibitions, this cell-based assay could be used to quantitate the suppressing ability of glucocorticoids (transrepression potency) on the expression of proinflammatory transcription factors caused by two different cytokines in parallel both in a detailed, full dose-response format as well as in a simpler single-dose format. Whereas inhibitory potencies obtained in the TNF assay correlated well with consensus glucocorticoid potencies (receptor-binding affinities, Kd, RBA, at the GR) for all compounds, the non-halogenated steroids (hydrocortisone, prednisolone, and loteprednol etabonate) were about an order of magnitude more potent than expected in the CD40 assay in this system. PMID:24747770

  11. Anti-tumour synergy of cytotoxic chemotherapy and anti-CD40 plus CpG-ODN immunotherapy through repolarization of tumour-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Buhtoiarov, Ilia N; Sondel, Paul M; Wigginton, Jon M; Buhtoiarova, Tatiana N; Yanke, Eric M; Mahvi, David A; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L

    2011-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of monoclonal anti-CD40 + cytosine-phosphate-guanosine-containing oligodeoxynucleotide 1826 (CpG-ODN) immunotherapy (IT) in mice treated with multidrug chemotherapy (CT) consisting of vincristine, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin. Combining CT with IT led to synergistic anti-tumour effects in C57BL/6 mice with established B16 melanoma or 9464D neuroblastoma. CT suppressed the functions of T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, but primed naïve peritoneal macrophages (Mφ) to in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), resulting in augmented nitric oxide (NO) production. IT, given after CT, did not restore the responsiveness of T cells and NK cells, but further activated Mφ to secrete NO, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-12p40 and to suppress the proliferation of tumour cells in vitro. These functional changes were accompanied by immunophenotype alterations on Mφ, including the up-regulation of Gr-1. CD11b(+) F4/80(+) Mφ comprised the major population of B16 tumour-infiltrating leucocytes. CT + IT treatment up-regulated molecules associated with the M1 effector Mφ phenotype [CD40, CD80, CD86, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-12] and down-regulated molecules associated with the M2 inhibitory Mφ phenotype (IL-4Rα, B7-H1, IL-4 and IL-10) on the tumour-associated Mφ compared with untreated controls. Together, the results show that CT and anti-CD40 + CpG-ODN IT synergize in the induction of anti-tumour effects which are associated with the phenotypic repolarization of tumour-associated Mφ.

  12. Prostaglandin E2-EP4 signaling persistently amplifies CD40-mediated induction of IL-23 p19 expression through canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojun; Aoki, Tomohiro; Narumiya, Shuh

    2016-03-01

    While there is mounting evidence that interleukin (IL)-23-IL-17 axis plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases, much remains to be elucidated on how IL-23 is induced in the pathological processes. IL-23 is a heterodimer composed of p19 and p40, the latter being shared with IL-12. We previously reported that prostaglandin (PG) E2 promotes CD40-mediated induction of Il23a (p19) expression through its E receptor subtype 4 (EP4) receptor in splenic dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we have analyzed signaling pathways regulating Il23a induction in the cross talk between EP4 and CD40 in bone marrow-derived DCs. We found that PGE2 synergistically induced Il23a transcription with CD40 signaling. An EP4 agonist, but not agonists of EP1, EP2, or EP3, reproduced this action. Stimulation of CD40 with an agonist antibody evoked biphasic induction of Il23a expression, with the early phase peaking at 1 h and the late phase peaking at 12 h and lasting up to 36 h after stimulation, whereas induction by lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor-α was transient. The early phase induction by CD40 stimulation was absent in DCs derived from Nfkb1-deficient mice, and the late phase induction was eliminated by RNA interference of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p100 subunit. Further, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) depletion completely eliminated the induction of Il23a by CD40 stimulation. The addition of the EP4 agonist amplified the induction in both phases through the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. These results suggest that Il23a expression in DCs is synergistically triggered by the PG E2-EP4-cAMP-PKA pathway and canonical/non-canonical NF-κB pathways and CREB activated by CD40 stimulation.

  13. Off-the-shelf adenoviral-mediated immunotherapy via bicistronic expression of tumor antigen and iMyD88/CD40 adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Kemnade, Jan Ole; Seethammagari, Mamatha; Narayanan, Priya; Levitt, Jonathan M; McCormick, Alison A; Spencer, David M

    2012-07-01

    Recent modest successes in ex vivo dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy have motivated continued innovation in the area of DC manipulation and activation. Although ex vivo vaccine approaches continue to be proving grounds for new DC manipulation techniques, the intrinsic limits of ex vivo therapy, including high cost, minimal standardization, cumbersome delivery, and poor accessibility, incentivizes the development of vaccines compatible with in vivo DC targeting. We describe here a method to co-deliver both tumor-specific antigen (TSA) and an iMyD88/CD40 adjuvant (iMC), to DCs that combines toll-like receptor (TLR) and CD40 signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that simple TSA delivery via adenoviral vectors results in strong antitumor immunity. Addition of iMC delivered in a separate vector is insufficient to enhance this effect. However, when delivered simultaneously with TSA in a single bicistronic vector (BV), iMC is able to significantly enhance antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses and inhibit established tumor growth. This study demonstrates the spatial-temporal importance of concurrent DC activation and TSA presentation. Further, it demonstrates the feasibility of in vivo molecular enhancement of DCs necessary for effective antitumor immune responses.

  14. CD40 ligand protects from TRAIL-induced apoptosis in follicular lymphomas through NF-kappaB activation and up-regulation of c-FLIP and Bcl-xL.

    PubMed

    Travert, Marion; Ame-Thomas, Patricia; Pangault, Céline; Morizot, Alexandre; Micheau, Olivier; Semana, Gilbert; Lamy, Thierry; Fest, Thierry; Tarte, Karin; Guillaudeux, Thierry

    2008-07-15

    The TNF family member TRAIL is emerging as a promising cytotoxic molecule for antitumor therapy. However, its mechanism of action and the possible modulation of its effect by the microenvironment in follicular lymphomas (FL) remain unknown. We show here that TRAIL is cytotoxic only against FL B cells and not against normal B cells, and that DR4 is the main receptor involved in the initiation of the apoptotic cascade. However, the engagement of CD40 by its ligand, mainly expressed on a specific germinal center CD4(+) T cell subpopulation, counteracts TRAIL-induced apoptosis in FL B cells. CD40 induces a rapid RNA and protein up-regulation of c-FLIP and Bcl-x(L). The induction of these antiapoptotic molecules as well as the inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis by CD40 is partially abolished when NF-kappaB activity is inhibited by a selective inhibitor, BAY 117085. Thus, the antiapoptotic signaling of CD40, which interferes with TRAIL-induced apoptosis in FL B cells, involves NF-kappaB-mediated induction of c-FLIP and Bcl-x(L) which can respectively interfere with caspase 8 activation or mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. These findings suggest that a cotreatment with TRAIL and an inhibitor of NF-kappaB signaling or a blocking anti-CD40 Ab could be of great interest in FL therapy.

  15. Enhancement of the anti-melanoma response of Hu14.18K322A by αCD40 + CpG.

    PubMed

    Alderson, Kory L; Luangrath, Mitchell; Elsenheimer, Megan M; Gillies, Stephen D; Navid, Fariba; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Sondel, Paul M

    2013-04-01

    Targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAb) can be used therapeutically for tumors with identifiable antigens such as disialoganglioside GD2, expressed on neuroblastoma and melanoma tumors. Anti-GD2 mAbs (αGD2) can provide clinical benefit in patients with neuroblastoma. An important mechanism of mAb therapy is antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Combinatorial therapeutic strategies can dramatically increase the anti-tumor response elicited by mAbs. We combined a novel αGD2 mAb, hu14.18K322A, with an immunostimulatory regimen of agonist CD40 mAb and class B CpG-ODN 1826 (CpG). Combination immunotherapy was more effective than the single therapeutic components in a syngeneic model of GD2-expressing B16 melanoma with minimal tumor burden. NK cell depletion in B6 mice showed that NK cells were required for the anti-tumor effect; however, anti-tumor responses were also observed in tumor-bearing SCID/beige mice. Thus, NK cell cytotoxicity did not appear to be essential. Peritoneal macrophages from anti-CD40 + CpG-treated mice inhibited tumor cells in vitro in an hu14.18K322A antibody-dependent manner. These data highlight the importance of myeloid cells as potential effectors in immunotherapy regimens utilizing tumor-specific mAb and suggest that further studies are needed to investigate the therapeutic potential of activated myeloid cells and their interaction with NK cells.

  16. Glucolipotoxicity initiates pancreatic β-cell death through TNFR5/CD40-mediated STAT1 and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Bagnati, Marta; Ogunkolade, Babatunji W; Marshall, Catriona; Tucci, Carmen; Hanna, Katie; Jones, Tania A; Bugliani, Marco; Nedjai, Belinda; Caton, Paul W; Kieswich, Julius; Yaqoob, Muhammed M; Ball, Graham R; Marchetti, Piero; Hitman, Graham A; Turner, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder, where failure to maintain normal glucose homoeostasis is associated with, and exacerbated by, obesity and the concomitant-elevated free fatty acid concentrations typically found in these patients. Hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia together contribute to a decline in insulin-producing β-cell mass through activation of the transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1. There are however a large number of molecules potentially able to modulate NF-κB and STAT1 activity, and the mechanism(s) by which glucolipotoxicity initially induces NF-κB and STAT1 activation is currently poorly defined. Using high-density microarray analysis of the β-cell transcritptome, we have identified those genes and proteins most sensitive to glucose and fatty acid environment. Our data show that of those potentially able to activate STAT1 or NF-κB pathways, tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-5 is the most highly upregulated by glucolipotoxicity. Importantly, our data also show that the physiological ligand for TNFR5, CD40L, elicits NF-κB activity in β-cells, whereas selective knockdown of TNFR5 ameliorates glucolipotoxic induction of STAT1 expression and NF-κB activity. This data indicate for the first time that TNFR5 signalling has a major role in triggering glucolipotoxic islet cell death. PMID:27512950

  17. Cancer Immunology Miniatures: Immune activation and a 9-year ongoing complete remission following CD40 antibody therapy and metastasectomy in a patient with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Bajor, David L.; Xu, Xiaowei; Torigian, Drew A.; Mick, Rosemarie; Garcia, Laura R.; Richman, Lee P.; Desmarais, Cindy; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Kalos, Michael; Vonderheide, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Direct immune activation via agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAb) is a potentially complementary approach to therapeutic blockade of inhibitory immune receptors in cancer. Here, we provide genetic analysis of the immunological consequences associated with the use of an agonistic CD40 mAb in a patient with metastatic melanoma who responded, underwent a single metastasectomy, and then achieved a complete remission ongoing for more than 9 years after starting therapy. Tumor microenvironment after immunotherapy was associated with pro-inflammatory modulations and emergence of a de novo T-cell repertoire as detected by next-generation sequencing of T-cell receptors (TCR) in the tumor and blood. The de-novo T-cell repertoire identified in the post-treatment metastasectomy sample was also present – and in some cases expanded – in the circulation years after completion of therapy. Comprehensive study of this “exceptional responder” highlights the emerging potential of direct immune agonists in the next wave of cancer immunotherapies and a potential role for TCR deep sequencing in cancer immune assessment. PMID:25252722

  18. Differential regulation of chromatin structure of the murine 3' IgH enhancer and IgG2b germline promoter in response to lipopolysaccharide and CD40 signaling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xincheng; Tang, Hong

    2006-03-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) of murine immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) is controlled by germline transcription-coupled modification of the accessibility of the highly repetitive switch regions (S) located upstream of the constant region genes. Activation of the 3' IgH enhancer (3'E) is believed to regulate CSR during B cell terminal differentiation, although the detailed molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we show that BAF57 and BRG1, two essential subunits of murine SWI/SNF complex, differentially associate with the DNase I hypersensitive region HS1/2 of 3'E and the IgG2b germline promoter in response to LPS activation or CD40 engagement. Both LPS and CD40 signaling cause SWI/SNF complex to dissociate from HS1/2 and associate with their responsive IgG2b germline promoter, suggesting the potential fluidity of chromatin structure and specific regulatory mode for the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler during CSR. More interesting, increase in histone acetylation is either inverse or parallel with the action of SWI/SNF complex at HS1/2 enhancer or IgG2b germline promoter, respectively. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that alteration of histone H3 and H4 acetylation has overall similarities in response to LPS and CD40 signaling, with H3 hyperacetylated and H4 hypoacetylated at the HS1/2 enhancer and reversed modification patterns at the IgG2b germline promoter. Finally, the specificity of LPS and CD40 signaling in control of CSR could be partially coded by the specific acetylation marking of H3 and H4. Our results further strengthen the notion that chromatin remodeling plays a critical role in CSR.

  19. Cholera Toxin B Subunit as a Carrier Molecule Promotes Antigen Presentation and Increases CD40 and CD86 Expression on Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    George-Chandy, Annie; Eriksson, Kristina; Lebens, Michael; Nordström, Inger; Schön, Emma; Holmgren, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is an efficient mucosal carrier molecule for the generation of mucosal antibody responses and/or induction of systemic T-cell tolerance to linked antigens. CTB binds with high affinity to GM1 ganglioside cell surface receptors. In this study, we evaluated how conjugation of a peptide or protein antigen to CTB by chemical coupling or genetic fusion influences the T-cell-activating capacity of different antigen-presenting cell (APC) subsets. Using an in vitro system in which antigen-pulsed APCs were incubated with antigen-specific, T-cell receptor-transgenic T cells, we found that the dose of antigen required for T-cell activation could be decreased >10,000-fold using CTB-conjugated compared to free antigen. In contrast, no beneficial effects were observed when CTB was simply admixed with antigen. CTB conjugation enhanced the antigen-presenting capacity not only of dendritic cells and B cells but also of macrophages, which expressed low levels of cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and were normally poor activators of naive T cells. Enhanced antigen-presenting activity by CTB-linked antigen resulted in both increased T-cell proliferation and increased interleukin-12 and gamma interferon secretion and was associated with up-regulation of CD40 and CD86 on the APC surface. These results imply that conjugation to CTB dramatically lowers the threshold concentration of antigen required for immune cell activation and also permits low-MHC II-expressing APCs to prime for a specific immune response. PMID:11500448

  20. MyD88/CD40 Genetic Adjuvant Function in Cutaneous Atypical Antigen-Presenting Cells Contributes to DNA Vaccine Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Slawin, Kevin M.; Levitt, Jonathan M.; Spencer, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic DNA-based vaccines aim to prime an adaptive host immune response against tumor-associated antigens, eliminating cancer cells primarily through CD8+ cytotoxic T cell-mediated destruction. To be optimally effective, immunological adjuvants are required for the activation of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells responses by DNA vaccination. Here, we describe enhanced anti-tumor efficacy of an in vivo electroporation-delivered DNA vaccine by inclusion of a genetically encoded chimeric MyD88/CD40 (MC) adjuvant, which integrates both innate and adaptive immune signaling pathways. When incorporated into a DNA vaccine, signaling by the MC adjuvant increased antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and promoted elimination of pre-established tumors. Interestingly, MC-enhanced vaccine efficacy did not require direct-expression of either antigen or adjuvant by local antigen-presenting cells, but rather our data supports a key role for MC function in “atypical” antigen-presenting cells of skin. In particular, MC adjuvant-modified keratinocytes increased inflammatory cytokine secretion, upregulated surface MHC class I, and were able to increase in vitro and in vivo priming of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, in the absence of critical CD8α+/CD103+ cross-priming dendritic cells, MC was still able to promote immune priming in vivo, albeit at a reduced level. Altogether, our data support a mechanism by which MC signaling activates an inflammatory phenotype in atypical antigen-presenting cells within the cutaneous vaccination site, leading to an enhanced CD8+ T cell response against DNA vaccine-encoded antigens, through both CD8α+/CD103+ dendritic cell-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:27741278

  1. TLR7 and TLR9 responsive human B cells share phenotypic and genetic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Simchoni, Noa; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    B cells activated by nucleic-acid sensing Toll-like receptor 7 and TLR9 proliferate and secrete immune globulins. Memory B cells are presumably more responsive due to higher TLR expression levels, but selectivity and differential outcomes remain largely unknown. In this study, peripheral blood human B cells were stimulated by TLR7 or TLR9 ligands, with or without IFNα, and compared to activators CD40L plus IL-21, to identify differentially responsive cell populations, defined phenotypically and by BCR characteristics. While all activators induced differentiation and antibody secretion, TLR stimulation expanded IgM+ memory and plasma cell lineage committed populations and favored secretion of IgM, unlike CD40L/IL-21 which drove IgM and IgG more evenly. Patterns of proliferation similarly differed, with CD40L/IL-21 inducing proliferation of most memory and naïve B cells, in contrast to TLRs which induced robust proliferation in a subset of these cells. On deep sequencing of the IgH locus, TLR responsive B cells shared patterns of IgHV and IgHJ usage, clustering apart from CD40L/IL-21 and control conditions. TLR activators, but not CD40L/IL-21, similarly promoted increased sharing of CDR3 sequences. TLR responsive B cells were characterized by more somatic hypermutation, shorter CDR3 segments, and less negative charges. TLR activation also induced long positively charged CDR3 segments, suggestive of autoreactive antibodies. Testing this, culture supernatants from TLR stimulated B cells were found to bind HEp-2 cells, while those from CD40L/IL-21 stimulated cells did not. Human B cells possess selective sensitivity to TLR stimulation, with distinctive phenotypic and genetic signatures. PMID:25740945

  2. B cell TLR1/2, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 interact in induction of class switch DNA recombination: modulation by BCR and CD40, and relevance to T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lou, Zheng; Lam, Tonika; Greenberg, Milton L; Wang, Rui; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Ig class switch DNA recombination (CSR) in B cells is crucial to the maturation of antibody responses. It requires IgH germline IH-CH transcription and expression of AID, both of which are induced by engagement of CD40 or dual engagement of a Toll-like receptor (TLR) and B cell receptor (BCR). Here, we have addressed cross-regulation between two different TLRs or between a TLR and CD40 in CSR induction by using a B cell stimulation system involving lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS-mediated long-term primary class-switched antibody responses and memory-like antibody responses in vivo and induced generation of class-switched B cells and plasma cells in vitro. Consistent with the requirement for dual TLR and BCR engagement in CSR induction, LPS, which engages TLR4 through its lipid A moiety, triggered cytosolic Ca2+ flux in B cells through its BCR-engaging polysaccharidic moiety. In the presence of BCR crosslinking, LPS synergized with a TLR1/2 ligand (Pam3CSK4) in CSR induction, but much less efficiently with a TLR7 (R-848) or TLR9 (CpG) ligand. In the absence of BCR crosslinking, R-848 and CpG, which per se induced marginal CSR, virtually abrogated CSR to IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG3 and/or IgA, as induced by LPS or CD154 (CD40 ligand) plus IL-4, IFN-γ or TGF-β, and reduced secretion of class-switched Igs, without affecting B cell proliferation or IgM expression. The CSR inhibition by TLR9 was associated with the reduction in AID expression and/or IgH germline IH-S-CH transcription, and required co-stimulation of B cells by CpG with LPS or CD154. Unexpectedly, B cells also failed to undergo CSR or plasma cell differentiation when co-stimulated by LPS and CD154. Overall, by addressing the interaction of TLR1/2, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 in the induction of CSR and modulation of TLR-dependent CSR by BCR and CD40, our study suggests the complexity of how different stimuli cross-regulate an important B cell differentiation process and an important role of TLRs in inducing

  3. Immunogenicity of human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Prigione, Ignazia; Corrias, Maria Valeria; Airoldi, Irma; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Morandi, Fabio; Bocca, Paola; Cocco, Claudia; Ferrone, Soldano; Pistoia, Vito

    2004-12-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a neuroectodermal tumor that affects children in the first years of life. Half of NB cases present with metastatic disease at diagnosis and have a poor prognosis, in spite of the most advanced chemotherapeutic protocols combined with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Among the new avenues for NB treatment that are being explored, immunotherapy has attracted much interest. Emphasis has been placed on monoclonal antibodies directed to tumor-associated antigens--in particular the disialoganglioside GD2--that have been tested in the clinical setting with promising results. In addition, stimulation of cell-mediated antitumor effector mechanisms have been attempted-for example, by recombinant interleukin (IL)-2 administration. Nonetheless, the issue of the immunogenicity of human NB cells has never been thoroughly addressed. Here we shall review the work carried out in our lab in recent years and show that NB cells express tumor-associated antigens, such as MAGE-3, but lack constitutive expression of costimulatory molecules and surface HLA class I and II molecules. As such, NB cells are likely to be ignored by the host T cell compartment, since expression of HLA and costimulatory molecules on antigen presenting cells are sine qua non conditions for efficient peptide presentation to T cells and for the subsequent activation and clonal expansion of the latter cells. Notably, in vitro experiments with NB cell lines demonstrated that surface HLA class I molecules and the CD40 costimulatory molecule were upregulated following cell incubation with recombinant interferon-gamma. Interaction of CD40 with recombinant CD40 ligand induced apoptosis of NB cells through a caspase 8-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these results indicate that the immunogenicity of human NB cells is very low but suggest that manipulation by cytokine administration or gene transfer can increase their immunogenic potential. On the other hand, NB cells represent an

  4. Rac regulates collagen-induced HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Yasunari; Doi, Tomoaki; Akamatsu, Shigeru; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Kondo, Akira; Mizutani, Jun; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Ogura, Shinji

    2013-10-01

    We previously reported that the collagen-induced phosphorylation of heat shock protein (HSP) 27 via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is sufficient to induce the secretion of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB and the release of soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) from human platelets. It has been shown that Rac, which belongs to the Rho family of small GTPases, is involved in the collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In this study, we investigated the role of Rac in the collagen-stimulated release of PDGF-AB and sCD40L in human platelets. Human blood was donated from healthy volunteers and platelet-rich plasma was obtained from the blood samples. The samples were then treated with 1.0 µg/ml collagen for 0, 1, 3, or 5 min and Rac1 activity was determined using the Rac1 Activation Assay kit. We found that collagen stimulated the activation of Rac in human platelets in a time-dependent manner. However, pre-treatment with NSC23766, a selective inhibitor of Rac-guanine nucleotide exchange factor interaction, reduced the collagen-induced platelet aggregation. NSC23766 markedly attenuated not only the collagen-induced p44/p42 MAP kinase phosphorylation, but also the phosphorylation of HSP27 at three serine residues (Ser-15, Ser-78 and Ser-82). In addition, the collagen‑induced release of PDGF-AB and sCD40L was significantly suppressed by NSC23766 in a dose-dependent manner. These results strongly suggest that Rac regulates the collagen-induced HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase in human platelets, resulting in the stimulation of PDGF-AB secretion and the release of sCD40L.

  5. Activation of Langerhans-Type Dendritic Cells Alters Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Reactivation in a Stimulus-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Coronel, Roxanne; Jesus, Desyree M.; Dalle Ore, Lucia; Mymryk, Joe S.; Hertel, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal Langerhans cells (LC) are likely to play important roles in host defense against infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV). We previously showed that in vitro-differentiated immature LC (iLC) populations contain smaller amounts of infected cells but produce higher yields than mature LC (mLC) cultures, obtained by iLC stimulation with fetal bovine serum (FBS), CD40 ligand (CD40L) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we sought to determine if exposure to select stimuli can improve LC permissiveness to infection, if specific components of the mLC cocktail are responsible for lowering viral yields, if this is due to defects in progeny production or release, and if these restrictions are also effective against reactivated virus. None of the stimuli tested extended the proportion of infected cells to 100%, suggesting that the block to infection onset cannot be fully removed. While CD40L and FBS exerted positive effects on viral progeny production per cell, stimulation with LPS alone or in combination with CD40L was detrimental. Reductions in viral titers were not due to defects in progeny release, and the permissive or restrictive intracellular environment established upon exposure to each stimulus appeared to act in a somewhat similar way toward lytic and latent infections. PMID:27683575

  6. Activation of Langerhans-Type Dendritic Cells Alters Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Reactivation in a Stimulus-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Coronel, Roxanne; Jesus, Desyree M; Dalle Ore, Lucia; Mymryk, Joe S; Hertel, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal Langerhans cells (LC) are likely to play important roles in host defense against infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV). We previously showed that in vitro-differentiated immature LC (iLC) populations contain smaller amounts of infected cells but produce higher yields than mature LC (mLC) cultures, obtained by iLC stimulation with fetal bovine serum (FBS), CD40 ligand (CD40L) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we sought to determine if exposure to select stimuli can improve LC permissiveness to infection, if specific components of the mLC cocktail are responsible for lowering viral yields, if this is due to defects in progeny production or release, and if these restrictions are also effective against reactivated virus. None of the stimuli tested extended the proportion of infected cells to 100%, suggesting that the block to infection onset cannot be fully removed. While CD40L and FBS exerted positive effects on viral progeny production per cell, stimulation with LPS alone or in combination with CD40L was detrimental. Reductions in viral titers were not due to defects in progeny release, and the permissive or restrictive intracellular environment established upon exposure to each stimulus appeared to act in a somewhat similar way toward lytic and latent infections. PMID:27683575

  7. Activation of Langerhans-Type Dendritic Cells Alters Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Reactivation in a Stimulus-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Coronel, Roxanne; Jesus, Desyree M.; Dalle Ore, Lucia; Mymryk, Joe S.; Hertel, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal Langerhans cells (LC) are likely to play important roles in host defense against infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV). We previously showed that in vitro-differentiated immature LC (iLC) populations contain smaller amounts of infected cells but produce higher yields than mature LC (mLC) cultures, obtained by iLC stimulation with fetal bovine serum (FBS), CD40 ligand (CD40L) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we sought to determine if exposure to select stimuli can improve LC permissiveness to infection, if specific components of the mLC cocktail are responsible for lowering viral yields, if this is due to defects in progeny production or release, and if these restrictions are also effective against reactivated virus. None of the stimuli tested extended the proportion of infected cells to 100%, suggesting that the block to infection onset cannot be fully removed. While CD40L and FBS exerted positive effects on viral progeny production per cell, stimulation with LPS alone or in combination with CD40L was detrimental. Reductions in viral titers were not due to defects in progeny release, and the permissive or restrictive intracellular environment established upon exposure to each stimulus appeared to act in a somewhat similar way toward lytic and latent infections.

  8. CD40L+ CD4+ memory T cells migrate in a CD62P-dependent fashion into reactive lymph nodes and license dendritic cells for T cell priming

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Fontecha, Alfonso; Baumjohann, Dirk; Guarda, Greta; Reboldi, Andrea; Hons, Miroslav; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sallusto, Federica

    2008-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the maturation state of dendritic cells (DCs) is a critical parameter determining the balance between tolerance and immunity. We report that mouse CD4+ effector memory T (TEM) cells, but not naive or central memory T cells, constitutively expressed CD40L at levels sufficient to induce DC maturation in vitro and in vivo in the absence of antigenic stimulation. CD4+ TEM cells were excluded from resting lymph nodes but migrated in a CD62P-dependent fashion into reactive lymph nodes that were induced to express CD62P, in a transient or sustained fashion, on high endothelial venules. Trafficking of CD4+ TEM cells into chronic reactive lymph nodes maintained resident DCs in a mature state and promoted naive T cell responses and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) to antigens administered in the absence of adjuvants. Antibodies to CD62P, which blocked CD4+ TEM cell migration into reactive lymph nodes, inhibited DC maturation, T cell priming, and induction of EAE. These results show that TEM cells can behave as endogenous adjuvants and suggest a mechanistic link between lymphocyte traffic in lymph nodes and induction of autoimmunity. PMID:18838544

  9. A nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor BAY11-7082 inhibits interactions between human endothelial cells, T cells, and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B; Liu, Z; Wang, P; Wu, C; Xu, H

    2008-10-01

    Costimulatory molecules play critical roles during cell-mediated immune responses. We undertook this study to determine whether CD154-CD40 interactions induced human endothelial cell (EC) activation via the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway, and whether the upregulation of monocyte-derived CD40 and CD80 is NF-kappaB pathway dependent. A CD154-expressing D1.1 cell-EC coculture with or without the NF-kappaB inhibitor BAY11-7082 was established to examine EC activation as indicated by CD62E expression. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-EC cocultures were performed in the presence or absence of BAY11-7082; the expression of CD40 and CD80 on monocytes was analyzed by FACS. Allogeneic mixed lymphocyte-EC reaction (MLER) was performed to determine the inhibitory effects of BAY11-7082 to prevent lymphocyte proliferation. FACS demonstrated upregulation of EC-derived CD62E expression induced by CD154 expressing D1.1 cells. BAY11-7082 pretreated EC failed to upregulate CD62E after interaction with D1.1 cells. Monocytes upregulated CD40 and CD80 expression during PBMC-HEC interaction, and BAY11-7082 suppressed monocyte-derived CD40 and CD80 expression in a dose-dependent manner. The monocyte-derived CD86 expression was downregulated by NF-kappaB inhibitor. BAY11-7082 demonstrated inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation of allogeneic MLER. This study demonstrated that the NF-kappaB inhibitor BAY11-7082 prevented CD154-CD40 interaction-induced EC activation, suggesting that the activation of EC by T-cell-derived CD154 is via NF-kappaB pathway. The NF-kappaB inhibitor suppressed upregulation of monocytederived CD40 and CD80. Additionally, BAY11-7082 suppressed lymphocyte proliferation in response to allogeneic EC. These data indicated that NF-kappaB plays an important role in regulating costimulatory molecules in allogeneic immune responses, and strengthens the rationale for the use of NF-kappaB-directed therapy in allotransplantation.

