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Sample records for cd95 death-inducing signaling

  1. CD95 triggers Orai1-mediated localized Ca2+ entry, regulates recruitment of protein kinase C (PKC) β2, and prevents death-inducing signaling complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Khadra, Nadine; Bresson-Bepoldin, Laurence; Penna, Aubin; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Ségui, Bruno; Levade, Thierry; Vacher, Anne-Marie; Reiffers, Josy; Ducret, Thomas; Moreau, Jean-François; Cahalan, Michael D.; Vacher, Pierre; Legembre, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The death receptor CD95 plays a pivotal role in immune surveillance and immune tolerance. Binding of CD95L to CD95 leads to recruitment of the adaptor protein Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD), which in turn aggregates caspase-8 and caspase-10. Efficient formation of the CD95/FADD/caspase complex, known as the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), culminates in the induction of apoptosis. We show that cells exposed to CD95L undergo a reorganization of the plasma membrane in which the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channel Orai1 and the endoplasmic reticulum-resident activator stromal interaction molecule 1 colocalize with CD95 into a micrometer-sized cluster in which the channel elicits a polarized entry of calcium. Orai1 knockdown and expression of a dominant negative construct (Orai1E106A) reveal that on CD95 engagement, the Orai1-driven localized Ca2+ influx is fundamental to recruiting the Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) β2 to the DISC. PKCβ2 in turn transiently holds the complex in an inactive status, preventing caspase activation and transmission of the apoptotic signal. This study identifies a biological role of Ca2+ and the Orai1 channel that drives a transient negative feedback loop, introducing a lag phase in the early steps of the CD95 signal. We suggest that these localized events provide a time of decision to prevent accidental cell death. PMID:22065776

  2. CD95 triggers Orai1-mediated localized Ca2+ entry, regulates recruitment of protein kinase C (PKC) β2, and prevents death-inducing signaling complex formation.

    PubMed

    Khadra, Nadine; Bresson-Bepoldin, Laurence; Penna, Aubin; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Ségui, Bruno; Levade, Thierry; Vacher, Anne-Marie; Reiffers, Josy; Ducret, Thomas; Moreau, Jean-François; Cahalan, Michael D; Vacher, Pierre; Legembre, Patrick

    2011-11-22

    The death receptor CD95 plays a pivotal role in immune surveillance and immune tolerance. Binding of CD95L to CD95 leads to recruitment of the adaptor protein Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD), which in turn aggregates caspase-8 and caspase-10. Efficient formation of the CD95/FADD/caspase complex, known as the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), culminates in the induction of apoptosis. We show that cells exposed to CD95L undergo a reorganization of the plasma membrane in which the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channel Orai1 and the endoplasmic reticulum-resident activator stromal interaction molecule 1 colocalize with CD95 into a micrometer-sized cluster in which the channel elicits a polarized entry of calcium. Orai1 knockdown and expression of a dominant negative construct (Orai1E106A) reveal that on CD95 engagement, the Orai1-driven localized Ca(2+) influx is fundamental to recruiting the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) β2 to the DISC. PKCβ2 in turn transiently holds the complex in an inactive status, preventing caspase activation and transmission of the apoptotic signal. This study identifies a biological role of Ca(2+) and the Orai1 channel that drives a transient negative feedback loop, introducing a lag phase in the early steps of the CD95 signal. We suggest that these localized events provide a time of decision to prevent accidental cell death.

  3. Constitutive caspase activation and impaired death-inducing signaling complex formation in CD95-resistant, long-term activated, antigen-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Gudrun; Knape, Ingrid; Melzner, Ingo; Debatin, Klaus-Michael

    2003-08-01

    Elimination of T cells during an immune response is mediated by activation-induced cell death (AICD) and CD95-mediated apoptosis. Chronic graft-vs-host disease and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases are caused by the persistence of activated T cells that escaped tolerance induction by deletion or silencing. To mimic the in vivo situation of long-term activated T cells, we generated an in vitro system using HLA-A1-specific T cells, weekly restimulated by Ag. While short-term activated T cells (two to five rounds of stimulation) were CD95 sensitive and susceptible to AICD, T cells stimulated more than eight times acquired constitutive CD95 resistance and exhibited reduced AICD. Phenotypically, these long-term activated T cells could be identified as effector/memory T cells. The expression of the proforms of the CD95 receptor initiator caspases, caspase-8 and -10, and the effector caspase-3 was strongly decreased in these cells, and only active caspase fragments were detected. In contrast to short-term activated T cells, constitutive CD95 receptor clustering was observed on the cell surface, and caspase-8 was bound to the CD95 receptor in the absence of receptor triggering. After further cross-linking of CD95, additional formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) was strongly impaired. Reduced DISC formation in long-term activated T cells was associated with the loss of PTEN expression and the increased phosphorylation of protein kinase B. Inhibitors of phosphoinositol 3-kinase restored CD95 sensitivity and DISC formation in long-term activated T cells. These data suggest that defective CD95 signaling in effector/memory T cells may contribute to the apoptosis resistance toward physiological stimuli in T cells mediating tissue destruction in vivo.

  4. Quantification of High-Molecular Weight Protein Platforms by AQUA Mass Spectrometry as Exemplified for the CD95 Death-Inducing Signaling Complex (DISC).

    PubMed

    Warnken, Uwe; Schleich, Kolja; Schnölzer, Martina; Lavrik, Inna

    2013-06-27

    Contemporary quantitative mass spectrometry provides fascinating opportunities in defining the stoichiometry of high-molecular weight complexes or multiprotein platforms. The composition stoichiometry of multiprotein platforms is a key to understand the regulation of complex signaling pathways and provides a basis for constructing models in systems biology. Here we present an improved AQUA technique workflow that we adapted for the quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of the stoichiometry of the CD95 (Fas/APO-1) death inducing signaling complex (DISC). The DISC is a high-molecular weight platform essential for the initiation of CD95-mediated apoptotic and non-apoptotic responses. For protein quantification, CD95 DISCs were immunoprecipitated and proteins in the immunoprecipitations were separated by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by protein quantification using the AQUA technique. We will discuss in detail AQUA analysis of the CD95 DISC focusing on the key issues of this methodology, i.e., selection and validation of AQUA peptides. The application of this powerful method allowed getting new insights into mechanisms of procaspase-8 activation at the DISC and apoptosis initiation [1]. Here we discuss the AQUA methodology adapted by us for the analysis of the CD95 DISC in more detail. This approach paves the way for the successful quantification of multiprotein complexes and thereby delineating the intrinsic details of molecular interactions.

  5. Cytotoxicity-dependent APO-1 (Fas/CD95)-associated proteins form a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) with the receptor.

    PubMed

    Kischkel, F C; Hellbardt, S; Behrmann, I; Germer, M; Pawlita, M; Krammer, P H; Peter, M E

    1995-11-15

    APO-1 (Fas/CD95), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, induces apoptosis upon receptor oligomerization. In a search to identify intracellular signaling molecules coupling to oligomerized APO-1, several cytotoxicity-dependent APO-1-associated proteins (CAP) were immunoprecipitated from the apoptosis-sensitive human leukemic T cell line HUT78 and the lymphoblastoid B cell line SKW6.4. CAP1-3 (27-29 kDa) and CAP4 (55 kDa), instantly detectable after the crosslinking of APO-1, were associated only with aggregated (the signaling form of APO-1) and not with monomeric APO-1. CAP1 and CAP2 were identified as serine phosphorylated MORT1/FADD. The association of CAP1-4 with APO-1 was not observed with C-terminally truncated non-signaling APO-1. In addition, CAP1 and CAP2 did not associate with an APO-1 cytoplasmic tail carrying the lprcg amino acid replacement. Moreover, no APO-1-CAP association was found in the APO-1+, anti-APO-1-resistant pre-B cell line Boe. Our data suggest that in vivo CAP1-4 are the APO-1 apoptosis-transducing molecules.

  6. Caspase-10 is recruited to and activated at the native TRAIL and CD95 death-inducing signalling complexes in a FADD-dependent manner but can not functionally substitute caspase-8

    PubMed Central

    Sprick, Martin R.; Rieser, Eva; Stahl, Heiko; Grosse-Wilde, Anne; Weigand, Markus A.; Walczak, Henning

    2002-01-01

    The involvement of the death adaptor protein FADD and the apoptosis-initiating caspase-8 in CD95 and TRAIL death signalling has recently been demonstrated by the analysis of the native death-inducing signalling complex (DISC) that forms upon ligand-induced receptor cross-linking. However, the role of caspase-10, the other death-effector-domain-containing caspase besides caspase-8, in death receptor signalling has been controversial. Here we show that caspase-10 is recruited not only to the native TRAIL DISC but also to the native CD95 DISC, and that FADD is necessary for its recruitment to and activation at these two protein complexes. With respect to the function of caspase-10, we show that it is not required for apoptosis induction. In addition, caspase-10 can not substitute for caspase-8, as the defect in apoptosis induction observed in caspase-8-deficient cells could not be rescued by overexpression of caspase-10. Finally, we demonstrate that caspase-10 is cleaved during CD95-induced apoptosis of activated T cells. These results show that caspase-10 activation occurs in primary cells, but that its function differs from that of caspase-8. PMID:12198154

  7. Physalis peruviana extract induces apoptosis in human Hep G2 cells through CD95/CD95L system and the mitochondrial signaling transduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Jing; Ng, Lean-Teik; Lin, Doung-Liang; Huang, Shan-Ney; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2004-11-25

    Physalis species is a popular folk medicine used for treating cancer, leukemia, hepatitis and other diseases. Studies have shown that the ethanol extract of Physalis peruviana (EEPP) inhibits growth and induces apoptotic death of human Hep G2 cells in culture, whereas proliferation of the mouse BALB/C normal liver cells was not affected. In this study, we performed detailed studies to define the molecular mechanism of EEPP-induced apoptosis in Hep G2 cells. The results further confirmed that EEPP inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. At 50 microg/ml, EEPP significantly increased the accumulation of the sub-G1 peak (hypoploid) and the portion of apoptotic annexin V positive cells. EEPP was found to trigger apoptosis through the release of cytochrome c, Smac/DIABLO and Omi/HtrA2 from mitochondria to cytosol and consequently resulted in caspase-3 activation. Pre-treatment with a general caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) prevented cytochrome c release. After 48 h of EEPP treatment, the apoptosis of Hep G2 cells was found to associate with an elevated p53, and CD95 and CD95L proteins expression. Furthermore, a marked down-regulation of the expression of the Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and XIAP, and up-regulation of the Bax and Bad proteins were noted. Taken together, the present results suggest that EEPP-induced Hep G2 cell apoptosis was possibly mediated through the CD95/CD95L system and the mitochondrial signaling transduction pathway.

  8. Lipid rafts and raft-mediated supramolecular entities in the regulation of CD95 death receptor apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2015-05-01

    Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides that have the property to segregate and concentrate proteins. Lipid and protein composition of lipid rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, thus providing sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction molecules, including CD95 death receptor-mediated signaling. CD95 can be recruited to rafts in a reversible way through S-palmitoylation following activation of cells with its physiological cognate ligand as well as with a wide variety of inducers, including several antitumor drugs through ligand-independent intracellular mechanisms. CD95 translocation to rafts can be modulated pharmacologically, thus becoming a target for the treatment of apoptosis-defective diseases, such as cancer. CD95-mediated signaling largely depends on protein-protein interactions, and the recruitment and concentration of CD95 and distinct downstream apoptotic molecules in membrane raft domains, forming raft-based supramolecular entities that act as hubs for apoptotic signaling molecules, favors the generation and amplification of apoptotic signals. Efficient CD95-mediated apoptosis involves CD95 and raft internalization, as well as the involvement of different subcellular organelles. In this review, we briefly summarize and discuss the involvement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD95-mediated apoptosis that may provide a new avenue for cancer therapy.

  9. Activation of CD95 (APO-1/Fas) signaling by ceramide mediates cancer therapy-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Herr, I; Wilhelm, D; Böhler, T; Angel, P; Debatin, K M

    1997-01-01

    We report here that anticancer drugs such as doxorubicin lead to induction of the CD95 (APO-1/Fas) system of apoptosis and the cellular stress pathway which includes JNK/SAPKs. Ceramide, which accumulates in response to different types of cellular stress such as chemo- and radiotherapy, strongly induced expression of CD95-L, cleavage of caspases and apoptosis. Antisense CD95-L as well as dominant-negative FADD inhibited ceramide- and cellular stress-induced apoptosis. Fibroblasts from type A Niemann-Pick patients (NPA), genetically deficient in ceramide synthesis, failed to up-regulate CD95-L expression and to undergo apoptosis after gamma-irradiation or doxorubicin treatment. In contrast, JNK/SAPK activity was still inducible by doxorubicin in the NPA cells, suggesting that activation of JNK/SAPKs alone is not sufficient for induction of the CD95 system and apoptosis. CD95-L expression and apoptosis in NPA fibroblasts were restorable by exogenously added ceramide. In addition, NPA fibroblasts undergo apoptosis after triggering of CD95 with an agonistic antibody. These data demonstrate that ceramide links cellular stress responses induced by gamma-irradiation or anticancer drugs to the CD95 pathway of apoptosis. PMID:9321399

  10. Defective CD95/APO-1/Fas signal complex formation in the human autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, type Ia.

    PubMed

    Martin, D A; Zheng, L; Siegel, R M; Huang, B; Fisher, G H; Wang, J; Jackson, C E; Puck, J M; Dale, J; Straus, S E; Peter, M E; Krammer, P H; Fesik, S; Lenardo, M J

    1999-04-13

    Heterozygous mutations in the CD95 (APO-1/Fas) receptor occur in most individuals with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and dominantly interfere with apoptosis by an unknown mechanism. We show that local or global alterations in the structure of the cytoplasmic death domain from nine independent ALPS CD95 death-domain mutations result in a failure to bind the FADD/MORT1 signaling protein. Despite heterozygosity for the abnormal allele, lymphocytes from ALPS patients showed markedly decreased FADD association and a loss of caspase recruitment and activation after CD95 crosslinking. These data suggest that intracytoplasmic CD95 mutations in ALPS impair apoptosis chiefly by disrupting death-domain interactions with the signaling protein FADD/MORT1.

  11. Fas/CD95-induced chemokines can serve as "find-me" signals for apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Sean P; Henry, Conor M; Kearney, Conor J; Logue, Susan E; Feoktistova, Maria; Tynan, Graham A; Lavelle, Ed C; Leverkus, Martin; Martin, Seamus J

    2013-03-28

    Apoptosis is commonly thought to represent an immunologically silent or even anti-inflammatory mode of cell death, resulting in cell clearance in the absence of explicit activation of the immune system. However, here we show that Fas/CD95-induced apoptosis is associated with the production of an array of cytokines and chemokines, including IL-6, IL-8, CXCL1, MCP-1, and GMCSF. Fas-induced production of MCP-1 and IL-8 promoted chemotaxis of phagocytes toward apoptotic cells, suggesting that these factors serve as "find-me" signals in this context. We also show that RIPK1 and IAPs are required for optimal production of cytokines and chemokines in response to Fas receptor stimulation. Consequently, a synthetic IAP antagonist potently suppressed Fas-dependent expression of multiple proinflammatory mediators and inhibited Fas-induced chemotaxis. Thus, in addition to provoking apoptosis, Fas receptor stimulation can trigger the secretion of chemotactic factors and other immunologically active proteins that can influence immune responsiveness toward dying cells.

  12. Cysteine cathepsins are not involved in Fas/CD95 signalling in primary skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bojic, Lea; Petelin, Ana; Stoka, Veronika; Reinheckel, Thomas; Peters, Christoph; Turk, Vito; Turk, Boris

    2007-11-13

    The potential role of cysteine cathepsins, especially cathepsin B, in Fas/CD95-induced apoptosis was investigated using wild-type and cathepsin B-deficient primary skin fibroblasts. Apoptosis was induced with an anti-Fas/CD95 antibody in the presence of cycloheximide and no difference was observed between the two genotypes. First cells with damaged mitochondria were observed approximately 3h post apoptosis induction and their number was significantly increased after 11h. In contrast, cells with damaged lysosomes were only seen after 15h with no difference between the two genotypes. Moreover, Bid cleavage was found to be diminished in cathepsin B-deficient cells. These results suggest that cysteine cathepsins have no active role in Fas/CD95 apoptosis.

  13. Hepatitis C virus and disrupted interferon signaling promote lymphoproliferation via type II CD95 and interleukins.

    PubMed

    Machida, Keigo; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Sekiguch, Satoshi; Seike, Eiji; Tóne, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Yukiko; Tobita, Yoshimi; Kasama, Yuri; Shimizu, Masumi; Takahashi, Hidemi; Taya, Chyoji; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kohara, Michinori

    2009-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms of lymphoproliferation associated with the disruption of interferon (IFN) signaling and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are poorly understood. Lymphomas are extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection; we sought to clarify the molecular mechanisms of these processes. We established interferon regulatory factor-1-null (irf-1(-/-)) mice with inducible and persistent expression of HCV structural proteins (irf-1/CN2 mice). All the mice (n = 900) were observed for at least 600 days after Cre/loxP switching. Histologic analyses, as well as analyses of lymphoproliferation, sensitivity to Fas-induced apoptosis, colony formation, and cytokine production, were performed. Proteins associated with these processes were also assessed. Irf-1/CN2 mice had extremely high incidences of lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders and displayed increased mortality. Disruption of irf-1 reduced the sensitivity to Fas-induced apoptosis and decreased the levels of caspases-3/7 and caspase-9 messenger RNA species and enzymatic activities. Furthermore, the irf-1/CN2 mice showed decreased activation of caspases-3/7 and caspase-9 and increased levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10, and Bcl-2, as well as increased Bcl-2 expression, which promoted oncogenic transformation of lymphocytes. IL-2 and IL-10 were induced by the HCV core protein in splenocytes. Disruption of IFN signaling resulted in development of lymphoma, indicating that differential signaling occurs in lymphocytes compared with liver. This mouse model, in which HCV expression and disruption of IFN signaling synergize to promote lymphoproliferation, will be an important tool for the development of therapeutic agents that target the lymphoproliferative pathway.

  14. Switch from type II to I Fas/CD95 death signaling upon in vitro culturing of primary hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Dorothée; Schmich, Kathrin; Vogel, Sandra; Pick, Robert; Kaufmann, Thomas; Hochmuth, Florian Christoph; Haber, Angelika; Neubert, Karin; McNelly, Sabine; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Merfort, Irmgard; Maurer, Ulrich; Strasser, Andreas; Borner, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Fas/CD95-induced apoptosis of hepatocytes in vivo proceeds through the so-called type II pathway, requiring the pro-apoptotic BH3-only Bcl-2 family member Bid for mitochondrial death signaling. Consequently, Bid-deficient mice are protected from anti-Fas antibody injection induced fatal hepatitis. Here we report the unexpected finding that freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes, cultured on collagen or Matrigel™, become independent of Bid for Fas-induced apoptosis, thereby switching death signaling from type II to type I. In such in vitro cultures, FasL activates caspase-3 without Bid cleavage, Bax/Bak activation or cytochrome c release, and neither Bid ablation nor Bcl-2 overexpression is protective. The type II to type I switch depends on extracellular matrix adhesion, as primary hepatocytes in suspension die in a Bid-dependent manner. Moreover, the switch is specific for FasL-induced apoptosis as collagen-plated Bid-deficient hepatocytes are protected from TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis. Conclusion Our data suggest a selective crosstalk between extracellular matrix and Fas-mediated signaling which favours mitochondria-independent type I apoptosis induction. PMID:19003879

  15. The induction of Bim expression in human T-cell blasts is dependent on nonapoptotic Fas/CD95 signaling.

    PubMed

    Bosque, Alberto; Aguiló, Juan Ignacio; Alava, M Angeles; Paz-Artal, Estela; Naval, Javier; Allende, Luis M; Anel, Alberto

    2007-02-15

    The BH3-only protein Bim is required for maintaining the homeostasis of the immune system, since Bim regulates the down-modulation of T-cell responses, mainly through cytokine deprivation. Using T-cell blasts from healthy donors and also from patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndromes (ALPSs) due to homozygous loss-of-function mutation of FasL (ALPS-Ic) or heterozygous mutation in the Fas/CD95 death domain (ALPS-Ia), it is shown that the induction of Bim expression during the process of human T-cell blast generation is strictly dependent on FasL/Fas-mediated signaling. The main pathway by which Fas signaling regulates the levels of Bim expression in human T-cell blasts is the death-domain- and caspase-independent generation of discrete levels of H2O2, which results in the net increase of Foxo3a levels. The present results connect the 2 main pathways described until the moment for the control of T-cell responses: death receptor-mediated activation-induced cell death and apoptosis by cytokine deprivation.

  16. CD95 (Fas/APO-1)/CD95L in the gastrointestinal tract: fictions and facts.

    PubMed

    Sträter, J; Möller, P

    2003-03-01

    CD95 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family. It is constitutively expressed on the basolateral membrane of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and induces apoptosis when cross-linked by its natural ligand, CD95L. The significance of providing such a death-inducing mechanism in IEC is not yet clear. In recent years a multitude of studies have been published addressing the question of where and under which conditions CD95L is produced in the gut in the normal and neoplastic situation. Although some of these studies have considerably influenced our view on the role of the CD95/CD95L system, it appears necessary to critically review published data which are in part confusing and contradictory. To date compelling evidence of CD95L expression in untransformed IEC is lacking, and involvement of the CD95/CD95L system in the physiological epithelial cell turnover appears unlikely. Whereas CD95L is overexpressed in T-cells under inflammatory conditions, its significance for mucosal damage in inflammatory bowel diseases is obscured by possible redundancies in cell death mechanisms. Finally, recent data indicate that the intriguing CD95L counterattack concept in gastrointestinal tract cancer needs to be revised.

  17. Cell death-independent activities of the death receptors CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Daniela; Lang, Isabell; Wajant, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Since their identification more than 20 years ago, the death receptors CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2 have been intensively studied with respect to their cell death-inducing activities. These receptors, however, can also trigger a variety of cell death-independent cellular responses reaching from the activation of proinflammatory gene transcription programs over the stimulation of proliferation and differentiation to induction of cell migration. The cell death-inducing signaling mechanisms of CD95 and the TRAIL death receptors are well understood. In contrast, despite the increasing recognition of the biological and pathophysiological relevance of the cell death-independent activities of CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2, the corresponding signaling mechanisms are less understood and give no fully coherent picture. This review is focused on the cell death-independent activities of CD95 and the TRAIL death receptors and addresses mainly three questions: (a) how are these receptors linked to noncell death pathways at the molecular level, (b) which factors determine the balance of cell death and cell death-independent activities of CD95 and the TRAIL death receptors at the cellular level, and (c) what are the consequences of the cell death-independent functions of these receptors for their role in cancer and inflammatory diseases. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Distinct patterns of cleavage and translocation of cell cycle control proteins in CD95-induced and p53-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Weon Seo; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Chung, Doo Hyun; Nam, Woo-Dong; Choi, Won Jin; Bae, Youngmee

    2003-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death induced by p53 occurs at a late G1 cell cycle checkpoint termed the restriction (R) point, and it has been proposed that p53-induced apoptosis causes upregulation of CD95. However, as cells with defective in CD95 signaling pathway are still sensitive to p53-induced apoptosis, CD95 cannot be the sole factor resulting in apoptosis. In addition, unlike p53-induced apoptosis, the relationship between CD95-mediated apoptosis and the cell cycle is not clearly understood. It would therefore be worth investigating whether CD95-mediated cell death is pertinent with p53-induced apoptosis in view of cell cycle related molecules. In this report, biochemical analysis showed that etoposide-induced apoptosis caused the induction and the nuclear translocation of effector molecules involved in G1 cell cycle checkpoint. However, there was no such translocation in the case of CD95-mediated death. Thus, although both types of apoptosis involved caspase activation, the cell cycle related proteins responded differently. This argues against the idea that p53-induced apoptosis occurs through the induction of CD95/CD95L expression. PMID:12923319

  19. Up-regulation of FLIP in cisplatin-selected HeLa cells causes cross-resistance to CD95/Fas death signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Kamarajan, Pachiyappan; Sun, Nian-Kang; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2003-01-01

    Cisplatin-selected cervix carcinoma HeLa cell lines induced less apoptosis, and weaker activation by cisplatin or Fas-activating antibody, of mitochondrial-associated caspase-9 and death receptor-mediated caspase-8 than did parental cells. Furthermore, less DISC (death-inducing signalling complex) was formed in cisplatin-selected cell lines than in parental cells. Ac-IETD-CHO (acetyl-Ile-Glu-Thr-Asp-aldehyde), which has a certain preference for inhibiting caspase-8, or Fas-antagonistic antibody, significantly inhibited cisplatin-induced apoptosis in both parental and cisplatin-selected HeLa cell lines. These results imply that cell-surface death signalling is inducible by cisplatin; that reduction of this pathway is associated with drug resistance, and that cisplatin-selected cells acquire cross-resistance to cell-surface death signalling. Sequential up-regulation of FLIP (FLICE-like inhibitory protein), but not Bcl-2, Bcl-x(L) or inhibitors of apoptosis protein (IAPs), was observed in resistant cells but not in parental cells. The inhibition of FLIP by FLIP antisense oligonucleotides promotes cisplatin and Fas-antibody-induced apoptosis. However, the modulation of apoptosis by FLIP antisense oligonucleotides in resistant cells is greater than that in parental cells. The presented data reveal that the up-regulation of FLIP may contribute to the suppression of apoptosis and thereby change cells that are resistant to cisplatin and Fas-mediated death signals. The results also show that cancer cells that have undergone long-term chemotherapy and become chemoresistant may change the FLIP level, becoming cross-resistant to death factors such as Fas. PMID:12911332

  20. (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate induces Fas/CD95-mediated apoptosis through inhibiting constitutive and IL-6-induced JAK/STAT3 signaling in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Yi; Hou, Shin-Chen; Chen, Shi-Chen; Kao, Ming-Ching; Yu, Chien-Chih; Funayama, Shinji; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2012-03-14

    In this study, we examined the effects of several plant-derived natural compounds on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. The results revealed that (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) demonstrated the most efficient cytotoxic effects on HNSCC cells. We then investigated the underlying molecular mechanism for the potent proapoptotic effect of EGCG on HNSCC. Cell apoptosis was observed in the EGCG-treated SAS and Cal-27 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In concert with the caspase-8 activation by EGCG, an enhanced expression in functional Fas/CD95 was identified. Consistent with the increased Fas/CD95 expression, a drastic decrease in the Tyr705 phosphorylation of STAT3, a known negative regulator of Fas/CD95 transcription, was shown within 15 min in the EGCG-treated cells, leading to downregulation of the target gene products of STAT3, such as bcl-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), mcl-1, and cyclin D1. An overexpression in STAT3 led to resistance to EGCG, suggesting that STAT3 was a critical target of EGCG. Besides inhibiting constitutive expression, EGCG also abrogated the interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced JAK/STAT3 signaling and further inhibited IL-6-induced proliferation on HNSCC cells. In comparison with apigenin, curcumin, and AG490, EGCG was a more effective inhibitor of IL-6-induced proliferation on HNSCC cells. Overall, our results strongly suggest that EGCG induces Fas/CD95-mediated apoptosis through inhibiting constitutive and IL-6-induced JAK/STAT3 signaling. This mechanism may be partially responsible for EGCG's ability to suppress proliferation of HNSCC cells. These findings provide that EGCG may be useful in the chemoprevention and/or treatment of HNSCC.

  1. FasL, Fas, and death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) proteins are recruited to membrane rafts after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Davis, Angela R; Lotocki, George; Marcillo, Alex E; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2007-05-01

    The Fas/CD95 receptor-ligand system plays an essential role in apoptosis that contributes to secondary damage after spinal cord injury (SCI), but the mechanism regulating the efficiency of FasL/Fas signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. Here, FasL/Fas signaling complexes in membrane rafts were investigated in the spinal cord of adult female Fischer rats subjected to moderate cervical SCI and sham operation controls. In sham-operated animals, a portion of FasL, but not Fas was present in membrane rafts. SCI resulted in FasL and Fas translocation into membrane raft microdomains where Fas associates with the adaptor proteins Fas-associated death domain (FADD), caspase-8, cellular FLIP long form (cFLIPL ), and caspase-3, forming a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Moreover, SCI induced expression of Fas in clusters around the nucleus in both neurons and astrocytes. The formation of the DISC signaling platform leads to rapid activation of initiator caspase-8 and effector caspase-3, and the modification of signaling intermediates such as FADD and cFLIP(L) . Thus, FasL/Fas-mediated signaling after SCI is similar to Fas expressing Type I cell apoptosis.

  2. Partial equilibrium approximations in apoptosis. II. The death-inducing signaling complex subsystem.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Jing; Hong, Liu; Yong, Wen-An

    2015-12-01

    This paper is a continuation of our previous work (Huang and Yong, 2013) for simplifying the Fas signaling-induced apoptotic pathway identified by Hua et al. (2005) for human tumor T cells. The previous paper studied the downstream intracelluar-signaling subsystem, while the present one is concerned with the upstream death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) subsystem. Under the assumption that the bind of Fas-associated death domains and FLICE-inhibitory proteins to the DISC is much faster than that of the initiator procaspases, we greatly simplify the upstream subsystem from 35 reactions with 26 species to 6 reactions with 9 species by adopting the classical and recently justified partial equilibrium approximation method. Numerical simulations show that the simplified model is in an excellent agreement with the original model. Most importantly, the simplified model clearly reveals the key reactants and dominated pathways in the Fas signaling process, and thus provides new insights into the apoptosis.

  3. Thrombin-induced regulation of CD95(Fas) expression in the N9 microglial cell line: evidence for involvement of proteinase-activated receptor(1) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Jonathan R; Zhang, Matthew; Kutlubaev, Mansur; Lee, Richard; Bishop, Caroline; Andersen, Henrik; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Möller, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Microglia are the immune cells of the CNS. Brain injury triggers phenotypic changes in microglia including regulation of surface antigens. The serine proteinase alpha-thrombin can induce profound changes in neural cell physiology via cleavage of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). We recently demonstrated that pharmaceutical-grade recombinant human alpha-thrombin (rh-thr) induces a restricted set of proteolysis-dependent changes in microglia. CD95(Fas) is a cell-death receptor that is up-regulated in microglia by inflammatory stimuli. Here we characterized the effect of rh-thr on CD95(Fas) expression in the N9 microglial cell line. Dose-response and time course studies demonstrated maximal effects at 100 U/ml and 24 h, respectively. Regulation of expression was seen at both the surface protein and steady-state mRNA levels. The rh-thr-induced effects were mimicked by PAR(1) agonist peptides and blocked by pharmacologic inhibitors selective for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). Rh-thr also induced a rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. Thrombin-induced regulation of CD95(Fas) could modulate the neuroinflammatory response in a variety of neurological disorders.

  4. Two Adjacent Trimeric Fas Ligands Are Required for Fas Signaling and Formation of a Death-Inducing Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Holler, Nils; Tardivel, Aubry; Kovacsovics-Bankowski, Magdalena; Hertig, Sylvie; Gaide, Olivier; Martinon, Fabio; Tinel, Antoine; Deperthes, David; Calderara, Silvio; Schulthess, Therese; Engel, Jürgen; Schneider, Pascal; Tschopp, Jürg

    2003-01-01

    The membrane-bound form of Fas ligand (FasL) signals apoptosis in target cells through engagement of the death receptor Fas, whereas the proteolytically processed, soluble form of FasL does not induce cell death. However, soluble FasL can be rendered active upon cross-linking. Since the minimal extent of oligomerization of FasL that exerts cytotoxicity is unknown, we engineered hexameric proteins containing two trimers of FasL within the same molecule. This was achieved by fusing FasL to the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G1 or to the collagen domain of ACRP30/adiponectin. Trimeric FasL and hexameric FasL both bound to Fas, but only the hexameric forms were highly cytotoxic and competent to signal apoptosis via formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Three sequential early events in Fas-mediated apoptosis could be dissected, namely, receptor binding, receptor activation, and recruitment of intracellular signaling molecules, each of which occurred independently of the subsequent one. These results demonstrate that the limited oligomerization of FasL, and most likely of some other tumor necrosis factor family ligands such as CD40L, is required for triggering of the signaling pathways. PMID:12556501

  5. c-FLIPL is a dual function regulator for caspase-8 activation and CD95-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, David W.; Xing, Zheng; Pan, Yi; Algeciras-Schimnich, Alicia; Barnhart, Bryan C.; Yaish-Ohad, Shoshanit; Peter, Marcus E.; Yang, Xiaolu

    2002-01-01

    Activation of the caspase cascade is a pivotal step in apoptosis and can occur via death adaptor-mediated homo-oligomerization of initiator procaspases. Here we show that c-FLIPL, a protease-deficient caspase homolog widely regarded as an apoptosis inhibitor, is enriched in the CD95 death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) and potently promotes procaspase-8 activation through hetero-dimerization. c-FLIPL exerts its effect through its protease-like domain, which associates efficiently with the procaspase-8 protease domain and induces the enzymatic activity of the zymogen. Ectopic expression of c-FLIPL at physiologically relevant levels enhances procaspase-8 processing in the CD95 DISC and promotes apoptosis, while a decrease of c-FLIPL expression results in inhibition of apoptosis. c-FLIPL acts as an apoptosis inhibitor only at high ectopic expression levels. Thus, c-FLIPL defines a novel type of caspase regulator, distinct from the death adaptors, that can either promote or inhibit apoptosis. PMID:12110583

  6. c-FLIP(L) is a dual function regulator for caspase-8 activation and CD95-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, David W; Xing, Zheng; Pan, Yi; Algeciras-Schimnich, Alicia; Barnhart, Bryan C; Yaish-Ohad, Shoshanit; Peter, Marcus E; Yang, Xiaolu

    2002-07-15

    Activation of the caspase cascade is a pivotal step in apoptosis and can occur via death adaptor-mediated homo-oligomerization of initiator procaspases. Here we show that c-FLIP(L), a protease-deficient caspase homolog widely regarded as an apoptosis inhibitor, is enriched in the CD95 death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) and potently promotes procaspase-8 activation through hetero-dimerization. c-FLIP(L) exerts its effect through its protease-like domain, which associates efficiently with the procaspase-8 protease domain and induces the enzymatic activity of the zymogen. Ectopic expression of c-FLIP(L) at physiologically relevant levels enhances procaspase-8 processing in the CD95 DISC and promotes apoptosis, while a decrease of c-FLIP(L) expression results in inhibition of apoptosis. c-FLIP(L) acts as an apoptosis inhibitor only at high ectopic expression levels. Thus, c-FLIP(L) defines a novel type of caspase regulator, distinct from the death adaptors, that can either promote or inhibit apoptosis.

  7. Inorganic mercury dissociates preassembled Fas/CD95 receptor oligomers in T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemba, Stamatina E.; McCabe, Michael J.; Rosenspire, Allen J. . E-mail: arosensp@sun.science.wayne.edu

    2005-08-15

    Genetically susceptible rodents exposed to low burdens of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) develop autoimmune disease. Previous studies have shown that low, noncytotoxic levels of Hg{sup 2+} inhibit Fas-mediated apoptosis in T cells. These results suggest that inhibition of the Fas death receptor pathway potentially contributes to autoimmune disease after Hg{sup 2+} exposure, as a consequence of disruption of peripheral tolerance. The formation of active death inducing signaling complexes (DISC) following CD95/Fas receptor oligomerization is a primary step in the Fas-mediated apoptotic pathway. Other recent studies have shown that Hg{sup 2+} at concentrations that inhibit apoptosis also inhibit formation of active DISC, suggesting that inhibition of DISC is the mechanism responsible for Hg{sup 2+}-mediated inhibition of apotosis. Preassociated Fas receptors have been implicated as key elements necessary for the production of functional DISC. We present evidence in this study showing that low and nontoxic concentrations of Hg{sup 2+} induce the dissociation of preassembled Fas receptor complexes in Jurkat T cells. Thus, this Hg{sup 2+}-induced event should subsequently decrease the amount of preassembled Fas available for DISC formation, potentially resulting in the attenuation of Fas-mediated apoptosis in T lymphocytes.

  8. CD95 death receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in liver cell apoptosis and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reinehr, Roland; Häussinger, Dieter

    2012-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that signaling pathways towards cell proliferation and cell death are much more interconnected than previously thought. Whereas not only death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1) can couple to both, cell death and proliferation, also growth factor receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are involved in these opposing kinds of cell fate. EGFR is briefly discussed as a growth factor receptor involved in liver cell proliferation during liver regeneration. Then the role of EGFR in activating CD95 death receptor in liver parenchymal cells (PC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which represent a liver stem/progenitor cell compartment, is described summarizing different ways of CD95- and EGFR-dependent signaling in the liver. Here, depending on the hepatic cell type (PC vs. HSC) and the respective signaling context (sustained vs. transient JNK activation) CD95-/EGFR-mediated signaling ends up in either liver cell apoptosis or cell proliferation.

  9. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  10. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Carlotta; Bonora, Massimo; Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-30

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca²⁺). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca²⁺ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway.

  11. Cellular taurine release triggered by stimulation of the Fas(CD95) receptor in Jurkat lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lang, F; Madlung, J; Uhlemann, A C; Risler, T; Gulbins, E

    1998-08-01

    One of the hallmarks of apoptosis is cell shrinkage which appears to be important for cell death. The mechanisms mediating cell volume decrease have, however, not been addressed. Mechanisms employed by swollen cells to decrease their cell volume include activation of ion transport pathways, such as ion channels and KCl cotransport, and release of cellular osmolytes, such as taurine, sorbitol, betaine and inositol. The present study has been performed to test for release of taurine. To this end Jurkat human T-lymphocytes were loaded with [3H]taurine and apoptotic cell death induced by triggering the Fas(CD95) receptor with monoclonal crosslinking antibody. Triggering the Fas(CD95) receptor led to a release of 60+/-5% of cellular taurine within 90 min. The release did not occur prior to 45 min. The release coincided with cell shrinkage as evidenced from forward scatter in FACS analysis and preceeded DNA fragmentation according to propidium iodide staining. The delay of taurine release was not influenced by exchange of medium and thus was not due to extracellular accumulation of a stimulator. The Fas(CD95)-induced taurine release, cell shrinkage and DNA fragmentation were blunted by lowering of ambient temperature to 23 degreesC. Following pretreatment of cells with Fas(CD95) antibody at 23 degreesC rewarming led to rapid taurine release, cell shrinkage and DNA fragmentation, indicating that the temperature-sensitive step is distal to the mechanisms accounting for the delay. Osmotic cell swelling led to an immediate release of taurine. In conclusion, Fas(CD95) triggering leads to delayed taurine release through a temperature-sensitive mechanism.

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid counteracts attenuation of CD95-induced cell death by inorganic mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Randall; Lanni, Lydia; Jen, K.-L. Catherine; McCabe, Michael J.; Rosenspire, Allen

    2015-01-01

    In the United States the principal environmental exposure to mercury is through dietary consumption of sea food. Although the mechanism by which low levels of mercury affect the nervous system is not well established, epidemiological studies suggest that low level exposure of pregnant women to dietary mercury can adversely impact cognitive development in their children, but that Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the most prominent n-polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-PUFA) present in fish may counteract negative effects of mercury on the nervous system. Aside from effects on the nervous system, epidemiological and animal studies have also suggested that low level mercury exposure may be a risk factor for autoimmune disease. However unlike the nervous system where a mechanism linking mercury to impaired cognitive development remains elusive, we have previously suggested a potential mechanism linking low level mercury exposures to immune system dysfunction and autoimmunity. In the immune system it is well established that disruption of CD95 mediated apoptosis leads to autoimmune disease. We have previously shown in vitro as well as in vivo that in lymphocytes burdened with low levels of mercury, CD95 mediated cell death is impaired. In this report we now show that DHA counteracts the negative effect of mercury on CD95 signaling in T lymphocytes. T cells which have been pre-exposed to DHA are able to cleave pro-caspase 3 and efficiently signal programmed cell death through the CD95 signaling pathway, whether or not they are burdened with low levels of mercury. Thus DHA may lower the risk of autoimmune disease after low level mercury exposures. - Highlights: • Inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) interferes with CD95 mediated cell death in Jurkat T cells • DHA restores the ability of CD95 to signal cell death in Hg{sup 2+} intoxicated T cells • The restoration of CD95 mediated cell death by DHA is correlated with increased activation of Caspase 3.

  13. Regulation of hippocampal Fas receptor and death-inducing signaling complex after kainic acid treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-12-03

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced brain neuronal cell death (especially in the hippocampus) was shown to be mainly mediated by the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. This study investigated the regulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway mediated by Fas ligand/Fas receptor and components of the indispensable death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in the hippocampus (marked changes) and cerebral cortex (modest changes) of KA-treated mice. KA (45mg/kg) induced a severe behavioral syndrome with recurrent motor seizures (scores; maximal at 60-90min; minimal at 72h) with activation of hippocampal pro-apoptotic JNK (+2.5 fold) and increased GFAP (+57%) and nuclear PARP-1 fragmentation (+114%) 72h post-treatment (delayed neurotoxicity). In the extrinsic apoptotic pathway (hippocampus), KA (72h) reduced Fas ligand (-92%) and Fas receptor aggregates (-24%). KA (72h) also altered the contents of major DISC components: decreased FADD adaptor (-44%), reduced activation of initiator caspase-8 (-47%) and increased survival FLIP-S (+220%). Notably, KA (72h) upregulated the content of anti-apoptotic p-Ser191 FADD (+41%) and consequently the expression of p-FADD/FADD ratio (+1.9-fold), a neuroplastic index. Moreover, the p-FADD dependent transcription factor NF-κB was also increased (+61%) in the hippocampus after KA (72h). The convergent adaptation of the extrinsic apoptotic machinery 72h after KA in mice (with otherwise normal gross behavior) is a novel finding which suggests the induction of survival mechanisms to partly counteract the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Caspase-8 tyrosine-380 phosphorylation inhibits CD95 DISC function by preventing procaspase-8 maturation and cycling within the complex

    PubMed Central

    Powley, I R; Hughes, M A; Cain, K; MacFarlane, M

    2016-01-01

    Caspase-8 is a key initiator of apoptotic cell death where it functions as the apical protease in death receptor-mediated apoptosis triggered via the death-inducing signalling complex (DISC). However, the observation that caspase-8 is upregulated in many common tumour types led to the discovery of alternative non-apoptotic, pro-survival functions, many of which are contingent on phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue (Y380) found in the linker region between the two catalytic domains of the enzyme. Furthermore, Src-mediated Y380 phosphorylation leads to increased resistance to CD95-induced apoptosis; however, the mechanism underlying this impaired response to extrinsic apoptotic stimuli has not been identified. Consequently, we have employed a number of model systems to further dissect this protective mechanism. First, using an in vitro DISC model together with recombinant procaspase-8 variants, we show that Y380 phosphorylation inhibits procaspase-8 activation at the CD95 DISC, thereby preventing downstream activation of the caspase cascade. Second, we validated this finding in a cellular context using transfected neuroblastoma cell lines deficient in caspase-8. Reconstitution of these lines with phosphomimetic-caspase-8 results in increased resistance to CD95-mediated apoptosis and enhanced cell migration. When the in vitro DISC is assembled in the presence of cell lysate, caspase-8 Y380 phosphorylation attenuates DISC activity by inhibiting procaspase-8 autoproteolytic activity but not recruitment or homodimerization of caspase-8 within the complex. Once incorporated into the DISC, phosphorylated caspase-8 is unable to be released from the complex; this inhibits further cycling and release of active catalytic subunits into the cytoplasm, thus resulting in increased apoptotic resistance. Taken together, our novel findings expand our understanding of the key mechanisms underlying the anti-apoptotic functions of caspase-8 which may act as a critical block to

  15. The death receptor CD95 activates adult neural stem cells for working memory formation and brain repair.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Nina S; Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Laudenklos, Sabrina; Glagow, Désirée; Kumar, Sachin; Letellier, Elisabeth; Koch, Philipp; Teodorczyk, Marcin; Kleber, Susanne; Klussmann, Stefan; Wiestler, Benedict; Brüstle, Oliver; Mueller, Wolf; Gieffers, Christian; Hill, Oliver; Thiemann, Meinolf; Seedorf, Matthias; Gretz, Norbert; Sprengel, Rolf; Celikel, Tansu; Martin-Villalba, Ana

    2009-08-07

    Adult neurogenesis persists in the subventricular zone and the dentate gyrus and can be induced upon central nervous system injury. However, the final contribution of newborn neurons to neuronal networks is limited. Here we show that in neural stem cells, stimulation of the "death receptor" CD95 does not trigger apoptosis but unexpectedly leads to increased stem cell survival and neuronal specification. These effects are mediated via activation of the Src/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, ultimately leading to a global increase in protein translation. Induction of neurogenesis by CD95 was further confirmed in the ischemic CA1 region, in the naive dentate gyrus, and after forced expression of CD95L in the adult subventricular zone. Lack of hippocampal CD95 resulted in a reduction in neurogenesis and working memory deficits. Following global ischemia, CD95-mediated brain repair rescued behavioral impairment. Thus, we identify the CD95/CD95L system as an instructive signal for ongoing and injury-induced neurogenesis.

  16. CD95-mediated apoptosis in Burkitt's lymphoma B-cells is associated with Pim-1 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Matou-Nasri, Sabine; Rabhan, Zaki; Al-Baijan, Haya; Al-Eidi, Hamad; Yahya, Wesam Bin; Al Abdulrahman, Abdelkareem; Almobadel, Nasser; Alsubeai, Mona; Al Ghamdi, Saleh; Alaskar, Ahmed; AlBalwi, Mohammed; Alzahrani, Mohsen; Alabdulkareem, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    B-cells of the high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) overexpress survival oncoproteins, including the proviral integration site for Moloney murine leukaemia virus kinase (Pim)-1, and become apoptosis resistant. Activated death receptor CD95 after ligation with anti-CD95 monoclonal antibody (mAb) resulted in the regression of BL via induction of apoptosis, suggesting a decrease of survival protein expression. Here, CD95-mediated apoptotic pathways in BL B-cell lines (Raji and Daudi) following treatment with anti-CD95 mAb was investigated with the cause-and-effects on pim-1 gene expression, in comparison with leukemic cell line (K562) used as CD95-negative cells. Immunohistochemical staining for CD95 and Pim-1 was performed, and the effects of anti-CD95 mAb on apoptotic signalling using western blotting, on caspase activity and cell survival of BL B-cell and leukemic cell lines were determined. We showed that Raji cells expressed more CD95 receptors than Daudi cells. Half of each population underwent apoptosis accompanied by decreased cell viability after anti-CD95 mAb treatment. Distinct extrinsic and intrinsic CD95-mediated apoptotic pathways in Raji and Daudi cells were revealed by high caspase activity and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, respectively. We observed decreased Pim-1 transcript and protein expression levels with increased heat-shock protein (Hsp)70 and decreased Hsp90 expression in anti-CD95 mAb-treated cells. Throughout the study, K562 cells did not undergo apoptosis upon anti-CD95 mAb treatment. Pim-1 knockdown following to stable transfection with plasmid vectors induced apoptosis and decreased viability of BL and K562 cells. Therefore, CD95-mediated apoptosis induces Pim-1 down-regulation in BL B-cells, but Pim-1 down-regulation cannot fully eradicate BL and leukaemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Endothelial cell-derived CD95 ligand serves as a chemokine in induction of neutrophil slow rolling and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Liang; Gülcüler, Gülce Sila; Golbach, Lieke; Block, Helena; Zarbock, Alexander; Martin-Villalba, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Integrin activation is crucial for the regulation of leukocyte rolling, adhesion and trans-vessel migration during inflammation and occurs by engagement of myeloid cells through factors presented by inflamed vessels. However, endothelial-dependent mechanisms of myeloid cell recruitment are not fully understood. Here we show using an autoperfused flow chamber assay of whole blood neutrophils and intravital microscopy of the inflamed cremaster muscle that CD95 mediates leukocyte slow rolling, adhesion and transmigration upon binding of CD95-ligand (CD95L) that is presented by endothelial cells. In myeloid cells, CD95 triggers activation of Syk-Btk/PLCγ2/Rap1 signaling that ultimately leads to integrin activation. Excitingly, CD95-deficient myeloid cells exhibit impaired bacterial clearance in an animal model of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Our data identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the chemoattractant effect of endothelial cell-derived CD95L in induction of neutrophil recruitment and support the use of therapeutic inhibition of CD95’s activity in inflammatory diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18542.001 PMID:27763263

  18. Docosahexaenoic acid counteracts attenuation of CD95-induced cell death by inorganic mercury.

    PubMed

    Gill, Randall; Lanni, Lydia; Jen, K-L Catherine; McCabe, Michael J; Rosenspire, Allen

    2015-01-01

    In the United States the principal environmental exposure to mercury is through dietary consumption of sea food. Although the mechanism by which low levels of mercury affect the nervous system is not well established, epidemiological studies suggest that low level exposure of pregnant women to dietary mercury can adversely impact cognitive development in their children, but that Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the most prominent n-polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-PUFA) present in fish may counteract negative effects of mercury on the nervous system. Aside from effects on the nervous system, epidemiological and animal studies have also suggested that low level mercury exposure may be a risk factor for autoimmune disease. However unlike the nervous system where a mechanism linking mercury to impaired cognitive development remains elusive, we have previously suggested a potential mechanism linking low level mercury exposures to immune system dysfunction and autoimmunity. In the immune system it is well established that disruption of CD95 mediated apoptosis leads to autoimmune disease. We have previously shown in vitro as well as in vivo that in lymphocytes burdened with low levels of mercury, CD95 mediated cell death is impaired. In this report we now show that DHA counteracts the negative effect of mercury on CD95 signaling in T lymphocytes. T cells which have been pre-exposed to DHA are able to cleave pro-caspase 3 and efficiently signal programmed cell death through the CD95 signaling pathway, whether or not they are burdened with low levels of mercury. Thus DHA may lower the risk of autoimmune disease after low level mercury exposures.

  19. Parameter identification using stochastic simulations reveals a robustness in CD95 apoptotic response.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Christoph; Schleich, Kolja; Lavrik, Inna

    2016-04-26

    A number of mathematical models of apoptosis generated recently allowed us to understand intrinsic mechanisms of life/death decisions in a cell. Nevertheless, the parameters for the mathematical models are often experimentally difficult to obtain and there is an emerging need for the development of efficient approaches for parameter estimation. In this study we suggest a new method for parameter estimation, which is based on stochastic simulations and can be used when the number of molecules in the system is small. Our approach comprised the following steps: we start from the selection of parameters that lead to a good ordinary differential equation (ODE) fit. We continued by carrying out stochastic simulations for each of these parameters. Comparing the correlation structure of these simulations with the data, we finally could identify the best parameter set. The method was applied for a model of CD95-induced apoptosis, the new best identified parameters fit well to the experimental data. The best parameter set allowed us to get new insights into CD95 apoptosis regulation and can be applied for the comprehensive analysis of other signaling networks. The modeling approach allowed us to get new insights into network regulation, in particular, to identify robustness in CD95 apoptotic response. Taken together, this new method provides valuable predictions and can be applied for the analysis of other signaling networks.

  20. TRAF2 inhibits TRAIL- and CD95L-induced apoptosis and necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Karl, I; Jossberger-Werner, M; Schmidt, N; Horn, S; Goebeler, M; Leverkus, M; Wajant, H; Giner, T

    2014-10-09

    The relevance of the adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) for signal transduction of the death receptor tumour necrosis factor receptor1 (TNFR1) is well-established. The role of TRAF2 for signalling by CD95 and the TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) DRs, however, is only poorly understood. Here, we observed that knockdown (KD) of TRAF2 sensitised keratinocytes for TRAIL- and CD95L-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, while cell death was fully blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD-fmk) in control cells, TRAF2-depleted keratinocytes were only partly rescued from TRAIL- and CD95L-induced cell death. In line with the idea the only partially protective effect of zVAD-fmk on TRAIL- and CD95L-treated TRAF2-depleted keratinocytes is due to the induction of necroptosis, combined treatment with zVAD-fmk and the receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1) inhibitor necrostatin-1 [corrected] fully rescued these cells. To better understand the impact of TRAF2 levels on RIP1- and RIP3-dependent necroptosis and RIP3-independent apoptosis, we performed experiments in HeLa cells that lack endogenous RIP3 and HeLa cells stably transfected with RIP3. HeLa cells, in which necroptosis has no role, were markedly sensitised to TRAIL-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis by TRAF2 KD. In RIP3-expressing HeLa transfectants, however, KD of TRAF2 also strongly sensitised for TRAIL-induced necroptosis. Noteworthy, priming of keratinocytes with soluble TWEAK, which depletes the cytosolic pool of TRAF2-containing protein complexes, resulted in strong sensitisation for TRAIL-induced necroptosis but had only a very limited effect on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The necroptotic TRAIL response was not dependent on endogenously produced TNF and TNFR signalling, since blocking TNF by TNFR2-Fc or anti-TNFα had no effect on necroptosis induction. Taken together, we identified TRAF2 not only as a negative regulator of DR

  1. Apoptosis of haematopoietic cells upon thymidylate synthase inhibition is independent of p53 accumulation and CD95-CD95 ligand interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Pinedo, C; Oliver, F J; López-Rivas, A

    2001-01-01

    Treatment of haematopoietic BA/F3 cells with the thymidylate synthase inhibitor 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUdR) activated apoptosis through a mechanism that required continuous protein synthesis and was inhibited by Bcl-2 over-expression. Analysis of p53 levels in cells treated with FUdR indicated a marked accumulation of this protein. Accumulation of p53 was also observed in cells over-expressing Bcl-2. In BA/F3 cells transfected with a cDNA coding for the human papilloma virus protein E6, p53 accumulation after FUdR treatment was inhibited markedly. However, apoptosis was induced in both control and E6 cells to a similar extent. The role of the CD95/CD95 ligand (CD95L) system in FUdR-induced apoptosis was also assessed. As determined by reverse transcriptase PCR, BA/F3 expressed a low constitutive level of CD95L mRNA, which decreased following FUdR treatment. Moreover, blocking CD95-CD95L interactions with antagonistic CD95 monoclonal antibody did not prevent drug-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, analysis of caspase involvement showed important differences in apoptosis induced by CD95-triggering or FUdR treatment. In summary, these results suggest that apoptosis induced by thymineless stress in haematopoietic BA/F3 cells occurs by a mechanism that does not require accumulation of p53 and which is independent of CD95-CD95L interactions. PMID:11115403

  2. Functional role of CD95 ligand in concanavalin A-induced intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Ghoreschi, K; Muders, M; Enders, G A

    1998-01-01

    Freshly isolated murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) express CD95 ligand (CD95L), as shown by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Between 15 and 25% of IEL could be stained with an antibody to CD95L. Therefore it was investigated whether the CD95L/CD95 pathway was effective in IEL cytotoxicity. Stimulation of IEL in vitro with concanavalin A (Con A) induced a strong cytotoxic response, which was much higher when using CD95-expressing target cells. This effect was most evident when comparing the specific lysis of CD95-transfected target cells of the leukaemia cell line L1210 with that of the untransfected parental cell line. In addition, an antibody to CD95 was able to dramatically reduce the specific lysis of CD95-expressing target cells. After stimulation with Con A, which is able to bind to CD95L, the effects were more obvious compared with the triggering of the T-cell receptor (TCR)-alphabeta or gamma delta. On the other hand, EGTA reduced the Con A-induced cytotoxicity. Together these findings support a role of the CD95L/CD95 pathway in IEL cytotoxicity, even though the reaction was Ca2+ sensitive. As a function, CD95L-expressing IEL should be able to contribute to the elimination of CD95-expressing target cells in the intestine. Images Figure 1 PMID:9893046

  3. Deficient activation of CD95 (APO-1/ Fas)-mediated apoptosis: a potential factor of multidrug resistance in human renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramp, U; Dejosez, M; Mahotka, C; Czarnotta, B; Kalinski, T; Wenzel, M; Lorenz, I; Müller, M; Krammer, P; Gabbert, H E; Gerharz, C D

    2000-01-01

    The pronounced resistance of human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to anticancer-induced apoptosis has primarily been related to the expression of P-glycoprotein and effective drug detoxification mechanisms. Because the CD95 system has recently been identified as a key mediator of anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, we analysed the contribution of the CD95 system to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in four newly established RCC cell lines. Here, we demonstrate that all RCC cell lines expressed CD95-receptor and -ligand. Exposure to agonistic anti-CD95 antibodies resulted in induction of apoptosis and significant (P< 0.05) reduction of cell number in three out of four cell lines, indicating that the essential components for CD95-mediated apoptosis were present and functionally intact in the majority of these RCC cell lines. Moreover, treatment of cultures with bleomycin or topotecan, a novel topoisomerase I inhibitor with little substrate affinity for P-glycoprotein, led to induction of apoptosis and significant (P< 0.05) dose-dependent reduction of cell number in all RCC cell lines. Both anticancer drugs also induced upregulation of CD95 ligand expression in all cell lines. Additionally, augmentation of CD95 receptor expression was found in three RCC cell lines, including one p53-mutated cell line, whereas another p53-mutated cell line showed no or only a weak CD95 receptor upregulation after exposure to topotecan or bleomycin, respectively. Despite this upregulation of CD95 receptor and ligand, antagonistic antibodies directed against CD95 receptors or ligands could not inhibit induction of apoptosis by topotecan and bleomycin in any cell line. Thus, although a functionally intact CD95 signalling cascade is present in most RCC cell lines, the anticancer drugs topotecan and bleomycin that induce upregulation of CD95 receptor and ligand fail to effectively activate CD95-mediated apoptosis. This deficient activation of CD95-mediated apoptosis might be an important additional

  4. Inhibition of programmed cell death by cyclosporin A; preferential blocking of cell death induced by signals via TCR/CD3 complex and its mode of action.