  10. Human CD100, a novel leukocyte semaphorin that promotes B-cell aggregation and differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, K T; Boumsell, L; Schultze, J L; Boussiotis, V A; Dorfman, D M; Cardoso, A A; Bensussan, A; Nadler, L M; Freeman, G J

    1996-01-01

    Herein we describe the molecular characterization of the human leukocyte activation antigen CD100 and identify it as the first semaphorin, to our knowledge, in the immune system. Semaphorins have recently been described as neuronal chemorepellants that direct pioneering neurons during nervous system development. In this study we demonstrate that CD100 induces B cells to aggregate and improves their viability in vitro. We show that CD100 modifies CD40-CD40L B-cell signaling by augmenting B-cell aggregation and survival and down-regulating CD23 expression. Thus, these results suggest that semaphorins as exemplified by CD100 also play a functional role in the immune system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8876214

  11. Activation status of human microglia is dependent on lesion formation stage and remyelination in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peferoen, Laura A N; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Ummenthum, Kimberley; Breur, Marjolein; Heijnen, Priscilla D A M; Gerritsen, Wouter H; Peferoen-Baert, Regina M B; van der Valk, Paul; Dijkstra, Christine D; Amor, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Similar to macrophages, microglia adopt diverse activation states and contribute to repair and tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, we show that in vitro M1-polarized (proinflammatory) human adult microglia express the distinctive markers CD74, CD40, CD86, and CCR7, whereas M2 (anti-inflammatory) microglia express mannose receptor and the anti-inflammatory cytokine CCL22. The expression of these markers was assessed in clusters of activated microglia in normal-appearing white matter (preactive lesions) and areas of remyelination, representing reparative multiple sclerosis lesions. We show that activated microglia in preactive and remyelinating lesions express CD74, CD40, CD86, and the M2 markers CCL22 and CD209, but not mannose receptor. To examine whether this intermediate microglia profile is static or dynamic and thus susceptible to changes in the microenvironment, we polarized microglia into M1 or M2 phenotype in vitro and then subsequently treated them with the opposing polarization regimen. These studies revealed that expression of CD40, CXCL10, and mannose receptor is dynamic and that microglia, like macrophages, can switch between M1 and M2 phenotypic profiles. Taken together, our data define the differential activation states of microglia during lesion development in multiple sclerosis-affected CNS tissues and underscore the plasticity of human adult microglia in vitro.

  12. Rituximab induces Interleukin-6 production by human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jonathan D.; Hamilton, B. JoNell; Skopelja, Sladjana; Rigby, William F. C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Rituximab (RTX), an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, is highly effective in the treatment of several autoimmune diseases. The mechanism by which RTX treatment improves Rheumatoid Arthritis and ANCA-Associated Vasculitis is not easily related to B cell depletion. We have shown that RTX mediates a rapid stripping of CD20 and CD19 from the human B cell through a process known as trogocytosis. We hypothesized that changes in B cell phenotype resulting from trogocytosis would diminish the ability of B cells to promote autoimmune disease. Methods Human PBMC were cultured with RTX under conditions that permitted trogocytosis. Changes in B cell phenotype and cytokine production were measured under basal and activated (IL-4/anti-CD40) conditions. The effects of RTX were characterized for their requirements for FcγR and Fc-dependent interactions. Results Trogocytosis induced a marked loss of surface CD19, IgD, CD40 and BR3, but did not alter induction of CD86 expression on purified B cells by IL-4/anti-CD40 treatment. Unexpectedly, RTX-dependent trogocytosis of normal human B cells in vitro led to a rapid upregulation of IL-6 production, with no effect on TNFα, IL-1β, INFγ, or IL-10 production. This effect was Fc-dependent and required the presence of an FcγR bearing cell. This effect involved the release of pre-formed intracellular IL-6 protein as well as marked increases in IL-6 mRNA levels. Conclusion RTX mediated trogocytosis of B cells in vitro results in acute production and release of IL-6. The nature of this effect and its relationship to acute infusion reactions seen with RTX administration remain to be determined. PMID:25080282

  13. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} impairs NF-{kappa}B activation in human naive B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geldmeyer-Hilt, Kerstin; Heine, Guido; Hartmann, Bjoern; Baumgrass, Ria; Radbruch, Andreas; Worm, Margitta

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} In naive B cells, VDR activation by calcitriol results in reduced NF-{kappa}B p105 and p50 protein expression. {yields} Ligating the VDR with calcitriol causes reduced nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65. {yields} Reduced nuclear amount of p65 after calcitriol incubation results in reduced binding of p65 on the p105 promoter. {yields} Thus, vitamin D receptor signaling may reduce or prevent activation of B cells and unwanted immune responses, e.g. in IgE dependent diseases such as allergic asthma. -- Abstract: 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (calcitriol), the bioactive metabolite of vitamin D, modulates the activation and inhibits IgE production of anti-CD40 and IL-4 stimulated human peripheral B cells. Engagement of CD40 results in NF-{kappa}B p50 activation, which is essential for the class switch to IgE. Herein, we investigated by which mechanism calcitriol modulates NF-{kappa}B mediated activation of human naive B cells. Naive B cells were predominantly targeted by calcitriol in comparison with memory B cells as shown by pronounced induction of the VDR target gene cyp24a1. Vitamin D receptor activation resulted in a strongly reduced p105/p50 protein and mRNA expression in human naive B cells. This effect is mediated by impaired nuclear translocation of p65 and consequently reduced binding of p65 to its binding site in the p105 promoter. Our data indicate that the vitamin D receptor reduces NF-{kappa}B activation by interference with NF-{kappa}B p65 and p105. Thus, the vitamin D receptor inhibits costimulatory signal transduction in naive B cells, namely by reducing CD40 signaling.

  14. Identification of IDO-positive and IDO-negative human dendritic cells after activation by various proinflammatory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Von Bubnoff, Dagmar; Scheler, Marina; Wilms, Helene; Fimmers, Rolf; Bieber, Thomas

    2011-06-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) can induce tolerance or immunity. We identified and characterized an IDO-expressing and an IDO-negative human DC population after stimulation by various proinflammatory stimuli. IDO expression was strongly dependent on the maturation status of the cells (CD83-positive cells only). The two DC subpopulations remained IDO positive and IDO negative, respectively, over a time period of at least 48 h. IDO enzyme activity of human DCs was highest during stimulation by strongly maturation-inducing TLR ligands such as highly purified LPS (TLR4 ligand) or polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (TLR3 ligand); factors of the adaptive immune system such as IFN-γ, a mixture of cytokines, and IFN-α had lesser stimulatory capacity for IDO induction and activity. After stimulation with CD40L, IDO-positive DCs expressed significantly increased levels of B7 family molecules such as CD40, CD80, CD86, ICOS ligand, as well as PD-L1 (B7-H1) and PD-L2 (B7-DC) compared with the IDO-negative DC subset. At the same time, the inhibitory receptors Ig-like transcripts 3 and 4 were significantly downregulated on IDO-positive cells. Functionally, IDO-positive DCs produced significantly more IL-1β and IL-15 and less IL-10 and IL-6 than the IDO-negative subset after CD40L stimulation. These results show that IDO expression is associated with a distinctive phenotype and functional capacity in mature DCs. It seems likely that the IDO-positive DC subset possesses a regulatory function and might skew a T cell response toward tolerance.

  15. IDO expression by human B lymphocytes in response to T lymphocyte stimuli and TLR engagement is biologically inactive.

    PubMed

    Godin-Ethier, Jessica; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Duvignaud, Jean-Baptiste; Leclerc, Denis; Lapointe, Réjean

    2011-10-01

    The immune system must be under tight control to avoid undesired responses. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) can exert necessary regulating effects by catabolizing tryptophan, leading to the suppression of immune responses in different settings, such as pregnancy and tumor growth. IDO's immuno-suppressive actions are mediated by tryptophan starvation and the accumulation of toxic tryptophan metabolites, resulting in T cell anergy, inhibition of clonal expansion or apoptosis. IDO activity in human macrophages and dendritic cells has been observed after interaction with T lymphocytes, and is triggered by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) as well as CD40-ligand (CD40L). However, it is unclear whether IDO activity is present in B lymphocytes, which have been identified as having suppressive properties involved in anti-tumor immunity inhibition. In this study, we investigated whether IDO expression is induced in human B cells after exposure to T lymphocyte stimuli and TLR ligands. We report IDO1 and IDO2 mRNA up-regulation by exogenous stimulation with CD40L and IFN-γ. IDO is also upregulated by imiquimod, a TLR 7/8 agonist. In addition, IDO protein is detected after treatment with these exogenous factors or with supernatant from activated CD4(+) T cells. We, however, report weak or absent enzymatic activity from these IDO-expressing cells, as assessed by tryptophan consumption. We conclude that IDO may not be a counter-regulatory mechanism utilized by B lymphocytes to down-regulate immune responses, although its expression is inducible.

  16. TLR3 Signaling Promotes the Induction of Unique Human BDCA-3 Dendritic Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Colletti, Nicholas J.; Liu, Hong; Gower, Adam C.; Alekseyev, Yuriy O.; Arendt, Christopher W.; Shaw, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (cDCs and pDCs) are the two populations of DCs that can be readily identified in human blood. Conventional DCs have been subdivided into CD1c+, or blood dendritic cells antigen (BDCA) 1 and CD141+, or BDCA-3, DCs, each having both unique gene expression profiles and functions. BDCA-3 DCs express high levels of toll-like receptor 3 and upon stimulation with Poly I:C secrete IFN-β, CXCL10, and IL-12p70. In this article, we show that activation of human BDCA-3 DCs with Poly I:C induces the expression of activation markers (CD40, CD80, and CD86) and immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT) 3 and 4. This Poly I:C stimulation results in four populations identifiable by flow cytometry based on their expression of ILT3 and ILT4. We focused our efforts on profiling the ILT4− and ILT4+ DCs. These ILT-expressing BDCA-3 populations exhibit similar levels of activation as measured by CD40, CD80, and CD86; however, they exhibit differential cytokine secretion profiles, unique gene signatures, and vary in their ability to prime allogenic naïve T cells. Taken together, these data illustrate that within a pool of BDCA-3 DCs, there are cells poised to respond differently to a given input stimulus with unique output of immune functions. PMID:27014268

  17. TLR3 Signaling Promotes the Induction of Unique Human BDCA-3 Dendritic Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Colletti, Nicholas J; Liu, Hong; Gower, Adam C; Alekseyev, Yuriy O; Arendt, Christopher W; Shaw, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (cDCs and pDCs) are the two populations of DCs that can be readily identified in human blood. Conventional DCs have been subdivided into CD1c(+), or blood dendritic cells antigen (BDCA) 1 and CD141(+), or BDCA-3, DCs, each having both unique gene expression profiles and functions. BDCA-3 DCs express high levels of toll-like receptor 3 and upon stimulation with Poly I:C secrete IFN-β, CXCL10, and IL-12p70. In this article, we show that activation of human BDCA-3 DCs with Poly I:C induces the expression of activation markers (CD40, CD80, and CD86) and immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT) 3 and 4. This Poly I:C stimulation results in four populations identifiable by flow cytometry based on their expression of ILT3 and ILT4. We focused our efforts on profiling the ILT4(-) and ILT4(+) DCs. These ILT-expressing BDCA-3 populations exhibit similar levels of activation as measured by CD40, CD80, and CD86; however, they exhibit differential cytokine secretion profiles, unique gene signatures, and vary in their ability to prime allogenic naïve T cells. Taken together, these data illustrate that within a pool of BDCA-3 DCs, there are cells poised to respond differently to a given input stimulus with unique output of immune functions.

  18. Differential regulation of TLR4 expression in human B cells and monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ganley-Leal, Lisa M.; Liang, YanMei; Jagannathan-Bogdan, Madhumita; Farraye, Francis A.; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S.

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an innate immune receptor that is constitutively and inducibly activated in monocytes. Although TLR4 is expressed at very low levels on human B cells from healthy individuals, recent reports showed that TLR4 expression and function is elevated in B cells from inflammatory disease patients. New data showed that TLR4 expression on B cell is increased upon stimulation through surface Igμ and CD40 in combination with IL-4. In contrast, monocyte stimulation through CD40 and IL-4 receptors decreased TLR4 surface expression. Analysis of molecular signatures of TLR4 activation in stimulated B cells suggested that TLR4 is regulated by different mechanisms in B cells compared to monocytes. PU.1 and interferon regulatory factor association with the TLR4 promoter are sufficient for TLR4 transcription, but are not sufficient for surface TLR4 expression on B cells. In contrast, the PU.1/IRF combination is sufficient for surface TLR4 expression on monocytes. These data identify mechanisms that can activate B cell TLR4 expression in inflammatory disease patients, and demonstrate that B cells have additional layers of TLR4 regulation absent in monocytes. PMID:20956019

  19. Human macrophage polarization in vitro: maturation and activation methods compared.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Daphne Y S; Glim, Judith E; Stavenuiter, Andrea W D; Breur, Marjolein; Heijnen, Priscilla; Amor, Sandra; Dijkstra, Christine D; Beelen, Robert H J

    2014-09-01

    Macrophages form a heterogeneous cell population displaying multiple functions, and can be polarized into pro- (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages, by environmental factors. Their activation status reflects a beneficial or detrimental role in various diseases. Currently several in vitro maturation and activation protocols are used to induce an M1 or M2 phenotype. Here, the impact of different maturation factors (NHS, M-CSF, or GM-CSF) and activation methods (IFN-γ/LPS, IL-4, dexamethason, IL-10) on the macrophage phenotype was determined. Regarding macrophage morphology, pro-inflammatory (M1) activation stimulated cell elongation, and anti-inflammatory (M2) activation induced a circular appearance. Activation with pro-inflammatory mediators led to increased CD40 and CD64 expression, whereas activation with anti-inflammatory factors resulted in increased levels of MR and CD163. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was induced by activation with IFN-γ/LPS, and TGF-β production was enhanced by the maturation factors M-CSF and GM-CSF. Our data demonstrate that macrophage marker expression and cytokine production in vitro is highly dependent on both maturation and activation methods. In vivo macrophage activation is far more complex, since a plethora of stimuli are present. Hence, defining the macrophage activation status ex vivo on a limited number of markers could be indecisive. From this study we conclude that maturation with M-CSF or GM-CSF induces a moderate anti- or pro-inflammatory state respectively, compared to maturation with NHS. CD40 and CD64 are the most distinctive makers for human M1 and CD163 and MR for M2 macrophage activation and therefore can be helpful in determining the activation status of human macrophages ex vivo.

  20. Clinical grade manufacturing of human alloantigen-reactive regulatory T cells for use in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Putnam, A L; Safinia, N; Medvec, A; Laszkowska, M; Wray, M; Mintz, M A; Trotta, E; Szot, G L; Liu, W; Lares, A; Lee, K; Laing, A; Lechler, R I; Riley, J L; Bluestone, J A; Lombardi, G; Tang, Q

    2013-11-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg) therapy has the potential to induce transplantation tolerance so that immunosuppression and associated morbidity can be minimized. Alloantigen-reactive Tregs (arTregs) are more effective at preventing graft rejection than polyclonally expanded Tregs (PolyTregs) in murine models. We have developed a manufacturing process to expand human arTregs in short-term cultures using good manufacturing practice-compliant reagents. This process uses CD40L-activated allogeneic B cells to selectively expand arTregs followed by polyclonal restimulation to increase yield. Tregs expanded 100- to 1600-fold were highly alloantigen reactive and expressed the phenotype of stable Tregs. The alloantigen-expanded Tregs had a diverse TCR repertoire. They were more potent than PolyTregs in vitro and more effective at controlling allograft injuries in vivo in a humanized mouse model.

  1. Diesel-Enriched Particulate Matter Functionally Activates Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Michael; Karp, Matthew; Killedar, Smruti; Bauer, Stephen M.; Guo, Jia; Williams, D'Ann; Breysse, Patrick; Georas, Steve N.; Williams, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have associated exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) with exacerbations of asthma. It is unknown how different sources of PM affect innate immunity. We sought to determine how car- and diesel exhaust–derived PM affects dendritic cell (DC) activation. DC development was modeled using CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors. Airborne PM was collected from exhaust plenums of Fort McHenry Tunnel providing car-enriched particles (CEP) and diesel-enriched particles (DEP). DC were stimulated for 48 hours with CEP, DEP, CD40-ligand, or lipopolysaccharide. DC activation was assessed by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and standard culture techniques. DEP increased uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran (a model antigen) by DC. Diesel particles enhanced cell-surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules (e.g., CD40 [P < 0.01] and MHC class II [P < 0.01]). By contrast, CEP poorly affected antigen uptake and expression of cell surface molecules, and did not greatly affect cytokine secretion by DC. However, DEP increased production of TNF, IL-6, and IFN-γ (P < 0.01), IL-12 (P < 0.05), and vascular endothelial growth factor (P < 0.001). In co-stimulation assays of PM-exposed DC and alloreactive CD4+ T cells, both CEP and DEP directed a Th2-like pattern of cytokine production (e.g., enhanced IL-13 and IL-18 and suppressed IFN-γ production). CD4+ T cells were not functionally activated on exposure to either DEP or CEP. Car- and diesel-enriched particles exert a differential effect on DC activation. Our data support the hypothesis that DEP (and to a lesser extent CEP) regulate important functional aspects of human DC, supporting an adjuvant role for this material. PMID:17630318

  2. Inhibitive effect of purple sweet potato leaf extract and its components on cell adhesion and inflammatory response in human aortic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Pi-Yu; Huang, Ya-Ping; Hsieh, Wen-Bin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of purple sweet potato leaf extract (PSPLE) and its components, cyanidin and quercetin, on human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) during the inflammatory process. HAECs were pretreated with 100 μg/mL PSPLE or 10 μM quercetin, cyanidin or aspirin for 18 h followed by TNF-α (2 ng/mL) for 6 h, and U937 cell adhesion was determined. Adhesion molecule expression and CD40 were evaluated; NFκB p65 protein localization and DNA binding were assessed. PSPLE, aspirin, cyanidin and quercetin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion (p < 0.05). Cyanidin, quercetin and PSPLE also significantly attenuated VCAM-1, IL-8 and CD40 expression, and quercetin significantly attenuated ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression (p < 0.05). Significant reductions in NFκB expression and DNA binding by aspirin, cyanidin and quercetin were also observed in addition to decreased expression of ERK1, ERK2 and p38 MAPK (p < 0.05). Thus, PSPLE and its components, cyanidin and quercetin, have anti-inflammatory effects through modulation of NFκB and MAPK signaling. Further in vivo studies are necessary to explore the possible therapeutic effects of PSPLE on atherosclerosis. PMID:23466865

  3. Morphological interactions of interdigitating dendritic cells with B and T cells in human mesenteric lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Kenji, A; Norihiro, T; Eisaku, K; Takashi, O; Kazuhiko, H; Tadashi, Y; Tadaatsu, A

    2001-07-01

    Interdigitating dendritic cells (IDC) of the human mesenteric lymph nodes (LN) were examined by two-color immunofluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry to clarify their exact localization, immunophenotype, and relationships with T and B cells. IDC were identified as HLA-DR(bright) large dendriform cells of the T cell areas co-expressing CD40, CD54 (ICAM-1), CD80 (B7/B7-1), CD83, and CD86 (B70/B7-2). The majority of IDC directly attached to a few IgD+ naive B cells as well as to numerous CD4+ T cells. When LN cells were singly suspended and briefly incubated in vitro, IDC formed clusters with IgD+ IgM+ naive B cells, but not with IgA+ or IgG+ B cells. When suspended LN cells were cultured, clustered B cells disappeared within 7 days, and on prolonged culture, some IDC developed into extensively dendriform cells forming stable complexes with several or sometimes numerous CD4+ IL-2R+ CD40L+ activated T cells. These findings indicate that resting naive B cells actually interact with IDC directly in T cell areas of human secondary lymphoid tissues. IDC have a non-antigen (Ag)-specific, strong affinity for resting naive B cells, but this affinity is transient and IDC cannot form stable complexes with B cells, although they can form stable complexes with activated T cells. It is suggested that the stable IDC/Ag-activated T cell complexes make it possible to capture and to stimulate rare Ag-specific resting naive B cells with high efficiency.

  4. A novel in vitro human microglia model: characterization of human monocyte-derived microglia.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Samar; Zamin, Rasheeda Mohd; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Filgueira, Luis

    2012-07-30

    Microglia are the innate immune cells of the central nervous system. They help maintaining physiological homeostasis and contribute significantly to inflammatory responses in the course of infection, injury and degenerative processes. To date, there is no standardized simple model available to investigate the biology of human microglia. The aim of this study was to establish a new human microglia model. For that purpose, human peripheral blood monocytes were cultured in serum free medium in the presence of M-CSF, GM-CSF, NGF and CCL2 to generate monocyte-derived microglia (M-MG). M-MG were clearly different in morphology, phenotype and function from freshly isolated monocytes, cultured monocytes in the absence of the cytokines and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (M-DC) cultured in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4. M-MG acquired a ramified morphology with primary and secondary processes. M-MG displayed a comparable phenotype to the human microglia cell line HMC3, expressing very low levels of CD45, CD14 and HLA-DR, CD11b and CD11c; and undetectable levels of CD40, CD80 and CD83, and a distinct pattern of chemokine receptors (positive for CCR1, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CXCR1, CXCR3, CX3CR1; negative for CCR6 and CCR7). In comparison with M-DC, M-MG displayed lower T-lymphocyte stimulatory capacity, as well as lower phagocytosis activity. The described protocol for the generation of human monocyte-derived microglia is feasible, well standardized and reliable, as it uses well defined culture medium and recombinant cytokines, but no serum or conditioned medium. This protocol will certainly be very helpful for future studies investigating the biology and pathology of human microglia. PMID:22659341

  5. Lactodifucotetraose, a human milk oligosaccharide, attenuates platelet function and inflammatory cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; Tanritanir, Ayse C; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Human milk strongly quenches inflammatory processes in vitro, and breastfed infants have lower incidence of inflammatory diseases than those fed artificially. Platelets from neonates, in contrast to those from adults, are less responsive to platelet agonists such as collagen, thrombin, ADP, and epinephrine. Breastfed infants absorb oligosaccharides intact from the human milk in their gut to the circulation. This study was to determine whether these oligosaccharides can attenuate platelet function and platelet secretion of pro-inflammatory proteins, and to identify the active component. The natural mixture of oligosaccharides from human milk and pure individual human milk oligosaccharides were tested for their ability to modulate responses of platelets isolated from human blood following exposure to thrombin, ADP, and collagen. Human milk and the natural mixture of human milk oligosaccharides inhibited platelet release of inflammatory proteins. Of the purified human milk oligosaccharides tested, only lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) significantly inhibited thrombin induced release of the pro-inflammatory proteins RANTES and sCD40L. LDFT also inhibited platelet adhesion to a collagen-coated surface, as well as platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. These data indicate that LDFT may help modulate hemostasis by suppressing platelet-induced inflammatory processes in breastfed infants. This activity suggests further study of LDFT for its potential as a therapeutic agent in infants and adults.

  6. Ciprofloxacin inhibits advanced glycation end products-induced adhesion molecule expression on human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mori, S; Takahashi, HK; Liu, K; Wake, H; Zhang, J; Liu, R; Yoshino, T; Nishibori, M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) subtypes, proteins or lipids that become glycated after exposure to sugars, can induce complications in diabetes. Among the various AGE subtypes, glyceraldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-2) and glycolaldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-3) are involved in inflammation in diabetic patients; monocytes are activated by these AGEs. Ciprofloxacin (CIP), a fluorinated 4-quinolone, is often used clinically to treat infections associated with diabetis due to its antibacterial properties. It also modulates immune responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) therefore we investigated the involvement of AGEs in these effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 was examined by flow cytometry. The production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cAMP were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Lymphocyte proliferation was determined by [3H]-thymidine uptake. KEY RESULTS CIP induced PGE2 production in monocytes, irrespective of the presence of AGE-2 and AGE-3, by enhancing COX-2 expression; this led to an elevation of intracellular cAMP in monocytes. Non-selective and selective COX-2 inhibitors, indomethacin and NS398, inhibited CIP-induced PGE2 and cAMP production. In addition, CIP inhibited AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced expressions of ICAM-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 in monocytes, the production of TNF-α and IFN-γ and lymphocyte proliferation in PBMC. Indomethacin, NS398 and a protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, inhibited the actions of CIP. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS CIP exerts immunomodulatory activity via PGE2, implying therapeutic potential of CIP for the treatment of AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced inflammatory responses. PMID:20718752

  7. IL-10-produced by human transitional B-cells down-regulates CD86 expression on B-cells leading to inhibition of CD4+T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Nova-Lamperti, Estefania; Fanelli, Giorgia; Becker, Pablo D.; Chana, Prabhjoat; Elgueta, Raul; Dodd, Philippa C.; Lord, Graham M.; Lombardi, Giovanna; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    A novel subset of human regulatory B-cells has recently been described. They arise from within the transitional B-cell subpopulation and are characterised by the production of IL-10. They appear to be of significant importance in regulating T-cell immunity in vivo. Despite this important function, the molecular mechanisms by which they control T-cell activation are incompletely defined. Here we show that transitional B-cells produced more IL-10 and expressed higher levels of IL-10 receptor after CD40 engagement compared to other B-cell subsets. Furthermore, under this stimulatory condition, CD86 expressed by transitional B-cells was down regulated and T-cell proliferation was reduced. We provide evidence to demonstrate that the down-regulation of CD86 expression by transitional B-cells was due to the autocrine effect of IL-10, which in turn leads to decreased T-cell proliferation and TNF-α production. This analysis was further extended to peripheral B-cells in kidney transplant recipients. We observed that B-cells from patients tolerant to the graft maintained higher IL-10 production after CD40 ligation, which correlates with lower CD86 expression compared to patients with chronic rejection. Hence, the results obtained in this study shed light on a new alternative mechanism by which transitional B-cells inhibit T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. PMID:26795594

  8. Early immune responses accompanying human asymptomatic Ebola infections

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, E M; Baize, S; Debre, P; Lansoud-Soukate, J; Mavoungou, E

    2001-01-01

    In a recent study we identified certain asymptomatic individuals infected by Ebola virus (EBOV) who mounted specific IgG and early and strong inflammatory responses. Here, we further characterized the primary immune response to EBOV during the course of asymptomatic infection in humans. Inflammatory responses occurred in temporal association with anti-inflammatory phase composed by soluble antagonist IL-1RA, circulating TNF receptors, IL-10 and cortisol. At the end of the inflammatory process, mRNA expression of T-cell cytokines (IL-2 and IL-4) and activation markers (CD28, CD40L and CTLA4) was up-regulated, strongly suggesting T-cell activation. This T-cell activation was followed by EBOV-specific IgG responses (mainly IgG3 ang IgG1), and by marked and sustained up-regulation of IFNγ, FasL and perforin mRNA expression, suggesting activation of cytotoxic cells. The terminal down-regulation of these latter markers coincided with the release of the apoptotic marker 41/7 NMP in blood and with the disappearance of viral RNA from PBMC, suggesting that infected cells are eliminated by cytotoxic mechanisms. Finally, RT-PCR analysis of TCR-Vβ repertoire usage showed that TCR-Vβ12 mRNA was never expressed during the infection. Taken together, these findings improve our understanding about immune response during human asymptomatic Ebola infection, and throw new light on protection against Ebola virus. PMID:11472407

  9. Immunological characteristics of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and the therapeutic effects of their transplantion on hyperglycemia in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwu; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Ni, Ping; Qiu, Xuerong; Lin, Xiaobo; Wu, Weizhao; Xie, Lichun; Lin, Limin; Min, Juan; Lai, Xiulan; Chen, Yunbin; Ho, Guyu; Ma, Lian

    2014-02-01

    Islet transplantation involves the transplantation of pancreatic islets from the pancreas of a donor to another individual. It has proven to be an effective method for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, islet transplantation is hampered by immune rejection, as well as the shortage of donor islets. Human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) are an ideal cell source for use in transplantation due to their biological characteristics and their use does not provoke any ethical issues. In this study, we investigated the immunological characteristics of HUMSCs and their effects on lymphocyte proliferation and the secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ, and explored whether direct cell-to-cell interactions and soluble factors, such as IFN-γ were important for balancing HUMSC-mediated immune regulation. We transplanted HUMSCs into diabetic rats to investigate whether these cells can colonize in vivo and differentiate into pancreatic β-cells, and whether the hyperglycemia of diabetic rats can be improved by transplantation. Our results revealed that HUMSCs did not stimulate the proliferation of lymphocytes and did not induce allogeneic or xenogeneic immune cell responses. qRT-PCR demonstrated that the HUMSCs produced an immunosuppressive isoform of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-I) and did not express HLA-DR. Flow cytometry revealed that the HUMSCs did not express immune response-related surface antigens such as, CD40, CD40L, CD80 and CD86. IFN-γ secretion by human peripheral blood lymphocytes was reduced when the cells were co-cultured with HUMSCs. These results suggest that HUMSCs are tolerated by the host in an allogeneic transplant. We transplanted HUMSCs into diabetic rats, and the cells survived in the liver and pancreas. Hyperglycemia of the diabetic rats was improved and the destruction of pancreatic cells was partly repaired by HUMSC transplantation. Hyperglycemic improvement may be related to the immunomodulatory effects of

  10. Characteristics of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells and their tropism to human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Liru; Wang, Dejun; Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Yan; Liang, Tian; Zhang, Guangmei

    2015-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from amniotic fluid (AF) have become an attractive stem cells source for cell-based therapy because they can be harvested at low cost and avoid ethical disputes. In human research, stem cells derived from AF gradually became a hot research direction for disease treatment, specifically for their plasticity, their reduced immunogenicity and their tumor tropism regardless of the tumor size, location and source. Our work aimed to obtain and characterize human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) and detect their ovarian cancer tropsim in nude mice model. Ten milliliters of twenty independent amniotic fluid samples were collected from 16-20 week pregnant women who underwent amniocentesis for fetal genetic determination in routine prenatal diagnosis in the first affiliated hospital of Harbin medical university. We successfully isolated the AFMSCs from thirteen of twenty amniotic fluid samples. AFMSCs presented a fibroblastic-like morphology during the culture. Flow cytometry analyses showed that the cells were positive for specific stem cell markers CD73,CD90, CD105, CD166 and HLA-ABC (MHC class I), but negative for CD 45,CD40, CD34, CD14 and HLA-DR (MHC class II). RT-PCR results showed that the AFMSCs expressed stem cell marker OCT4. AFMSCs could differentiate into bone cells, fat cells and chondrocytes under certain conditions. AFMSCs had the high motility to migrate to ovarian cancer site but didn't have the tumorigenicity. This study enhances the possibility of AFMSCs as drug carrier in human cell-based therapy. Meanwhile, the research emphasis in the future can also put in targeting therapy of ovarian cancer.

  11. T cell–dependent survival of CD20+ and CD20− plasma cells in human secondary lymphoid tissue

    PubMed Central

    Withers, David R.; Fiorini, Claudia; Fischer, Randy T.; Ettinger, Rachel; Grammer, Amrie C.

    2007-01-01

    The signals mediating human plasma cell survival in vivo, particularly within secondary lymphoid tissue, are unclear. Human tonsils grafted into immunodeficient mice were therefore used to delineate the mechanisms promoting the survival of plasma cells. Tonsillar plasma cells were maintained within the grafts and the majority were nonproliferating, indicating a long-lived phenotype. A significant depletion of graft plasma cells was observed after anti-CD20 treatment, consistent with the expression of CD20 by most of the cells. Moreover, anti-CD52 treatment caused the complete loss of all graft lymphocytes, including plasma cells. Unexpectedly, anti-CD3, but not anti-CD154, treatment caused the complete loss of plasma cells, indicating an essential role for T cells, but not CD40-CD154 interactions in plasma cell survival. The in vitro coculture of purified tonsillar plasma cells and T cells revealed a T-cell survival signal requiring cell contact. Furthermore, immunofluorescence studies detected a close association between human plasma cells and T cells in vivo. These data reveal that human tonsil contains long-lived plasma cells, the majority of which express CD20 and can be deleted with anti-CD20 therapy. In addition, an important role for contact-dependent interactions with T cells in human plasma cell survival within secondary lymphoid tissue was identified. PMID:17299094

  12. T cell-dependent survival of CD20+ and CD20- plasma cells in human secondary lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Withers, David R; Fiorini, Claudia; Fischer, Randy T; Ettinger, Rachel; Lipsky, Peter E; Grammer, Amrie C

    2007-06-01

    The signals mediating human plasma cell survival in vivo, particularly within secondary lymphoid tissue, are unclear. Human tonsils grafted into immunodeficient mice were therefore used to delineate the mechanisms promoting the survival of plasma cells. Tonsillar plasma cells were maintained within the grafts and the majority were nonproliferating, indicating a long-lived phenotype. A significant depletion of graft plasma cells was observed after anti-CD20 treatment, consistent with the expression of CD20 by most of the cells. Moreover, anti-CD52 treatment caused the complete loss of all graft lymphocytes, including plasma cells. Unexpectedly, anti-CD3, but not anti-CD154, treatment caused the complete loss of plasma cells, indicating an essential role for T cells, but not CD40-CD154 interactions in plasma cell survival. The in vitro coculture of purified tonsillar plasma cells and T cells revealed a T-cell survival signal requiring cell contact. Furthermore, immunofluorescence studies detected a close association between human plasma cells and T cells in vivo. These data reveal that human tonsil contains long-lived plasma cells, the majority of which express CD20 and can be deleted with anti-CD20 therapy. In addition, an important role for contact-dependent interactions with T cells in human plasma cell survival within secondary lymphoid tissue was identified.

  13. Efficient gene transfer into normal human B lymphocytes with the chimeric adenoviral vector Ad5/F35.

    PubMed

    Jung, Daniel; Néron, Sonia; Drouin, Mathieu; Jacques, Annie

    2005-09-01

    The failure to efficiently introduce genes into normal cells such as human B lymphocytes limits the characterization of their function on cellular growth, differentiation and survival. Recent studies have shown that a new adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 can efficiently transduce human haematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cells. In this study, we compared the gene transfer efficiencies of the Ad5/F35 vector to that of the parental vector Ad5 in human B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells obtained from healthy individuals were cultured in vitro using CD40-CD154 system. Normal B lymphocytes were infected with replication-defectives Ad5 and Ad5/F35, both containing the GFP reporter gene, and transduction efficiencies were monitored by flow cytometry. Ad5 was highly ineffective, infecting only about 5% of human B lymphocytes. In contrast, Ad5/F35 transduced up to 60% of human B lymphocytes and GFP expression could be detected for up to 5 days post infection. Importantly, physiology of B lymphocytes such as proliferation, viability and antibodies secretion were unaffected following Ad5/F35 transduction. Finally, we observed that memory B lymphocytes were more susceptible to Ad5/F35 infection than naïve B lymphocytes. Thus, our results demonstrate that the adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 is an efficient tool for the functional characterization of genes in B lymphopoiesis.

  14. Human HOIP and LUBAC deficiency underlies autoinflammation, immunodeficiency, amylopectinosis, and lymphangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Dobbs, Kerry; Cobat, Aurélie; Tarantino, Nadine; Hazen, Melissa; Lidov, Hart G.W.; Hopkins, Gregory; Du, Likun; Belkadi, Aziz; Chrabieh, Maya; Itan, Yuval; Picard, Capucine; Fournet, Jean-Christophe; Eibel, Hermann; Tsitsikov, Erdyni; Pai, Sung-Yun; Abel, Laurent; Al-Herz, Waleed; Israel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Inherited, complete deficiency of human HOIL-1, a component of the linear ubiquitination chain assembly complex (LUBAC), underlies autoinflammation, infections, and amylopectinosis. We report the clinical description and molecular analysis of a novel inherited disorder of the human LUBAC complex. A patient with multiorgan autoinflammation, combined immunodeficiency, subclinical amylopectinosis, and systemic lymphangiectasia, is homozygous for a mutation in HOIP, the gene encoding the catalytic component of LUBAC. The missense allele (L72P, in the PUB domain) is at least severely hypomorphic, as it impairs HOIP expression and destabilizes the whole LUBAC complex. Linear ubiquitination and NF-κB activation are impaired in the patient’s fibroblasts stimulated by IL-1β or TNF. In contrast, the patient’s monocytes respond to IL-1β more vigorously than control monocytes. However, the activation and differentiation of the patient’s B cells are impaired in response to CD40 engagement. These cellular and clinical phenotypes largely overlap those of HOIL-1-deficient patients. Clinical differences between HOIL-1- and HOIP-mutated patients may result from differences between the mutations, the loci, or other factors. Our findings show that human HOIP is essential for the assembly and function of LUBAC and for various processes governing inflammation and immunity in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26008899

  15. Human HOIP and LUBAC deficiency underlies autoinflammation, immunodeficiency, amylopectinosis, and lymphangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Dobbs, Kerry; Cobat, Aurélie; Tarantino, Nadine; Hazen, Melissa; Lidov, Hart G W; Hopkins, Gregory; Du, Likun; Belkadi, Aziz; Chrabieh, Maya; Itan, Yuval; Picard, Capucine; Fournet, Jean-Christophe; Eibel, Hermann; Tsitsikov, Erdyni; Pai, Sung-Yun; Abel, Laurent; Al-Herz, Waleed; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Israel, Alain; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2015-06-01

    Inherited, complete deficiency of human HOIL-1, a component of the linear ubiquitination chain assembly complex (LUBAC), underlies autoinflammation, infections, and amylopectinosis. We report the clinical description and molecular analysis of a novel inherited disorder of the human LUBAC complex. A patient with multiorgan autoinflammation, combined immunodeficiency, subclinical amylopectinosis, and systemic lymphangiectasia, is homozygous for a mutation in HOIP, the gene encoding the catalytic component of LUBAC. The missense allele (L72P, in the PUB domain) is at least severely hypomorphic, as it impairs HOIP expression and destabilizes the whole LUBAC complex. Linear ubiquitination and NF-κB activation are impaired in the patient's fibroblasts stimulated by IL-1β or TNF. In contrast, the patient's monocytes respond to IL-1β more vigorously than control monocytes. However, the activation and differentiation of the patient's B cells are impaired in response to CD40 engagement. These cellular and clinical phenotypes largely overlap those of HOIL-1-deficient patients. Clinical differences between HOIL-1- and HOIP-mutated patients may result from differences between the mutations, the loci, or other factors. Our findings show that human HOIP is essential for the assembly and function of LUBAC and for various processes governing inflammation and immunity in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26008899

  16. Measles virus interacts with human SLAM receptor on dendritic cells to cause immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Bumsuk; Arbour, Nathalie; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) infects dendritic cells (DCs) resulting in immunosuppression. Human DCs express two MV receptors: CD46 and human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (hSLAM); thus, the role played by either alone is unclear. Because wild-type (wt) MV uses hSLAM receptor preferentially, we dissected the molecular basis of MV–DC interaction and resultant immunosuppression through the hSLAM receptor by creating transgenic (tg) mice expressing hSLAM on DCs. After infection with wt MV, murine splenic DCs expressing hSLAM receptor had less B7-1, B7-2, CD40, MHC class I, and MHC class II molecules on their surfaces and displayed an increased rate of apoptosis when compared to uninfected DCs. Further, MV-infected DCs failed to stimulate allogeneic T cells and inhibited mitogen-dependent T-cell proliferation. Individual expression of human SLAM, interferon α/β receptor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and lymphotoxin-α or β from T cells was not required for MV-infected DCs to inhibit the proliferation of T cells. PMID:15193925

  17. Use of the human monocytic leukemia THP-1 cell line and co-incubation with microsomes to identify and differentiate hapten and prohapten sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Chipinda, Itai; Ruwona, Tinashe B; Templeton, Steven P; Siegel, Paul D

    2011-02-27

    Consumer and medical products can contain leachable chemical allergens which can cause skin sensitization. Recent efforts have been directed at the development of non-animal based tests such as in vitro cell activation assays for the identification of skin sensitizers. Prohapten identification by in vitro assays is still problematic due to the lack of prohapten bioactivation. The present study evaluated the effect of hapten and prohapten exposure on cell surface markers expression (CD86, CD54 and CD40) in the human monocytic leukemia, THP-1, cell line. Upregulation of activation and costimulatory markers are key events in the allergic sensitization process and have been reported to serve as indicators of skin sensitization. Cells were exposed to the prohaptens benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), carvone oxime (COx), cinnamic alcohol (CA) and isoeugenol (IEG) at concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 μM for 24 and 48 h. The direct-binding haptens dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), benzoquinone (BQ), hydroxylethyl acrylate (HEA) and benzylbromide (BB) were used as positive controls. Cells were also exposed to the irritants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sulfanilamide (SFA). Bioactivation of prohaptens was achieved by adding aroclor-induced rat liver microsomes (S9) to the cell cultures. Consistent upregulation of surface expressions of CD86, CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD40 was observed in THP-1 cells treated with direct-acting haptens (±S9) or prohapten (+S9). Upregulation of these markers was not observed after exposure to skin irritants or prohaptens in the absence of exogenously added S9. In conclusion, modification of in vitro cell culture assays to include co-incubation with microsomes enhances identification of prohaptens and allows them to be clearly distinguished from direct-binding haptens. PMID:21163322

  18. Natural mannosylation of HIV-1 gp120 imposes no immunoregulatory effects in primary human plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Vinner, Lasse; Brix, Susanne

    2014-06-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a vital role in activation of anti-HIV-1 immunity, and suppression of pDCs might mitigate immune responses against HIV-1. HIV-1 gp120 high-mannose has been attributed immunosuppressive roles in human myeloid DCs, but no receptors for high-mannose have so far been reported on human pDCs. Here we show that upon activation with HIV-1 or by a synthetic compound triggering the same receptor in human pDCs as single-stranded RNA, human pDCs upregulate the mannose receptor (MR, CD206). To examine the functional outcome of this upregulation, inactivated intact or viable HIV-1 particles with various degrees of mannosylation were cultured with pDCs. Activation of pDCs was determined by assaying secretion of IFN-alpha, viability, and upregulation of several pDC-activation markers: CD40, CD86, HLA-DR, CCR7, and PD-L1. The level of activation negatively correlated with degree of mannosylation, however, subsequent reduction in the original mannosylation level had no effect on the pDC phenotype. Furthermore, two of the infectious HIV-1 strains induced profound necrosis in pDCs, also in a mannose-independent manner. We therefore conclude that natural mannosylation of HIV-1 is not involved in HIV-1-mediated immune suppression of pDCs.

  19. Platelet lysate from whole blood-derived pooled platelet concentrates and apheresis-derived platelet concentrates for the isolation and expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells: production process, content and identification of active components

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Natalie; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Fürst, Daniel; Maurer, Caroline; Dausend, Julia; Fleury-Cappellesso, Sandrine; Mailänder, Volker; Lotfi, Ramin; Ignatius, Anita; Sensebé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Rojewski, Markus Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background aims The clinical use of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) requires ex vivo expansion in media containing supplements such as fetal bovine serum or, alternatively, human platelet lysate (PL). Methods Platelet concentrates were frozen, quarantine stored, thawed and sterile filtered to obtain PL. PL content and its effect on fibroblast-colony-forming unit (CFU-F) formation, MSC proliferation and large-scale expansion were studied. Results PL contained high levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), soluble CD40L (sCD40L), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), platelet-derived growth factor AA (PDGF-AA), platelet-derived growth factor AB/BB (PDGF-AB/BB), chemokine (C-C) ligand 5 (CCL5; RANTES) transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and chemokine (C-X-C) ligand 1/2/3 (GRO), with low batch-to-batch variability, and most were stable for up to 14 days. Inhibition of PDGF-BB and bFGF decreased MSC proliferation by about 20% and 50%, respectively. The strongest inhibition (about 75%) was observed with a combination of anti-bFGF + anti-PDGF-BB and anti-bFGF + anti-TGF-β1 + anti-PDGF-BB. Interestingly, various combinations of recombinant PDGF-BB, bFGF and TGF-β1 were not sufficient to promote cell proliferation. PL from whole blood-derived pooled platelet concentrates and apheresis platelet concentrates did not differ significantly in their growth-promoting activity on MSC. Conclusions PL enhances MSC proliferation and can be regarded as a safe tool for MSC expansion for clinical purposes. \\in particular, PDGF-BB and bFGF are essential components for the growth-promoting effect of PL, but are not sufficient for MSC proliferation. PMID:22296115

  20. Global gene expression changes of in vitro stimulated human transformed germinal centre B cells as surrogate for oncogenic pathway activation in individual aggressive B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are a group of lymphomas derived from germinal centre B cells which display a heterogeneous pattern of oncogenic pathway activation. We postulate that specific immune response associated signalling, affecting gene transcription networks, may be associated with the activation of different oncogenic pathways in aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Methodology The B cell receptor (BCR), CD40, B-cell activating factor (BAFF)-receptors and Interleukin (IL) 21 receptor and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) were stimulated in human transformed germinal centre B cells by treatment with anti IgM F(ab)2-fragments, CD40L, BAFF, IL21 and LPS respectively. The changes in gene expression following the activation of Jak/STAT, NF-кB, MAPK, Ca2+ and PI3K signalling triggered by these stimuli was assessed using microarray analysis. The expression of top 100 genes which had a change in gene expression following stimulation was investigated in gene expression profiles of patients with Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Results αIgM stimulation led to the largest number of changes in gene expression, affecting overall 6596 genes. While CD40L stimulation changed the expression of 1194 genes and IL21 stimulation affected 902 genes, only 283 and 129 genes were modulated by lipopolysaccharide or BAFF receptor stimulation, respectively. Interestingly, genes associated with a Burkitt-like phenotype, such as MYC, BCL6 or LEF1, were affected by αIgM. Unique and shared gene expression was delineated. NHL-patients were sorted according to their similarity in the expression of TOP100 affected genes to stimulated transformed germinal centre B cells The αIgM gene module discriminated individual DLBCL in a similar manner to CD40L or IL21 gene modules. DLBCLs with low module activation often carry chromosomal MYC aberrations. DLBCLs with high module activation show strong expression of genes involved in cell-cell communication, immune responses

  1. Brucella β 1,2 Cyclic Glucan Is an Activator of Human and Mouse Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Anna; Pérez-Gutierrez, Camino; Banchereau, Romain; Dutartre, Hélène; Lecine, Patrick; Dullaers, Melissa; Mello, Marielle; Pinto Salcedo, Suzana; Muller, Alexandre; Leserman, Lee; Levy, Yves; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandy; Moreno, Edgardo; Moriyón, Ignacio; Klechevsky, Eynav; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, SangKon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glucans showed neither toxicity nor immunogenicity compared to LPS and triggered antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in vivo. These cyclic glucans also enhanced antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses including cross-presentation by different human DC subsets. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans increased the memory CD4+ T cell responses of blood mononuclear cells exposed to recombinant fusion proteins composed of anti-CD40 antibody and antigens from both hepatitis C virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus cyclic glucans represent a new class of adjuvants, which might contribute to the development of effective antimicrobial therapies. PMID:23166489

  2. Activated inflammatory T cells correlate with lesion size in human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Lis R V; Dutra, Walderez O; Almeida, Roque P; Bacellar, Olivia; Carvalho, Edgar M; Gollob, Kenneth J

    2005-11-15

    Leishmaniasis is an important parasitic disease affecting millions worldwide. In attempts to understand the clinical relevance of immunological measurements as determined using flow cytometry, several immunological phenotypes were determined for a group of well defined human leishmaniasis patients and correlated with clinical measurements of the disease (Montenegro skin test (MST) and lesion area). The analysis demonstrated a positive correlation between the MST size and the frequency of ex vivo recent activated CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, higher frequencies of recent activated CD8(+) T cells were correlated with a smaller MST size. Moreover, a positive correlation was observed between the lesion total area and the frequency of activated CD69(+) (ex vivo) and CD40L(+) (cultured with Leishmania soluble antigen (SLA)) T lymphocytes. Finally, larger lesions were also correlated with a higher frequency of SLA specific inflammatory cytokine (IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha) producing lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that immunological markers are correlated with clinical indicators of human leishmaniasis and serve to better understand the evolution of this important parasitic disease.

  3. Human See, Human Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to…

  4. Comparison of promoter activities for efficient expression into human B cells and haematopoietic progenitors with adenovirus Ad5/F35.

    PubMed

    Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Drouin, Mathieu; Sea, Serey-Phorn; Forest, Audrey; Côté, Serge; Simard, Carl; Boyer, Lucie; Jacques, Annie; Pineault, Nicolas; Jung, Daniel

    2007-04-30

    Adenoviral gene transfer into human B lymphocytes and haematopoietic progenitors would allow the characterization of their function on cellular growth, differentiation and survival. Efficient gene expression is however strongly dependent on the promoter used. In this study, we investigated the relative strength of various promoters by following and measuring the expression of the reporter gene EYFP in human peripheral B lymphocytes, cord blood CD34(+) cells and the megakaryocytic cell line M-07e. The murine PGK promoter provided the best level of transgene expression in CD34(+) cells among the four promoters tested, followed closely by the CMV promoter, and to a lesser extend by a CMV promoter with a beta-globin/IgG chimeric intron, whereas the human CD40 promoter provided the lowest levels of expression. In contrast, the strongest promoters in B lymphocytes were the two CMV promoters. Surprisingly, even the best promoters were unable to induce transgene expression in more than 75-80% of the primary B and CD34(+) cells, even though 100% of the cells were infected. Finally and in contrast to retroviruses, only a minority of B lymphocytes and CD34(+) cells were able to induce the transcription of IRES-containing bicistronic expression cassettes from adenovirus.

  5. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human CD27 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Loenen, W.A.M.; Gravestein, L.A.; Beumer, S.; Borst, J. ); Melief, C.J.M. ); Hagemeijer, A. )

    1992-12-15

    CD27 is a lymphocyte-specific member of a recently identified receptor family with at least 10 members that includes the receptors for nerve growth factor and TNF, CD40, and Fas. Several members of this family play a role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. Within the amino terminal ligand binding domain of these receptors, repeat motifs have been identified. These repeats contain many cysteine residues in a conserved pattern, characteristic of this family. The authors have isolated and characterized the human CD27 gene to gain insight into the evolution of this type of receptor domain. The gene was localized on chromosome 12, band 12p13. Sequence analysis showed no correlation between the intron/exon organization and the subdivision of the protein into distinct domains. Structural information for the cysteine-rich domain is contained within three exons. In addition, the splice sites in the CD27 gene are located in a different position from those in the related nerve growth factor receptor gene. However, a comparison of the splice sites within the regions encoding the respective ligand-binding domains of the CD27 and nerve growth factor receptor genes identifies the archetypal cysteine-rich building blocks, from which the members of this family may have arisen during the course of evolution. From this observation, they propose a new organization of the repeat motifs. 57 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Differential regulation of human T lymphoblast functions by IL-2 and IL-15.

    PubMed

    Bulfone-Paus, S; Dürkop, H; Paus, R; Krause, H; Pohl, T; Onu, A

    1997-07-01

    Interleukin 15 (IL-15) shares many functional properties with interleukin 2 (IL-2), although both cytokines probably also exert distinct functions. In order to screen for functional differences between IL-2 and IL-15 with respect to the control of T cell functions, we have stimulated human T lymphoblasts (hTBl) with IL-2 and/or IL-15 and have assessed the resulting changes in the following parameters: T cell proliferation; expression of various relevant surface markers; cytokine and receptor (alpha-chain) transcription; and IL-2 and IL-15 activity. Both cytokines equally upregulate standard activation markers such as CD25 and CD95 and downregulate CD27. However, IL-2 upregulates CD30, TNF receptor type II and CD40L expression significantly stronger than IL-15. IL-15 potentiates Con A-induced IL-2 secretion. Even though hTBl transcribe the IL-15 gene, they do not secrete IL-15 activity. These observations suggest that both cytokines can differentially regulate T cells, e.g. T cell functions relevant to the control of cell cycle progression and apoptosis, and/or that they can stimulate different T cell subsets. Moreover, IL-15 may potentiate IL-2-driven T cell responses.

  7. An ACT1 mutation selectively abolishes interleukin-17 responses in humans with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Bertrand; Wang, Chenhui; Pedergnana, Vincent; Wu, Ling; Cypowyj, Sophie; Rybojad, Michel; Belkadi, Aziz; Picard, Capucine; Abel, Laurent; Fieschi, Claire; Puel, Anne; Li, Xiaoxia; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-10-17

    Patients with inborn errors of interleukin-17F (IL-17F) or IL-17RA display chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). We report a biallelic missense mutation (T536I) in the adaptor molecule ACT1 in two siblings with CMC. The mutation, located in the SEFIR domain, abolished the homotypic interaction of ACT1 with IL-17 receptors, with no effect on homodimerization. The patients' fibroblasts failed to respond to IL-17A and IL-17F, and their T cells to IL-17E. By contrast, healthy individuals homozygous for the common variant D10N, located in the ACT1 tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-interacting domain and previously associated with psoriasis, had impaired, but not abolished, responses to IL-17 cytokines. SEFIR-independent interactions of ACT1 with other proteins, such as CD40, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and HSP90, were not affected by the T536I mutation. Overall, human IL-17A and IL-17F depend on ACT1 to mediate protective mucocutaneous immunity. Moreover, other ACT1-dependent IL-17 cytokines seem to be largely redundant in host defense. PMID:24120361

  8. Abnormal NF-kappa B function characterizes human type 1 diabetes dendritic cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mollah, Zia U A; Pai, Saparna; Moore, Craig; O'Sullivan, Brendan J; Harrison, Matthew J; Peng, Judy; Phillips, Karen; Prins, Johannes B; Cardinal, John; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2008-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) differentiation is abnormal in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, the nature of the relationship between this abnormality and disease pathogenesis is unknown. We studied the LPS response in monocytes and monocyte-derived DCs isolated from T1DM patients and from non-T1DM controls. In T1DM patients, late LPS-mediated nuclear DNA binding by RelA, p50, c-Rel, and RelB was impaired as compared with type 2 DM, rheumatoid arthritis, and healthy subjects, associated with impaired DC CD40 and MHC class I induction but normal cytokine production. In TIDM monocytes, RelA and RelB were constitutively activated, and the src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-1), a negative regulator of NF-kappaB, was overexpressed. Addition of sodium stibogluconate, a SHP-1 inhibitor, to DCs differentiating from monocyte precursors restored their capacity to respond to LPS in approximately 60% of patients. The monocyte and DC NF-kappaB response to LPS is thus a novel phenotypic and likely pathogenetic marker for human T1DM. SHP-1 is at least one NF-kappaB regulatory mechanism which might be induced as a result of abnormal inflammatory signaling responses in T1DM monocytes. PMID:18292540

  9. In-Vitro Differentiation of Mature Dendritic Cells From Human Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Dirk; Soruri, Afsaneh; Schwartz, Peter; Peters, J. Hinrich

    1998-01-01

    Representing the most potent antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DC) can now be generated from human blood monocytes. We recently presented a novel protocol employing GM-CSF, IL-4, and IFN-γ to differentiate monocyte-derived DC in vitro. Here, such cells are characterized in detail. Cells in culture exhibited both dendritic and veiled morphologies, the former being adherent and the latter suspended. Phenotypically, they were CD1a-/dim, CD11a+, CD11b++, CD11c+, CD14dim/-, CD16a-/dim, CD18+, CD32dim/-, CD33+, CD40+, CD45R0+, CD50+, CD54+, CD64-/dim, CD68+, CD71+, CD80dim, CD86+/++, MHC class I++/+++ HLA-DR++/+++ HLA-DP+, and HLA-DQ+. The DC stimulated a strong allogeneic T-cell response, and further evidence for their autologous antigen-specific stimulation is discussed. Although resembling a mature CD 11c+CD45R0+ blood DC subset identified earlier, their differentiation in the presence of the Thl and Th2 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-4 indicates that these DC may conform to mature mucosal DC. PMID:9716903

  10. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  11. Collagen Induces Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Signaling through Osteoclast-Associated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Heidi S.; Nitze, Louise M.; Zeuthen, Louise H.; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J.; Hamilton, John A.; Berchtold, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB–dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR–collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs. PMID:25725106

  12. Collagen induces maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by signaling through osteoclast-associated receptor.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Heidi S; Nitze, Louise M; Zeuthen, Louise H; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Hamilton, John A; Berchtold, Martin W; Panina, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB-dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR-collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs.

  13. B-cell signaling networks reveal a negative prognostic human lymphoma cell subset that emerges during tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Irish, Jonathan M.; Myklebust, June H.; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Houot, Roch; Sharman, Jeff P.; Czerwinski, Debra K.; Nolan, Garry P.; Levy, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Human tumors contain populations of both cancerous and host immune cells whose malignant signaling interactions may define each patient's disease trajectory. We used multiplexed phospho-flow cytometry to profile single cells within human follicular lymphoma tumors and discovered a subpopulation of lymphoma cells with impaired B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling. The abundance of BCR-insensitive cells in each tumor negatively correlated with overall patient survival. These lymphoma negative prognostic (LNP) cells increased as tumors relapsed following chemotherapy. Loss of antigen receptor expression did not explain the absence of BCR signaling in LNP tumor cells, and other signaling responses were intact in these cells. Furthermore, BCR signaling responses could be reactivated in LNP cells, indicating that BCR signaling is not missing but rather specifically suppressed. LNP cells were also associated with changes to signaling interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Lower IL-7 signaling in tumor infiltrating T cells was observed in tumors with high LNP cell counts. The strength of signaling through T cell mediator of B cell function CD40 also stratified patient survival, particularly for those whose tumors contained few LNP cells. Thus, analysis of cell–cell interactions in heterogeneous primary tumors using signaling network profiles can identify and mechanistically define new populations of rare and clinically significant cells. Both the existence of these LNP cells and their aberrant signaling profiles provide targets for new therapies for follicular lymphoma. PMID:20543139

  14. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a wholly new…

  15. Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of climate change Video not supported Human Health Climate change threatens human health and well-being ... Copy link to clipboard Key Message: Wide-ranging Health Impacts Climate change threatens human health and well- ...

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Characteristics of Human Anterior Cruciate Ligament Outgrowth Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Manuela; Prager, Patrick; Barthel, Thomas; Jakob, Franz; Nöth, Ulrich; Murray, Martha M.; Evans, Christopher H.; Porter, Ryan M.