    PubMed Central

    Yasutomi, D; Odaka, C; Saito, S; Niizeki, H; Kizaki, H; Tadakuma, T

    1992-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is reported to inhibit programmed cell death. We confirmed this by using T-cell hybridomas which are inducible to programmed cell death by activation with immobilized anti-CD3 antibody or with anti-Thy 1.2 antibody. Cell death and DNA fragmentation, characteristic features of programmed cell death, were almost completely blocked by CsA or FK506. To investigate whether CsA inhibits only the cell death through the signals via the TCR/CD3 complex or all of the programmed cell death induced by various reagents, we further established CD4+8+ thymic lymphomas which result in programmed cell death after activation with calcium ionophore, dexamethasone, cyclic AMP or anti-CD3 antibody. It was revealed that CsA could block only the cell death mediated by the TCR/CD3 complex. For the clarification of the site of action of CsA, Ca2+ influx and endocytosis of receptors after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody were monitored in the presence of CsA, and no significant effects of CsA were observed. Furthermore, prevention of cell death was examined by adding CsA at various periods of time after initiation of culture. CsA was found to exert its effect even when added after 4 h of cultivation, and the kinetic pattern of suppression was similar to that of the suppressive effect on IL-2 production. These observations indicate that in the events of programmed cell death, the major site of action of CsA will not be the inhibition of the immediate membrane events after activation of the TCR/CD3 complex but rather the interference in the function of molecules that transmit signals between membrane events and the activation of genes in the nucleus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1383138

  5. Infiltration of circulating myeloid cells through CD95L contributes to neurodegeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Liang; Brenner, David; Llorens-Bobadilla, Enric; Saiz-Castro, Gonzalo; Frank, Tobias; Wieghofer, Peter; Hill, Oliver; Thiemann, Meinolf; Karray, Saoussen; Prinz, Marco; Weishaupt, Jochen H.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is increasingly recognized as a hallmark of neurodegeneration. Activated central nervous system–resident microglia and infiltrating immune cells contribute to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons (DNs). However, how the inflammatory process leads to neuron loss and whether blocking this response would be beneficial to disease progression remains largely unknown. CD95 is a mediator of inflammation that has also been proposed as an apoptosis inducer in DNs, but previous studies using ubiquitous deletion of CD95 or CD95L in mouse models of neurodegeneration have generated conflicting results. Here we examine the role of CD95 in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin (MPTP)–induced neurodegeneration using tissue-specific deletion of CD95 or CD95L. We show that DN death is not mediated by CD95-induced apoptosis because deletion of CD95 in DNs does not influence MPTP-induced neurodegeneration. In contrast, deletion of CD95L in peripheral myeloid cells significantly protects against MPTP neurotoxicity and preserves striatal dopamine levels. Systemic pharmacological inhibition of CD95L dampens the peripheral innate response, reduces the accumulation of infiltrating myeloid cells, and efficiently prevents MPTP-induced DN death. Altogether, this study emphasizes the role of the peripheral innate immune response in neurodegeneration and identifies CD95 as potential pharmacological target for neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25779632

  6. Complexes of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 Proteins Form Pseudo-Death-Inducing Signaling Complex Structures during Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Apoptosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Filippova, Maria; Filippov, Valery A.; Kagoda, Mercy; Garnett, Theodore; Fodor, Nadya; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J.

    2009-01-01

    High-risk strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) such as HPV type 16 (HPV16) and HPV18 are causative agents of most human cervical carcinomas. E6, one of the oncogenes encoded by HPV16, possesses a number of biological and transforming functions. We have previously shown that the binding of E6 to host apoptotic proteins such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) R1, the adaptor protein FADD, and procaspase 8 results in a significant modification of the normal flow of apoptotic events. For example, E6 can bind to and accelerate the degradation of FADD. In addition, full-length E6 binds to the TNF R1 death domain and can also bind to and accelerate the degradation of procaspase 8. In contrast, the binding of small splice isoforms known as E6* results in the stabilization of procaspase 8. In this report, we propose a model for the ability of HPV16 E6 to both sensitize and protect cells from TNF as well as to protect cells from Fas. We demonstrate that both the level of E6 expression and the ratio between full-length E6 and E6* are important factors in the modification of the host extrinsic apoptotic pathways and show that at high levels of E6 expression, the further sensitization of U2OS, NOK, and Ca Ski cells to TNF-mediated apoptosis is most likely due to the formation of a pseudo-death-inducing signaling complex structure that includes complexes of E6 proteins. PMID:18842714

  7. Ginkgo biloba extract EGb761 attenuates brain death-induced renal injury by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines and the SAPK and JAK-STAT signalings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yifu; Xiong, Yunyi; Zhang, Huanxi; Li, Jun; Wang, Dong; Chen, Wenfang; Yuan, Xiaopeng; Su, Qiao; Li, Wenwen; Huang, Huiting; Bi, Zirong; Liu, Longshan; Wang, Changxi

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of EGb761, a Ginkgo Biloba extract, against brain death-induced kidney injury. Sixty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups: sham, brain-death (BD), BD + EGb b48h (48 hours before BD), BD + EGb 2 h (2 hours after BD), BD + EGb 1 h, and BD + EGb 0.5 h. Six hours after BD, serum sample and kidney tissues were collected for analyses. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine significantly elevated in the BD group than in sham group. In all the EGb761-treated BD animals except for the BD + Gb 2 h group, the levels of BUN and serum creatinine significantly reduced (all P < 0.01). EGb761 attenuated tubular injury and lowered the histological score. In addition, the longer duration of drug treatment was, the better protective efficacy could be observed. EGb761 significantly reduced IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, IP-10 mRNA expression and macrophage infiltration in the kidney. EGb761 treatment at 48 hour before brain death significantly attenuate the levels of p-JNK-MAPK, p-p38-MAPK, and p-STAT3 proteins (all P < 0.05, compared to BD group). In summary, our data showed that EGb761 treatment protected donor kidney from BD-induced damages by blocking SAPK and JAK-STAT signalings. Early administration of EGb761 can provide better protective efficacy. PMID:28332628

  8. miRs-138 and -424 control palmitoylation-dependent CD95-mediated cell death by targeting acyl protein thioesterases 1 and 2 in CLL.

    PubMed

    Berg, Valeska; Rusch, Marion; Vartak, Nachiket; Jüngst, Christian; Schauss, Astrid; Waldmann, Herbert; Hedberg, Christian; Pallasch, Christian P; Bastiaens, Philippe I H; Hallek, Michael; Wendtner, Clemens-Martin; Frenzel, Lukas P

    2015-05-07

    Resistance toward CD95-mediated apoptosis is a hallmark of many different malignancies, as it is known from primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Previously, we could show that miR-138 and -424 are downregulated in CLL cells. Here, we identified 2 new target genes, namely acyl protein thioesterase (APT) 1 and 2, which are under control of both miRs and thereby significantly overexpressed in CLL cells. APTs are the only enzymes known to promote depalmitoylation. Indeed, membrane proteins are significantly less palmitoylated in CLL cells compared with normal B cells. We identified APTs to directly interact with CD95 to promote depalmitoylation, thus impairing apoptosis mediated through CD95. Specific inhibition of APTs by siRNAs, treatment with miRs-138/-424, and pharmacologic approaches restore CD95-mediated apoptosis in CLL cells and other cancer cells, pointing to an important regulatory role of APTs in CD95 apoptosis. The identification of the depalmitoylation reaction of CD95 by APTs as a microRNA (miRNA) target provides a novel molecular mechanism for how malignant cells escape from CD95-mediated apoptosis. Here, we introduce palmitoylation as a novel posttranslational modification in CLL, which might impact on localization, mobility, and function of molecules, survival signaling, and migration.

  9. The Fas antigen (CD95) on human lymphoid cells: epitope analysis with ten antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zola, H; Fusco, M; Ridings, J; Flego, L R; Weedon, H M; Nicholson, I; Organ, N; Roberton, D M; Macardle, P J

    1996-11-01

    The expression of CD95 antigen was examined on adult and cord blood lymphocytes using a highly sensitive immunofluorescence/flow cytometric procedure. CD95 was expressed by the majority of circulating blood T cells in adults, and by a smaller proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in cord blood. The majority of circulating B cells did not react with seven CD95 antibodies, but three antibodies did stain B cells. In tonsil sections, CD95 was expressed throughout the tissue but germinal centres showed generally stronger staining than the surrounding follicular mantle and interfollicular areas. This was confirmed by flow cytometry, which showed expression preferentially on B cells with a germinal centre phenotype. Because different antibodies stained different proportions of B cells, CD95 epitopes were examined by inhibition, additive binding and protease susceptibility studies using a panel of ten CD95 antibodies. B cells apparently reacting selectively with CD95 antibodies were sorted and CD95 mRNA was reverse transcribed to cDNA and analyzed, in order to confirm the presence of CD95 in cells which reacted selectively and to explore the possible existence of CD95 isoforms. The major cDNA band was identical in the two populations. Inhibition of N-glycosylation suggested that the epitopes detected differentially could not be accounted for by differential N-glycosylation.

  10. Stimulation of CD40 in human bladder carcinoma cells inhibits anti-Fas/APO-1 (CD95)-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jakobson, E; Jönsson, G; Björck, P; Paulie, S

    1998-09-11

    CD40 and the CD95 (Fas/APO-1 antigen) are both members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family. Whereas CD40 mediates a strong growth stimulatory signal in B cells, engagement of the CD95 receptor leads to growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis. As it has been reported that CD40 activation may rescue B cells from undergoing apoptosis, we were interested to see whether it had a similar effect in other cells expressing the CD40 receptor. We used epithelial tumor cells from the urinary bladder, a cell type that frequently expresses CD40 but for which no clear function of the molecule has been assigned. We found that the ligation of CD95 with the antibody anti-APO-1 induced apoptosis in most of the cell lines tested. Stimulation of CD40 with antibodies or a soluble construct of the CD40 ligand was shown to protect cells from apoptosis, as demonstrated by their ability to suppress the growth inhibition exerted by the anti-APO-1 antibody. Our results show that CD40 stimulation make cells less vulnerable to apoptosis induced via CD95 and suggest that CD40 expression on epithelial tumors may be associated with cell survival.

  11. Nitric oxide inhibits apoptosis via AP-1-dependent CD95L transactivation.

    PubMed

    Melino, G; Bernassola, F; Catani, M V; Rossi, A; Corazzari, M; Sabatini, S; Vilbois, F; Green, D R

    2000-05-01

    Several inducers of cytotoxic stress promote apoptotic cell death, which, at least in some cases, involves the CD95/CD95 ligand (CD95L) pathway. The induction of the CD95/CD95L pathway can be activated by the activator protein-1 (AP-1)-mediated up-regulation of the CD95L promoter, which is responsible for the induction of apoptosis elicited by stimuli such as etoposide. We show that nitric oxide (NO) represents a regulatory element able to block apoptosis by interfering with this loop. Etoposide- and C6-ceramide-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T cells with different kinetics. Cell death was accompanied by an increase in DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor AP-1, transactivation of the AP-1 site-containing CD95L promoter, and caspase 3-like protease activation. Using different NO-releasing compounds, we found that apoptosis was prevented in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, in both models of apoptosis, NO-releasing compounds dose-dependently reduced: (a) the number of the titratable thiol groups (cysteine residues) of c-Jun; (b) induction of AP-1 DNA-binding activity; (c) AP-1-driven transactivation of the CD95L promoter; and (d) caspase activation. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that NO can modulate cell death at an upstream level, by interfering with the ability of AP-1 to induce CD95L expression.

  12. GDP-mannose-4,6-dehydratase (GMDS) deficiency renders colon cancer cells resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor- and CD95-mediated apoptosis by inhibiting complex II formation.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Kenta; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2011-12-16

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through binding to TRAIL receptors, death receptor 4 (DR4), and DR5. TRAIL has potential therapeutic value against cancer because of its selective cytotoxic effects on several transformed cell types. Fucosylation of proteins and lipids on the cell surface is a very important posttranslational modification that is involved in many cellular events. Recently, we found that a deficiency in GDP-mannose-4,6-dehydratase (GMDS) rendered colon cancer cells resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, resulting in tumor development and metastasis by escape from tumor immune surveillance. GMDS is an indispensable regulator of cellular fucosylation. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of inhibition of TRAIL signaling by GMDS deficiency. DR4, but not DR5, was found to be fucosylated; however, GMDS deficiency inhibited both DR4- and DR5-mediated apoptosis despite the absence of fucosylation on DR5. In addition, GMDS deficiency also inhibited CD95-mediated apoptosis but not the intrinsic apoptosis pathway induced by anti-cancer drugs. Binding of TRAIL and CD95 ligand to their cognate receptors primarily leads to formation of a complex comprising the receptor, FADD, and caspase-8, referred to as the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). GMDS deficiency did not affect formation of the primary DISC or recruitment to and activation of caspase-8 on the DISC. However, formation of secondary FADD-dependent complex II, comprising caspase-8 and cFLIP, was significantly inhibited by GMDS deficiency. These results indicate that GMDS regulates the formation of secondary complex II from the primary DISC independent of direct fucosylation of death receptors.

  13. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells inhibit spontaneous Ig production by autologous bone marrow cells: role of CD95-CD95L interaction.

    PubMed

    Sampalo, A; Navas, G; Medina, F; Segundo, C; Cámara, C; Brieva, J A

    2000-11-01

    A variable degree of humoral immunodeficiency is a common feature in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). The aim of this study was to explore the possibility that B-CLL cells play a direct role in this phenomenon. To this end, patients' bone marrow (BM) immunoglobulin (Ig)-secreting cells were cocultured with autologous purified B-CLL cells. The results show that tumoral cells inhibited the spontaneous IgG secretion by BM plasma cells, and this effect increased after PMA-induction of B-CLL cells. This inhibitory process was proportional to the number of B-CLL cells added and depended on cellular contact. Adhesion molecules did not appear to be involved in the cellular interaction, because the inclusion of blocking antibody to a variety of these proteins did not reverse the inhibitory phenomenon. However, the addition of monoclonal antibody that blocked the function of either CD95 or CD95L clearly reversed B-CLL cell inhibition on autologous BM plasma cells. These latter cells were shown to express CD95, and B-CLL cells contained detectable quantities of CD95L at the level of messenger RNA and protein. Annexin V-binding experiments revealed increased apoptosis of BM Ig-secreting cells when cocultured with autologous B-CLL cells. Finally, this inhibitory phenomenon might be operative in vivo because (a) there was a good correlation between the intensity of the inhibitory effect in vitro and the serum IgG level exhibited by every patient and (b) B-CLL cells also inhibited in vivo antigen-induced IgG-tetanus toxoid-secreting cells obtained from normal immunized subjects. Collectively, these data suggest that B-CLL cells inhibit autologous CD95-bearing Ig-secreting cells by the interaction with CD95L present on B-CLL cells and, hence, contribute to the state of humoral immunodeficiency that occurs in these patients.

  14. Genome-wide identification of Fas/CD95 alternative splicing regulators reveals links with iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, J Ramón; Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-01-08

    Alternative splicing of Fas/CD95 exon 6 generates either a membrane-bound receptor that promotes, or a soluble isoform that inhibits, apoptosis. Using an automatized genome-wide siRNA screening for alternative splicing regulators of endogenous transcripts in mammalian cells, we identified 200 genes whose knockdown modulates the ratio between Fas/CD95 isoforms. These include classical splicing regulators; core spliceosome components; and factors implicated in transcription and chromatin remodeling, RNA transport, intracellular signaling, and metabolic control. Coherent effects of genes involved in iron homeostasis and pharmacological modulation of iron levels revealed a link between intracellular iron and Fas/CD95 exon 6 inclusion. A splicing regulatory network linked iron levels with reduced activity of the Zinc-finger-containing splicing regulator SRSF7, and in vivo and in vitro assays revealed that iron inhibits SRSF7 RNA binding. Our results uncover numerous links between cellular pathways and RNA processing and a mechanism by which iron homeostasis can influence alternative splicing.

  15. Expression of CD95 (Fas) in sun-exposed human skin and cutaneous carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Filipowicz, Ewa; Adegboyega, P; Sanchez, R L; Gatalica, Zoran

    2002-02-01

    Carcinomas of the skin are by far the most common human malignancies. Continuous exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light facilitates the development of precancerous lesions (actinic keratosis [AK]) that may progress to invasive squamous carcinomas. Apoptosis, triggered by the activation of CD95 (Fas), is one of the most important defense mechanisms against UV light-induced carcinogenesis in experimental models, but the dynamics of CD95 expression in patients with sun-induced lesions are largely unknown. The authors studied the expression of CD95 (Fas) in biopsy samples of normal skin (not exposed to sun) and compared it with chronically sun-exposed skin (as evidenced by solar elastosis), AK, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and keratoacanthomas (KA). Normal skin keratinocytes expressed CD95 in cytoplasmic membranes and intercellular bridges in the basal layer. In chronically sun-exposed keratinocytes (solar elastosis, no evidence of dysplasia), CD95 expression was up-regulated and was observed throughout the entire thickness of the epidermis. However, in actinic keratosis there was a complete absence of Fas in approximately two-thirds of the cases (8 of 12). In invasive SCC, CD95 was expressed focally and weakly only at the sites of contact with stromal lymphocytes. Keratoacanthomas consistently expressed CD95 at the interface with the inflammatory cells. No staining was observed in BCC. CD95 (Fas) up-regulation in chronically sun-exposed keratinocytes indicates an important role in the control of sun-induced damage. Further sun exposure results, however, in significant down-regulation of this defense mechanism, proportional to the degree of dysplasia. Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society. DOI 10.1002/cncr.10277

  16. CD95/CD95L-mediated apoptosis of the hepatic stellate cell. A mechanism terminating uncontrolled hepatic stellate cell proliferation during hepatic tissue repair.

    PubMed Central

    Saile, B.; Knittel, T.; Matthes, N.; Schott, P.; Ramadori, G.

    1997-01-01

    During liver tissue repair, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), a pericyte-like mesenchymal liver cell population, transform from a "quiescent" status ("resting" HSC) into myofibroblast-like cells ("activated" HSC) with the latter representing the principle matrix synthesizing cell of the liver. Presently, the mechanisms that terminate HSC cell proliferation when tissue repair is concluded are poorly understood. Controlled cell death known as apoptosis could be a mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Therefore, apoptosis and its regulation were studied in HSC using an in vitro and in vivo approach. Spontaneous apoptosis became detectable in parallel with HSC activation because resting cells (2 days after isolation) displayed no sign of apoptosis, whereas apoptosis was present in 8% (+/- 5%) of "transitional" cells (day 4) and in 18% (+/- 8%) of fully activated cells (day 7). Both CD95 (APO-1/Fas) and CD95L (APO-1-/Fas-ligand) became increasingly expressed during the course of activation. Apoptosis could be fully blocked by CD95-blocking antibodies in normal cells and HSC already entering the apoptotic cycle. Using CD95-activating antibodies, transition of more than 95% cells into apoptosis was evident at each activation step. The apoptosis-regulating proteins Bcl-2 and p53 could not be detected in resting cells but were found in increasing amounts at days 4 and 7 of cultivation. Whereas p53 expression was induced by the CD95-activating antibody, no change was inducible in Bcl-2 expression. The Bcl-2-related protein bax could be found at days 2 and 4 in similar expression, was considerably up-regulated at day 7, but was not regulated by CD95-agonistic antibodies. In vivo, acute tissue damage was first accompanied by activation and proliferation of HSC displaying no sign of apoptosis. In the recovery phase, apoptotic HSC were detectable in parallel to a reduction in the total number of HSC present in the liver tissue. The data demonstrate that apoptosis becomes detectable

  17. The apoptotic members CD95, BclxL, and Bcl-2 cooperate to promote cell migration by inducing Ca2+ flux from the endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Fouqué, A; Lepvrier, E; Debure, L; Gouriou, Y; Malleter, M; Delcroix, V; Ovize, M; Ducret, T; Li, C; Hammadi, M; Vacher, P; Legembre, P

    2016-01-01

    Metalloprotease-processed CD95L (cl-CD95L) is a soluble cytokine that implements a PI3K/Ca2+ signaling pathway in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Accordingly, high levels of cl-CD95L in TNBC women correlate with poor prognosis, and administration of this ligand in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model accelerates the metastatic dissemination of TNBC cells. The molecular mechanism underlying CD95-mediated cell migration remains unknown. Here, we present genetic and pharmacologic evidence that the anti-apoptotic molecules BclxL and Bcl-2 and the pro-apoptotic factors BAD and BID cooperate to promote migration of TNBC cells stimulated with cl-CD95L. BclxL was distributed in both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrion membranes. The mitochondrion-localized isoform promoted cell migration by interacting with voltage-dependent anion channel 1 to orchestrate Ca2+ transfer from the ER to mitochondria in a BH3-dependent manner. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter contributed to this flux, which favored ATP production and cell migration. In conclusion, this study reveals a novel molecular mechanism controlled by BclxL to promote cancer cell migration and supports the use of BH3 mimetics as therapeutic options not only to kill tumor cells but also to prevent metastatic dissemination in TNBCs. PMID:27367565

  18. sCD95L in serum after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, A; Sperl, A; Heller, R; Gerner, H J; Biglari, B

    2016-11-01

    A prospective observational study reporting correlation between sCD95L (serum cluster of differentiation 95 ligand) serum levels and remission after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). To describe the correlation between sCD95L serum levels and remission after traumatic SCI in a human protocol compared with animal studies. Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz), Germany. We included 45 patients with traumatic SCI. According to their neurological outcome, patients were divided into two groups, patients with (G1, n=26) and without (G2, n=19) remission. Blood was collected on post-admission and according to a fixed scheme, that is, after 4, 9, 12 h, 1, 3 days and 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 weeks. By comparing G1 with G2, we found a correlation between neurological remission and sCD95L serum concentrations. Consistently elevated levels of sCD95L in G1 between 9 h and 1 month after injury show significantly differing values 7 days after injury. This indicates a correlation between patients with clinically documented neurological remission and elevated sCD95L serum concentrations. In opposite to animal studies, our patients with neurological remission show on average higher levels of sCD95L compared with patients without. Therefore, spinal cord-injured patients would probably not profit from neutralizing CD95L. Our results present that the transfer of findings from animal studies to humans must always be considered critically. We were able to show that peripheral serum cytokine expression is suitable to state processes after SCI in humans.

  19. Inhibitors of XIAP sensitize CD40-activated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to CD95-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kater, Arnon P.; Dicker, Frank; Mangiola, Massimo; Welsh, Kate; Houghten, Richard; Ostresh, John; Nefzi, Adel; Reed, John C.; Pinilla, Clemencia; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) treated with adenovirus CD154 (Ad-CD154, CD40 ligand [CD40L]) gene therapy experienced rapid reductions in leukemia cell counts and lymph node size associated with the induced expression of Fas (CD95). However, CLL cells initially resist CD95-mediated apoptosis within the first 3 days after CD40 ligation in vitro. Thereafter, they become sensitive, which is associated with the CD40-induced expression of the proapoptotic protein B-cell leukemia 2 homology 3 (BH3) interacting domain death agonist (Bid). We hypothesized that the initial resistance to CD95-mediated apoptosis may be due to the high-level expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) by CLL cells. Consistent with this, CLL cells from patients 1 day after treatment with autologous Ad-CD154-transduced CLL cells became sensitive to CD95-mediated apoptosis following treatment with a novel XIAP inhibitor, 1540-14. Similarly, 1540-14 specifically enhanced CD95-mediated apoptosis of CLL cells following CD40 ligation in vitro. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that treatment with 1540-14 allowed CD40-stimulated CLL cells to experience high-level activation of caspases-8 and -3 and cleavage of poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase following CD95 ligation. This study demonstrates that distal apoptosis regulators contribute to the initial resistance of CD40-activated CLL cells to CD95-mediated apoptosis and suggests that XIAP inhibitors might enhance the effectiveness of immune-based treatment strategies that target CD40, such as CD154 gene therapy. (Blood. 2005;106:1742-1748) PMID:15914559

  20. FAP-1 in pancreatic cancer cells: functional and mechanistic studies on its inhibitory role in CD95-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ungefroren, H; Kruse, M L; Trauzold, A; Roeschmann, S; Roeder, C; Arlt, A; Henne-Bruns, D; Kalthoff, H

    2001-08-01

    In this study we investigated the functional role of FAP-1 as a potential inhibitor of CD95 (Fas, APO-1)-mediated apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Stable transfection of the CD95-sensitive, FAP-1-negative cell line Capan-1 with an FAP-1 cDNA resulted in a strongly decreased sensitivity to CD95-induced apoptosis, as measured by DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activity. Inhibition of cellular protein tyrosine phosphatases with orthovanadate dose-dependently increased CD95-induced apoptosis in CD95-resistant FAP-1-positive Panc89 and Capan-1-FAP-1 cells almost to the level seen in wild-type Capan-1 cells. Blocking the CD95/FAP-1 interaction in Panc89 cells by cytoplasmic microinjection of a synthetic tripeptide mimicking the C terminus of CD95 resulted in a mean 5.5-fold increase in apoptosis compared to cells that received a control peptide. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy we show that in Panc89 cells FAP-1 is mainly associated with the Golgi complex and with peripheral vesicles. FAP-1 displayed enhanced colocalization with CD95 upon CD95 stimulation in the Golgi complex but not in surface-associated vesicles. This correlated with a decrease in plasma membrane staining for CD95 as determined by FACS analysis. Inhibition of Golgi anterograde transport by brefeldin A abolished the anti-CD95-induced colocalization of FAP-1 and CD95 as well as the decrease in cell-surface-associated CD95. Finally, we demonstrate by immunohistochemistry that FAP-1 is strongly expressed in tumor cells from pancreatic carcinoma tissues. Taken together, these results show that FAP-1 can protect pancreatic carcinoma cells from CD95-mediated apoptosis, probably by preventing anti-CD95-induced translocation of CD95 from intracellular stores to the cell surface.

  1. Isolation of Lipid Rafts Through Discontinuous Sucrose Gradient Centrifugation and Fas/CD95 Death Receptor Localization in Raft Fractions.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2017-01-01

    Lipid raft domains, enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, serve as sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction proteins, and show resistance to detergent solubilization. Despite rafts have been involved in survival processes, these membrane domains have also been shown to play a major role in the modulation of death receptor signaling. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for isolating lipid rafts from whole cells by taking advantage of the lipid raft resistance to Triton X-100 solubilization at 4 °C, followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, with subsequent analysis of Fas/CD95 death receptor localization in the raft fractions by immunoblotting. This method is also useful to localize additional proteins in membrane rafts.

  2. Interleukin 7 up-regulates CD95 protein on CD4+ T cells by affecting mRNA alternative splicing: priming for a synergistic effect on HIV-1 reservoir maintenance.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yue; Zhang, Shaoying; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Xu; Geng, Guannan; Li, Jun; Guo, Xuemin; Cai, Weiping; Li, Linghua; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-02

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) has been used as an immunoregulatory and latency-reversing agent in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Although IL-7 can restore circulating CD4(+) T cell counts in HIV-1-infected patients, the anti-apoptotic and proliferative effects of IL-7 appear to benefit survival and expansion of HIV-1-latently infected memory CD4(+) T lymphocytes. IL-7 has been shown to elevate CD95 on CD4(+) T cells in HIV-1-infected individuals and prime CD4(+) T lymphocytes to CD95-mediated proliferative or apoptotic signals. Here we observed that through increasing microRNA-124, IL-7 down-regulates the splicing regulator polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB), leading to inclusion of the transmembrane domain-encoding exon 6 of CD95 mRNA and, subsequently, elevation of CD95 on memory CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, IL-7 up-regulates cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) and stimulates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation, which switches CD95 signaling to survival mode in memory CD4(+) T lymphocytes. As a result, co-stimulation through IL-7/IL-7R and FasL/CD95 signal pathways augments IL-7-mediated survival and expansion of HIV-1-latently infected memory CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Collectively, we have demonstrated a novel mechanism for IL-7-mediated maintenance of HIV-1 reservoir.

  3. Cisplatin-induced CD95 redistribution into membrane lipid rafts of HT29 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Sandrine; Hammann, Arlette; Grazide, Solène; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Athias, Anne; Sergent, Odile; Laurent, Guy; Gambert, Philippe; Solary, Eric; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse

    2004-05-15

    We have shown previously that the death receptor CD95 could contribute to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis of colon cancer cells. In addition, anticancer drugs cooperate with CD95 cognate ligand or agonistic antibodies to trigger cancer cell apoptosis. In the present study, we show that the anticancer drug cisplatin induces clustering of CD95 at the surface of the human colon cancer cell line HT29, an event inhibited by the inhibitor of acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) imipramine. The cholesterol sequestering agent nystatin also prevents cisplatin-induced CD95 clustering and decreases HT29 cell sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis and the synergy between cisplatin and anti-CD95 agonistic antibodies. CD95, together with the adaptor molecule Fas-associated death domain and procaspase-8, is redistributed into cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched cell fractions after cisplatin treatment, suggesting plasma membrane raft involvement. Interestingly, nystatin prevents the translocation of the aSMase to the extracellular surface of plasma membrane and the production of ceramide, suggesting that these early events require raft integrity. In addition, nystatin prevents cisplatin-induced transient increase in plasma membrane fluidity that could be required for CD95 translocation. Together, these results demonstrate that cisplatin activates aSMase and induces ceramide production, which triggers the redistribution of CD95 into the plasma membrane rafts. Such redistribution contributes to cell death and sensitizes tumor cells to CD95-mediated apoptosis.

  4. Ursodeoxycholyl Lysophosphatidylethanolamide Protects Against CD95/Fas-Induced Fulminant Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Utaipan, Tanyarath; Otto, Ann-Christin; Gan-Schreier, Hongying; Chunglok, Warangkana; Pathil, Anita; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Chamulitrat, Walee

    2017-01-04

    Increased activation of CD95/Fas by Fas ligand in viral hepatitis and autoimmunity is involved in pathogenesis of fulminant hepatitis and liver failure. We designed a bile-acid phospholipid conjugate ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide (UDCA-LPE with LPE containing oleate at the sn-1) as a hepatoprotectant that was shown to protect against fulminant hepatitis induced by endotoxin. We herein further assessed the ability of UDCA-LPE to prevent death receptor CD95/Fas-induced fulminant hepatitis. C57BL/6 mice were intravenously administered with CD95/Fas agonistic monoclonal antibody (Jo-2) with or without 1 h pretreatment with 50 mg/kg UDCA-LPE. Jo-2 administration caused massive hepatocyte damage as seen by histology, and this was associated with a significant decrease in hepatic phosphatidylcholine (PC), lysoPC, and lysophosphatidylethanolamine levels. By histology, UDCA-LPE pretreatment improved hepatocyte damage and restored the loss of these phospholipids in part by a mechanism involving an inhibition of cytosolic phospholipaseA2 expression. Accordingly, Jo-2 treatment increased hepatic expression of cleaved caspase 8, caspase 3, and poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase-1, and on the other hand decreased that of anti-apoptotic cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein. UDCA-LPE pretreatment was able to reverse all these changes. Moreover, UDCA-LPE attenuated inflammatory response by lowering the levels of Jo-2-induced proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in liver and serum. UDCA-LPE was also able to decrease the levels of stimulated Th1/Th17 cytokines in Jo-2-primed isolated splenocytes. Taken together, UDCA-LPE exhibited potent anti-inflammatory effects against CD95/Fas-induced fulminant hepatitis.

  5. TLR9-ERK-mTOR signaling is critical for autophagic cell death induced by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide 107 combined with irradiation in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Cen, Yanyan; Cai, Yongqing; Liu, Tao; Liu, Huan; Cao, Guanqun; Liu, Dan; Li, Bin; Peng, Wei; Zou, Jintao; Pang, Xueli; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2016-06-02

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated CpG dinucleotides (CpG ODN) function as potential radiosensitizers for glioma treatment, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. It was observed that CpG ODN107, when combined with irradiation, did not induce apoptosis. Herein, the effect of CpG ODN107 + irradiation on autophagy and the related signaling pathways was investigated. In vitro, CpG ODN107 + irradiation induced autophagosome formation, increased the ratio of LC3 II/LC3 I, beclin 1 and decreased p62 expression in U87 cells. Meanwhile, CpG ODN107 also increased LC3 II/LC3 I expression in U251 and CHG-5 cells. In vivo, CpG ODN107 combined with local radiotherapy induced autophagosome formation in orthotopic transplantation tumor. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms demonstrated that CpG ODN107 + irradiation increased the levels of TLR9 and p-ERK, and decreased the level of p-mTOR in glioma cells. Further, TLR9-specific siRNA could affect the expressions of p-ERK and autophagy-related proteins in glioma cells. Taken together, CpG ODN107 combined with irradiation could induce autophagic cell death, and this effect was closely related to the TLR9-ERK-mTOR signaling pathway in glioma cells, providing new insights into the investigation mechanism of CpG ODN.

  6. Rapid and selective apoptosis in human leukemic cells induced by Aplidine through a Fas/CD95- and mitochondrial-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; An, Feiyun; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2003-04-01

    Aplidine is a promising antitumor agent derived from the Mediterranean tunicate Aplidium albicans. We have found that Aplidine at nM concentrations (10-100 nM) induced apoptosis in human leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cell cultures from leukemic patients. Inhibition of the Fas (CD95)/Fas ligand (CD95L) signaling pathway with an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody partially inhibited Aplidine-induced apoptosis. L929 cells were resistant to Aplidine action but underwent apoptosis after transfection with human Fas cDNA. Aplidine induced a rapid and sustained c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation, and pretreatment with curcumin or SP600125 inhibited Aplidine-induced c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and apoptosis. However, inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 kinase signaling pathways did not affect Aplidine-induced apoptosis. Aplidine induced caspase-3 activation, and caspase inhibition prevented Aplidine-induced apoptosis. Aplidine failed to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, defective in caspase-3, additionally implicating caspase-3 in its proapoptotic action. Aplidine also triggered an early release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, and overexpression of bcl-2 by gene transfer abrogated mitochondrial cytochrome c release and apoptosis. Aplidine rapidly induced cleavage of Bid, a mediator that connects the Fas/CD95 cell death receptor to the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Primary cultures of normal human cells, including hepatocytes and resting peripheral blood lymphocytes, were spared or weakly affected after Aplidine treatment. Nevertheless, mitogen (phytohemagglutinin/interleukin-2)-activated T lymphocytes resulted sensitively to the apoptotic action of Aplidine. Thus, Aplidine is an extremely potent and rapid apoptotic inducer on leukemic cells that triggers Fas/CD95- and mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling routes, and shows a rather selective apoptotic action on cancer cells and activated T cells.

  7. Involvement of the CD95 (APO-1/Fas) receptor and ligand system in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric epithelial apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rudi, J; Kuck, D; Strand, S; von Herbay, A; Mariani, S M; Krammer, P H; Galle, P R; Stremmel, W

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric carcinoma. The potential role of CD95-mediated apoptosis was investigated in a panel of gastric biopsies obtained from patients with H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis (n = 29) and with noninfected normal mucosa (n = 10). Immunohistochemistry revealed increased CD95 receptor expression in epithelial and lamina propria cells in chronic gastritis. By in situ hybridization, CD95 ligand mRNA was absent or low in normal mucosa but expressed at high levels in lamina propria lymphocytes and, unexpectedly, in epithelial cells in chronic gastritis. Apoptotic cells were rare in normal mucosa but were observed regularly in chronic gastritis in close proximity to CD95 ligand mRNA expression throughout the epithelial and lamina propria cells. In a functional analysis gastric epithelial cell lines were incubated with supernatants of H. pylori. Treatment with the cytotoxic isolate H. pylori 60190 but not with the noncytotoxic isolate Tx30a upregulated CD95 in up to 50% of gastric epithelial cells and induced apoptosis in these cells. H. pylori-induced apoptosis was partially prevented by blocking CD95, demonstrating the functional role of the CD95 system. These findings suggest that H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis involves apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells by activation of the CD95 receptor and ligand system. PMID:9788963

  8. Preparation and characteristics of Cd.95Mn.05Se single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazai, B.; Kershaw, R.; Dwight, K.; Wold, A.

    1983-01-01

    Homogeneous crystals of Cd.95Mn.05Se of high optical quality have been grown by a modified Bridgman method. Magnetic susceptibility measurements verify the uniform distribution of Mn(II) obtained after annealing at 600 degrees C. Crystals grown in the presence of 5 atomic percent excess selenium showed high resistivity; the addition of 1 mg iodine to a 10 g charge resulted in n-type conductivity and a room-temperature carrier concentration 3/2.9 x 10 to the 16th power cm.

  9. Structural Insight for Roles of DR5 Death Domain Mutations on Oligomerization of DR5 Death Domain-FADD Complex in the Death-Inducing Signaling Complex Formation: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongyi; Song, Yuhua

    2016-04-01

    Death receptor 5 (DR5)-induced apoptosis that prioritizes the death of tumor cells has been proposed as one of the promising cancer therapies. In this process, oligomerized DR5 death domain (DD) binding to Fas-associated death domain (FADD) leads to FADD activating caspase-8, which marks the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) that initiates apoptosis. DR5 DD mutations found in cancer cells have been suggested to play an important pathological role, the mechanism through which those mutants prevent the DR5-activated DISC formation is not clear yet. This study sought to provide structural and molecular insight for the roles of four selected DR5 DD mutations (E355K, E367K, K415N, and L363F) in the oligomerization of DR5 DD-FADD complex during the DISC formation. Results from the molecular dynamics simulations show that the simulated mutants induce conformational, dynamical motions and interactions changes in the DR5 DD-FADD tetramer complex, including changes in a protein's backbone flexibility, less exposure of FADD DED's caspase-8 binding site, reduced H-bonding and hydrophobic contacts at the DR5 DD-FADD DD binding, altered distribution of the electrostatic potentials and correlated motions of residues, and reduced binding affinity of DR5 DD binding to FADD. This study provides structural and molecular insight for the influence of DR5 DD mutations on oligomerization of DR5 DD-FADD complex, which is expected to foster understanding of the DR5 DD mutants' resistance mechanism against DR5-activated DISC formation.

  10. Fas/CD95 prevents autoimmunity independently of lipid raft localization and efficient apoptosis induction

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Anthony C.; Ramaswamy, Madhu; Ouyang, Claudia; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Meylan, Françoise; Thomas, Stacy K.; Richoz, Nathan; Eil, Robert; Price, Susan; Casellas, Rafael; Rao, V. Koneti; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Siegel, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affecting the apoptosis-inducing function of the Fas/CD95 TNF-family receptor result in autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disease. However, Fas can also costimulate T-cell activation and promote tumour cell growth and metastasis. Palmitoylation at a membrane proximal cysteine residue enables Fas to localize to lipid raft microdomains and induce apoptosis in cell lines. Here, we show that a palmitoylation-defective Fas C194V mutant is defective in inducing apoptosis in primary mouse T cells, B cells and dendritic cells, while retaining the ability to enhance naive T-cell differentiation. Despite inability to efficiently induce cell death, the Fas C194V receptor prevents the lymphoaccumulation and autoimmunity that develops in Fas-deficient mice. These findings indicate that induction of apoptosis through Fas is dependent on receptor palmitoylation in primary immune cells, and Fas may prevent autoimmunity by mechanisms other than inducing apoptosis. PMID:28008916

  11. IL-7 Promotes CD95-Induced Apoptosis in B Cells via the IFN-γ/STAT1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Dang Vu Phuong, Linh; Ruffin, Nicolas; Pham Hong, Thang; Lantto, Rebecka; Vivar, Nancy; Chiodi, Francesca; Rethi, Bence

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) concentrations are increased in the blood of CD4+ T cell depleted individuals, including HIV-1 infected patients. High IL-7 levels might stimulate T cell activation and, as we have shown earlier, IL-7 can prime resting T cell to CD95 induced apoptosis as well. HIV-1 infection leads to B cell abnormalities including increased apoptosis via the CD95 (Fas) death receptor pathway and loss of memory B cells. Peripheral B cells are not sensitive for IL-7, due to the lack of IL-7Ra expression on their surface; however, here we demonstrate that high IL-7 concentration can prime resting B cells to CD95-mediated apoptosis via an indirect mechanism. T cells cultured with IL-7 induced high CD95 expression on resting B cells together with an increased sensitivity to CD95 mediated apoptosis. As the mediator molecule responsible for B cell priming to CD95 mediated apoptosis we identified the cytokine IFN-γ that T cells secreted in high amounts in response to IL-7. These results suggest that the lymphopenia induced cytokine IL-7 can contribute to the increased B cell apoptosis observed in HIV-1 infected individuals. PMID:22194871

  12. CD95 maintains stem cell-like and non-classical EMT programs in primary human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Drachsler, M; Kleber, S; Mateos, A; Volk, K; Mohr, N; Chen, S; Cirovic, B; Tüttenberg, J; Gieffers, C; Sykora, J; Wirtz, C R; Mueller, W; Synowitz, M; Martin-Villalba, A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive types of cancer with limited therapeutic options and unfavorable prognosis. Stemness and non-classical epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (ncEMT) features underlie the switch from normal to neoplastic states as well as resistance of tumor clones to current therapies. Therefore, identification of ligand/receptor systems maintaining this privileged state is needed to devise efficient cancer therapies. In this study, we show that the expression of CD95 associates with stemness and EMT features in GBM tumors and cells and serves as a prognostic biomarker. CD95 expression increases in tumors and with tumor relapse as compared with non-tumor tissue. Recruitment of the activating PI3K subunit, p85, to CD95 death domain is required for maintenance of EMT-related transcripts. A combination of the current GBM therapy, temozolomide, with a CD95 inhibitor dramatically abrogates tumor sphere formation. This study molecularly dissects the role of CD95 in GBM cells and contributes the rational for CD95 inhibition as a GBM therapy. PMID:27124583

  13. Fas (CD95) expression in myeloid cells promotes obesity-induced muscle insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wueest, Stephan; Mueller, Rouven; Blüher, Matthias; Item, Flurin; Chin, Annie S H; Wiedemann, Michael S F; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Kovtonyuk, Larisa; Chervonsky, Alexander V; Schoenle, Eugen J; Manz, Markus G; Konrad, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue and liver has been implicated in obesity-associated insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Yet, the contribution of inflammatory cells to the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. In a large cohort of obese human individuals, blood monocyte Fas (CD95) expression correlated with systemic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance. To test a causal role for myeloid cell Fas expression in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, we generated myeloid/haematopoietic cell-specific Fas-depleted mice. Myeloid/haematopoietic Fas deficiency prevented the development of glucose intolerance in high fat-fed mice, in ob/ob mice, and in mice acutely challenged by LPS. In vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated preservation of muscle insulin responsiveness with no effect on adipose tissue or liver. Studies using neutralizing antibodies demonstrated a role for TNFα as mediator between myeloid Fas and skeletal muscle insulin resistance, supported by significant correlations between monocyte Fas expression and circulating TNFα in humans. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an unanticipated crosstalk between myeloid cells and skeletal muscle in the development of obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:24203314

  14. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) caused by Fas (CD95) mutation mimicking sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Müllauer, Leonhard; Emhofer, Josef; Wohlfart, Sabine; Pichlhöfer, Bettina; Stary, Susanne; Ebetsberger, Georg; Mannhalter, Christine; Chott, Andreas

    2008-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an inherited disorder associated with defects in apoptosis, characterized by childhood onset of lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and autoimmune disease. ALPS is most frequently associated with a mutation in the cell death receptor Fas (CD95). Very rarely a mutation in caspase 10 is present. An increase of CD4/CD8 double negative T cells in the peripheral blood and lymph nodes is a feature characteristic of ALPS. Additionally, histiocytic proliferations resembling sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease) were reported recently in patients with ALPS. In the rare cases with a caspase 10 mutation an accumulation of dendritic cells in lymphoid organs was noted. We describe a different, sarcoidosislike, histiocytic infiltration of lymph nodes that persisted for years in a girl, that was initially supposed to suffer from sarcoidosis, but was eventually diagnosed as ALPS, associated with a missense mutation in the intracellular death domain of Fas. This sarcoidosislike histologic picture extends the spectrum of histiocytic lymph node alterations observed in ALPS and alerts of a potential diagnostic pitfall.

  15. Pathogen-Induced Proapoptotic Phenotype and High CD95 (Fas) Expression Accompany a Suboptimal CD8+ T-Cell Response: Reversal by Adenoviral Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, José Ronnie; Bruña–Romero, Oscar; Araújo, Adriano F.; Dominguez, Mariana R.; Ersching, Jonatan; de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bortoluci, Karina R.; Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P.; Lopes, Marcela F.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2012-01-01

    MHC class Ia-restricted CD8+ T cells are important mediators of the adaptive immune response against infections caused by intracellular microorganisms. Whereas antigen-specific effector CD8+ T cells can clear infection caused by intracellular pathogens, in some circumstances, the immune response is suboptimal and the microorganisms survive, causing host death or chronic infection. Here, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms that could explain why CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity during infection with the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is not optimal. For that purpose, we compared the CD8+ T-cell mediated immune responses in mice infected with T. cruzi or vaccinated with a recombinant adenovirus expressing an immunodominant parasite antigen. Several functional and phenotypic characteristics of specific CD8+ T cells overlapped. Among few exceptions was an accelerated expansion of the immune response in adenoviral vaccinated mice when compared to infected ones. Also, there was an upregulated expression of the apoptotic-signaling receptor CD95 on the surface of specific T cells from infected mice, which was not observed in the case of adenoviral-vaccinated mice. Most importantly, adenoviral vaccine provided at the time of infection significantly reduced the upregulation of CD95 expression and the proapoptotic phenotype of pathogen-specific CD8+ cells expanded during infection. In parallel, infected adenovirus-vaccinated mice had a stronger CD8 T-cell mediated immune response and survived an otherwise lethal infection. We concluded that a suboptimal CD8+ T-cell response is associated with an upregulation of CD95 expression and a proapoptotic phenotype. Both can be blocked by adenoviral vaccination. PMID:22615561

  16. Modified arabinoxylan rice bran (MGN-3/Biobran) sensitizes human T cell leukemia cells to death receptor (CD95)-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Gollapudi, Sastry

    2003-11-10

    MGN-3, an arabinoxylan extracted from rice bran that is treated enzymatically with an extract from Shiitaki mushrooms, is an effective biological response modifier that increases NK cell activity, and potentiates the activity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we investigated the effect of MGN-3 on death receptor-induced apoptosis in the human leukemic HUT 78 cell line. HUT 78 cells were pre-treated with MGN-3, and then were incubated with the agonistic antibody against death receptor (Fas, CD95). Apoptosis was determined by the propidium iodide technique using FACScan. Activation of caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9 was determined by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured with DIOC(6) dye using FACScan. Expression of CD95 and Bcl-2 were measured by flow cytometry. In a dose-dependent manner, MGN-3 enhanced anti-CD95 antibody-induced apoptosis. Increased cell death was correlated with increased depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased activation of caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9. MGN-3 treatment had no effect on the level of expression of CD95, but it caused down regulation of Bcl-2 expression. These results suggest that MGN-3 increases the susceptibility of cancer cells to undergo apoptosis mediated by death ligands, which may be relevant for anti-cancer activities.

  17. Paclitaxel (Taxol)-induced apoptosis in human epithelioid sarcoma cell lines is enhanced by upregulation of CD95 ligand (FasL/Apo-1L).

    PubMed

    Heikaus, Sebastian; Matuszek, Krystian S; Suschek, Christoph V; Ramp, Uwe; Reinecke, Petra; Grinstein, Edgar; Haremza, Janine; Gabbert, Helmut E; Mahotka, Csaba

    2008-06-01

    Metastasizing epithelioid sarcoma (ES) is an extremely aggressive tumor, because conventional chemotherapy and irradiation are largely ineffective. Here, we analyzed the impact of the CD95-mediated drug-induced apoptosis in ES cell lines. The effects of paclitaxel (Taxol) and 5-FU were determined by MTT assay. The extent of apoptosis was analyzed by light microscopy and Annexin V staining (flow cytometry). The expression of death receptors and ligands was defined by RT-PCR, Western blotting and flow cytometry. All cell lines expressed CD95, but not the CD95 ligand. The CD95 activation resulted in apoptosis and cell death in all cell lines. Both paclitaxel and 5-FU are able to trigger apoptosis, and furthermore, to upregulate CD95, whereas only paclitaxel increases CD95 ligand expression. Neutralizing antibodies directed against CD95 ligand effectively inhibited paclitaxel-induced cell death, thereby providing evidence for a direct involvement of the CD95 system in paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Concomitant upregulation of CD95 receptor and ligand may significantly enhance the response of ES to anticancer drugs. As evident from the differential response of our clonal ES subpopulations to paclitaxel and 5-FU, effective activation of the CD95 system depends on intrinsic properties of both the chemotherapeutic agent and target cell population.

  18. A Recombinant Bispecific CD20×CD95 Antibody With Superior Activity Against Normal and Malignant B-cells

    PubMed Central

    Nalivaiko, Kristina; Hofmann, Martin; Kober, Karina; Teichweyde, Nadine; Krammer, Peter H; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed to the B-cell-specific CD20-antigen are successfully used for the treatment of lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare the anti-B-cell activity of three different antibodies directed to CD20: (i) a chimeric, monospecific antibody, (ii) an Fc-optimized variant thereof, and (iii) a bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody in a newly developed recombinant format, termed Fabsc. The bispecific antibody specifically triggers the CD95 death receptor on malignant, as well as activated, normal B-cells. We found that the capability of this antibody to suppress the growth of malignant B-cells in vitro and in vivo and to specifically deplete normal, activated B-cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures was superior to that of the Fc-optimized monospecific antibody. This antibody in turn was more effective than its nonoptimized variant. Moreover, the bispecific antibody was the only reagent capable of significantly suppressing antibody production in vitro. Our findings imply that the bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody might become a new, prototypical reagent for the treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. PMID:26581163

  19. Sunlight-induced basal cell carcinoma tumor cells and ultraviolet-B-irradiated psoriatic plaques express Fas ligand (CD95L).

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Steil, C; Wrone-Smith, T; Sun, X; Krueger, J G; Coven, T; Nickoloff, B J

    1998-01-01

    The skin is constantly exposed to sunlight and frequently develops sun-induced skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma (BCC). These epidermal-derived tumors escape local immune surveillance and infiltrate the dermis, requiring surgical removal. We report here that in contrast to keratinocytes in normal skin (n = 4), BCC tumor cells (n = 6) strongly and diffusely express Fas ligand (CD95L), but not Fas antigen (CD95). This CD95L expression in vivo by BCC tumor cells is associated with peritumoral T lymphocytes that are undergoing apoptosis. Moreover, CD95L can be induced on normal cultured keratinocytes after exposure to ultraviolet-B light (UV-B) irradiation. This induction of CD95L was confirmed at the mRNA and protein levels using multipassaged human keratinocytes and a keratinocyte cell line. Keratinocytes induced to express CD95L acquired the functional capacity to kill a CD95-positive lymphocyte cell line. Whereas hyperplastic keratinocytes in untreated psoriatic plaques do not express CD95L on their plasma membrane, after UV-B treatment there is strong and diffuse keratinocyte CD95L expression that coincided in a temporal fashion with depletion of intraepidermal T cells in all five patients studied. Our data suggest a novel molecular pathway by which UV light can contribute to the ability of a skin cancer to escape from immune attack by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and a previously unrecognized therapeutic mechanism of action for UV-B light in psoriasis via keratinocyte CD95L expression. Such immunological events involving CD95L provide new insight and opportunity for novel treatment approaches not only for cutaneous neoplasms but also for various T cell-mediated dermatoses such as psoriasis. PMID:9421463

  20. Alloantigen specific deletion of primary human T cells by Fas ligand (CD95L)-transduced monocyte-derived killer-dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Christian; Hoves, Sabine; Halbritter, Dagmar; Zhang, Huang-Ge; Mountz, John D; Fleck, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have been performed in vitro and in various animal models to modulate the interaction of dendritic cells (DC) and T cells by Fas (CD95/Apo-1) signalling to delete activated T cells via induction of activation-induced cell death (AICD). Previously, we could demonstrate that Fas ligand (FasL/CD95L)-expressing ‘killer-antigen-presenting cells’ can be generated from human monocyte-derived mature DC (mDC) using adenoviral gene transfer. To evaluate whether these FasL-expressing mDC (mDC-FasL) could eliminate alloreactive primary human T cells in vitro, co-culture experiments were performed. Proliferation of human T cells was markedly reduced in primary co-cultures with allogeneic mDC-FasL, whereas a strong proliferative T-cell response could be observed in co-cultures with enhanced green fluorescent protein-transduced mDC. Inhibition of T-cell proliferation was related to the transduction efficiency, and the numbers of mDC-FasL present in co-cultures. In addition, proliferation of pre-activated alloreactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells could be almost completely inhibited in secondary co-cultures using mDC-FasL as stimulatory cells, which was the result of induction of apoptosis in the majority of preactivated T cells. The specific deletion of alloreactive T cells by mDC-FasL was confirmed by an unaffected proliferative response of surviving T cells towards allogeneic ‘third-party’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a third stimulation, or upon unspecific stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 beads. The results of this study demonstrate that allospecifically activated T cells are efficiently eliminated by mDC-FasL, supporting further investigations to apply FasL-expressing ‘killer-DC’ as a novel strategy for the treatment of allograft rejection. PMID:21342185

  1. A functional polymorphism in fas (CD95/APO-1) gene promoter associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kanemitsu, Satomi; Ihara, Kenji; Saifddin, Ahmed; Otsuka, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Nagayama, Jun; Kuwano, Michihiko; Hara, Toshiro

    2002-06-01

    To investigate whether Fas promoter polymorphisms show a genetic contribution to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a Japanese population, and to study the functional difference in promoter activity of the polymorphisms. In 109 SLE patients and 140 controls, the frequencies of A/G polymorphisms at -670 nucleotide position and G/A at -1377 nucleotide position were determined by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis. The functional significance of the -670A/G polymorphism in the Fas gene was evaluated by a combination of Fas transcriptional activity in the reporter gene assay and binding activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. SLE patients exhibited significantly higher frequency of A allele at nucleotide position -670 (p = 0.004). There was no significant difference in the nucleotide position -1377 in Fas promoter gene between SLE patients and controls. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that the oligonucleotide with -670A in the Fas promoter had a higher binding ability to a GAS binding protein, STAT1, than that with -670G, although there was no statistically significant difference in the reporter gene assay. Fas promoter -670A/G polymorphism was significantly associated with SLE, suggesting a possibility that Fas promoter contributes, at least in part, to the pathogenesis of SLE.