    2011-01-01

    When ruptured, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the human knee has limited regenerative potential. However, the goal of this report was to show that the cells that migrate out of the human ACL constitute a rich population of progenitor cells and we hypothesize that they display mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characteristics when compared with adherent cells derived from bone marrow or collagenase digests from ACL. We show that ACL outgrowth cells are adherent, fibroblastic cells with a surface immunophenotype strongly positive for cluster of differentiation (CD)29, CD44, CD49c, CD73, CD90, CD97, CD105, CD146, and CD166, weakly positive for CD106 and CD14, but negative for CD11c, CD31, CD34, CD40, CD45, CD53, CD74, CD133, CD144, and CD163. Staining for STRO-1 was seen by immunohistochemistry but not flow cytometry. Under suitable culture conditions, the ACL outgrowth-derived MSCs differentiated into chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes and showed capacity to self-renew in an in vitro assay of ligamentogenesis. MSCs derived from collagenase digests of ACL tissue and human bone marrow were analyzed in parallel and displayed similar, but not identical, properties. In situ staining of the ACL suggests that the MSCs reside both aligned with the collagenous matrix of the ligament and adjacent to small blood vessels. We conclude that the cells that emigrate from damaged ACLs are MSCs and that they have the potential to provide the basis for a superior, biological repair of this ligament. PMID:21247268

  17. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  18. LLT1 and CD161 Expression in Human Germinal Centers Promotes B Cell Activation and CXCR4 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Llibre, Alba; López-Macías, Constantino; Marafioti, Teresa; Mehta, Hema; Partridge, Amy; Kanzig, Carina; Rivellese, Felice; Galson, Jacob D.; Walker, Lucy J.; Milne, Paul; Phillips, Rodney E.; Kelly, Dominic F.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are microanatomical structures critical for the development of high-affinity Abs and B cell memory. They are organized into two zones, light and dark, with coordinated roles, controlled by local signaling. The innate lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1) is known to be expressed on B cells, but its functional role in the GC reaction has not been explored. In this study, we report high expression of LLT1 on GC-associated B cells, early plasmablasts, and GC-derived lymphomas. LLT1 expression was readily induced via BCR, CD40, and CpG stimulation on B cells. Unexpectedly, we found high expression of the LLT1 ligand, CD161, on follicular dendritic cells. Triggering of LLT1 supported B cell activation, CD83 upregulation, and CXCR4 downregulation. Overall, these data suggest that LLT1–CD161 interactions play a novel and important role in B cell maturation within the GC in humans. PMID:26829983

  19. Double-Negative αβ T Cells Are Early Responders to AKI and Are Found in Human Kidney.

    PubMed

    Martina, Maria N; Noel, Sanjeev; Saxena, Ankit; Bandapalle, Samatha; Majithia, Richa; Jie, Chunfa; Arend, Lois J; Allaf, Mohamad E; Rabb, Hamid; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A

    2016-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of AKI, and previous studies established important roles for conventional CD4(+) T cells, natural killer T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in AKI pathogenesis. We recently identified CD4(-)CD8(-) (double-negative; DN) T cells as an important subset of αβ T cell receptor-positive cells residing in mouse kidney. However, little is known about the pathophysiologic functions of kidney DN T cells. In this study, we phenotypically and functionally characterized murine kidney DN T cells in the steady state and in response to IRI. Unlike CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, DN T cells in the steady state expressed high levels of CD69, CD28, and CD40L; differentially expressed IL-27 and IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokines; spontaneously proliferated at a very high rate; and suppressed in vitro proliferation of activated CD4(+) T cells. Within the first 3-24 hours after IRI, kidney DN T cells expanded significantly and upregulated expression of IL-10. In adoptive transfer experiments, DN T cells significantly protected recipients from AKI by an IL-10-dependent mechanism. DN T cells also made up a large fraction of the T cell compartment in human kidneys. Our results indicate that DN T cells are an important subset of the resident αβ(+) T cell population in the mammalian kidney and are early responders to AKI that have anti-inflammatory properties.

  20. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  1. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs.

  2. IL-21 and BAFF/BLyS synergize in stimulating plasma cell differentiation from a unique population of human splenic memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Rachel; Sims, Gary P; Robbins, Rachel; Withers, David; Fischer, Randy T; Grammer, Amrie C; Kuchen, Stefan; Lipsky, Peter E

    2007-03-01

    Both constitutive Ig secretion by long-lived plasma cells (PC) and the recurrent differentiation of memory (mem) B cells into PC contribute to the maintenance of serologic mem. However, the relative contribution of each is unknown. In this study, we describe a novel population of human postswitched mem B cells that rapidly differentiate into PC and thus contribute to serologic mem. These IgG(+) B cells reside in the region of human spleen analogous to the murine marginal zone and have not previously been examined. These cells are highly responsive to IL-21 in the context of CD40 stimulation. Uniquely, IgG(+) marginal zone analog B cells are exquisitely sensitive to the combination of IL-21 and B cell-activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF/BLyS) that synergize in the absence of further costimulation to induce up-regulation of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 and drive PC differentiation. Other cytokine combinations are not active in this regard. This is the first demonstration that this unique population of mem B cells can respond specifically and exclusively to IL-21 and BAFF/BLyS by differentiating into IgG-secreting PC, and thus contributing to serologic mem in an Ag-independent manner.

  3. Human Trafficking

    MedlinePlus

    ... TRAFFICKING (English) Listen < Back to Search FACT SHEET: HUMAN TRAFFICKING (English) Published: August 2, 2012 Topics: Public Awareness , ... organizations that protect and serve trafficking victims. National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1.888.373.7888 Last ...

  4. Human tolerogenic dendritic cells produce IL-35 in the absence of other IL-12 family members.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Karen O; van der Kooij, Sandra W; Vignali, Dario A A; van Kooten, Cees

    2015-06-01

    IL-35 is a cytokine of the IL-12 family, existing as a heterodimer of IL-12p35 and Ebi3. IL-35 has anti-inflammatory properties and is produced by regulatory T cells in humans and mice, where it is required for optimal suppression of immune responses. Distinct from other IL-12 cytokines, the expression of IL-35 has not been described in antigen-presenting cells. In view of the immune-regulatory properties of IL-35, we investigated the expression, regulation, and function of IL-12p35 and Ebi3 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs). These tolDCs do not produce IL-12p70 or the homodimer IL-12p40. We demonstrate that tolDCs completely lack transcriptional expression of IL-12p40. However, tolDCs maintain mRNA expression of IL-12p35 and Ebi3. Using intracellular flow cytometry and Western blot analysis, we show that tolDCs produce Ebi3 and IL-12p35, and both can be enhanced upon stimulation with IFN-γ, LPS, or CD40L. tolDCs supernatants have the capacity to suppress T-cell activation. Using IL12A silencing, we demonstrate that IL-12p35 is required for tolDCs to reach their full suppressive potential. Taken together, our results indicate that tolDCs produce IL-35, providing an additional novel mechanism by which tolDCs elicit their tolerogenic potential.

  5. Interleukin-17A-Induced Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Superior Modulators of Immunological Function.

    PubMed

    Sivanathan, Kisha Nandini; Rojas-Canales, Darling M; Hope, Christopher M; Krishnan, Ravi; Carroll, Robert P; Gronthos, Stan; Grey, Shane T; Coates, Patrick T

    2015-09-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-preactivated mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-γ) are highly immunosuppressive but immunogenic in vivo due to their inherent expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules. Here, we present an improved approach where we modified human bone marrow-derived MSC with interleukin-17A (MSC-17) to enhance T cell immunosuppression but not their immunogenicity. MSC-17, unlike MSC-γ, showed no induction or upregulation of MHC class I, MHC class II, and T cell costimulatory molecule CD40, but maintained normal MSC morphology and phenotypic marker expression. When cocultured with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated human T cells, MSCs-17 were potent suppressors of T cell proliferation. Furthermore, MSC-17 inhibited surface CD25 expression and suppressed the elaboration of Th1 cytokines, IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and IL-2 when compared with untreated MSCs (UT-MSCs). T cell suppression by MSC-17 correlated with increased IL-6 but not with indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1, cyclooxygenase 1, and transforming growth factor β-1. MSC-17 but not MSC-γ consistently induced CD4(+) CD25(high) CD127(low) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (iTregs) from PHA-activated CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells. MSC-induced iTregs expressed CD39, CD73, CD69, OX40, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR). These suppressive MSCs-17 can engender Tregs to potently suppress T cell activation with minimal immunogenicity and thus represent a superior T cell immunomodulator for clinical application. PMID:26037953

  6. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  7. Teaching humanism.

    PubMed

    Stern, David T; Cohen, Jordan J; Bruder, Ann; Packer, Barbara; Sole, Allison

    2008-01-01

    As the "passion that animates authentic professionalism," humanism must be infused into medical education and clinical care as a central feature of medicine's professionalism movement. In this article, we discuss a current definition of humanism in medicine. We will also provide detailed descriptions of educational programs intended to promote humanism at a number of medical schools in the United States (and beyond) and identify the key factors that make these programs effective. Common elements of programs that effectively teach humanism include: (1) opportunities for students to gain perspective in the lives of patients; (2) structured time for reflection on those experiences; and (3) focused mentoring to ensure that these events convert to positive, formative learning experiences. By describing educational experiences that both promote and sustain humanism in doctors, we hope to stimulate the thinking of other medical educators and to disseminate the impact of these innovative educational programs to help the profession meet its obligation to provide the public with humanistic physicians.

  8. N-3-(oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone promotes the induction of regulatory T-cells by preventing human dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youqiang; Zhou, Huayou; Zhang, Yunyan; Huang, Bin; Qu, Pinghua; Zeng, Jianming; E, Shunmei; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    N-3-(Oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (C12) is a small bacterial signaling molecule secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), which activates mammalian cells through TLR4-independent mechanisms. C12 acts as an immunosuppressant and it has been shown to modulate murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cell-mediated T-helper 2 (Th2) cell polarizations in vitro. In the present study, we initially examined the impact of C12 on the maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-DCs) and the induction of regulatory T-cells (iTregs) in culture. Our findings demonstrate that C12-treated Mo-DCs failed to undergo lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced maturation. At the molecular level, C12 blocked the upregulation of surface molecules, including CD11c, HLA-DR, CD40, and CD80, and it switched to an interleukin (IL)-10high, IL-12p70low phenotype. Moreover, C12 selectively inhibited the capacity of Mo-DCs to stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic CD4+ T-cells. Otherwise, the C12-treated Mo-DCs promoted the generation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+-induced regulatory T-cells (iTregs) and enhanced their IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β production associated with reduced interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-12p70 production. These findings provide new insights towards understanding the persistence of chronic inflammation in PA infection. PMID:25749498

  9. A soluble form of the human T cell differentiation antigen CD27 is released after triggering of the TCR/CD3 complex.

    PubMed

    Hintzen, R Q; de Jong, R; Hack, C E; Chamuleau, M; de Vries, E F; ten Berge, I J; Borst, J; van Lier, R A

    1991-07-01

    The human T cell Ag CD27 belongs to a recently defined family of cell surface receptors, including the nerve growth factor receptor, two distinct tumor necrosis factor receptors, and the B cell specific molecule CD40. On resting T cells, CD27 is a transmembrane homodimer with subunits of 50 to 55 kDa (p55). T cell activation via the TCR/CD3 complex causes a strong enhancement of p55 expression. Concomitantly, an alternative form of the CD27 molecule with a molecular mass of 28 to 32 kDa (p32) appears at the cell surface. With the use of ELISA, we here show that a soluble form of CD27 (sCD27) can be detected in the supernatant of T cells activated with anti-CD3 or combinations of anti-CD2 mAb. Moreover, sCD27 is found in both serum and urine from healthy donors. sCD27, purified from either culture supernatant or urine, has a molecular mass of 28 to 32 kDa and is, according to peptide mapping, structurally homologous to the p55 membrane form of CD27. Quantification of sCD27 levels may be used as a marker for T lymphocyte activation in vivo.

  10. Expression of sprouty2 inhibits B-cell proliferation and is epigenetically silenced in mouse and human B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Matthew J.; Dawson, David W.; Bensinger, Steven J.; Hong, Jason S.; Knosp, Wendy M.; Xu, Lizhong; Balatoni, Cynthia E.; Allen, Eric L.; Shen, Rhine R.; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Martin, Gail R.

    2009-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma is the most common immune system malignancy. TCL1 transgenic mice (TCL1-tg), in which TCL1 is ectopically expressed in mature lymphocytes, develop multiple B- and T-cell leukemia and lymphoma subtypes, supporting an oncogenic role for TCL1 that probably involves AKT and MAPK-ERK signaling pathway augmentation. Additional, largely unknown genetic and epigenetic alterations cooperate with TCL1 during lymphoma progression. We examined DNA methylation patterns in TCL1-tg B-cell tumors to discover tumor-associated epigenetic changes, and identified hypermethylation of sprouty2 (Spry2). Sprouty proteins are context-dependent negative or positive regulators of MAPK-ERK pathway signaling, but their role(s) in B-cell physiology or pathology are unknown. Here we show that repression of Spry2 expression in TCL1-tg mouse and human B-cell lymphomas and cell lines is associated with dense DNA hypermethylation and was reversed by inhibition of DNA methylation. Spry2 expression was induced in normal splenic B cells by CD40/B-cell receptor costimulation and regulated a negative feedback loop that repressed MAPK-ERK signaling and decreased B-cell viability. Conversely, loss of Spry2 function hyperactivated MAPK-ERK signaling and caused increased B-cell proliferation. Combined, these results implicate epigenetic silencing of Spry2 expression in B lymphoma progression and suggest it as a companion lesion to ectopic TCL1 expression in enhancing MAPK-ERK pathway signaling. PMID:19147787

  11. Invariant NKT cells reduce the immunosuppressive activity of influenza A virus–induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    De Santo, Carmela; Salio, Mariolina; Masri, S. Hajar; Lee, Laurel Yong-Hwa; Dong, Tao; Speak, Anneliese O.; Porubsky, Stefan; Booth, Sarah; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Platt, Frances M.; Zambon, Maria; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Infection with influenza A virus (IAV) presents a substantial threat to public health worldwide, with young, elderly, and immunodeficient individuals being particularly susceptible. Inflammatory responses play an important role in the fatal outcome of IAV infection, but the mechanism remains unclear. We demonstrate here that the absence of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in mice during IAV infection resulted in the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which suppressed IAV-specific immune responses through the expression of both arginase and NOS, resulting in high IAV titer and increased mortality. Adoptive transfer of iNKT cells abolished the suppressive activity of MDSCs, restored IAV-specific immune responses, reduced IAV titer, and increased survival rate. The crosstalk between iNKT and MDSCs was CD1d- and CD40-dependent. Furthermore, IAV infection and exposure to TLR agonists relieved the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Finally, we extended these results to humans by demonstrating the presence of myeloid cells with suppressive activity in the PBLs of individuals infected with IAV and showed that their suppressive activity is substantially reduced by iNKT cell activation. These findings identify what we believe to be a novel immunomodulatory role of iNKT cells, which we suggest could be harnessed to abolish the immunosuppressive activity of MDSCs during IAV infection. PMID:19033672

  12. Nonspreading Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection of Human Dendritic Cells Results in Downregulation of CD83 and Full Maturation of Bystander Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oreshkova, Nadia; Wichgers Schreur, Paul J.; Spel, Lotte; Vloet, Rianka P. M.; Moormann, Rob J. M.; Boes, Marianne; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines based on nonspreading Rift Valley fever virus (NSR) induce strong humoral and robust cellular immune responses with pronounced Th1 polarisation. The present work was aimed to gain insight into the molecular basis of NSR-mediated immunity. Recent studies have demonstrated that wild-type Rift Valley fever virus efficiently targets and replicates in dendritic cells (DCs). We found that NSR infection of cultured human DCs results in maturation of DCs, characterized by surface upregulation of CD40, CD80, CD86, MHC-I and MHC-II and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-β, IL-6 and TNF. Interestingly, expression of the most prominent marker of DC maturation, CD83, was consistently downregulated at 24 hours post infection. Remarkably, NSR infection also completely abrogated CD83 upregulation by LPS. Downregulation of CD83 was not associated with reduced mRNA levels or impaired CD83 mRNA transport from the nucleus and could not be prevented by inhibition of the proteasome or endocytic degradation pathways, suggesting that suppression occurs at the translational level. In contrast to infected cells, bystander DCs displayed full maturation as evidenced by upregulation of CD83. Our results indicate that bystander DCs play an important role in NSR-mediated immunity. PMID:26575844

  13. Quiescent Innate Response to Infective Filariae by Human Langerhans Cells Suggests a Strategy of Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alexis; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Wang, Yuanyuan; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Law, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infection is initiated by mosquito-derived third-stage larvae (L3) deposited on the skin that transit through the epidermis, which contains Langerhans cells (LC) and keratinocytes (KC), among other cells. This earliest interaction between L3 and the LC likely conditions the priming of the immune system to the parasite. To determine the nature of this interaction, human LC (langerin+ E-cadherin+ CD1a+) were generated in vitro and exposed to live L3. LC exposed to live L3 for 48 h showed no alterations in the cell surface markers CD14, CD86, CD83, CD207, E-cadherin, CD80, CD40, and HLA-DR or in mRNA expression of inflammation-associated genes, such as those for interleukin 18 (IL-18), IL-18BP, and caspase 1. In contrast to L3, live tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite, induced production of CXCL9, IP-10, and IL-6 in LC. Furthermore, preexposure of LC to L3 did not alter Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)- or TLR4-mediated expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-6, or IL-10. Interestingly, cocultures of KC and LC produced significantly more IL-18, IL-1α, and IL-8 than did cultures of LC alone, although exposure of the cocultures to live L3 did not result in altered cytokine production. Microarray examination of ex vivo LC from skin blisters that were exposed to live L3 also showed few significant changes in gene expression compared with unexposed blisters, further underscoring the relatively muted response of LC to L3. Our data suggest that failure by LC to initiate an inflammatory response to the invasive stage of filarial parasites may be a strategy for immune evasion by the filarial parasite. PMID:23429540

  14. Age-associated modifications of intestinal permeability and innate immunity in human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Man, Angela L; Bertelli, Eugenio; Rentini, Silvia; Regoli, Mari; Briars, Graham; Marini, Mario; Watson, Alastair J M; Nicoletti, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    The physical and immunological properties of the human intestinal epithelial barrier in aging are largely unknown. Ileal biopsies from young (7-12 years), adult (20-40 years) and aging (67-77 years) individuals not showing symptoms of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies were used to assess levels of inflammatory cytokines, barrier integrity and cytokine production in response to microbial challenges. Increased expression of interleukin (IL)-6, but not interferon (IFN)γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β was observed during aging; further analysis showed that cluster of differentiation (CD)11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs) are one of the major sources of IL-6 in the aging gut and expressed higher levels of CD40. Up-regulated production of IL-6 was accompanied by increased expression of claudin-2 leading to reduced transepithelial electric resistance (TEER); TEER could be restored in in vitro and ex vivo cultures by neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibody. In contrast, expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin and junctional-adhesion molecule-A1 did not vary with age and overall permeability to macromolecules was not affected. Finally, cytokine production in response to different microbial stimuli was assessed in a polarized in vitro organ culture (IVOC). IL-8 production in response to flagellin declined progressively with age although the expression and distribution of toll-like receptor (TLR)-5 on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) remained unchanged. Also, flagellin-induced production of IL-6 was less pronounced in aging individuals. In contrast, TNF-α production in response to probiotics (VSL#3) did not decline with age; however, in our experimental model probiotics did not down-regulate the production of IL-6 and expression of claudin-2. These data suggested that aging affects properties of the intestinal barrier likely to impact on age-associated disturbances, both locally and systemically. PMID:25948052

  15. Accelerated in vitro differentiation of blood monocytes into dendritic cells in human sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Faivre, V; Lukaszewicz, A-C; Alves, A; Charron, D; Payen, D; Haziot, A

    2007-01-01

    Sepsis-induced immune depression is characterized by infection susceptibility and monocyte early deactivation. Because monocytes are precursors for dendritic cells (DC), alterations in their differentiation into DC may contribute to defective immune responses in septic patients. We therefore investigated the ability of monocytes to differentiate into functional DC in vitro in patients undergoing surgery for peritonitis. Monocytes from 20 patients collected immediately after surgery (D0), at week 1 and at weeks 3–4 and from 11 control donors were differentiated into immature DC. We determined the phenotype of monocytes and derived DC, and analysed the ability of DC to respond to microbial products and to elicit T cell responses in a mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR). We show that, although monocytes from septic patients were deactivated with decreased responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan and low human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR) expression, they expressed the co-stimulatory molecule CD80, CD40 and CCR7. Monocytes collected from patients at D0 and week 1 differentiated faster into DC with early loss of CD14 expression. Expression of HLA-DR increased dramatically in culture to reach control levels, as did responses of DC to LPS and peptidoglycan. However, although patient and control immature DC had similar abilities to induce T cell proliferation in MLR, maturation of DC derived from patients did not increase T cell responses. These results show that circulating monocytes from septic patients express markers of activation and/or differentiation despite functional deactivation, and differentiate rapidly into phenotypically normal DC. These DC fail, however, to increase their T cell activation abilities upon maturation. PMID:17302891

  16. Butyrate affects differentiation, maturation and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Millard, A L; Mertes, P M; Ittelet, D; Villard, F; Jeannesson, P; Bernard, J

    2002-01-01

    We studied the in vitro effects of butyric acid on differentiation, maturation and function of dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (MΦ) generated from human monocytes. A non-toxic dose of butyrate was shown to alter the phenotypic differentiation process of DC as assessed by a persistence of CD14, and a decreased CD54, CD86 and HLA class II expression. The more immature differentiation stage of treated cells was confirmed further by their increased phagocytic capability, their altered capacity to produce IL-10 and IL-12, and their weak allostimulatory abilities. Butyrate also altered DC terminal maturation, regardless of the maturation inducer, as demonstrated by a strong down-regulation of CD83, a decreased expression of CD40, CD86 and HLA class II. Similarly, butyrate altered MΦ differentiation, down-regulating the expression of the restricted membrane antigens and reducing the phagocytic capacity of treated cells. To investigate further the mechanism by which butyrate hampers the monocyte dual differentiation pathway, we studied the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 alone or in combination with butyrate on the phenotypic features of DC. Unlike 1,25(OH)2D3, butyrate inhibited DC differentiation without redirecting it towards MΦ. Combined treatment gave rise to a new cell subset (CD14high, CD86 and HLA-DRlow) phenotypically distinct from monocytes. These results reveal an alternative mechanism of inhibition of DC and MΦ differentiation. Altogether, our data demonstrate a novel immune suppression property of butyrate that may modulate both inflammatory and immune responses and support further the interest for butyrate and its derivatives as new immunotherapeutic agents. PMID:12390312

  17. A circulating antibody panel for pretransplant prediction of FSGS recurrence after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Delville, Marianne; Sigdel, Tara K.; Wei, Changli; Li, Jing; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Fornoni, Alessia; Burke, George W.; Bruneval, Patrick; Naesens, Maarten; Jackson, Annette; Alachkar, Nada; Canaud, Guillaume; Legendre, Christophe; Anglicheau, Dany; Reiser, Jochen; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (rFSGS) after kidney transplantation is a cause of accelerated graft loss. To evaluate pathogenic antibodies (Abs) in rFSGS, we processed 141 serum samples from 64 patients with and without primary rFSGS and 34 non-FSGS control patients transplanted at four hospitals. We screened about 9000 antigens in pretransplant sera and selected 10 Abs targeting glomerular antigens for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) validation. A panel of seven Abs (CD40, PTPRO, CGB5, FAS, P2RY11, SNRPB2, and APOL2) could predict posttransplant FSGS recurrence with 92% accuracy. Pretransplant elevation of anti-CD40 Ab alone had the best correlation (78% accuracy) with rFSGS risk after transplantation. Epitope mapping of CD40 with customized peptide arrays and rFSGS sera demonstrated altered immunogenicity of the extracellular CD40 domain in rFSGS. Immunohistochemistry of CD40 demonstrated a differential expression in FSGS compared to non-FSGS controls. Anti-CD40 Abs purified from rFSGS patients were particularly pathogenic in human podocyte cultures. Injection of anti-CD40/rFSGS Ab enhanced suPAR (soluble urokinase receptor)–mediated proteinuria in wild-type mice, yet no sensitizing effect was noted in mice deficient in CD40 or in wild-type mice that received blocking Ab to CD40. In conclusion, a panel of seven Abs can help identify primary FSGS patients at high risk of recurrence before transplantation. Intrarenal CD40 (and possibly other specific glomerular antigens) is an important contributor to FSGS disease pathogenesis. Human trials of anti-CD40 therapies are warranted to evaluate their efficacy for preventing rFSGS and improving graft survival. PMID:25273097

  18. Human Issues in Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the report of the National Academy of Sciences' Committee in Human Rights which seeks to ease the plight of individual scientists, engineers, and medical personnel suffering severe repression. Case studies of instances of negligence of human rights are provided. (CP)

  19. Human rights

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J Enoch

    1977-01-01

    What are human rights? In this article Enoch Powell, MP (a former Conservative Minister of Health), approaches this question through a critical discussion of Article 25 (I) of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Professor R S Downie in his accompanying commentary analyses Mr Powell's statements and takes up in particular Mr Powell's argument that claiming rights for one person entails compulsion on another person. In Professor Downie's view there is nothing in Article 25 (I) that cannot embody acceptable moral rights, the commonly accepted interpretation of that Article of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights which many people think is wholly acceptable. PMID:604483

  20. 3,3′-Diindolylmethane Induces G1 Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Acute T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Lyndsey E.; Hagman, Amanda M.; Williams, David E.; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Benninghoff, Abby D.

    2012-01-01

    Certain bioactive food components, including indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) from cruciferous vegetables, have been shown to target cellular pathways regulating carcinogenesis. Previously, our laboratory showed that dietary I3C is an effective transplacental chemopreventive agent in a dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC)-dependent model of murine T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. The primary objective of the present study was to extend our chemoprevention studies in mice to an analogous human neoplasm in cell culture. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that I3C or DIM may be chemotherapeutic in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Treatment of the T-ALL cell lines CCRF-CEM, CCRF-HSB2, SUP-T1 and Jurkat with DIM in vitro significantly reduced cell proliferation and viability at concentrations 8- to 25-fold lower than the parent compound I3C. DIM (7.5 µM) arrested CEM and HSB2 cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle and 15 µM DIM significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells in all T-ALL lines. In CEM cells, DIM reduced protein expression of cyclin dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4, CDK6) and D-type cyclin 3 (CCND3); DIM also significantly altered expression of eight transcripts related to human apoptosis (BCL2L10, CD40LG, HRK, TNF, TNFRSF1A, TNFRSF25, TNFSF8, TRAF4). Similar anticancer effects of DIM were observed in vivo. Dietary exposure to 100 ppm DIM significantly decreased the rate of growth of human CEM xenografts in immunodeficient SCID mice, reduced final tumor size by 44% and increased the apoptotic index compared to control-fed mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate a potential for therapeutic application of DIM in T-ALL. PMID:22514694

  1. STAT1-Dependent Signal Integration between IFNγ and TLR4 in Vascular Cells Reflect Pro-Atherogenic Responses in Human Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Stefan; Olejnik, Adam; Sikorski, Krzysztof; Pelisek, Jaroslav; Błaszczyk, Katarzyna; Aoqui, Cristiane; Nowicka, Hanna; Zernecke, Alma; Heemann, Uwe; Wesoly, Joanna; Baumann, Marcus; Bluyssen, Hans A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Signal integration between IFNγ and TLRs in immune cells has been associated with the host defense against pathogens and injury, with a predominant role of STAT1. We hypothesize that STAT1-dependent transcriptional changes in vascular cells involved in cross-talk between IFNγ and TLR4, reflect pro-atherogenic responses in human atherosclerosis. Genome-wide investigation identified a set of STAT1-dependent genes that were synergistically affected by interactions between IFNγ and TLR4 in VSMCs. These included the chemokines Cxcl9, Ccl12, Ccl8, Ccrl2, Cxcl10 and Ccl5, adhesion molecules Cd40, Cd74, and antiviral and antibacterial genes Rsad2, Mx1, Oasl1, Gbp5, Nos2, Batf2 and Tnfrsf11a. Among the amplified genes was also Irf8, of which Ccl5 was subsequently identified as a new pro-inflammatory target in VSMCs and ECs. Promoter analysis predicted transcriptional cooperation between STAT1, IRF1, IRF8 and NFκB, with the novel role of IRF8 providing an additional layer to the overall complexity. The synergistic interactions between IFNγ and TLR4 also resulted in increased T-cell migration and impaired aortic contractility in a STAT1-dependent manner. Expression of the chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 correlated with STAT1 phosphorylation in vascular cells in plaques from human carotid arteries. Moreover, using data mining of human plaque transcriptomes, expression of a selection of these STAT1-dependent pro-atherogenic genes was found to be increased in coronary artery disease (CAD) and carotid atherosclerosis. Our study provides evidence to suggest that in ECs and VSMCs STAT1 orchestrates a platform for cross-talk between IFNγ and TLR4, and identifies a STAT1-dependent gene signature that reflects a pro-atherogenic state in human atherosclerosis. PMID:25478796

  2. Inhibition of NF-kappa B during human dendritic cell differentiation generates anergy and regulatory T-cell activity for one but not two human leukocyte antigen DR mismatches.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ana; Burger, Melissa; Blomberg, Bonnie B; Ross, William A; Gaynor, Jeffrey J; Lindner, Inna; Cirocco, Robert; Mathew, James M; Carreno, Manuel; Jin, Yidi; Lee, Kelvin P; Esquenazi, Violet; Miller, Joshua

    2007-09-01

    We examined the in vitro inhibition of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) maturation via NF-kappaB blockade on T-cell allostimulation, cytokine production, and regulatory T-cell generation. DC were generated from CD14+ monocytes isolated from peripheral blood using GM-CSF and IL-4 for differentiation and TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and PGE2 as maturational stimuli with or without the NF-kappaB inhibitors, BAY 11-7082 (BAY-DC) or Aspirin (ASA-DC). Stimulator and responder cells were one versus two HLA-DR mismatched in direct versus indirect presentation assays. Both BAY-DC and ASA-DC expressed high levels of HLA-DR and CD86 but always expressed less CD40 compared with controls. Some experiments showed slightly lower levels of CD80. Both BAY- and ASA-allogeneic DC and autologous alloantigen pulsed DC were weaker stimulators of T cells (by MLR) compared with controls, and there was reduced IL-2 and IFN-gamma production by T cells stimulated with BAY-DC or ASA-DC (by ELISPOT) (more marked results were always observed with ASA-treated DC). In addition, NF-kappaB blockade of DC maturation caused the generation of T cells with regulatory function (T regs) but only when T cells were stimulated by either allogeneic (direct presentation) or alloantigen pulsed autologous DC (indirect presentation) with one HLA-DR mismatch and not with two HLA-DR mismatches (either direct or indirect presentation). However, the T regs generated from these ASA-DC showed similar FoxP3 mRNA expression to those from nontreated DC. Extension of this study to human organ transplantation suggests potential therapies using one DR-matched NF-kappaB blocked DC to help generate clinical tolerance.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 induces anergy in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by inducing interleukin-10 production.

    PubMed Central

    Schols, D; De Clercq, E

    1996-01-01

    The effects of recombinant gp120 on the proliferative responses and cytokine production by normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were investigated. gp120 inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (MAb)- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses. The production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 was diminished by gp120 in the anti-CD3- and concanavalin A-stimulated cultures. In unstimulated PBMC, gp120 induced the production of considerable amounts of IL-10, gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. The gp120-induced reduction in the proliferative responses of PBMC was at least partially reversed by the addition of IL-2, anti-CD28 MAb, or transfectants expressing CD80, CD86, or CD40 but not with exogenous IL-4. Also, a neutralizing anti-IL-10 MAb reversed the inhibitory effect of gp120 on the proliferative responses whereas exogenous IL-10 further enhanced this inhibitory effect. These findings indicate that IL-10 plays an important role in the inhibitory effect of gp120 on PBMC proliferation. The ratio of CD3+CD4+ to CD3+CD8+ T cells was the same in gp120-treated and untreated cell cultures. No apoptosis in these two T-cell populations was observed. However, the number of activated CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD3+CD8+ T cells, as judged by CD25, CD69, and HLA-DR expression, was consistently reduced. gp120 induced the expression of IL-10 in the monocyte/macrophage population, and therefore gp120 also reduced the proliferative responses of CD4+ T-cell-depleted PBMC. Taken together, our observations point to the importance of the cytokine pattern changes and, in particular, the role of IL-10 (produced by the monocytes) in the inhibitory effect of gp120. This mechanism of gp120-induced immunosuppression, if operative in vivo, could contribute to the depressed immune responses associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection and thus have important implications for immunotherapeutic strategies to slow down disease

  4. Modulation of dendritic cell maturation and function by the Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Pooja; Ahuja, Jaya; Khan, Zafar K.; Shimizu, Saori; Meucci, Olimpia; Jennings, Stephen R.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is characterized by the generation of an intense CTL cell response directed against the viral transactivator protein Tax. In addition, patients diagnosed with HAM/TSP exhibit rapid activation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC), likely contributing to the robust, Tax-specific CTL response. In this study, extracellular Tax has been shown to induce maturation and functional alterations in human monocyte-derived DC, critical observations being confirmed in freshly isolated myeloid DC. Tax was shown to promote the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines involved in the DC activation process in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, Tax induced the expression of DC activation (CD40, CD80, and CD86) and maturation (CD83) markers and enhanced the T cell proliferation capability of DC. Heat inactivation of Tax resulted in abrogation of these effects, indicating a requirement for the native structure of Tax, which was found to bind efficiently to the DC membrane and was internalized within a few hours, suggesting that extracellular Tax may possess an intracellular mechanism of action subsequent to entry. Finally, inhibitors of cellular signaling pathways, NF-κB, protein kinase, tyrosine kinase, and phospholipase C, were shown to inhibit Tax-mediated DC activation. This is the first study reporting the immunomodulatory effects of extracellular Tax in the DC compartment. These results suggest that DC, once exposed to Tax by uptake from the extracellular environment, can undergo activation, providing constant antigen presentation and costimulation to T cells, leading to the intense T cell proliferation and inflammatory responses underlying HAM/TSP. PMID:17442856

  5. Suppression of Human B Cell Activation by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Involves Altered Regulation of B Cell Lymphoma-6

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis-Moghe, Ashwini S.; Crawford, Robert B.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) produces marked suppression of the primary humoral immune response in virtually every animal species evaluated thus far. In addition, epidemiological studies performed in areas of dioxin contamination have identified an association between TCDD exposure and an increased incidence of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Recent studies using an in vitro CD40 ligand model of human B cell differentiation have shown that TCDD impairs both B cell activation and differentiation. The present study extends these findings by identifying B cell lymphoma-6 [BCL-6] as a putative cellular target for deregulation by TCDD, which may contribute to suppression of B cell function as well as NHL. BCL-6 is a multifunctional transcriptional repressor frequently mutated in NHLs and known to regulate critical events of B cell activation and differentiation. In the presence of TCDD, BCL-6 protein levels were elevated and concurrently the same population of cells with high BCL-6 levels showed decreased CD80 and CD69 expression indicative of impaired cellular activation. The elevated BCL-6 levels resulted in a concomitant increase in BCL-6 DNA binding activity at its cognate binding site within an enhancer region for CD80. Furthermore, a small molecule inhibitor of BCL-6 activity reversed TCDD-mediated suppression of CD80 expression in human B cells. In the presence of a low-affinity ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), suppression of B cell activation and altered BCL-6 regulation were not observed. These results provide new mechanistic insights into the role of BCL-6 in the suppression of human B cell activation by TCDD. PMID:25543051

  6. The Attenuated Brucella abortus Strain 19 Invades, Persists in, and Activates Human Dendritic Cells, and Induces the Secretion of IL-12p70 but Not IL-23

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Mario; Eisenblätter, Martin; Jasny, Edith; Fehlings, Michael; Finke, Antje; Gayum, Hermine; Rüschendorf, Ursula; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Moos, Verena; Allers, Kristina; Schneider, Thomas; Schaible, Ulrich E.; Schumann, Ralf R.; Mielke, Martin E.; Ignatius, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vectors have been proposed as novel vaccine strategies to induce strong cellular immunity. Attenuated strains of Brucella abortus comprise promising vector candidates since they have the potential to induce strong CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell mediated immune responses in the absence of excessive inflammation as observed with other Gram-negative bacteria. However, some Brucella strains interfere with the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs), which is essential for antigen-specific T-cell priming. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of human monocyte-derived DCs with the smooth attenuated B. abortus strain (S) 19, which has previously been employed successfully to vaccinate cattle. Methodology/Principal findings We first looked into the potential of S19 to hamper the cytokine-induced maturation of DCs; however, infected cells expressed CD25, CD40, CD80, and CD86 to a comparable extent as uninfected, cytokine-matured DCs. Furthermore, S19 activated DCs in the absence of exogeneous stimuli, enhanced the expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR, and was able to persist intracellularly without causing cytotoxicity. Thus, DCs provide a cellular niche for persisting brucellae in vivo as a permanent source of antigen. S19-infected DCs produced IL-12/23p40, IL-12p70, and IL-10, but not IL-23. While heat-killed bacteria also activated DCs, soluble mediators were not involved in S19-induced activation of human DCs. HEK 293 transfectants revealed cellular activation by S19 primarily through engagement of Toll-like receptor (TLR)2. Conclusions/Significance Thus, as an immunological prerequisite for vaccine efficacy, B. abortus S19 potently infects and potently activates (most likely via TLR2) human DCs to produce Th1-promoting cytokines. PMID:23805193

  7. [Human monkeypox].

    PubMed

    Chastel, C

    2009-03-01

    Unlike other recent viral emergences, which were in majority caused by RNA viruses, the monkeypox results from infection by a DNA virus, an orthopoxvirus closely related to both vaccine and smallpox viruses and whose two genomic variants are known. Unexpectedly isolated from captive Asiatic monkeys and first considered as an laboratory curiosity, this virus was recognised in 1970 as an human pathogen in tropical Africa. Here it was responsible for sporadic cases following intrusions (for hunting) into tropical rain forests or rare outbreak with human-to-human transmission as observed in 1996 in Democratic Republic of Congo. As monkeypox in humans is not distinguishable from smallpox (a disease globally eradicated in 1977) it was only subjected to vigilant epidemiological surveillance and not considered as a potential threat outside Africa. This point of view radically changed in 2003 when monkeypox was introduced in the USA by African wild rodents and spread to 11 different states of this country. Responsible for 82 infections in American children and adults, this outbreak led to realize the sanitary hazards resulting from international trade of exotic animals and scientific investigations increasing extensively our knowledge of this zoonosis. PMID:18394820

  8. Humanizing Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirillo, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the history and the mathematics used by Newton and Leibniz in their invention of calculus. The exploration of this topic is intended to show students that mathematics is a human invention. Suggestions are made to help teachers incorporate the mathematics and the history into their own lessons. (Contains 3…

  9. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  10. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  11. Human Rights in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  12. Flow cytometric assessment of the signaling status of human B lymphocytes from normal and autoimmune individuals.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Amrie C; Fischer, Randy; Lee, Olivia; Zhang, Xuan; Lipsky, Peter E

    2004-01-01

    Abnormalities in lymphocyte signaling cascades are thought to play an important role in the development of autoimmune disease. However, the large amount of cellular material needed for standard biochemical assessment of signaling status has made it difficult to evaluate putative abnormalities completely using primary lymphocytes. The development of technology to employ intracellular staining and flow cytometry to assess the signaling status of individual cells has now made it possible to delineate the perturbations that are present in lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune disease. As an example, human B cells from the Ramos B cell line and the periphery of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients or normal nonautoimmune controls were assessed for activation of the NF-kappaB and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades by intracellular multiparameter flow cytometric analysis and biochemical Western blotting. In combination with fluorochrome conjugated antibodies specific for surface proteins that define B cell subsets, antibodies that recognize activated, or phosphorylated inhibitors of kappaB (IkappaB) as well as the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or p38 MAPKs were used to stain fixed and permeabilized human B cells and analyze them flow cytometrically. Examination of the known signaling pathways following engagement of CD40 on human B cells confirmed that intracellular flow cytometry and Western blotting equivalently assay CD154-induced phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB proteins as well as phosphorylation of the MAPKs ERK, JNK and p38. In addition, B cells from the periphery of SLE patients had a more activated status immediately ex vivo as assessed by intracellular flow cytometric analysis of phosphorylated ERK, JNK and p38 when compared with B cells from the periphery of normal, nonautoimmune individuals. Together, these results indicate that multiparameter intracellular flow cytometric

  13. Flow cytometric assessment of the signaling status of human B lymphocytes from normal and autoimmune individuals

    PubMed Central

    Grammer, Amrie C; Fischer, Randy; Lee, Olivia; Zhang, Xuan; Lipsky, Peter E

    2004-01-01

    Abnormalities in lymphocyte signaling cascades are thought to play an important role in the development of autoimmune disease. However, the large amount of cellular material needed for standard biochemical assessment of signaling status has made it difficult to evaluate putative abnormalities completely using primary lymphocytes. The development of technology to employ intracellular staining and flow cytometry to assess the signaling status of individual cells has now made it possible to delineate the perturbations that are present in lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune disease. As an example, human B cells from the Ramos B cell line and the periphery of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients or normal nonautoimmune controls were assessed for activation of the NF-κB and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades by intracellular multiparameter flow cytometric analysis and biochemical Western blotting. In combination with fluorochrome conjugated antibodies specific for surface proteins that define B cell subsets, antibodies that recognize activated, or phosphorylated inhibitors of κB (IκB) as well as the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or p38 MAPKs were used to stain fixed and permeabilized human B cells and analyze them flow cytometrically. Examination of the known signaling pathways following engagement of CD40 on human B cells confirmed that intracellular flow cytometry and Western blotting equivalently assay CD154-induced phosphorylation and degradation of IκB proteins as well as phosphorylation of the MAPKs ERK, JNK and p38. In addition, B cells from the periphery of SLE patients had a more activated status immediately ex vivo as assessed by intracellular flow cytometric analysis of phosphorylated ERK, JNK and p38 when compared with B cells from the periphery of normal, nonautoimmune individuals. Together, these results indicate that multiparameter intracellular flow cytometric analysis of

  14. Human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This text provides full and balanced coverage of the concepts requisite for a thorough understanding of human genetics. Applications to both the individual and society are integrated throughout the lively and personal narrative, and the essential principles of heredity are clearly presented to prepare students for informed participation in public controversies. High-interest, controversial topics, including recombinant DNA technology, oncogenes, embryo transfer, environmental mutagens and carcinogens, IQ testing, and eugenics encourage understanding of important social issues.

  15. Human evolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, B

    1996-12-01

    The common ancestor of modern humans and the great apes is estimated to have lived between 5 and 8 Myrs ago, but the earliest evidence in the human, or hominid, fossil record is Ardipithecus ramidus, from a 4.5 Myr Ethiopian site. This genus was succeeded by Australopithecus, within which four species are presently recognised. All combine a relatively primitive postcranial skeleton, a dentition with expanded chewing teeth and a small brain. The most primitive species in our own genus, Homo habilis and Homo rudolfensis, are little advanced over the australopithecines and with hindsight their inclusion in Homo may not be appropriate. The first species to share a substantial number of features with later Homo is Homo ergaster, or 'early African Homo erectus', which appears in the fossil record around 2.0 Myr. Outside Africa, fossil hominids appear as Homo erectus-like hominids, in mainland Asia and in Indonesia close to 2 Myr ago; the earliest good evidence of 'archaic Homo' in Europe is dated at between 600-700 Kyr before the present. Anatomically modern human, or Homo sapiens, fossils are seen first in the fossil record in Africa around 150 Kyr ago. Taken together with molecular evidence on the extent of DNA variation, this suggests that the transition from 'archaic' to 'modern' Homo may have taken place in Africa. PMID:8976151

  16. Human evolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, B

    1996-12-01

    The common ancestor of modern humans and the great apes is estimated to have lived between 5 and 8 Myrs ago, but the earliest evidence in the human, or hominid, fossil record is Ardipithecus ramidus, from a 4.5 Myr Ethiopian site. This genus was succeeded by Australopithecus, within which four species are presently recognised. All combine a relatively primitive postcranial skeleton, a dentition with expanded chewing teeth and a small brain. The most primitive species in our own genus, Homo habilis and Homo rudolfensis, are little advanced over the australopithecines and with hindsight their inclusion in Homo may not be appropriate. The first species to share a substantial number of features with later Homo is Homo ergaster, or 'early African Homo erectus', which appears in the fossil record around 2.0 Myr. Outside Africa, fossil hominids appear as Homo erectus-like hominids, in mainland Asia and in Indonesia close to 2 Myr ago; the earliest good evidence of 'archaic Homo' in Europe is dated at between 600-700 Kyr before the present. Anatomically modern human, or Homo sapiens, fossils are seen first in the fossil record in Africa around 150 Kyr ago. Taken together with molecular evidence on the extent of DNA variation, this suggests that the transition from 'archaic' to 'modern' Homo may have taken place in Africa.

  17. A novel antibody discovery platform identifies anti-influenza A broadly neutralizing antibodies from human memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiaodong; Chen, Yan; Varkey, Reena; Kallewaard, Nicole; Koksal, Adem C; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Herren; Chowdhury, Partha S; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2016-07-01

    Monoclonal antibody isolation directly from circulating human B cells is a powerful tool to delineate humoral responses to pathological conditions and discover antibody therapeutics. We have developed a platform aimed at improving the efficiencies of B cell selection and V gene recovery. Here, memory B cells are activated and amplified using Epstein-Barr virus infection, co-cultured with CHO-muCD40L cells, and then assessed by functional screenings. An in vitro transcription and translation (IVTT) approach was used to analyze variable (V) genes recovered from each B cell sample and identify the relevant heavy/light chain pair(s). We achieved efficient amplification and activation of memory B cells, and eliminated the need to: 1) seed B cells at clonal level (≤1 cell/well) or perform limited dilution cloning; 2) immortalize B cells; or 3) assemble V genes into an IgG expression vector to confirm the relevant heavy/light chain pairing. Cross-reactive antibodies targeting a conserved epitope on influenza A hemagglutinin were successfully isolated from a healthy donor. In-depth analysis of the isolated antibodies suggested their potential uses as anti-influenza A antibody therapeutics and uncovered a distinct affinity maturation pathway. Importantly, our results showed that cognate heavy/light chain pairings contributed to both the expression level and binding abilities of our newly isolated VH1-69 family, influenza A neutralizing antibodies, contrasting with previous observations that light chains do not significantly contribute to the function of this group of antibodies. Our results further suggest the potential use of the IVTT as a powerful antibody developability assessment tool. PMID:27049174

  18. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor affects activation and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Ye, Z; Kijlstra, A; Zhou, Y; Yang, P

    2014-08-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is well known for mediating the toxic effects of dioxin-containing pollutants, but has also been shown to be involved in the natural regulation of the immune response. In this study, we investigated the effect of AhR activation by its endogenous ligands 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE) on the differentiation, maturation and function of monocyte-derived DCs in Behçet's disease (BD) patients. In this study, we showed that AhR activation by FICZ and ITE down-regulated the expression of co-stimulatory molecules including human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR), CD80 and CD86, while it had no effect on the expression of CD83 and CD40 on DCs derived from BD patients and normal controls. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated dendritic cells (DCs) from active BD patients showed a higher level of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-23 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α production. FICZ or ITE significantly inhibited the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23 and TNF-α, but induced IL-10 production by DCs derived from active BD patients and normal controls. FICZ or ITE-treated DCs significantly inhibited the T helper type 17 (Th17) and Th1 cell response. Activation of AhR either by FICZ or ITE inhibits DC differentiation, maturation and function. Further studies are needed to investigate whether manipulation of the AhR pathway may be used to treat BD or other autoimmune diseases.

  19. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  20. Human mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue and amnion influence T-cells depending on stimulation method and presence of other immune cells.

    PubMed

    Kronsteiner, Barbara; Wolbank, Susanne; Peterbauer, Anja; Hackl, Christa; Redl, Heinz; van Griensven, Martijn; Gabriel, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells exerting immunomodulatory effects on cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. It has been shown that an inflammatory milieu is required for the activation of MSC-mediated immunomodulation, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) plays an important role in this process. We determined the influence of IFN-γ on human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs). We further evaluated the effect of MSCs on stimulated T-cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a cell-contact independent setting. On IFN-γ treatment, ASCs and hAMSCs possessed significantly higher antiproliferative properties and showed surface characteristics of nonprofessional antigen presenting cells (HLA-DR(+)CD40(med+)CD54(high)) with a possible regulatory phenotype (PD-L1(+)PD-L2(+)). The effect of ASCs and hAMSCs on cytokine secretion and T-cell activation was dependent on stimulation method and cellular context. Although ASCs and hAMSCs highly inhibited cytokine secretion of stimulated PBMCs, this was not observed in the case of purified T-cells. The presence of ASCs even favored the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IFN-γ by T-cells, although T-cell proliferation was efficiently inhibited. Further, ASCs enhanced the number of CD69(+) T-cells independent of the stimuli and cellular context. Interestingly, ASCs significantly suppressed CD25 expression on phytohemagglutinin stimulated PBMCs but had no effect on αCD3/αCD28 stimulated cells. Depending on the stimulation method and cellular context, immune cells create a specific cytokine milieu in vitro, thus differently influencing MSCs and, in turn, affecting their action on immune cells.

  1. Induction of maturation and activation of human dendritic cells: A mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of Viscum album as complimentary therapy in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elluru, Sri Ramulu; van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; Delignat, Sandrine; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Friboulet, Alain; Kaveri, Srini V; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2008-01-01

    Background Viscum album (VA) preparations have been used as a complimentary therapy in cancer. In addition to their cytotoxic properties, they have also been shown to have immunostimulatory properties. In the present study, we examine the hypothesis that the VA preparations induce activation of human DC that facilitates effective tumor regression. Methods Four day old monocyte-derived immature DCs were treated with VA Qu Spez at 5, 10 and 15 μg/ml for 48 hrs. The expression of surface molecules was analyzed by flow cytometry. The ability of Qu Spez-educated DC to stimulate T cells was analyzed by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction and activation of Melan-A/MART-1-specific M77-80 CD8+T cells. Cytokines in cell free culture supernatant was analyzed by cytokine bead array assay. Results VA Qu Spez stimulated DCs presented with increased expression of antigen presenting molecule HLA-DR and of co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86. The VA Qu Spez also induced the secretion of inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Further, Qu Spez-educated DC stimulated CD4+T cells in a allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction and activated melanoma antigen Melan-A/MART-1-specific M77-80 CD8+T cells as evidenced by increased secretion of TNF-α and IFNγ. Conclusion The VA preparations stimulate the maturation and activation of human DCs, which may facilitate anti-tumoral immune responses. These results should assist in understanding the immunostimulatory properties of VA preparations and improving the therapeutic strategies. PMID:18533025

  2. Complement protein C1q bound to apoptotic cells suppresses human macrophage and dendritic cell-mediated Th17 and Th1 T cell subset proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Elizabeth V.; Weist, Brian M.; Walsh, Craig M.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2015-01-01

    A complete genetic deficiency of the complement protein C1q results in SLE with nearly 100% penetrance in humans, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for this association have not yet been fully determined. C1q opsonizes ACs for enhanced ingestion by phagocytes, such as Mϕ and iDCs, avoiding the extracellular release of inflammatory DAMPs upon loss of the membrane integrity of the dying cell. We previously showed that human monocyte-derived Mϕ and DCs ingesting autologous, C1q-bound LALs (C1q-polarized Mϕ and C1q-polarized DCs), enhance the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and reduce proinflammatory cytokines relative to Mϕ or DC ingesting LAL alone. Here, we show that C1q-polarized Mϕ have elevated PD-L1 and PD-L2 and suppressed surface CD40, and C1q-polarized DCs have higher surface PD-L2 and less CD86 relative to Mϕ or DC ingesting LAL alone, respectively. In an MLR, C1q-polarized Mϕ reduced allogeneic and autologous Th17 and Th1 subset proliferation and demonstrated a trend toward increased Treg proliferation relative to Mϕ ingesting LAL alone. Moreover, relative to DC ingesting AC in the absence of C1q, C1q-polarized DCs decreased autologous Th17 and Th1 proliferation. These data demonstrate that a functional consequence of C1q-polarized Mϕ and DC is the regulation of Teff activation, thereby “sculpting” the adaptive immune system to avoid autoimmunity, while clearing dying cells. It is noteworthy that these studies identify novel target pathways for therapeutic intervention in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:25381385

  3. Human Heredity: Genetic Mechanisms in Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are some of the uncertainties in human genetic mechanisms that are often presented as dogma in Biology textbooks. Presented is a brief historical background and illustrations involving chromosome abnormality in humans and linkage studies in humans. (CW)

  4. Human Astroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pintó, Rosa M.; Guix, Susana

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human astroviruses (HAtVs) are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses that were discovered in 1975. Astroviruses infecting other species, particularly mammalian and avian, were identified and classified into the genera Mamastrovirus and Avastrovirus. Through next-generation sequencing, many new astroviruses infecting different species, including humans, have been described, and the Astroviridae family shows a high diversity and zoonotic potential. Three divergent groups of HAstVs are recognized: the classic (MAstV 1), HAstV-MLB (MAstV 6), and HAstV-VA/HMO (MAstV 8 and MAstV 9) groups. Classic HAstVs contain 8 serotypes and account for 2 to 9% of all acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Infections are usually self-limiting but can also spread systemically and cause severe infections in immunocompromised patients. The other groups have also been identified in children with gastroenteritis, but extraintestinal pathologies have been suggested for them as well. Classic HAstVs may be grown in cells, allowing the study of their cell cycle, which is similar to that of caliciviruses. The continuous emergence of new astroviruses with a potential zoonotic transmission highlights the need to gain insights on their biology in order to prevent future health threats. This review focuses on the basic virology, pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, diagnostic assays, and prevention strategies for HAstVs. PMID:25278582

  5. Human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, Daniel G; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Secor, W Evan; King, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis—or bilharzia—is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. By conservative estimates, at least 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily, which must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce a distinct immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes local and systemic pathological effects ranging from anaemia, growth stunting, impaired cognition, and decreased physical fitness, to organ-specific effects such as severe hepatosplenism, periportal fibrosis with portal hypertension, and urogenital inflammation and scarring. At present, preventive public health measures in endemic regions consist of treatment once every 1 or 2 years with the isoquinolinone drug, praziquantel, to suppress morbidity. In some locations, elimination of transmission is now the goal; however, more sensitive diagnostics are needed in both the field and clinics, and integrated environmental and health-care management will be needed to ensure elimination. PMID:24698483

  6. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  7. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  8. Inhibitory effects of Cyperus digitatus extract on human platelet function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Forero-Doria, Oscar; Alarcón, Marcelo; Palomo, Iván

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the mechanisms of antiplatelet action of Cyperus digitatus. The antiplatelet action of C. digitatus was studied on platelet function: secretion, adhesion, aggregation, and sCD40L release. The platelet ATP secretion and aggregation were significantly inhibited by CDA (ethyl acetate extract) at 0.1 mg/ml and after the incubation of whole blood with CDA, the platelet coverage was inhibited by 96 ± 3% (p < 0.001). At the same concentration, CDA significantly decreased sCD40L levels. The mechanism of antiplatelet action of CDA could be by NF-κB inhibition and that is cAMP independent. In conclusion, C. digitatus extract may serve as a new source of antiplatelet agents for food and nutraceutical applications. PMID:25548968

  9. Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lamson, Daryl M.; St. George, Kirsten; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs), first discovered in the 1950s, are responsible for more than one-half of cold-like illnesses and cost billions of dollars annually in medical visits and missed days of work. Advances in molecular methods have enhanced our understanding of the genomic structure of HRV and have led to the characterization of three genetically distinct HRV groups, designated groups A, B, and C, within the genus Enterovirus and the family Picornaviridae. HRVs are traditionally associated with upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, and sinusitis. In recent years, the increasing implementation of PCR assays for respiratory virus detection in clinical laboratories has facilitated the recognition of HRV as a lower respiratory tract pathogen, particularly in patients with asthma, infants, elderly patients, and immunocompromised hosts. Cultured isolates of HRV remain important for studies of viral characteristics and disease pathogenesis. Indeed, whether the clinical manifestations of HRV are related directly to viral pathogenicity or secondary to the host immune response is the subject of ongoing research. There are currently no approved antiviral therapies for HRVs, and treatment remains primarily supportive. This review provides a comprehensive, up-to-date assessment of the basic virology, pathogenesis, clinical epidemiology, and laboratory features of and treatment and prevention strategies for HRVs. PMID:23297263

  10. Human oestrus

    PubMed Central

    Gangestad, Steven W; Thornhill, Randy

    2008-01-01

    For several decades, scholars of human sexuality have almost uniformly assumed that women evolutionarily lost oestrus—a phase of female sexuality occurring near ovulation and distinct from other phases of the ovarian cycle in terms of female sexual motivations and attractivity. In fact, we argue, this long-standing assumption is wrong. We review evidence that women's fertile-phase sexuality differs in a variety of ways from their sexuality during infertile phases of their cycles. In particular, when fertile in their cycles, women are particularly sexually attracted to a variety of features that likely are (or, ancestrally, were) indicators of genetic quality. As women's fertile-phase sexuality shares with other vertebrate females' fertile-phase sexuality a variety of functional and physiological features, we propose that the term oestrus appropriately applies to this phase in women. We discuss the function of women's non-fertile or extended sexuality and, based on empirical findings, suggest ways that fertile-phase sexuality in women has been shaped to partly function in the context of extra-pair mating. Men are particularly attracted to some features of fertile-phase women, but probably based on by-products of physiological changes males have been selected to detect, not because women signal their cycle-based fertility status. PMID:18252670

  11. Human Factors in Human-Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Sandor, Aniko; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Tillman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Any large organization whose mission is to design and develop systems for humans, and train humans needs a well-developed integration and process plan to deal with the challenges that arise from managing multiple subsystems. Human capabilities, skills, and needs must be considered early in the design and development process, and must be continuously considered throughout the development lifecycle. This integration of human needs within system design is typically formalized through a Human-Systems Integration (HSI) program. By having an HSI program, an institution or organization can reduce lifecycle costs and increase the efficiency, usability, and quality of its products because human needs have been considered from the beginning.

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids enhance phagocytosis of Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid-β42 by human microglia and decrease inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Erik; Zhu, Mingqin; Toro, Veronica Cortés; Vedin, Inger; Palmblad, Jan; Cederholm, Tommy; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Faxen-Irving, Gerd; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Basun, Hans; Eriksdotter, Maria; Schultzberg, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    The use of supplements with omega-3 (ω3) fatty acids (FAs) such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is widespread due to proposed beneficial effects on the nervous and cardiovascular systems. Many effects of ω3 FAs are believed to be caused by down-regulation and resolution of inflammation. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with inflammation mediated by microglia and astrocytes, and ω3 FAs have been proposed as potential treatments for AD. The focus of the present study is on the effects of DHA and EPA on microglial phagocytosis of the AD pathogen amyloid-β (Aβ), on secreted and cellular markers of immune activity, and on production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Human CHME3 microglial cells were exposed to DHA or EPA, with or without the presence of Aβ42. Phagocytosis of Aβ42 was analyzed by flow cytometry in conjunction with immunocytochemistry using antibodies to cellular proteins. Secreted proteins were analyzed by ELISA. Both DHA and EPA were found to stimulate microglial phagocytosis of Aβ42. Phagocytosis of Aβ42 was performed by microglia with a predominance of M2 markers. EPA increased the levels of BDNF in the culture medium. The levels of TNF-α were decreased by DHA. Both DHA and EPA decreased the pro-inflammatory M1 markers CD40 and CD86, and DHA had a stimulatory effect on the anti-inflammatory M2 marker CD206. DHA and EPA can be beneficial in AD by enhancing removal of Aβ42, increasing neurotrophin production, decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and by inducing a shift in phenotype away from pro-inflammatory M1 activation. PMID:23481688

  13. Periodontitis‐associated pathogens P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans activate human CD14+ monocytes leading to enhanced Th17/IL‐17 responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wan‐Chien; van Asten, Saskia D.; Burns, Lachrissa A.; Evans, Hayley G.; Walter, Gina J.; Hashim, Ahmed; Hughes, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    The Th17/IL‐17 pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis (PD), however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated the mechanism by which the periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) promote a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro, and studied IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in gingival tissue and peripheral blood from patients with PD versus periodontally healthy controls. Addition of Pg or Aa to monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures promoted a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro in a dose‐ and time‐dependent manner. Pg or Aa stimulation of monocytes resulted in increased CD40, CD54 and HLA‐DR expression, and enhanced TNF‐α, IL‐1β, IL‐6 and IL‐23 production. Mechanistically, IL‐17 production in Pg‐stimulated co‐cultures was partially dependent on IL‐1β, IL‐23 and TLR2/TLR4 signalling. Increased frequencies of IL‐17+ cells were observed in gingival tissue from patients with PD compared to healthy subjects. No differences were observed in IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in peripheral blood. In vitro, Pg induced significantly higher IL‐17 production in anti‐CD3 mAb‐stimulated monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures from patients with PD compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that periodontal pathogens can activate monocytes, resulting in increased IL‐17 production by human CD4+ T cells, a process that appears enhanced in patients with PD. PMID:27334899

  14. Humane Education: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Eileen S.; Westerlund, Stuart R.

    This booklet traces the historical development of human education as it has been instilled into the young people of America from colonial times to the present and provides a future prognosis of humaneness in the schools. Humane education promotes humane behavior and is an important part of the humane movement in the United States, although until…

  15. Abnormal costimulatory phenotype and function of dendritic cells before and after the onset of severe murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Dinnall, Joudy-Ann; Shivers, Debra K; Frisoni, Lorenza; Caricchio, Roberto; Gallucci, Stefania

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed the activation and function of dendritic cells (DCs) in the spleens of diseased, lupus-prone NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice and age-matched BALB/c and C57BL/6 control mice. Lupus DCs showed an altered ex vivo costimulatory profile, with a significant increase in the expression of CD40, decreased expression of CD80 and CD54, and normal expression of CD86. DCs from young lupus-prone NZM2410 mice, before the development of the disease, expressed normal levels of CD80 and CD86 but already overexpressed CD40. The increase in CD40-positive cells was specific for DCs and involved the subset of myeloid and CD8alpha+ DCs before disease onset, with a small involvement of plasmacytoid DCs in diseased mice. In vitro data from bone marrow-derived DCs and splenic myeloid DCs suggest that the overexpression of CD40 is not due to a primary alteration of CD40 regulation in DCs but rather to an extrinsic stimulus. Our analyses suggest that the defect of CD80 in NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice, which closely resembles the costimulatory defect found in DCs from humans with systemic lupus erythematosus, is linked to the autoimmune disease. The increase in CD40 may instead participate in disease pathogenesis, being present months before any sign of autoimmunity, and its downregulation should be explored as an alternative to treatment with anti-CD40 ligand in lupus.