  2. α-Galactosylceramide suppresses murine eosinophil production through interferon-γ-dependent induction of NO synthase and CD95

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar-Elsas, Maria Ignez; Queto, Túlio; Masid-de-Brito, Daniela; Vieira, Bruno Marques; de Luca, Bianca; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz; Xavier-Elsas, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), a pleiotropic immunomodulator with therapeutic potential in neoplastic, autoimmune and allergic diseases, activates invariant natural killer T-cells throughCD1-restricted receptors for α-GalCer on antigen-presenting cells, inducing cytokine secretion. However the haemopoietic effects of α-GalCer remain little explored. Experimental Approach α-GalCer-induced modulation of eosinophil production in IL-5-stimulated bone marrow cultures was examined in wild-type (BALB/c, C57BL/6) mice and their mutants lacking CD1, inducible NOS (iNOS), CD95 and IFN-γ, along with the effects of lymphocytes; IFN-γ; caspase and iNOS inhibitors; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and LTD4; and dexamethasone. Key Results α-GalCer (10−6–10−8M) suppressed IL-5-stimulated eosinopoiesis by inducing apoptosis. α-GalCer pretreatment in vivo (100 μg·kg−1, i.v.) suppressed colony formation by GM-CSF-stimulated bone marrow progenitors in semi-solid cultures. α-GalCer and dexamethasone synergistically promoted eosinophil maturation. Suppression of eosinophil production by α-GalCer was prevented by aminoguanidine and was undetectable in bone marrow lacking iNOS, CD95, CD28; or CD1d. Separation on Percoll gradients and depletion of CD3+ cells made bone marrow precursors unresponsive to α-GalCer. Responsiveness was restored with splenic lymphocytes. Experiments with (i) IFN-γ-deficient bone marrow, alone or co-cultured with spleen T-cells from wild-type, but not from CD1d-deficient, donors; (ii) IFN-γ neutralization; and (iii) recombinant IFN-γ, showed that these effects of α-GalCer were mediated by IFN-γ. Effects of α-GalCer on eosinophil production were blocked by LTD4 and NSAIDs. Conclusions and Implications α-GalCer activation of IFN-γ-secreting, CD1d-restricted lymphocytes induced iNOS-CD95-dependent apoptosis in developing eosinophils. This pathway is initiated by endogenous regulatory lymphocytes

  3. Apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells and sCD95 levels in women's sera are related with the risk of developing cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Romero-Ramos, Jose E; Olimon-Andalon, Vicente; Hernandez-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Diaz, Jose M; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo C; Morgan-Villela, Gilberto; del Toro-Arreola, Susana; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Jave-Suarez, Luis F

    2008-01-01

    Background Currently, there is clear evidence that apoptosis plays an important role in the development and progression of tumors. One of the best characterized apoptosis triggering systems is the CD95/Fas/APO-1 pathway; previous reports have demonstrated high levels of soluble CD95 (sCD95) in serum of patients with some types of cancer. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. As a first step in an attempt to design a minimally invasive test to predict the risk of developing cervical cancer in patients with precancerous lesions, we used a simple assay based on the capacity of human serum to induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We evaluated the relationship between sCD95 levels and the ability to induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells in cervical cancer patients and controls. Methods Jurkat cells were exposed to serum from 63 women (20 healthy volunteers, 21 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade I [CIN 1] and 22 with cervical-uterine carcinoma). The apoptotic rate was measured by flow cytometry using Annexin-V-Fluos and Propidium Iodide as markers. Serum levels of sCD95 and soluble CD95 ligand (sCD95L) were measured by ELISA kits. Results We found that serum from almost all healthy women induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells, while only fifty percent of the sera from women with CIN 1 induced cell death in Jurkat cells. Interestingly, only one serum sample from a patient with cervical-uterine cancer was able to induce apoptosis, the rest of the sera protected Jurkat cells from this killing. We were able to demonstrate that elimination of Jurkat cells was mediated by the CD95/Fas/Apo-1 apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the serum levels of sCD95 measured by ELISA were significantly higher in women with cervical cancer. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that there is a strong correlation between low levels of sCD95 in serum of normal women and higher apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells. We suggest that an analysis of the apoptotic rate induced

  4. Apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells and sCD95 levels in women's sera are related with the risk of developing cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Romero-Ramos, Jose E; Olimon-Andalon, Vicente; Hernandez-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Diaz, Jose M; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo C; Morgan-Villela, Gilberto; Del Toro-Arreola, Susana; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Jave-Suarez, Luis F

    2008-04-11

    Currently, there is clear evidence that apoptosis plays an important role in the development and progression of tumors. One of the best characterized apoptosis triggering systems is the CD95/Fas/APO-1 pathway; previous reports have demonstrated high levels of soluble CD95 (sCD95) in serum of patients with some types of cancer. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. As a first step in an attempt to design a minimally invasive test to predict the risk of developing cervical cancer in patients with precancerous lesions, we used a simple assay based on the capacity of human serum to induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We evaluated the relationship between sCD95 levels and the ability to induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells in cervical cancer patients and controls. Jurkat cells were exposed to serum from 63 women (20 healthy volunteers, 21 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade I [CIN 1] and 22 with cervical-uterine carcinoma). The apoptotic rate was measured by flow cytometry using Annexin-V-Fluos and Propidium Iodide as markers. Serum levels of sCD95 and soluble CD95 ligand (sCD95L) were measured by ELISA kits. We found that serum from almost all healthy women induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells, while only fifty percent of the sera from women with CIN 1 induced cell death in Jurkat cells. Interestingly, only one serum sample from a patient with cervical-uterine cancer was able to induce apoptosis, the rest of the sera protected Jurkat cells from this killing. We were able to demonstrate that elimination of Jurkat cells was mediated by the CD95/Fas/Apo-1 apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the serum levels of sCD95 measured by ELISA were significantly higher in women with cervical cancer. Our results demonstrate that there is a strong correlation between low levels of sCD95 in serum of normal women and higher apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells. We suggest that an analysis of the apoptotic rate induced by serum in Jurkat cells and the

  5. CD95/Fas expression on peripheral blood T lymphocytes in patients with multiple sclerosis: effect of high-dose methylprednisolone therapy.

    PubMed

    Petelin, Zeljka; Brinar, Vesna; Petravic, Damir; Zurak, Niko; Dubravcic, Klara; Batinic, Drago

    2004-06-01

    Recent data indicate that the apoptotic process, mediated by the CD95/Fas cell surface receptor, is impaired in activated lymphocytes of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Using flow cytometric-immunophenotyping, we analyzed the expression of CD95/Fas on peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes (PBL) in 10 MS patients in relapse, and the effect of pulse corticosteroid therapy on the apoptosis of autoreactive lymphocytes. The proportions of CD8+ and CD8+CD95+ T lymphocytes were significantly higher in MS patients in relapse before than after pulse corticosteroid therapy. Conversely, the proportions of CD4+ and CD4+CD95+ T cells were significantly lower before than after therapy, but not significantly different from healthy persons. The different expression of CD95/Fas on peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytes in relapsing RRMS and in healthy controls suggests a possible involvement of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of MS. Our results also show that pulse corticosteroid therapy influences the CD95/Fas expression on CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes in patients with RRMS.

  6. Analysis of CD95 and CCR7 expression on circulating CD4(+) lymphocytes revealed disparate immunoregulatory potentials in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Aldahlawi, Alia M; Elshal, Mohamed F; Damiaiti, Laila A; Damanhori, Laila H; Bahlas, Sami M

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data have implicated a critical role for CD4 in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study was designed to delineate the contribution of CD4(+) T cells in the pathogenesis of SLE disease. Forty-four patients (3 male: 41 female) and 20 healthy volunteers (4 male: 16 female) were included in the study. CD4(+) lymphocytes analysis was done using three-color flow cytometry with antibodies against human-CD95, a prototype cell death receptor, and the chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7) after gating for lymphocytes based on the forward and side scatter. Serum levels of IL-6, IL-12, IL-17, TNF-α and IL-10 cytokines were assayed using ELISA. Disease activity was assessed using the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI). Based on the expression of CCR7 and CD95, CD4(+) lymphocytes were subdivided into three particular subsets; CD4(+)CD95(+)CCR7(+) cells, CD4(+)CD95(-)CCR7(+) cells and CD4(+)CD95(+)CCR7(-) cells. Percentage of CD4(+)CD95(+)CCR7(+) cell subset was significantly higher in patients with SLE with active disease (SLEDAI > 6) and inactive (SLEDAI < 6) as compared with controls (P = 0.005), and it showed a significant positive correlation with ANA titer (P = 0.01), and a negative correlation with WBCs count (P = 0.001). CD4(+)CD95(+)CCR7(-) cell subset was significantly higher in active SLE patients in comparison to patients with inactive disease and controls (P = 0.05, P = 0.005 respectively), and it correlates positively with SLEDAI, IL-6 and IL-17 levels (P = 0.001, 0.05, 0.01 respectively), and negatively with blood WBCs counts (P = 0.001). The third CD4(+)CD95(-)CCR7(+)cell subset was found significantly lower in SLE patients compared with controls, and it was found negatively correlated with IL-10, IL-6, and IL-17. The results show that CD4(+)CD95(+)subset lacking expression of CCR7 is associated with cell mediated inflammatory response as manifested by its correlation with signs of inflammation, inflammatory cytokines

  7. The Expression and Prognostic Impact of CD95 Death Receptor and CD20, CD34 and CD44 Differentiation Markers in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    M. Kamazani, Fatemeh; Bahoush-Mehdiabadi, Gholamreza; Aghaeipour, Mahnaz; Vaeli, Shahram; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the expression and prognostic significance of the CD95 death receptor and CD20, a B cell-lineage associated marker, along with CD34 and CD44 non-lineage associated molecules in Iranian children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methods: We performed immunophenotyping for expressions of the molecules in blood samples from children diagnosed with ALL by using a panel of monoclonal antibodies for flow cytometry analysis. The expression of markers was evaluated in relation to clinical and paraclinical features as well as response to treatment in the patients. Findings : CD95 showed a higher expression in T-ALL compared to B-ALL (P<0.001). Analysis of the clinical and laboratory findings at diagnosis in the group of B-ALL patients revealed an association between CD95 expression with lower white blood cell (WBC) numbers and bone marrow blasts (P<0.05). We detected a positive correlation between the expressions of CD95 and CD44 (r=0.445, P<0.01) in B-ALL patients. There was an association between CD20 expression and several poor prognostic factors that included increased extramedullary involvement (EMI) and decreased platelet numbers (P<0.008). The mean expression of CD34 in B-ALL was higher than T-ALL (P=0.004). At follow-up, complete remission duration (CRD) and survival duration did not significantly differ between patients who were positive or negative for each marker. Conclusion: Association of the studied molecules with several prognostic factors implies the significance of CD95 molecule as favorable and CD20 as unfavorable prognostic markers for childhood ALL. PMID:25755857

  8. Effect of C-terminal deletion of P53 on heat induced CD95 expression and apoptosis in a rat histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, Amere S; Pardhasaradhi, Bobbili V V; Khar, Ashok; Srinivas, Usha K

    2002-06-06

    Tumor suppressor gene product p53 in its wild-type conformation, is an effector of apoptosis. A rat histiocytic tumor, AK-5 which has a rearranged and mutated p53 gene undergoes apoptosis upon heat shock through surface expression of CD95 receptor. DNA sequence analysis of p53 gene from tumor cells revealed a deletion of 'C' at nucleotide position 942 and an addition of 'A' at position 1055. Deletion of one nucleotide caused premature termination of p53 protein which resulted in shorter p53 protein with an altered sequence from amino acids 315 to 341. Altered p53 was unable to protect BC-8, a single cell clone of AK-5 cells from apoptosis upon heat shock. BC-8 cells transfected with a wild-type p53gene (3B4 cells) were resistant to heat induced apoptosis and did not show the expression CD95 death receptor. Inhibition of p53 expression by using antisense oligo induced apoptosis upon heat shock in 3B4 cells. Similarly, inhibition of CD95 expression by antisense oligo inhibited heat induced apoptosis in BC-8 cells. In addition, cell cycle regulatory molecules, cdc2 and cdk2 are differentially regulated in a non-cell cycle dependent manner in these tumor cells. These results, in view of lack of heat shock response in BC-8 cells suggest a complex interaction between p53, CD95 and hsp70 which determines the fate of the cell. In the absence of functional p53, CD95 appears to be an effector of apoptosis in BC-8 cells.

  9. The importance of CD39, CD43, CD81, and CD95 expression for differentiating B cell lymphoma by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Chandra Chiappin; Auat, Mariangeles; Santos-Pirath, Iris Mattos; Rudolf-Oliveira, Renata Cristina Messores; da Silva, Jessica Pires; Lange, Bárbara Gil; Siegel, Danielle; de Moraes, Ana Carolina Rabello; Del Moral, Joanita Angela Gonzaga; Santos-Silva, Maria Claudia

    2017-05-16

    B cell lymphomas' (BCL) current diagnosis is usually based on a combination of morphology, immunophenotype, recurrent cytogenetic aberration and clinical features. However, even with these diagnostic tools, a definitive diagnosis can be difficult to achieve. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the profile of CD39, CD43, CD81, and CD95 expressions in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL), and Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cases. To address this issue, we investigated the expression of CD39, CD43, CD81, and CD95 by eight-color flow cytometry in retrospective cases from 2014 to 2016. The study included 27 adult patients diagnosed with DLBCL, FL, and BL during the study period. Four patients were diagnosed with germinal center B cell-like DLBCL (GCB DLBCL), seven with non-GCB DLBCL, nine with FL, and seven with BL. CD39 seems to be especially relevant to differentiate non-GCB DLBCL from BL and from FL. BL showed stronger expression of CD43 when compared to FL and GCB DLBCL. Moreover, CD43 may help to distinguish non-GCB DLBCL from GCB DLBCL. CD81 expression was much stronger in BL when compared to the other three groups of patients. Lastly, CD95 may also help to distinguish BL from the other subtypes, as BL cells expressed this antigen at low levels. In combination, CD39, CD43, CD81, and CD95 expressions appear to be helpful to distinguish CD10(+) BCL, particularly BL. Phenotypic distinction between FL and GCB DLBCL remains challenging and requires further studies. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  10. Evading apoptosis by calcitriol-differentiated human leukemic HL-60 cells is not mediated by changes in CD95 receptor system but by increased sensitivity of these cells to insulin.

    PubMed

    Marcinkowska, E; Chrobak, A; Wiedłocha, A

    2001-10-15

    Previous studies revealed that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (calcitriol)-induced differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells leads to an increased resistance of the cells to apoptosis-inducing agents. However many attempts were made to explain it, the mechanism underlying this effect still remains unclear. Our results suggest that the acquired resistance to apoptosis-inducing agents in HL-60 cells is not mediated by the CD95 receptor/ligand system. The expression of CD95 on the surface of HL-60 cells is very low and does not change during the calcitriol-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells. Studies presented here provide a strong indication that this receptor is unable to transmit the death signal in either differentiated or undifferentiated HL-60 cells. We therefore asked if evading apoptosis by differentiated human leukemia HL-60 cells may be caused by their increased sensitivity to growth factors contained in fetal calf serum. This study demonstrates that HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells, differentiated by exposure to calcitriol, undergo apoptosis in serum-free conditions. As low as 1% of fetal calf serum is enough to prevent cell death of differentiated HL-60 cells. The ability of 1% fetal calf serum to prevent apoptosis can be blocked by the specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, LY294002. We then tried to find out which component of fetal calf serum may be able to prevent serum-free cell death of differentiated cells. It appeared that serum-free cell death of differentiated HL-60 cells is reversed by addition of 10 microM insulin to the culture medium. The antiapoptotic activity of insulin can be inhibited by LY294002. Moreover, insulin increases the viability of differentiated, but not of undifferentiated, HL-60 cells. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. CD31 signals confer immune privilege to the vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Kenneth; Ma, Liang; Wang, Guosu; Coe, David; Ferro, Riccardo; Falasca, Marco; Buckley, Christopher D.; Mauro, Claudio; Marelli-Berg, Federica M.

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive resistance to cell death induced by inflammatory stimuli activating the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis is a key feature of vascular endothelial cells (ECs). Although this property is central to the maintenance of the endothelial barrier during inflammation, the molecular mechanisms of EC protection from cell-extrinsic, proapoptotic stimuli have not been investigated. We show that the Ig-family member CD31, which is expressed by endothelial but not epithelial cells, is necessary to prevent EC death induced by TNF-α and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vitro. Combined quantitative RT-PCR array and biochemical analysis show that, upon the engagement of the TNF receptor with TNF-α on ECs, CD31 becomes activated and, in turn, counteracts the proapoptotic transcriptional program induced by TNF-α via activation of the Erk/Akt pathway. Specifically, Akt activation by CD31 signals prevents the localization of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO3 to the nucleus, thus inhibiting transcription of the proapoptotic genes CD95/Fas and caspase 7 and de-repressing the expression of the antiapoptotic gene cFlar. Both CD31 intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs are required for its prosurvival function. In vivo, CD31 gene transfer is sufficient to recapitulate the cytoprotective mechanisms in CD31− pancreatic β cells, which become resistant to immune-mediated rejection when grafted in fully allogeneic recipients. PMID:26392551

  12. ASPP1/2 regulate p53-dependent death of retinal ganglion cells through PUMA and Fas/CD95 activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ariel M; Morquette, Barbara; Abdouh, Mohamed; Unsain, Nicolás; Barker, Philip A; Feinstein, Elena; Bernier, Gilbert; Di Polo, Adriana

    2013-01-30

    The transcription factor p53 mediates neuronal death in a variety of stress-related and neurodegenerative conditions. The proapoptotic activity of p53 is tightly regulated by the apoptosis-stimulating proteins of p53 (ASPP) family members: ASPP1 and ASPP2. However, whether ASPP1/2 play a role in the regulation of p53-dependent neuronal death in the CNS is currently unknown. To address this, we asked whether ASPP1/2 contribute to the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) using in vivo models of acute optic nerve damage in mice and rats. Here, we show that p53 is activated in RGCs soon after injury and that axotomy-induced RGC death is attenuated in p53 heterozygote and null mice. We demonstrate that ASPP1/2 proteins are abundantly expressed by injured RGCs, and that short interfering (si)RNA-based ASPP1 or ASPP2 knockdown promotes robust RGC survival. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that siASPP-mediated downregulation of p53-upregulated-modulator-of-apoptosis (PUMA), Fas/CD95, and Noxa depends on p53 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, siRNA against PUMA or Fas/CD95 confers neuroprotection, demonstrating a functional role for these p53 targets in RGC death. Our study demonstrates a novel role for ASPP1 and ASPP2 in the death of RGCs and provides evidence that blockade of the ASPP-p53 pathway is beneficial for central neuron survival after axonal injury.

  13. Antigen-specific cytotoxicity by invariant NKT cells in vivo is CD95/CD178-dependent and is correlated with antigenic potency.

    PubMed

    Wingender, Gerhard; Krebs, Philippe; Beutler, Bruce; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2010-09-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are a unique subset of T lymphocytes that rapidly carry out effector functions following activation with glycolipid Ags, such as the model Ag alpha-galactosylceramide. Numerous studies have investigated the mechanisms leading to Th1 and Th2 cytokine production by iNKT cells, as well as the effects of the copious amounts of cytokines these cells produce. Less is known, however, about the mechanisms of iNKT cell cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the effect of Ag availability and strength, as well as the molecules involved in iNKT cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that the iNKT cell cytotoxicity in vivo correlates directly with the amount of CD1d expressed by the targets as well as the TCR affinity for the target glycolipid Ag. iNKT cells from spleen, liver, and thymus were comparable in their cytotoxicity in vitro. Surprisingly, we show that the Ag-specific cytotoxicity of iNKT cells in vivo depended almost exclusively on the interaction of CD95 (Fas) with CD178 (FasL), and that this mechanism can be efficiently used for tumor protection. Therefore, unlike NK cells, which rely mostly on perforin/granzyme-mediated mechanisms, the Ag-specific cytotoxicity of iNKT cells in vivo is largely restricted to the CD95/CD178 pathway.

  14. Antigen-specific cytotoxicity by invariant NKT cells in vivo is CD95/CD178 dependent and is correlated with antigenic potency

    PubMed Central

    Wingender, Gerhard; Krebs, Philippe; Beutler, Bruce; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are a unique subset of T lymphocytes that rapidly carry out effector functions following activation with glycolipid Ags, such as the model Ag α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). Numerous studies have investigated the mechanisms leading to Th1- and Th2 cytokine production by iNKT cells, and the effects of the copious amounts of cytokines these cells produce. Less is known, however, about the mechanisms of iNKT cell cytotoxicity. Here we investigated the effect of antigen availability and strength, as well as the molecules involved in iNKT cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that the iNKT cell cytotoxicity in vivo correlates directly with the amount of CD1d expressed by the targets as well as the TCR affinity for the target glycolipid Ag. iNKT cells from spleen, liver and thymus were comparable in their cytotoxicity in vitro. Surprisingly, we show that the antigen-specific cytotoxicity of iNKT cells in vivo depended almost exclusively on the interaction of CD95 (Fas) with CD178 (FasL), and that this mechanism can be efficiently utilized for tumor protection. Therefore unlike NK cells, which rely mostly on perforin/granzyme mediated mechanisms, the antigen-specific cytotoxicity of iNKT cells in vivo is largely restricted to the CD95/CD178 pathway. PMID:20660713

  15. High proportion of CD95(+) and CD38(+) in cultured CD8(+) T cells predicts acute rejection and infection, respectively, in kidney recipients.

    PubMed

    Mancebo, Esther; Castro, María José; Allende, Luís M; Talayero, Paloma; Brunet, Mercè; Millán, Olga; Guirado, Luís; López-Hoyos, Marcos; San Segundo, David; Rodrigo, Emilio; Muñoz, Pedro; Boix Giner, Francisco; Llorente Viñas, Santiago; Muro-Amador, Manuel; Paz-Artal, Estela

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to find noninvasive T-cell markers able to predict rejection or infection risk after kidney transplantation. We prospectively examined T-lymphocyte subsets after cell culture stimulation (according to CD38, CD69, CD95, CD40L, and CD25 expression) in 79 first graft recipients from four centers, before and after transplantation. Patients were followed up for one year. Patients who rejected within month-1 (n=10) showed high pre-transplantation and week-1 post-transplantation percentages of CD95(+), in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells (P<0.001 for all comparisons). These biomarkers conferred independent risk for early rejection (HR:5.05, P=0.061 and HR:75.31, P=0.004; respectively). The cut-off values were able to accurately discriminate between rejectors and non-rejectors and Kaplan-Meier curves showed significantly different free-of-rejection time rates (P<0.005). Patients who rejected after the month-1 (n=4) had a higher percentage of post-transplantation CD69(+) in CD8(+) T-cells than non-rejectors (P=0.002). Finally, patients with infection (n=41) previously showed higher percentage of CD38(+) in CD8(+) T-cells at all post-transplantation times evaluated, being this increase more marked in viral infections. A cut-off of 59% CD38(+) in CD8(+) T-cells at week-1, week-2 and month-2 reached 100% sensitivity for the detection of subsequent viral infections. In conclusion, predictive biomarkers of rejection and infection risk after transplantation were detected that could be useful for the personalized care of kidney recipients.

  16. Death Inducer-Obliterator 1 Triggers Apoptosis after Nuclear Translocation and Caspase Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    García-Domingo, David; Ramírez, Dorian; González de Buitrago, Gonzalo; Martínez-A, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Death inducer-obliterator 1 (DIO-1) is a gene that is upregulated early in apoptosis. Here we report that in healthy cells, the DIO-1 gene product was located in the cytoplasm, where it formed oligomers. After interleukin-3 starvation or c-Myc-induced apoptosis in serum-free conditions, DIO-1 translocated to the nucleus, where it upregulated caspase levels and activity. A nuclear localization signal deletion mutant (DIO-1ΔNLS) was unable to translocate to the nuclear compartment in the absence of interleukin-3 and failed to upregulate procaspase levels or trigger cell death. In addition, cells stably expressing DIO-1ΔNLS were protected from apoptosis induced by interleukin-3 withdrawal. These results indicate that DIO-1 has a relevant role in regulating the early stages of cell death. PMID:12697821

  17. Tracking Spinal Cord Injury: Differences in Cytokine Expression of IGF-1, TGF- B1, and sCD95l Can Be Measured in Blood Samples and Correspond to Neurological Remission in a 12-Week Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Ferbert, Thomas; Child, Christopher; Graeser, Viola; Swing, Tyler; Akbar, Michael; Heller, Raban; Biglari, Bahram; Moghaddam, Arash

    2017-02-01

    Neuroinflammation presumably has an important impact on the secondary phase of spinal cord injury and is regulated by pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. We analyzed serum levels of three different cytokines (insulin-like-growth-factor [IGF]-1, tumor growth factor [TGF]-β1, and soluble CD 95 ligand [sCD95L]), in blood samples of 23 patients admitted with acute traumatic spinal cord injury between November 2010 and July 2013 with a follow-up period of 12 weeks. Quantification was performed using Human Quantikine Immunoassays, classification of neurological impairment was performed using the American Spinal Cord Injury Impairment Scale at time of admission and after 12 weeks. After an initial drop of all three cytokine serum levels, IGF-1, TGF-β1, and sCD95L showed significantly increased serum levels during the acute and sub-acute phases. For IGF-1 and sCD95L, we could also observe significantly higher serum levels in patients without neurological improvement compared with patients who had improvement after 12 weeks. In this study, we were able to show differences in cytokine serum levels in patients with different neurological outcome. Measuring the serum level patterns of IGF-1, TGF-β1, and sCD95L might be a useful tool for prognosis in patients with neurological improvement and tracking the pathophysiology in further studies. Further, our observations might link promising therapeutic efforts in numerous animal studies and future studies in human patients.

  18. HLA B44 is associated with decreased severity of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in patients with CD95 defects (ALPS type Ia).

    PubMed

    Vacek, Marla M; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Davis, Joie; Fischer, Roxanne E; Dale, Janet K; Adams, Sharon; Straus, Stephen E; Puck, Jennifer M

    2006-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis characterized by non-malignant lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, expansion of T cells without either CD4 or CD8 surface markers, and increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and lymphoma. Most patients with ALPS have dominant, heterozygous mutations in tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 6 (TNFRSF6), which encodes CD95, also known as Fas, a mediator of apoptosis. Penetrance and range of disease manifestations in ALPS are highly variable, even among family members who share the same dominant TNFRSF6 mutation. To evaluate HLA as a candidate modifier locus, we typed HLA A, B (including subtypes), and DQB alleles in 356 individuals from 63 unrelated families with defined TNFRSF6 mutations associated with ALPS. We also developed a quantitative severity score and performed statistical analysis. Among the healthier, mutation-bearing individuals, transmission of HLA B44 was significantly overrepresented (nominal P<0.0074) as compared to transmission in patients with severe clinical features of ALPS. The B44 allele may exert a protective role in ALPS.

  19. Transfer of Fas (CD95) protein from the cell surface to the surface of polystyrene beads coated with anti-Fas antibody clone CH-11.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Hirofumi; Domae, Naochika

    2010-02-04

    Mouse monoclonal anti-Fas (CD95) antibody clone CH-11 has been widely used in research on apoptosis. CH-11 has the ability to bind to Fas protein on cell surface and induce apoptosis. Here, we used polystyrene beads coated with CH-11 to investigate the role of lipid rafts in Fas-mediated apoptosis in SKW6.4 cells. Unexpectedly, by treatment of the cells with CH-11-coated beads Fas protein was detached from cell surface and transferred to the surface of CH-11-coated beads. Western blot analysis showed that Fas protein containing both extracellular and intracellular domains was attached to the beads. Fas protein was not transferred from the cells to the surface of the beads coated with other anti-Fas antibodies or Fas ligand. Similar phenomenon was observed in Jurkat T cells. Furthermore, CH-11-induced apoptosis was suppressed by pretreatment with CH-11-coated beads in Jurkat cells. These results suggest that CH-11 might possess distinct properties on Fas protein compared with other anti-Fas antibodies or Fas ligand, and also suggest that caution should be needed to use polystyrene beads coated with antibodies such as CH-11.

  20. Transfer of Fas (CD95) protein from the cell surface to the surface of polystyrene beads coated with anti-Fas antibody clone CH-11

    PubMed Central

    Sawai, H.; Domae, N.

    2010-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal anti-Fas (CD95) antibody clone CH-11 has been widely used in research on apoptosis. CH-11 has the ability to bind to Fas protein on cell surface and induce apoptosis. Here, we used polystyrene beads coated with CH-11 to investigate the role of lipid rafts in Fas-mediated apoptosis in SKW6.4 cells. Unexpectedly, by treatment of the cells with CH-11-coated beads Fas protein was detached from cell surface and transferred to the surface of CH-11-coated beads. Western blot analysis showed that Fas protein containing both extracellular and intracellular domains was attached to the beads. Fas protein was not transferred from the cells to the surface of the beads coated with other anti-Fas antibodies or Fas ligand. Similar phenomenon was observed in Jurkat T cells. Furthermore, CH-11-induced apoptosis was suppressed by pretreatment with CH-11-coated beads in Jurkat cells. These results suggest that CH-11 might possess distinct properties on Fas protein compared with other anti-Fas antibodies or Fas ligand, and also suggest that caution should be needed to use polystyrene beads coated with antibodies such as CH-11. PMID:20353915

  1. Synergistic induction of the Fas (CD95) ligand promoter by Max and NFkappaB in human non-small lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Zoltan; Ontsouka, Edgar C; Jakob, Sabine; Torgler, Ralph; Falus, Andras; Mueller, Christoph; Brunner, Thomas

    2004-09-10

    Fas (CD95/APO-1) ligand is a member of the Tumor Necrosis Factor family and a potent inducer of apoptosis. Fas ligand is expressed in activated T cells and represents a major cytotoxic effector mechanism by which T cells kill their target cells. Activation-induced Fas ligand expression in T cells is under the stringent control of various transcription factors, including nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) and c-Myc/Max. There is accumulating evidence that Fas ligand is also expressed by various non-hematopoietic tumor cells, however, little is known about Fas ligand regulation in tumor cells. In this study, we have analyzed the regulation of the Fas ligand gene promoter induction in two non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, with a major focus on the role of the c-Myc/Max transcription factor. Our results revealed that inhibition of c-Myc/Max did not substantially reduce basal levels of Fas ligand promoter activity, nor did overexpression of c-Myc significantly induce promoter activity. In contrast, we observed that overexpression of Max resulted in a marked increase in basal promoter activity and synergistically enhanced phorbolester- and doxorubicin-induced NFkappaB-mediated Fas ligand promoter activity. These results were confirmed by analyzing endogenous Fas ligand transcription. We conclude that high levels of Max and stress-induced NFkappaB activation may result in elevated expression of Fas ligand in human lung cancer cells and possibly contribute to Fas ligand-associated immune escape mechanisms.

  2. The Central Executioner of Apoptosis: Multiple Connections between Protease Activation and Mitochondria in Fas/APO-1/CD95- and Ceramide-induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Susin, Santos A.; Zamzami, Naoufal; Castedo, Maria; Daugas, Eric; Wang, Hong-Gang; Geley, Stephan; Fassy, Florence; Reed, John C.; Kroemer, Guido

    1997-01-01

    According to current understanding, cytoplasmic events including activation of protease cascades and mitochondrial permeability transition (PT) participate in the control of nuclear apoptosis. However, the relationship between protease activation and PT has remained elusive. When apoptosis is induced by cross-linking of the Fas/APO-1/CD95 receptor, activation of interleukin-1β converting enzyme (ICE; caspase 1) or ICE-like enzymes precedes the disruption of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). In contrast, cytosolic CPP32/ Yama/Apopain/caspase 3 activation, plasma membrane phosphatidyl serine exposure, and nuclear apoptosis only occur in cells in which the ΔΨm is fully disrupted. Transfection with the cowpox protease inhibitor crmA or culture in the presence of the synthetic ICE-specific inhibitor Ac-YVAD.cmk both prevent the ΔΨm collapse and subsequent apoptosis. Cytosols from anti-Fas–treated human lymphoma cells accumulate an activity that induces PT in isolated mitochondria in vitro and that is neutralized by crmA or Ac-YVAD.cmk. Recombinant purified ICE suffices to cause isolated mitochondria to undergo PT-like large amplitude swelling and to disrupt their ΔΨm. In addition, ICE-treated mitochondria release an apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) that induces apoptotic changes (chromatin condensation and oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation) in isolated nuclei in vitro. AIF is a protease (or protease activator) that can be inhibited by the broad spectrum apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk and that causes the proteolytical activation of CPP32. Although Bcl-2 is a highly efficient inhibitor of mitochondrial alterations (large amplitude swelling + ΔΨm collapse + release of AIF) induced by prooxidants or cytosols from ceramide-treated cells, it has no effect on the ICE-induced mitochondrial PT and AIF release. These data connect a protease activation pathway with the mitochondrial phase of apoptosis regulation. In addition, they provide a

  3. Immunogenicity of an eight amino acid domain shared by Fas (CD95/Apo-I) and HIV-1 gp120. I. Structural and antigenic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Silvestris, F.; Cocco, T.; Cafforio, P.; Calvani, N.; Dammacco, F.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to VEINCTR-N, a domain shared by Fas (CD95/Apo-I) and gp120, contribute to T-cell apoptosis during human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) infection as a result of the agonist cross-linking of Fas. The present work was designed to determine whether these molecules are elicited primarily to HIV-1 or the cell receptor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sera from 439 HIV-1-infected patients were screened by ELISA for their reactivity to VEINCTR-N. Subjects with significant serum elevations of IgG anti-VEINCTR-N were further investigated. Immunologic parameters, including CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte count, extent of T-cell apoptosis, occurrence of both anti-Fas antibodies and circulating soluble Fas titers, and reactivity to the 8-mer peptides resembling the flank-regions of VEINCTR-N on both gp120 V3 loop and Fas were examined. In addition, the antigenicity of these domains was assessed by biochemical and computerized analyses. RESULTS: 21 patients with significant levels of IgG to VEINCTR-N showed both an increased extent of peripheral T-cell apoptosis and binding to full-length Fas. A weak, though positive correlation of the anti-VEINCTR-N activity with its antecedent peptide on Fas was also found. Charge and structural analysis revealed that, although the extended 26-amino acid (a.a.) regions on both proteins were hydrophilic, the Fas peptide adjacent to VEINCTR-N expressed a short beta-conformed a.a. sequence in contiguity with a portion of the shared epitope, also in beta-sheet conformation. Patterns of antigenicity confirmed an apparent immunodominance of the full VEINCTR-N, based on its homology with the consensus sequence of other members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family. The hypothesis that the high immunogenicity of this region of Fas, rather than gp120, can drive the production of anti-VEINCTR-N antibodies also was supported by the concurrent significant elevations of soluble

  4. Synthetic Bichalcone TSWU-BR23 Induces Apoptosis of Human Colon Cancer HT-29 Cells by p53-Mediated Mitochondrial Oligomerization of BAX/BAK and Lipid Raft Localization of CD95/FADD.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Liang; Chen, Shih-Shun; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2015-10-01

    A synthetic bichalcone analog, (E)-1-(3-((4-(4-acetylphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)methyl)-4-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)-3-(pyridin-3-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (TSWU-BR23), has been shown to induce apoptosis in human colon cancer HT-29 cells involving the induction of CD95 and FAS-associated protein death domain (FADD), but its precise mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. Using cell-surface biotinylation and sucrose density-gradient-based membrane flotation techniques, we showed that the disruption of TSWU-BR23-induced lipid raft localization of CD95/FADD by cholesterol-depleting agent (methyl-β-cyclodextrin) was reversed by cholesterol replenishment. Blockade of p53 expression by short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) suppressed oligomeric Bcl-2-associated x protein (BAX)/Bcl-2 antagonist killer 1 (BAK)-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis but did not inhibit lipid raft localization of CD95/FADD and pro-caspase-8 cleavage induced by TSWU-BR23. Co-expression of p53 shRNA and dominant-negative mutant of FADD completely inhibited TSWU-BR32-induced mitochondrial apoptotic cell death. Collectively, these data demonstrate that TSWU-BR23 leads to HT-29 cell apoptosis by inducing p53-mediated mitochondrial oligomerization of BAX/BAK and the localization of CD95/FADD with lipid rafts at the cell surface. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Different types of cell death induced by enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chen, Chia-Ling; Huang, Wei-Ching; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Wang, Chi-Yun; Hong, Ming-Yuan

    2010-08-01

    The infection of bacterial organisms generally causes cell death to facilitate microbial invasion and immune escape, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. In addition to the intercellular infectious processes, pathogen-produced/secreted enterotoxins (mostly exotoxins) are the major weapons that kill host cells and cause diseases by inducing different types of cell death, particularly apoptosis and necrosis. Blocking these enterotoxins with synthetic drugs and vaccines is important for treating patients with infectious diseases. Studies of enterotoxin-induced apoptotic and necrotic mechanisms have helped us to create efficient strategies to use against these well-characterized cytopathic toxins. In this article, we review the induction of the different types of cell death from various bacterial enterotoxins, such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B, staphylococcal alpha-toxin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, alpha-hemolysin of Escherichia coli, Shiga toxins, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1, heat-labile enterotoxins, and the cholera toxin, Vibrio cholerae. In addition, necrosis caused by pore-forming toxins, apoptotic signaling through cross-talk pathways involving mitochondrial damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and lysosomal injury is discussed.

  6. Turkish propolis supresses MCF-7 cell death induced by homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Tartik, Musa; Darendelioglu, Ekrem; Aykutoglu, Gurkan; Baydas, Giyasettin

    2016-08-01

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) level is a most important risk factor for various vascular diseases including coronary, cerebral and peripheral arterial and venous thrombosis. Propolis is produced by honeybee from various oils, pollens and wax materials. Therefore, it has various biological properties including antioxidant, antitumor and antimicrobial activities. This study investigated the effects of propolis and Hcy on apoptosis in cancer cells. According to our findings, Hcy induced apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells by regulating numerous genes and proteins involved in the apoptotic signal transduction pathway. In contrast, treatment with propolis inhibited caspase- 3 and -9 induced by Hcy in MCF-7 cells. It can be concluded that Hcy may augment the activity of anticancer agents that induce excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptosis in their target cells. In contrast to the previous studies herein we found that propolis in low doses protected cancer cells inhibiting cellular apoptosis mediated by intracellular ROS-dependent mitochondrial pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Decreased CD95 expression on naive T cells from HIV-infected persons undergoing highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) and the influence of IL-2 low dose administration

    PubMed Central

    Amendola, A; Poccia, F; Martini, F; Gioia, C; Galati, V; Pierdominici, M; Marziali, M; Pandolfi, F; Colizzi, V; Piacentini, M; Girardi, E; D'Offizi, G

    2000-01-01

    The functional recovery of the immune system in HIV-infected persons receiving HAART and the role of adjuvant immune therapy are still matters of intensive investigation. We analysed the effects of HAART combined with cytokines in 22 naive asymptomatic individuals, randomized to receive HAART (n = 6), HAART plus a low dose (1000 000 U/daily) of rIL-2 (n = 8), and HAART plus rIL-2 after previous administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (n = 8). After 3 months of therapy, increased CD4+ T cell counts and diminished viral loads were observed in all patients, independently of cytokine addition. A decreased expression of CD95 (Apo 1/Fas) was evident in all groups when compared with values before therapy. The percentages of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) expressing CD95 after therapy decreased by 15%, 22% and 18% in the three treatment groups, respectively (P < 0·05). Analysis of PBMC subsets demonstrated that CD95 expression was significantly reduced on CD45RA+CD62L+ naive T cells (25·3%, 22·4%, and 18·6%, respectively; P < 0·05) in each group, after therapy. Accordingly, all patients showed a reduced rate of in vitro spontaneous apoptosis (P < 0·05). Another effect induced by HAART was a significant increase in IL-2Rα expression on total PBMC (P < 0·05), independently of cytokine addition. Altogether, our results suggest that very low dose administration of rIL-2 (1000 000 U/daily) may be not enough to induce a significant improvement in the immune system as regards HAART alone. The employment of higher doses of recombinant cytokines and/or different administration protocols in clinical trials might however contribute to ameliorate the immune reconstitution in patients undergoing HAART. PMID:10792383

  8. Lack of Fas/CD95 surface expression in highly proliferative leukemic cell lines correlates with loss of CtBP/BARS and redirection of the protein toward giant lysosomal structures.

    PubMed

    Monleón, Inmaculada; Iturralde, María; Martínez-Lorenzo, María José; Monteagudo, Luis; Lasierra, Pilar; Larrad, Luis; Piñeiro, Andrés; Naval, Javier; Alava, María Angeles; Anel, Alberto

    2002-07-01

    Fas/CD95 is a type-I membrane glycoprotein, which inducesapoptotic cell death when ligated by its physiological ligand. We generated previously hyperproliferative sublines derived from the human T-cell leukemia Jurkat, Jurkat-ws and Jurkat-hp, which lost Fas/CD95 surface expression. We have now observed that the total amount of Fas protein is similar in the sublines and in the parental cells, indicating that in the sublines Fas remains in an intracellular compartment. We have found that the protein is directed toward lysosomes in the sublines, where it is degraded. This defect in the secretory pathway correlates with loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids from cellular lipids, and with the lack of expression of endophilin-I and CtBP/BARS, enzymes that regulate vesicle fission by catalyzing the acylation of arachidonate into lysophosphatidic acid. In addition, great multillamer bodies, which contained acid phosphatase activity, absent in the parental Jurkat cells, were observed by transmission electron microscopy in the sublines.

  9. Potassium loss is involved in tobacco cell death induced by palmitoleic acid and ceramide.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jeanne; Chin, Chee-Kok

    2007-09-01

    Tobacco cell death induced by palmitoleic acid (16:1), ceramide, and KCN was found to possess features associated with program cell death (PCD), including cell volume decrease, loss of membrane integrity, DNA damage, nuclear and plastid disorganization, and chromatin condensation. Cell volume decrease was found to be caused by loss of intracellular K(+). Ba(2+) was able to prevent the K(+) loss and it also protected the cells from death induced by 16:1 and ceramide but not KCN. The results suggest that K(+) loss is a critical step in plant PCD. The inability of Ba(2+) to prevent cell death was most likely due to its other effects of KCN, i.e., inhibition of cytochrome oxidase in the respiratory chain and generation of reactive oxygen species.

  10. Characterization of Breast Cancer Cell Death Induced by Interferons and Retinoids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    responses in several human tumor cells. In particular this combination induces cell death similar to apoptosis in vitro, which could not be observed with...individual agents. Preliminary studies identified no changes in the levels of known regulators of cell death such as p53, cyclin D and Bc12. Thus it...products that mediate the growth inhibitory/ cell death inducing activities of the combination of IFN and RA in human tumor cells. To directly identify these

  11. The hnRNP-Htt axis regulates necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression through impaired RNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Y; Tamura, T; Yuki, Y; Abe, D; Tamada, Y; Imoto, S; Tanaka, H; Homma, H; Tagawa, K; Miyano, S; Okazawa, H

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we identify signaling network of necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression (TRIAD) by α-amanitin (AMA), the selective RNA polymerase II inhibitor, as a model of neurodegenerative cell death. We performed genetic screen of a knockdown (KD) fly library by measuring the ratio of transformation from pupa to larva (PL ratio) under TRIAD, and selected the cell death-promoting genes. Systems biology analysis of the positive genes mapped on protein–protein interaction databases predicted the signaling network of TRIAD and the core pathway including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) and huntingtin (Htt). RNA sequencing revealed that AMA impaired transcription and RNA splicing of Htt, which is known as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stabilizing molecule. The impairment in RNA splicing and PL ratio was rescued by overexpresion of hnRNP that had been also affected by transcriptional repression. Fly genetics with suppressor or expresser of Htt and hnRNP worsened or ameliorated the decreased PL ratio by AMA, respectively. Collectively, these results suggested involvement of RNA splicing and a regulatory role of the hnRNP-Htt axis in the process of the transcriptional repression-induced necrosis. PMID:27124581

  12. The hnRNP-Htt axis regulates necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression through impaired RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Y; Tamura, T; Yuki, Y; Abe, D; Tamada, Y; Imoto, S; Tanaka, H; Homma, H; Tagawa, K; Miyano, S; Okazawa, H

    2016-04-28

    In this study, we identify signaling network of necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression (TRIAD) by α-amanitin (AMA), the selective RNA polymerase II inhibitor, as a model of neurodegenerative cell death. We performed genetic screen of a knockdown (KD) fly library by measuring the ratio of transformation from pupa to larva (PL ratio) under TRIAD, and selected the cell death-promoting genes. Systems biology analysis of the positive genes mapped on protein-protein interaction databases predicted the signaling network of TRIAD and the core pathway including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) and huntingtin (Htt). RNA sequencing revealed that AMA impaired transcription and RNA splicing of Htt, which is known as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stabilizing molecule. The impairment in RNA splicing and PL ratio was rescued by overexpresion of hnRNP that had been also affected by transcriptional repression. Fly genetics with suppressor or expresser of Htt and hnRNP worsened or ameliorated the decreased PL ratio by AMA, respectively. Collectively, these results suggested involvement of RNA splicing and a regulatory role of the hnRNP-Htt axis in the process of the transcriptional repression-induced necrosis.

  13. Fas death receptor signalling: roles of Bid and XIAP

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, T; Strasser, A; Jost, P J

    2012-01-01

    Fas (also called CD95 or APO-1), a member of a subgroup of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily that contain an intracellular death domain, can initiate apoptosis signalling and has a critical role in the regulation of the immune system. Fas-induced apoptosis requires recruitment and activation of the initiator caspase, caspase-8 (in humans also caspase-10), within the death-inducing signalling complex. In so-called type 1 cells, proteolytic activation of effector caspases (-3 and -7) by caspase-8 suffices for efficient apoptosis induction. In so-called type 2 cells, however, killing requires amplification of the caspase cascade. This can be achieved through caspase-8-mediated proteolytic activation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain (BH)3-only protein BH3-interacting domain death agonist (Bid), which then causes mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilisation. This in turn leads to mitochondrial release of apoptogenic proteins, such as cytochrome c and, pertinent for Fas death receptor (DR)-induced apoptosis, Smac/DIABLO (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase/direct IAP binding protein with low Pi), an antagonist of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), which imposes a brake on effector caspases. In this review, written in honour of Juerg Tschopp who contributed so much to research on cell death and immunology, we discuss the functions of Bid and XIAP in the control of Fas DR-induced apoptosis signalling, and we speculate on how this knowledge could be exploited to develop novel regimes for treatment of cancer. PMID:21959933

  14. Apoptosis: A Functional Paradigm for Programmed Plant Cell Death Induced by a Host-Selective Phytotoxin and Invoked during Development.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Li, J; Bostock, RM; Gilchrist, DG

    1996-01-01

    The host-selective AAL toxins secreted by Alternaria alternata f sp lycopersici are primary chemical determinants in the Alternaria stem canker disease of tomato. The AAL toxins are members of a new class of sphinganine analog mycotoxins that cause cell death in both animals and plants. Here, we report detection of stereotypic hallmarks of apoptosis during cell death induced by these toxins in tomato. DNA ladders were observed during cell death in toxin-treated tomato protoplasts and leaflets. The intensity of the DNA ladders was enhanced by Ca2+ and inhibited by Zn2+. The progressive delineation of fragmented DNA into distinct bodies, coincident with the appearance of DNA ladders, also was observed during death of toxin-treated tomato protoplasts. In situ analysis of cells dying during development in both onion root caps and tomato leaf tracheary elements revealed DNA fragmentation localized to the dying cells as well as the additional formation of apoptotic-like bodies in sloughing root cap cells. We conclude that the fundamental elements of apoptosis, as characterized in animals, are conserved in plants. The apoptotic process may be expressed during some developmental transitions and is the functional process by which symptomatic lesions are formed in the Alternaria stem canker disease of tomato. Sphinganine analog mycotoxins may be used to characterize further signaling pathways leading to apoptosis in plants. PMID:12239387

  15. Characterization of a novel epigenetic effect of ionizing radiation: the death-inducing effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagar, Shruti; Smith, Leslie E.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The detrimental effects associated with exposure to ionizing radiation have long been thought to result from the direct targeting of the nucleus leading to DNA damage; however, the emergence of concepts such as radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects have challenged this dogma. After cellular exposure to ionizing radiation, we have isolated a number of clones of Chinese hamster-human hybrid GM10115 cells that demonstrate genomic instability as measured by chromosomal destabilization. These clones show dynamic and persistent generation of chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after the original insult. We hypothesize that these unstable clones maintain this delayed instability phenotype by secreting factors into the culture medium. To test this hypothesis we transferred filtered medium from unstable cells to unirradiated GM10115 cells. No GM10115 cells were able to survive this medium. This phenomenon by which GM10115 cells die when cultured in medium from chromosomally unstable GM10115 clones is the death-inducing effect. Medium transfer experiments indicate that a factor or factors is/are secreted by unstable cells within 8 h of growth in fresh medium and result in cell killing within 24 h. These factors are stable at ambient temperature but do not survive heating or freezing, and are biologically active when diluted with fresh medium. We present the initial description and characterization of the death-inducing effect. This novel epigenetic effect of radiation has implications for radiation risk assessment and for health risks associated with radiation exposure.

  16. Involvement of Egr-1 in lens epithelial cell death induced by selenite.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T; Belusko, P B; Walkup, R D; Azuma, M; Shearer, T R

    2006-05-01

    Selenite-overdose cataract in young rats may be caused by an initial insult to the lens epithelial cells. Our previous DNA array analysis revealed a significant increase in the expression of mRNA for early growth response protein-1 (Egr-1) in lens epithelial cells after injection of selenite. This suggested that up-regulation of Egr-1 mRNA may be involved in lens epithelial cell death. The purpose of the present experiment was to further clarify the involvement of Egr-1 in lens epithelial cell death induced by selenite. Rat lens epithelial explants were cultured with sodium selenite. Selenite caused epithelial explants to leak LDH into the medium. During LDH leakage, increased expression of mRNA for Egr-1 was observed by RT-PCR. To further test the involvement of Egr-1 in selenite-induced cell death, mouse lens epithelial cell line (alpha-TN4 cells) was treated with antisense oligonucleotide for Egr-1. Antisense oligonucleotide for Egr-1 significantly diminished expression of Egr-1 protein and leakage of LDH. These results suggested that increased activity of Egr-1 may be a factor in lens epithelial cell death induced by selenite.

  17. Characterization of a novel epigenetic effect of ionizing radiation: the death-inducing effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagar, Shruti; Smith, Leslie E.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The detrimental effects associated with exposure to ionizing radiation have long been thought to result from the direct targeting of the nucleus leading to DNA damage; however, the emergence of concepts such as radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects have challenged this dogma. After cellular exposure to ionizing radiation, we have isolated a number of clones of Chinese hamster-human hybrid GM10115 cells that demonstrate genomic instability as measured by chromosomal destabilization. These clones show dynamic and persistent generation of chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after the original insult. We hypothesize that these unstable clones maintain this delayed instability phenotype by secreting factors into the culture medium. To test this hypothesis we transferred filtered medium from unstable cells to unirradiated GM10115 cells. No GM10115 cells were able to survive this medium. This phenomenon by which GM10115 cells die when cultured in medium from chromosomally unstable GM10115 clones is the death-inducing effect. Medium transfer experiments indicate that a factor or factors is/are secreted by unstable cells within 8 h of growth in fresh medium and result in cell killing within 24 h. These factors are stable at ambient temperature but do not survive heating or freezing, and are biologically active when diluted with fresh medium. We present the initial description and characterization of the death-inducing effect. This novel epigenetic effect of radiation has implications for radiation risk assessment and for health risks associated with radiation exposure.

  18. Molecular mechanism of cell death induced by king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom l-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Fung, Shin Yee; Lee, Mui Li; Tan, Nget Hong

    2015-03-01

    Snake venom LAAOs have been reported to exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities, including cytotoxic, edema-inducing, platelet aggregation-inducing/platelet aggregation-inhibiting, bactericidal and antiviral activities. A heat-stable form of l-amino acid oxidase isolated from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom (OH-LAAO) has been shown to exhibit very potent cytotoxicity against human tumorigenic cells but not in their non-tumorigenic counterparts, and the cytotoxicity was due to the apoptosis-inducing effect of the enzyme. In this work, the molecular mechanism of cell death induced by OH-LAAO was investigated. The enzyme exerts its apoptosis-inducing effect presumably via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways as suggested by the increase in caspase-8 and -9 activities. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis showed that the expression of a total of 178 genes was significantly altered as a result of oxidative stress induced by the hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzyme. Of the 178 genes, at least 27 genes are involved in apoptosis and cell death. These alterations of gene expression was presumably caused by the direct cytotoxic effect of H2O2 generated during the enzymatic reaction, as well as the non-specific oxidative modifications of signaling molecules that eventually lead to apoptosis and cell death. The very substantial up-regulation of cytochrome P450 genes may also contribute to the potent cytotoxic action of OH-LAAO by producing excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, the potent apoptosis inducing activity of OH-LAAO was likely due to the direct cytotoxic effect of H2O2 generated during the enzymatic reaction, as well as the non-specific oxidation of signalling molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [The influence of methylprednisolone on the ability of CD4+CD95+HLA-DR+ T-cells to produce proinflammatory medators in cultures of TCR-activated CD3+CD45RO+ T-lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Todosenko, N M; Khaziakhmatova, O G; Yurova, K A; Malinina, I P; Litvinova, L S

    2017-05-01

    The effect of different concentrations of the glucocorticoid (GC) methylprednisolone (MP) on CD4+CD95+HLA-DR+ T-cells and their ability to produce proinflammatory mediators in cultures of TCR-stimulated CD3+CD45RO+ T-lymphocytes in the in vitro system was investigated. T cells were obtained from healthy donors and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Under conditions of TCR-activation, MP increased the number of CD4+HLA-DR+CD95+ cells in CD3+CD45RO+ cultures obtained from RA patients and did not change their content in the control group. In general, MP decreased production of proinflammatory factors (IFN-, IL-2, IL-17, IL-21 and TNF-) by TCR-activated CD3+CD45RO+ cells from healthy donors and RA, consistent with the overall immunosuppressive mechanism of GC action. The correlation between CD4+CD45RO+HLA-DR+CD95+ T-cell contents and parameters reflecting production of proinflammatory mediators (IL-17, IL-21 and TNF-) in RA patients indicates maintenance of the pro-inflammatory potential of this T-cell population exposed to GC action. We suggest that relative resistance of CD4+CD45RO+CD95+HLA-DR+ T-cells of RA patients to the suppressor effect of GC leads to maintenance and even enhancement in the functional capacities of autoreactive cells in the pathogenesis of RA.

  20. Induction of morphological changes in death-induced cancer cells monitored by holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    El-Schich, Zahra; Mölder, Anna; Tassidis, Helena; Härkönen, Pirkko; Falck Miniotis, Maria; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2015-03-01

    We are using the label-free technique of holographic microscopy to analyze cellular parameters including cell number, confluence, cellular volume and area directly in the cell culture environment. We show that death-induced cells can be distinguished from untreated counterparts by the use of holographic microscopy, and we demonstrate its capability for cell death assessment. Morphological analysis of two representative cell lines (L929 and DU145) was performed in the culture flasks without any prior cell detachment. The two cell lines were treated with the anti-tumour agent etoposide for 1-3days. Measurements by holographic microscopy showed significant differences in average cell number, confluence, volume and area when comparing etoposide-treated with untreated cells. The cell volume of the treated cell lines was initially increased at early time-points. By time, cells decreased in volume, especially when treated with high doses of etoposide. In conclusion, we have shown that holographic microscopy allows label-free and completely non-invasive morphological measurements of cell growth, viability and death. Future applications could include real-time monitoring of these holographic microscopy parameters in cells in response to clinically relevant compounds.

  1. Arabidopsis GRI is involved in the regulation of cell death induced by extracellular ROS

    PubMed Central

    Wrzaczek, Michael; Brosché, Mikael; Kollist, Hannes; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have important functions in plant stress responses and development. In plants, ozone and pathogen infection induce an extracellular oxidative burst that is involved in the regulation of cell death. However, very little is known about how plants can perceive ROS and regulate the initiation and the containment of cell death. We have identified an Arabidopsis thaliana protein, GRIM REAPER (GRI), that is involved in the regulation of cell death induced by extracellular ROS. Plants with an insertion in GRI display an ozone-sensitive phenotype. GRI is an Arabidopsis ortholog of the tobacco flower-specific Stig1 gene. The GRI protein appears to be processed in leaves with a release of an N-terminal fragment of the protein. Infiltration of the N-terminal fragment of the GRI protein into leaves caused cell death in a superoxide- and salicylic acid-dependent manner. Analysis of the extracellular GRI protein yields information on how plants can initiate ROS-induced cell death during stress response and development. PMID:19279211

  2. Arabidopsis GRI is involved in the regulation of cell death induced by extracellular ROS.

    PubMed

    Wrzaczek, Michael; Brosché, Mikael; Kollist, Hannes; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2009-03-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have important functions in plant stress responses and development. In plants, ozone and pathogen infection induce an extracellular oxidative burst that is involved in the regulation of cell death. However, very little is known about how plants can perceive ROS and regulate the initiation and the containment of cell death. We have identified an Arabidopsis thaliana protein, GRIM REAPER (GRI), that is involved in the regulation of cell death induced by extracellular ROS. Plants with an insertion in GRI display an ozone-sensitive phenotype. GRI is an Arabidopsis ortholog of the tobacco flower-specific Stig1 gene. The GRI protein appears to be processed in leaves with a release of an N-terminal fragment of the protein. Infiltration of the N-terminal fragment of the GRI protein into leaves caused cell death in a superoxide- and salicylic acid-dependent manner. Analysis of the extracellular GRI protein yields information on how plants can initiate ROS-induced cell death during stress response and development.

  3. Arabidopsis Bax Inhibitor-1 inhibits cell death induced by pokeweed antiviral protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is an active form of programmed cell death (PCD) that plays critical roles in the development, differentiation and resistance to pathogens in multicellular organisms. Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) are able to induce apoptotic cell death in mammalian cells. In this study, using yeast as a model system, we showed that yeast cells expressing pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a single-chain ribosome-inactivating protein, exhibit apoptotic-like features, such as nuclear fragmentation and ROS production. We studied the interaction between PAP and AtBI-1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Bax Inhibitor-1), a plant anti-apoptotic protein, which inhibits Bax induced cell death. Cells expressing PAP and AtBI-1 were able to survive on galactose media compared to PAP alone, indicating a reduction in the cytotoxicity of PAP in yeast. However, PAP was able to depurinate the ribosomes and to inhibit total translation in the presence of AtBI-1. A C-terminally deleted AtBI-1 was able to reduce the cytotoxicity of PAP. Since anti-apoptotic proteins form heterodimers to inhibit the biological activity of their partners, we used a co-immunoprecipitation assay to examine the binding of AtBI-1 to PAP. Both full length and C-terminal deleted AtBI-1 were capable of binding to PAP. These findings indicate that PAP induces cell death in yeast and AtBI-1 inhibits cell death induced by PAP without affecting ribosome depurination and translation inhibition. PMID:28357275

  4. Type of cell death induced by seven metals in cultured mouse osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Contreras, René García; Vilchis, José Rogelio Scougall; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yuko; Nakamura, Yukio; Hibino, Yasushi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shimada, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The use of dental metal alloys in the daily clinic makes it necessary to evaluate the cytotoxicity of eluted metal components against oral cells. However, the cytotoxic mechanism and the type of cell death induced by dental metals in osteoblasts have not been well characterized. This study investigated the cytotoxicity of seven metals against the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. alpha-MEM was used as a culture medium, since this medium provided much superior proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells over DMEM. Ag (NH(3))(2)F was the most cytotoxic, followed by CuCl>CuCl(2) >CoCl(2), NiCl(2)>FeCl(3) and FeCl(2) (least toxic). None of the metals showed any apparent growth stimulating effect (so-called 'hormesis') at lower concentrations. A time course study demonstrated that two hours of contact between oral cells and Ag (NH(3))(2)F, CuCl, CoCl(2) or NiCl(2) induced irreversible cell death. Contact with these metals induced a smear pattern of DNA fragmentation without activation of caspase-3. Preincubation of MC3T3-E1 cells with either a caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) or autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin) failed to rescue them from metal cytotoxicity. These data suggest the induction of necrotic cell death rather than apoptosis and autophagy by metals in this osteoblastic cell line.

  5. The expression of Death Inducer-Obliterator (DIDO) variants in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Berzoti-Coelho, Maria Gabriela; Ferreira, Aline Fernanda; de Souza Nunes, Natalia; Pinto, Mariana Tomazini; Júnior, Maurício Cristiano Rocha; Simões, Belinda Pinto; Martínez-A, Carlos; Souto, Elizabeth Xisto; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Kashima, Simone; Castro, Fabíola Attié

    2016-07-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML), Polycythemia Vera (PV), Essential Thrombocythemia (ET) and Primary Myelofibrosis (PMF) are Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN) characterized by clonal myeloproliferation without cell maturation impairment. CML pathogenesis is associated with the Ph chromosome leading to BCR-ABL tyrosine-kinase constitutive expression. The Ph negative MPN (PV, ET and PMF) are characterized by the mutation JAK2(V617F) of the JAK2 protein in the auto-inhibitory JH2 domain, which is found in most PV patients and in approximately half of ET and PMF patients. Considerable effort is being made to understand the role of JAK2(V617F) at the MPN initiation and to clarify the pathogenesis and apoptosis resistance in CML, PV, ET and PMF patients. In the present investigation, we evaluated the Death Inducer-Obliterator (DIDO) (variants DIDO 1, 2 and 3) levels in CML, PV, ET and PMF patients. Our data reported the DIDO 1, 2 and 3 differential expressions in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxidative modification of neurofilament-L and neuronal cell death induced by the catechol neurotoxin, tetrahydropapaveroline.

    PubMed

    Kyeong, Inn Goo; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young; Kang, Jung Hoon

    2013-02-13

    Tetrahydropapaveroline (THP), which is an endogenous neurotoxin, has been suspected to be associated with dopaminergic neurotoxicity of l-DOPA. In this study, we examined oxidative modification of neurofilament-L (NF-L) and neuronal cell death induced by THP. When disassembled NF-L was incubated with THP, protein aggregation was increased in a time- and THP dose-dependent manner. The formation of carbonyl compounds and dityrosine were observed in the THP-mediated NF-L aggregates. Radical scavengers reduced THP-mediated NF-L modification. These results suggest that the modification of NF-L by THP may be due to oxidative damage resulting from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). When THP exposed NF-L was subjected to amino acid analysis, glutamate, proline and lysine residues were found to be particularly sensitive. We also investigated the effects of copper ions on THP-mediated NF-L modification. At a low concentration of THP, copper ions enhanced the modification of NF-L. Treatment of C6 astrocyte cells with THP led to a concentration-dependent reduction in cell viability. When these cells were treated with 100μM THP, the levels of ROS increased 3.5-fold compared with control cells. Furthermore, treatment of cells with THP increased NF-L aggregate formation, suggesting the involvement of NF-L modification in THP-induced cell damage.

  7. Mechanisms of cell death induced by infusion sets leachables in in vitro experimental settings.

    PubMed

    Kozlovskaya, Luba; Stepensky, David

    2015-01-30

    Leachable materials that are released from infusion sets during their use can induce local and systemic toxic effects. We studied the mechanisms and kinetics of cell death induced by infusion sets leachates in vitro using L-929 and bEnd. 3 cells. Changes in cell morphology and metabolic activity were determined using light microscopy and the MTT test, respectively. Detailed analysis of the mechanisms of cell death was performed using membrane integrity and caspases 3 and 7 activity tests, annexin V-FITC/7-AAD analysis by FACS, and DAPI nuclear staining followed by confocal microscopy. Infusion sets released toxic leachables and induced toxic effects. Latex flashball was the most toxic part of the studied infusion sets, and it potently induced cell oncosis via increased permeability of the cell membrane. Latex-induced decrease in cells metabolic activity and cell death were not accompanied by activation of caspases 3 and 7, changes in nuclear morphology, or substantial annexin V-FITC cell staining. Leachables from the tube part of the infusion sets were less toxic, and induced some biochemical changes without altering the cells morphology. Further studies are needed to reveal the in vivo toxicity of infusion sets and its correlation with the results of in vitro toxicity studies.

  8. Molecular Basis of Cytotoxicity of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) in EBV Latency III B Cells: LMP1 Induces Type II Ligand-Independent Autoactivation of CD95/Fas with Caspase 8-Mediated Apoptosis▿ ‖

    PubMed Central

    Le Clorennec, Christophe; Ouk, Tan-Sothéa; Youlyouz-Marfak, Ibtissam; Panteix, Stéphanie; Martin, Catherine-Claude; Rastelli, Julia; Adriaenssens, Eric; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Coll, Jean; Feuillard, Jean; Jayat-Vignoles, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) oncoprotein latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is thought to act as the major transforming protein in various cell types, by rerouting the tumor necrosis factor receptor family signaling pathway. Despite this implication in EBV-associated transformation of cells, LMP1 toxicity is a well-known but poorly studied feature, perhaps because it contradicts its role in transformation. We show that LMP1 physiological levels are very heterogeneous and that the highest levels of LMP1 correlate with Fas overexpression and spontaneous apoptosis in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). To understand the cytotoxic effect of LMP1 in LCLs, we cloned wild-type LMP1 into a doxycycline double-inducible episomal vector pRT-1, with a truncated version of NGFR as a surrogate marker of inducibility. We found that LMP1 overexpression induced apoptosis in LCL B cells, as shown by annexin V labeling, sub-G1 peak, and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase cleavage. Knocking down Fas expression by small interfering RNA abolished LMP1-induced apoptosis. The absence of detectable levels of Fas ligand mRNA suggested a ligand-independent activation of Fas. LMP1 induced Fas overexpression with its relocalization in lipid raft microdomains of the membrane. Fas immunoprecipitation detected FADD (Fas-associated death domain protein) and caspase 8, suggesting a Fas-dependent formation of the death-inducing signaling complex. Caspases 8, 9, 3, and 7 were activated by LMP1. Caspase 8 activation was associated with BID cleavage and truncated-BID mitochondrial relocalization, consistent with type II apoptosis. Therefore, our results are in agreement with a model where LMP1-dependent NF-κB activation induces Fas overexpression and autoactivation that could overwhelm the antiapoptotic effect of NF-κB, revealing an ambivalent function of LMP1 in cell survival and programmed cell death. PMID:18448526

  9. Type of cell death induced by various metal cations in cultured human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, René García; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shimada, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Metal ions are released from casting alloys and cause damage to cell structures and local inflammation. However, the cytotoxic mechanism and the type of cell death induced in human gingival fibroblast (HGF) by contact with dental metals have not been well characterized. Here the cytotoxicity of eight metals against HGF was investigated. Cytoxicity of metals against HGF was in the following order: Ag(NH(3))(2)F (most cytotoxic)>AgCl>CuCl(2)>CuCl, CoCl(2)> NiCl(2)>FeCl(2), FeCl(3) (least cytotoxic). None of the metals showed any apparent hormetic growth stimulation at lower concentrations, except for Ag(NH(3))(2)F at 20 or higher population-doubling level of HGF. The sensitivity of HGF against Ag(NH(3))(2)F was reduced during in vitro aging, similar to previous report with sodium fluoride. Contact with Ag(NH(3))(2)F for only one hour induced irreversible cell death, whereas longer duration of contact with AgCl or CuCl(2) was necessary to induce irreversible cell death. These metals induced neither DNA fragmentation nor caspase-3 activation. Pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin) did not apparently affect the cytotoxicity of metals, when corrected for the effect of inhibitor alone on growth. We also found that Ag(NH(3))(2)F induced much higher cytotoxicity than AgCl in mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1, possibly inducing necrosis. These data suggest the importance of cautious application of Ag(NH(3))(2)F to the oral cavity.

  10. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos-Campos, I.; Asín, L.; Torres, T. E.; Marquina, C.; Tres, A.; Ibarra, M. R.; Goya, G. F.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH2 + ) or negative (COOH - ) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  11. Characterization of Bax-sigma, a cell death-inducing isoform of Bax.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, E; Paquet, C; Beauchemin, M; Dever-Bertrand, J; Bertrand, R

    2000-04-21

    The Ced-9/Bcl-like family of genes codes for proteins that have antiapoptotic and proapoptotic activity. Several Bax isoproteins have been detected by 2-D gel electrophoresis, and a novel human member, designated as Bax-sigma, has been identified and cloned from human cancer promyelocytic cells. Bax-sigma contains BH-3, BH-1, and BH-2 domains, putative alpha-5 and alpha-6 helices, and the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane domain but lacks amino acids 159 to 171 compared to Bax-alpha. mRNA expression analysis by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and RNase protection assays have revealed that Bax-sigma is expressed in a variety of human cancer cell lines and normal tissues. To investigate the potential role of Bax-sigma in apoptosis, first its effects were compared to those of Bax-alpha by transient expression in human B lymphoma Namalwa cells. Both Bax-sigma and Bax-alpha promoted apoptosis, as detected by DNA fragmentation and morphological analysis by electron microscopy. The apoptosis induced by Bax-sigma and Bax-alpha was correlated with their expression, cytochrome c release, and caspase activation. In a yeast two-hybrid system, Bax-sigma interacted with several Ced-9/Bcl family members but had no affinity for the human Egl-1 homologs Bik and Bad and the Ced-4 homolog Apaf-1. In human cells, Bax-sigma function was counteracted by Bcl-xL overexpression, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that Bax-sigma was associated with Bcl-xL. Furthermore, Bax-sigma overexpression increased cell death induced by various concentrations of genotoxic agents with the most pronounced effect occurring at low camptothecin and vinblastine dose levels. Our results suggest that Bax-sigma, a novel variant of Bax, encodes a protein with a proapoptotic effect and mode of action similar to those of Bax-alpha.

  12. Morphophysiological responses and programmed cell death induced by cadmium in Genipa americana L. (Rubiaceae).

    PubMed

    Souza, Vânia L; de Almeida, Alex-Alan F; Lima, Stella G C; de M Cascardo, Júlio C; da C Silva, Delmira; Mangabeira, Pedro A O; Gomes, Fábio P

    2011-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) originating from atmospheric deposits, from industrial residues and from the application of phosphate fertilizers may accumulate in high concentrations in soil, water and food, thus becoming highly toxic to plants, animals and human beings. Once accumulated in an organism, Cd discharges and sets off a sequence of biochemical reactions and morphophysiological changes which may cause cell death in several tissues and organs. In order to test the hypothesis that Cd interferes in the metabolism of G. americana, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to measure eventual morphophysiological responses and cell death induced by Cd in this species. The plants were exposed to Cd concentrations ranging from 0 to 16 mg l(-1), in a nutritive solution. In TUNEL reaction, it was shown that Cd caused morphological changes in the cell nucleus of root tip and leaf tissues, which are typical for apoptosis. Cadmium induced anatomical changes in roots and leaves, such as the lignification of cell walls in root tissues and leaf main vein. In addition, the leaf mesophyll showed increase of the intercellular spaces. On the other hand, Cd caused reductions in the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration, while the maximum potential quantum efficiency of PS2 (Fv/Fm) was unchanged. Cadmium accumulated in the root system in high concentrations, with low translocation for the shoot, and promoted an increase of Ca and Zn levels in the roots and a decrease of K level in the leaves. High concentrations of Cd promoted morphophysiological changes and caused cell death in roots and leaves tissues of G. americana.

  13. Mitochondrial complex I inhibition is not required for dopaminergic neuron death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Seok; Kruse, Shane E.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Xia, Zhengui

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I is one of the leading hypotheses for dopaminergic neuron death associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). To test this hypothesis genetically, we used a mouse strain lacking functional Ndufs4, a gene encoding a subunit required for complete assembly and function of complex I. Deletion of the Ndufs4 gene abolished complex I activity in midbrain mesencephalic neurons cultured from embryonic day (E) 14 mice, but did not affect the survival of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive than other neurons in these cultures to cell death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat treatments, the absence of complex I activity did not protect the dopaminergic neurons, as would be expected if these compounds act by inhibiting complex 1. In fact, the dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive to rotenone. These data suggest that dopaminergic neuron death induced by treatment with rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat is independent of complex I inhibition. PMID:18812510

  14. Protective effect of aqueous extract from Spirulina platensis against cell death induced by free radicals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Spirulina is a commercial alga well known to contain various antioxidants, especially phycocyanin. Apart from being sold as a nutraceutical, Spirulina is incorporated as a functional ingredient in food products and beverages. Most of the previous reports on antioxidant activity of Spirulina were based on chemical rather than cell-based assays. The primary objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant activity of aqueous extract from Spirulina based on its protective effect against cell death induced by free radicals. Methods The antioxidant activity of the cold water extract from food-grade Spirulina platensis was assessed using both chemical and cell-based assays. In the cell-based assay, mouse fibroblast cells (3T3) cells were incubated for 1 h in medium containing aqueous extract of Spirulina or vitamin C (positive control) at 25, 125 and 250 μg/mL before the addition of 50 μM 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) or 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS). The cells were incubated for another 24 h before being assessed for cell death due to apoptosis using the Cell Death Detection ELISA Kit. Spectrophotometric assays based on DPPH and ABTS were also used to assess the antioxidant activity of the extract compared to vitamin C and vitamin E (positive controls). Results Spirulina extract did not cause cytotoxic effect on 3T3 cells within the range of concentrations tested (0 - 250 μg/mL). The extract reduced significantly (p < 0.05) apoptotic cell death due to DPPH and ABTS by 4 to 5-fold although the activity was less than vitamin C. Based on the DPPH assay, the radical scavenging activity of the extract was higher than phycocyanin and was at least 50% of vitamin C and vitamin E. Based on the ABTS assay, the antioxidant activity of the extract at 50 μmug/mL was as good as vitamin C and vitamin E. Conclusions The results showed that aqueous extract of Spirulina has a protective effect against apoptotic cell death due to free radicals

  15. Hyaluronan Protects Bovine Articular Chondrocytes against Cell Death Induced by Bupivacaine under Supraphysiologic Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sen; Zhang, Qing-Song; Hester, William; O’Brien, Michael J.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    Background Bupivacaine and supraphysiologic temperature can independently reduce cell viability of articular chondrocytes. In combination these two deleterious factors could further impair cell viability. Hypothesis Hyaluronan may protect chondrocytes from death induced by bupivacaine at supraphysiologic temperatures. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Bovine articular chondrocytes were treated with hyaluronan at physiologic (37°C) and supraphysiologic temperatures (45°C and 50°C) for one hour, and then exposed to bupivacaine for one hour at room temperature. Cell viability was assessed at three time points: immediately after treatment, six hours later, and twenty-four hours later using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The effects of hyaluronan on the levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan in the chondrocytes were determined using Alcian blue staining. Results (1) Bupivacaine alone did not induce noticeable chondrocyte death at 37°C; (2) bupivacaine and temperature synergistically increased chondrocyte death, that is, when the chondrocytes were conditioned to 45°C and 50°C, 0.25% and 0.5% bupivacaine increased the cell death rate by 131% to 383% in comparison to the phosphate-buffered saline control group; and, (3) addition of hyaluronan reduced chondrocyte death rates to approximately 14% and 25% at 45°C and 50°C, respectively. Hyaluronan’s protective effects were still observed at six and twenty-four hours after bupivacaine treatment at 45°C. However, at 50°C, hyaluronan delayed but did not prevent the cell death caused by bupivacaine. One-hour treatment with hyaluronan significantly increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan levels in the chondrocytes. Conclusions Bupivacaine and supraphysiologic temperature synergistically increase chondrocyte death and hyaluronan may protect articular chondrocytes from death caused by bupivacaine. Clinical Relevance This study provides a rationale to perform pre-clinical and clinical studies to

  16. Mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, M; Yoshioka, T; Saio, M; Banno, Y; Nagaoka, H; Okano, Y

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, which refers to cell death or its prologue triggered by aberrant mitosis, can be induced by a heterogeneous group of stimuli, including chromosome damage or perturbation of the mitotic apparatus. We investigated the mechanism of mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization. We transfected cells harboring wild-type or mutated p53 with siRNAs targeting Aurora A, ninein, TOG, TACC3, γ-tubulin, or pericentriolar material-1, and monitored the effects on cell death. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, TOG, and TACC3 led to cell death, regardless of p53 status. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, and TOG, led to aberrant spindle formation and subsequent cell death, which was accompanied by several features of apoptosis, including nuclear condensation and Annexin V binding in HeLa cells. During this process, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, caspase-3, and caspase-9 was detected, but cleavage of caspase-8 was not. Cell death, monitored by time-lapse imaging, occurred during both interphase and M phase. In cells depleted of a centrosomal protein (Aurora A, ninein, or TOG), the rate of cell death was higher if the cells were cotransfected with siRNA against BubR1 or Mad2 than if they were transfected with siRNA against Bub1 or a control siRNA. These results suggest that metaphase arrest is necessary for the mitotic catastrophe and cell death caused by depletion of centrosomal proteins. Knockdown of centrosomal proteins led to increased phosphorylation of Chk2. Enhanced p-Chk2 localization was also observed at the centrosome in cells arrested in M phase, as well as in the nuclei of dying cells. Cotransfection of siRNAs against Chk2, in combination with depletion of a centrosomal protein, decreased the amount of cell death. Thus, Chk2 activity is indispensable for apoptosis after mitotic catastrophe induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization

  17. [Studying the dynamics of the levels CD4+CD25+, CD4+ HLA-DR4 + and CD4+CD95+ cells in the semen of men with oligosymptomatic forms of chronic urogenital infection complicated infertility under the influence of fortege].

    PubMed

    Tsiporenko, S Iu

    2013-09-01

    The markers of activating of lymphocytes in sperm of men with the oligosymptomatic forms of chronic urogenital infection depending on fertility. It is set that the increasing of correlation of CD25/CD95 brings to growth of pathological forms of spermatozoa and, consequently, to the decline of impregnating ability of men. Fortege application leads to the normalization of this correlation and a reduction of pathological forms of sperm and thus to the increasing of the fertilizing potential.

  18. Retinal cell death induced by TRPV1 activation involves NMDA signaling and upregulation of nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Leonelli, Mauro; Martins, Daniel O; Britto, Luiz R G

    2013-04-01

    The activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel (TRPV1) has been correlated with oxidative and nitrosative stress and cell death in the nervous system. Our previous results indicate that TRPV1 activation in the adult retina can lead to constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthase-dependent protein nitration and apoptosis. In this report, we have investigated the potential effects of TRPV1 channel activation on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and function, and the putative participation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in retinal TRPV1-induced protein nitration, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Intravitreal injections of the classical TRPV1 agonist capsaicin up-regulated the protein expression of the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms. Using 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate for nitric oxide (NO) imaging, we found that capsaicin also increased the production of NO in retinal blood vessels. Processes and perikarya of TRPV1-expressing neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina were found in the vicinity of nNOS-positive neurons, but those two proteins did not colocalize. Retinal explants exposed to capsaicin presented high protein nitration, lipid peroxidation, and cell death, which were observed in the inner nuclear and plexiform layers and in ganglion cells. This effect was partially blocked by AP-5, a NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist, but not by CNQX, an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist. These data support a potential role for TRPV1 channels in physiopathological retinal processes mediated by NO, which at least in part involve glutamate release.

  19. Evaluation of the Contribution of Multiple DAMPs and DAMP Receptors in Cell Death-Induced Sterile Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Zubin; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    When cells die by necrosis in vivo they stimulate an inflammatory response. It is thought that this response is triggered when the injured cells expose proinflammatory molecules, collectively referred to as damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by cells or soluble molecules of the innate or adaptive immune system. Several putative DAMPs and/or their receptors have been identified, but whether and how much they participate in responses in vivo is incompletely understood, and they have not previously been compared side-by-side in the same models. This study focuses on evaluating the contribution of multiple mechanisms that have been proposed to or potentially could participate in cell death-induced inflammation: The third component of complement (C3), ATP (and its receptor P2X7), antibodies, the C-type lectin receptor Mincle (Clec4e), and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). We investigate the role of these factors in cell death-induced inflammation to dead cells in the peritoneum and acetaminophen-induced liver damage. We find that mice deficient in antibody, C3 or PAR2 have impaired inflammatory responses to dying cells. In contrast there was no reduction in inflammation to cell death in the peritoneum or liver of mice that genetically lack Mincle, the P2X7 receptor or that were treated with apyrase to deplete ATP. These results indicate that antibody, complement and PAR2 contribute to cell death-induced inflammation but that Mincle and ATP- P2X7 receptor are not required for this response in at least 2 different in vivo models. PMID:25127469

  20. RNA-Seq-based transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis reveal stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yachen; Hu, Jingjin; Fan, Linlin; Chen, Qihe

    2017-01-01

    As a typical harmful inhibitor in cellulosic hydrolyzates, acetic acid not only hinders bioethanol production, but also induces cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Herein, we conducted both transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to investigate the global responses under acetic acid stress at different stages. There were 295 up-regulated and 427 down-regulated genes identified at more than two time points during acetic acid treatment (150 mM, pH 3.0). These differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were mainly involved in intracellular homeostasis, central metabolic pathway, transcription regulation, protein folding and stabilization, ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process, vesicle-mediated transport, protein synthesis, MAPK signaling pathways, cell cycle, programmed cell death, etc. The interaction network of all identified DEGs was constructed to speculate the potential regulatory genes and dominant pathways in response to acetic acid. The transcriptional changes were confirmed by metabolic profiles and phenotypic analysis. Acetic acid resulted in severe acidification in both cytosol and mitochondria, which was different from the effect of extracellular pH. Additionally, the imbalance of intracellular acetylation was shown to aggravate cell death under this stress. Overall, this work provides a novel and comprehensive understanding of stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in yeast. PMID:28209995

  1. RNA-Seq-based transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis reveal stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yachen; Hu, Jingjin; Fan, Linlin; Chen, Qihe

    2017-02-17

    As a typical harmful inhibitor in cellulosic hydrolyzates, acetic acid not only hinders bioethanol production, but also induces cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Herein, we conducted both transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to investigate the global responses under acetic acid stress at different stages. There were 295 up-regulated and 427 down-regulated genes identified at more than two time points during acetic acid treatment (150 mM, pH 3.0). These differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were mainly involved in intracellular homeostasis, central metabolic pathway, transcription regulation, protein folding and stabilization, ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process, vesicle-mediated transport, protein synthesis, MAPK signaling pathways, cell cycle, programmed cell death, etc. The interaction network of all identified DEGs was constructed to speculate the potential regulatory genes and dominant pathways in response to acetic acid. The transcriptional changes were confirmed by metabolic profiles and phenotypic analysis. Acetic acid resulted in severe acidification in both cytosol and mitochondria, which was different from the effect of extracellular pH. Additionally, the imbalance of intracellular acetylation was shown to aggravate cell death under this stress. Overall, this work provides a novel and comprehensive understanding of stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in yeast.

  2. The Differential DRP1 Phosphorylation and Mitochondrial Dynamics in the Regional Specific Astroglial Death Induced by Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ah-Reum; Hyun, Hye-Won; Min, Su-Ji; Kim, Ji-Eun

    2016-01-01

    The response and susceptibility to astroglial degenerations are relevant to the distinctive properties of astrocytes in a hemodynamic-independent manner following status epilepticus (SE). Since impaired mitochondrial fission plays an important role in mitosis, apoptosis and programmed necrosis, we investigated whether the unique pattern of mitochondrial dynamics is involved in the characteristics of astroglial death induced by SE. In the present study, SE induced astroglial apoptosis in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by decreased mitochondrial length. In contrast, clasmatodendritic (autophagic) astrocytes in the CA1 region showed mitochondrial elongation induced by SE. Mdivi-1 (an inhibitor of mitochondrial fission) effectively attenuated astroglial apoptosis, but WY14643 (an enhancer of mitochondrial fission) aggravated it. In addition, Mdivi-1 accelerated clasmatodendritic changes in astrocytes. These regional specific mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytes were closely correlated with dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) phosphorylation, not optic atrophy 1 (OPA1; a mitochondrial fusion protein) expression. To the best of our knowledge, the present data demonstrate for the first time the novel role of DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission in astroglial loss. Thus, the present findings suggest that the differential astroglial mitochondrial dynamics may participate in the distinct characteristics of astroglial death induced by SE. PMID:27242436

  3. Combining oncolytic HSV-1 with immunogenic cell death-inducing drug mitoxantrone breaks cancer immune tolerance and improves therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Workenhe, Samuel T; Pol, Jonathan G; Lichty, Brian D; Cummings, Derek T; Mossman, Karen L

    2013-11-01

    Although antitumor activity of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0 null oncolytic vectors has been validated in murine breast cancer models, oncolytic virus treatment alone is insufficient to break immune tolerance. Thus, we investigated enhancing efficacy through combination therapy with the immunogenic cell death-inducing chemotherapeutic drug, mitoxantrone. Despite a lack of enhanced cytotoxicity in vitro, HSV-1 ICP0 null oncolytic virus KM100 with 5 μmol/L mitoxantrone provided significant survival benefit to BALB/c mice bearing Her2/neu TUBO-derived tumors. This protection was mediated by increased intratumoral infiltration of neutrophils and tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Depletion studies verified that CD8-, CD4-, and Ly6G-expressing cells are essential for enhanced efficacy of the combination therapy. Moreover, the addition of mitoxantrone to KM100 oncolytic virus treatment broke immune tolerance in BALB-neuT mice bearing TUBO-derived tumors. This study suggests that oncolytic viruses in combination with immunogenic cell death-inducing chemotherapeutics enhance the immunogenicity of the tumor-associated antigens, breaking immunologic tolerance established toward these antigens.

  4. Distinct modes of cell death induced by different reactive oxygen species: amino acyl chloramines mediate hypochlorous acid-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Englert, Robert P; Shacter, Emily

    2002-06-07

    Oxidants derived from inflammatory phagocytes compose a key element of the host immune defense system and can kill mammalian cells by one of several different mechanisms. In this report, we compare mechanisms of cell death induced in human B lymphoma cells by the inflammatory oxidants superoxide, H(2)O(2), and HOCl. The results indicate that the mode of cell death induced depends on the nature of the oxidant involved and the medium in which the cells are treated. When human Burkitt's lymphoma cells are exposed to superoxide anion, generated as a flux from xanthine and xanthine oxidase, the cells die by a non-apoptotic mechanism (pyknosis/necrosis) identical to that seen when cells are treated with a bolus of reagent H(2)O(2). Addition of superoxide dismutase has no effect, whereas catalase is completely protective, indicating that exogenously generated superoxide kills cells entirely through its dismutation into H(2)O(2). In contrast, cells treated in culture media with reagent HOCl die largely by apoptosis. HOCl-induced apoptosis is mediated by aminoacyl chloramines generated in the culture media and can be mimicked by treatment of cells with taurine chloramine or with long lived chloramines generated from modified Lys or Arg. The results suggest that in a physiological milieu in which O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2) are the main oxidants being formed, the principal form of cell death may be necrotic, and under inflammatory conditions in which HOCl is generated, apoptotic cell death may predominate.

  5. Analysis of the cell death-inducing ability of the ethylene response factors in group VIII of the AP2/ERF family.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Takuya; Kida, Yuma; Tochigi, Mayuko; Matsushita, Yasuhiko

    2013-08-01

    The ethylene response factor (ERF) family is one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors. We have shown previously that the overexpression of the gene for NtERF3, a tobacco transcriptional repressor containing the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif in the C-terminal region, induces hypersensitive reaction (HR)-like cell death. Many EAR motif-containing ERFs, including NtERF3, are clustered in group VIII of the ERF family. In this study, we aimed at revealing the cell death-inducing ability of group VIII ERFs and the correlation between ERFs and HR. The results showed that many of the EAR motif-containing ERFs classified into subgroup VIII-a of Arabidopsis, rice, and tobacco had cell death-inducing ability in tobacco leaves. Seven AtERFs in subgroup VIII-b did not induce cell death; however, some ERFs in subgroup VIII-b of rice and tobacco showed cell death-inducing ability. An expression analysis of group VIII ERFs in HR-inducing tobacco suggested that the cell death-inducing ability of NtERFs was not necessarily associated with induction of HR. In addition, it was revealed that the EAR motif-containing AtERFs in subgroup II-a also showed cell death-inducing ability. The influence of sequence variation in the EAR motif on the ability to induce cell death is also discussed.

  6. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 is involved in the neuronal death induced by quinolinic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Perla Deyanira; Chánez-Cárdenas, María Elena; Barrera, Diana; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Santamaría, Abel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2007-09-20

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formation leads to DNA damage in animals treated with quinolinic acid. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a protein involved in the DNA base excision repair system. Its overactivation promotes cellular energy deficit and necrosis. Here, we evaluated the effect of PJ-34, a potent inhibitor of PARP-1, on the neuronal damage induced by quinolinic acid. Animals were administered with PJ-34 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), 1 h before and 1 h after a striatal infusion of 1 microl of quinolinic acid (240 nmol). PJ-34 clearly attenuated the circling behavior produced by quinolinic acid and completely prevented the histological damage induced by the toxin. The protective effect of PJ-34 suggests that PARP-1 activation is playing an active role in the neuronal death induced by quinolinic acid.

  7. A nuclease that mediates cell death induced by DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingfei; An, Ran; Umanah, George K.; Park, Hyejin; Nambiar, Kalyani; Eacker, Stephen M.; Kim, BongWoo; Bao, Lei; Harraz, Maged M.; Chang, Calvin; Chen, Rong; Wang, Jennifer E.; Kam, Tae-In; Jeong, Jun Seop; Xie, Zhi; Neifert, Stewart; Qian, Jiang; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition or genetic deletion of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is protective against toxic insults in many organ systems. The molecular mechanisms underlying PARP-1–dependent cell death involve release of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and its translocation to the nucleus, which results in chromatinolysis. We identified macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as a PARP-1–dependent AIF-associated nuclease (PAAN). AIF was required for recruitment of MIF to the nucleus, where MIF cleaves genomic DNA into large fragments. Depletion of MIF, disruption of the AIF-MIF interaction, or mutation of glutamic acid at position 22 in the catalytic nuclease domain blocked MIF nuclease activity and inhibited chromatinolysis, cell death induced by glutamate excitotoxicity, and focal stroke. Inhibition of MIF's nuclease activity is a potential therapeutic target for diseases caused by excessive PARP-1 activation. PMID:27846469

  8. Use of nanotechnology for improved pharmacokinetics and activity of immunogenic cell death inducers used in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Janicka, Martyna; Gubernator, Jerzy

    2017-09-01

    Immunogenic cell death inducers (ICD inducers) are a diverse group of therapeutic molecules capable of eliciting an adaptive immune response against the antigens present on the surface of dying cancer cells. Most of these molecules suffer from low bioavailability, high toxicity and poor pharmacokinetics which limit their application. It is believed that nanotechnology, in particular nano-sized nanocarriers, can address most of the issues that limit the use of ICD inducers. Area covered: The mechanism of action of ICD inducers and their limitations is discussed. In addition, we cover the novel possibilities arising from the use of nanotechnology to improve delivery of ICD inducers to the target tissue as well as the restrictions of modern nanotechnology. Expert opinion: At present, nanocarrier formulations suffer from low bioavailability, poor pharmacokinetics and stability issues. Nonetheless, there is a tremendous future for combinatorial immune-pharmacological treatments of human tumors based on nanocarrier delivery of ICD inducers.

  9. A nuclease that mediates cell death induced by DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingfei; An, Ran; Umanah, George K; Park, Hyejin; Nambiar, Kalyani; Eacker, Stephen M; Kim, BongWoo; Bao, Lei; Harraz, Maged M; Chang, Calvin; Chen, Rong; Wang, Jennifer E; Kam, Tae-In; Jeong, Jun Seop; Xie, Zhi; Neifert, Stewart; Qian, Jiang; Andrabi, Shaida A; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-Li; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M

    2016-10-07

    Inhibition or genetic deletion of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is protective against toxic insults in many organ systems. The molecular mechanisms underlying PARP-1-dependent cell death involve release of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and its translocation to the nucleus, which results in chromatinolysis. We identified macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as a PARP-1-dependent AIF-associated nuclease (PAAN). AIF was required for recruitment of MIF to the nucleus, where MIF cleaves genomic DNA into large fragments. Depletion of MIF, disruption of the AIF-MIF interaction, or mutation of glutamic acid at position 22 in the catalytic nuclease domain blocked MIF nuclease activity and inhibited chromatinolysis, cell death induced by glutamate excitotoxicity, and focal stroke. Inhibition of MIF's nuclease activity is a potential therapeutic target for diseases caused by excessive PARP-1 activation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Churpita, Olexander; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal plasma has been recognized as a promising tool across a vast variety of biomedical applications, with the potential to create novel therapeutic methods. However, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind non-thermal plasma cellular effects remains a significant challenge. In this study, we show how two types of different non-thermal plasmas induce cell death in mammalian cell cultures via the formation of multiple intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Our results showed a discrepancy in the superoxide accumulation and lysosomal activity in response to air and helium plasma, suggesting that triggered signalling cascades might be grossly different between different plasmas. In addition, the effects of ozone, a considerable component of non-thermal plasma, have been simultaneously evaluated and have revealed much faster and higher cytotoxic effects. Our findings offer novel insight into plasma-induced cellular responses, and provide a basis for better controlled biomedical applications.

  11. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Churpita, Olexander; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma has been recognized as a promising tool across a vast variety of biomedical applications, with the potential to create novel therapeutic methods. However, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind non-thermal plasma cellular effects remains a significant challenge. In this study, we show how two types of different non-thermal plasmas induce cell death in mammalian cell cultures via the formation of multiple intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Our results showed a discrepancy in the superoxide accumulation and lysosomal activity in response to air and helium plasma, suggesting that triggered signalling cascades might be grossly different between different plasmas. In addition, the effects of ozone, a considerable component of non-thermal plasma, have been simultaneously evaluated and have revealed much faster and higher cytotoxic effects. Our findings offer novel insight into plasma-induced cellular responses, and provide a basis for better controlled biomedical applications. PMID:25410636

  12. Site Specific Activation of AKT Protects Cells from Death Induced by Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meng; Liang, Jiyong; Lu, Yiling; Guo, Huifang; German, Peter; Bai, Shanshan; Jonasch, Eric; Yang, Xingsheng; Mills, Gordon B.; Ding, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase AKT is a key mediator of cancer cell survival. We demonstrate that transient glucose deprivation modestly induces AKT phosphorylation at both Thr308 and Ser473. In contrast, prolonged glucose deprivation induces selective AKTThr308 phosphorylation and phosphorylation of a distinct subset of AKT downstream targets leading to cell survival under metabolic stress. Glucose deprivation-induced AKTThr308 phosphorylation is dependent on PDK1 and PI3K but not EGFR or IGF1R. Prolonged glucose deprivation induces the formation of a complex of AKT, PDK1, and the GRP78 chaperone protein, directing phosphorylation of AKTThr308 but AKTSer473. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of AKT activation under prolonged glucose deprivation that protects cells from metabolic stress. The selective activation of AKTThr308 phosphorylation that occurs during prolonged nutrient deprivation may provide an unexpected opportunity for the development and implementation of drugs targeting cell metabolism and aberrant AKT signaling. PMID:23396361

  13. Role of peroxynitrite in programmed cell death induced in self-incompatible pollen.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Irene; Romero-Puertas, María C; Rodríguez Serrano, María; Sandalio, Luisa M; Olmedilla, Adela

    2012-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species and NO are involved in the signaling pathway of programmed cell death (PCD). Information concerning the role of these molecules in self-incompatible pollination is scarce especially in non-model species studied in vivo. We recently reported that in the olive tree, compatible and self-incompatible pollen have different levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and that PCD is induced in self-incompatible pollen. Levels of O 2 (.-) and NO are higher in pollen after self-incompatible pollination than after compatible pollination. The presence of these reactive species was concomitant with the presence of peroxynitrite. Similar results were obtained on pollen-germination experiments both in vivo and in vitro. These data, together with observations made after treating pollinated flowers with scavengers, suggest that peroxynitrite plays a role in PCD induced after self-incompatible pollination and we propose here a model to describe the way in which it might work.

  14. Interleukin-3 Prevents Cellular Death Induced by Oxidative Stress in HEK293 Cells.

    PubMed

    López, Camila; Zamorano, Patricia; Teuber, Stefanie; Salas, Mónica; Otth, Carola; Hidalgo, María A; Concha, Ilona; Zambrano, Angara

    2017-06-01

    Interleukin-3 (IL-3) is a well-characterized growth factor in hematopoietic cells, but it is also expressed in other cell types with poorly described functions. Many studies have provided evidence that IL-3 plays an important role in cell survival. We have previously shown that IL-3 is able to increase glucose uptake in HEK293 cells, suggesting that this factor requires sustained glucose metabolism to promote cell survival. In this study, we demonstrate that IL-3 contributes to cell survival under oxidative stress, a prominent feature in the pathophysiology of cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as in the aging process. Our results suggest a molecular mechanism that involves signaling pathways mediated by PI-3k/Akt and Erk. Altogether, these findings show an important role for IL-3 in supporting the viability of non-hematopoietic systems. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1330-1340, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Nitric oxide activates superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase to repress the cell death induced by wounding.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ching; Jih, Pei-Ju; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Jeng-Shane; Chang, Ling-Lan; Shen, Yu-Hsing; Jeng, Shih-Tong

    2011-10-01

    Wounding caused by rain, wind, and pathogen may lead plants to onset defense response. Previous studies indicated that mechanical wounding stimulates plants to generate nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). In this study, the functions of NO and H(2)O(2) after wounding in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Tainung 57) was further analyzed. Mechanical wounding damaged cells and resulted in necrosis, but the presence of NO donors or NO scavenger might reduce or enhance the cell death caused by wounding, respectively. The amount of H(2)O(2) induced by wounding was also decreased or increased when plants were incubated with NO donors or NO scavenger, individually. These results indicate that NO may regulate H(2)O(2) generation to affect cell death. NO-induced proteins isolated from two-dimensional electrophoresis were identified to be Copper/Zinc superoxide dismutases (CuZnSODs). The activities of CuZnSODs and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) could be enhanced by NO. In addition, the expression of CuZnSOD and APX was induced by wounding via NO, and their expression was further stimulated by NO through the generation of cGMP. The influx of calcium ions and the activity of NADPH oxidase were also involved in the NO signal transduction pathway inducing APX expression. Collectively, the generation of H(2)O(2) in wounded plants might trigger cell death. Meanwhile, the production of NO induced by wounding stimulated signal transducers including cGMP, calcium ions, and H(2)O(2) to activate CuZnSOD and APX, which further decreased H(2)O(2) level and reduced the cell death caused by wounding.

  16. Sam68 is cleaved by caspases under apoptotic cell death induced by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong-Jun; Choi, Moo Hyun; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Cha Soon; Pyo, Suhkneung; Yang, Kwang Hee

    2015-03-01

    The RNA-binding protein Sam68, a mitotic substrate of tyrosine kinases, has been reported to participate in the cell cycle, apoptosis, and signaling. In particular, overexpression of Sam68 protein is known to suppress cell growth and cell cycle progression in NIH3T3 cells. Although Sam68 is involved in many cellular activities, the function of Sam68, especially in response to apoptotic stimulation, is not well understood. In this study, we found that Sam68 protein is cleaved in immune cells undergoing apoptosis induced by γ-radiation. Moreover, we found that Sam68 cleavage was induced by apoptotic stimuli containing γ-radiation in a caspase-dependent manner. In particular, we showed that activated casepase-3, 7, 8 and 9 can directly cleave Sam68 protein through in vitro protease cleavage assay. Finally, we found that the knockdown of Sam68 attenuated γ-radiation-induced cell death and growth suppression. Conclusively, the cleavage of Sam68 is a new indicator for the cell damaging effects of ionizing radiation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  17. Lipidomic profile of GM95 cell death induced by Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin.

    PubMed

    Manni, Marco M; Valero, Juan G; Pérez-Cormenzana, Miriam; Cano, Ainara; Alonso, Cristina; Goñi, Félix M

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin (ATX) is considered as a prototype of cytotoxic bacterial phospholipases C, and is the major virulence factor in C. perfringens-induced gas gangrene. It is known that, depending on the dose, ATX causes membrane disruption and cytolysis or only limited hydrolysis of its substrates. In the latter case, toxin activity leads to the unregulated generation of bioactive lipids that can ultimately induce cell death. We have characterized apoptosis and necrosis in highly ATX-sensitive, ganglioside-deficient cells exposed to different concentrations of ATX and we have studied the lipidomic profile of cells treated with ATX as compared to native cells to detect the main changes in the lipidomic profile and the possible involvement of lipid signals in cell death. ATX causes both apoptosis and necrosis, depending on dose and time. ATX activates cell death, stimulating the release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and the consequent activation of caspases-3. Moreover GM95 cells treated with ATX showed important lipidomic alterations, among them we detected a general decrease in several phospholipid species and important changes in lipids involved in programmed cell death e.g. ceramide. The data suggest two different mechanisms of cell death caused by ATX, one leading to (mainly saturated) glycerophospholipid hydrolysis related to an increase in diacylglycerols and associated to membrane damage and necrosis, and a second mechanism involving chiefly sphingomyelin hydrolysis and generation of proapoptotic lipidic mediators such as ceramide, N-acylethanolamine and saturated non-esterified fatty acids.

  18. Camptothecin Enhances Cell Death Induced by (177)Lu-EDTMP in Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Chandan; Vats, Kusum; Lohar, Sharad P; Korde, Aruna; Samuel, Grace

    2014-10-01

    Lutetium-177 is an assured therapeutic radionuclide with favorable half-life and suitable β(-) energy. Radiolabeled (177)Lu-EDTMP (Ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonic acid) is by and large used for bone pain palliation in cancer patients. In vitro cell studies are carried out in osteosarcoma cells MG-63 to evaluate the combined effect of anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT) and (177)Lu-EDTMP. Two concentrations of (177)Lu-EDTMP (3.7 and 37 MBq) were incubated with MG63 cell line for 48 hours with and without pretreatment of CPT (10 nM) for 1 hour. After completion of incubation, the cells were harvested and cellular toxicity was estimated by LDH, MTT, and trypan blue dye. Apoptotic DNA fragmentation was estimated by ELISA kit. The expression of proteins such as bcl2, PARP, and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) that were related to apoptotic signaling pathways was assessed by western blotting. The results indicated that cellular toxicity and apoptosis were relatively higher in MG63 cells that were treated with CPT prior to treating with (177)Lu-EDTMP in comparison with the corresponding individual controls.

  19. Cell Death Induced by the Jak2 Inhibitor, G6, Correlates with Cleavage of Vimentin Filaments†

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Anurima; Kirabo, Annet; Karrupiah, Kanchana; Tsuda, Shigeharu; Caldwell-Busby, Jennifer; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Keserű, György M.; Sayeski, Peter P.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperkinetic Jak2 tyrosine kinase signaling has been implicated in several human diseases including leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma and the myeloproliferative neoplasms. Using structure-based virtual screening, we previously identified a novel Jak2 inhibitor named G6. We showed that G6 specifically inhibits Jak2 kinase activity and suppresses Jak2-mediated cellular proliferation. To elucidate the molecular and biochemical mechanisms by which G6 inhibits Jak2-mediated cellular proliferation, we treated Jak2-V617F expressing human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells for 12 hours with either vehicle control or 25 μM of the drug and compared protein expression profiles using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. One differentially expressed protein identified by electrospray mass spectroscopy was the intermediate filament protein, vimentin. It was present in DMSO treated cells, but absent in G6 treated cells. HEL cells treated with G6 showed both time- and dose-dependent cleavage of vimentin as well as a marked reorganization of vimentin intermediate filaments within intact cells. In a mouse model of Jak2-V617F mediated human erythroleukemia, G6 also decreased the levels of vimentin protein, in vivo. The G6-induced cleavage of vimentin was found to be Jak2-dependent and calpain-mediated. Furthermore, we found that intracellular calcium mobilization is essential and sufficient for the cleavage of vimentin. Finally, we show that the cleavage of vimentin intermediate filaments, per se, is sufficient to reduce HEL cell viability. Collectively, these results suggest that G6-induced inhibition of Jak2-mediated pathogenic cell growth is concomitant with the disruption of intracellular vimentin filaments. As such, this work describes a novel pathway for the targeting of Jak2-mediated pathological cell growth. PMID:21823612

  20. Reciprocal effects of glucose on the process of cell death induced by calcium ionophore or H2O2 in rat lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Horimoto, Kanna; Nishimura, Yumiko; Oyama, Tomohiro M; Onoda, Kyoko; Matsui, Hiroko; Oyama, Toshihisa B; Kanemaru, Kaori; Masuda, Toshiya; Oyama, Yasuo

    2006-08-15

    We have examined the effects of glucose at high concentrations on the process of cell death induced by excessive increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) or oxidative stress in rat lymphocytes. The cell death elicited by the excessive increase in [Ca(2+)](i) seemed to be induced by an activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels because the inhibitors for Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels attenuated the decrease in cell viability. Glucose at 30-50mM augmented the decrease in cell viability by the excessive increase in [Ca(2+)](i). It was not specific for glucose because it was the case for sucrose or NaCl, suggesting an involvement of increased osmolarity in adverse action of glucose. On the contrary, glucose protected the cells suffering from oxidative stress induced by H(2)O(2), one of reactive oxygen species. It was also the case for fructose or sucrose, but not for NaCl. The process of cell death induced by H(2)O(2) started, being independent from the presence of glucose. Glucose delayed the process of cell death induced by H(2)O(2). Sucrose and fructose also protected the cells against oxidative stress. The reactivity of sucrose to reactive oxygen species is lower than those of glucose and fructose. The order in the reactivity cannot explain the protective action of glucose. Glucose at high concentrations exerts reciprocal actions on the process of cell death induced by the oxidative stress and excessive increase in [Ca(2+)](i).

  1. Evidence of programmed cell death induced by reconditioning after cold stress in cucumber fruit and possible involvement of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohong; Nie, Peng; Deng, Hongjun; Mi, Hongbo; Hou, Xiaorong; Li, Ping; Mao, Linchun

    2014-05-01

    Cucumber fruit is susceptible to chilling injury (CI), which could be accelerated significantly with subsequent shelf-life. This type of CI culminates in deterioration of organs and eventually leads to cell death. In this study, evidence of programmed cell death (PCD), involving cell death induced by cold stress, was investigated in cucumber. Harvested cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Zhexiu-1) fruits were stored at 2 °C for 3, 6 or 9 days and subsequently transferred to 20 °C for 2 days. Significant cell death acceleration was observed upon reconditioning after 9 days' cold stress when the hallmark of PCD - DNA laddering - was clearly observed. Further evidence of nuclear DNA cleavage was confirmed by the in situ TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Chromatin condensation and nucleus distortion were observed by nuclear staining of DPI. Ethylene burst was observed upon reconditioning after 9 days of consecutive cold stress. The features of PCD process induced by reconditioning after cold stress in cucumber fruit may be mainly attributed to ethylene burst. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Susceptibility to oral cancers with CD95 and CD95L promoter SNPs may vary with the site and gender.

    PubMed

    Daripally, Sarika; Nallapalle, Sateesh Reddy; Katta, Saritha; Prasad, Vidudala V T S

    2015-09-01

    We investigated risk association of oral cancers (tongue and buccal mucosa cancers) with FAS (-1377G > A and FAS -670 A > G) and FASL (-844 T > C) SNPs, in males and females. A case-control study of 535 oral cancer and 525 control subjects was performed. SNPs were detected in the genomic DNA isolated from peripheral blood using PCR-RFLP. We report FASL -844 T > C SNPs increased risk for buccal mucosa cancer in females but not in males. On the other hand, FAS genotypes did not alter the risk of the cancers in both females and males. However, co-occurrence of FAS -1377 GA and -670 GG, FAS -1377 AA and -670 GG genotypes, and combined genotypes of FAS and FASL (FAS -1377 AA + FAS -670 GG + FASL -844 CC) alter male susceptibility towards tongue cancer. In females, combined genotypes of FAS (-1377GA and -670 AA) were found to be a risk factor of buccal mucosa cancer (OR = 3.27, CI = 1.28-8.36; P ≤ 0.01). FASL variants (GA and AA) increased tongue cancer risk in females who were tobacco users compared to non-tobacco users. In conclusion, SNPs of the FAS and FASL might alter risk of tongue and buccal mucosa cancers differentially, in a gender-dependent manner.

  3. Nitric oxide is the key mediator of death induced by fisetin in human acute monocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ash, Dipankar; Subramanian, Manikandan; Surolia, Avadhesha; Shaha, Chandrima

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to be effective in cancer chemoprevention and therefore drugs that help generate NO would be preferable for combination chemotherapy or solo use. This study shows a new evidence of NO as a mediator of acute leukemia cell death induced by fisetin, a promising chemotherapeutic agent. Fisetin was able to kill THP-1 cells in vivo resulting in tumor shrinkage in the mouse xenograft model. Death induction in vitro was mediated by an increase in NO resulting in double strand DNA breaks and the activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Double strand DNA breaks could be reduced if NO inhibitor was present during fisetin treatment. Fisetin also inhibited the downstream components of the mTORC1 pathway through downregulation of levels of p70 S6 kinase and inducing hypo-phosphorylation of S6 Ri P kinase, eIF4B and eEF2K. NO inhibition restored phosphorylation of downstream effectors of mTORC1 and rescued cells from death. Fisetin induced Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels and abrogation of Ca(2+) influx reduced caspase activation and cell death. NO increase and increased Ca(2+) were independent phenomenon. It was inferred that apoptotic death of acute monocytic leukemia cells was induced by fisetin through increased generation of NO and elevated Ca(2+) entry activating the caspase dependent apoptotic pathways. Therefore, manipulation of NO production could be viewed as a potential strategy to increase efficacy of chemotherapy in acute monocytic leukemia.

  4. Nefiracetam attenuates post-ischemic nonconvulsive seizures in rats and protects neuronal cell death induced by veratridine and glutamate.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi-Chun May; Dave, Jitendra R; Chen, Zhiyong; Cao, Ying; Liao, Zhilin; Tortella, Frank C

    2013-06-13

    Stroke patients are at a high risk of developing post-ischemic seizures and cognitive impairment. Nefiracetam (NEF), a pyrrolidone derivative, has been shown to possess both anti-epileptic and cognitive-enhancing properties. In this study the anti-seizure effects of NEF were evaluated in a rat model of post-ischemic nonconvulsive seizures (NCSs). Its potential mechanisms were investigated in neuronal cell culture assays of neurotoxicity associated with ischemic brain injury and epileptogenesis. In the in vivo study, rats received 24h permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. NEF was administered intravenously either at 15 min post-injury but prior to the first NCS event (30 mg/kg, pre-NCS treatment) or immediately after the first NCS occurred (30 or 60 mg/kg, post-NCS treatment). In the in vitro study, neuronal cell cultures were exposed to veratridine or glutamate and treated with NEF (1-500 nM). The NEF pre-NCS treatment significantly reduced the NCS frequency and duration, whereas the higher NEF dose (60 mg/kg) was required to achieve similar effects when given after NCS occurred. The NEF treatment also dose-dependently (5-500 nM) protected against neuronal cell death induced by veratridine as measured by MTT cell viability assay, but higher doses (250-500 nM) were required against glutamate toxicity. The anti-seizure property of NEF was demonstrated in a clinically relevant rat model of post-ischemic NCS. The preferential effects of NEF against in vitro veratridine toxicity suggest the involvement of its modulation of sodium channel malfunction. Future studies are warranted to study the mechanisms of NEF against ischemic brain injury and post-ischemic seizures. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Nitric oxide is the key mediator of death induced by fisetin in human acute monocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Dipankar; Subramanian, Manikandan; Surolia, Avadhesha; Shaha, Chandrima

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to be effective in cancer chemoprevention and therefore drugs that help generate NO would be preferable for combination chemotherapy or solo use. This study shows a new evidence of NO as a mediator of acute leukemia cell death induced by fisetin, a promising chemotherapeutic agent. Fisetin was able to kill THP-1 cells in vivo resulting in tumor shrinkage in the mouse xenograft model. Death induction in vitro was mediated by an increase in NO resulting in double strand DNA breaks and the activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Double strand DNA breaks could be reduced if NO inhibitor was present during fisetin treatment. Fisetin also inhibited the downstream components of the mTORC1 pathway through downregulation of levels of p70 S6 kinase and inducing hypo-phosphorylation of S6 Ri P kinase, eIF4B and eEF2K. NO inhibition restored phosphorylation of downstream effectors of mTORC1 and rescued cells from death. Fisetin induced Ca2+ entry through L-type Ca2+ channels and abrogation of Ca2+ influx reduced caspase activation and cell death. NO increase and increased Ca2+ were independent phenomenon. It was inferred that apoptotic death of acute monocytic leukemia cells was induced by fisetin through increased generation of NO and elevated Ca2+ entry activating the caspase dependent apoptotic pathways. Therefore, manipulation of NO production could be viewed as a potential strategy to increase efficacy of chemotherapy in acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:25973292

  6. Metabolic rewiring in cancer cells overexpressing the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (GILZ): Activation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and sensitization to oxidative cell death induced by mitochondrial targeted drugs.

    PubMed

    André, Fanny; Trinh, Anne; Balayssac, Stéphane; Maboudou, Patrice; Dekiouk, Salim; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Quesnel, Bruno; Idziorek, Thierry; Kluza, Jérome; Marchetti, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cell metabolism is largely controlled by oncogenic signals and nutrient availability. Here, we highlighted that the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), an intracellular protein influencing many signaling pathways, reprograms cancer cell metabolism to promote proliferation. We provided evidence that GILZ overexpression induced a significant increase of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation as evidenced by the augmentation in basal respiration, ATP-linked respiration as well as respiratory capacity. Pharmacological inhibition of glucose, glutamine and fatty acid oxidation reduced the activation of GILZ-induced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. At glycolysis level, GILZ-overexpressing cells enhanced the expression of glucose transporters in their plasmatic membrane and showed higher glycolytic reserve. (1)H NMR metabolites quantification showed an up-regulation of amino acid biosynthesis. The GILZ-induced metabolic reprograming is present in various cancer cell lines regardless of their driver mutations status and is associated with higher proliferation rates persisting under metabolic stress conditions. Interestingly, high levels of OXPHOS made GILZ-overexpressing cells vulnerable to cell death induced by mitochondrial pro-oxidants. Altogether, these data indicate that GILZ reprograms cancer metabolism towards mitochondrial OXPHOS and sensitizes cancer cells to mitochondria-targeted drugs with pro-oxidant activities.