  16. Human Research Risk Management

    NASA Video Gallery

    Crew health and performance is critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. The Human Research Program (HRP) investigates and mitigates the highest risks to human health and per...

  17. Human-machine interactions

    DOEpatents

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  18. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  19. Immunomodulatory Effects of Four Leishmania infantum Potentially Excreted/Secreted Proteins on Human Dendritic Cells Differentiation and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Markikou-Ouni, Wafa; Drini, Sima; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Chenik, Mehdi; Meddeb-Garnaoui, Amel

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania parasites and some molecules they secrete are known to modulate innate immune responses through effects on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. Here, we characterized four Leishmania infantum potentially excreted/secreted recombinant proteins (LipESP) identified in our laboratory: Elongation Factor 1 alpha (LiEF-1α), a proteasome regulatory ATPase (LiAAA-ATPase) and two novel proteins with unknown functions, which we termed LiP15 and LiP23, by investigating their effect on in vitro differentiation and maturation of human DCs and on cytokine production by DCs and monocytes. During DCs differentiation, LipESP led to a significant decrease in CD1a. LiP23 and LiEF-1α, induced a decrease of HLA-DR and an increase of CD86 surface expression, respectively. During maturation, an up-regulation of HLA-DR and CD80 was found in response to LiP15, LiP23 and LiAAA-ATPase, while an increase of CD40 expression was only observed in response to LiP15. All LipESP induced an over-expression of CD86 with significant differences between proteins. These proteins also induced significant IL-12p70 levels in immature DCs but not in monocytes. The LipESP-induced IL-12p70 production was significantly enhanced by a co-treatment with IFN-γ in both cell populations. TNF-α and IL-10 were induced in DCs and monocytes with higher levels observed for LiP15 and LiAAA-ATPase. However, LPS-induced cytokine production during DC maturation or in monocyte cultures was significantly down regulated by LipESP co-treatment. Our findings suggest that LipESP strongly interfere with DCs differentiation suggesting a possible involvement in mechanisms established by the parasite for its survival. These proteins also induce DCs maturation by up-regulating several costimulatory molecules and by inducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which is a prerequisite for T cell activation. However, the reduced ability of LipESP-stimulated DCs and monocytes to respond to lipopolysaccharide (LPS

  20. Immunomodulatory Effects of Four Leishmania infantum Potentially Excreted/Secreted Proteins on Human Dendritic Cells Differentiation and Maturation.

    PubMed

    Markikou-Ouni, Wafa; Drini, Sima; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Chenik, Mehdi; Meddeb-Garnaoui, Amel

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania parasites and some molecules they secrete are known to modulate innate immune responses through effects on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. Here, we characterized four Leishmania infantum potentially excreted/secreted recombinant proteins (LipESP) identified in our laboratory: Elongation Factor 1 alpha (LiEF-1α), a proteasome regulatory ATPase (LiAAA-ATPase) and two novel proteins with unknown functions, which we termed LiP15 and LiP23, by investigating their effect on in vitro differentiation and maturation of human DCs and on cytokine production by DCs and monocytes. During DCs differentiation, LipESP led to a significant decrease in CD1a. LiP23 and LiEF-1α, induced a decrease of HLA-DR and an increase of CD86 surface expression, respectively. During maturation, an up-regulation of HLA-DR and CD80 was found in response to LiP15, LiP23 and LiAAA-ATPase, while an increase of CD40 expression was only observed in response to LiP15. All LipESP induced an over-expression of CD86 with significant differences between proteins. These proteins also induced significant IL-12p70 levels in immature DCs but not in monocytes. The LipESP-induced IL-12p70 production was significantly enhanced by a co-treatment with IFN-γ in both cell populations. TNF-α and IL-10 were induced in DCs and monocytes with higher levels observed for LiP15 and LiAAA-ATPase. However, LPS-induced cytokine production during DC maturation or in monocyte cultures was significantly down regulated by LipESP co-treatment. Our findings suggest that LipESP strongly interfere with DCs differentiation suggesting a possible involvement in mechanisms established by the parasite for its survival. These proteins also induce DCs maturation by up-regulating several costimulatory molecules and by inducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which is a prerequisite for T cell activation. However, the reduced ability of LipESP-stimulated DCs and monocytes to respond to lipopolysaccharide (LPS

  1. Visualizing Humans by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of the problems and techniques involved in visualizing humans in a three-dimensional scene. Topics discussed include human shape modeling, including shape creation and deformation; human motion control, including facial animation and interaction with synthetic actors; and human rendering and clothing, including textures and…

  2. Special Section: Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  3. Human Research Program Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of HRP is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Human Research Program was designed to meet the needs of human space exploration, and understand and reduce the risk to crew health and performance in exploration missions.

  4. The Humanities: Interconnections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on a wide range of interdisciplinary themes and ideas for humanities instruction, the 17 articles in this journal issue discuss the following topics: (1) literature, humanities, and the adult learner; (2) the role of the humanities in educating for a democracy; (3) humanities in the marketplace; (4) literature versus "great books" in high…

  5. ISS Payload Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  6. Economics of human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  7. Economics of human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans. PMID:20645472

  8. Human mesothelioma induces defects in dendritic cell numbers and antigen-processing function which predict survival outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cornwall, Scott M.J.; Wikstrom, Matthew; Musk, Arthur W.; Alvarez, John; Nowak, Anna K.; Nelson, Delia J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mesothelioma is an almost invariably fatal tumor with chemotherapy extending survival by a few months. One immunotherapeutic strategy is to target dendritic cells (DCs), key antigen-presenting cells involved in antigen presentation, to induce antigen-specific T cell responses. However, DC-targeting will only be effective if DCs are fit-for-purpose, and the functional status of DCs in mesothelioma patients was not clear. We found that mesothelioma patients have significantly decreased numbers of circulating myeloid (m)DC1 cells, mDC2 cells and plasmacytoid (p)DCs relative to healthy age and gender-matched controls. Blood monocytes from patients could not differentiate into immature monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs), indicated by a significantly reduced ability to process antigen and reduced expression of costimulatory (CD40, CD80 and CD86) and MHC (HLA-DR) molecules, relative to controls. Activation of mesothelioma-derived MoDCs with LPS+/-IFNγ generated partially mature MoDCs, evident by limited upregulation of the maturation marker, CD83, and the costimulatory markers. Attempts to rescue mesothelioma-derived DC function using CD40Ligand(L) also failed, indicated by maintenance of antigen-processing capacity and limited upregulation of CD40, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR. These data suggest that mesothelioma patients have significant numerical and functional DC defects and that their reduced capacity to process antigen and reduced expression of costimulatory molecules could induce anergized/tolerized T cells. Nonetheless, survival analyses revealed that individuals with mesothelioma and higher than median levels of mDC1s and/or whose MoDCs matured in response to LPS, IFNγ or CD40L lived longer, implying their selection for DC-targeting therapy could be promising especially if combined with another treatment modality. PMID:27057464

  9. Mice with human livers.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; Strom, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Animal models are used to study many aspects of human disease and to test therapeutic interventions. However, some very important features of human biology cannot be replicated in animals, even in nonhuman primates or transgenic rodents engineered with human genes. Most human microbial pathogens do not infect animals and the metabolism of many xenobiotics is different between human beings and animals. The advent of transgenic immune-deficient mice has made it possible to generate chimeric animals harboring human tissues and cells, including hepatocytes. The liver plays a central role in many human-specific biological processes and mice with humanized livers can be used to model human metabolism, liver injury, gene regulation, drug toxicity, and hepatotropic infections.

  10. Virtual Human Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, RD

    2001-06-12

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive human modeling environment, the Virtual Human, which will be used initially to model the human respiratory system for purposes of predicting pulmonary disease or injury using lung sounds. The details of the computational environment, including the development of a Virtual Human Thorax, a database for storing models, model parameters, and experimental data, and a Virtual Human web interface are outlined. Preliminary progress in developing this environment will be presented. A separate paper at the conference describes the modeling of sound generation using computational fluid dynamics and the modeling of sound propagation in the human respiratory system.

  11. Mining human antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become drugs of choice for the management of an increasing number of human diseases. Human antibody repertoires provide a rich source for human mAbs. Here we review the characteristics of natural and non-natural human antibody repertoires and their mining with non-combinatorial and combinatorial strategies. In particular, we discuss the selection of human mAbs from naïve, immune, transgenic and synthetic human antibody repertoires using methods based on hybridoma technology, clonal expansion of peripheral B cells, single-cell PCR, phage display, yeast display and mammalian cell display. Our reliance on different strategies is shifting as we gain experience and refine methods to the efficient generation of human mAbs with superior pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:20505349

  12. Pathfinder: Humans in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on the Pathfinder program. Information is given on human exploration of the solar system, technical requirements interfaces, program objectives, space suits, human performance, man-machine systems, space habitats, life support systems, and artificial gravity

  13. Human bites (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  14. Telling the Human Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  15. Human assisted robotic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Files, B. T.; Canady, J.; Warnell, G.; Stump, E.; Nothwang, W. D.; Marathe, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    In support of achieving better performance on autonomous mapping and exploration tasks by incorporating human input, we seek here to first characterize humans' ability to recognize locations from limited visual information. Such a characterization is critical to the design of a human-in-the-loop system faced with deciding whether and when human input is useful. In this work, we develop a novel and practical place-recognition task that presents humans with video clips captured by a navigating ground robot. Using this task, we find experimentally that human performance does not seem to depend on factors such as clip length or familiarity with the scene and also that there is significant variability across subjects. Moreover, we find that humans significantly outperform a state-of-the-art computational solution to this problem, suggesting the utility of incorporating human input in autonomous mapping and exploration techniques.

  16. Biodegradable nanoparticle mediated antigen delivery to human cord blood derived dendritic cells for induction of primary T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Manish; Elamanchili, Praveen; Lane, Helena; Gainer, Anita; Samuel, John

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) in the peripheral tissues act as sentinels of the immune system. They detect and capture pathogens entering the body and present their antigens to T cells to trigger responses directed towards elimination of the pathogen. The induction of peripheral tolerance against self and certain foreign antigens is also believed to be mediated through DCs. The outcome of any immune response is largely controlled by the microenvironment of antigen capture, processing and presentation by DCs. The "context" of antigen delivery to DCs will directly influence the microenvironment of antigen presentation and hence the regulation of immune responses. We report here preliminary investigations describing the formulation of a pharmaceutically acceptable, biodegradable, and strategic nanoparticulate delivery system, and its application for efficient antigen loading of DCs to achieve antigen specific T cell activation. "Pathogen-mimicking" nanoparticles capable of interacting with DCs were fabricated by incorporating monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA; toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand) or CpG ODN (seq #2006; TLR9 ligand) in biodegradable copolymer, poly(D,L,-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The uptake of PLGA nanoparticles by human umbilical cord blood derived DCs (DCs propagated from CD34 progenitors) was conclusively demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Cell phenotype at day 12 of cultures was determined as immature DC using specific cell surface markers, i.e. CD11c (approximately 90%), MHC-II (approximately 70%), CD86 (approximately 20%), CD83 (approximately 5%), CD80 (approximately 40%), CD40 (approximately 40%), and CCR7 (approximately 5%). Tetanus toxoid (TT), a model antigen, was encapsulated in nanoparticles along with an immunomodulator, i.e. either MPLA or CpG ODN. DCs pulsed with various antigen formulations were co-cultured with autologous naïve T cells at

  17. Human productivity program definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The optimization of human productivity on the space station within the existing resources and operational constraints is the aim of the Human Productivity Program. The conceptual objectives of the program are as follows: (1) to identify long lead technology; (2) to identify responsibility for work elements; (3) to coordinate the development of crew facilities and activities; and (4) to lay the foundation for a cost effective approach to improving human productivity. Human productivity work elements are also described and examples are presented.

  18. Some Criteria for Humanizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Charlotte S.

    Patterns for humanizing the information sciences include recognizing essential "humanness," taking a holistic approach to the subject field, and being aware of the epistemological nature of how people communicate and relate to others and themselves. The complete inclusion of the human factor in information theory researches can only amplify the…

  19. A Human Rights Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Presents a human rights glossary that includes definitions of basic terms, treaties, charters, and groups/organizations that have been featured in previous articles in this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education"; the human rights terms have been compiled as part of the celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). (CMK)

  20. Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mensel, R. Frank

    The contradictions of campus management are examined in this speech and applied to the problems of human resource development. The author suggests that human resource development cannot be considered fully without taking into account the state of the institution and institutional development. Since human resources represents 75 percent or more of…

  1. Demystifying the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonham, George

    1980-01-01

    The new Rockefeller Foundation's Commission on the Humanities' report is discussed. Some of the commission's recommendations include: improved quality of elementary and secondary schools, strengthening of humanities research, reaffirmation within education of the values of the humanities, and closer collaboration of educational and cultural…

  2. Visible Human Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mobile Gallery Site Navigation Home The Visible Human Project ® Overview The Visible Human Project ® is an outgrowth of the NLM's 1986 Long- ... The long-term goal of the Visible Human Project ® is to produce a system of knowledge structures ...

  3. Whose Human Rights?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendel, Margherita

    During the last 50 years, principles, institutions, and policies of human rights have been developed worldwide. This book brings together European and international conventions on human rights, the rights of women, and the users and uses of education, and places them in their wider context. It examines issues in how human rights work, the ways in…

  4. Human nature and enhancement.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Allen

    2009-03-01

    Appeals to the idea of human nature are frequent in the voluminous literature on the ethics of enhancing human beings through biotechnology. Two chief concerns about the impact of enhancements on human nature have been voiced. The first is that enhancement may alter or destroy human nature. The second is that if enhancement alters or destroys human nature, this will undercut our ability to ascertain the good because, for us, the good is determined by our nature. The first concern assumes that altering or destroying human nature is in itself a bad thing. The second concern assumes that human nature provides a standard without which we cannot make coherent, defensible judgments about what is good. I will argue (1) that there is nothing wrong, per se, with altering or destroying human nature, because, on a plausible understanding of what human nature is, it contains bad as well as good characteristics and there is no reason to believe that eliminating some of the bad would so imperil the good as to make the elimination of the bad impermissible, and (2) that altering or destroying human nature need not result in the loss of our ability to make judgments about the good, because we possess a conception of the good by which we can and do evaluate human nature. I will argue that appeals to human nature tend to obscure rather than illuminate the debate over the ethics of enhancement and can be eliminated in favor of more cogent considerations.

  5. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  6. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences. PMID:23908778

  7. Financing Human Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juffras, Jason; Sawhill, Isabel V.

    This paper examines the government's role in financing human capital investments. It first examines why private investments in education, training, and other forms of human capital are likely to fall short of socially desirable levels. It then reviews past trends in public support for human resource investments. Finally, it discusses current…

  8. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  9. Human-technology Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Katharine M.

    Human-technology integration is the replacement of human parts and extension of human capabilities with engineered devices and substrates. Its result is hybrid biological-artificial systems. We discuss here four categories of products furthering human-technology integration: wearable computers, pervasive computing environments, engineered tissues and organs, and prosthetics, and introduce examples of currently realized systems in each category. We then note that realization of a completely artificial sytem via the path of human-technology integration presents the prospect of empirical confirmation of an aware artificially embodied system.

  10. Biological Races in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  11. Mapping human genetic ancestry.

    PubMed

    Ebersberger, Ingo; Galgoczy, Petra; Taudien, Stefan; Taenzer, Simone; Platzer, Matthias; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2007-10-01

    The human genome is a mosaic with respect to its evolutionary history. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of 23,210 DNA sequence alignments from human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and rhesus, we present a map of human genetic ancestry. For about 23% of our genome, we share no immediate genetic ancestry with our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. This encompasses genes and exons to the same extent as intergenic regions. We conclude that about 1/3 of our genes started to evolve as human-specific lineages before the differentiation of human, chimps, and gorillas took place. This explains recurrent findings of very old human-specific morphological traits in the fossils record, which predate the recent emergence of the human species about 5-6 MYA. Furthermore, the sorting of such ancestral phenotypic polymorphisms in subsequent speciation events provides a parsimonious explanation why evolutionary derived characteristics are shared among species that are not each other's closest relatives.

  12. Human rights and bioethics.

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y M; Brusa, M

    2008-05-01

    In the first part of this article we survey the concept of human rights from a philosophical perspective and especially in relation to the "right to healthcare". It is argued that regardless of meta-ethical debates on the nature of rights, the ethos and language of moral deliberation associated with human rights is indispensable to any ethics that places the victim and the sufferer in its centre. In the second part we discuss the rise of the "right to privacy", particularly in the USA, as an attempt to make the element of personal free will dominate over the element of basic human interest within the structure of rights and when different rights seem to conflict. We conclude by discussing the relationship of human rights with moral values beyond the realm of rights, mainly human dignity, free will, human rationality and response to basic human needs.

  13. Office for Human Research Protections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office for Human Research Protections The Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) provides leadership in the protection of the rights, welfare, and wellbeing of human subjects involved in ...

  14. Human research subjects as human research workers.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Holly Fernandez

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research involving human subjects has traditionally been treated as a unique endeavor, presenting special risks and demanding special protections. But in several ways, the regulatory scheme governing human subjects research is counter-intuitively less protective than the labor and employment laws applicable to many workers. This Article relies on analogical and legal reasoning to demonstrate that this should not be the case; in a number of ways, human research subjects ought to be fundamentally recast as human research workers. Like other workers protected under worklaw, biomedical research subjects often have interests that diverge from those in positions of control but little bargaining power for change. Bearing these important similarities in mind, the question becomes whether there is any good reason to treat subjects and protected workers differently as a matter of law. With regard to unrestricted payment, eligibility for a minimum wage, compensation for injury, and rights to engage in concerted activity, the answer is no and human subjects regulations ought to be revised accordingly. PMID:25051653

  15. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  16. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    PubMed

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept.

  17. [The embryo, the human and the humanized].

    PubMed

    Roa, A

    1992-03-01

    Since the moment of fecundation the human embryo is endowed with the properties of unity and uniqueness and its existence is therefore inviolable. Disputing arguments against this thesis are analyzed. Recent views of some biologists negate the human character to the embryo since the essence of a human being would be its cultural nature and ability to communicate. However, the embryo contains all the genetic information that will allow him to develop the ability to communicate. Any attempt to separate the 3 moments of time, past present and future is a definitive violation of ethics. A basic foundation of ethics is that present and future are implicit in the past and vice-versa. Finally, the idea that the unwanted child is not a cultural being should be discarded.

  18. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    PubMed

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept. PMID:24979876

  19. Human Performance in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Human factors is a critical discipline for human spaceflight. Nearly every human factors research area is relevant to space exploration -- from the ergonomics of hand tools used by astronauts, to the displays and controls of a spacecraft cockpit or mission control workstation, to levels of automation designed into rovers on Mars, to organizational issues of communication between crew and ground. This chapter focuses more on the ways in which the space environment (especially altered gravity and the isolated and confined nature of long-duration spaceflight) affects crew performance, and thus has specific novel implications for human factors research and practice. We focus on four aspects of human performance: neurovestibular integration, motor control and musculo-skeletal effects, cognitive effects, and behavioral health. We also provide a sampler of recent human factors studies from NASA.

  20. Chimeras and human dignity.

    PubMed

    de Melo-Martín, Inmaculada

    2008-12-01

    Discussions about whether new biomedical technologies threaten or violate human dignity are now common. Indeed, appeals to human dignity have played a central role in national and international debates about whether to allow particular kinds of biomedical investigations. The focus of this paper is on chimera research. I argue here that both those who claim that particular types of human-nonhuman chimera research threaten human dignity and those who argue that such threat does not exist fail to make their case. I first introduce some of the arguments that have been offered supporting the claim that the creation of certain sorts of chimeras threatens or violates human dignity. I next present opponents' assessments of such arguments. Finally I critically analyze both the critics' and the supporters' claims about whether chimera research threatens human dignity.

  1. [Humanization and nursing work].

    PubMed

    Collet, Neusa; Rozendo, Célia Alves

    2003-01-01

    In this work we have as our objective to reflect on the theme of the 63rd. Annual Nursing Week "Humanization and Work: reason and meaning in Nursing". We discuss the relationship between humanization/work in nursing, differentiating the aspects related to the humanization of nursing work to those of the humanized work in nursing. The challenges of the process of humanization of assistance and of work relationships imply on the overcoming of the relevance given to the technical scientific competence, routine patterns which are crystallized, conventional models of management, corporativism of the different professional categories in favor of interdependence and the complementarity in health actions; construction of an utopia of the humanization as collective process which can be reached and implemented.

  2. Human reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, E.M.; Fragola, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a treatment of human reliability analysis incorporating an introduction to probabilistic risk assessment for nuclear power generating stations. They treat the subject according to the framework established for general systems theory. Draws upon reliability analysis, psychology, human factors engineering, and statistics, integrating elements of these fields within a systems framework. Provides a history of human reliability analysis, and includes examples of the application of the systems approach.

  3. Robotics for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  4. Human cloning 2001.

    PubMed

    Healy, David L; Weston, Gareth; Pera, Martin F; Rombauts, Luk; Trounson, Alan O

    2002-05-01

    This review summaries human cloning from a clinical perspective. Natural human clones, that is, monozygotic twins, are increasing in the general community. Iatrogenic human clones have been produced for decades in infertile couples given fertility treatment such as ovulation induction. A clear distinction must be made between therapeutic cloning using embryonic stem cells and reproductive cloning attempts. Unlike the early clinical years of in vitro fertilization, with cloning there is no animal model that is safe and dependable. Until there is such a model, 'Dolly'-style human cloning is medically unacceptable.

  5. Artificial human vision camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudou, J.-F.; Maggio, S.; Fagno, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a real-time vision system modeling the human vision system. Our purpose is to inspire from human vision bio-mechanics to improve robotic capabilities for tasks such as objects detection and tracking. This work describes first the bio-mechanical discrepancies between human vision and classic cameras and the retinal processing stage that takes place in the eye, before the optic nerve. The second part describes our implementation of these principles on a 3-camera optical, mechanical and software model of the human eyes and associated bio-inspired attention model.

  6. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  7. Interactions of human cytomegalovirus with human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vonka, V; Benyesh-Melnick, M

    1966-01-01

    Vonka, Vladimir (Baylor University College of Medicine, Houston, Tex.), and Matilda Benyesh-Melnick. Interactions of human cytomegalovirus with human fibroblasts. J. Bacteriol. 91:213-220. 1966.-Virus attachment of human cytomegalovirus to human embryo lung fibroblasts was found to be temperature-independent, from 4 to 37 C. Prolonged incubation at 4 C, however, resulted in inactivation of a high proportion of attached virus. Virus penetration seemed to be temperature-dependent, occurring at 37 C but not at 4 C. Detailed studies of the growth curve of the virus were made. Cell-associated virus preceded the appearance of virus in the fluid phase by 2 to 5 days. Complement-fixing antigen could be detected, but only when the cytopathic effect was advanced, and it was demonstrable only in the cell-associated fraction. Under methyl cellulose, decreasing the bicarbonate concentration in the overlay from 0.225 to 0.15% resulted in marked increase in plating efficiency with all strains tested. However, varying the concentration of bicarbonate from 0.3 to 0.15% in fluid medium did not influence the growth of virus.

  8. Human Pythiosis, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Sandra de Moraes Gimenes; Araújo, João Pessoa; Candeias, João Manuel Grisi; Fabiano de Franco, Marcello; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Mendoza, Leonel; Pires de Camargo, Rosangela; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2005-01-01

    Pythiosis, caused by Pythium insidiosum, occurs in humans and animals and is acquired from aquatic environments that harbor the emerging pathogen. Diagnosis is difficult because clinical and histopathologic features are not pathognomonic. We report the first human case of pythiosis from Brazil, diagnosed by using culture and rDNA sequencing. PMID:15890126

  9. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  10. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to protect public health and safeguard the environment. Risk assessment is an integral part of this mission in that it identifies and characterizes environmentally related human health problems. The Human Health Re...

  11. HSI in Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggerman, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document examines the scope of Human Systems Integration (HSI) at NASA, and the implementation of HSI in the human space flight programs. Two areas of interest are the Responsibilities and the lessons learned from the International Space Station and the strategy and approach for the Crew Exploration Vehicle.

  12. Being Human in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dorothy J.; Fahey, Brian W.

    The structure of humanness as the unique and essential being of the individual, constantly emerging through experience and the actualization of human potential within the sports environment, is the central theme of this book. Sport is defined broadly to include all forms of physical activity experiences. Each chapter represents an inquiry unique…

  13. Quantifying Human Performance Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askren, William B.; Regulinski, Thaddeus L.

    Human performance reliability for tasks in the time-space continuous domain is defined and a general mathematical model presented. The human performance measurement terms time-to-error and time-to-error-correction are defined. The model and measurement terms are tested using laboratory vigilance and manual control tasks. Error and error-correction…

  14. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  15. Human Mind Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  16. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  17. Toward a Humane Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foshay, Arthur W.

    In this paper, an integrated view is presented of the direction that education must take if it is to become the creative, effective, joyful enterprise that many educators long for. Educational institutions are not humane because they fail to deal with the human condition in all its variety and meaning. They continue to affirm the intellectual part…

  18. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  19. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  20. Hooking Kids with Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anstead, Neil L.

    1993-01-01

    Humanitas is part of Collaboratives for Humanities and Arts Teaching (CHART), a nationwide network funded primarily by the Rockefeller Foundation. In 11 large school districts and numerous rural districts, high school teachers, academics, artists, and business and community leaders are cooperating to promote teaching of the arts and humanities.…

  1. Human Dignity Through History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlie, Arthur L.

    A major educational need, as assessed by a committee of teachers, students, and community members, is to recognize acceptance of human dignity as the ultimate value in decision making. This concept provides a basis for the elementary and secondary social studies program. Although the concept of human dignity was promoted with the signing of the…

  2. Humanities in Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruprecht, Robert

    1997-01-01

    States that engineers contribute tremendously to the changing face of the earth, and the ever more urgent call for languages, management, and law competencies for engineers is an expression of the need for a grounding in humanities. Discusses the role of humanities in engineering education in the context of world economics and the role of…

  3. The Humanities' Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey Galt

    2009-01-01

    Why should society support the humanities when so many people are suffering from the effects of the economic crisis? What claim do the humanities, or scholarship generally, have on increasingly limited resources? Shouldn't such pursuits be considered luxuries at a time when people should be focusing on essentials? The alleviation of human…

  4. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can…

  5. Human Simulated Diving Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, David S.; Speck, Dexter F.

    1979-01-01

    This report details several simulated divinq experiments on the human. These are suitable for undergraduate or graduate laboratories in human or environmental physiology. The experiment demonstrates that a diving reflex is precipitated by both facial cooling and apnea. (Author/RE)

  6. Methods in human cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 4, discusses the various techniques used in the study human cytogenetics. The methods are discussed in historical order, from direct methods to tissue culture techniques, prenatal studies, meiotic studies, sex chromatin techniques, banding techniques, prophase banding and replication studies. Nomenclature of human chromosomes and quantitative methods are also mentioned. 60 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Humanism within Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  8. Quantification of human responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinlage, R. C.; Gantner, T. E.; Lim, P. Y. W.

    1992-01-01

    Human perception is a complex phenomenon which is difficult to quantify with instruments. For this reason, large panels of people are often used to elicit and aggregate subjective judgments. Print quality, taste, smell, sound quality of a stereo system, softness, and grading Olympic divers and skaters are some examples of situations where subjective measurements or judgments are paramount. We usually express what is in our mind through language as a medium but languages are limited in available choices of vocabularies, and as a result, our verbalizations are only approximate expressions of what we really have in mind. For lack of better methods to quantify subjective judgments, it is customary to set up a numerical scale such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 1, 2, 3, ..., 9, 10 for characterizing human responses and subjective judgments with no valid justification except that these scales are easy to understand and convenient to use. But these numerical scales are arbitrary simplifications of the complex human mind; the human mind is not restricted to such simple numerical variations. In fact, human responses and subjective judgments are psychophysical phenomena that are fuzzy entities and therefore difficult to handle by conventional mathematics and probability theory. The fuzzy mathematical approach provides a more realistic insight into understanding and quantifying human responses. This paper presents a method for quantifying human responses and subjective judgments without assuming a pattern of linear or numerical variation for human responses. In particular, quantification and evaluation of linguistic judgments was investigated.