  7. Identification of a novel cell death-inducing domain reveals that fungal amyloid-controlled programmed cell death is related to necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Daskalov, Asen; Habenstein, Birgit; Sabaté, Raimon; Berbon, Mélanie; Martinez, Denis; Chaignepain, Stéphane; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Hofmann, Kay; Loquet, Antoine; Saupe, Sven J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings have revealed the role of prion-like mechanisms in the control of host defense and programmed cell death cascades. In fungi, HET-S, a cell death-inducing protein containing a HeLo pore-forming domain, is activated through amyloid templating by a Nod-like receptor (NLR). Here we characterize the HELLP protein behaving analogously to HET-S and bearing a new type of N-terminal cell death-inducing domain termed HeLo-like (HELL) and a C-terminal regulatory amyloid motif known as PP. The gene encoding HELLP is part of a three-gene cluster also encoding a lipase (SBP) and a Nod-like receptor, both of which display the PP motif. The PP motif is similar to the RHIM amyloid motif directing formation of the RIP1/RIP3 necrosome in humans. The C-terminal region of HELLP, HELLP(215-278), encompassing the motif, allows prion propagation and assembles into amyloid fibrils, as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction and FTIR analyses. Solid-state NMR studies reveal a well-ordered local structure of the amyloid core residues and a primary sequence that is almost entirely arranged in a rigid conformation, and confirm a β-sheet structure in an assigned stretch of three amino acids. HELLP is activated by amyloid templating and displays membrane-targeting and cell death-inducing activity. HELLP targets the SBP lipase to the membrane, suggesting a synergy between HELLP and SBP in membrane dismantling. Remarkably, the HeLo-like domain of HELLP is homologous to the pore-forming domain of MLKL, the cell death-execution protein in necroptosis, revealing a transkingdom evolutionary relationship between amyloid-controlled fungal programmed cell death and mammalian necroptosis. PMID:26903619

  8. Compartmentalized oxidative stress in dopaminergic cell death induced by pesticides and complex I inhibitors: Distinct roles of superoxide anion and superoxide dismutases

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Pickett, Chillian; Sumin, Li; Jones, Jocelyn; Chen, Han; Webb, Brian; Choi, Jae; Zhou, You; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    The loss of dopaminergic neurons induced by the parkinsonian toxins paraquat, rotenone and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) is associated with oxidative stress. However, controversial reports exist regarding the source/compartmentalization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and its exact role in cell death. We aimed to determine in detail the role of superoxide anion (O2•−), oxidative stress and their subcellular compartmentalization in dopaminergic cell death induced by parkinsonian toxins. Oxidative stress and ROS formation was determined in the cytosol, intermembrane (IMS) and mitochondrial matrix compartments, using dihydroethidine derivatives, the redox sensor roGFP, as well as electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Paraquat induced an increase in ROS and oxidative stress in both the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix prior to cell death. MPP+ and rotenone primarily induced an increase in ROS and oxidative stress in the mitochondrial matrix. No oxidative stress was detected at the level of the IMS. In contrast to previous studies, overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) or copper/zinc SOD (CuZnSOD) had no effect on ROS steady state levels, lipid peroxidation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and dopaminergic cell death induced by MPP+ or rotenone. In contrast, paraquat-induced oxidative stress and cell death were selectively reduced by MnSOD overexpression, but not by CuZnSOD or manganese-porphyrins. However, MnSOD also failed to prevent ΔΨm loss. Finally, paraquat, but not MPP+ or rotenone, induced the transcriptional activation the redox-sensitive antioxidant response elements (ARE) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB). These results demonstrate a selective role of mitochondrial O2•− in dopaminergic cell death induced by paraquat, and show that toxicity induced by the complex I inhibitors rotenone and MPP+ does not depend directly on mitochondrial O2•− formation. PMID:23602909

  9. Identification of a novel cell death-inducing domain reveals that fungal amyloid-controlled programmed cell death is related to necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Daskalov, Asen; Habenstein, Birgit; Sabaté, Raimon; Berbon, Mélanie; Martinez, Denis; Chaignepain, Stéphane; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Hofmann, Kay; Loquet, Antoine; Saupe, Sven J

    2016-03-08

    Recent findings have revealed the role of prion-like mechanisms in the control of host defense and programmed cell death cascades. In fungi, HET-S, a cell death-inducing protein containing a HeLo pore-forming domain, is activated through amyloid templating by a Nod-like receptor (NLR). Here we characterize the HELLP protein behaving analogously to HET-S and bearing a new type of N-terminal cell death-inducing domain termed HeLo-like (HELL) and a C-terminal regulatory amyloid motif known as PP. The gene encoding HELLP is part of a three-gene cluster also encoding a lipase (SBP) and a Nod-like receptor, both of which display the PP motif. The PP motif is similar to the RHIM amyloid motif directing formation of the RIP1/RIP3 necrosome in humans. The C-terminal region of HELLP, HELLP(215-278), encompassing the motif, allows prion propagation and assembles into amyloid fibrils, as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction and FTIR analyses. Solid-state NMR studies reveal a well-ordered local structure of the amyloid core residues and a primary sequence that is almost entirely arranged in a rigid conformation, and confirm a β-sheet structure in an assigned stretch of three amino acids. HELLP is activated by amyloid templating and displays membrane-targeting and cell death-inducing activity. HELLP targets the SBP lipase to the membrane, suggesting a synergy between HELLP and SBP in membrane dismantling. Remarkably, the HeLo-like domain of HELLP is homologous to the pore-forming domain of MLKL, the cell death-execution protein in necroptosis, revealing a transkingdom evolutionary relationship between amyloid-controlled fungal programmed cell death and mammalian necroptosis.

  10. Human Peritoneal Mesothelial Cell Death Induced by High-Glucose Hypertonic Solution Involves Ca2+ and Na+ Ions and Oxidative Stress with the Participation of PKC/NOX2 and PI3K/Akt Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Felipe; Tapia, Pablo; Armisen, Ricardo; Echeverria, Cesar; Gatica, Sebastian; Vallejos, Alejandro; Pacheco, Alejandro; Sanhueza, Maria E.; Alvo, Miriam; Segovia, Erico

    2017-01-01

    Chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD) therapy is equally efficient as hemodialysis while providing greater patient comfort and mobility. Therefore, PD is the treatment of choice for several types of renal patients. During PD, a high-glucose hyperosmotic (HGH) solution is administered into the peritoneal cavity to generate an osmotic gradient that promotes water and solutes transport from peritoneal blood to the dialysis solution. Unfortunately, PD has been associated with a loss of peritoneal viability and function through the generation of a severe inflammatory state that induces human peritoneal mesothelial cell (HPMC) death. Despite this deleterious effect, the precise molecular mechanism of HPMC death as induced by HGH solutions is far from being understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the pathways involved in HGH solution-induced HPMC death. HGH-induced HPMC death included influxes of intracellular Ca2+ and Na+. Furthermore, HGH-induced HPMC death was inhibited by antioxidant and reducing agents. In line with this, HPMC death was induced solely by increased oxidative stress. In addition to this, the cPKC/NOX2 and PI3K/Akt intracellular signaling pathways also participated in HGH-induced HPMC death. The participation of PI3K/Akt intracellular is in agreement with previously shown in rat PMC apoptosis. These findings contribute toward fully elucidating the underlying molecular mechanism mediating peritoneal mesothelial cell death induced by high-glucose solutions during peritoneal dialysis. PMID:28659813

  11. Apoptotic death induced by the cyclophosphamide analogue mafosfamide in human lymphoblastoid cells: Contribution of DNA replication, transcription inhibition and Chk/p53 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Michael; Roos, Wynand P. Kaina, Bernd

    2008-05-15

    Cyclophosphamide is one of the most often used anticancer drugs. Although DNA interstrand cross-links are considered responsible for its cytotoxicity, the mechanism of initiation and execution of cell death is largely unknown. Using the cyclophosphamide analogue mafosfamide, which does not need metabolic activation, we show that mafosfamide induces apoptosis dose and time dependently in lymphoblastoid cells, with clearly more apoptosis in p53{sup wt} cells. We identified two upstream processes that initiate apoptosis, DNA replication blockage and transcriptional inhibition. In lymphoblastoid cells, wherein DNA replication can be switched off by tetracycline, proliferation is required for inducing apoptosis at low dose mafosfamide. At high dose, transcriptional inhibition also contributes to cell death. The RNA synthesis inhibitor {alpha}-amanitin induced similar to mafosfamide more apoptosis in p53{sup wt} than in p53{sup mt} cells. In combination with mafosfamide, however, {alpha}-amanitin had no additive effect. Mafosfamide caused p53 stabilization by phosphorylation of Ser15, 20 and 37, and activation of ATM/ATR and Chk1/Chk2. Inhibition of ATM/ATR, PI3-kinase and Chk1/Chk2 by CGK733, wortmannin and DBH, respectively, attenuated the apoptotic response in p53{sup wt} but not p53{sup mt} cells. Mafosfamide induced caspase dependent apoptosis and, for low dose treated cells, caspases were preferentially activated in the S-phase, whereas at high dose caspases were activated in all cell cycle stages. These data support the conclusion that at low dose level of mafosfamide, DNA replication blockage is the dominant apoptosis-inducing event, while at high dose, transcriptional inhibition comes into play. The data provide a mechanistic explanation of why cyclophosphamide applied at therapeutic doses preferentially kills replicating tumor cells.

  12. Multidrug transporter ABCG2 prevents tumor cell death induced by the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor Iressa (ZD1839, Gefitinib).

    PubMed

    Elkind, N Barry; Szentpétery, Zsófia; Apáti, Agota; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Várady, György; Ujhelly, Olga; Szabó, Katalin; Homolya, László; Váradi, András; Buday, László; Kéri, György; Német, Katalin; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2005-03-01

    Iressa (ZD1839, Gefitinib), used in clinics to treat non-small cell lung cancer patients, is a tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor that leads to specific decoupling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Recent data indicate that Iressa is especially effective in tumors with certain EGFR mutations; however, a subset of these tumors does not respond to Iressa. In addition, certain populations have an elevated risk of side effects during Iressa treatment. The human ABCG2 (BCRP/MXR/ABCP) transporter causes cancer drug resistance by actively extruding a variety of cytotoxic drugs, and it functions physiologically to protect our tissues from xenobiotics. Importantly, ABCG2 modifies absorption, distribution, and toxicity of several pharmacologic agents. Previously, we showed that ABCG2 displays a high-affinity interaction with several tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitors, including Iressa. Here, we show that the expression of ABCG2, but not its nonfunctional mutant, protects the EGFR signaling-dependent A431 tumor cells from death on exposure to Iressa. This protection is reversed by the ABCG2-specific inhibitor, Ko143. These data, reinforced with cell biology and biochemical experiments, strongly suggest that ABCG2 can actively pump Iressa. Therefore, variable expression and polymorphisms of ABCG2 may significantly modify the antitumor effect as well as the absorption and tissue distribution of Iressa.

  13. Calcium signaling and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Kass, G E; Orrenius, S

    1999-01-01

    The divalent calcium cation Ca(2+) is used as a major signaling molecule during cell signal transduction to regulate energy output, cellular metabolism, and phenotype. The basis to the signaling role of Ca(2+) is an intricate network of cellular channels and transporters that allow a low resting concentration of Ca(2+) in the cytosol of the cell ([Ca(2+)]i) but that are also coupled to major dynamic and rapidly exchanging stores. This enables extracellular signals from hormones and growth factors to be transduced as [Ca(2+)]i spikes that are amplitude and frequency encoded. There is considerable evidence that a number of toxic environmental chemicals target these Ca(2+) signaling processes, alter them, and induce cell death by apoptosis. Two major pathways for apoptosis will be considered. The first one involves Ca(2+)-mediated expression of ligands that bind to and activate death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1). In the second pathway, Ca(2+) has a direct toxic effect and its primary targets include the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mitochondria may respond to an apoptotic Ca(2+) signal by the selective release of cytochrome c or through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and opening of an inner mitochondrial membrane pore. Toxic agents such as the environmental pollutant tributyltin or the natural plant product thapsigargin, which deplete the ER Ca(2+) stores, will induce as a direct result of this effect the opening of plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels and an ER stress response. In contrast, under some conditions, Ca(2+) signals may be cytoprotective and antagonize the apoptotic machinery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10229704

  14. A bcl-2 transgene expressed in hepatocytes protects mice from fulminant liver destruction but not from rapid death induced by anti-Fas antibody injection

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Stimulation of the Fas (APO-1, CD95) receptor, which is present on a variety of cells, usually triggers a process of programmed cell death. Systemic injection of anti-Fas antibody into mice leads to fulminant liver destruction resulting from massive hepatocyte apoptosis, and to rapid death. Hepatocytes bear Fas but do not express Bcl-2, a protein that plays, in a number of conditions, a protective role against apoptosis. We have generated mice whose liver expresses Bcl-2 as the result of bcl-2 transgene placed under the control of the hepatocyte- specific alpha1-anti-trypsin gene promoter, but is otherwise not distinguishable from that of normal mice. These mice display a marked to almost total resistance to liver damage induced by anti-Fas antibody injection. This protective effect of Bcl-2 occurs in the absence of significant variations, in the stimulated livers, in the level of expression of other proteins also involved in resistance or sensitivity to apoptosis, namely Bcl-x, Bax, Bad, Bak, and p53. Mice with protected livers, however, die almost as rapidly as normal mice, which indicates that acute lethality results from stimulation of Fas receptors present on other target organs or cells. PMID:8642244

  15. Role of SIRT1-mediated mitochondrial and Akt pathways in glioblastoma cell death induced by Cotinus coggygria flavonoid nanoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Jun Jie; To, Tony SS; Zhao, Hua Fu; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids, the major polyphenol components in Cotinus coggygria (CC), have been found to show an anticancer effect in our previous study; however, the exact mechanisms of inducing human glioblastoma (GBM) cell death remain to be resolved. In this study, a novel polyvinylpyrrolidone K-30/sodium dodecyl sulfate and polyethyleneglycol-coated liposome loaded with CC flavonoids (CCFs) was developed to enhance solubility and the antibrain tumor effect, and the molecular mechanism regarding how CCF nanoliposomes (CCF-NLs) induce apoptotic cell death in vitro was investigated. DBTRG-05MG GBM cell lines treated with CCF-NLs showed potential antiproliferative effects. Regarding the underlying mechanisms of inducing apoptosis in DBTRG-05MG GBM cells, CCF-NLs were shown to downregulate the expression of antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 2 (Bcl-2), an apoptosis-related protein family member, but the expression of proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein was enhanced compared with that in controls. CCF-NLs also inhibited the activity of caspase-3 and -9, which is the initiator caspase of the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Blockade of caspase activation consistently induced apoptosis and inhibited growth in CCF-NL-treated DBTRG-05MG cells. This study further investigated the role of the Akt pathway in the apoptotic cell death by CCF-NLs, showing that CCF-NLs deactivated Akt. Specifically, CCF-NLs downregulated the expression of p-Akt and SIRT1 as well as the level of phosphorylated p53. Together, these results indicated SIRT1/p53-mediated cell death was induced by CCF-NLs, but not by extracellular signal-regulated kinase, in DBTRG-05MG cells. Overall, this study suggested caspase-dependent activation of both the intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways, probably through blockade of the SIRT1/p53-mediated mitochondrial and Akt pathways to exert the proapoptotic effect of CCF-NLs in DBTRG-05MG GBM cells. PMID:26345416

  16. Nuclear calcium controls the apoptotic-like cell death induced by d-erythro-sphinganine in tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Lachaud, Christophe; Da Silva, Daniel; Cotelle, Valérie; Thuleau, Patrice; Xiong, Tou Cheu; Jauneau, Alain; Brière, Christian; Graziana, Annick; Bellec, Yannick; Faure, Jean-Denis; Ranjeva, Raoul; Mazars, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Studies performed in animals have highlighted the major role of sphingolipids in regulating the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Sphingolipids have also been shown to induce cell death in plants via calcium-based signalling pathways but the contribution of free cytosolic and/or nuclear calcium in the overall process has never been evaluated. Here, we show that increase in tobacco BY-2 cells of the endogenous content of Long Chain Bases (LCBs) caused by external application of d-erythro-sphinganine (DHS) is followed by immediate dose-dependent elevations of cellular free calcium concentration within the first minute in the cytosol and 10min later in the nucleus. Cells challenged with DHS enter a death process through apoptotic-like mechanisms. Lanthanum chloride, a general blocker of calcium entry, suppresses the cellular calcium variations and the PCD induced by DHS. Interestingly, dl-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP5) and [(+)-dizocilpine] (MK801), two inhibitors of animal and plant ionotropic glutamate receptors, suppress DHS-induced cell death symptoms by selectively inhibiting the variations of nuclear calcium concentration. The selective action of these compounds demonstrates the crucial role of nuclear calcium signature in controlling DHS-induced cell death in tobacco cells. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. TLQP-21, a neuroendocrine VGF-derived peptide, prevents cerebellar granule cells death induced by serum and potassium deprivation.

    PubMed

    Severini, Cinzia; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Biondini, Laura; Quaresima, Stefania; Rinaldi, Anna Maria; Levi, Andrea; Frank, Claudio; Possenti, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    Different VGF peptides derived from Vgf, originally identified as a nerve growth factor responsive gene, have been detected in neurons within the central and peripheral nervous system and in various endocrine cells. In the current study, we have evaluated the ability of TLQP-21, a VGF-derived peptide, to protect, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from serum and potassium deprivation-induced cell death. We demonstrated that TLQP-21 increased survival of CGCs by decreasing the degree of apoptosis as assessed by cell viability and DNA fragmentation. Moreover, TLQP-21 significantly activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, serine/threonine protein kinase, and c-jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, while decreased the extent of protein kinase C phosphorylation, as demonstrated by western blot analysis. In addition, TLQP-21 induced significant increase in intracellular calcium (as measured by fura-2AM) in about 60% of the recorded neurons. Taken together, the present results demonstrate that TLQP-21 promotes the survival of CGCs via pathways involving, within few minutes, modulation of kinases associated with CGCs survival, and by increasing intracellular calcium which can contribute to the neuroprotective effect of the peptide.

  18. Tat-NOL3 protects against hippocampal neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress through the regulation of apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Shin, Min Jea; Eum, Won Sik; Kim, Dae Won; Yong, Ji In; Ryu, Eun Ji; Park, Jung Hwan; Cho, Su Bin; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Im, Seung Kwon; Kweon, Hae Young; Kim, Duk-Soo; Yu, Yeon Hee; Cho, Sung-Woo; Park, Meeyoung; Park, Jinseu; Cho, Yong-Jun; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is associated with neuronal cell death and ischemia. The NOL3 [nucleolar protein 3 (apoptosis repressor with CARD domain)] protein protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death. However, the protective mechanism responsible for this effect as well as the effects of NOL3 against oxidative stress in ischemia remain unclear. Thus, we examined the protective effects of NOL3 protein on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and the mechanism responsible for these effects in hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells and in an animal model of forebrain ischemia using Tat-fused NOL3 protein (Tat-NOL3). Purified Tat-NOL3 protein transduced into the H2O2-exposed HT22 cells and inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA fragmentation and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). In addition, Tat-NOL3 prevented neuronal cell death through the regulation of apoptotic signaling pathways including Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-2, -3 and -8, PARP and p53. In addition, Tat-NOL3 protein transduced into the animal brains and significantly protected against neuronal cell death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus by regulating the activation of microglia and astrocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Tat-NOL3 protein protects against oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death by regulating oxidative stress and by acting as an anti-apoptotic protein. Thus, we suggest that Tat-NOL3 represents a potential therapeutic agent for protection against ischemic brain injury.

  19. Novel DNA damage checkpoints mediating cell death induced by the NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924.

    PubMed

    Blank, Jonathan L; Liu, Xiaozhen J; Cosmopoulos, Katherine; Bouck, David C; Garcia, Khristofer; Bernard, Hugues; Tayber, Olga; Hather, Greg; Liu, Ray; Narayanan, Usha; Milhollen, Michael A; Lightcap, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    MLN4924 is an investigational small-molecule inhibitor of the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) in phase I clinical trials. NAE inhibition prevents the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of substrates for cullin-RING ubiquitin E3 ligases that support cancer pathophysiology, but the genetic determinants conferring sensitivity to NAE inhibition are unknown. To address this gap in knowledge, we conducted a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify genes and pathways that affect the lethality of MLN4924 in melanoma cells. Of the 154 genes identified, approximately one-half interfered with components of the cell cycle, apoptotic machinery, ubiquitin system, and DNA damage response pathways. In particular, genes involved in DNA replication, p53, BRCA1/BRCA2, transcription-coupled repair, and base excision repair seemed to be important for MLN4924 lethality. In contrast, genes within the G(2)-M checkpoint affected sensitivity to MLN4924 in colon cancer cells. Cell-cycle analysis in melanoma cells by flow cytometry following RNAi-mediated silencing showed that MLN4924 prevented the transition of cells from S-G(2) phase after induction of rereplication stress. Our analysis suggested an important role for the p21-dependent intra-S-phase checkpoint and extensive rereplication, whereas the ATR-dependent intra-S-phase checkpoint seemed to play a less dominant role. Unexpectedly, induction of the p21-dependent intra-S-phase checkpoint seemed to be independent of both Cdt1 stabilization and ATR signaling. Collectively, these data enhance our understanding of the mechanisms by which inhibition of NEDD8-dependent ubiquitination causes cell death, informing clinical development of MLN4924.

  20. Overexpression of ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE1a alleviates mitochondria-dependent programmed cell death induced by aluminium phytotoxicity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Li, Zhe; Wang, Yongqiang; Xing, Da

    2014-08-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX) is a terminal oxidase found in all plants, and functions to maintain the electron flux and reduce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our previous study demonstrated that aluminium (Al) treatment could induce increased expression of the AOX1a gene, but the mechanism of how AOX1a participates in the regulation of Al-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is still not clear. To investigate the possible mechanism, mitochondrial ROS production and the behaviour of mitochondria, as well as caspase-3-like activation were monitored under Al treatment in wild-type (WT), AOX1a-lacking (aox1a), and AOX1a-overexpressing (AOX1a-OE) Arabidopsis. Our results showed that Al treatment increased the expression of AOX1a at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Overexpression of AOX1a reduced mitochondrial ROS production by maintaining the mitochondrial electron flux, and alleviated subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-3-like activation in Al-induced PCD. Moreover, it was found that a change in AOX1a level could influence the expression levels of downstream functional genes that play protective roles in Al-induced PCD. Experiments using mutants and inhibitors demonstrated that superoxide anion (O2 (-)) derived from mitochondria was involved in Al-induced upregulation of AOX1a gene expression. Taken together, these results indicated that overexpression of AOX1a alleviated Al-induced PCD by maintaining mitochondrial function and promoting the expression of protective functional genes, providing new insights into the signalling cascades that modulate the Al phytotoxicity mechanism.

  1. Novel Insights into the Molecular Events Linking to Cell Death Induced by Tetracycline in the Amitochondriate Protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Yang; Ku, Fu-Man; Cheng, Wei-Hung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Huang, Po-Jung; Chu, Lichieh Julie; Cheng, Chih-Chieh; Fang, Yi-Kai; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis colonizes the human urogenital tract and causes trichomoniasis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease. Currently, 5-nitroimidazoles are the only recommended drugs for treating trichomoniasis. However, increased resistance of the parasite to 5-nitroimidazoles has emerged as a highly problematic public health issue. Hence, it is essential to identify alternative chemotherapeutic agents against refractory trichomoniasis. Tetracycline (TET) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with activity against several protozoan parasites, but the mode of action of TET in parasites remains poorly understood. The in vitro effect of TET on the growth of T. vaginalis was examined, and the mode of cell death was verified by various apoptosis-related assays. Next-generation sequencing-based RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was employed to elucidate the transcriptome of T. vaginalis in response to TET. We show that TET has a cytotoxic effect on both metronidazole (MTZ)-sensitive and -resistant T. vaginalis isolates, inducing some features resembling apoptosis. RNA-seq data reveal that TET significantly alters the transcriptome via activation of specific pathways, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and carbohydrate metabolism. Functional analyses demonstrate that TET disrupts the hydrogenosomal membrane potential and antioxidant system, which concomitantly elicits a metabolic shift toward glycolysis, suggesting that the hydrogenosomal function is impaired and triggers cell death. Collectively, we provide in vitro evidence that TET is a potential alternative therapeutic choice for treating MTZ-resistant T. vaginalis. The in-depth transcriptomic signatures in T. vaginalis upon TET treatment presented here will shed light on the signaling pathways linking to cell death in amitochondriate organisms. PMID:26303799

  2. Novel insights into the molecular events linking to cell death induced by tetracycline in the amitochondriate protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Yang; Ku, Fu-Man; Cheng, Wei-Hung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Huang, Po-Jung; Chu, Lichieh Julie; Cheng, Chih-Chieh; Fang, Yi-Kai; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia; Tang, Petrus

    2015-11-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis colonizes the human urogenital tract and causes trichomoniasis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease. Currently, 5-nitroimidazoles are the only recommended drugs for treating trichomoniasis. However, increased resistance of the parasite to 5-nitroimidazoles has emerged as a highly problematic public health issue. Hence, it is essential to identify alternative chemotherapeutic agents against refractory trichomoniasis. Tetracycline (TET) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with activity against several protozoan parasites, but the mode of action of TET in parasites remains poorly understood. The in vitro effect of TET on the growth of T. vaginalis was examined, and the mode of cell death was verified by various apoptosis-related assays. Next-generation sequencing-based RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was employed to elucidate the transcriptome of T. vaginalis in response to TET. We show that TET has a cytotoxic effect on both metronidazole (MTZ)-sensitive and -resistant T. vaginalis isolates, inducing some features resembling apoptosis. RNA-seq data reveal that TET significantly alters the transcriptome via activation of specific pathways, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and carbohydrate metabolism. Functional analyses demonstrate that TET disrupts the hydrogenosomal membrane potential and antioxidant system, which concomitantly elicits a metabolic shift toward glycolysis, suggesting that the hydrogenosomal function is impaired and triggers cell death. Collectively, we provide in vitro evidence that TET is a potential alternative therapeutic choice for treating MTZ-resistant T. vaginalis. The in-depth transcriptomic signatures in T. vaginalis upon TET treatment presented here will shed light on the signaling pathways linking to cell death in amitochondriate organisms.

  3. Role and regulation of Cdc25A phosphatase in neuron death induced by NGF deprivation or β-amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nandini; Sanphui, Priyankar; Kemeny, Stav; Greene, Lloyd A; Biswas, Subhas C

    2016-01-01

    Neuron death during development and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with aberrant regulation/induction of cell cycle proteins. However, the proximal events in this process are unknown. Cell cycle initiation requires dephosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinases by cell division cycle 25A (Cdc25A). Here, we show that Cdc25A is essential for neuronal death in response to NGF deprivation or β-amyloid (Aβ) treatment and describe the mechanisms by which it is regulated in these paradigms. Cdc25A mRNA, protein and Cdc25A phosphatase activity were induced by NGF deprivation and Aβ treatment. Enhanced Cdc25A expression was also observed in rat brains infused with Aβ and in Aβ-overexpressing AβPPswe-PS1dE9 mice. In cultured neurons Cdc25A inhibition by chemical inhibitors or shRNA prevented cell death and neurite degeneration caused by NGF deprivation or Aβ. Additionally, Cdc25A inhibition diminished distal signaling events including Cdk-dependent elevation of phospho-pRb and subsequent caspase-3 activation. Mechanism studies revealed that Cdc25A induction by NGF deprivation and Aβ is mediated by activation of Forkhead transcription factors that in turn suppress miR-21, a negative regulator of Cdc25A. Our studies thus identify Cdc25A as a required upstream element of the apoptotic cell cycle pathway that is required for neuron death in response to trophic factor deprivation and to Aβ exposure and therefore as a potential target to suppress pathologic neuron death. PMID:28028440

  4. Cell-death-inducing DFFA-like Effector B Contributes to the Assembly of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Particles and Interacts with HCV NS5A

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hua; Yao, Wenxia; Li, Leike; Li, Xinlei; Hu, Longbo; Mai, Runming; Peng, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) uses components of the very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) pathway for assembly/release. We previously reported that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) participates in HCV assembly/release through downstream factors those participate in VLDL assembly/secretion. Cell-death-inducing DFFA-like effector B (CIDEB) is an important regulator of the VLDL pathway. CIDEB is required for entry of HCV particles from cell culture (HCVcc), but the effects of CIDEB on the post-entry steps of the HCV lifecycle are unclear. In the present study, we determined that CIDEB is required for HCV assembly in addition to HCVcc entry. Furthermore, CIDEB interacts with the HCV NS5A protein, and the N terminus of CIDEB and the domain I of NS5A are involved in this interaction. Moreover, CIDEB silencing impairs the association of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) with HCV particles. Interestingly, CIDEB is also required for the post-entry stages of the dengue virus (DENV) life cycle. Collectively, these results indicate that CIDEB is a new host factor that is involved in HCV assembly, presumably by interacting with viral protein, providing new insight into the exploitation of the VLDL regulator CIDEB by HCV. PMID:27282740

  5. Apoptotic cell death induces temperature-sensitive lethality in hybrid seedlings and calli derived from the cross of Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Marubashi, W; Niwa, M

    2000-10-01

    Hybrid lethality expressed in the interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana suaveolens Lehm. x N. tabacum L. cv. Hicks-2 is one of the mechanisms for reproductive isolation and it is temperature-sensitive. Apoptotic changes were detected in the cells of hybrid seedlings and calli expressing lethality at 28 degrees C but not under high-temperature conditions (36 degrees C), when the lethality is suppressed. Condensation of chromatin, fragmentation of nuclei and cytoplasmic reduction are the cytological changes associated with apoptosis leading to hybrid lethality. Fragmentation of nuclei was correlated with the lethal symptoms in both hybrid seedlings and calli, as confirmed by fluorimetry of the nuclear DNA using laser scanning cytometry. Agarose gel analysis of DNA extracted from hybrid seedlings and calli showing lethal symptoms revealed a specific ladder pattern suggesting nucleosomal fragmentation which is one of the biochemical changes of apoptosis. In-situ detection using terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick end labeling (TUNEL) showed that this process occurred in distinct stages on each organ of hybrid seedlings and centripetally in hybrid calli. From these results, we confirmed that cell death inducing hybrid lethality was indeed apoptosis.

  6. Spermatozoal cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector A (CIDEA) gene expression and DNA fragmentation in infertile men with metabolic syndrome and normal seminogram.

    PubMed

    Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; Abdalla, Hussein Abdelaziz; Hassanien, Mohammed; Gaballah, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate spermatozoal cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector A (CIDEA) gene expression and DNA fragmentations in the spermatozoa of men diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MS) who have normal seminograms with unexplained infertility, and to correlate these parameters with seminal glucose concentration. This study included 120 participants: 75 male subjects with MS (38 fertile and 37 infertile), and a control group of 45 fertile males without MS. HOMA-IR, semen analysis, and biochemical measurement of seminal plasma insulin and glucose levels were carried out. Spermatozoal insulin gene and CIDEA gene expressions were performed by the RT-PCR method. The percentage of spermatozoal DNA fragmentation was also estimated. The spermatozoal insulin and CIDEA gene expression, as well as the DNA fragmentation, were significantly higher in the infertile MS group than in the fertile MS group, and significantly higher in both the MS groups than in the control group. Seminal glucose concentration showed significant positive correlations with seminal insulin level, spermatozoa insulin, CIDEA gene expression, and DNA fragmentation. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between spermatozoa CIDEA gene expression and DNA fragmentation. It can be concluded that MS may affect male fertility at the molecular level, through its possible inducing effect of spermatozoa CIDEA and insulin gene expression, DNA fragmentation, and increased seminal glucose.

  7. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of wild type (WT) or mutant A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic and yeast cells in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

  8. Quinazoline-based tricyclic compounds that regulate programmed cell death, induce neuronal differentiation, and are curative in animal models for excitotoxicity and hereditary brain disease

    PubMed Central

    Vainshtein, A; Veenman, L; Shterenberg, A; Singh, S; Masarwa, A; Dutta, B; Island, B; Tsoglin, E; Levin, E; Leschiner, S; Maniv, I; Pe’er, L; Otradnov, I; Zubedat, S; Aga-Mizrachi, S; Weizman, A; Avital, A; Marek, I; Gavish, M

    2015-01-01

    Expanding on a quinazoline scaffold, we developed tricyclic compounds with biological activity. These compounds bind to the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) and protect U118MG (glioblastoma cell line of glial origin) cells from glutamate-induced cell death. Fascinating, they can induce neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells (cell line of pheochromocytoma origin with neuronal characteristics) known to display neuronal characteristics, including outgrowth of neurites, tubulin expression, and NeuN (antigen known as ‘neuronal nuclei’, also known as Rbfox3) expression. As part of the neurodifferentiation process, they can amplify cell death induced by glutamate. Interestingly, the compound 2-phenylquinazolin-4-yl dimethylcarbamate (MGV-1) can induce expansive neurite sprouting on its own and also in synergy with nerve growth factor and with glutamate. Glycine is not required, indicating that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors are not involved in this activity. These diverse effects on cells of glial origin and on cells with neuronal characteristics induced in culture by this one compound, MGV-1, as reported in this article, mimic the diverse events that take place during embryonic development of the brain (maintenance of glial integrity, differentiation of progenitor cells to mature neurons, and weeding out of non-differentiating progenitor cells). Such mechanisms are also important for protective, curative, and restorative processes that occur during and after brain injury and brain disease. Indeed, we found in a rat model of systemic kainic acid injection that MGV-1 can prevent seizures, counteract the process of ongoing brain damage, including edema, and restore behavior defects to normal patterns. Furthermore, in the R6-2 (transgenic mouse model for Huntington disease; Strain name: B6CBA-Tg(HDexon1)62Gpb/3J) transgenic mouse model for Huntington disease, derivatives of MGV-1 can increase lifespan by >20% and reduce incidence of abnormal movements. Also in vitro

  9. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M.; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M.; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A.; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of WT or A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells and yeast in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways. PMID:25497688

  10. NAMPT inhibition sensitizes pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells to tumor-selective, PAR-independent metabolic catastrophe and cell death induced by β-lapachone

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Z; Chakrabarti, G; Luo, X; Ali, A; Hu, Z; Fattah, F J; Vemireddy, R; DeBerardinis, R J; Brekken, R A; Boothman, D A

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibitors (e.g., FK866) target the most active pathway of NAD+ synthesis in tumor cells, but lack tumor-selectivity for use as a single agent. Reducing NAD+ pools by inhibiting NAMPT primed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells for poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP1)-dependent cell death induced by the targeted cancer therapeutic, β-lapachone (β-lap, ARQ761), independent of poly(ADP ribose) (PAR) accumulation. β-Lap is bioactivated by NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in a futile redox cycle that consumes oxygen and generates high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause extensive DNA damage and rapid PARP1-mediated NAD+ consumption. Synergy with FK866+β-lap was tumor-selective, only occurring in NQO1-overexpressing cancer cells, which is noted in a majority (∼85%) of PDA cases. This treatment strategy simultaneously decreases NAD+ synthesis while increasing NAD+ consumption, reducing required doses and treatment times for both drugs and increasing potency. These complementary mechanisms caused profound NAD(P)+ depletion and inhibited glycolysis, driving down adenosine triphosphate levels and preventing recovery normally observed with either agent alone. Cancer cells died through an ROS-induced, μ-calpain-mediated programmed cell death process that kills independent of caspase activation and is not driven by PAR accumulation, which we call NAD+-Keresis. Non-overlapping specificities of FK866 for PDA tumors that rely heavily on NAMPT-catalyzed NAD+ synthesis and β-lap for cancer cells with elevated NQO1 levels affords high tumor-selectivity. The concept of reducing NAD+ pools in cancer cells to sensitize them to ROS-mediated cell death by β-lap is a novel strategy with potential application for pancreatic and other types of NQO1+ solid tumors. PMID:25590809

  11. NAMPT inhibition sensitizes pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells to tumor-selective, PAR-independent metabolic catastrophe and cell death induced by β-lapachone.

    PubMed

    Moore, Z; Chakrabarti, G; Luo, X; Ali, A; Hu, Z; Fattah, F J; Vemireddy, R; DeBerardinis, R J; Brekken, R A; Boothman, D A

    2015-01-15

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibitors (e.g., FK866) target the most active pathway of NAD(+) synthesis in tumor cells, but lack tumor-selectivity for use as a single agent. Reducing NAD(+) pools by inhibiting NAMPT primed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells for poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP1)-dependent cell death induced by the targeted cancer therapeutic, β-lapachone (β-lap, ARQ761), independent of poly(ADP ribose) (PAR) accumulation. β-Lap is bioactivated by NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in a futile redox cycle that consumes oxygen and generates high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause extensive DNA damage and rapid PARP1-mediated NAD(+) consumption. Synergy with FK866+β-lap was tumor-selective, only occurring in NQO1-overexpressing cancer cells, which is noted in a majority (∼85%) of PDA cases. This treatment strategy simultaneously decreases NAD(+) synthesis while increasing NAD(+) consumption, reducing required doses and treatment times for both drugs and increasing potency. These complementary mechanisms caused profound NAD(P)(+) depletion and inhibited glycolysis, driving down adenosine triphosphate levels and preventing recovery normally observed with either agent alone. Cancer cells died through an ROS-induced, μ-calpain-mediated programmed cell death process that kills independent of caspase activation and is not driven by PAR accumulation, which we call NAD(+)-Keresis. Non-overlapping specificities of FK866 for PDA tumors that rely heavily on NAMPT-catalyzed NAD(+) synthesis and β-lap for cancer cells with elevated NQO1 levels affords high tumor-selectivity. The concept of reducing NAD(+) pools in cancer cells to sensitize them to ROS-mediated cell death by β-lap is a novel strategy with potential application for pancreatic and other types of NQO1+ solid tumors.

  12. Hyaluronan synthase-2 upregulation protects smpd3-deficient fibroblasts against cell death induced by nutrient deprivation, but not against apoptosis evoked by oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Garoby-Salom, Sandra; Rouahi, Myriam; Mucher, Elodie; Auge, Nathalie; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The neutral type 2 sphingomyelinase (nSMase2) hydrolyzes sphingomyelin and generates ceramide, a major bioactive sphingolipid mediator, involved in growth arrest and apoptosis. The role of nSMase2 in apoptosis is debated, and apparently contradictory results have been observed on fibroblasts isolated from nSMase2-deficient fragilitas ossium (homozygous fro/fro) mice. These mice exhibit a severe neonatal dysplasia, a lack of long bone mineralization and delayed apoptosis patterns of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate. We hypothesized that apoptosis induced by nutrient deprivation, which mimics the environmental modifications of the growth plate, requires nSMase2 activation. In this study, we have compared the resistance of fro/fro fibroblasts to different death inducers (oxidized LDL, hydrogen peroxide and nutrient starvation). The data show that nSMase2-deficient fro/fro cells resist to apoptosis evoked by nutrient starvation (fetal calf serum/glucose/pyruvate-free DMEM), whereas wt fibroblasts die after 48 h incubation in this medium. In contrast, oxidized LDL and hydrogen peroxide are similarly toxic to fro/fro and wt fibroblasts, indicating that nSMase2 is not involved in the mechanism of toxicity evoked by these agents. Interestingly, wt fibroblasts treated with the SMase inhibitor GW4869 were more resistant to starvation-induced apoptosis. The resistance of fro/fro cells to starvation-induced apoptosis is associated with an increased expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) mRNAs and protein, which is inhibited by ceramide. In wt fibroblasts, this HAS2 rise and its protective effect did not occur, but exogenously added HA exhibited a protective effect against starvation-induced apoptosis. The protective mechanism of HAS2 involves an increased expression of the heat-shock protein Hsp72, a chaperone with antiapoptotic activity. Taken together, these results highlight the role of nSMase2 in apoptosis evoked by nutrient starvation that could

  13. The effects of cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector C on milk lipid synthesis in mammary glands of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Lin, Ye; Duan, Xiaoyu; Lv, He; Xing, Weinan; Li, Qingzhang; Gao, Xuejun; Hou, Xiaoming

    2017-03-08

    Adequate lipid synthesis by the mammary gland during lactation is essential for the survival of mammalian offspring. Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector C (CIDEC) is a lipid droplet-associated protein and functions to promote lipid accumulation and inhibit lipolysis in mice and human adipocytes. However, the function of CIDEC in regulation of milk lipid synthesis in dairy cow mammary gland remains largely unknown. In this study, 6 multiparous Holstein cows (parity = 3) in early lactation were allocated to high-fat milk (milk yield 33.9 ± 2.1 kg/d, milk fat >3.5%, n = 3) and low-fat milk (milk yield 33.7 ± 0.5 kg/d, milk fat <3.5%, n = 3) groups according to their milk fat content. Lactating cows were slaughtered at 90 d in milk and mammary tissues were collected to detect CIDEC localization. Immunofluorescence staining of sections of lactating mammary glands with high- and low-fat milk showed that CIDEC was expressed in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells and localized to lipid droplets. Lipid droplets and CIDEC protein were also detected in isolated lactating mammary epithelial cells of dairy cows. Immunostaining of CIDEC in isolated mammary epithelial cells also confirmed its presence in the nucleus. The knockdown of CIDEC in cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells decreased milk lipid content and reduced expression of genes associated with mammary de novo fatty acid synthesis, short- and long-chain intracellular fatty acid activation, triacylglycerol synthesis, and transcription regulation. These genes included those for acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC, -60%), fatty acid synthase (FASN, -65%), acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 2 (ACSS2, -50%), acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (ACSL1, -30%), diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1, -60%), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1, -45%), and SREBP cleavage activating protein (SCAP, -66%). Conversely, in cells overexpressing CIDEC, triacylglycerol content

  14. Preparation and Characterization of Cd.95Mn.05Se Single Crystals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-03

    BULLETIN 19. KEY WORDS fContinue on revorse aide it necessary and Identify by block number) __ 1. Manganese-Substituted Cadmium Selenide * 2. Homogeneous...phenomena should be observed for cadmium selenide , with the transition energy gap adjusted by the introduction of controlled quantities of manganese...X = l.S404A) radiation, to ascertain the formation of the cadmium selenide phase. III II ’:4--.- - u.. • .v W -. Magnetic Measurements Magnetic

  15. Amelioration of collagen-induced arthritis by CD95 (Apo-1/Fas)-ligand gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Yang, Y; Horton, J L; Samoilova, E B; Judge, T A; Turka, L A; Wilson, J M; Chen, Y

    1997-01-01

    Both rheumatoid arthritis and animal models of autoimmune arthritis are characterized by hyperactivation of synovial cells and hyperplasia of the synovial membrane. The activated synovial cells produce inflammatory cytokines and degradative enzymes that lead to destruction of cartilage and bones. Effective treatment of arthritis may require elimination of most or all activated synovial cells. The death factor Fas/Apo-1 and its ligand (FasL) play pivotal roles in maintaining self-tolerance and immune privilege. Fas is expressed constitutively in most tissues, and is dramatically upregulated at the site of inflammation. In both rheumatoid arthritis and animal models of autoimmune arthritis, high levels of Fas are expressed on activated synovial cells and infiltrating leukocytes in the inflamed joints. Unlike Fas, however, the levels of FasL expressed in the arthritic joints are extremely low, and most activated synovial cells survive despite high levels of Fas expression. To upregulate FasL expression in the arthritic joints, we have generated a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus carrying FasL gene; injection of the FasL virus into inflamed joints conferred high levels of FasL expression, induced apoptosis of synovial cells, and ameliorated collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice. The Fas-ligand virus also inhibited production of interferon-gamma by collagen-specific T cells. Coadministration of Fas-immunoglobulin fusion protein with the Fas-ligand virus prevented these effects, demonstrating the specificity of the Fas-ligand virus. Thus, FasL gene transfer at the site of inflammation effectively ameliorates autoimmune disease. PMID:9329958

  16. Up-regulation of Fas (CD95) expression in tumour cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peshes-Yaloz, Naama; Rosen, Dalia; Sondel, Paul M; Krammer, Peter H; Berke, Gideon

    2007-01-01

    Both the function and regulation of Fas expression in tumours is poorly understood. Our laboratory has reported that cultured, low Fas-expressing tumours undergo massive, yet reversible, up-regulation of cell surface Fas expression when injected into mice. The present study was aimed at determining what causes this enhanced Fas expression and whether the newly expressed Fas functions as a death receptor. Newly expressed Fas is indeed capable of inducing apoptosis. Based on our observation that Fas induction is reduced when tumour cells are injected into immune-deficient mice, we propose that Fas up-regulation in vivo involves the host's immune system. Accordingly, Fas up-regulation occurs in vitro when low Fas-expressing tumour cells are cocultured with lymphoid cells. Furthermore ascitic fluid extracted from tumour-bearing mice trigger Fas up-regulation in low Fas expressing tumours. This last finding suggests that a soluble factor(s) mediates induction of Fas expression. The best candidate for this soluble factor is nitric oxide (NO) based on the following observations: the factor in the ascites is unstable; Fas expression is induced to a lesser degree after injection into inducible NO synthase (NOS)-deficient (iNOS–/–) mice when compared to control mice; similarly, coculture with iNOS–/– splenocytes induces Fas less effectively than coculture with control splenocytes; and finally, the NO donor SNAP induces considerable Fas up-regulation in tumours in vitro. Our model is that host lymphoid cells in response to a tumour increase NO synthesis, which in turn causes enhanced Fas expression in the tumour. PMID:17343612

  17. The role of STAT-6 as a key transcription regulator in HeLa cell death induced by IFN-γ/TNF-α co-immobilized on nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhibin; Guan, Yan-Qing; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2014-06-01

    Based on the fact that the transcription of STAT-1 plus its Serine 727 and Tyrosine 701 phosphorylation is not the pre-requisite for the cell death signal transduction in the IFN-γ signaling pathway induced by co-immobilized IFN-γ/TNF-α, we investigate both in vitro and in vivo the key transcription regulators to promote the signal transduction of HeLa cells. It is found that IFN-γ R2 is the important death signal receptor in the HeLa cell death by RNA interference. Checking the expression of the whole transcription (STAT) protein family reveals that STAT-6 is highly expressed in comparison with the other STAT proteins. The gene silence of IFN-γ R2 leads to the down-regulation of STAT-6 and phosphorylation-STAT-6 (p-STAT-6) expressions. The successful gene silence of STAT-6 results in the reduction of HeLa cell programmed death and the expression of several important key factors related to programmed cell death (p53, Bcl-2, and Bax). More importantly, our in vivo experiments by injecting nanoparticle drug carriers with the co-immobilized IFN-γ/TNF-α into nude mice model confirm the high expression of STAT-6 and p-STAT-6. It is thus concluded that, in response to IFN-γ, the co-immobilized IFN-γ/TNF-α unusually promotes the activation of STAT-6 rather than STAT-1, resulting in the enhanced cell programmed death in HeLa. The present work reveals the gene-level molecular mechanism of IFN-γ/TNF-α co-immobilized on biomaterials as a potentially effective therapy against cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel role for mitochondria: protein kinase Ctheta-dependent oxidative signaling organelles in activation-induced T-cell death.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Marcin; Kiessling, Michael; Süss, Dorothee; Krammer, Peter H; Gülow, Karsten

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in regulation of activation-induced T-cell death (AICD) by induction of CD95L expression. However, the molecular source and the signaling steps necessary for ROS production are largely unknown. Here, we show that the proximal T-cell receptor-signaling machinery, including ZAP70 (zeta chain-associated protein kinase 70), LAT (linker of activated T cells), SLP76 (SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa), PLCgamma1 (phospholipase Cgamma1), and PKCtheta (protein kinase Ctheta), are crucial for ROS production. PKCtheta is translocated to the mitochondria. By using cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA, we identified the mitochondria as the source of activation-induced ROS. Inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport complex I assembly by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of the chaperone NDUFAF1 resulted in a block of ROS production. Complex I-derived ROS are converted into a hydrogen peroxide signal by the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. This signal is essential for CD95L expression, as inhibition of complex I assembly by NDUFAF1-specific siRNA prevents AICD. Similar results were obtained when metformin, an antidiabetic drug and mild complex I inhibitor, was used. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that PKCtheta-dependent ROS generation by mitochondrial complex I is essential for AICD.

  19. Exposure to inorganic mercury in vivo attenuates extrinsic apoptotic signaling in Staphylococcal aureus enterotoxin B stimulated T-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Laiosa, Michael D.; Eckles, Kevin G.; Langdon, Margaret; Rosenspire, Allen J.; McCabe, Michael J.

    2007-12-15

    The heavy metal mercury (Hg) is known to have immunomodulatory properties affecting lymphocyte signal transduction, death receptor signaling and autoimmunity. In this study we tested the hypothesis that Hg exposure would attenuate T-cell activation and caspase 8 and 3 activity in response to antigenic stimuli. To test this hypothesis, BALB/cJ mice were exposed to 10 mg/l mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) in their drinking water for 2 weeks followed by injection with 20 {mu}g of the Staphylococcal aureus enterotoxin B (SEB) superantigen. Eighteen hours after SEB challenge, there was a statistically significant reduction in caspase 8 and caspase 3 enzyme activity in the SEB reactive V{beta}8+ T-cells. The attenuated caspase activity in Hg-exposed mice persisted for 48 h after exposure. Moreover, activation of caspase 8 and caspase 3 was reduced by more than 60% in CD95 deficient MRL/MpJ-Fas{sup lpr} mice demonstrating that caspase 8 and 3 activation in response to SEB is CD95 dependent. In addition to the effects of Hg on caspase activity, expression of the T-cell activation marker CD69 was also attenuated in SEB reactive V{beta}8 T-cells in Hg-exposed mice. Moreover, CD69 expression in MRL/MpJ-Fas{sup lpr} mice was also reduced. Taken together the caspase and CD69 data support a role for CD95 in promoting a proapoptotic and activated state in SEB responsive T-lymphocytes and this state is attenuated by the autoimmune potentiating environmental agent mercury.

  20. Interference with Protease-activated Receptor 1 Alleviates Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Microglial Cells through the PI3K/Akt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuxin; Yang, Wuyang; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Wang, Baocheng; Xu, Shujun; Zhu, Weijie; Yu, Feng; Yuan, Shaoji; Lu, Peigang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive microglial cells activation in response to inflammatory stimuli leads to synaptic loss, dysfunction, and neuronal cell death. Activated microglia are involved in the pathogenesis of neurological conditions and frequently contribute to several complications. Accumulating evidence suggests that signaling through PAR-1 is involved in inflammation, however, its function has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we have demonstrated that the suppression of PAR-1 leads to down-regulation of inflammatory factors including IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, NO, as well as the prevention of activation of NF-κB in BV2 cells. In addition, we found that a PAR-1 antagonist, SCH, prevented LPS-induced excessive microglial activation in a dose-dependent manner. As a result of SCH treatment, neuronal cell death via up-regulation of Akt-mediated pathways was reduced. Our results demonstrate that the beneficial effects of SCH are linked to its ability to block an inflammatory response. Further, we found that SCH inhibited the death of PC12 neurons from the cytotoxicity of activated BV2 cells via activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These neuro-protective effects appear to be related to inhibition of PAR-1, and represents a novel neuroprotective strategy that could has potential for use in therapeutic interventions of neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:27910893

  1. CHIP, a carboxy terminus HSP-70 interacting protein, prevents cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cabral Miranda, Felipe; Adão-Novaes, Juliana; Hauswirth, William W; Linden, Rafael; Petrs-Silva, Hilda; Chiarini, Luciana B

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and protein misfolding are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptative response. However, severe ER stress can induce cell death. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase and co-chaperone Carboxyl Terminus HSP70/90 Interacting Protein (CHIP) prevents neuron death in the hippocampus induced by severe ER stress. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) were exposed to Tunicamycin, a pharmacological ER stress inducer, to trigger cell death. Overexpression of CHIP was achieved with a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) and significantly diminished ER stress-induced cell death, as shown by analysis of propidium iodide (PI) uptake, condensed chromatin, TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3 in the CA1 region of OHSCs. In addition, overexpression of CHIP prevented upregulation of both CHOP and p53 both pro-apoptotic pathways induced by ER stress. We also detected an attenuation of eIF2a phosphorylation promoted by ER stress. However, CHIP did not prevent upregulation of BiP/GRP78 induced by UPR. These data indicate that overexpression of CHIP attenuates ER-stress death response while maintain ER stress adaptative response in the central nervous system. These results indicate a neuroprotective role for CHIP upon UPR signaling. CHIP emerge as a candidate for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases associated with ER stress.

  2. CHIP, a carboxy terminus HSP-70 interacting protein, prevents cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cabral Miranda, Felipe; Adão-Novaes, Juliana; Hauswirth, William W.; Linden, Rafael; Petrs-Silva, Hilda; Chiarini, Luciana B.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and protein misfolding are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptative response. However, severe ER stress can induce cell death. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase and co-chaperone Carboxyl Terminus HSP70/90 Interacting Protein (CHIP) prevents neuron death in the hippocampus induced by severe ER stress. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) were exposed to Tunicamycin, a pharmacological ER stress inducer, to trigger cell death. Overexpression of CHIP was achieved with a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) and significantly diminished ER stress-induced cell death, as shown by analysis of propidium iodide (PI) uptake, condensed chromatin, TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3 in the CA1 region of OHSCs. In addition, overexpression of CHIP prevented upregulation of both CHOP and p53 both pro-apoptotic pathways induced by ER stress. We also detected an attenuation of eIF2a phosphorylation promoted by ER stress. However, CHIP did not prevent upregulation of BiP/GRP78 induced by UPR. These data indicate that overexpression of CHIP attenuates ER-stress death response while maintain ER stress adaptative response in the central nervous system. These results indicate a neuroprotective role for CHIP upon UPR signaling. CHIP emerge as a candidate for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases associated with ER stress. PMID:25620910

  3. Characterization of cell death induced by ethacrynic acid in a human colon cancer cell line DLD-1 and suppression by N-acetyl-L-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Shu; Ookawa, Keizou; Kudo, Toshihiro; Asano, Junpei; Hayakari, Makoto; Tsuchida, Shigeki

    2003-10-01

    Since ethacrynic acid (EA), an SH modifier as well as glutathione S-transferase (GST) inhibitor, has been suggested to induce apoptosis in some cell lines, its effects on a human colon cancer cell line DLD-1 were examined. EA enhanced cell proliferation at 20-40 microM, while it caused cell death at 60-100 microM. Caspase inhibitors did not block cell death and DNA ladder formation was not detected. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, however, was cleaved into an 82-kDa fragment, different from an 85-kDa fragment that is specific for apoptosisis. The 82-kDa fragment was not recognized by antibody against PARP fragment cleaved by caspase 3. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) completely inhibited EA-induced cell death, but 3(2)-t-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole or pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate ammonium salt did not. Glutathione (GSH) levels were dose-dependently increased in cells treated with EA and this increase was hardly affected by NAC addition. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) 1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and GST P1-1 were increased in cells treated with 25-75 microM EA, while c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1 and p38 MAPK were markedly decreased by 100 microM EA. NAC repressed EA-induced alterations in these MAPKs and GST P1-1. p38 MAPK inhibitors, SB203580 and FR167653, dose-dependently enhanced EA-induced cell death. An MEK inhibitor, U0126, did not affect EA-induced cell death. These studies revealed that EA induced cell death concomitantly with a novel PARP fragmentation, but without DNA fragmentation. p38 MAPK was suggested to play an inhibitory role in EA-induced cell death.

  4. Signal voter

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Roy L.

    1981-01-01

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals, each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  5. Signal voter

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, R.L.

    1981-04-28

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals , each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  6. Acute cold exposure-induced down-regulation of CIDEA, cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector A, in rat interscapular brown adipose tissue by sympathetically activated beta3-adrenoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2009-09-18

    The thermogenic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) largely depends on the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which is up-regulated by environmental alterations such as cold. Recently, CIDEA (cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector A) has also been shown to be expressed at high levels in the mitochondria of BAT. Here we examined the effect of cold on the mRNA and protein levels of CIDEA in interscapular BAT of conscious rats with regard to the sympathetic nervous system. Cold exposure (4 degrees C for 3h) elevated the plasma norepinephrine level and increased norepinephrine turnover in BAT. Cold exposure resulted in down-regulation of the mRNA and protein levels of CIDEA in BAT, accompanied by up-regulation of mRNA and protein levels of UCP1. The cold exposure-induced changes of CIDEA and UCP1 were attenuated by intraperitoneal pretreatment with propranolol (a non-selective beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist) (2mg/animal) or SR59230A (a selective beta(3)-adrenoreceptor antagonist) (2mg/animal), respectively. These results suggest that acute cold exposure resulted in down-regulation of CIDEA in interscapular BAT by sympathetically activated beta(3)-adrenoreceptor-mediated mechanisms in rats.

  7. Green tea polyphenols precondition against cell death induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation via stimulation of laminin receptor, generation of reactive oxygen species, and activation of protein kinase Cε.

    PubMed

    Gundimeda, Usha; McNeill, Thomas H; Elhiani, Albert A; Schiffman, Jason E; Hinton, David R; Gopalakrishna, Rayudu

    2012-10-05

    As the development of synthetic drugs for the prevention of stroke has proven challenging, utilization of natural products capable of preconditioning neuronal cells against ischemia-induced cell death would be a highly useful complementary approach. In this study using an oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) model in PC12 cells, we show that 2-day pretreatment with green tea polyphenols (GTPP) and their active ingredient, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), protects cells from subsequent OGD/R-induced cell death. A synergistic interaction was observed between GTPP constituents, with unfractionated GTPP more potently preconditioning cells than EGCG. GTPP-induced preconditioning required the 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR), to which EGCG binds with high affinity. 67LR also mediated the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via activation of NADPH oxidase. An exogenous ROS-generating system bypassed 67LR to induce preconditioning, suggesting that sublethal levels of ROS are indeed an important mediator in GTPP-induced preconditioning. This role for ROS was further supported by the fact that antioxidants blocked GTPP-induced preconditioning. Additionally, ROS induced an activation and translocation of protein kinase C (PKC), particularly PKCε from the cytosol to the membrane/mitochondria, which was also blocked by antioxidants. The crucial role of PKC in GTPP-induced preconditioning was supported by use of its specific inhibitors. Preconditioning was increased by conditional overexpression of PKCε and decreased by its knock-out with siRNA. Collectively, these results suggest that GTPP stimulates 67LR and thereby induces NADPH oxidase-dependent generation of ROS, which in turn induces activation of PKC, particularly prosurvival isoenzyme PKCε, resulting in preconditioning against cell death induced by OGD/R.

  8. Green Tea Polyphenols Precondition against Cell Death Induced by Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation via Stimulation of Laminin Receptor, Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species, and Activation of Protein Kinase Cϵ

    PubMed Central

    Gundimeda, Usha; McNeill, Thomas H.; Elhiani, Albert A.; Schiffman, Jason E.; Hinton, David R.; Gopalakrishna, Rayudu

    2012-01-01

    As the development of synthetic drugs for the prevention of stroke has proven challenging, utilization of natural products capable of preconditioning neuronal cells against ischemia-induced cell death would be a highly useful complementary approach. In this study using an oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) model in PC12 cells, we show that 2-day pretreatment with green tea polyphenols (GTPP) and their active ingredient, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), protects cells from subsequent OGD/R-induced cell death. A synergistic interaction was observed between GTPP constituents, with unfractionated GTPP more potently preconditioning cells than EGCG. GTPP-induced preconditioning required the 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR), to which EGCG binds with high affinity. 67LR also mediated the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via activation of NADPH oxidase. An exogenous ROS-generating system bypassed 67LR to induce preconditioning, suggesting that sublethal levels of ROS are indeed an important mediator in GTPP-induced preconditioning. This role for ROS was further supported by the fact that antioxidants blocked GTPP-induced preconditioning. Additionally, ROS induced an activation and translocation of protein kinase C (PKC), particularly PKCϵ from the cytosol to the membrane/mitochondria, which was also blocked by antioxidants. The crucial role of PKC in GTPP-induced preconditioning was supported by use of its specific inhibitors. Preconditioning was increased by conditional overexpression of PKCϵ and decreased by its knock-out with siRNA. Collectively, these results suggest that GTPP stimulates 67LR and thereby induces NADPH oxidase-dependent generation of ROS, which in turn induces activation of PKC, particularly prosurvival isoenzyme PKCϵ, resulting in preconditioning against cell death induced by OGD/R. PMID:22879598

  9. Systems biology of death receptor networks: live and let die

    PubMed Central

    Lavrik, I N

    2014-01-01

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by death receptor activation. Death receptor activation leads to the formation of death receptor signaling platforms, resulting in the demolition of the cell. Despite the fact that death receptor-mediated apoptosis has been studied to a high level of detail, its quantitative regulation until recently has been poorly understood. This situation has dramatically changed in the last years. Creation of mathematical models of death receptor signaling led to an enormous progress in the quantitative understanding of the network regulation and provided fascinating insights into the mechanisms of apoptosis control. In the following sections, the models of the death receptor signaling and their biological implications will be addressed. Central attention will be given to the models of CD95/Fas/APO-1, an exemplified member of the death receptor signaling pathways. The CD95 death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) and regulation of CD95 DISC activity by its key inhibitor c-FLIP, have been vigorously investigated by modeling approaches, and therefore will be the major topic here. Furthermore, the non-linear dynamics of the DISC, positive feedback loops and bistability as well as stoichiometric switches in extrinsic apoptosis will be discussed. Collectively, this review gives a comprehensive view how the mathematical modeling supported by quantitative experimental approaches has provided a new understanding of the death receptor signaling network. PMID:24874731

  10. The newly synthesized 2-(3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)-6,7-methylenedioxyquinolin-4-one triggers cell apoptosis through induction of oxidative stress and upregulation of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in HL-60 human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Yi; Yang, Jai-Sing; Tsai, Shih-Chang; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Chung, Jing-Gung; Huang, Li-Jiau; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chien, Hsi-Cheng; Tsuzuki, Minoru; Kuo, Sheng-Chu

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to discover the signaling pathways associated with 2-(3-hydroxy-5-methoxy-phenyl)-6,7-methylenedioxyquinolin-4-one (YYK1)-induced apoptosis in HL-60 human leukemia cells. YYK1 induced cytotoxic effects, cell morphological changes, decreased the cell number and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in HL-60 cells. YYK1-induced apoptosis was confirmed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Results from colorimetric assays and western blot analysis indicated that activities of caspase-7/-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 were increased in YYK1-treated HL-60 cells. Western blot analysis showed that the protein levels of extrinsic apoptotic proteins (Fas/CD95, FasL and FADD), intrinsic related proteins (cytochrome c, Apaf-1, AIF and Endo G), the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and phosphorylated p38 MAPK were increased in HL-60 cells after YYK1 treatment. Cell apoptosis was significantly reduced after pre-treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC; a ROS scavenger) or diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI; a NADPH oxidase inhibitor). Blockage of p38 MAPK signaling by SB202190 abolished YYK1-induced Fas/CD95 upregulation and apoptosis in HL-60 cells. We conclude that YYK1 induces both of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways via ROS-mediated activation of p38 MAPK signaling in HL-60 human leukemia cells in vitro.

  11. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) regulates T cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Henning, G; Kraft, M S; Derfuss, T; Pirzer, R; de Saint-Basile, G; Aversa, G; Fleckenstein, B; Meinl, E

    2001-09-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) is a CD2-related surface receptor expressed by activated T cells and B cells. SLAM is a self ligand and enhances T cellular proliferation and IFN-gamma production. A defective SLAM associated protein (SAP) causes X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP), a frequently lethal mononucleosis based on the inability to control EBV. We report that SLAM augments TCR-mediated cytotoxicity. In normal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, SLAM enhanced TCR-mediated cytotoxicity. In CD4(+) and CD8(+) Herpesvirus saimiri (H.saimiri) infected T cells, SLAM engagement alone triggered cytotoxicity. Using H.saimiri-transformed T cells as a model system we found that SLAM-engagement promotes the release of lytic granules and a CD95-independent killing that requires extracellular Ca(2+), cytoskeletal rearrangements, and signaling mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases MEK1/2. SLAM-enhanced cytotoxicity implies an immunoregulatory function by facilitating the elimination of APC and a role in overcoming infections with pathogens requiring a cytotoxic immune response.

  12. Apoptosis of bovine granulosa cells after serum withdrawal is mediated by Fas antigen (CD95) and Fas ligand.

    PubMed

    Hu, C L; Cowan, R G; Harman, R M; Porter, D A; Quirk, S M

    2001-02-01

    Ovarian follicular atresia occurs by apoptosis of granulosa and theca cells. The Fas antigen (Fas), a cell surface receptor that triggers apoptosis when activated by Fas ligand (FasL), may be involved in this process. A possible role of the Fas pathway in mediating serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis of granulosa cells was examined. Granulosa cells collected from 5- to 10-mm bovine follicles were cultured in DMEM-F12 containing serum for 3 days, deprived of serum, and live cells were counted at various times after serum withdrawal. Cell death increased significantly 6 h after serum withdrawal (21% +/- 7%; P: < 0.05 vs. 0 h) and continued to increase until 24 h (43% +/- 6%). No further increases in cell death were observed through 72 h. Detection of the translocation of phosphatidylserine to the outer surface of the cell membrane by annexin V binding indicated that cells died by apoptosis. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays showed no changes in Fas mRNA levels but a 4.7-fold increase in FasL mRNA 3 h after serum withdrawal (P: < 0.05 vs. 0 h). FasL mRNA remained elevated through 24 h and returned to basal levels at 48 h. Immunohistochemical staining showed that both Fas and FasL protein increased on the cell surface within 3 h and remained elevated through 12 h (the last time point tested). Binding of FasL to Fas was blocked with two reagents that bind to the extracellular domain of FasL: an anti-FasL antibody and Fas:Fc, a chimeric protein consisting of the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G and the extracellular domain of human Fas. Cell death 24 h after serum withdrawal was reduced 55% +/- 10% and 34% +/- 12% by anti-FasL antibody and Fas:Fc, respectively (P: < 0.05 vs. no blocking protein). In conclusion, serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis of bovine granulosa cells is mediated at least partially by Fas/FasL interactions. These results are consistent with a potential role of Fas in an autocrine or paracrine pathway to trigger ovarian follicular atresia.

  13. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  14. Frontline Science: Placenta-derived decidual stromal cells alter IL-2R expression and signaling in alloantigen-activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Erkers, Tom; Solders, Martin; Verleng, Lotte; Bergström, Cecilia; Stikvoort, Arwen; Rane, Lalit; Nava, Silvia; Ringdén, Olle; Kaipe, Helen

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated how stromal cells affect the IL-2 pathway in alloantigen-activated T cells. We found that decidual stromal cells (DSCs) from term placentas promoted a high production of IL-2 in cultures with alloantigen-activated T cells. The intensity of expression of cluster of differentiation 25 (CD25; IL-2Rα) on T cells was increased by DSCs, whereas the frequency and intensity of expression of the signaling subunits CD122 (IL-2Rβ) and CD132 (IL-2Rγc) were reduced. Consequently, uptake of IL-2 and STAT5 phosphorylation (pSTAT5) was abrogated. DSCs also decreased the proportion of pSTAT5(+) T cells in response to IL-15, which also use CD122 for signaling. Addition of DSCs to the allogeneic cultures did not increase the expression of programmed death 1 (PD-1) or CD95, indicating that they did not promote T cell exhaustion. However, exogenous recombinant (r)IL-2 in similar concentrations in the same setting increased the expression of CD95 and down-regulated CD122 in T cells. The antiproliferative effect of sirolimus (SRL) and cyclosporine A (CsA), which target the IL-2 signaling pathway, was diminished by DSCs in vitro. To conclude, DSCs affect IL-2 production and IL-2R expression and signaling, which may contribute to the stromal cell-mediated immune modulation and phenotype shift seen in activated T cells. Altered proliferation in cultures when combining DSCs and SRL or CsA may be of clinical importance, as stromal cells are used in trials for acute inflammation and are often used in combination with conventional immunosuppressive therapies.

  15. Cellular prion protein transduces neuroprotective signals

    PubMed Central

    Chiarini, Luciana B.; Freitas, Adriana R.O.; Zanata, Silvio M.; Brentani, Ricardo R.; Martins, Vilma R.; Linden, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    To test for a role for the cellular prion protein (PrPc) in cell death, we used a PrPc-binding peptide. Retinal explants from neonatal rats or mice were kept in vitro for 24 h, and anisomycin (ANI) was used to induce apoptosis. The peptide activated both cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) and Erk pathways, and partially prevented cell death induced by ANI in explants from wild-type rodents, but not from PrPc-null mice. Neuroprotection was abolished by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, with human peptide 106–126, with certain antibodies to PrPc or with a PKA inhibitor, but not with a MEK/Erk inhibitor. In contrast, antibodies to PrPc that increased cAMP also induced neuroprotection. Thus, engagement of PrPc transduces neuroprotective signals through a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway. PrPc may function as a trophic receptor, the activation of which leads to a neuroprotective state. PMID:12093733

  16. IFNs-signaling effects on lung cancer: an up-to-date pathways-specific review.

    PubMed

    Galani, Vasiliki; Kastamoulas, Michalis; Varouktsi, Anna; Lampri, Evangeli; Mitselou, Antigoni; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L

    2017-08-01

    IFNs have found important applications in clinical medicine, including the treatment of lung malignancies. The biological effect of the IFN-receptor signaling is regulated essentially by three factors: the expression profile of the IFN itself, the profile of the receptor, and the expression of target genes. IFNs initiate their signaling by binding to specific receptors. The activated IFNs can directly induce gene transcription and/or multiple downstream signaling that both induce diverse cellular responses including the cell cycle arrest and the apoptosis in tumor cells. We provided evidence that IFN-γ enhances the pro cell death effects of Fas/CD95 in human neoplastic alveolar epithelial cell line, A549. We also found that p27 protein plays a pivotal role in the inducing cell death of IFNγ-CH-11-treated A549 cells, since it is involved in the Ras/Raf signaling pathway. This article discusses recent insights into these possible additional functions of IFNs in lung cancer treatment.

  17. Involvement of NtERF3 in the cell death signalling pathway mediated by SIPK/WIPK and WRKY1 in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Ogata, T; Okada, H; Kawaide, H; Takahashi, H; Seo, S; Mitsuhara, I; Matsushita, Y

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that one of the ethylene response factors (ERFs), NtERF3, and other members of the subgroup VIII-a ERFs of the AP2/ERF family exhibit cell death-inducing ability in tobacco leaves. In this study, we focused on the involvement of NtERF3 in a cell death signalling pathway in tobacco plants, particularly downstream of NtSIPK/NtWIPK and NtWRKY1, which are mitogen-activated protein kinases and a phosphorylation substrate of NtSIPK, respectively. An ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif-deficient NtERF3b mutant (NtERF3bΔEAR) that lacked cell death-inducing ability suppressed the induction of cell death caused by NtERF3a. The transient co-expression of NtERF3bΔEAR suppressed the hypersensitive reaction (HR)-like cell death induced by NtSIPK and NtWRKY1. The induction of cell death by NtSIPK and NtWRKY1 was also inhibited in transgenic plants expressing NtERF3bΔEAR. Analysis of gene expression, ethylene production and cell death symptoms in salicylic acid-deficient tobacco plants suggested the existence of some feedback regulation in the HR cell death signalling pathway mediated by SIPK/WIPK and WRKY1. Overall, these results suggest that NtERF3 functions downstream of NtSIPK/NtWIPK and NtWRKY1 in a cell death signalling pathway, with some feedback regulation.

  18. Fas ligand based immunotherapy: A potent and effective neoadjuvant with checkpoint inhibitor properties, or a systemically toxic promoter of tumor growth?

    PubMed

    Modiano, Jaime F; Bellgrau, Donald

    2016-02-01

    Fas ligand (FasL, CD95L) is a 40-kDa type II transmembrane protein that binds to Fas (CD95) receptors and promotes programmed cell death. Fas receptors are expressed at higher levels in many tumors than in normal cells; however, systemic administration of FasL or agonistic anti-Fas antibodies to mice with tumors caused lethal hepatitis. Somewhat paradoxically, elimination of Fas or FasL from tumors also leads to death induced by CD95 receptor/ligand elimination (DICE). At face value, this suggests that Fas signaling not only kills normal cells, but that it also is essential for tumor cell survival. Targeting this pathway may not only fail to kill tumors, but instead may even enhance their growth, leading some to report the demise of Fas ligand in cancer immunotherapy. But, to paraphrase Mark Twain, is this death an exaggeration? Here, we provide a careful examination of the literature exploring the merits of FasL as a novel form of cancer immunotherapy. With local administration using delivery vectors that achieve high levels of expression in the tumor environment, our results indicate that the potential for systemic toxicity is eliminated in higher mammals, and that a systemic anti-tumor response ensues, which delays or prevents progression and simultaneously attacks distant metastases.

  19. Hyperactivated Wnt signaling induces synthetic lethal interaction with Rb inactivation by elevating TORC1 activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyi; Liao, Yang; Hsu, Fu-Ning; Zhang, Robin; Searle, Jennifer S; Pei, Xun; Li, Xuan; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Du, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Inactivation of the Rb tumor suppressor can lead to increased cell proliferation or cell death depending on specific cellular context. Therefore, identification of the interacting pathways that modulate the effect of Rb loss will provide novel insights into the roles of Rb in cancer development and promote new therapeutic strategies. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction between Rb inactivation and deregulated Wg/Wnt signaling through unbiased genetic screens. We show that a weak allele of axin, which deregulates Wg signaling and increases cell proliferation without obvious effects on cell fate specification, significantly alters metabolic gene expression, causes hypersensitivity to metabolic stress induced by fasting, and induces synergistic apoptosis with mutation of fly Rb ortholog, rbf. Furthermore, hyperactivation of Wg signaling by other components of the Wg pathway also induces synergistic apoptosis with rbf. We show that hyperactivated Wg signaling significantly increases TORC1 activity and induces excessive energy stress with rbf mutation. Inhibition of TORC1 activity significantly suppressed synergistic cell death induced by hyperactivated Wg signaling and rbf inactivation, which is correlated with decreased energy stress and decreased induction of apoptotic regulator expression. Finally the synthetic lethality between Rb and deregulated Wnt signaling is conserved in mammalian cells and that inactivation of Rb and APC induces synergistic cell death through a similar mechanism. These results suggest that elevated TORC1 activity and metabolic stress underpin the evolutionarily conserved synthetic lethal interaction between hyperactivated Wnt signaling and inactivated Rb tumor suppressor.

  20. (125)I Seeds Radiation Induces Paraptosis-Like Cell Death via PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway in HCT116 Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lelin; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    (125)I seeds brachytherapy implantation has been extensively performed in unresectable and rerecurrent rectal carcinoma. Many studies on the cancer-killing activity of (125)I seeds radiation mainly focused on its ability to trigger apoptosis, which is the most well-known and dominant type of cell death induced by radiation. However our results showed some unique morphological features such as cell swelling, cytoplasmic vacuolation, and plasma membrane integrity, which is obviously different to apoptosis. In this study, clonogenic proliferation was carried out to assay survival fraction. Transmission electron microscopy was used to analyze ultrastructural and evaluate morphologic feature of HCT116 cells after exposure to (125)I seeds radiation. Immunofluorescence analysis was used to detect the origin of cytoplasmic vacuoles. Flow cytometry analysis was employed to detect the size and granularity of HCT116 cells. Western blot was performed to measure the protein level of AIP1, caspase-3, AKT, p-Akt (Thr308), p-Akt (Ser473), and β-actin. We found that (125)I seeds radiation activated PI3K/AKT signaling pathway and could trigger paraptosis-like cell death. Moreover, inhibitor of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway could inhibit paraptosis-like cell death induced by (125)I seeds radiation. Our data suggest that (125)I seeds radiation can induce paraptosis-like cell death via PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  1. 125I Seeds Radiation Induces Paraptosis-Like Cell Death via PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway in HCT116 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lelin; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    125I seeds brachytherapy implantation has been extensively performed in unresectable and rerecurrent rectal carcinoma. Many studies on the cancer-killing activity of 125I seeds radiation mainly focused on its ability to trigger apoptosis, which is the most well-known and dominant type of cell death induced by radiation. However our results showed some unique morphological features such as cell swelling, cytoplasmic vacuolation, and plasma membrane integrity, which is obviously different to apoptosis. In this study, clonogenic proliferation was carried out to assay survival fraction. Transmission electron microscopy was used to analyze ultrastructural and evaluate morphologic feature of HCT116 cells after exposure to 125I seeds radiation. Immunofluorescence analysis was used to detect the origin of cytoplasmic vacuoles. Flow cytometry analysis was employed to detect the size and granularity of HCT116 cells. Western blot was performed to measure the protein level of AIP1, caspase-3, AKT, p-Akt (Thr308), p-Akt (Ser473), and β-actin. We found that 125I seeds radiation activated PI3K/AKT signaling pathway and could trigger paraptosis-like cell death. Moreover, inhibitor of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway could inhibit paraptosis-like cell death induced by 125I seeds radiation. Our data suggest that 125I seeds radiation can induce paraptosis-like cell death via PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:28078301

  2. Lipid raft-mediated Akt signaling as a therapeutic target in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Reis-Sobreiro, M; Roué, G; Moros, A; Gajate, C; de la Iglesia-Vicente, J; Colomer, D; Mollinedo, F

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that lipid raft membrane domains modulate both cell survival and death. Here, we have found that the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway is present in the lipid rafts of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells, and this location seems to be critical for full activation and MCL cell survival. The antitumor lipids (ATLs) edelfosine and perifosine target rafts, and we found that ATLs exerted in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity against MCL cells by displacing Akt as well as key regulatory kinases p-PDK1 (phosphatidylinositol-dependent protein kinase 1), PI3K and mTOR (mammalian TOR) from lipid rafts. This raft reorganization led to Akt dephosphorylation, while proapoptotic Fas/CD95 death receptor was recruited into rafts. Raft integrity was critical for Ser473 Akt phosphorylation. ATL-induced apoptosis appeared to correlate with the basal Akt phosphorylation status in MCL cell lines and primary cultures, and could be potentiated by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin, or inhibited by the Akt activator pervanadate. Classical Akt inhibitors induced apoptosis in MCL cells. Microenvironmental stimuli, such as CD40 ligation or stromal cell contact, did not prevent ATL-induced apoptosis in MCL cell lines and patient-derived cells. These results highlight the role of raft-mediated PI3K/Akt signaling in MCL cell survival and chemotherapy, thus becoming a new target for MCL treatment. PMID:23727661

  3. XIAP acts as a switch between type I and type II FAS-induced apoptosis signalling

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Philipp J.; Grabow, Stephanie; Gray, Daniel; McKenzie, Mark D.; Nachbur, Ueli; Huang, David C.S.; Bouillet, Philippe; Thomas, Helen E.; Borner, Christoph; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Kaufmann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    FAS (APO-1/CD95) and its physiological ligand, FASL, regulate apoptotic death of unwanted or dangerous cells in many tissues, functioning as a guardian against autoimmunity and cancer development1-4. Distinct cell types differ in the mechanisms by which the ‘death receptor’ FAS triggers their apoptosis1-4. In type I cells, such as lymphocytes, activation of ‘effector caspases’ by FAS-induced activation of caspase-8 suffices for cell killing whereas in type II cells, including hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells, amplification of the caspase cascade through caspase-8 mediated activation of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member BID5 is essential6-8. Here we show, that loss of X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)9,10 function by gene-targeting or treatment with a second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (SMAC11, also called DIABLO12: direct IAP binding protein with low pI) mimetic drug rendered hepatocytes independent of BID for FAS-induced apoptosis signalling. These results show that XIAP is the critical discriminator between type I versus type II apoptosis signalling and suggest that IAP inhibitors should be used with caution in cancer patients with underlying liver conditions. PMID:19626005

  4. Signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, David M.

    The application of signal processing technology to conventional weapons systems can lower operator workloads and enhance kill probabilities, while automating wide-area surveillance, target search and classification, target tracking, and aimpoint selection. Immediate opportunities exist for automatic target cueing in underwater and over-the-horizon targeting, as well as for airborne multiple-target fire control. By embedding the transit/receive electronics into conformal aircraft sensor arrays, a 'smart' skin can be created. Electronically scanned phased arrays can be used to yield accurate azimuthal and elevation positions while nullifying EW threats. Attention is given to major development thrusts in algorithm design.

  5. Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    ORGANIZATION Univ of Minnesota (f*fto U. S. Army Research Office 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (Wiy Stat, and ZIP Code...Minneapolis, MN 55455 P. 0. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Sa. NAME Of FUNDING ISPONSORING Sb. OFFICE SYMBOL 9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT...PROJECT ITASK jWORK UNIT Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 EMNTO.I NO NO CESOIO 11. TITLE (Incudt Security Classifiratio") Signal Processing of, he auth

  6. Activin Signaling in the Pathogenesis and Therapy of Neuropsychiatric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Link, Andrea S.; Zheng, Fang; Alzheimer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Activins are members of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) family and serve as multifunctional regulatory proteins in many tissues and organs. In the brain, activin A, which is formed by two disulfide-linked βA subunits, is recognized as the predominant player in activin signaling. Over the last years, considerable progress has been made in elucidating novel and unexpected functions of activin in the normal and diseased brain and in deciphering the underlying molecular mechanisms. Initially identified as a neurotrophic and protective factor during development and in several forms of acute injury, the scope of effects of activin A in the adult central nervous system (CNS) has been considerably broadened by now. Here, we will highlight recent findings that bear significance for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of various neuropsychiatric diseases and might hold promise for novel therapeutic strategies. While the basal level of activin A in the adult brain is low, significant short-term up-regulation occurs in response to increased neuronal activity. In fact, brief exposure to an enriched environment (EE) is already sufficient to considerably strengthen activin signaling. Enhancement of this pathway tunes the performance of glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses in a fashion that impacts on cognitive functions and affective behavior, counteracts death-inducing signals through extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), and stimulates adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. We will discuss how impaired activin signaling is involved in anxiety disorders, depression, drug dependence, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, and how reinforcement of activin signaling might be exploited for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27242425

  7. Signaling pathway for aloe-emodin-induced apoptosis in human H460 lung nonsmall carcinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Feng-Tsgh; Wu, Chun-Hsiung; Lee, Hong-Zin

    2003-08-10

    Aloe-emodin (1,8-dihydroxy-3-(hydroxymethyl)-anthraquinone) is an active component from the root and rhizome of Rheum palmatum that has been reported to exhibit antitumor effects through an unknown mechanism. Our study investigated the mechanisms of aloe-emodin-induced cell death in the human lung nonsmall cell carcinoma cell line H460. Aloe-emodin (40 microM)-induced apoptosis of H460 cells involves modulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, Bcl-2, caspase-3 and p38 protein expression. The relationship of various signals involved in cell death, such as cAMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, Bcl-2, caspase-3 and p38, has been investigated in the regulation of apoptotic cell death of aloe-emodin. We demonstrated that the expression of p38 is an important determinant of apoptotic death induced by aloe-emodin.

  8. The Root Hair Assay Facilitates the Use of Genetic and Pharmacological Tools in Order to Dissect Multiple Signalling Pathways That Lead to Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzyk, Joanna; Devine, Aoife; McCabe, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    The activation of programmed cell death (PCD) is often a result of complex signalling pathways whose relationship and intersection are not well understood. We recently described a PCD root hair assay and proposed that it could be used to rapidly screen genetic or pharmacological modulators of PCD. To further assess the applicability of the root hair assay for studying multiple signalling pathways leading to PCD activation we have investigated the crosstalk between salicylic acid, autophagy and apoptosis-like PCD (AL-PCD) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The root hair assay was used to determine rates of AL-PCD induced by a panel of cell death inducing treatments in wild type plants treated with chemical modulators of salicylic acid synthesis or autophagy, and in genetic lines defective in autophagy or salicylic acid signalling. The assay demonstrated that PCD induced by exogenous salicylic acid or fumonisin B1 displayed a requirement for salicylic acid signalling and was partially dependent on the salicylic acid signal transducer NPR1. Autophagy deficiency resulted in an increase in the rates of AL-PCD induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1, but not by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. The phenylalanine ammonia lyase-dependent salicylic acid synthesis pathway contributed only to death induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1. 3-Methyladenine, which is commonly used as an inhibitor of autophagy, appeared to influence PCD induction in all treatments suggesting a possible secondary, non-autophagic, effect on a core component of the plant PCD pathway. The results suggest that salicylic acid signalling is negatively regulated by autophagy during salicylic acid and mycotoxin-induced AL-PCD. However, this crosstalk does not appear to be directly involved in PCD induced by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. This study demonstrates that the root hair assay is an effective tool for relatively rapid investigation of complex signalling pathways leading to the activation of

  9. A Signaling Network Controlling Androgenic Repression of c-Fos Protein in Prostate Adenocarcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Eswar; Song, Kyung; Corum, Sarah L.; Bane, Kara L.; Wang, Hui; Kao, Hung-Ying; Danielpour, David

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor c-Fos controls many important cellular processes, including cell growth and apoptosis. c-Fos expression is rapidly elevated in the prostate upon castration-mediated androgen withdrawal through an undefined mechanism. Here we show that androgens (5α-dihydrotestosterone and R1881) suppress c-Fos protein and mRNA expression induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or EGF in human prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines. Such suppression transpires through a transcriptional mechanism, predominantly at the proximal serum response element of the c-fos promoter. We show that androgen signaling suppresses TPA-induced c-Fos expression through repressing a PKC/MEK/ERK/ELK-1 signaling pathway. Moreover, our results support the hypothesis that p38MAPK, PI3K, and PKCδ are involved in the androgenic regulation of c-Fos through controlling MEK/ERK. Stable silencing of c-Fos and PKCδ with shRNAs suggests that R1881 promotes cell death induced by low-dose TPA through a mechanism that is dependent on both PKCδ and loss of c-Fos expression. Reciprocally, loss of either PKCδ or c-Fos activates p38MAPK while suppressing the activation of ERK1/2. We also provide the first demonstration that R1881 permits cell death induced by low-dose TPA in the LNCaP androgen-dependent PCa cell line and that TPA-induced cell death is independent of exogenous androgen in the castration-resistant variants of LNCaP, C4-2 and C4-2B. Acquisition of androgen-independent killing by TPA correlates with activation of p38MAPK, suppression of ERK1/2, and loss of c-Fos. These results provide new insights into androgenic control of c-Fos and use of PKC inhibitors in PCa therapy. PMID:26786102

  10. Urothelial Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The urothelium, which lines the inner surface of the renal pelvis, the ureters, and the urinary bladder, not only forms a high-resistance barrier to ion, solute and water flux, and pathogens, but also functions as an integral part of a sensory web which receives, amplifies, and transmits information about its external milieu. Urothelial cells have the ability to sense changes in their extracellular environment, and respond to chemical, mechanical and thermal stimuli by releasing various factors such as ATP, nitric oxide, and acetylcholine. They express a variety of receptors and ion channels, including P2X3 purinergic receptors, nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and TRP channels, which all have been implicated in urothelial-neuronal interactions, and involved in signals that via components in the underlying lamina propria, such as interstitial cells, can be amplified and conveyed to nerves, detrusor muscle cells, and ultimately the central nervous system. The specialized anatomy of the urothelium and underlying structures, and the possible communication mechanisms from urothelial cells to various cell types within the bladder wall are described. Changes in the urothelium/lamina propria (“mucosa”) produced by different bladder disorders are discussed, as well as the mucosa as a target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23589830

  11. Niche signaling promotes stem cell survival in the Drosophila testis via the JAK-STAT target DIAP1.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Salman; Hétié, Phylis; Matunis, Erika L

    2015-08-01

    Tissue-specific stem cells are thought to resist environmental insults better than their differentiating progeny, but this resistance varies from one tissue to another, and the underlying mechanisms are not well-understood. Here, we use the Drosophila testis as a model system to study the regulation of cell death within an intact niche. This niche contains sperm-producing germline stem cells (GSCs) and accompanying somatic cyst stem cells (or CySCs). Although many signals are known to promote stem cell self-renewal in this tissue, including the highly conserved JAK-STAT pathway, the response of these stem cells to potential death-inducing signals, and factors promoting stem cell survival, have not been characterized. Here we find that both GSCs and CySCs resist cell death better than their differentiating progeny, under normal laboratory conditions and in response to potential death-inducing stimuli such as irradiation or starvation. To ask what might be promoting stem cell survival, we characterized the role of the anti-apoptotic gene Drosophila inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (diap1) in testis stem cells. DIAP1 protein is enriched in the GSCs and CySCs and is a JAK-STAT target. diap1 is necessary for survival of both GSCs and CySCs, and ectopic up-regulation of DIAP1 in somatic cyst cells is sufficient to non-autonomously rescue stress-induced cell death in adjacent differentiating germ cells (spermatogonia). Altogether, our results show that niche signals can promote stem cell survival by up-regulation of highly conserved anti-apoptotic proteins, and suggest that this strategy may underlie the ability of stem cells to resist death more generally.

  12. AIDS and the death receptors.

    PubMed

    Peter, M E; Ehret, A; Berndt, C; Krammer, P H

    1997-01-01

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells involves the CD95 receptor/ligand system. T cell activation through the T cell receptor results in expression of the CD95 ligand (CD95L) that acts on CD95+ cells by direct binding and in a paracrine or autocrine fashion. In AIDS, upregulation of CD95L in T cells is accelerated by two viral gene products, HIV-1 Tat and gp120. The CD95 signaling pathway is, therefore, likely to represent an important road to cell death of the CD4+ T cells in AIDS. Recently, the early events in the CD95 signaling pathway have been identified. A key role hereby plays a receptor-interacting member of the interleukin 1 beta-converting enzymes (ICE), FLICE, that could be a target for therapeutic intervention. In addition to CD95, the role of other members of the TNF receptor superfamily in AIDS is discussed.

  13. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, E.W.; Simms, R.

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  14. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, Edward W.; Simms, Richard

    1981-01-01

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  15. PINK1 signaling in mitochondrial homeostasis and in aging (Review).

    PubMed

    Kitagishi, Yasuko; Nakano, Noriko; Ogino, Mako; Ichimura, Mayuko; Minami, Akari; Matsuda, Satoru

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the pathology of Parkinson's disease, an age-associated neurodegenerative disorder. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase protein 1 (PINK1) is responsible for the most common form of recessive Parkinson's disease. PINK1 is a mitochondrial kinase that is involved in mitrochondrial quality control and promotes cell survival. PINK1 has been shown to protect against neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress. Accordingly, PINK1 deficiency is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction as well as increased oxidative cellular stress and subsequent neuronal cell death. In addition, several mitochondrial chaperone proteins have been shown to be substrates of the PINK1 kinase. In this review, we discuss recent studies concerning the signaling cascades and molecular mechanisms involved in the process of mitophagy, which is implicated in neurodegeneration and in related aging associated with oxidative stress. Particular attention will be given to the molecular mechanisms proposed to explain the effects of natural compounds and/or food ingredients against oxidative stress. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in this cellular protection could be critical for developing treatments to prevent and control excessive progression of neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Regulation of cell signaling and apoptosis by tumor suppressor WWOX

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jui-Yen; Chou, Ying-Tsen; Lai, Feng-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Human fragile WWOX gene encodes a tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (named WWOX, FOR, or WOX1). Functional suppression of WWOX prevents apoptotic cell death induced by a variety of stress stimuli, such as tumor necrosis factor, UV radiation, and chemotherapeutic drug treatment. Loss of WWOX gene expression due to gene deletions, loss of heterozygosity, chromosomal translocations, or epigenetic silencing is frequently observed in human malignant cancer cells. Acquisition of chemoresistance in squamous cell carcinoma, osteosarcoma, and breast cancer cells is associated with WWOX deficiency. WWOX protein physically interacts with many signaling molecules and exerts its regulatory effects on gene transcription and protein stability and subcellular localization to control cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, autophagy, and metabolism. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which WWOX regulates cellular functions and stress responses. A potential scenario is that activation of WWOX by anticancer drugs is needed to overcome chemoresistance and trigger cancer cell death, suggesting that WWOX can be regarded as a prognostic marker and a candidate molecule for targeted cancer therapies. PMID:25595191

  17. Role of TLR2- and TLR4-mediated signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage death.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Dulfary; Rojas, Mauricio; Hernández, Israel; Radzioch, Danuta; García, Luis F; Barrera, Luis F

    2010-01-01

    Infection of macrophages with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. TLRs 2 and 4 recognition of mycobacterial ligands has been independently associated to apoptosis induction. To try to understand the particular contribution of these receptors to apoptotic or necrotic signaling upon infection with live Mtb H37Rv, we used macrophage lines derived from wild-type or TLR2-, TLR4-, and MyD88-deficient mouse strains. Mtb-infection triggered apoptosis depending on a TLR2/TLR4/MyD88/p38/ERK/PI-3K/NF-kB pathway; however, necrosis was favored in absence of TLR4 signaling independently of p38, ERK1/2, PI-3K or NF-kappaB activity. In conclusion, our results indicate that cooperation between TLR2- and TLR4-dependent mediated signals play a critical role in macrophage apoptosis induced by Mtb and the TLR4-mediated signaling has important role in the maintenance of the balance between apoptotic vs. necrotic cell death induced by macrophage infection with Mtb.

  18. Cadmium overkill: autophagy, apoptosis and necrosis signalling in endothelial cells exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Messner, Barbara; Türkcan, Adrian; Ploner, Christian; Laufer, Günther; Bernhard, David

    2016-04-01

    Apoptosis, necrosis, or autophagy-it is the mode of cell demise that defines the response of surrounding cells and organs. In case of one of the most toxic substances known to date, cadmium (Cd), and despite a large number of studies, the mode of cell death induced is still unclear. As there exists conflicting data as to which cell death mode is induced by Cd both across various cell types and within a single one, we chose to analyse Cd-induced cell death in primary human endothelial cells by investigating all possibilities that a cell faces in undergoing cell death. Our results indicate that Cd-induced death signalling starts with the causation of DNA damage and a cytosolic calcium flux. These two events lead to an apoptosis signalling-related mitochondrial membrane depolarisation and a classical DNA damage response. Simultaneously, autophagy signalling such as ER stress and phagosome formation is initiated. Importantly, we also observed lysosomal membrane permeabilization. It is the integration of all signals that results in DNA degradation and a disruption of the plasma membrane. Our data thus suggest that Cd causes the activation of multiple death signals in parallel. The genotype (for example, p53 positive or negative) as well as other factors may determine the initiation and rate of individual death signals. Differences in the signal mix and speed may explain the differing results recorded as to the Cd-induced mode of cell death thus far. In human endothelial cells it is the sum of most if not all of these signals that determine the mode of Cd-induced cell death: programmed necrosis.

  19. A common mechanism of cellular death induced by bactericidal antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kohanski, Michael A; Dwyer, Daniel J; Hayete, Boris; Lawrence, Carolyn A; Collins, James J

    2007-09-07

    Antibiotic mode-of-action classification is based upon drug-target interaction and whether the resultant inhibition of cellular function is lethal to bacteria. Here we show that the three major classes of bactericidal antibiotics, regardless of drug-target interaction, stimulate the production of highly deleterious hydroxyl radicals in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, which ultimately contribute to cell death. We also show, in contrast, that bacteriostatic drugs do not produce hydroxyl radicals. We demonstrate that the mechanism of hydroxyl radical formation induced by bactericidal antibiotics is the end product of an oxidative damage cellular death pathway involving the tricarboxylic acid cycle, a transient depletion of NADH, destabilization of iron-sulfur clusters, and stimulation of the Fenton reaction. Our results suggest that all three major classes of bactericidal drugs can be potentiated by targeting bacterial systems that remediate hydroxyl radical damage, including proteins involved in triggering the DNA damage response, e.g., RecA.

  20. Non-Canonical Cell Death Induced by p53

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Atul; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a vital biological process for multicellular organisms to maintain cellular homeostasis, which is regulated in a complex manner. Over the past several years, apart from apoptosis, which is the principal mechanism of caspase-dependent cell death, research on non-apoptotic forms of programmed cell death has gained momentum. p53 is a well characterized tumor suppressor that controls cell proliferation and apoptosis and has also been linked to non-apoptotic, non-canonical cell death mechanisms. p53 impacts these non-canonical forms of cell death through transcriptional regulation of its downstream targets, as well as direct interactions with key players involved in these mechanisms, in a cell type- or tissue context-dependent manner. In this review article, we summarize and discuss the involvement of p53 in several non-canonical modes of cell death, including caspase-independent apoptosis (CIA), ferroptosis, necroptosis, autophagic cell death, mitotic catastrophe, paraptosis, and pyroptosis, as well as its role in efferocytosis which is the process of clearing dead or dying cells. PMID:27941671

  1. Non-Canonical Cell Death Induced by p53.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Atul; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2016-12-09

    Programmed cell death is a vital biological process for multicellular organisms to maintain cellular homeostasis, which is regulated in a complex manner. Over the past several years, apart from apoptosis, which is the principal mechanism of caspase-dependent cell death, research on non-apoptotic forms of programmed cell death has gained momentum. p53 is a well characterized tumor suppressor that controls cell proliferation and apoptosis and has also been linked to non-apoptotic, non-canonical cell death mechanisms. p53 impacts these non-canonical forms of cell death through transcriptional regulation of its downstream targets, as well as direct interactions with key players involved in these mechanisms, in a cell type- or tissue context-dependent manner. In this review article, we summarize and discuss the involvement of p53 in several non-canonical modes of cell death, including caspase-independent apoptosis (CIA), ferroptosis, necroptosis, autophagic cell death, mitotic catastrophe, paraptosis, and pyroptosis, as well as its role in efferocytosis which is the process of clearing dead or dying cells.

  2. Unraveling the mechanism of cell death induced by chemical fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Olivier; Kampmann, Martin; Bassik, Michael C.; Zorn, Julie A.; Venditto, Vincent J.; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Agard, Nicholas J.; Shimada, Kenichi; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Stockwell, Brent R.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    We previously discovered a small-molecule inducer of cell death, named 1541, that non-covalently self-assembles into chemical fibrils (“chemi-fibrils”) and activates procaspase-3 in vitro. We report here that 1541-induced cell death is caused by the fibrillar, rather than the soluble form of the drug. An shRNA screen reveals that knockdown of genes involved in endocytosis, vesicle trafficking, and lysosomal acidification causes partial 1541 resistance. We confirm the role of these pathways using pharmacological inhibitors. Microscopy shows that the fluorescent chemi-fibrils accumulate in punctae inside cells that partially co-localize with lysosomes. Notably, the chemi-fibrils bind and induce liposome leakage in vitro, suggesting they may do the same in cells. The chemi-fibrils induce extensive proteolysis including caspase substrates, yet modulatory profiling reveals that chemi-fibrils form a distinct class from existing inducers of cell death. The chemi-fibrils share similarities to proteinaceous fibrils and may provide insight into their mechanism of cellular toxicity. PMID:25262416

  3. Amplitude death induced by fractional derivatives in nonlinear coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. X.; Liu, J. K.; Chen, Y. M.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a study on amplitude death in nonlinear coupled oscillators containing fractional derivatives. Analytical criterion for amplitude death region is obtained by eigenvalue analysis and verified by numerical results. It is found that amplitude death regions can be enlarged to a large extent by fractional derivatives. For this reason, amplitude death can be detected in fractional Stuart-Landau systems with weak coupling strength and low frequency, whereas it never appears in integer-order systems. Interestingly, the widening of amplitude death region induced by fractional derivative is shared by a variety of oscillators with different types of coupling mechanisms. An interpretation for the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon is briefly addressed, based on which we further suggest a coupling organization leading to amplitude death only in fractional oscillators.

  4. Melatonin, a natural programmed cell death inducer in cancer.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hidalgo, M; Guerrero, J M; Villegas, I; Packham, G; de la Lastra, C A

    2012-01-01

    Melatonin, an indolamine derived from the amino-acid tryptophan, participates in diverse physiological functions and has great functional versatility related to the regulation of circadian rhythms and seasonal behaviour, sexual development, retinal physiology, tumour inhibition, as an antioxidant, immunomodulatory and anti-aging properties. In relation to its oncostatic properties, there is evidence that tumor initiation, promotion or progression may be restrained by the night-time physiological surge of melatonin in the blood or extracellular fluid. In addition, depressed nocturnal melatonin concentrations or nocturnal excretion of the main melatonin metabolite, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, were found in individuals with various tumor types. In the majority of studies, melatonin was shown to inhibit development and/or growth of various experimental animal tumors and some human cell lines in vitro. Many tumors do not respond to drug treatment due to their resistance to undergo apoptosis thereby contributing to the development of cancer. Thus, given the importance of the apoptotic program in cancer treatment, the role of melatonin in influencing apoptosis in tumor cells attracted attention because it seems that it actually promotes apoptosis in most tumor cells, in contrast to the obvious inhibition of apoptotic processes in normal cells. Thus, this paper is also intended to provide to the reader an up-date of all the researches that have been carried out to date, which investigate the proapoptotic effects of melatonin in experimental preclinical models of cancer (in vitro and in vivo) and the underlying proposed action mechanism of this effects. If melatonin uniformly induces apoptosis in cancer cells, the findings could have important clinical implications to improve the quality of live while preventing the appearance of cancer.

  5. Mitochondrial control of cell death induced by hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Criollo, Alfredo; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Lavandero, Sergio; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-01-01

    HeLa and HCT116 cells respond differentially to sorbitol, an osmolyte able to induce hypertonic stress. In these models, sorbitol promoted the phenotypic manifestations of early apoptosis followed by complete loss of viability in a time-, dose-, and cell type-specific fashion, by eliciting distinct yet partially overlapping molecular pathways. In HCT116 but not in HeLa cells, sorbitol caused the mitochondrial release of the caspase-independent death effector AIF, whereas in both cell lines cytochrome c was retained in mitochondria. Despite cytochrome c retention, HeLa cells exhibited the progressive activation of caspase-3, presumably due to the prior activation of caspase-8. Accordingly, caspase inhibition prevented sorbitol-induced killing in HeLa, but only partially in HCT116 cells. Both the knock-out of Bax in HCT116 cells and the knock-down of Bax in A549 cells by RNA interference reduced the AIF release and/or the mitochondrial alterations. While the knock-down of Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) sensitized to sorbitol-induced killing, overexpression of a Bcl-2 variant that specifically localizes to mitochondria (but not of the wild-type nor of a endoplasmic reticulum-targeted form) strongly inhibited sorbitol effects. Thus, hyperosmotic stress kills cells by triggering different molecular pathways, which converge at mitochondria where pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family exert their control.

  6. Protection of Momordica charantia polysaccharide against intracerebral hemorrhage-induced brain injury through JNK3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhen-Zhen; Zhou, Xiao-Ling; Li, Yi-Hang; Zhang, Feng; Li, Feng-Ying; Su-Hua, Qi

    2015-01-01

    It has been well documented that Momordica charantia polysaccharide (MCP) has multiple biological effects such as immune enhancement, anti-oxidation and anti-cancer. However, the potential protective effects of MCP on stroke damage and its relative mechanisms remain unclear. Our present study demonstrated that MCP could scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) in intra-cerebral hemorrhage damage, significantly attenuating the neuronal death induced by thrombin in primary hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we found that MCP prevented the activation of the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK3), c-Jun and caspase-3, which was caused by the intra-cerebral hemorrhage injury. Taken together, our study demonstrated that MCP had a neuroprotective effect in response to intra-cerebral hemorrhage and its mechanisms involved the inhibition of JNK3 signaling pathway.

  7. An Evolution-Guided Analysis Reveals a Multi-Signaling Regulation of Fas by Tyrosine Phosphorylation and its Implication in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabandhu, Krittalak; Huault, Sébastien; Durivault, Jérôme; Lang, Kévin; Ta Ngoc, Ly; Bole, Angelique; Doma, Eszter; Dérijard, Benoit; Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Pierres, Michel; Hueber, Anne-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Demonstrations of both pro-apoptotic and pro-survival abilities of Fas (TNFRSF6/CD95/APO-1) have led to a shift from the exclusive “Fas apoptosis” to “Fas multisignals” paradigm and the acceptance that Fas-related therapies face a major challenge, as it remains unclear what determines the mode of Fas signaling. Through protein evolution analysis, which reveals unconventional substitutions of Fas tyrosine during divergent evolution, evolution-guided tyrosine-phosphorylated Fas proxy, and site-specific phosphorylation detection, we show that the Fas signaling outcome is determined by the tyrosine phosphorylation status of its death domain. The phosphorylation dominantly turns off the Fas-mediated apoptotic signal, while turning on the pro-survival signal. We show that while phosphorylations at Y232 and Y291 share some common functions, their contributions to Fas signaling differ at several levels. The findings that Fas tyrosine phosphorylation is regulated by Src family kinases (SFKs) and the phosphatase SHP-1 and that Y291 phosphorylation primes clathrin-dependent Fas endocytosis, which contributes to Fas pro-survival signaling, reveals for the first time the mechanistic link between SFK/SHP-1-dependent Fas tyrosine phosphorylation, internalization route, and signaling choice. We also demonstrate that levels of phosphorylated Y232 and Y291 differ among human cancer types and differentially respond to anticancer therapy, suggesting context-dependent involvement of Fas phosphorylation in cancer. This report provides a new insight into the control of TNF receptor multisignaling by receptor phosphorylation and its implication in cancer biology, which brings us a step closer to overcoming the challenge in handling Fas signaling in treatments of cancer as well as other pathologies such as autoimmune and degenerative diseases. PMID:26942442

  8. Toll-Like Signaling and the Cytokine IL-6 Regulate Histone Deacetylase Dependent Neuronal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Forgione, Nicole; Tropepe, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins have a role in promoting neuronal survival in vitro, but the mechanism underlying this function has not been identified. Here we provide evidence that components of the neuronal microenvironment, including non-neuronal cells and defined culture media, can mitigate midbrain neuronal cell death induced by HDAC inhibitor treatment. Using microarrays we further identified gene expression changes taking place in non-neuronal cells as a result of HDAC inhibition. This analysis demonstrated that HDAC inhibitor treatment results in the down-regulation of immunity related signaling factors, in particular the Toll-like receptors (TLR). TLR signaling is active in cultured midbrain cells, yet blocking TLR receptors is not sufficient to cause neuronal cell death. In contrast, selective activation of this pathway using TLR ligands can modestly block the effects of HDAC inhibition. Furthermore, we observed that the negative effects of HDAC inhibitor treatment on neuronal survival could be more substantially blocked by the cytokine Interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is a major downstream target of TLR signaling. These data suggest that HDACs function to promote neuronal survival by activating a TLR and IL-6 dependent pathway. PMID:22848425

  9. The Fas-FADD Death Domain Complex Structure Unravels Signalling by Receptor Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, F.; Stec, B; Pop, C; Dobaczewska, M; Lee, J; Monosov, E; Robinson, H; Salvesen, G; Schwarzenbacher, R; Riedl, S

    2009-01-01

    The death inducing signalling complex (DISC) formed by Fas receptor, FADD (Fas-associated death domain protein) and caspase 8 is a pivotal trigger of apoptosis1, 2, 3. The Fas-FADD DISC represents a receptor platform, which once assembled initiates the induction of programmed cell death. A highly oligomeric network of homotypic protein interactions comprised of the death domains of Fas and FADD is at the centre of DISC formation4, 5. Thus, characterizing the mechanistic basis for the Fas-FADD interaction is crucial for understanding DISC signalling but has remained unclear largely because of a lack of structural data. We have successfully formed and isolated the human Fas-FADD death domain complex and report the 2.7 A crystal structure. The complex shows a tetrameric arrangement of four FADD death domains bound to four Fas death domains. We show that an opening of the Fas death domain exposes the FADD binding site and simultaneously generates a Fas-Fas bridge. The result is a regulatory Fas-FADD complex bridge governed by weak protein-protein interactions revealing a model where the complex itself functions as a mechanistic switch. This switch prevents accidental DISC assembly, yet allows for highly processive DISC formation and clustering upon a sufficient stimulus. In addition to depicting a previously unknown mode of death domain interactions, these results further uncover a mechanism for receptor signalling solely by oligomerization and clustering events.

  10. Glutamate excitotoxicity activates the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway and induces the survival of rat hippocampal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; González, Raúl Montes; Verdaguer, Ester; Huerta, Verónica Chaparro; Torres-Mendoza, Blanca M; Lemus, Lourdes; Rivera-Cervantes, Martha Catalina; Camins, A; Zárate, C Beas

    2014-03-01

    Current knowledge concerning the molecular mechanisms of the cellular response to excitotoxic insults in neurodegenerative diseases is insufficient. Although glutamate (Glu) has been widely studied as the main excitatory neurotransmitter and principal excitotoxic agent, the neuroprotective response enacted by neurons is not yet completely understood. Some of the molecular participants have been revealed, but the signaling pathways involved in this protective response are just beginning to be identified. Here, we demonstrate in vivo that, in response to the cell damage and death induced by Glu excitotoxicity, neurons orchestrate a survival response through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway by increasing ERK expression in the rat hippocampal (CA1) region, allowing increased neuronal survival. In addition, this protective response is specifically reversed by U0126, an ERK inhibitor, which promotes cell death only when it is administered together with Glu. Our findings demonstrate that the ERK signaling pathway has a neuroprotective role in the response to Glu-induced excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons. Therefore, the ERK signaling pathway may be activated as a cellular response to excitotoxic injury to prevent damage and neural loss, representing a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Dysregulation of SOCS-Mediated Negative Feedback of Cytokine Signaling in Carcinogenesis and Its Significance in Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Wen-wen; Liu, Pengpeng; Yu, Wenwen; Liu, Ting; Yu, Jinpu

    2017-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are major negative feedback regulators of cytokine signaling mediated by the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway. In particular, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are strong inhibitors of JAKs and can play pivotal roles in the development and progression of cancers. The abnormal expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 in cancer cells is associated with the dysregulation of cell growth, migration, and death induced by multiple cytokines and hormones in human carcinomas. In addition, the mechanisms involved in SOCS1- and SOCS3-regulated abnormal development and activation of immune cells in carcinogenesis, including T cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, are still unclear. Therefore, this study aims to further discuss the molecules and signal pathways regulating the expression and function of SOCS1 and SOCS3 in various types of cancers and elucidate the feasibility and efficiency of SOCS-based target therapeutic strategy in anticancer treatment. PMID:28228755

  12. Signal processor for processing ultrasonic receiver signals

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1980-01-01

    A signal processor is provided which uses an analog integrating circuit in conjunction with a set of digital counters controlled by a precision clock for sampling timing to provide an improved presentation of an ultrasonic transmitter/receiver signal. The signal is sampled relative to the transmitter trigger signal timing at precise times, the selected number of samples are integrated and the integrated samples are transferred and held for recording on a strip chart recorder or converted to digital form for storage. By integrating multiple samples taken at precisely the same time with respect to the trigger for the ultrasonic transmitter, random noise, which is contained in the ultrasonic receiver signal, is reduced relative to the desired useful signal.

  13. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer–resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism. PMID:24068354

  14. Retroactive Signaling in Short Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sepulchre, Jacques-Alexandre; Merajver, Sofía D.; Ventura, Alejandra C.

    2012-01-01

    In biochemical signaling pathways without explicit feedback connections, the core signal transduction is usually described as a one-way communication, going from upstream to downstream in a feedforward chain or network of covalent modification cycles. In this paper we explore the possibility of a new type of signaling called retroactive signaling, offered by the recently demonstrated property of retroactivity in signaling cascades. The possibility of retroactive signaling is analysed in the simplest case of the stationary states of a bicyclic cascade of signaling cycles. In this case, we work out the conditions for which variables of the upstream cycle are affected by a change of the total amount of protein in the downstream cycle, or by a variation of the phosphatase deactivating the same protein. Particularly, we predict the characteristic ranges of the downstream protein, or of the downstream phosphatase, for which a retroactive effect can be observed on the upstream cycle variables. Next, we extend the possibility of retroactive signaling in short but nonlinear signaling pathways involving a few covalent modification cycles. PMID:22848403

  15. Multidimensional signal processing for ultrasonic signal classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Ramuhalli, P.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S.

    2001-04-01

    Neural network based signal classification systems are being used increasingly in the analysis of large volumes of data obtained in NDE applications. One example is in the interpretation on ultrasonic signals obtained from inspection of welds where signals can be due to porosity, slag, lack of fusion and cracks in the weld region. Standard techniques rely on differences in individual A-scans to classify the signals. This paper proposes an ultrasonic signal classification technique based on the information in a group of signals and examining the statistical characteristics of the signals. The method was 2-dimensional signal processing algorithms to analyze the information in B- and B'-scan images. In this paper, 2-dimensional transform based coefficients of the images are used as features and a multilayer perceptron is used to classify them. These results are then combined to get the final classification for the inspected region. Results of applying the technique to data obtained from the inspection of welds are presented.