  9. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  10. Environment and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; And Others

    As a conference report, the booklet is primarily devoted to abstracts of papers presented at a Conference on Environment and Humanities held in Tallahassee, Florida, April 25-27, 1976. Dr. Huston Smith of Syracuse University, the main speaker, addressed the issue of "Humanities and Environmental Awareness." Other topics discussed included: (1)…

  11. Ecology and Human Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1970

    "Ecology and Human Values" is an interdisciplinary course designed for senior year high school students in social studies and/or science. Its main thrust is the investigation of human values as they relate to the environment, although rooted in the natural sciences as a means of understanding the complexities inherent in the environment. Use is…

  12. Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Mount, Frances

    2004-01-01

    The first human space flight, in the early 1960s, was aimed primarily at determining whether humans could indeed survive and function in micro-gravity. Would eating and sleeping be possible? What mental and physical tasks could be performed? Subsequent programs increased the complexity of the tasks the crew performed. Table 1 summarizes the history of U.S. space flight, showing the projects, their dates, crew sizes, and mission durations. With over forty years of experience with human space flight, the emphasis now is on how to design space vehicles, habitats, and missions to produce the greatest returns to human knowledge. What are the roles of the humans in space flight in low earth orbit, on the moon, and in exploring Mars?

  13. Mars Human Exploration Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Geoff

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the objectives and other considerations of Human exploration of Mars. The objectives of human exploration of Mars are: (1) to learn how Mars is similar to, and different from, Earth; (2) to explore possible life, past and present; (3) to discover what Mars is like now from the perspective of Geoscience and geologic history; and (4) how did Mars form and how did its formation differ from Earth. Considerations of human Martian exploration involve: (1) having a capable base laboratory; (2) having long range transportation; (3) having operational autonomy of the crew, and the requirement of the crew to possess a range of new cognitive processes along with easy communications with terrestrial colleagues; and finally (4) creating the human habitat along with human factors which involve more than just survivability.

  14. Helminths in human carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fried, Bernard; Reddy, Aditya; Mayer, David

    2011-06-28

    This review examines the salient literature on selected helminths involved in carcinogenicity in humans and updates information in an earlier review on cancer and helminths by Mayer and Fried (2007, Advances in Parasitology 65, 239-296). The earlier review was concerned with various helminths, i.e., trematodes, cestodes, and nematodes, that are definitely implicated as being carcinogenic. This review examines only those helminths, all of which turn out to be trematodes, that are definitely implicated as being carcinogenic. These trematodes are the blood flukes Schistosoma haematobium, associated with inducing human carcinoma of the urinary bladder and the liver flukes Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis, associated with inducing cancer of the bile duct (cholangiocarcinoma) and cancer of the liver (hepatocarcinoma) in humans. The review examines mainly the epidemiology and pathology of these helminthic infections in humans and considers what we know about the mechanisms associated with the carcinogenicity of these three trematodes in humans.

  15. Beliefs about Human Extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, Bruce Edward

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a web-based survey about futures issues. Among many questions, respondents were asked whether they believe humans will become extinct. Forty-five percent of the almost 600 respondents believe that humans will become extinct. Many of those holding this believe felt that humans could become extinct within 500-1000 years. Others estimated extinction 5000 or more years into the future. A logistic regression model was estimated to explore the bases for this belief. It was found that people who describe themselves a secular are more likely to hold this belief than people who describe themselves as being Protestant. Older respondents and those who believe that humans have little control over their future also hold this belief. In addition, people who are more apt to think about the future and are better able to imagine potential futures tend to also believe that humans will become extinct.

  16. Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony

    2014-01-01

    The Mars probe, launched by India a few months ago, is on its way to Mars. At this juncture, it is appropriate to talk about the opportunities presented to us for the Human Exploration of Mars. I am planning to highlight some of the challenges to take humans to Mars, descend, land, stay, ascend and return home safely. The logistics of carrying the necessary accessories to stay at Mars will be delivered in multiple stages using robotic missions. The primary ingredients for human survival is air, water, food and shelter and the necessity to recycle the primary ingredients will be articulated. Humans have to travel beyond the van Allen radiation belt under microgravity condition during this inter-planetary travel for about 6 months minimum one way. The deconditioning of human system under microgravity conditions and protection of humans from Galactic cosmic radiation during the travel should be taken into consideration. The multi-disciplinary effort to keep the humans safe and functional during this journey will be addressed.

  17. Archaea on human skin.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alexander J; Auerbach, Anna K; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  18. Human Plasma Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent protein, which exists in bovine plasma as a precursor of a serine protease. In this study, protein C was isolated to homogeneity from human plasma by barium citrate adsorption and elution, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, dextran sulfate agarose chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Human protein C (Mr = 62,000) contains 23% carbohydrate and is composed of a light chain (Mr = 21,000) and a heavy chain (Mr = 41,000) held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain has an amino-terminal sequence of Ala-Asn-Ser-Phe-Leu- and the heavy chain has an aminoterminal sequence of Asp-Pro-Glu-Asp-Gln. The residues that are identical to bovine protein C are underlined. Incubation of human protein C with human α-thrombin at an enzyme to substrate weight ratio of 1:50 resulted in the formation of activated protein C, an enzyme with serine amidase activity. In the activation reaction, the apparent molecular weight of the heavy chain decreased from 41,000 to 40,000 as determined by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. No apparent change in the molecular weight of the light chain was observed in the activation process. The heavy chain of human activated protein C also contains the active-site serine residue as evidenced by its ability to react with radiolabeled diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Human activated protein C markedly prolongs the kaolin-cephalin clotting time of human plasma, but not that of bovine plasma. The amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of human activated protein C were completely obviated by prior incubation of the enzyme with diisopropyl fluorophosphate. These results indicate that human protein C, like its bovine counterpart, exists in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease by limited proteolysis with attendant anticoagulant activity. Images PMID:468991

  19. Human exposure to aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  20. Aluminium in human sweat.

    PubMed

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans.

  1. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  2. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  3. Human Computer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwani, Akhilesh; Sengar, Chitransh; Talwaniper, Jyotsna; Sharma, Shaan

    2012-08-01

    The paper basically deals with the study of HCI (Human computer interaction) or BCI(Brain-Computer-Interfaces) Technology that can be used for capturing brain signals and translating them into commands that allow humans to control (just by thinking) devices such as computers, robots, rehabilitation technology and virtual reality environments. The HCI is based as a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. BCIs are often aimed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions.The paper also deals with many advantages of BCI Technology along with some of its applications and some major drawbacks.

  4. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-06-01

    The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

  5. ESA Human Exploration Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, Scott

    The long term goal of the Aurora Exploration Programme is Human exploration of Mars. In preparation for this, exploration of the Moon is a necessary step to provide demonstration of capabilities, mandatory for long duration human spaceflight. With the European Columbus module attached to the ISS, Europe has access to a world class laboratory in space for microgravity research, technology demonstration and preparation for future human exploration missions. The ongoing phase of the exploration programme has been focused on defining the overall European strategy and exploration architecture within the global exploration environment. System studies as well as focused technology developments are in progress (e.g. development of regenerative life support).

  6. [Human dying has changed].

    PubMed

    Llano Escobar, A

    1990-01-01

    In the modern era, the act of dying, at least in the West, presents a series of new characteristics resulting from scientific and technological progress and social changes. More and more frequently, humans die in the strange surroundings of medical establishments without the support of their loved ones and without the opportunity of taking part in decisions related to their own deaths. In the light of the serious personal and social problems caused by this transformation of human death, bioethics emerges as an attempt to uncover options that are more humane.

  7. The Concept of Being Human.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Royal

    This analysis of the relationship between humanism and humanitarianism outlines educational goals that should lead to a more humane world. Section 1, an outline of human life examines six substructures--human life, individuality, amenity, contact, actualization, and problems. A definition and examples of humanism in section 2 are elaborated into a…

  8. Pesticides and Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control a pest Integrated Pest Management What are pesticides? Herbicides Disinfectants Fungicides Insecticides Natural and Biological Pesticides ... Rodenticides Other types of pesticides Disponible en español Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides have a specific purpose ...

  9. Approaches to Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Richard W., Ed.; Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This anthology of essays approaches human communication from the points of view of: anthropology, art biology, economics, encounter groups, semantics, general system theory, history, information theory, international behavior, journalism, linguistics, mass media, neurophysiology, nonverbal behavior, organizational behavior, philosophy, political…

  10. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Print Email Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  11. Viruses and human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  12. Creativity: The Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses an exhibition entitled "Creativity--The Human Resource." The exhibition examines the work of 15 Americans, such as designer Buckminster Fuller and artist Judy Chicago, who have contributed in special ways to the arts and sciences. (PHR)

  13. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  14. Humanism vs. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Madeline

    1977-01-01

    Author argues that humanism and behaviorism are not necessarily exclusive of one another, and that principles of behaviorism, when thoughtfully applied, can lead to the achievement of humanistic goals. (RW)

  15. Bridging Humanism and Behaviorism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Lily

    1980-01-01

    Humanistic behaviorism may provide the necessary bridge between behaviorism and humanism. Perhaps the most humanistic approach to teaching is to learn how certain changes will help students and how these changes can be accomplished. (Author/MLF)

  16. Teaching about Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sampling of items from the ERIC database concerning the teaching of human geography. Includes documents dealing with Africa, Asia, the United States, Canada, Antarctica, and geographic concepts. Explains how to obtain ERIC documents. (SG)

  17. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  18. Human Resource Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, W. H.; Wyatt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    By using the total resource approach, we have focused attention on the need to integrate human resource planning with other business plans and highlighted the importance of a productivity strategy. (Author)

  19. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You Human Papillomavirus Vaccine HPV Information in Other Languages Women ...

  20. Human Biomass Consumption

    NASA Video Gallery

    Humans are using an increasing amount of Earth’s annual production of plants. Research shows that, from 1995 to 2005, consumption rose from 20 to 25 percent of the planet's annual production. Wha...

  1. Human Systems Integration Introduction

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lecture provides an overview of Human Systems Integration (HSI), its implementation cost and return on investment, HSI domains, how HSI fits into the NASA organization structure, HSI roles and...

  2. The Human Hazard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickell, Crispin

    1995-01-01

    Examines the plight of environmental refugees and the adequacy of political responses to the situation. Discusses the consequences of accelerated environmental change, particularly the impact of global warming on human migration. (LZ)

  3. Elitism in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomfield, Morton W.

    1974-01-01

    A justification and explication of the existence of elites in the academic world, but especially in the humanities where they perform a practical and necessary function for the enrichment of the mankind, is presented. (JH)

  4. Pushing Human Frontiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    With human colonization of Mars, I think you will see a higher standard of civilization, just as America set a higher standard of civilization which then promulgated back into Europe. I think that if you want to maximize human potential, you need a higher standard of civilization, and that becomes an example that benefits everyone. Without an open frontier, closed world ideologies, such as the Malthus Theory, tend to come to the forefront. It is that there are limited resources; therefore, we are all in deadly competition with each other for the limited pot. The result is tyrannical and potentially genocidal regimes, and we've already seen this in the twentieth century. There s no truth in the Malthus Theory, because human beings are the creators of their resources. With every mouth comes a pair of hands and a brain. But if it seems to be true, you have a vector in this direction, and it is extremely unfortunate. It is only in a universe of infinite resources that all humans can be brothers and sisters. The fundamental question which affects humanity s sense of itself is whether the world is changeable or fixed. Are we the makers of our world or just its inhabitants? Some people have a view that they re living at the end of history within a world that s already defined, and there is no fundamental purpose to human life because there is nothing humans can do that matters. On the other hand, if humans understand their own role as the creators of their world, that s a much more healthy point of view. It raises the dignity of humans. Indeed, if we do establish a new branch of human civilization on Mars that grows in time and potency to the point where it cannot really settle Mars, but transforms Mars, and brings life to Mars, we will prove to everyone and for all time the precious and positive nature of the human species and every member of it.

  5. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  6. Habitability and Human Factors Contributions to Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumaya, Jennifer Boyer

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch in support of human space flight in two main areas: Applied support to major space programs, and Space research. The field of Human Factors applies knowledge of human characteristics for the design of safer, more effective, and more efficient systems. This work is in several areas of the human space program: (1) Human-System Integration (HSI), (2) Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, (3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA), (4) Lunar Surface Systems, (5) International Space Station (ISS), and (6) Human Research Program (HRP). After detailing the work done in these areas, the facilities that are available for human factors work are shown.

  7. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes.

  8. Humans in space.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Averner, M

    2001-02-22

    Many successful space missions over the past 40 years have highlighted the advantages and necessity of humans in the exploration of space. But as space travel becomes ever more feasible in the twenty-first century, the health and safety of future space explorers will be paramount. In particular, understanding the risks posed by exposure to radiation and extended weightlessness will be crucial if humans are to travel far from Earth.

  9. Evolution and human sexuality.

    PubMed

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory.

  10. Quality and human society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, W.

    1991-02-01

    Quality of products and services is seen as a necessity in our modern world. Quality also has important cross-links to safety in our society. It is however suggested, that human beings are living in their industrial environment under the stress of a fractured personality with anxieties and frustrations. Some cultural comparisons with other industrial nations are given. Quality control tailored to human nature is recommended.

  11. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  12. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes several case studies of human space exploration, considered by the NASA's Office of Exploration in 1988. Special attention is given to the mission scenarios, the critical technology required in these expeditions, and the extraterrestrial power requirements of significant system elements. The cases examined include a manned expedition to Phobos, the inner Martian moon; a human expedition to Mars; the Lunar Observatory; and a lunar outpost to early Mars evolution.

  13. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of autonomy of future long duration manned missions will emphasize interactions between human operators and automated systems aimed at the most effective allocations of tasks between humans and machines. Knowledge of crewmembers' physical status, encompassing both capabilities and limitations, will also be critical during EVA and planetary roving missions; psychological evaluation and support, with a view to both individual health and group cohesion and productivity, may become a critical consideration. Attention is here given to crewmembers' medical and psychological vulnerabilities.

  14. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  15. Human Factors Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R.

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  16. Glycobiology of human milk.

    PubMed

    Newburg, D S

    2013-07-01

    Glycans are characteristic components of milk, and each species has unique patterns of specific carbohydrates. Human milk is unusually rich in glycans, with the major components being lactose and oligosaccharides, representing approximately 6.8 and 1% of the milk, respectively. Other sources of glycans in human milk include monosaccharides, mucins, glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins, glycopeptides, and glycolipids. In human milk, the presence and patterns of these glycans vary depending upon the stage of lactation and the maternal genes and their genetic polymorphisms that control glycosyl transferases. The synthesis of milk glycans utilizes a significant portion of the metabolic energy that the mother expends when producing her milk, but other than lactose, these glycans contribute little to the nutritional needs of the infant. The data herein support several functions. 1) Many human milk glycans inhibit pathogens from binding to the intestinal mucosa. 2) Human milk glycans attenuate inflammation. 3) Glycans also directly stimulate the growth of beneficial (mutualist) bacteria of the microbiota (formerly considered commensal microflora of the intestine); these mutualists and their fermentation products can, in turn, (a) inhibit pathogens, (b) modulate signaling and inflammation, and (c) the fermentation products can be absorbed and utilized as a source of dietary calories. These functions can help direct and support intestinal postnatal growth, development, and ontogeny of colonization. The many functions of the milk glycans may synergistically protect infants from disease. Hence, human milk glycans and their homologs may serve as novel prophylactic or therapeutic agents for a diverse range of deleterious conditions.

  17. Genomics of human longevity.

    PubMed

    Slagboom, P E; Beekman, M; Passtoors, W M; Deelen, J; Vaarhorst, A A M; Boer, J M; van den Akker, E B; van Heemst, D; de Craen, A J M; Maier, A B; Rozing, M; Mooijaart, S P; Heijmans, B T; Westendorp, R G J

    2011-01-12

    In animal models, single-gene mutations in genes involved in insulin/IGF and target of rapamycin signalling pathways extend lifespan to a considerable extent. The genetic, genomic and epigenetic influences on human longevity are expected to be much more complex. Strikingly however, beneficial metabolic and cellular features of long-lived families resemble those in animals for whom the lifespan is extended by applying genetic manipulation and, especially, dietary restriction. Candidate gene studies in humans support the notion that human orthologues from longevity genes identified in lower species do contribute to longevity but that the influence of the genetic variants involved is small. Here we discuss how an integration of novel study designs, labour-intensive biobanking, deep phenotyping and genomic research may provide insights into the mechanisms that drive human longevity and healthy ageing, beyond the associations usually provided by molecular and genetic epidemiology. Although prospective studies of humans from the cradle to the grave have never been performed, it is feasible to extract life histories from different cohorts jointly covering the molecular changes that occur with age from early development all the way up to the age at death. By the integration of research in different study cohorts, and with research in animal models, biological research into human longevity is thus making considerable progress.

  18. The human telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Moyzis, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    An ultimate goal of human genetics is the generation of a complete physical and ''functional'' map of the human genome. Twenty-five percent of human DNA, however, consists of repetitive DNA sequences. These repetitive DNA sequences are thought to arise by many mechanisms, from direct sequence amplification by the unequal recombination of homologous DNA regions to the reverse flow of genetic information. A general outline of the chromosomal organization of these repetitive sequences will be discussed. Our working hypothesis is that certain classes of human repetitive DNA sequences ''encode'' the information necessary for defining long-range genomic structure. Evidence will be presented that the first goal of this research, the identification and cloning of the human telomere, has been achieved. A human repetitive DNA library was constructed from randomly sheared, reassociated, and oligo(G/center dot/C)-tailed DNA, a method that minimizes the potential loss of sequences devoid of a given restriction enzyme site. Sequences too large to clone efficiently in cosmid or /lambda/ vectors, such as centromeric repeats, or telomeric sequences with an end incompatible for cloning, should be present in this library. In order to isolate highly conserved repetitive DNA sequences, this library was screened with radiolabeled hamster Cot50 repetitive DNA. Two clones, containing tandem arrays of the sequence (TTAGGG), were isolated by this method. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Human bites - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Bites - human - self-care ... Human bites can occur in 2 ways: If someone bites you If your hand comes into contact ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than animal bites. ...

  20. Human behavior and human performance: Psychomotor demands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of several experiments are presented in abstract form. These studies are critical for the interpretation and acceptance of flight based science to be conducted by the Behavior and Performance project. Some representative titles are as follow: External audio for IBM/PC compatible computers; A comparative assessment of psychomotor performance (target prediction by humans and macaques); Response path (a dependent measure for computer maze solving and other tasks); Behavioral asymmetries of psychomotor performance in Rhesus monkey (a dissociation between hand preference and skill); Testing primates with joystick based automated apparatus; and Environmental enrichment and performance assessment for ground or flight based research with primates;

  1. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    Manned space flight can be viewed as an interaction of three general elements: the human crewmember, spacecraft systems, and the environment. While the human crewmember is a crucial element in the system, certain physiological, psychological, environ- mental and spacecraft systems factors can compromise human performance in space. These factors include atmospheric pressure, physiology, uncertainties associated with space radiation, the potential for exposure to toxic materials in the closed environment, and spacecraft habitability. Health protection in space, for current and future missions, relies on a philosophy of risk reduction, which in the space program is achieved in four ways-through health maintenance, health care, design criteria, an selection and training. Emphasis is place upon prevention, through selection criteria and careful screening. Spacecraft health care systems must be absolutely reliable, and they will be automated and computerized to the maximum extent possible, but still designed with the human crewmember's capabilities in mind. The autonomy and technological sophistication of future missions will require a greater emphasis on high-level interaction between the human operator and automated systems, with effective allocation of tasks between humans and machines. Performance in space will include complex tasks during extravehicular activity (EVA) and on planetary surfaces, and knowledge of crewmembers' capability and limitations during such operations will be critical to mission success. Psychological support will become increasingly important on space missions, as crews spend long periods in remote and potentially hazardous environments. The success of future missions will depend on both individual psychological health and group cohesion and productivity, particularly as crew profiles become more heterogeneous. Thus, further human factors are needed in the area of small-group dynamics and performance.

  2. Human Milk Fortification.

    PubMed

    Simmer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the feed of choice for preterm infants. However, human milk does not provide enough nutrition, especially protein, for preterm infants to achieve target growth rates similar to those in utero (15-20 g/kg per day). Fortifiers for human milk, manufactured from bovine milk, are commercially available and routinely used for patients born <32 weeks' gestation prior to discharge home. Recent recommended dietary intakes (RDI) have been revised. Up to 4.2 g of protein and 135 kcal/kg per day is recommended for infants born very preterm. Additional supplements are needed to current commercial fortifiers to achieve these RDI and reduce the incidence of ex-uterine growth failure. A human milk fortifier that is manufactured from donor human milk is available in some developed countries and may confer some clinical benefits, including a reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis. Fortification can be added in a standardized protocol as per manufacturers' instructions. Human milk composition can be analyzed and fortification individualized to take into account the large variation from mother to mother. Alternatively, fortification can be increased in a stepwise manner based on assumed composition while monitoring blood urea levels for safety. The current aim is to prevent preterm infants dropping percentiles and falling below the 10th percentile at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age or discharge home. More data are required on how best to fortify human milk for preterm infants to achieve optimal growth, development and health outcomes in the long term. There is an urgent need for well-designed and informed randomized clinical trials in this vulnerable preterm population. PMID:26111568

  3. Human Milk Fortification.

    PubMed

    Simmer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the feed of choice for preterm infants. However, human milk does not provide enough nutrition, especially protein, for preterm infants to achieve target growth rates similar to those in utero (15-20 g/kg per day). Fortifiers for human milk, manufactured from bovine milk, are commercially available and routinely used for patients born <32 weeks' gestation prior to discharge home. Recent recommended dietary intakes (RDI) have been revised. Up to 4.2 g of protein and 135 kcal/kg per day is recommended for infants born very preterm. Additional supplements are needed to current commercial fortifiers to achieve these RDI and reduce the incidence of ex-uterine growth failure. A human milk fortifier that is manufactured from donor human milk is available in some developed countries and may confer some clinical benefits, including a reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis. Fortification can be added in a standardized protocol as per manufacturers' instructions. Human milk composition can be analyzed and fortification individualized to take into account the large variation from mother to mother. Alternatively, fortification can be increased in a stepwise manner based on assumed composition while monitoring blood urea levels for safety. The current aim is to prevent preterm infants dropping percentiles and falling below the 10th percentile at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age or discharge home. More data are required on how best to fortify human milk for preterm infants to achieve optimal growth, development and health outcomes in the long term. There is an urgent need for well-designed and informed randomized clinical trials in this vulnerable preterm population.

  4. Spaceflight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Jan

    2009-01-01

    NASA created a new approach for human system integration and human performance standards. NASA created two documents a standard and a reference handbook. The standard is titled NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard (SFHSS) and consists of two-volumes: Volume 1- Crew Health This volume covers standards needed to support astronaut health (medical care, nutrition, sleep, exercise, etc.) Volume 2 Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health This volume covers the standards for system design that will maintain astronaut performance (ie., environmental factors, design of facilities, layout of workstations, and lighting requirements). It includes classic human factors requirements. The new standards document is written in terms so that it is applicable to a broad range of present and future NASA systems. The document states that all new programs prepare system-specific requirements that will meet the general standards. For example, the new standard does not specify a design should accommodate specific percentiles of a defined population. Rather, NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 states that all programs shall prepare program-specific requirements that define the user population and their size ranges. The design shall then accommodate the full size range of those users. The companion reference handbook, Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH), was developed to capture the design consideration information from NASA-STD-3000, and adds spaceflight lessons learned, gaps in knowledge, example solutions, and suggests research to further mature specific disciplines. The HIDH serves two major purposes: HIDH is the reference document for writing human factors requirements for specific systems. HIDH contains design guidance information that helps insure that designers create systems which safely and effectively accommodate the capabilities and limitations of space flight crews.

  5. Why Geo-Humanities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graells, Robert Casals i.; Sibilla, Anna; Bohle, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic global change is a composite process. It consists of societal processes (in the 'noosphere') and natural processes (in the 'bio-geosphere'). The 'noosphere' is the ensemble of social, cultural or political insights ('shared subjective mental concepts') of people. Understanding the composite of societal and natural processes ('human geo-biosphere intersections'), which shapes the features of anthropogenic global change, would benefit from a description that draws equally on natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. To that end it is suggested to develop a concept of 'geo-humanities': This essay presents some aspects of its scope, discussing "knowledge that is to manage", "intentions that are to shape", "choices that are to justify" and "complexity that is to handle". Managing knowledge: That people understand anthropogenic global change requires their insights into how 'human geosphere intersections' function. Insights are formed ('processed') in the noosphere by means of interactions between people. Understanding how 'human geosphere intersections' functions combines scientific, engineering and economic studies with studies of the dynamics of the noosphere. Shaping intentions: During the last century anthropogenic global change developed as the collateral outcome of humankind's accumulated actions. It is caused by the number of people, the patterns of their consumption of resources, and the alterations of their environments. Nowadays, anthropogenic global chance is either an intentional negligence or a conscious act. Justifying choices: Humanity has alternatives how to alter Earth at planetary scale consciously. For example, there is a choice to alter the geo-biosphere or to adjust the noosphere. Whatever the choice, it will depend on people's world-views, cultures and preferences. Thus beyond issues whether science and technology are 'sound' overarching societal issues are to tackle, such as: (i) how to appropriate and distribute natural

  6. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different…

  7. [Human ehrlichiosis. Review].

    PubMed

    Arraga-Alvarado, C

    1994-12-01

    Human ehrlichiosis is a newly recognized tick-borne disease. Since 1935 Ehrlichia canis has been known as a cause of illness in dogs and other canine species, and for a few years it was related with human disease. In 1990, Ehrlichia chaffeensis was isolated from a man suspected of having ehrlichiosis. Partial sequencing of the rRNAS from the human isolate and E. canis, indicated that they are 98.7% related. More recently (May 1994) an "human granulocytic ehrlichiosis" have been reported in USA. PCR amplification and sequence of 16S rDNA, showed that the human isolate was virtually identical to those reported for E. phagocytophila y E. equi, organisms that cause ehrlichiosis in rumiant and in horses. Most patients shows fever, headache, malaise, nausea or vomiting, anorexia and in a minority of cases rash is present. Some of them have complications such as pulmonary infiltrates, gastrointestinal problems, renal dysfunction or failure, hepatoesplenomegaly, neurologic abnormalities, DIC and some times death. Leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzyme values have been common findings. Tetracycline and cloramphenicol have been using in adults and children as especific theraphy.

  8. Healthy human gut phageome.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M; Young, Mark J

    2016-09-13

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20-50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health. PMID:27573828

  9. The Human Serum Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D.; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Smith, Steven R.; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W.; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  10. The Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1989-01-01

    Early in 1986, Charles DeLisi, then head of the Office of Health and Environmental Research at the Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to organize a workshop charged with inquiring whether the state of technology and potential payoffs in biological knowledge and medical practice were such as to justify an organized program to map and sequence the human genome. The DOE's interest arose from its mission to assess the effects of radiation and other products of energy generation on human health in general and genetic material in particular. The workshop concluded that the technology was ripe, the benefits would be great, and a national program should be promptly initiated. Later committees, reporting to DOE, to the NIH, to the Office of Technology Assessment of the US Congress, and to the National Academy of Science have reviewed these issues more deliberately and come to the same conclusion. As a consequence, there has been established in the United States, a Human Genome Program, with funding largely from the NIH and the DOE, as indicated in Table 1. Moreover, the Program has attracted international interest, and Great Britain, France, Italy, and the Soviet Union, among other countries, have been reported to be starting human genome initiatives. Coordination of these programs, clearly in the interests of each, remains to be worked out, although an international Human Genome Organization (HUGO) is considering such coordination. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Human HOX gene disorders.

    PubMed

    Quinonez, Shane C; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The Hox genes are an evolutionarily conserved family of genes, which encode a class of important transcription factors that function in numerous developmental processes. Following their initial discovery, a substantial amount of information has been gained regarding the roles Hox genes play in various physiologic and pathologic processes. These processes range from a central role in anterior-posterior patterning of the developing embryo to roles in oncogenesis that are yet to be fully elucidated. In vertebrates there are a total of 39 Hox genes divided into 4 separate clusters. Of these, mutations in 10 Hox genes have been found to cause human disorders with significant variation in their inheritance patterns, penetrance, expressivity and mechanism of pathogenesis. This review aims to describe the various phenotypes caused by germline mutation in these 10 Hox genes that cause a human phenotype, with specific emphasis paid to the genotypic and phenotypic differences between allelic disorders. As clinical whole exome and genome sequencing is increasingly utilized in the future, we predict that additional Hox gene mutations will likely be identified to cause distinct human phenotypes. As the known human phenotypes closely resemble gene-specific murine models, we also review the homozygous loss-of-function mouse phenotypes for the 29 Hox genes without a known human disease. This review will aid clinicians in identifying and caring for patients affected with a known Hox gene disorder and help recognize the potential for novel mutations in patients with phenotypes informed by mouse knockout studies.

  12. Human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, D K; Dominguez, G; Pellett, P E

    1997-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 variant A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 6 variant B (HHV-6B) are two closely related yet distinct viruses. These visuses belong to the Roseolovirus genus of the betaherpesvirus subfamily; they are most closely related to human herpesvirus 7 and then to human cytomegalovirus. Over 95% of people older than 2 years of age are seropositive for either or both HHV-6 variants, and current serologic methods are incapable of discriminating infection with one variant from infection with the other. HHV-6A has not been etiologically linked to any human disease, but such an association will probably be found soon. HHV-6B is the etiologic agent of the common childhood illness exanthem subitum (roseola infantum or sixth disease) and related febrile illnesses. These viruses are frequently active and associated with illness in immunocompromised patients and may play a role in the etiology of Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies. HHV-6 is a commensal inhabitant of brains; various neurologic manifestations, including convulsions and encephalitis, can occur during primary HHV-6 infection or in immunocompromised patients. HHV-6 and distribution in the central nervous system are altered in patients with multiple sclerosis; the significance of this is under investigation. PMID:9227865

  13. Human hybrid hybridoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.; Zeijlemaker, W.P.

    1987-11-15

    Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.