  16. Dendritic cell-elicited B-cell activation fosters immune privilege via IL-10 signals in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Fang-Zhu; Wu, Rui-Qi; Wei, Yuan; Liu, Rui-Xian; Yang, Dong; Xiao, Xiao; Zheng, Limin; Li, Bo; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Kuang, Dong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    B cells are prominent components of human solid tumours, but activation status and functions of these cells in human cancers remain elusive. Here we establish that over 50% B cells in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) exhibit an FcγRIIlow/− activated phenotype, and high infiltration of these cells positively correlates with cancer progression. Environmental semimature dendritic cells, but not macrophages, can operate in a CD95L-dependent pathway to generate FcγRIIlow/− activated B cells. Early activation of monocytes in cancer environments is critical for the generation of semimature dendritic cells and subsequent FcγRIIlow/− activated B cells. More importantly, the activated FcγRIIlow/− B cells from HCC tumours, but not the resting FcγRIIhigh B cells, without external stimulation suppress autologous tumour-specific cytotoxic T-cell immunity via IL-10 signals. Collectively, generation of FcγRIIlow/− activated B cells may represent a mechanism by which the immune activation is linked to immune tolerance in the tumour milieu. PMID:27853178

  17. ERK Signals: Scaffolding Scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    ERK1/2 MAP Kinases become activated in response to multiple intra- and extra-cellular stimuli through a signaling module composed of sequential tiers of cytoplasmic kinases. Scaffold proteins regulate ERK signals by connecting the different components of the module into a multi-enzymatic complex by which signal amplitude and duration are fine-tuned, and also provide signal fidelity by isolating this complex from external interferences. In addition, scaffold proteins play a central role as spatial regulators of ERKs signals. In this respect, depending on the subcellular localization from which the activating signals emanate, defined scaffolds specify which substrates are amenable to be phosphorylated. Recent evidence has unveiled direct interactions among different scaffold protein species. These scaffold-scaffold macro-complexes could constitute an additional level of regulation for ERK signals and may serve as nodes for the integration of incoming signals and the subsequent diversification of the outgoing signals with respect to substrate engagement. PMID:27303664

  18. Many checkpoints on the road to cell death: regulation of Fas-FasL interactions and Fas signaling in peripheral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Madhu; Cleland, Sophia Y.; Cruz, Anthony C.; Siegel, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between the TNF-family receptor Fas (CD95) and Fas Ligand (FasL, CD178) can efficiently induce apoptosis and are critical for maintenance of immunological self-tolerance. FasL is kept under strict control by transcriptional and post-translational regulation. Surface FasL can be cleaved by metalloproteases, resulting in shed extracellular domains, and FasL can also traffic to secretory lysosomes. Each form of FasL has distinct biological functions. Fas is more ubiquitously expressed, but its apoptosis-inducing function is regulated by a number of mechanisms including submembrane localization, efficiency of receptor signaling complex assembly and activation, and bcl-2 family members in some circumstances. When apoptosis is not induced, Fas-FasL interactions can also trigger a number of activating and pro-inflammatory signals. Harnessing the apoptosis-inducing potential of Fas for therapy for cancer and autoimmune disease has been actively pursued, and despite a number of unexpected side-effects that result from manipulating Fas-FasL interactions, this remains a worthy goal. PMID:19132321

  19. p53 and Ca(2+) signaling from the endoplasmic reticulum: partners in anti-cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Bittremieux, Mart; Bultynck, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Ca(2+) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the mitochondria critically controls cell survival and cell death decisions. Different oncogenes and deregulation of tumor suppressors exploit this mechanism to favor the survival of altered, malignant cells. Two recent studies of the Pinton team revealed a novel, non-transcriptional function of cytosolic p53 in cell death. During cell stress, p53 is recruited to the ER and the ER-mitochondrial contact sites. This results in augmented ER Ca(2+) levels by enhancing sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) activity, ultimately promoting mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload. The boosting of "toxic" Ca(2+) signaling by p53 appears to be a critical component of the cell death-inducing properties of chemotherapeutic agents and anti-cancer treatments, like photodynamic stress. Strikingly, the resistance of p53-deficient cancer cells to these treatments could be overcome by facilitating Ca(2+) transfer between the ER and the mitochondria via overexpression of SERCA or of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). Importantly, these concepts have also been supported by in vivo Ca(2+) measurements in tumor masses in mice. Collectively, these studies link for the first time the major tumor suppressor, p53, to Ca(2+) signaling in dictating cell-death outcomes and by the success of anti-cancer treatments.

  20. Scrophularia orientalis extract induces calcium signaling and apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LANGE, INGO; MOSCHNY, JULIA; TAMANYAN, KAMILLA; KHUTSISHVILI, MANANA; ATHA, DANIEL; BORRIS, ROBERT P.; KOOMOA, DANA-LYNN

    2016-01-01

    Effective neuroblastoma (NB) treatments are still limited despite treatment options available today. Therefore, this study attempted to identify novel plant extracts that have anticancer effects. Cytotoxicity and increased intracellular calcium levels were determined using the Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay and Fluo4-AM (acetoxymethyl) staining and fluorescence microscopy in NB cells in order to screen a library of plant extracts. The current study examined the anticancer effects of a dichloromethane extract from Scrophularia orientalis L. (Scrophulariaceae), a plant that has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. This extract contained highly potent agents that significantly reduced cell survival and increased calcium levels in NB cells. Further analysis revealed that cell death induced by this extract was associated with intracellular calcium release, opening of the MPTP, caspase 3- and PARP-cleavage suggesting that this extract induced aberrant calcium signaling that resulted in apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, agents from Scrophularia orientalis may have the potential to lead to new chemo therapeutic anticancer drugs. Furthermore, targeting intracellular calcium signaling may be a novel strategy to develop more effective treatments for NB. PMID:26848085

  1. Bz-423 superoxide signals B cell apoptosis via Mcl-1, Bak, and Bax.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Neal B; Boitano, Anthony E; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Opipari, Anthony W; Glick, Gary D

    2009-10-15

    Bz-423 is a pro-apoptotic 1,4-benzodiazepine with therapeutic properties in murine models of lupus demonstrating selectivity for autoreactive lymphocytes. Bz-423 modulates the F(1)F(0)-ATPase, inducing the formation of superoxide within the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which then functions as a second messenger initiating apoptosis. In order to understand some of the features that contribute to the increased sensitivity of lymphocytes, we report the signaling pathway engaged by Bz-423 in a Burkitt lymphoma cell line (Ramos). Following the generation of superoxide, Bz-423-induced apoptosis requires the activation of Bax and Bak to induce mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and cytochrome c release. Knockdown of the BH3-only proteins Bad, Bim, Bik, and Puma inhibits Bz-423 apoptosis, suggesting that these proteins serve as upstream sensors of the oxidant stress induced by Bz-423. Treatment with Bz-423 results in superoxide-dependent Mcl-1 degradation, implicating this protein as the link between Bz-423-induced superoxide and Bax and Bak activation. In contrast to fibroblasts, B cell death induced by Bz-423 is independent of c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results demonstrate that superoxide generated from the mitochondrial respiratory chain as a consequence of a respiratory transition can signal a specific apoptotic response that differs across cell types.

  2. Signaling in myxobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Dale

    2004-01-01

    Myxobacteria use soluble and cell-contact signals during their starvation-induced formation of fruiting bodies. These signals coordinate developmental gene expression with the cell movements that build fruiting bodies. Early in development, the quorum-sensing A-signal in Myxococcus xanthus helps to assess starvation and induce the first stage of aggregation. Later, the morphogenetic C-signal helps to pattern cell movement and shape the fruiting body. C-signal is a 17-kDa cell surface protein that signals by contact between the ends of two cells. The number of C-signal molecules per cell rises 100-fold from the beginning of fruiting body development to the end, when spores are formed. Traveling waves, streams, and sporulation have increasing thresholds for C-signal activity, and this progression ensures that spores form inside fruiting bodies.

  3. Signal sciences workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-05-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing.

  4. Staggered Costas signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Avraham; Levanon, Nadav

    1986-11-01

    A radar signal, based on coherent processing of a train of staggered Costas (1984) bursts is based on a minimum number of collocation of their individual ambiguity function sidelobe peaks. The resulting ambiguity function combines qualities of both 'thumbtack' and 'bed of nails' signals. Comparison with linear-FM, V-FM, and complementary phase coded signals is given, as well as comparison with hybrid signals consisting of both phase and frequency coding.

  5. Tetrapyrrole Signaling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles make critical contributions to a number of important processes in diverse organisms. In plants, tetrapyrroles are essential for light signaling, the detoxification of reactive oxygen species, the assimilation of nitrate and sulfate, respiration, photosynthesis, and programed cell death. The misregulation of tetrapyrrole metabolism can produce toxic reactive oxygen species. Thus, it is not surprising that tetrapyrrole metabolism is strictly regulated and that tetrapyrrole metabolism affects signaling mechanisms that regulate gene expression. In plants and algae, tetrapyrroles are synthesized in plastids and were some of the first plastid signals demonstrated to regulate nuclear gene expression. In plants, the mechanism of tetrapyrrole-dependent plastid-to-nucleus signaling remains poorly understood. Additionally, some of experiments that tested ideas for possible signaling mechanisms appeared to produce conflicting data. In some instances, these conflicts are potentially explained by different experimental conditions. Although the biological function of tetrapyrrole signaling is poorly understood, there is compelling evidence that this signaling is significant. Specifically, this signaling appears to affect the accumulation of starch and may promote abiotic stress tolerance. Tetrapyrrole-dependent plastid-to-nucleus signaling interacts with a distinct plastid-to-nucleus signaling mechanism that depends on GENOMES UNCUOPLED1 (GUN1). GUN1 contributes to a variety of processes, such as chloroplast biogenesis, the circadian rhythm, abiotic stress tolerance, and development. Thus, the contribution of tetrapyrrole signaling to plant function is potentially broader than we currently appreciate. In this review, I discuss these aspects of tetrapyrrole signaling. PMID:27807442

  6. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, Darrell; Azevado, Stephen

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  7. Satellite signaling at synapses

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor-Giles, Kate M.; Ganetzky, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Neural function requires effective communication between neurons and their targets at synapses. Thus, proper formation, growth and plasticity of synapses are critical to behavior. A retrograde (muscle to neuron) BMP signal is required to promote synaptic growth, homeostasis and stability at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions (NMJs).1-4 We recently demonstrated that this signal constitutes an instructive signal that sculpts synaptic growth in a graded manner and uncovered a presynaptic endocytic mechanism that modulates BMP signaling levels. In the absence of this regulation, excessive BMP signaling results in overgrown NMJs with a proliferation of ectopic boutons.5 PMID:20798607

  8. Acoustic Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William M.; Candy, James V.

    Signal processing refers to the acquisition, storage, display, and generation of signals - also to the extraction of information from signals and the re-encoding of information. As such, signal processing in some form is an essential element in the practice of all aspects of acoustics. Signal processing algorithms enable acousticians to separate signals from noise, to perform automatic speech recognition, or to compress information for more efficient storage or transmission. Signal processing concepts are the building blocks used to construct models of speech and hearing. Now, in the 21st century, all signal processing is effectively digital signal processing. Widespread access to high-speed processing, massive memory, and inexpensive software make signal processing procedures of enormous sophistication and power available to anyone who wants to use them. Because advanced signal processing is now accessible to everybody, there is a need for primers that introduce basic mathematical concepts that underlie the digital algorithms. The present handbook chapter is intended to serve such a purpose.

  9. Neuronal signaling through endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cosker, Katharina E; Segal, Rosalind A

    2014-02-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease.

  10. Neuronal Signaling through Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cosker, Katharina E.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease. PMID:24492712

  11. Telephone multiline signaling using common signal pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodloe, R. R.; Toole, P. C.; Belt, J. L.; Leininger, D. B. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An operator can rapidly and automatically produce coded electrical signals by manipulating mechanical thumb wheel switches so as to instruct a service center to connect any number of telephone lines to the console thus enabling the operator to listen and/or talk over several lines simultaneously. The system includes an on-site console having several mechanically operated thumb wheel switches to which the desired lines to be connected can be dialed in. Electrical coded signals are fed to a number of banks of line AND gates representing units, tens and hundreds, a group of channel gates, and a command gate. These signals are gated out in a controlled manner to an encoder which generates tones that are transmitted over a single line to a communication service center.

  12. Quantitation of signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Krauss, S; Brand, M D

    2000-12-01

    Conventional qualitative approaches to signal transduction provide powerful ways to explore the architecture and function of signaling pathways. However, at the level of the complete system, they do not fully depict the interactions between signaling and metabolic pathways and fail to give a manageable overview of the complexity that is often a feature of cellular signal transduction. Here, we introduce a quantitative experimental approach to signal transduction that helps to overcome these difficulties. We present a quantitative analysis of signal transduction during early mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes, with steady-state respiration rate as a convenient marker of metabolic stimulation. First, by inhibiting various key signaling pathways, we measure their relative importance in regulating respiration. About 80% of the input signal is conveyed via identifiable routes: 50% through pathways sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and MAP kinase and 30% through pathways sensitive to an inhibitor of calcineurin. Second, we quantify how each of these pathways differentially stimulates functional units of reactions that produce and consume a key intermediate in respiration: the mitochondrial membrane potential. Both the PKC and calcineurin routes stimulate consumption more strongly than production, whereas the unidentified signaling routes stimulate production more than consumption, leading to no change in membrane potential despite increased respiration rate. The approach allows a quantitative description of the relative importance of signal transduction pathways and the routes by which they activate a specific cellular process. It should be widely applicable.

  13. Long non-coding RNA Malat1 promotes neurite outgrowth through activation of ERK/MAPK signalling pathway in N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Feng, Peimin; Zhu, Xi; He, Shixu; Duan, Jialan; Zhou, Dong

    2016-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are playing critical roles in neurogenesis, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. Neurite outgrowth is an early step in neuronal differentiation and regeneration. Using in vitro differentiation of neuroblastoma-derived Neuro-2a (N2a) cell as a model, we performed expression profiling to identify lncRNAs putatively relevant for neurite outgrowth. We identified that Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (Malat1) was one of the most significantly up-regulated lncRNAs during N2a cell differentiation. Malat1 knockdown resulted in defects in neurite outgrowth as well as enhanced cell death. To pinpoint signalling pathways perturbed by Malat1 depletion, we then performed a reporter-based screening to examine the activities of 50 signalling pathways in Malat1 knockdown cells. We found that Malat1 knockdown resulted in conspicuous inhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway as well as abnormal activation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) and P53 signalling pathway. Inhibition of ERK/MAPK pathway with PD98059 potently blocked N2a cell neurite outgrowth, whereas phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced ERK activation rescued defects in neurite outgrowth and cell death induced by Malat1 depletion. Together, our results established a critical role of Malat1 in the early step of neuronal differentiation through activating ERK/MAPK signalling pathway.

  14. Wnt signaling in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, T; Rindtorff, N; Boutros, M

    2017-01-01

    Wnt signaling is one of the key cascades regulating development and stemness, and has also been tightly associated with cancer. The role of Wnt signaling in carcinogenesis has most prominently been described for colorectal cancer, but aberrant Wnt signaling is observed in many more cancer entities. Here, we review current insights into novel components of Wnt pathways and describe their impact on cancer development. Furthermore, we highlight expanding functions of Wnt signaling for both solid and liquid tumors. We also describe current findings how Wnt signaling affects maintenance of cancer stem cells, metastasis and immune control. Finally, we provide an overview of current strategies to antagonize Wnt signaling in cancer and challenges that are associated with such approaches. PMID:27617575

  15. [Growth hormone signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Zych, Sławomir; Szatkowska, Iwona; Czerniawska-Piatkowska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The substantial improvement in the studies on a very complicated mechanism-- growth hormone signaling in a cell, has been noted in last decade. GH-induced signaling is characterized by activation of several pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the signal transducer and activator of transcription and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3) pathways. This review shows a current model of the growth hormone receptor dimerization, rotation of subunits and JAK2 kinase activation as the initial steps in the cascade of events. In the next stages of the signaling process, the GH-(GHR)2-(JAK2)2 complex may activate signaling molecules such as Stat, IRS-1 and IRS-2, and particularly all cascade proteins that activate MAP kinase. These pathways regulate basal cellular functions including target gene transcription, enzymatic activity and metabolite transport. Therefore growth hormone is considered as a major regulator of postnatal growth and metabolism, probably for mammary gland growth and development too.

  16. Optical signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses several optical configurations used for signal processing. Electronic-to-optical transducers are outlined, noting fixed window transducers and moving window acousto-optic transducers. Folded spectrum techniques are considered, with reference to wideband RF signal analysis, fetal electroencephalogram analysis, engine vibration analysis, signal buried in noise, and spatial filtering. Various methods for radar signal processing are described, such as phased-array antennas, the optical processing of phased-array data, pulsed Doppler and FM radar systems, a multichannel one-dimensional optical correlator, correlations with long coded waveforms, and Doppler signal processing. Means for noncoherent optical signal processing are noted, including an optical correlator for speech recognition and a noncoherent optical correlator.

  17. Optical Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-28

    compatible with the laser cation in the on-line inspection of products such as source. Thus, if the laser wavelength is z850 nm, hypodermic needles ...content for cw signals, short pulse signals, and evolving pulse signals - - the most difficult ones to analyze. We performed an extensive analysis on a...agreer.nt with the theory , and support our claims concerning the high performance level of our acousto-optir. architecture. We recognized the opportunity to

  18. Signaling Mechanisms for Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chun-Lin; Iijima, Miho

    2011-01-01

    Cells recognize external chemical gradients and translate these environmental cues into amplified intracellular signaling that results in elongated cell shape, actin polymerization toward the leading edge, and movement along the gradient. Mechanisms underlying chemotaxis are conserved evolutionarily from Dictyostelium amoeba to mammalian neutrophils. Recent studies have uncovered several parallel intracellular signaling pathways that crosstalk in chemotaxing cells. Here, we review these signaling mechanisms in Dictyostelium discoideum. PMID:21585354

  19. Danger signals in stroke.

    PubMed

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Sobey, Christopher G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Magnus, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Danger molecules are the first signals released from dying tissue after stroke. These danger signals bind to receptors on immune cells that will result in their activation and the release of inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators, resulting in amplification of the immune response and subsequent enlargement of the damaged brain volume. The release of danger signals is a central event that leads to a multitude of signals and cascades in the affected and neighbouring tissue, therefore providing a potential target for therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Slit-Robo signaling.

    PubMed

    Blockus, Heike; Chédotal, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Slits are secreted proteins that bind to Roundabout (Robo) receptors. Slit-Robo signaling is best known for mediating axon repulsion in the developing nervous system. However, in recent years the functional repertoire of Slits and Robo has expanded tremendously and Slit-Robo signaling has been linked to roles in neurogenesis, angiogenesis and cancer progression among other processes. Likewise, our mechanistic understanding of Slit-Robo signaling has progressed enormously. Here, we summarize new insights into Slit-Robo evolutionary and system-dependent diversity, receptor-ligand interactions, signaling crosstalk and receptor activation.

  1. Brefeldin A-Inhibited Guanine Nucleotide-Exchange Factor 1 (BIG1) Governs the Recruitment of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 2 (TRAF2) to Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) Signaling Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takuya; Tsuchida, Mei; Kogue, Yosuke; Spadini, Christian; Hirata, Yusuke; Matsuzawa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a critical mediator of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) signaling. However, the regulatory mechanisms of TRAF2 are not fully understood. Here we show evidence that TRAF2 requires brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factor 1 (BIG1) to be recruited into TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling complexes. In BIG1 knockdown cells, TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was attenuated and the sensitivity to TNF-α-induced apoptosis was increased. Since these trends correlated well with those of TRAF2 deficient cells as previously demonstrated, we tested whether BIG1 functions as an upstream regulator of TRAF2 in TNFR1 signaling. As expected, we found that knockdown of BIG1 suppressed TNF-α-dependent ubiquitination of TRAF2 that is required for JNK activation, and impaired the recruitment of TRAF2 to the TNFR1 signaling complex (complex I). Moreover, we found that the recruitment of TRAF2 to the death-inducing signaling complex termed complex II was also impaired in BIG1 knockdown cells. These results suggest that BIG1 is a key component of the machinery that drives TRAF2 to the signaling complexes formed after TNFR1 activation. Thus, our data demonstrate a novel and unexpected function of BIG1 that regulates TNFR1 signaling by targeting TRAF2. PMID:27834853

  2. Signaling by Gasotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Asif K.; Gadalla, Moataz M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide is well established as a major signaling molecule. Evidence is accumulating that carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide also are physiologic mediators in the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems. This Review focuses on mechanisms whereby they signal by binding to metal centers in metalloproteins, such as in guanylyl cyclase, or modifying sulfhydryl groups in protein targets. PMID:19401594

  3. MBA Quality Signals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Randall S.

    1998-01-01

    A study identified quality signals for master's programs in business administration (MBAs). Traditional scholarly oriented academic signals are apparently not valued as such by external customer groups. MBA academic quality appears to be a multidimensional construct, with subdimensions of real-worldness; placement; student satisfaction; and…

  4. Geophysical Signal Recognition,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    quite helpful in the magnetosphere. Detecting a particular in earthquake prediction . However pattern recog- micropulsation event can provide a diagnosis...bio- In su..a.iry, application of pattern recognition to medical signals, progress in geophysical signal earthquake prediction is in its infancy

  5. MBA Quality Signals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Randall S.

    1998-01-01

    A study identified quality signals for master's programs in business administration (MBAs). Traditional scholarly oriented academic signals are apparently not valued as such by external customer groups. MBA academic quality appears to be a multidimensional construct, with subdimensions of real-worldness; placement; student satisfaction; and…

  6. Adaptive signal processor

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, H.V.

    1980-07-01

    An experimental, general purpose adaptive signal processor system has been developed, utilizing a quantized (clipped) version of the Widrow-Hoff least-mean-square adaptive algorithm developed by Moschner. The system accommodates 64 adaptive weight channels with 8-bit resolution for each weight. Internal weight update arithmetic is performed with 16-bit resolution, and the system error signal is measured with 12-bit resolution. An adapt cycle of adjusting all 64 weight channels is accomplished in 8 ..mu..sec. Hardware of the signal processor utilizes primarily Schottky-TTL type integrated circuits. A prototype system with 24 weight channels has been constructed and tested. This report presents details of the system design and describes basic experiments performed with the prototype signal processor. Finally some system configurations and applications for this adaptive signal processor are discussed.

  7. Jasmonate signalling: a copycat of auxin signalling?

    PubMed

    Pérez, A Cuéllar; Goossens, A

    2013-12-01

    Plant hormones regulate almost all aspects of plant growth and development. The past decade has provided breakthrough discoveries in phytohormone sensing and signal transduction, and highlighted the striking mechanistic similarities between the auxin and jasmonate (JA) signalling pathways. Perception of auxin and JA involves the formation of co-receptor complexes in which hormone-specific E3-ubiquitin ligases of the SKP1-Cullin-F-box protein (SCF) type interact with specific repressor proteins. Across the plant kingdom, the Aux/IAA and the JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins correspond to the auxin- and JA-specific repressors, respectively. In the absence of the hormones, these repressors form a complex with transcription factors (TFs) specific for both pathways. They also recruit several proteins, among which the general co-repressor TOPLESS, and thereby prevent the TFs from activating gene expression. The hormone-mediated interaction between the SCF and the repressors targets the latter for 26S proteasome-mediated degradation, which, in turn, releases the TFs to allow modulating hormone-dependent gene expression. In this review, we describe the similarities and differences in the auxin and JA signalling cascades with respect to the protein families and the protein domains involved in the formation of the pathway-specific complexes.

  8. EP2 Receptor Signaling Regulates Microglia Death

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Myung-Soon; Jiang, Jianxiong; Ganesh, Thota; Joe, Eunhye; Dingledine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The timely resolution of inflammation prevents continued tissue damage after an initial insult. In the brain, the death of activated microglia by apoptosis has been proposed as one mechanism to resolve brain inflammation. How microglial death is regulated after activation is still unclear. We reported that exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interleukin (IL)-13 together initially activates and then kills rat microglia in culture by a mechanism dependent on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We show here that activation of the E prostanoid receptor 2 (EP2, PTGER2) for prostaglandin E2 mediates microglial death induced by LPS/IL-13, and that EP2 activation by agonist alone kills microglia. Both EP2 antagonists and reactive oxygen scavengers block microglial death induced by either LPS/IL-13 or EP2 activation. By contrast, the homeostatic induction of heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) by LPS/IL-13 or EP2 activation protects microglia. Both the Hmox1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin and a compound that releases the Hmox1 product carbon monoxide (CO) attenuated microglial death produced by LPS/IL-13. Whereas CO reduced COX-2 protein expression, EP2 activation increased Hmox1 and COX-2 expression at both the mRNA and protein level. Interestingly, caspase-1 inhibition prevented microglial death induced by either LPS/IL-13 or low (but not high) concentrations of butaprost, suggestive of a predominantly pyroptotic mode of death. Butaprost also caused the expression of activated caspase-3 in microglia, pointing to apoptosis. These results indicate that EP2 activation, which initially promotes microglial activation, later causes delayed death of activated microglia, potentially contributing to the resolution phase of neuroinflammation. PMID:25715797

  9. Deblurring Signal Network Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kamps, Dominic; Dehmelt, Leif

    2017-09-15

    To orchestrate the function and development of multicellular organisms, cells integrate intra- and extracellular information. This information is processed via signal networks in space and time, steering dynamic changes in cellular structure and function. Defects in those signal networks can lead to developmental disorders or cancer. However, experimental analysis of signal networks is challenging as their state changes dynamically and differs between individual cells. Thus, causal relationships between network components are blurred if lysates from large cell populations are analyzed. To directly study causal relationships, perturbations that target specific components have to be combined with measurements of cellular responses within individual cells. However, using standard single-cell techniques, the number of signal activities that can be monitored simultaneously is limited. Furthermore, diffusion of signal network components limits the spatial precision of perturbations, which blurs the analysis of spatiotemporal processing in signal networks. Hybrid strategies based on optogenetics, surface patterning, chemical tools, and protein design can overcome those limitations and thereby sharpen our view into the dynamic spatiotemporal state of signal networks and enable unique insights into the mechanisms that control cellular function in space and time.

  10. A type III effector antagonises death receptor signalling during bacterial gut infection

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Ong, Sze Ying; Kennedy, Catherine L; Kelly, Michelle; Robinson, Keith S; Wong, Tania; Mansell, Ashley; Riedmaier, Patrice; Oates, Clare VL; Zaid, Ali; Mühlen, Sabrina; Crepin, Valerie F; Marches, Olivier; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A; O’Reilly, Lorraine A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Nachbur, Ueli; Infusini, Giuseppe; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection by enteric bacterial pathogens depends on the ability of the bacteria to colonise the gut, replicate in host tissues and disseminate to other hosts. Pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC), utilise a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells during infection that promote colonisation and interfere with antimicrobial host responses 1-3. Here we report that the T3SS effector NleB1 from EPEC binds to host cell death domain containing proteins and thereby inhibits death receptor signalling. Protein interaction studies identified FADD, TRADD and RIPK1 as binding partners of NleB1. NleB1 expressed ectopically or injected by the bacterial T3SS prevented Fas ligand or TNF-induced formation of the canonical death inducing signalling complex (DISC) and proteolytic activation of caspase-8, an essential step in death receptor induced apoptosis. This inhibition depended on the N-GlcNAc transferase activity of NleB1, which specifically modified Arg117 in the death domain of FADD. The importance of the death receptor apoptotic pathway to host defence was demonstrated using mice deficient in the FAS signalling pathway, which showed delayed clearance of the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium and reversion to virulence of an nleB mutant. The activity of NleB suggests that EPEC and other attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens antagonise death receptor induced apoptosis of infected cells, thereby blocking a major antimicrobial host response. PMID:24025841

  11. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  12. Electrical signaling and photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical irritation of trigger hairs and subsequent generation of action potentials have significant impact on photosynthesis and respiration in carnivorous Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula). Action potential-mediated inhibition of photosynthesis and stimulation of respiration is confined only to the trap and was not recorded in adjacent photosynthetic lamina. We showed that the main primary target of electrical signals on assimilation is in the dark enzymatic reaction of photosynthesis. Without doubt, the electrical signaling is costly, and the possible co-existence of such type of signals and photosynthesis in plant cell is discussed. PMID:21558815

  13. Aestivation: signaling and hypometabolism.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B; Storey, Janet M

    2012-05-01

    Aestivation is a survival strategy used by many vertebrates and invertebrates to endure arid environmental conditions. Key features of aestivation include strong metabolic rate suppression, strategies to retain body water, conservation of energy and body fuel reserves, altered nitrogen metabolism, and mechanisms to preserve and stabilize organs, cells and macromolecules over many weeks or months of dormancy. Cell signaling is crucial to achieving both a hypometabolic state and reorganizing multiple metabolic pathways to optimize long-term viability during aestivation. This commentary examines the current knowledge about cell signaling pathways that participate in regulating aestivation, including signaling cascades mediated by the AMP-activated kinase, Akt, ERK, and FoxO1.

  14. CD99 triggering induces methuosis of Ewing sarcoma cells through IGF-1R/RAS/Rac1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Manara, Maria Cristina; Terracciano, Mario; Mancarella, Caterina; Sciandra, Marika; Guerzoni, Clara; Pasello, Michela; Grilli, Andrea; Zini, Nicoletta; Picci, Piero; Colombo, Mario P.; Morrione, Andrea; Scotlandi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    CD99 is a cell surface molecule that has emerged as a novel target for Ewing sarcoma (EWS), an aggressive pediatric bone cancer. This report provides the first evidence of methuosis in EWS, a non-apoptotic form of cell death induced by an antibody directed against the CD99 molecule. Upon mAb triggering, CD99 induces an IGF-1R/RAS/Rac1 complex, which is internalized into RAB5-positive endocytic vacuoles. This complex is then dissociated, with the IGF-1R recycling to the cell membrane while CD99 and RAS/Rac1 are sorted into immature LAMP-1-positive vacuoles, whose excessive accumulation provokes methuosis. This process, which is not detected in CD99-expressing normal mesenchymal cells, is inhibited by disruption of the IGF-1R signaling, whereas enhanced by IGF-1 stimulation. Induction of IGF-1R/RAS/Rac1 was also observed in the EWS xenografts that respond to anti-CD99 mAb, further supporting the role of the IGF/RAS/Rac1 axis in the hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis and selective death of EWS cells. Thus, we describe a vulnerability of EWS cells, including those resistant to standard chemotherapy, to a treatment with anti-CD99 mAb, which requires IGF-1R/RAS signaling but bypasses the need for their direct targeting. Overall, we propose CD99 targeting as new opportunity to treat EWS patients resistant to canonical apoptosis-inducing agents. PMID:27835596

  15. GNSS Ocean Reflected Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean reflected signals from the GNSS satellites (received at low-Earth orbiting satellites, airplanes and fixed mountain locations) describe the ocean surface mean height, waves, roughness, spectral reflectivity and emissivity. The estimated accuracy of the average surface height is of the order of 10 cm for smooth conditions. Thus global observations could be an important new contribution to long-term variations of the ocean mean height as well as the monitoring of ocean mesoscale eddies, which result in sea-height changes much larger than the accuracy of the GNSS technique for reflected signals. The ocean reflected signals can be divided into two set of measurements, 1) high elevation measurements (equal to low incidence angles) and 2) low elevation grazing angle measurements. For the first type the ocean reflection cross-section has a limited extent. The reflected signal is coherent with smaller errors due to ocean waves, sampling rate and the internal processing method of the receiver. For low elevations, the signal reveals the incoherent scatter process at the reflection zone. To quantify the potential of the GNSS signals for determining spectral reflectivity at low elevations, we present ocean reflection GPS measurements from the Haleakala Summit on Maui, Hawaii, revealing the spectral characteristics of both the direct satellite signal and the ocean reflected signal for low elevation angles. The characteristics of the reflected signal depend on the scattering properties of the sea surface and the footprint of the reflection zone. While the footprint size and shape in turn depends on the signal incidence angle, the ocean mean tilt, and the relative velocities of transmitter and receiver to the reflection point. Thus the scattering properties of the sea surface are related to the sea surface roughness. We present the spectral properties of the signals as received by a high precision GPS instrument, simultaneously in both phase-locked mode and open-loop raw

  16. Peptide signaling in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Hayakawa, Eisuke

    2012-01-01

    Peptides play a number of crucial roles as signaling molecules in metazoans. In order to elaborate a more complete picture of the roles played by peptides in a single organism, we launched the "Hydra Peptide Project". For this project, we used Hydra magnipapillata, a species belonging to Cnidaria, one of the most basal metazoan phyla, and using a peptidomic approach, we systematically identified a number of peptide signaling molecules, their encoding genes and their functions. In this article, we report the peptides isolated from Hydra and other cnidarians, as well as their synthesis, processing and release from the cells to the target. Possible peptide signaling pathways are overviewed and finally we discuss the evolution of the peptide signaling system.

  17. Signal processing in SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, D. K.; Linscott, I. R.; Oliver, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is believed that the Galaxy might contain ten billion potential life sites. In view of the physical inaccessibility of extraterrestrial life on account of the vast distances involved, a logical first step in a search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) appears to be an attempt to detect signals already being radiated. The characteristics of the signals to be expected are discussed together with the search strategy of a NASA program. It is pointed out that all presently planned searches will use existing radio-astronomy antennas. If no extraterrestrial intelligence signals are discovered, society will have to decide whether SETI justifies a dedicated facility of much greater collecting area. Attention is given to a multichannel spectrum analyzer, CW signal detection, pulse detection, the pattern detector, and details of SETI system operation.

  18. Nucleotide signalling during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Idzko, Marco; Ferrari, Davide; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions are associated with the extracellular release of nucleotides, particularly ATP. In the extracellular compartment, ATP predominantly functions as a signalling molecule through the activation of purinergic P2 receptors. Metabotropic P2Y receptors are G-protein-coupled, whereas ionotropic P2X receptors are ATP-gated ion channels. Here we discuss how signalling events through P2 receptors alter the outcomes of inflammatory or infectious diseases. Recent studies implicate a role for P2X/P2Ysignalling in mounting appropriate inflammatory responses critical for host defence against invading pathogens or tumours. Conversely, P2X/P2Y signalling can promote chronic inflammation during ischaemia and reperfusion injury, inflammatory bowel disease or acute and chronic diseases of the lungs. Although nucleotide signalling has been used clinically in patients before, research indicates an expanding field of opportunities for specifically targeting individual P2 receptors for the treatment of inflammatory or infectious diseases. PMID:24828189

  19. Audio signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    System provides automatic volume control for an audio amplifier or a voice communication system without introducing noise surges during pauses in the input, and without losing the initial signal when the input resumes.

  20. Signals from the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Jeffrey M.

    1991-01-01

    Introduces the basics of radio astronomy and describes how to assemble several simple systems for receiving radio signals from the cosmos. Includes schematics, parts lists, working drawings, and contact information for radio astronomy suppliers. (11 references) (Author/JJK)

  1. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  2. Quantifying Ubiquitin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ordureau, Alban; Münch, Christian; Harper, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin (UB)-driven signaling systems permeate biology, and are often integrated with other types of post-translational modifications (PTMs), most notably phosphorylation. Flux through such pathways is typically dictated by the fractional stoichiometry of distinct regulatory modifications and protein assemblies as well as the spatial organization of pathway components. Yet, we rarely understand the dynamics and stoichiometry of rate-limiting intermediates along a reaction trajectory. Here, we review how quantitative proteomic tools and enrichment strategies are being used to quantify UB-dependent signaling systems, and to integrate UB signaling with regulatory phosphorylation events. A key regulatory feature of ubiquitylation is that the identity of UB chain linkage types can control downstream processes. We also describe how proteomic and enzymological tools can be used to identify and quantify UB chain synthesis and linkage preferences. The emergence of sophisticated quantitative proteomic approaches will set a new standard for elucidating biochemical mechanisms of UB-driven signaling systems. PMID:26000850

  3. Signals from the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Jeffrey M.

    1991-01-01

    Introduces the basics of radio astronomy and describes how to assemble several simple systems for receiving radio signals from the cosmos. Includes schematics, parts lists, working drawings, and contact information for radio astronomy suppliers. (11 references) (Author/JJK)

  4. Signal processing in SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, D. K.; Linscott, I. R.; Oliver, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is believed that the Galaxy might contain ten billion potential life sites. In view of the physical inaccessibility of extraterrestrial life on account of the vast distances involved, a logical first step in a search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) appears to be an attempt to detect signals already being radiated. The characteristics of the signals to be expected are discussed together with the search strategy of a NASA program. It is pointed out that all presently planned searches will use existing radio-astronomy antennas. If no extraterrestrial intelligence signals are discovered, society will have to decide whether SETI justifies a dedicated facility of much greater collecting area. Attention is given to a multichannel spectrum analyzer, CW signal detection, pulse detection, the pattern detector, and details of SETI system operation.

  5. Effects of Salidroside on cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia damage and mTOR signaling repression in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoyong; Lin, Ruhui; Li, Zuanfang; Mao, Jingjie; Chen, Lidian

    2014-01-01

    Salidroside (SA), a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., has been documented to exert a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties, including protective effects against neuronal death induced by various stresses. To provide further insights into the neuroprotective functions of SA, this study examined whether SA can attenuate cobalt chloride (CoCl2)-induced hypoxia damage and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling repression in PC12 differentiated cells. Differentiated PC12 cells were exposed to CoCl2 for 12 h to mimic hypoxic/ischemic conditions and treated with SA at the same time, followed by electron microscopy and analysis of cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) level, and the regulated in development and DNA damage responses (REDD1)/mTOR/ p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K) signaling pathway. Our data indicated that SA can dramatically attenuate the ultrastructural damage of mitochondria induced by CoCl2 and significantly decrease CoCl2-induced ROS production. Moreover, phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) was significantly reduced by CoCl2, and this inhibition was relieved by the treatment of SA in PC12 cells, as evidenced by immunoblot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses. The SA effects were blocked by pretreatment of RAD001. The results indicate that SA can rescue CoCl2-induced repression of REDD1/mTOR/ p70S6K signal transduction in PC12 cells. Our data demonstrate that SA is able to attenuate CoCl2-induced hypoxia damage and mTOR signaling repression, suggesting that SA may protect brain neurons from ischemic injury through mTOR signaling, and provide new insights into the prevention and treatment of cerebral ischemic.

  6. Optical Signal Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-31

    8217 \\..\\ We let k be the ratio of the time base of the reference\\ \\ . signal to that of the received signal. PAU~ ~; II .~** We could analyze this case for an...decreases. The central to the approximation usually stated in optics texts. lobe of the pattern just covers the region II :s I when k We claimed...Reference Waveforms for Heterodyne Spectrum Analyzers K We previously developed the use of a distributed local oscillator, generated by a reference wavefront

  7. Dissecting DR3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Pobezinskaya, Yelena L; Liu, Zhenggang; Choksi, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Receptor signaling can be evaluated in multiple ways, including analysis of phosphorylation of downstream molecules and analysis of proteins that are recruited to the receptor upon ligand binding. Majority of studies on the mechanism of DR3 signaling were performed using overexpression systems that can often lead to artifacts. In this chapter we describe how to analyze DR3 downstream events with most attention being paid to endogenous immunoprecipitation.

  8. Wnt signaling and osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Manolagas, Stavros C.

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in understanding basic bone biology and the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of osteoporosis, over the last 20 years, have dramatically altered the management of this disease. The purpose of this mini-review is to highlight the seminal role of Wnt signaling in bone homeostasis and disease and the emergence of novel osteoporosis therapies by targeting Wnt signaling with drugs. PMID:24815296

  9. Signal-light nomogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, J. I.; Edgerton, C. F.; Duntley, S. Q.

    1975-01-01

    A nomogram is presented for predicting the sighting range for white, steady-burning signal lights. The theoretical and experimental bases are explained and instructions are provided for its use for a variety of practical problems concerning the visibility of signal lights. The nomogram is appropriate for slant path as well as horizontal sightings, and the gain of range achieved by utilizing binoculars can be predicted by use of it.

  10. Digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, A. V.; Baggeroer, A. B.; Lim, J. S.; Musicus, B. R.; Mook, D. R.; Duckworth, G. L.; Bordley, T. E.; Curtis, S. R.; Deadrick, D. S.; Dove, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    Signal and image processing research projects are described. Topics include: (1) modeling underwater acoustic propagation; (2) image restoration; (3) signal reconstruction; (4) speech enhancement; (5) pitch detection; (6) spectral analysis; (7) speech synthesis; (8) speech enhancement; (9) autoregressive spectral estimation; (10) knowledge based array processing; (11) speech analysis; (12) estimating the degree of coronary stenosis with image processing; (13) automatic target detection; and (14) video conferencing.

  11. Redox signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Our aim is to deliver an authoritative and challenging perspective of current concepts in plant redox signaling, focusing particularly on the complex interface between the redox and hormone-signaling pathways that allow precise control of plant growth and defense in response to metabolic triggers and environmental constraints and cues. Plants produce significant amounts of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of photosynthetic electron transport and metabolism. Such pathways contribute to the compartment-specific redox-regulated signaling systems in plant cells that convey information to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. Like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, the apoplast-cell wall compartment makes a significant contribution to the redox signaling network, but unlike these organelles, the apoplast has a low antioxidant-buffering capacity. The respective roles of ROS, low-molecular antioxidants, redox-active proteins, and antioxidant enzymes are considered in relation to the functions of plant hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, in the composite control of plant growth and defense. Regulation of redox gradients between key compartments in plant cells such as those across the plasma membrane facilitates flexible and multiple faceted opportunities for redox signaling that spans the intracellular and extracellular environments. In conclusion, plants are recognized as masters of the art of redox regulation that use oxidants and antioxidants as flexible integrators of signals from metabolism and the environment.

  12. Cytokinin signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ildoo; Sheen, Jen; Müller, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Despite long-standing observations on diverse cytokinin actions, the discovery path to cytokinin signaling mechanisms was tortuous. Unyielding to conventional genetic screens, experimental innovations were paramount in unraveling the core cytokinin signaling circuitry, which employs a large repertoire of genes with overlapping and specific functions. The canonical two-component transcription circuitry involves His kinases that perceive cytokinin and initiate signaling, as well as His-to-Asp phosphorelay proteins that transfer phosphoryl groups to response regulators, transcriptional activators, or repressors. Recent advances have revealed the complex physiological functions of cytokinins, including interactions with auxin and other signal transduction pathways. This review begins by outlining the historical path to cytokinin discovery and then elucidates the diverse cytokinin functions and key signaling components. Highlights focus on the integration of cytokinin signaling components into regulatory networks in specific contexts, ranging from molecular, cellular, and developmental regulations in the embryo, root apical meristem, shoot apical meristem, stem and root vasculature, and nodule organogenesis to organismal responses underlying immunity, stress tolerance, and senescence.

  13. Sucrose signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Jorge A.; Pontis, Horacio G.; Martínez-Noël, Giselle M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The role of sucrose as a signaling molecule in plants was originally proposed several decades ago. However, recognition of sucrose as a true signal has been largely debated and only recently this role has been fully accepted. The best-studied cases of sucrose signaling involve metabolic processes, such as the induction of fructan or anthocyanin synthesis, but a large volume of scattered information suggests that sucrose signals may control a vast array of developmental processes along the whole life cycle of the plant. Also, wide gaps exist in our current understanding of the intracellular steps that mediate sucrose action. Sucrose concentration in plant tissues tends to be directly related to light intensity, and inversely related to temperature, and accordingly, exogenous sucrose supply often mimics the effect of high light and cold. However, many exceptions to this rule seem to occur due to interactions with other signaling pathways. In conclusion, the sucrose role as a signal molecule in plants is starting to be unveiled and much research is still needed to have a complete map of its significance in plant function. PMID:23333971

  14. Purinergic signalling and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Novak, Ivana

    2013-09-01

    The pancreas is an organ with a central role in nutrient breakdown, nutrient sensing and release of hormones regulating whole body nutrient homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the balance is broken-cells can be starving in the midst of plenty. There are indications that the incidence of diabetes type 1 and 2, and possibly pancreatogenic diabetes, is rising globally. Events leading to insulin secretion and action are complex, but there is emerging evidence that intracellular nucleotides and nucleotides are not only important as intracellular energy molecules but also as extracellular signalling molecules in purinergic signalling cascades. This signalling takes place at the level of the pancreas, where the close apposition of various cells-endocrine, exocrine, stromal and immune cells-contributes to the integrated function. Following an introduction to diabetes, the pancreas and purinergic signalling, we will focus on the role of purinergic signalling and its changes associated with diabetes in the pancreas and selected tissues/organ systems affected by hyperglycaemia and other stress molecules of diabetes. Since this is the first review of this kind, a comprehensive historical angle is taken, and common and divergent roles of receptors for nucleotides and nucleosides in different organ systems will be given. This integrated picture will aid our understanding of the challenges of the potential and currently used drugs targeted to specific organ/cells or disorders associated with diabetes.

  15. Redox regulation of metabolic and signaling pathways by thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in NOS-3 overexpressing hepatoblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    González, Raúl; López-Grueso, M. José; Muntané, Jordi; Bárcena, J. Antonio; Padilla, C. Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays relevant roles in signal transduction in physiopathology and its effects are dependent on several environmental factors. NO has both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic functions but the molecular mechanisms responsible for these opposite effects are not fully understood. The action of NO occurs mainly through redox changes in target proteins, particularly by S-nitrosylation of reactive cysteine residues. Thioredoxin (Trx) and glutaredoxin (Grx) systems are the main cellular controllers of the thiolic redox state of proteins exerting controversial effects on apoptosis with consequences for the resistance to or the development of cancer. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether Trx and/or Grx systems mediate the antiproliferative effect of NO on hepatoblastoma cells by modulating the redox-state of key proteins. Proliferation decreased and apoptosis increased in HepG2 cells overexpressing Nitric Oxide Synthase-3 (NOS-3) as a result of multilevel cellular responses to the oxidative environment generated by NO. Enzyme levels and cysteine redox state at several metabolic checkpoints were consistent with prominence of the pentose phosphate pathway to direct the metabolic flux toward NADPH for antioxidant defense and lowering of nucleotide biosynthesis and hence proliferation. Proteins involved in cell survival pathways, proteins of the redoxin systems and phosphorylation of MAPK were all significantly increased accompanied by a shift of the thiolic redox state of Akt1, Trx1 and Grx1 to more oxidized. Silencing of Trx1 and Grx1 neutralized the increases in CD95, Akt1 and pAkt levels induced by NO and produced a marked increase in caspase-3 and -8 activities in both control and NOS-3 overexpressing cells concomitant with a decrease in the number of cells. These results demonstrate that the antiproliferative effect of NO is actually hampered by Trx1 and Grx1 and support the strategy of weakening the thiolic antioxidant defenses when designing new

  16. Separation of Climate Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Fodor, I

    2002-11-13

    Understanding changes in global climate is a challenging scientific problem. Simulated and observed data include signals from many sources, and untangling their respective effects is difficult. In order to make meaningful comparisons between different models, and to understand human effects on global climate, we need to isolate the effects of different sources. Recent eruptions of the El Chichon and Mt. Pinatubo volcanoes coincided with large El Nino and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, which complicates the separation of their contributions on global temperatures. Current approaches for separating volcano and ENSO signals in global mean data involve parametric models and iterative techniques [3]. We investigate alternative methods based on principal component analysis (PCA) [2] and independent component analysis (ICA) [1]. Our goal is to determine if such techniques can automatically identify the signals corresponding to the different sources, without relying on parametric models.

  17. Integrin signaling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Finney, Alexandra C; Stokes, Karen Y; Pattillo, Christopher B; Orr, A Wayne

    2017-06-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic lipid-driven inflammatory disease affecting large arteries, represents the primary cause of cardiovascular disease in the world. The local remodeling of the vessel intima during atherosclerosis involves the modulation of vascular cell phenotype, alteration of cell migration and proliferation, and propagation of local extracellular matrix remodeling. All of these responses represent targets of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors. As such, alterations in integrin signaling affect multiple aspects of atherosclerosis, from the earliest induction of inflammation to the development of advanced fibrotic plaques. Integrin signaling has been shown to regulate endothelial phenotype, facilitate leukocyte homing, affect leukocyte function, and drive smooth muscle fibroproliferative remodeling. In addition, integrin signaling in platelets contributes to the thrombotic complications that typically drive the clinical manifestation of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we examine the current literature on integrin regulation of atherosclerotic plaque development and the suitability of integrins as potential therapeutic targets to limit cardiovascular disease and its complications.

  18. Telemetry Ranging: Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the details of the signal processing used in a telemetry ranging system in which timing information is extracted from the downlink telemetry signal in order to compute spacecraft range. A previous article describes telemetry ranging concepts and architecture, which are a slight variation of a scheme published earlier. As in that earlier work, the telemetry ranging concept eliminates the need for a dedicated downlink ranging signal to communicate the necessary timing information. The present article describes the operation and performance of the major receiver functions on the spacecraft and the ground --- many of which are standard tracking loops already in use in JPL's flight and ground radios --- and how they can be used to provide the relevant information for making a range measurement. It also describes the implementation of these functions in software, and performance of an end-to-end software simulation of the telemetry ranging system.

  19. Updating dopamine reward signals

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has advanced our knowledge of phasic dopamine reward prediction error signals. The error signal is bidirectional, reflects well the higher order prediction error described by temporal difference learning models, is compatible with model-free and model-based reinforcement learning, reports the subjective rather than physical reward value during temporal discounting and reflects subjective stimulus perception rather than physical stimulus aspects. Dopamine activations are primarily driven by reward, and to some extent risk, whereas punishment and salience have only limited activating effects when appropriate controls are respected. The signal is homogeneous in terms of time course but heterogeneous in many other aspects. It is essential for synaptic plasticity and a range of behavioural learning situations. PMID:23267662

  20. Plant TOR signaling components

    PubMed Central

    John, Florian; Roffler, Stefan; Wicker, Thomas; Ringli, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Cell growth is a process that needs to be tightly regulated. Cells must be able to sense environmental factors like nutrient abundance, the energy level or stress signals and coordinate growth accordingly. The Target Of Rapamycin (TOR) pathway is a major controller of growth-related processes in all eukaryotes. If environmental conditions are favorable, the TOR pathway promotes cell and organ growth and restrains catabolic processes like autophagy. Rapamycin is a specific inhibitor of the TOR kinase and acts as a potent inhibitor of TOR signaling. As a consequence, interfering with TOR signaling has a strong impact on plant development. This review summarizes the progress in the understanding of the biological significance and the functional analysis of the TOR pathway in plants. PMID:22057328

  1. Endocytosis, Signaling, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; von Zastrow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic network comprises a vast and intricate system of membrane-delimited cell entry and cargo sorting routes running between biochemically and functionally distinct intracellular compartments. The endocytic network caters to the organization and redistribution of diverse subcellular components, and mediates appropriate shuttling and processing of materials acquired from neighboring cells or the extracellular milieu. Such trafficking logistics, despite their importance, represent only one facet of endocytic function. The endocytic network also plays a key role in organizing, mediating, and regulating cellular signal transduction events. Conversely, cellular signaling processes tightly control the endocytic pathway at different steps. The present article provides a perspective on the intimate relationships that exist between particular endocytic and cellular signaling processes in mammalian cells, within the context of understanding the impact of this nexus on integrated physiology. PMID:25085911

  2. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  3. A stilbene synthase allele from a Chinese wild grapevine confers resistance to powdery mildew by recruiting salicylic acid signalling for efficient defence

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yuntong; Xu, Weirong; Duan, Dong; Wang, Yuejin; Nick, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stilbenes are central phytoalexins in Vitis, and induction of the key enzyme stilbene synthase (STS) is pivotal for disease resistance. Here, we address the potential for breeding resistance using an STS allele isolated from Chinese wild grapevine Vitis pseudoreticulata (VpSTS) by comparison with its homologue from Vitis vinifera cv. ‘Carigane’ (VvSTS). Although the coding regions of both alleles are very similar (>99% identity on the amino acid level), the promoter regions are significantly different. By expression in Arabidopsis as a heterologous system, we show that the allele from the wild Chinese grapevine can confer accumulation of stilbenes and resistance against the powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum, whereas the allele from the vinifera cultivar cannot. To dissect the upstream signalling driving the activation of this promoter, we used a dual-luciferase reporter system in a grapevine cell culture. We show elevated responsiveness of the promoter from the wild grape to salicylic acid (SA) and to the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flg22, equal induction of both alleles by jasmonic acid (JA), and a lack of response to the cell death-inducing elicitor Harpin. This elevated SA response of the VpSTS promoter depends on calcium influx, oxidative burst by RboH, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling, and JA synthesis. We integrate the data in the context of a model where the resistance of V. pseudoreticulata is linked to a more efficient recruitment of SA signalling for phytoalexin synthesis. PMID:27702992

  4. The cleaved FAS ligand activates the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 through Akt/ROCK1 to stimulate cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Monet, Michael; Poët, Mallorie; Tauzin, Sébastien; Fouqué, Amélie; Cophignon, Auréa; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Vacher, Pierre; Legembre, Patrick; Counillon, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane CD95L (Fas ligand) can be cleaved to release a promigratory soluble ligand, cl-CD95L, which can contribute to chronic inflammation and cancer cell dissemination. The motility signaling pathway elicited by cl-CD95L remains poorly defined. Here, we show that in the presence of cl-CD95L, CD95 activates the Akt and RhoA signaling pathways, which together orchestrate an allosteric activation of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt or ROCK1 independently blocks the cl-CD95L-induced migration. Confirming these pharmacologic data, disruption of the Akt and ROCK1 phosphorylation sites on NHE1 decreases cell migration in cells exposed to cl-CD95L. Together, these findings demonstrate that NHE1 is a novel molecular actor in the CD95 signaling pathway that drives the cl-CD95L-induced cell migration through both the Akt and RhoA signaling pathways. PMID:27302366

  5. The cleaved FAS ligand activates the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 through Akt/ROCK1 to stimulate cell motility.

    PubMed

    Monet, Michael; Poët, Mallorie; Tauzin, Sébastien; Fouqué, Amélie; Cophignon, Auréa; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Vacher, Pierre; Legembre, Patrick; Counillon, Laurent

    2016-06-15

    Transmembrane CD95L (Fas ligand) can be cleaved to release a promigratory soluble ligand, cl-CD95L, which can contribute to chronic inflammation and cancer cell dissemination. The motility signaling pathway elicited by cl-CD95L remains poorly defined. Here, we show that in the presence of cl-CD95L, CD95 activates the Akt and RhoA signaling pathways, which together orchestrate an allosteric activation of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt or ROCK1 independently blocks the cl-CD95L-induced migration. Confirming these pharmacologic data, disruption of the Akt and ROCK1 phosphorylation sites on NHE1 decreases cell migration in cells exposed to cl-CD95L. Together, these findings demonstrate that NHE1 is a novel molecular actor in the CD95 signaling pathway that drives the cl-CD95L-induced cell migration through both the Akt and RhoA signaling pathways.

  6. TOR signalling in plants.

    PubMed

    Rexin, Daniel; Meyer, Christian; Robaglia, Christophe; Veit, Bruce

    2015-08-15

    Although the eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signalling pathway has emerged as a key player for integrating nutrient-, energy- and stress-related cues with growth and metabolic outputs, relatively little is known of how this ancient regulatory mechanism has been adapted in higher plants. Drawing comparisons with the substantial knowledge base around TOR kinase signalling in fungal and animal systems, functional aspects of this pathway in plants are reviewed. Both conserved and divergent elements are discussed in relation to unique aspects associated with an autotrophic mode of nutrition and adaptive strategies for multicellular development exhibited by plants. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  7. Noninvasive vital signal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenan; Chee, Jonny; Chua, Kok Poo; Chen, ZhouDe

    2010-05-01

    Vital signals of patients, such as heart rate, temperature and movement are crucial to monitor patients in hospital. Current heart rate measurement is obtained by using Electrocardiograph, which normally applies electrodes to the patient's body. As electrodes are extremely uncomfortable to ware and hinder patient's movement, a non-invasive vital signal-monitoring device will be a better solution. Similar to Electrocardiograph, the device detects the voltage difference across the heart by using concept of capacitance, which can be obtained by two conductive fiber sewing on the bed sheet. Simultaneous temperature reading can also be detected by using surface mounted temperature sensor. This paper will mainly focus on the heart rate monitoring.

  8. Physiological Signal Conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedericks, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing a Physiological Signal Conditioner (PSC) for monitoring of astronauts in the ISS Human Research Facility. The PSC is battery powered and worn by the crew. The Engineering Development Unit (PSC EDU) and the form-and-fit PSC Tooling Model will be displayed along with associated graphics and text explanations. Results of a recent advanced PSC-2 feasibility study will be presented. The presentation will stimulate discussion of the functional capabilities of a wireless, crew worn Physiological Signal Conditioner. Application of advanced technology to meet the conflicting demands of size, power, and functional capability will be of interest.