  14. Human occupancy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    1994-10-01

    In the area of security and surveillance technologies, the problem of the arrival in Canada of illegal and undesirable ship and truck cargo loads is steadily increasing. As the volumes of cargo arrivals increase so do the Immigration and Customs problems related to the determination of the validity of those cargo contents. Of special concern to Immigration Control Authorities around the world is the emerging and increasing trend of illegal smuggling of human beings hidden inside of shipping containers. Beginning in 1992, Immigration Control Authorities in Canada observed an escalation of alien people smuggling through the use of cargo shipping containers arriving in the Port of Montreal. This paper will present to the audience the recently completed Immigration Canada Human Occupancy Detection project by explaining the design, development and testing of human occupancy detectors. The devices are designed to electronically detect the presence of persons hiding inside of shipping containers, without the requirement of opening the container doors. The human occupancy detection concepts are based upon the presence of carbon dioxide or other human waste characteristics commonly found inside of shipping containers.

  15. Humanized Mice for Studying Human Leukocyte Integrins In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Kumar, Priti; Ye, Chunting; Shankar, Premlata

    2015-01-01

    Humanized mice have recently emerged as powerful translational animal models for studying human hematopoiesis, immune interactions, and diseases of the human immune system. Several important advances in the humanized mouse technology have been reported over the last few years, thereby resulting in improved engraftment, high levels of human chimerism, and sustained human hematopoiesis. This chapter describes the detailed procedures for generating various humanized mouse models including hu-PBL, hu-HSC, and BLT models and discusses considerations for choosing the appropriate model system. PMID:21909931

  16. Teleoperator Human Factors Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the spectrum of space teleoperation activities likely in the 1985 to 1995 decade focused on the resolution of critical human engineering issues and characterization of the technology effect on performance of remote human operators. The study began with the identification and documentation of a set of representative reference teleoperator tasks. For each task, technology, development, and design options, issues, and alternatives that bear on human operator performance were defined and categorized. A literature survey identified existing studies of man/machine issues. For each teleoperations category, an assessment was made of the state of knowledge on a scale from adequate to void. The tests, experiments, and analyses necessary to provide the missing elements of knowledge were then defined. A limited set of tests were actually performed, including operator selection, baseline task definition, control mode study, lighting study, camera study, and preliminary time delay study.

  17. Human factors in aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L. (Editor); Nagel, David C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of human-factors (HF) analysis for aviation applications are examined in a collection of reviews by leading experts, with an emphasis on recent developments. The aim is to provide information and guidance to the aviation community outside the HF field itself. Topics addressed include the systems approach to HF, system safety considerations, the human senses in flight, information processing, aviation workloads, group interaction and crew performance, flight training and simulation, human error in aviation operations, and aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythms. Also discussed are pilot control; aviation displays; cockpit automation; HF aspects of software interfaces; the design and integration of cockpit-crew systems; and HF issues for airline pilots, general aviation, helicopters, and ATC.

  18. Seaweed and human health.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emma S; Allsopp, Philip J; Magee, Pamela J; Gill, Chris I R; Nitecki, Sonja; Strain, Conall R; McSorley, Emeir M

    2014-03-01

    Seaweeds may have an important role in modulating chronic disease. Rich in unique bioactive compounds not present in terrestrial food sources, including different proteins (lectins, phycobiliproteins, peptides, and amino acids), polyphenols, and polysaccharides, seaweeds are a novel source of compounds with potential to be exploited in human health applications. Purported benefits include antiviral, anticancer, and anticoagulant properties as well as the ability to modulate gut health and risk factors for obesity and diabetes. Though the majority of studies have been performed in cell and animal models, there is evidence of the beneficial effect of seaweed and seaweed components on markers of human health and disease status. This review is the first to critically evaluate these human studies, aiming to draw attention to gaps in current knowledge, which will aid the planning and implementation of future studies.

  19. Human trichromacy revisited.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Hiroshi; Winawer, Jonathan; Dougherty, Robert F; Wandell, Brian A

    2013-01-15

    The presence of a photopigment (melanopsin) within certain retinal ganglion cells was a surprising and significant discovery. This pigment is routinely described as "nonvisual" to highlight its signaling role in pupil dilation and circadian rhythms. Here we asked whether light absorbed by melanopsin can be seen by healthy human subjects. To answer this requires delivering intense (above rod saturation), well-controlled lights using four independent primaries. We collected detection thresholds to many four-primary stimuli. Threshold measurements in the fovea are explained by trichromatic theory, with no need to invoke a fourth photopigment. In the periphery, where melanopsin is present, threshold measurements deviate from trichromatic theory; at high photopic levels, sensitivity is explained by absorptions in four, not three, photopigment classes. We consider a series of hypotheses to explain the tetrasensitivity at high photopic levels in the human peripheral field. The most likely hypothesis is that in healthy human subjects melanopsin absorptions influence visibility. PMID:23256158

  20. Abortion and human rights.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Dorothy

    2010-10-01

    Abortion has been a reality in women's lives since the beginning of recorded history, typically with a high risk of fatal consequences, until the last century when evolutions in the field of medicine, including techniques of safe abortion and effective methods of family planning, could have ended the need to seek unsafe abortion. The context of women's lives globally is an important but often ignored variable, increasingly recognised in evolving human rights especially related to gender and reproduction. International and regional human rights instruments are being invoked where national laws result in violations of human rights such as health and life. The individual right to conscientious objection must be respected and better understood, and is not absolute. Health professional organisations have a role to play in clarifying responsibilities consistent with national laws and respecting reproductive rights. Seeking common ground using evidence rather than polarised opinion can assist the future focus. PMID:20303830

  1. Highest permanent human habitation.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this analysis was to determine the altitude of the highest permanent human habitation in the hope that this will throw some light on what determines the highest altitude that a community can tolerate indefinitely. A number of places where people have lived at very high altitudes for long periods of time are reviewed. Individuals have lived for as long as 2 yr at an altitude of 5950 m, and there was a miner's camp at 5300 m for several years. The highest permanently inhabited town in the world at the present time appears to be La Rinconada, a mining village of over 7000 people in southern Peru at an altitude of up to 5100 m, which has been in existence for over 40 yr. The altitude of the highest permanent human habitation is determined partly by economic factors, rather than solely by human tolerance to hypoxia. PMID:12631426

  2. [Human rights and procreation].

    PubMed

    Leroy, F

    1990-04-01

    The impact of procreation on freedom, health and welfare of human beings, is considerable. This relationship, however, is not mirrored in texts devoted to Human Rights. This omission obviously implies a neglect of women's and children's rights. The history of anticonceptive methods exemplifies the struggle for these rights. This conquest, which has lasted two hundred years, is far from completed. Because of the demographic outbreak in Third World countries, an ideological conflict has appeared between first generation Human Rights concerned with individual freedom ("rights of") and those of second generation aiming at social fairness ("rights to"). Adequate political and economic adjustment between North and South is a prerequisite to any balanced compromise that would resolve this conflict through democratic, albeit intensive, birth control.

  3. Is humanity suicidal?

    PubMed

    Wilson, E O

    1993-01-01

    The world's fauna and flora has entered a crisis unparalleled since the end of the Mesozoic Era, with the extinction rate of species now elevated to more than a thousand times that existing before the coming of humanity. Scientists and policy makers are ill-prepared to moderate this hemorrhaging, because so little is known of the biology of the Earth's millions of species and because so little effort has been directed toward conservation thus far. With the vanished species will go great potential wealth in scientific knowledge, new products, ecosystems services, and part of the natural world in which the human species originated. The need for new research and improved management is thus urgent. If it is not met, humanity will likely survive, but in a world biologically impoverished for all time.

  4. Human nutrition: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barnicot, N A

    2005-01-01

    In recent decades, much new evidence relating to the ape forerunners of modern humans has come to hand and diet appears to be an important factor. At some stage, there must have been a transition from a largely vegetarian ape diet to a modern human hunting economy providing significant amounts of meat. On an even longer evolutionary time scale the change was more complex. The mechanisms of evolutionary change are now better understood than they were in Darwin's time, thanks largely to great advances in genetics, both experimental and theoretical. It is virtually certain that diet, as a major component of the human environment, must have exerted evolutionary effects, but researchers still have little good evidence. PMID:17393680

  5. Human-Robot Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  6. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  7. Preparing for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G.; Joosten, B. Kent

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise is defining architectures and requirements for human exploration that radically reduce the costs of such missions through the use of advanced technologies, commercial partnerships and innovative systems strategies. In addition, the HEDS Enterprise is collaborating with the Space Science Enterprise to acquire needed early knowledge about Mars and to demonstrate critical technologies via robotic missions. This paper provides an overview of the technological challenges facing NASA as it prepares for human exploration. Emphasis is placed on identifying the key technologies including those which will provide the most return in terms of reducing total mission cost and/or reducing potential risk to the mission crew. Top-level requirements are provided for those critical enabling technology options currently under consideration.

  8. Scientists and Human Rights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Yousef

    2012-02-01

    The American Physical Society has a long history of involvement in defense of human rights. The Committee on International Freedom of Scientists was formed in the mid seventies as a subcommittee within the Panel On Public Affairs ``to deal with matters of an international nature that endangers the abilities of scientists to function as scientists'' and by 1980 it was established as an independent committee. In this presentation I will describe some aspects of the early history and the impetus that led to such an advocacy, the methods employed then and how they evolved to the present CIFS responsibility ``for monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists throughout the world''. I will also describe the current approach and some sample cases the committee has pursued recently, the interaction with other human rights organizations, and touch upon some venues through which the community can engage to help in this noble cause.

  9. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  10. Human Modeling for Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Lawrence, Brad A.; Stelges, Katrine S.; Steady, Marie-Jeanne O.; Ridgwell, Lora C.; Mills, Robert E.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over the last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the human modeling currently used at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs

  11. The Exploration of Mars by Humans: Why Mars? Why Humans?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's historic flight in 1961, the first flight of a human in space, plans are underway for another historic human mission. Plans are being developed for a human mission to Mars. Once we reach Mars, the human species will become the first two-planet species. Both the Bush Administration (in 2004) and the Obama Administration (in 2010) proposed a human mission to Mars as a national goal of the United States.

  12. Disorders of Human Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Arthur; Mears, J. Gregory; Ramirez, Francesco

    1980-02-01

    Studies of the human hemoglobin system have provided new insights into the regulation of expression of a group of linked human genes, the γ -δ -β globin gene complex in man. In particular, the thalassemia syndromes and related disorders of man are inherited anemias that provide mutations for the study of the regulation of globin gene expression. New methods, including restriction enzyme analysis and cloning of cellular DNA, have made it feasible to define more precisely the structure and organization of the globin genes in cellular DNA. Deletions of specific globin gene fragments have already been found in certain of these disorders and have been applied in prenatal diagnosis.

  13. Artificial human vision.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Can vision be restored to the blind? As early as 1929 it was discovered that stimulating the visual cortex of an individual led to the perception of spots of light, known as phosphenes [1] . The aim of artificial human vision systems is to attempt to utilize the perception of phosphenes to provide a useful substitute for normal vision. Currently, four locations for electrical stimulation are being investigated; behind the retina (subretinal), in front of the retina (epiretinal), the optic nerve and the visual cortex (using intra- and surface electrodes). This review discusses artificial human vision technology and requirements, and reviews the current development projects.

  14. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  15. We Are Human Beings.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan's arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state (PVS) patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw from the arguments in respect of the moral status of embryos and PVS patients.

  16. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The nation's efforts to expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system was given renewed emphasis in January of 1988 when the Presidential Directive on National Space Policy was signed into effect. The expansion of human presence into the solar system has particular significance, in that it defines long-range goals for NASA's future missions. To embark and achieve such ambitious ventures is a significant undertaking, particularly compared to past space activities. Missions to Mars, the Moon, and Phobos, as well as an observatory based on the dark side of the Moon are discussed.

  17. Defining the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Ursell, Luke K; Metcalf, Jessica L; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Knight, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly developing sequencing methods and analytical techniques are enhancing our ability to understand the human microbiome, and, indeed, how we define the microbiome and its constituents. In this review we highlight recent research that expands our ability to understand the human microbiome on different spatial and temporal scales, including daily timeseries datasets spanning months. Furthermore, we discuss emerging concepts related to defining operational taxonomic units, diversity indices, core versus transient microbiomes and the possibility of enterotypes. Additional advances in sequencing technology and in our understanding of the microbiome will provide exciting prospects for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine. PMID:22861806

  18. Human push capability.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Ralph L; Liber, Theodore

    2006-02-22

    Use of unassisted human push capability arises from time to time in the areas of crowd and animal control, the security of locked doors, the integrity of railings, the removal of tree stumps and entrenched vehicles, the manoeuvering of furniture, and athletic pursuits such as US football or wrestling. Depending on the scenario, human push capability involves strength, weight, weight distribution, push angle, footwear/floor friction, and the friction between the upper body and the pushed object. Simple models are used to establish the relationships among these factors.

  19. Mapping Human Epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Chloe M.; Ren, Bing

    2013-01-01

    As the second dimension to the genome, the epigenome contains key information specific to every type of cells. Thousands of human epigenome maps have been produced in recent years thanks to rapid development of high throughput epigenome mapping technologies. In this review, we discuss the current epigenome mapping toolkit and utilities of epigenome maps. We focus particularly on mapping of DNA methylation, chromatin modification state and chromatin structures, and emphasize the use of epigenome maps to delineate human gene regulatory sequences and developmental programs. We also provide a perspective on the progress of the epigenomics field and challenges ahead. PMID:24074860

  20. Microsporidia and human infections.

    PubMed Central

    Shadduck, J A; Greeley, E

    1989-01-01

    Protozoa of the phylum Microspora are obligate intracellular pathogens that are being detected with increasing frequency in humans, especially in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Organisms from four genera have been reported to date, and serological data suggest the occurrence of latent infections. Sources of human infections are not known, but microsporidia are widespread in lower vertebrates and invertebrates. There is no known treatment. Study of the disease in mammals suggests that infection often will be clinically silent, that intact T-cell-mediated host defenses are required for resistance, and that serious clinical disease may occur under circumstances in which extensive parasite replication can occur. Images PMID:2650860

  1. Human disease genes.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sanchez, G; Childs, B; Valle, D

    2001-02-15

    The complete human genome sequence will facilitate the identification of all genes that contribute to disease. We propose that the functional classification of disease genes and their products will reveal general principles of human disease. We have determined functional categories for nearly 1,000 documented disease genes, and found striking correlations between the function of the gene product and features of disease, such as age of onset and mode of inheritance. As knowledge of disease genes grows, including those contributing to complex traits, more sophisticated analyses will be possible; their results will yield a deeper understanding of disease and an enhanced integration of medicine with biology.

  2. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  3. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  4. Biodemography of human ageing

    PubMed Central

    Vaupel, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Human senescence has been delayed by a decade. This finding, documented in 1994 and bolstered since, is a fundamental discovery about the biology of human ageing, and one with profound implications for individuals, society and the economy. Remarkably, the rate of deterioration with age seems to be constant across individuals and over time: it seems that death is being delayed because people are reaching old age in better health. Research by demographers, epidemiologists and other biomedical researchers suggests that further progress is likely to be made in advancing the frontier of survival — and healthy survival — to even greater ages. PMID:20336136

  5. We Are Human Beings.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan's arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state (PVS) patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw from the arguments in respect of the moral status of embryos and PVS patients. PMID:26810918

  6. IL-21 is the primary common γ chain-binding cytokine required for human B-cell differentiation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Recher, Mike; Berglund, Lucinda J.; Avery, Danielle T.; Cowan, Morton J.; Gennery, Andrew R.; Smart, Joanne; Peake, Jane; Wong, Melanie; Pai, Sung-Yun; Baxi, Sachin; Walter, Jolan E.; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Tangye, Gillian A.; Rice, Michael; Brothers, Shannon; Al-Herz, Waleed; Oettgen, Hans; Eibel, Hermann; Puck, Jennifer M.; Cattaneo, Federica; Ziegler, John B.; Giliani, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    SCID resulting from mutations in IL2RG or JAK3 is characterized by lack of T and natural killer cells; B cells are present in normal number, but antibody responses are defective. Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is curative for SCID. However, B-cell dysfunction persists in a substantial proportion of patients. We hypothesized that impaired B-cell responses after HCT in IL2RG/JAK3 deficiency results from poor donor B-cell engraftment and defective γc-dependent cytokine signaling in host B cells. To test this, and to identify which γc cytokine(s) is critical for humoral immunity, we studied 28 transplanted patients with IL2RG/JAK3 deficiency. Lack of donor B-cell engraftment associated with persistent humoral dysfunction and significantly reduced memory B cells. B-cell proliferation induced by CD40L alone or together with CpG, anti-Ig, IL-4, IL-10, or IL-13 was comparable in healthy controls and in post-HCT SCID patients, irrespective of their chimerism status. However, in vitro stimulation with CD40L/IL-21 induced B-cell proliferation, plasmablast differentiation, and antibody secretion in patients with donor B cells, but not in patients with autologous B cells. These data imply that IL-21–mediated signaling is critical for long-lived humoral immunity and to restore antibody responses in IL2RG/JAK3-deficient patients after HCT. Furthermore, in vitro stimulation with CD40L/IL-21 can predict in vivo B-cell immunity in IL2RG/JAK3 SCID after transplantation. PMID:22039266

  7. Human dignity and human tissue: a meaningful ethical relationship?

    PubMed

    Kirchhoffer, David G; Dierickx, Kris

    2011-09-01

    Human dignity has long been used as a foundational principle in policy documents and ethical guidelines intended to govern various forms of biomedical research. Despite the vast amount of literature concerning human dignity and embryonic tissues, the majority of biomedical research uses non-embryonic human tissue. Therefore, this contribution addresses a notable lacuna in the literature: the relationship, if any, between human dignity and human tissue. This paper first elaborates a multidimensional understanding of human dignity that overcomes many of the shortcomings associated with the use of human dignity in other ethical debates. Second, it discusses the relationship between such an understanding of human dignity and 'non-embryonic' human tissue. Finally, it considers the implications of this relationship for biomedical research and practice involving human tissue. The contribution demonstrates that while human tissue cannot be said to have human dignity, human dignity is nevertheless implicated by human tissue, making what is done with human tissue and how it is done worthy of moral consideration.

  8. Human Rights: The Essential Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Carol; Hansen, Carol Rae; Wilde, Ralph; Bronkhorst, Daan; Moritz, Frederic A.; Rolle, Baptiste; Sherman, Rebecca; Southard, Jo Lynn; Wilkinson, Robert; Poole, Hilary, Ed.

    This reference work documents the history of human rights theory, explains each article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, explores the contemporary human rights movement, and examines the major human rights issues facing the world today. This book is the first to combine historical and contemporary perspectives on these critical…

  9. Making IBM's Computer, Watson, Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachlin, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This essay uses the recent victory of an IBM computer (Watson) in the TV game, "Jeopardy," to speculate on the abilities Watson would need, in addition to those it has, to be human. The essay's basic premise is that to be human is to behave as humans behave and to function in society as humans function. Alternatives to this premise are considered…

  10. Human Challenges in Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presents an overview using pictures some of the history of human exploration of the new frontiers of Earth and then examines some of the challenges to human exploration of space. Particular attention is given to the environmental factors and to the social and human factors that effect humans in space environments.

  11. Sacred Sounds in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Robert A.

    To see literature as a sign and a symbol simply reasserts the view of the humanities as the embodiment of the highest aspirations of human nature. Human beings are sign givers and symbol makers as they look for the sacred meaning in their lives. Through a college humanities course, some of the symbols that artists employ in fiction, poetry, drama,…

  12. Humanizing the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubos, Rene J.

    1973-01-01

    By using scientific knowledge and ecological wisdom, new ecosystems can be created which will be more stable, profitable, and favorable to the continued growth of civilization. Nature by itself has not taken care of many problems of ecological interest in past and human intervention is necessary. (PS)

  13. Animal and human influenzas.

    PubMed

    Peiris, M; Yen, H-L

    2014-08-01

    Influenza type A viruses affect humans and other animals and cause significant morbidity, mortality and economic impact. Influenza A viruses are well adapted to cross species barriers and evade host immunity. Viruses that cause no clinical signs in wild aquatic birds may adapt in domestic poultry to become highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses which decimate poultry flocks. Viruses that cause asymptomatic infection in poultry (e.g. the recently emerged A/H7N9 virus) may cause severe zoonotic disease and pose a major pandemic threat. Pandemic influenza arises at unpredictable intervals from animal viruses and, in its global spread, outpaces current technologies for making vaccines against such novel viruses. Confronting the threat of influenza in humans and other animals is an excellent example of a task that requires a One Health approach. Changes in travel, trade in livestock and pets, changes in animal husbandry practices, wet markets and complex marketing chains all contribute to an increased risk of the emergence of novel influenza viruses with the ability to cross species barriers, leading to epizootics or pandemics. Coordinated surveillance at the animal- human interface for pandemic preparedness, risk assessment, risk reduction and prevention at source requires coordinated action among practitioners in human and animal health and the environmental sciences. Implementation of One Health in the field can be challenging because of divergent short-term objectives. Successful implementation requires effort, mutual trust, respect and understanding to ensure that long-term goals are achieved without adverse impacts on agricultural production and food security.

  14. Futures of Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, L. S.

    There are several research areas basic to the long-range future of human communications. Telecommunication and transportation offer the possiblity of two worldwide communications networks whose interrelationships need to be explored in terms of the needs of the individual, the community, and the world at large. Expanding possibilities of…

  15. Human Resource Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinford, Paul

    1978-01-01

    A computer at Valley View Schools, Illinois, is used to collect, store, maintain, and retrieve information about a school district's human resources. The system was designed to increase the efficiency and thoroughness of personnel and payroll record keeping, and reporting functions. (Author/MLF)

  16. Toward a Technical Humanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malassis, Louis

    1977-01-01

    Examines the relationship between education and development in developing nations. Advocates the fostering of a technical humanism--the development of knowledge in all its forms as a basis for action. In this system, technical education is as highly valued as general education. The system, and its applications to rural education is discussed. (CP)

  17. Humane Treatment of Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joan Smithey

    This booklet is designed to give teachers resource information about the humane treatment of and care for animals. The topics are presented as springboards for discussion and class activity. Topics include the care of dogs, cats, birds, horses, and fish; wildlife and ecological relationships; and careers with animals. Illustrations on some pages…

  18. The Human Potential Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamashiro, Roy T.

    The advent of the human potential movement has generated the expectation that educators unleash the intellectual, emotional, physical, and spiritual talents of students. This movement is characterized by its focus on (1) the person as a total being, (2) the needs and concerns of students, (3) phenomenology, (4) personal values and goals, and (5)…

  19. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  20. Designers of Human Settlements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliff, Ursula

    1976-01-01

    Reviewed herein are the ideas of nine men who have addressed themselves to the problems of human settlements in this century. The ideas reviewed include those of Arnold Toynbee, Lewis Mumford, Hassan Fathy, Buckminster Fuller, Constantinos Doxiadis, Charles Correa, Paul Mwaluko, Robert McNamara and John F. C. Turner. (BT)

  1. Who Hung the Humanities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper is partly based on a lecture given at the AGTA conference in Perth in January 2013. It argues for a progressive subject based curriculum in which geography plays an essential part. This is based on an analysis of why and how subjects like geography, as part of the humanities, have been undermined and diminished in recent times. In a way…

  2. Human grasp point selection.

    PubMed

    Kleinholdermann, Urs; Franz, Volker H; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2013-07-25

    When we grasp an object, our visuomotor system has to solve an intricate problem: how to find the best out of an infinity of possible contact points of the fingers with the object? The contact point selection model (CoPS) we present here solves this problem and predicts human grasp point selection in precision grip grasping by combining a few basic rules that have been identified in human and robotic grasping. Usually, not all of the rules can be perfectly satisfied. Therefore, we assessed their relative importance by creating simple stimuli that put them into conflict with each other in pairs. Based on these conflict experiments we made model-based grasp point predictions for another experiment with a novel set of complexly shaped objects. The results show that our model predicts the human choice of grasp points very well, and that observers' preferences for their natural grasp angles is as important as physical stability constraints. Incorporating a human grasp point selection model like the one presented here could markedly improve current approaches to cortically guided arm and hand prostheses by making movements more natural while also allowing for a more efficient use of the available information.

  3. Parasites and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Perry, George H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of human evolutionary and population history can be advanced by ecological and evolutionary studies of our parasites. Many parasites flourish only in the presence of very specific human behaviors and in specific habitats, are wholly dependent on us, and have evolved with us for thousands or millions of years. Therefore, by asking when and how we first acquired those parasites, under which environmental and cultural conditions we are the most susceptible, and how the parasites have evolved and adapted to us and we in response to them, we can gain considerable insight into our own evolutionary history. As examples, the tapeworm life cycle is dependent on our consumption of meat, the divergence of body and head lice may have been subsequent to the development of clothing, and malaria hyperendemicity may be associated with agriculture. Thus, the evolutionary and population histories of these parasites are likely intertwined with critical aspects of human biology and culture. Here I review the mechanics of these and multiple other parasite proxies for human evolutionary history and discuss how they currently complement our fossil, archeological, molecular, linguistic, historical, and ethnographic records. I also highlight potential future applications of this promising model for the field of evolutionary anthropology.

  4. "HUMANITIES" AS A SUBJECT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KUHNS, RICHARD

    SINCE MOST OF THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM IS DEVOTED TO SPECIALIZED DISCIPLINES, HUMANITIES COURSES PROVIDE THE OPPORTUNITY FOR CREATING IN STUDENTS AN AWARENESS OF THE UNITY WHICH EXISTS AMONG PHILOSOPHY, HISTORY, AND THE ARTS. INTENSIVE STUDY AND CLASS DISCUSSION OF INDIVIDUAL WORKS BECOMES IMPOSSIBLE, HOWEVER, WHEN TOO MANY BOOKS ARE CROWDED INTO A…

  5. Antihumanism in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the antihumanistic elements of Jacques Derrida's theory of deconstruction. Argues that the modern French intellectuals, including Foucault, Derrida, and Lacan, have had an antihumanistic effect on the American social sciences and humanities by rejecting the existence of truth, morality, and rationality. (FMW)

  6. Reconsidering Human Performance Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Hwan Young

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses three perceived challenges in the field of human performance technology: a missing link from training to performance, limitations in gap analysis and cause analysis, and a lack of attention to business and organization performance. It then provides possible alternatives for each issue, such as instructional system…

  7. Occupying the Digital Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This essay questions the digital humanities' dependence on interpretation and critique as strategies for reading and responding to texts. Instead, the essay proposes suggestion as a digital rhetorical practice, one that does not replace hermeneutics, but instead offers alternative ways to respond to texts. The essay uses the Occupy movement as an…

  8. Human Biology: Experimental.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    Education is a process of adapting to change, and the rate of change is especially rapid in science today. This curriculum in human biology is an alternative to the New York State courses in general and Regents biology, and it has been designed to focus on change from the standpoint of the urban student. It is designed to provide students with…

  9. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the…

  10. Human Memory: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  11. Human Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  12. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  13. Humanizing the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfield, Roy P., Ed.

    A series of essays discussing ideas about humanizing work are presented in the document. Three major sections divide the essays, and each includes a preface with comments suggesting the central focus and questions with which the authors are concerned. The first section deals with the history, philosophy, and issues related to work and contains…

  14. Strengthening Career Human Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    Rooted in A. Bandura's (1982, 2001b) social cognitive theory, the notion of human agency has received considerable attention in vocational and career psychology for the last 2 decades, especially with the recent emergence of social constructivist thinking in the field. This article continues in the same direction. In reviewing the notion of human…

  15. Sarcocystis in Humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humans serve as definitive hosts for two known species of Sarcocystis, acquired from eating undercooked pork or beef, and resulting in gastrointestinal infection. Sporocysts excreted from these infected persons are each infectious for pigs and cattle, the intermediate hosts, resulting in the develop...

  16. Human thimet oligopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Dando, P M; Brown, M A; Barrett, A J

    1993-01-01

    We have purified human thimet oligopeptidase to homogeneity from erythrocytes, and compared it with the enzyme from rat testis and chicken liver. An antiserum raised against rat thimet oligopeptidase also recognized the human and chicken enzymes, suggesting that the structure of the enzyme has been strongly conserved in evolution. Consistent with this, the properties of the human enzyme were very similar to those for the other species. Thus human thimet oligopeptidase also is a thiol-dependent metallo-oligopeptidase with M(r) about 75,000. Specificity for cleavage of a number of peptides was indistinguishable from that of the rat enzyme, but Ki values for the four potent reversible inhibitors tested were lower. In discussing the results, we consider the determinants of the complex substrate specificity of thimet oligopeptidase. We question whether substrates containing more than 17 amino acid residues are cleaved, as has been suggested. We also point out that the favourable location of a proline residue and a free C-terminus in the substrate may be as important as the hydrophobic residues in the P2, P1 and P3' positions that have been emphasized in the past. Images Figure 1 PMID:8373360

  17. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  18. Communicating Humanism Nonverbally.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillison, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the importance of nonverbal communication by counselors in expressing humanistic feeling. Notes that facial expression (i.e., smiling) provides immediate feedback to the observer; use of space (i.e., close proximity) communicates warmth and humaneness; and tone of voice can complement spoken words and give them more meaning. (WAS)

  19. Trends in Humanities Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavrek, Bernard, Ed.; Whitney, Loralyn, Ed.

    Proceedings from this workshop sponsored by the Center for the Study of Rural Librarianship are intended to disseminate information to assist rural librarians engaged in planning and conducting public programs that explore issues related to the humanities. This report of the proceedings includes the texts of three presented papers, reactions from…

  20. Television's New Humane Collectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrag, Robert L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Analyzes "Taxi,""Barney Miller,""Lou Grant," and "M*A*S*H" in terms of three fantasy themes: the realization of significant others, the alliance in action, and membership into personhood. From these themes emerges a rhetorical vision of the new humane collectivity. (PD)