  9. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Hallberg, Carl; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center have designed a signal conditioning amplifier which automatically matches itself to almost any kind of transducer. The product, called Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), uses state-of-the-art technologies to deliver high accuracy measurements. USCA's features which can be either programmable or automated include: voltage, current, or pulsed excitation, unlimited resolution gain, digital filtering and both analog and digital output. USCA will be used at Kennedy Space Center's launch pads for environmental measurements such as vibrations, strains, temperatures and overpressures. USCA is presently being commercialized through a co-funded agreement between NASA, the State of Florida, and Loral Test and Information Systems, Inc.

  10. Multichannel signal enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    A mixed adaptive filter is formulated for the signal processing problem where desired a priori signal information is not available. The formulation generates a least squares problem which enables the filter output to be calculated directly from an input data matrix. In one embodiment, a folded processor array enables bidirectional data flow to solve the recursive problem by back substitution without global communications. In another embodiment, a balanced processor array solves the recursive problem by forward elimination through the array. In a particular application to magnetoencephalography, the mixed adaptive filter enables an evoked response to an auditory stimulus to be identified from only a single trial.

  11. Array signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Haykin, S.; Justice, J.H.; Owsley, N.L.; Yen, J.L.; Kak, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    This is the first book to be devoted completely to array signal processing, a subject that has become increasingly important in recent years. The book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1, which is introductory, reviews some basic concepts in wave propagation. The remaining five chapters deal with the theory and applications of array signal processing in (a) exploration seismology, (b) passive sonar, (c) radar, (d) radio astronomy, and (e) tomographic imaging. The various chapters of the book are self-contained. The book is written by a team of five active researchers, who are specialists in the individual fields covered by the pertinent chapters.

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  16. Fetuin-A aggravates lipotoxicity in podocytes via interleukin-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Jana M; Kampe, Kapil; Schulze, Friederike; Sieber, Jonas; Jehle, Andreas W

    2017-05-01

    Sterile inflammation is considered critical in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Here we show that Fetuin-A (FetA) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exacerbate palmitic acid-induced podocyte death, which is associated with a strong induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC). Moreover, blockage of TLR4 prevents MCP-1 and KC secretion and attenuates podocyte death induced by palmitic acid alone or combined with FetA. In addition, inhibition of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling by anakinra, a recombinant human IL-1Ra, or a murinized anti-IL-1β antibody attenuates the inflammatory and ultimate cell death response elicited by FetA alone or combined with palmitic acid. In vivo short-term therapy of diabetic DBA/2J mice with an anti-IL1-β antibody for 4 weeks prevented an increase in serum FetA and considerably decreased urinary tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α), a known risk factor for DN progression. In summary, our results suggest that FetA similarly to LPS leads to an inflammatory response in podocytes, which exacerbates palmitic acid-induced podocyte death and our data imply a critical role for IL-1β signaling in this process. The study offers the rational for prolonged in vivo studies aimed at testing anti-IL-1β therapy for prevention and treatment of DN. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  17. Contextual signaling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Smithson, Laura J; Anastasaki, Corina; Chen, Ran; Toonen, Joseph A; Williams, Sidney B; Gutmann, David H

    2016-10-01

    The formation and maintenance of an organism are highly dependent on the orderly control of cell growth, differentiation, death, and migration. These processes are tightly regulated by signaling cascades in which a limited number of molecules dictate these cellular events. While these signaling pathways are highly conserved across species and cell types, the functional outcomes that result from their engagement are specified by the context in which they are activated. Using the Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome as an illustrative platform, we discuss how NF1/RAS signaling can create functional diversity at multiple levels (molecular, cellular, tissue, and genetic/genomic). As such, the ability of related molecules (e.g., K-RAS, H-RAS) to activate distinct effectors, as well as cell type- and tissue-specific differences in molecular composition and effector engagement, generate numerous unique functional effects. These variations, coupled with a multitude of extracellular cues and genomic/genetic changes that each modify the innate signaling properties of the cell, enable precise control of cellular physiology in both health and disease. Understanding these contextual influences is important when trying to dissect the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of cancer relevant to molecularly-targeted therapeutics.

  18. Communication Signals in Lizards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Charles C.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses mechanisms and functional intent of visual communication signals in iguanid/agamid lizards. Demonstrated that lizards communicate with each other by using pushups and head nods and that each species does this in its own way, conveying different types of information. (JN)

  19. Signal processing in SETI.

    PubMed

    Cullers, D K; Linscott, I R; Oliver, B M

    1985-11-01

    The development of a multi-channel spectrum analyzer (MCSA) for the SETI program is described. The spectrum analyzer is designed for both all-sky surveys and targeted searches. The mechanisms of the MCSA are explained and a diagram is provided. Detection of continuous wave signals, pulses, and patterns is examined.

  20. Communication Signals in Lizards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Charles C.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses mechanisms and functional intent of visual communication signals in iguanid/agamid lizards. Demonstrated that lizards communicate with each other by using pushups and head nods and that each species does this in its own way, conveying different types of information. (JN)

  1. Signaling by Sensory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Julius, David; Nathans, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Sensory systems detect small molecules, mechanical perturbations, or radiation via the activation of receptor proteins and downstream signaling cascades in specialized sensory cells. In vertebrates, the two principal categories of sensory receptors are ion channels, which mediate mechanosensation, thermosensation, and acid and salt taste; and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which mediate vision, olfaction, and sweet, bitter, and umami tastes. GPCR-based signaling in rods and cones illustrates the fundamental principles of rapid activation and inactivation, signal amplification, and gain control. Channel-based sensory systems illustrate the integration of diverse modulatory signals at the receptor, as seen in the thermosensory/pain system, and the rapid response kinetics that are possible with direct mechanical gating of a channel. Comparisons of sensory receptor gene sequences reveal numerous examples in which gene duplication and sequence divergence have created novel sensory specificities. This is the evolutionary basis for the observed diversity in temperature- and ligand-dependent gating among thermosensory channels, spectral tuning among visual pigments, and odorant binding among olfactory receptors. The coding of complex external stimuli by a limited number of sensory receptor types has led to the evolution of modality-specific and species-specific patterns of retention or loss of sensory information, a filtering operation that selectively emphasizes features in the stimulus that enhance survival in a particular ecological niche. The many specialized anatomic structures, such as the eye and ear, that house primary sensory neurons further enhance the detection of relevant stimuli. PMID:22110046

  2. Hybrid ECG signal conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinard, G. A.; Steffen, D. A.; Sturm, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Circuit with high common-mode rejection has ability to filter and amplify accepted analog electrocardiogram (ECG) signals of varying amplitude, shape, and polarity. In addition, low power circuit develops standardized pulses that can be counted and averaged by heart/breath rate processor.

  3. Multipath signal model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghais, A. F.; Wachsman, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    The development and use of mathematical models of signals received through the multipath environmental of a TDRS-to-user spacecraft link and vice versa are discussed. The TDRS (tracking and data relay satellite) will be in synchronous orbit. The user spacecraft will be in a low altitude orbit between 200 and 4000 km.

  4. Chondrodysplasias and TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Le Goff, Carine; Cormier-Daire, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Human chondrodysplasias are a group of conditions that affect the cartilage. This review is focused on the involvement of transforming growth factor-β signaling in a group of chondrodysplasias, entitled acromelic dysplasia, characterized by short stature, short hands and restricted joint mobility. PMID:25798233

  5. Signals: Applying Academic Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    Academic analytics helps address the public's desire for institutional accountability with regard to student success, given the widespread concern over the cost of higher education and the difficult economic and budgetary conditions prevailing worldwide. Purdue University's Signals project applies the principles of analytics widely used in…

  6. Auxin signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Gretchen

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA) controls growth and developmental responses throughout the life of a plant. A combination of molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches has identified several key components involved in auxin signal transduction. Rapid auxin responses in the nucleus include transcriptional activation of auxin-regulated genes and degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. The nuclear auxin receptor is an integral component of the protein degradation machinery. Although auxin signalling in the nucleus appears to be short and simple, recent studies indicate that there is a high degree of diversity and complexity, largely due to the existence of multigene families for each of the major molecular components. Current studies are attempting to identify interacting partners among these families, and to define the molecular mechanisms involved in the interactions. Future goals are to determine the levels of regulation of the key components of the transcriptional complex, to identify higher-order complexes and to integrate this pathway with other auxin signal transduction pathways, such as the pathway that is activated by auxin binding to a different receptor at the outer surface of the plasma membrane. In this case, auxin binding triggers a signal cascade that affects a number of rapid cytoplasmic responses. Details of this pathway are currently under investigation. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  7. Signals: Applying Academic Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    Academic analytics helps address the public's desire for institutional accountability with regard to student success, given the widespread concern over the cost of higher education and the difficult economic and budgetary conditions prevailing worldwide. Purdue University's Signals project applies the principles of analytics widely used in…

  8. Synergistic signals in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, S F; McLachlan, J A

    1996-01-01

    Numerous endogenous signals (such as hormones and growth factors) or environmental signals (including chemicals or temperature) contribute to determining the overall biological response produced by cells. Some combinations of endogenous or environmental signals produce synergistic activity. This commentary examines the different types of interactions between signals that contribute to synergy at the biological level. Images Figure 1. PMID:8930538

  9. Aural perception of NDE signals

    SciTech Connect

    Light, G.M.; Holt, A.E.; Polk, K.D.; Godwin, J.G.; Clayton, W.T.

    1994-12-31

    During nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of a material, the inspection signals are received typically by an NDE instrument. These signals usually are displayed electronically for visual interpretation. Work has been done to convert these signals into aural (audible) signals with the intent to enhance the accuracy of evaluation through the use of two senses (ears and eyes) instead of one. This paper describes auralization of ultrasonic NDE testing signals to improve characterization and evaluation of materials.

  10. Proteolytic activation of proapoptotic kinase protein kinase Cδ by tumor necrosis factor α death receptor signaling in dopaminergic neurons during neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    model was also observed. Conclusions Collectively, these results identify proteolytic activation of PKCδ proapoptotic signaling as a key downstream effector of dopaminergic cell death induced by TNF. These findings also provide a rationale for therapeutically targeting PKCδ to mitigate progressive dopaminergic degeneration resulting from chronic neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:22540228

  11. Signal processor chip implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraud, J. P.

    1985-03-01

    Advances in technology have made it now possible to integrate very large microprocessors on a single chip. Two basic design methodologies are available, including gate array and custom design. The present paper is concerned with a signal processor (SP) chip which is based on a mixture of the two technologies. Involved is a high-density chip which requires little manual effort for its production. The SP is characterized by separate instruction and data memories. The SP consists of three main parts which operate simultaneously. These parts include the sequencer, the address generator, and the computer portion. The chip comprises a library of predesigned building blocks. Attention is given to a signal processor block diagram, the basic TTL gate, a two-input master-slave latch, the physical library, aspects of logical design, the multiplier basic cell and adder line organization, and physical design methodology.

  12. Signals and Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Angie

    2006-01-01

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between bacteria in the family Rhizobiaceae and members of the legume family (Fabaceae) has been well studied, particularly from the perspective of the early signaling and recognition events. Recent studies of non-nodulating legume mutants have resulted in the identification of a number of genes that are responsive to signal molecules from the bacteria. However, a second group of nodule-forming bacteria, completely unrelated to the Rhizobiaceae, which are α-Proteobacteria, has been discovered. These bacteria belong to the β-Proteobacteria and have been designated β-rhizobia to distinguish them from the better-known α-rhizobia. Here, we review what is known in this economically important symbiosis about the interaction between legumes and α-rhizobia, and we incorporate information, where known, about the β-rhizobia. PMID:19521481

  13. Microglia Ontology and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    ElAli, Ayman; Rivest, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Microglia constitute the powerhouse of the innate immune system in the brain. It is now widely accepted that they are monocytic-derived cells that infiltrate the developing brain at the early embryonic stages, and acquire a resting phenotype characterized by the presence of dense branching processes, called ramifications. Microglia use these dynamic ramifications as sentinels to sense and detect any occurring alteration in brain homeostasis. Once a danger signal is detected, such as molecular factors associated to brain damage or infection, they get activated by acquiring a less ramified phenotype, and mount adequate responses that range from phagocyting cell debris to secreting inflammatory and trophic factors. Here, we review the origin of microglia and we summarize the main molecular signals involved in controlling their function under physiological conditions. In addition, their implication in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and stress is discussed. PMID:27446922

  14. Strigolactones: promising plant signals.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Roldan, Victoria; Roux, Christophe; Girard, Daniel; Bécard, Guillaume; Puech-Pagés, Virginie

    2007-05-01

    As obligate biotrophic symbionts, Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) fungi must efficiently recognize their host plant to insure their survival and complete their life cycle. Recent works have shown that some root secreted molecules, the strigolactones, activate the presymbiotic growth of AM fungi at extremely low concentrations. These compounds, derived from carotenoid biosynthesis, induce the mitochondrial metabolism of the fungus. The hypothesis that strigolactones are important plant recognition signals for AM fungi was further supported in this study by using maize seedlings treated with fluridone, an upstream inhibitor of the carotenoid metabolism. We showed that mycorrhization of the treated seedlings was significantly reduced, but restored by the addition of GR24, a strigolactone analogue. Similar results were obtained with the y9 mutant of maize defective in an upstream step of carotenoid synthesis. These data provide additional evidence that strigolactones may be essential symbiotic signals for the establishment of AM symbiosis.

  15. JAZing up jasmonate signaling.

    PubMed

    Staswick, Paul E

    2008-02-01

    Recent discoveries show that jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) transcriptional repressors are key regulators of jasmonate hormonal response. Jasmonate promotes interaction between JAZ proteins and the SCF(COI1) ubiquitin ligase, leading to JAZ degradation via the 26S proteasome in Arabidopsis thaliana. Elimination of JAZ repressors then frees the MYC2 transcription factor to stimulate jasmonate-dependent gene expression. Although jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate were thought to be key regulators of jasmonate responses, they were ineffective in promoting SCF(COI1)-JAZ interaction and it is the isoleucine conjugate of jasmonic acid that acts in this signal transduction pathway. The discovery of JAZ transcriptional regulators greatly advances our understanding of how jasmonate signaling regulates plant growth and response to the environment.

  16. Tailpulse signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John; Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, Stanley John; Decman, Daniel J.; White, Gregory K.

    2009-06-23

    A tailpulse signal generating/simulating apparatus, system, and method designed to produce electronic pulses which simulate tailpulses produced by a gamma radiation detector, including the pileup effect caused by the characteristic exponential decay of the detector pulses, and the random Poisson distribution pulse timing for radioactive materials. A digital signal process (DSP) is programmed and configured to produce digital values corresponding to pseudo-randomly selected pulse amplitudes and pseudo-randomly selected Poisson timing intervals of the tailpulses. Pulse amplitude values are exponentially decayed while outputting the digital value to a digital to analog converter (DAC). And pulse amplitudes of new pulses are added to decaying pulses to simulate the pileup effect for enhanced realism in the simulation.

  17. Wnt signaling in cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Holstein, Thomas W

    2008-01-01

    Cnidarians are an ancient group of animals at the base of metazoan evolution. They exhibit a simple body plan with only one well-defined body axis and a small number of cell types. Cnidarians are also well known for their enormous regeneration capacity. Recent work in the freshwater polyp Hydra and in the sea anemone Nematostella has identified an unexpectedly high level of genetic complexity of wnt genes. Canonical Wnt signaling acts in pattern formation and regeneration of Hydra and also in gastrulation and early embryogenesis of Nematostella. Vertebrate-specific Wnt-antagonists were also identified from cnidarians and exhibit similar conserved functions. The simple cnidarian body plan and the now available genomes from Hydra and Nematostella, together with new functional approaches, make these animals an attractive model for studying the basic functions of canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling.

  18. Pituitary Somatostatin Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a major regulator of pituitary function, mostly inhibiting hormone secretion and to a lesser extent pituitary cell growth. Five SRIF receptor subtypes (SSTR1–5) are ubiquitously expressed G-protein coupled receptors. In the pituitary, SSTR1, SSTR2, SSTR3 and SSTR5 are expressed, with SSTR2 and SSTR5 predominating. As new SRIF-analogs have recently been introduced for treatment of pituitary disease, we evaluate the current knowledge of cell-specific pituitary SRIF receptor signaling and highlight areas of future research for comprehensive understanding of these mechanisms. Elucidating pituitary SRIF receptor signaling enables understanding of pituitary hormone secretion and cell growth, and also points to future therapeutic development for pituitary disorders. PMID:20149677

  19. Growth hormone signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Carter-Su, Christin; Schwartz, Jessica; Argetsinger, Lawrence S

    2016-06-01

    Over 20years ago, our laboratory showed that growth hormone (GH) signals through the GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. We showed that GH binding to its membrane-bound receptor enhances binding of JAK2 to the GHR, activates JAK2, and stimulates tyrosyl phosphorylation of both JAK2 and GHR. The activated JAK2/GHR complex recruits a variety of signaling proteins, thereby initiating multiple signaling pathways and cellular responses. These proteins and pathways include: 1) Stat transcription factors implicated in the expression of multiple genes, including the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 1; 2) Shc adapter proteins that lead to activation of the grb2-SOS-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1,2 pathway; 3) insulin receptor substrate proteins implicated in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and Akt pathway; 4) signal regulatory protein α, a transmembrane scaffold protein that recruits proteins including the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2; and 5) SH2B1, a scaffold protein that can activate JAK2 and enhance GH regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Our recent work has focused on the function of SH2B1. We have shown that SH2B1β is recruited to and phosphorylated by JAK2 in response to GH. SH2B1 localizes to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and focal adhesions; it also cycles through the nucleus. SH2B1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and promotes GH-dependent motility of RAW264.7 macrophages. Mutations in SH2B1 have been found in humans exhibiting severe early-onset childhood obesity and insulin resistance. These mutations impair SH2B1 enhancement of GH-induced macrophage motility. As SH2B1 is expressed ubiquitously and is also recruited to a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases, our results raise the possibility that effects of SH2B1 on the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types, including neurons, may play a role in regulating body weight.

  20. Complex Auditory Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 56, 1835-1847. Sachs, M. B., and Young, E.ID. (1979). Encoding of steady-state vowels in the auditory nerve...amplitude to the amplitude of that component of the standard in decibels . If the signal amplitude is one-eighth the amplitude of the com- ponent of the...Isolated pure tone appears to have little to do with how we recognize differences between vowels or broadband consonants. The simplicity of

  1. Strain Gage Signal Interpretation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    blades and vanes in many engines have been collected, played back and examined. The engine types encompass GE’s stable of turbine engines from the small...aeromechanical engineer . 1.3 SUMMARY OF RESULTS Strain gage signals from vibrating rotor blades and vanes were collected, examined, classified, and generalized...turboprops, to turbojets and to the large high bypass turbofan engines . Test conditions include all the phases that are investigated

  2. Signal Acquisition Using AXIe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narciso, Steven J.

    2011-08-01

    An emerging test and measurement standard called AXIe, AdvancedTCA extensions for Instrumentation, is expected to find wide acceptance within the Physics community as it offers many benefits to applications including shock, plasma, particle and nuclear physics. It is expected that many COTS (commercial off-the-shelf) signal conditioning, acquisition and processing modules will become available from a range of different suppliers. AXIe uses AdvancedTCA® as its basis, but then levers test and measurement industry standards such as PXI, IVI, and LXI to facilitate cooperation and plug-and-play interoperability between COTS instrument suppliers. AXIe's large board footprint and power allows high density in a 19" rack, enabling the development of high-performance signal conditioning, analog-to-digital conversion, and data processing, while offering channel count scalability inherent in modular systems. Synchronization between modules is flexible and provided by two triggering structures: a parallel trigger bus, and radially-distributed, time-matched point-to-point trigger lines. Inter-module communication is also provided with an adjacent module local bus allowing data transfer to 600 Gbits/s in each direction, for example between a front-end digitizer and DSP. AXIe allows embedding high performance computing and a range of COTS AdvancedTCA® computer blades are currently available that provide low cost alternatives to the development of custom signal processing modules. The availability of both LAN and PCI Express allow interconnection between modules, as well as industry-standard high-performance data paths to external host computer systems. AXIe delivers a powerful environment for custom module devel opment. As in the case of VXIbus and PXI before it, commercial development kits are expected to be available. This paper will give an overview of the architectural elements of AXIe 1.0, the compatibility model with AdvancedTCA, and signal acquisition performance of many

  3. Automatic Seismic Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-04

    CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (end Sublitle) S. TYPE O REPORT & PERIOD COVERED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT - ROUTINE AUTOM!ATIC SEISMIC ANALYSIS TECHNICAL PACKAGE 6...Seismic Analysis Package ARPA Order Number: 4199 Name of Contractor: ENSCO, Inc. 4 - Contract Number: F086 06-80-C-0021 Effective Date of Contract: 10...developed and demonstrated. This timing detector algorithm times the start time of signals and their envelope peaks. It was designed to measure the size

  4. RASSP signal processing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Fred; Bassett, Bob; Letellier, J. P.

    1995-06-01

    The rapid prototyping of application specific signal processors (RASSP) program is an ARPA/tri-service effort to dramatically improve the process by which complex digital systems, particularly embedded signal processors, are specified, designed, documented, manufactured, and supported. The domain of embedded signal processing was chosen because it is important to a variety of military and commercial applications as well as for the challenge it presents in terms of complexity and performance demands. The principal effort is being performed by two major contractors, Lockheed Sanders (Nashua, NH) and Martin Marietta (Camden, NJ). For both, improvements in methodology are to be exercised and refined through the performance of individual 'Demonstration' efforts. The Lockheed Sanders' Demonstration effort is to develop an infrared search and track (IRST) processor. In addition, both contractors' results are being measured by a series of externally administered (by Lincoln Labs) six-month Benchmark programs that measure process improvement as a function of time. The first two Benchmark programs are designing and implementing a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor. Our demonstration team is using commercially available VME modules from Mercury Computer to assemble a multiprocessor system scalable from one to hundreds of Intel i860 microprocessors. Custom modules for the sensor interface and display driver are also being developed. This system implements either proprietary or Navy owned algorithms to perform the compute-intensive IRST function in real time in an avionics environment. Our Benchmark team is designing custom modules using commercially available processor ship sets, communication submodules, and reconfigurable logic devices. One of the modules contains multiple vector processors optimized for fast Fourier transform processing. Another module is a fiberoptic interface that accepts high-rate input data from the sensors and provides video-rate output data to a

  5. Biological Information Signal Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward T.; Peterson, John C.; Yoo, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    Biological Information Signal Processor (BISP) is computing system analyzing data on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences for molecular genetic analysis. Includes coprocessors, specialized microprocessors complementing present and future computers by performing rapidly most-time-consuming DNA-sequence-analyzing functions, establishing relationships (alignments) between both global sequences and defining patterns in multiple sequences. Also includes state-of-art software and data-base systems on both conventional and parallel computer systems to augment analytical abilities of developmental coprocessors.

  6. Multipoint multirate signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claypoole, Roger L., Jr.

    1994-12-01

    This thesis provides a fundamentally new, systematic study of multipoint multirate signal processing systems. The multipoint multirate operators are analyzed via equivalent circuits comprised entirely of conventional multirate operators. Interconnections of the operators are demonstrated, and the multipoint noble identities are derived. The multipoint polyphase representation is presented, and the M channel multipoint multirate system with vector length N is presented as an MN channel multipoint polyphase system. The conditions sufficient for perfect reconstruction in the multipoint multirate system are derived. These conditions constrain the multipoint filter banks to be composed of comb filters generated from paraunitary sets of conventional filters. The perfect reconstruction multipoint multirate system is then combined with the multiresolution wavelet decomposition to form the generalized wavelet decomposition with varying vector decimation length at each level. The generalized wavelet decomposition is used as an algorithm to redistribute the energy of a signal throughout the levels of the decomposition. It is shown that, for band pass and high pass signals, significant improvements can be made in the energy distribution. It is recommended that this algorithm be studied as a front end to a vector quantizer for data compression applications.

  7. Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parliament, Hugh A.

    1991-09-01

    The design and implementation of a system for the acquisition, processing, and analysis of signal data is described. The initial application for the system is the development and analysis of algorithms for excision of interfering tones from direct sequence spread spectrum communication systems. The system is called the Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) and is an integrated hardware and software system built around the TMS320C30 chip. The hardware consists of a radio frequency data source, digital receiver, and an adaptive signal processor implemented on a Sun workstation. The software components of the ASPT consists of a number of packages including the Sun driver package; UNIX programs that support software development on the TMS320C30 boards; UNIX programs that provide the control, user interaction, and display capabilities for the data acquisition, processing, and analysis components of the ASPT; and programs that perform the ASPT functions including data acquisition, despreading, and adaptive filtering. The performance of the ASPT system is evaluated by comparing actual data rates against their desired values. A number of system limitations are identified and recommendations are made for improvements.

  8. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  9. Activation of the insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling pathway by the antiapoptotic agents aurintricarboxylic acid and evans blue.

    PubMed

    Beery, R; Haimsohn, M; Wertheim, N; Hemi, R; Nir, U; Karasik, A; Kanety, H; Geier, A

    2001-07-01

    Aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), an endonuclease inhibitor, prevents the death of a variety of cell types in culture. Previously we have shown that ATA, similar to insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), protected MCF-7 cells against apoptotic death induced by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Here we show that ATA and a polysulfonated aromatic compound, Evans blue (EB), similar to IGF-I, promote survival and increase proliferation of MCF-7 cells in serum-free culture medium. This may suggest a common signaling pathway shared by the aromatic polyanions and IGF-I. Therefore, the ability of these aromatic compounds to activate the signal transduction pathway of IGF-I was examined. We found that ATA and EB mimicked the IGF-I effect on tyrosine phosphorylation of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) and its major substrates, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and IRS-2; induced the association of these substrates with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Grb2; and activated Akt kinase and p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinases. ATA and EB competed for IGF-I binding to the IGF-IR. ATA was found to be selective for the IGF-IR, whereas EB also activated the insulin receptor. Upon fractionation of commercial ATA by size exclusion chromatography, we found that fractions that enhanced the intensity of tyrosyl-phosphorylated IRS-1/IRS-2 also increased the survival of MCF-7 cells in the presence of cycloheximide, whereas fractions devoid of IRS phosphorylation activity had no survival ability. Taken together, these results suggest that the survival/proliferation-promoting effects of ATA and EB in MCF-7 cells are transduced via the IGF-IR signaling pathway.

  10. [Interference Detection and Signal Quality Assessment of Pulse Signals].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Wei, Fangyuan; Chou, Yongxin; Yang, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Pulse signal contains a wealth of biological and pathological information. However, it is susceptible to the influence of various factors which results in poor signal quality, and causes the device to generate false alarms. First the pulse signals are processing into discrete symbols, and then compare the test signal with the pulse template by using Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) to get the threshold for which can be used to find the interference segment of the test signal. By analyzing the DTW distance of the pulse signal, we can get the interference degree of the signal, then the quality level of the plus signal can be defined by the relationship between the interference degree and quality of the signal. The 1 055 group pulse signals provided by MIMIC II physiological database are used to train and test the signal quality assessment algorithms, and compared with other existing algorithms. The results show that the algorithms can accurately detect interference segments in pulse signal and reflect the quality of it.

  11. The Hedgehog Signal Transduction Network

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, David J.; Fei, Dennis Liang; Riobo, Natalia A.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins regulate the development of a wide range of metazoan embryonic and adult structures, and disruption of Hh signaling pathways results in various human diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the signaling pathways regulated by Hh, consolidating data from a diverse array of organisms in a variety of scientific disciplines. Similar to the elucidation of many other signaling pathways, our knowledge of Hh signaling developed in a sequential manner centered on its earliest discoveries. Thus, our knowledge of Hh signaling has for the most part focused on elucidating the mechanism by which Hh regulates the Gli family of transcription factors, the so-called “canonical” Hh signaling pathway. However, in the past few years, numerous studies have shown that Hh proteins can also signal through Gli-independent mechanisms collectively referred to as “noncanonical” signaling pathways. Noncanonical Hh signaling is itself subdivided into two distinct signaling modules: (i) those not requiring Smoothened (Smo) and (ii) those downstream of Smo that do not require Gli transcription factors. Thus, Hh signaling is now proposed to occur through a variety of distinct context-dependent signaling modules that have the ability to crosstalk with one another to form an interacting, dynamic Hh signaling network. PMID:23074268

  12. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments

    PubMed Central

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990’s when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine) receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  13. Notch Signaling Components

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Yan; Wu, Tao; Li, Qing; Wang, Min-Cong; Jing, Li; Ruan, Zhi-Ping; Yao, Yu; Nan, Ke-Jun; Guo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a lethal and aggressive malignancy. Currently, the identities of prognostic and predictive makers of NSCLC have not been fully established. Dysregulated Notch signaling has been implicated in many human malignancies, including NSCLC. However, the prognostic value of measuring Notch signaling and the utility of developing Notch-targeted therapies in NSCLC remain inconclusive. The present study investigated the association of individual Notch receptor and ligand levels with lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) prognosis using the Kaplan-Meier plotte database. This online database encompasses 2437 lung cancer samples. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The results showed that higher Notch1, Notch2, JAG1, and DLL1 mRNA expression predicted better overall survival (OS) in lung ADC, but showed no significance in SCC patients. Elevated Notch3, JAG2, and DLL3 mRNA expression was associated with poor OS of ADC patients, but not in SCC patients. There was no association between Notch4 and OS in either lung ADC or SCC patients. In conclusion, the set of Notch1, Notch2, JAG1, DLL1 and that of Notch3, JAG2, DLL3 played opposing prognostic roles in lung ADC patients. Neither set of Notch receptors and ligands was indicative of lung SCC prognosis. Notch signaling could serve as promising marker to predict outcomes in lung ADC patients. The distinct features of lung cancer subtypes and Notch components should be considered when developing future Notch-targeted therapies. PMID:27196489

  14. Biphonation in voice signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzel, Hanspeter; Reuter, Robert

    1996-06-01

    Irregularities in voiced speech are often observed as a consequence of vocal fold lesions, paralyses, and other pathological conditions. Many of these instabilities are related to the intrinsic nonlinearities in the vibrations of the vocal folds. In this paper, a specific nonlinear phenomenon is discussed: The appearance of two independent fundamental frequencies termed biphonation. Several narrow-band spectrograms are presented showing biphonation in signals from voice patients, a newborn cry, a singer, and excised larynx experiments. Finally, possible physiological mechanisms of instabilities of the voice source are discussed.

  15. Optical signal computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathey, Wade Thomas; Schmidt, Rodney A.; Moddel, Garret

    1989-12-01

    Architectures for optical symbolic computing were designed, devices were designed and built that were specifically for the architectures, and test circuits for some of the logic elements were designed, constructed, and operated. The research elements were designed, constructed, and operated. The research led to novel architectures for optical symbolic computing. Devices were developed that are suitable for optical 2-D memory and logic. These devices are pixilated photo-addressed spatial light modulators (SLMs) with a three terminal arrangement so that the threshold can be adjusted. Spinoff non-pixilated devices are useful as high frame rate, high resolution SLMs that can be used for many optical signal processing applications.

  16. Arabidopsis brassinosteroid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Belkhadir, Youssef; Wang, Xuelu; Chory, Joanne

    2006-12-05

    Plants control their size through the action of several phytohormones. One class of growth-promoting hormones is the brassinosteroids (BRs), the polyhydroxylated steroid hormones of plants. Here, we present the Arabidopsis-specific proteins that are the founding members of key BR signaling pathway components found in all plants. The genetic studies that identified these components are unique to Arabidopsis owing to its rapid generation time, sophisticated genetics, and facile transformation protocols, thereby highlighting the importance of a reference plant for understanding fundamental processes in all land plants.

  17. Biphonation in voice signals

    SciTech Connect

    Herzel, H.; Reuter, R.

    1996-06-01

    Irregularities in voiced speech are often observed as a consequence of vocal fold lesions, paralyses, and other pathological conditions. Many of these instabilities are related to the intrinsic nonlinearities in the vibrations of the vocal folds. In this paper, a specific nonlinear phenomenon is discussed: The appearance of two independent fundamental frequencies termed biphonation. Several narrow-band spectrograms are presented showing biphonation in signals from voice patients, a newborn cry, a singer, and excised larynx experiments. Finally, possible physiological mechanisms of instabilities of the voice source are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Signal Processing Circuit Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    Simplified active filter circuit 64 42. Video output amplifier 66 43. 64/128 gated clock circuitry 68 44. Two pole Sallen-Key active filters 7!1 45. Switched...four quadrant multiplier, log compression, multiple pole active video filtering and black level control. In what follows in this report an attempt...chip is shown in Fiqu-e 5. This is the master synch chip which generates all of the control signals necessary for TV monitor presentation of video data

  19. Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Promote Endothelial Cell Morphogenesis and Protect Endothelial Cells against Ischemia via HIF-1α-regulated VEGF Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roitbak, Tamara; Li, Lu; Cunningham, Lee Anna

    2010-01-01

    Vascular cells provide a neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) niche that regulates expansion and differentiation of NSPCs within germinal zones of embryonic and adult brain under both physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we examined NSPC-endothelial cell (NSPC-EC) interaction under conditions of ischemia, both in vitro and following intracerebral transplantation. In culture, embryonic mouse NSPCs supported capillary morphogenesis and protected ECs from cell death induced by serum-starvation or by transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). NSPCs constitutively expressed hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) transcription factor and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), both of which were increased approximately 2-fold following exposure of NSPCs to OGD. The protective effects of NSPCs on endothelial cells under conditions of serum starvation and hypoxia were blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of VEGF signaling, SU 1498 and Flt1-Fc. Following intracerebral transplantation, NSPCs continued to express HIF-1α and VEGF, and promoted microvascular density following focal ischemia. HIF-1α was constitutively expressed by NSPCs in both the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of adult brain. These studies support a role for NSPCs in stabilization of vasculature during ischemia, mediated via HIF-1α-VEGF signaling pathways, and suggest therapeutic application of NSPCs to promote revascularization and repair following brain injury. PMID:18478024

  20. Calcium Signaling in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Maria Jimena; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) is a highly versatile second messenger that regulates a wide range of functions in every type of cell and tissue. To achieve this versatility, the Ca2+ signaling system operates in a variety of ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range. This is particularly well exemplified for Ca2+ signals in the liver, which modulate diverse and specialized functions such as bile secretion, glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. These Ca2+ signals are organized to control distinct cellular processes through tight spatial and temporal coordination of [Ca2+]i signals, both within and between cells. This article will review the machinery responsible for the formation of Ca2+ signals in the liver, the types of subcellular, cellular, and intercellular signals that occur, the physiological role of Ca2+ signaling in the liver, and the role of Ca2+ signaling in liver disease. PMID:23720295

  1. A controllable water signal transistor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lili; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Lu, Hangjun; Liang, Qing; Kou, Jianlong; Wu, Fengmin; Fan, Jintu

    2017-03-27

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations to study the regulating ability of water chains confined in a Y-shaped nanochannel. It was shown that a signal at the molecular level could be controlled by two other charge-induced signals when the water chains were confined in a Y-shaped nanochannel, demonstrating promising applications as water signal transistors in nanosignal systems. The mechanism of a water signal transistor is similar to a signal logic device. This remarkable ability to control the water signal is attributed to the strong dipole-ordering of the water chains in the nanochannel. The controllable water signal process of the Y-shaped nanochannel provides opportunities for future application in the design of molecular-scale signal devices.

  2. Signal quality of endovascular electroencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bryan D.; Ebrahimi, Mosalam; Palafox, Leon; Srinivasan, Lakshminarayan

    2016-02-01

    Objective, Approach. A growing number of prototypes for diagnosing and treating neurological and psychiatric diseases are predicated on access to high-quality brain signals, which typically requires surgically opening the skull. Where endovascular navigation previously transformed the treatment of cerebral vascular malformations, we now show that it can provide access to brain signals with substantially higher signal quality than scalp recordings. Main results. While endovascular signals were known to be larger in amplitude than scalp signals, our analysis in rabbits borrows a standard technique from communication theory to show endovascular signals also have up to 100× better signal-to-noise ratio. Significance. With a viable minimally-invasive path to high-quality brain signals, patients with brain diseases could one day receive potent electroceuticals through the bloodstream, in the course of a brief outpatient procedure.

  3. Simple hormones but complex signalling.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Hannes; Kuhlemeier, Cris

    2003-02-01

    It has not been easy to make sense of the pleiotropic effects of plant hormones, especially of auxins; but now, it has become possible to study these effects within the framework of what we know about signal transduction in general. Changes in local auxin concentrations, perhaps even actively maintained auxin gradients, signal to networks of transcription factors, which in turn signal to downstream effectors. Transcription factors can also signal back to hormone biosynthetic pathways.

  4. Macula densa cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Bell, P Darwin; Lapointe, Jean Yves; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2003-01-01

    Macula densa cells are renal sensor elements that detect changes in distal tubular fluid composition and transmit signals to the glomerular vascular elements. This tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism plays an important role in regulating glomerular filtration rate and blood flow. Macula densa cells detect changes in luminal sodium chloride concentration through a complex series of ion transport-related intracellular events. NaCl entry via a Na:K:2Cl cotransporter and Cl exit through a basolateral channel lead to cell depolarization and increases in cytosolic calcium. Na/H exchange (NHE2) results in cell alkalization, whereas intracellular [Na] is regulated by an apically located H(Na)-K ATPase and not by the traditional basolateral Na:K ATPase. Communication from macula densa cells to the glomerular vascular elements involves ATP release across the macula densa basolateral membrane through a maxi-anion channel. The adaptation of multi-photon microscopy is providing new insights into macula densa-glomerular signaling.

  5. Calcium signalling in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2014-11-01

    Molecular cascades responsible for Ca(2+) homeostasis and Ca(2+) signalling could be assembled in highly plastic toolkits that define physiological adaptation of cells to the environment and which are intimately involved in all types of cellular pathology. Control over Ca(2+) concentration in different cellular compartments is intimately linked to cell metabolism, because (i) ATP production requires low Ca(2+), (ii) Ca(2+) homeostatic systems consume ATP and (iii) Ca(2+) signals in mitochondria stimulate ATP synthesis being an essential part of excitation-metabolic coupling. The communication between the ER and mitochondria plays an important role in this metabolic fine tuning. In the insulin resistance state and diabetes this communication has been impaired leading to different disorders, for instance, diminished insulin production by pancreatic β cells, reduced heart and skeletal muscle contractility, reduced NO production by endothelial cells, increased glucose production by liver, increased lipolysis by adipose cells, reduced immune responses, reduced cognitive functions, among others. All these processes eventually trigger degenerative events resulting in overt diabetes due to reduction of pancreatic β cell mass, and different complications of diabetes, such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and different cardiovascular diseases.

  6. GTPases in semaphorin signaling.

    PubMed

    Püschel, Andreas W

    2007-01-01

    A hallmark of semaphorin receptors is their interaction with multiple GTPases. Plexins, the signal transducing component of semaphorin receptors, directly associate with several GTPases. In addition, they not only recruit guaninine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) but also are the only known integral membrane proteins that show a catalytic activity as GAPs for small GTPases. GTPases function upstream of semaphorin receptors and regulate the activity of plexins through an interaction with the cytoplasmic domain. The association of Plexin-Al (Sema3A receptor) or Plexin-B1 (Sema4D receptor) with the GTPase Rnd1 and ligand-dependent receptor clustering are required for their activity as R-Ras GAPs. The GTPases R-Ras and Rho function downstream of plexins and are required for the repulsive effects of semaphorins. In this review, I will focus on the role of GTPases in signaling by two plexins that have been analyzed in most detail, Plexin-A1 and Plexin-B1.

  7. Calcium Signaling and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington’s disease (HD), and spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are very important both for fundamental science and for practical medicine. Despite extensive research into the causes of these diseases, clinical researchers have had very limited progress and, as of now, there is still no cure for any of these diseases. One of the main obstacles in the way of creating treatments for these disorders is the fact that their etiology and pathophysiology still remain unclear. This paper reviews results that support the so–called “calcium hypothesis of neurodegenerative diseases.” The calcium hypothesis states that the atrophic and degenerative processes in the neurons of AD, PD, ALS, HD, and SCA patients are accompanied by alterations in calcium homeostasis. Moreover, the calcium hypothesis states that this deregulation of calcium signaling is one of the early–stage and key processes in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Based on the results we reviewed, we conclude that the calcium channels and other proteins involved in the neuronal calcium signaling system are potential drug targets for AD, PD, ALS, HD, and SCA therapy. PMID:22649630

  8. Endocannabinoid Signaling in Autism.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Persico, Antonio; Battista, Natalia; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex behavioral condition with onset during early childhood and a lifelong course in the vast majority of cases. To date, no behavioral, genetic, brain imaging, or electrophysiological test can specifically validate a clinical diagnosis of ASD. However, these medical procedures are often implemented in order to screen for syndromic forms of the disorder (i.e., autism comorbid with known medical conditions). In the last 25 years a good deal of information has been accumulated on the main components of the "endocannabinoid (eCB) system", a rather complex ensemble of lipid signals ("endocannabinoids"), their target receptors, purported transporters, and metabolic enzymes. It has been clearly documented that eCB signaling plays a key role in many human health and disease conditions of the central nervous system, thus opening the avenue to the therapeutic exploitation of eCB-oriented drugs for the treatment of psychiatric, neurodegenerative, and neuroinflammatory disorders. Here we present a modern view of the eCB system, and alterations of its main components in human patients and animal models relevant to ASD. This review will thus provide a critical perspective necessary to explore the potential exploitation of distinct elements of eCB system as targets of innovative therapeutics against ASD.

  9. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Hallberg, Carl; Cecil, Jim

    1994-01-01

    A state-of-the-art instrumentation amplifier capable of being used with most types of transducers has been developed at the Kennedy Space Center. This Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) can eliminate costly measurement setup item and troubleshooting, improve system reliability and provide more accurate data than conventional amplifiers. The USCA can configure itself for maximum resolution and accuracy based on information read from a RAM chip attached to each transducer. Excitation voltages or current are also automatically configured. The amplifier uses both analog and digital state-of-the-art technology with analog-to-digital conversion performed in the early stages in order to minimize errors introduced by offset and gain drifts in the analog components. A dynamic temperature compensation scheme has been designed to achieve and maintain 12-bit accuracy of the amplifier from 0 to 70 C. The digital signal processing section allows the implementation of digital filters up to 511th order. The amplifier can also perform real-time linearizations up to fourth order while processing data at a rate of 23.438 kS/s. Both digital and analog outputs are available from the amplifier.

  10. The Akt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Mosca, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Studies using cultured melanoma cells and patient tumor biopsies have demonstrated deregulated PI3 kinase-Akt3 pathway activity in ∼70% of melanomas. Furthermore, targeting Akt3 and downstream PRAS40 has been shown to inhibit melanoma tumor development in mice. Although these preclinical studies and several other reports using small interfering RNAs and pharmacological agents targeting key members of this pathway have been shown to retard melanoma development, analysis of early Phase I and Phase II clinical trials using pharmacological agents to target this pathway demonstrate the need for (1) selection of patients whose tumors have PI3 kinase-Akt pathway deregulation, (2) further optimization of therapeutic agents for increased potency and reduced toxicity, (3) the identification of additional targets in the same pathway or in other signaling cascades that synergistically inhibit the growth and progression of melanoma, and (4) better methods for targeted delivery of pharmaceutical agents inhibiting this pathway. In this review we discuss key potential targets in PI3K-Akt3 signaling, the status of pharmacological agents targeting these proteins, drugs under clinical development, and strategies to improve the efficacy of therapeutic agents targeting this pathway. PMID:22157148

  11. Neural Network Communications Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    This final technical report describes the research and development- results of the Neural Network Communications Signal Processing (NNCSP) Program...The objectives of the NNCSP program are to: (1) develop and implement a neural network and communications signal processing simulation system for the...purpose of exploring the applicability of neural network technology to communications signal processing; (2) demonstrate several configurations of the

  12. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG; a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments, commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a `repeat` sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  13. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time-and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments, commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  14. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  15. Salicylic acid signaling inhibits apoplastic reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are used by plants as signaling molecules during stress and development. Given the amount of possible challenges a plant face from their environment, plants need to activate and prioritize between potentially conflicting defense signaling pathways. Until recently, most studies on signal interactions have focused on phytohormone interaction, such as the antagonistic relationship between salicylic acid (SA)-jasmonic acid and cytokinin-auxin. Results In this study, we report an antagonistic interaction between SA signaling and apoplastic ROS signaling. Treatment with ozone (O3) leads to a ROS burst in the apoplast and induces extensive changes in gene expression and elevation of defense hormones. However, Arabidopsis thaliana dnd1 (defense no death1) exhibited an attenuated response to O3. In addition, the dnd1 mutant displayed constitutive expression of defense genes and spontaneous cell death. To determine the exact process which blocks the apoplastic ROS signaling, double and triple mutants involved in various signaling pathway were generated in dnd1 background. Simultaneous elimination of SA-dependent and SA-independent signaling components from dnd1 restored its responsiveness to O3. Conversely, pre-treatment of plants with SA or using mutants that constitutively activate SA signaling led to an attenuation of changes in gene expression elicited by O3. Conclusions Based upon these findings, we conclude that plants are able to prioritize the response between ROS and SA via an antagonistic action of SA and SA signaling on apoplastic ROS signaling. PMID:24898702

  16. Signal localization: a new approach in signal discovery.

    PubMed

    Malov, Sergey V; Antonik, Alexey; Tang, Minzhong; Berred, Alexandre; Zeng, Yi; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2017-01-01

    A new approach for statistical association signal identification is developed in this paper. We consider a strategy for nonprecise signal identification by extending the well-known signal detection and signal identification methods applicable to the multiple testing problem. Collection of statistical instruments under the presented approach is much broader than under the traditional signal identification methods, allowing more efficient signal discovery. Further assessments of maximal value and average statistics in signal discovery are improved. While our method does not attempt to detect individual predictors, it instead detects sets of predictors that are jointly associated with the outcome. Therefore, an important application would be in genome wide association study (GWAS), where it can be used to detect genes which influence the phenotype but do not contain any individually significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). We compare power of the signal identification method based on extremes of single p-values with the signal localization method based on average statistics for logarithms of p-values. A simulation analysis informs the application of signal localization using the average statistics for wide signals discovery in Gaussian white noise process. We apply average statistics and the localization method to GWAS to discover better gene influences of regulating loci in a Chinese cohort developed for risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Rise-Time Distortion of Signal without Carrying Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhman, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with one-dimensional problem of rise-time distortion signal without carrying signal, that appears in the starting point intermittently, that is signal distortion at front edge or one of its derivative. The authors show that front edge of signal isn't distorted in case of propagation in unrestricted (including absorbing) area (amplitude of starting signal step or of one of its derivatives doesn't change) and move with the accuracy of vacuum light speed. The paper proves that it is the time interval shortage that causes signal loss with the route extension, but not the reduction of its starting amplitude, during which front edge of signal retains its starting value. The research presents new values for this time interval.

  18. SIRT1 is involved in oncogenic signaling mediated by GPER in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santolla, M F; Avino, S; Pellegrino, M; De Francesco, E M; De Marco, P; Lappano, R; Vivacqua, A; Cirillo, F; Rigiracciolo, D C; Scarpelli, A; Abonante, S; Maggiolini, M

    2015-01-01

    A number of tumors exhibit an altered expression of sirtuins, including NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) that may act as a tumor suppressor or tumor promoter mainly depending on the tumor types. For instance, in breast cancer cells SIRT1 was shown to exert an essential role toward the oncogenic signaling mediated by the estrogen receptor-α (ERα). In accordance with these findings, the suppression of SIRT1 led to the inhibition of the transduction pathway triggered by ERα. As the regulation of SIRT1 has not been investigated in cancer cells lacking ER, in the present study we ascertained the expression and function of SIRT1 by estrogens in ER-negative breast cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts obtained from breast cancer patients. Our results show that 17β-estradiol (E2) and the selective ligand of GPER, namely G-1, induce the expression of SIRT1 through GPER and the subsequent activation of the EGFR/ERK/c-fos/AP-1 transduction pathway. Moreover, we demonstrate that SIRT1 is involved in the pro-survival effects elicited by E2 through GPER, like the prevention of cell cycle arrest and cell death induced by the DNA damaging agent etoposide. Interestingly, the aforementioned actions of estrogens were abolished silencing GPER or SIRT1, as well as using the SIRT1 inhibitor Sirtinol. In addition, we provide evidence regarding the involvement of SIRT1 in tumor growth stimulated by GPER ligands in breast cancer cells and xenograft models. Altogether, our data suggest that SIRT1 may be included in the transduction network activated by estrogens through GPER toward the breast cancer progression. PMID:26225773

  19. Binary-Signal Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griebeler, Elmer L.

    2011-01-01

    Binary communication through long cables, opto-isolators, isolating transformers, or repeaters can become distorted in characteristic ways. The usual solution is to slow the communication rate, change to a different method, or improve the communication media. It would help if the characteristic distortions could be accommodated at the receiving end to ease the communication problem. The distortions come from loss of the high-frequency content, which adds slopes to the transitions from ones to zeroes and zeroes to ones. This weakens the definition of the ones and zeroes in the time domain. The other major distortion is the reduction of low frequency, which causes the voltage that defines the ones or zeroes to drift out of recognizable range. This development describes a method for recovering a binary data stream from a signal that has been subjected to a loss of both higher-frequency content and low-frequency content that is essential to define the difference between ones and zeroes. The method makes use of the frequency structure of the waveform created by the data stream, and then enhances the characteristics related to the data to reconstruct the binary switching pattern. A major issue is simplicity. The approach taken here is to take the first derivative of the signal and then feed it to a hysteresis switch. This is equivalent in practice to using a non-resonant band pass filter feeding a Schmitt trigger. Obviously, the derivative signal needs to be offset to halfway between the thresholds of the hysteresis switch, and amplified so that the derivatives reliably exceed the thresholds. A transition from a zero to a one is the most substantial, fastest plus movement of voltage, and therefore will create the largest plus first derivative pulse. Since the quiet state of the derivative is sitting between the hysteresis thresholds, the plus pulse exceeds the plus threshold, switching the hysteresis switch plus, which re-establishes the data zero to one transition

  20. Notch Signaling in Pancreatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu-Yan; Zhai, Wen-Jun; Teng, Chun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a significant role in embryonic cell fate determination and adult tissue homeostasis. Various studies have demonstrated the deep involvement of Notch signaling in the development of the pancreas and the lateral inhibition of Notch signaling in pancreatic progenitor differentiation and maintenance. The targeted inactivation of the Notch pathway components promotes premature differentiation of the endocrine pancreas. However, there is still the contrary opinion that Notch signaling specifies the endocrine lineage. Here, we review the current knowledge of the Notch signaling pathway in pancreatic development and its crosstalk with the Wingless and INT-1 (Wnt) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathways. PMID:26729103

  1. Chaos-Based Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorzałek, Maciej J.

    2002-07-01

    Nonlinear systems exhibiting chaotic behavior can be considered as a source of a great variety of signals. Given a time series measured from a known or an unknown dynamical system we address a series of problems, such as section-wise approximation of the measured signal by pieces of trajectories from a chosen nonlinear dynamical system (model) signal restoration when the measured signal has been corrupted e.g. by quantization; signal coding and compression. The key to attack these problems is estimation of the initial conditions for a dynamical system which is used as the generator of approximating waveforms.

  2. Quantitative measures for redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Ché S; Eagling, Beatrice D; Driscoll, Scott R E; Rohwer, Johann M

    2016-07-01

    Redox signaling is now recognized as an important regulatory mechanism for a number of cellular processes including the antioxidant response, phosphokinase signal transduction and redox metabolism. While there has been considerable progress in identifying the cellular machinery involved in redox signaling, quantitative measures of redox signals have been lacking, limiting efforts aimed at understanding and comparing redox signaling under normoxic and pathogenic conditions. Here we have outlined some of the accepted principles for redox signaling, including the description of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule and the role of kinetics in conferring specificity to these signaling events. Based on these principles, we then develop a working definition for redox signaling and review a number of quantitative methods that have been employed to describe signaling in other systems. Using computational modeling and published data, we show how time- and concentration- dependent analyses, in particular, could be used to quantitatively describe redox signaling and therefore provide important insights into the functional organization of redox networks. Finally, we consider some of the key challenges with implementing these methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epigenetic signaling in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ibi, Daisuke; González-Maeso, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation represent central dynamic and reversible processes that regulate gene expression and contribute to cellular phenotypes. These epigenetic marks have been shown to play fundamental roles in a diverse set of signaling and behavioral outcomes. Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression are complex and heterogeneous diseases with multiple and independent factors that may contribute to their pathophysiology, making challenging to find a link between specific elements and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the disorder and its treatment. Growing evidences suggest that epigenetic modifications in certain brain regions and neural circuits represent a key mechanism through which environmental factors interact with individual’s genetic constitution to affect risk of psychiatric conditions throughout life. This review focuses on recent advances that directly implicate epigenetic modifications in schizophrenia and antipsychotic drug action. PMID:26120009

  4. Collider Signal I :. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.

    2010-08-01

    These TASI lectures were part of the summer school in 2008 and cover the collider signal associated with resonances in models of physics beyond the Standard Model. I begin with a review of the Z boson, one of the best-studied resonances in particle physics, and review how the Breit-Wigner form of the propagator emerges in perturbation theory and discuss the narrow width approximation. I review how the LEP and SLAC experiments could use the kinematics of Z events to learn about fermion couplings to the Z. I then make a brief survey of models of physics beyond the Standard Model which predict resonances, and discuss some of the LHC observables which we can use to discover and identify the nature of the BSM physics. I finish up with a discussion of the linear moose that one can use for an effective theory description of a massive color octet vector particle.

  5. Chemotherapy and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bagnyukova, Tetyana; Serebriiskii, Ilya G; Zhou, Yan; Hopper-Borge, Elizabeth A; Golemis, Erica A

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, oncologists have begun to conclude that chemotherapy has reached a plateau of efficacy as a primary treatment modality, even if toxicity can be effectively controlled. Emerging specific inhibitors of signaling and metabolic pathways (i.e., targeted agents) contrast with traditional chemotherapy drugs in that the latter primarily interfere with the DNA biosynthesis and the cell replication machinery. In an attempt to improve on the efficacy, combination of targeted drugs with conventional chemotherapeutics has become a routine way of testing multiple new agents in early phase clinical trials. This review discusses the recent advances including integrative systematic biology and RNAi approaches to counteract the chemotherapy resistance and to buttress the selectivity, efficacy and personalization of anticancer drug therapy. PMID:20935499

  6. Oxygen sensing and signaling.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Joost T; Licausi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an indispensable substrate for many biochemical reactions in plants, including energy metabolism (respiration). Despite its importance, plants lack an active transport mechanism to distribute oxygen to all cells. Therefore, steep oxygen gradients occur within most plant tissues, which can be exacerbated by environmental perturbations that further reduce oxygen availability. Plants possess various responses to cope with spatial and temporal variations in oxygen availability, many of which involve metabolic adaptations to deal with energy crises induced by low oxygen. Responses are induced gradually when oxygen concentrations decrease and are rapidly reversed upon reoxygenation. A direct effect of the oxygen level can be observed in the stability, and thus activity, of various transcription factors that control the expression of hypoxia-induced genes. Additional signaling pathways are activated by the impact of oxygen deficiency on mitochondrial and chloroplast functioning. Here, we describe the molecular components of the oxygen-sensing pathway.

  7. Signaling dynamics and peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Mast, Fred D; Rachubinski, Richard A; Aitchison, John D

    2015-08-01

    Peroxisomes are remarkably responsive organelles. Their composition, abundance and even their mechanism of biogenesis are influenced strongly by cell type and the environment. This plasticity underlies peroxisomal functions in metabolism and the detoxification of dangerous reactive oxygen species. However, peroxisomes are integrated into the cellular system as a whole such that they communicate intimately with other organelles, control signaling dynamics as in the case of innate immune responses to infectious disease, and contribute to processes as fundamental as longevity. The increasing evidence for peroxisomes having roles in various cellular and organismal functions, combined with their malleability, suggests complex mechanisms operate to control cellular dynamics and the specificity of cellular responses and functions extending well beyond the peroxisome itself. A deeper understanding of the functions of peroxisomes and the mechanisms that control their plasticity could offer opportunities for exploiting changes in peroxisome abundance to control cellular function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Signal Processing Suite Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahr, John D.; Mir, Hasan; Morabito, Andrew; Grossman, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Our role in this project was to participate in the design of the signal processing suite to analyze plasma density measurements on board a small constellation (3 or 4) satellites in Low Earth Orbit. As we are new to space craft experiments, one of the challenges was to simply gain understanding of the quantity of data which would flow from the satellites, and possibly to interact with the design teams in generating optimal sampling patterns. For example, as the fleet of satellites were intended to fly through the same volume of space (displaced slightly in time and space), the bulk plasma structure should be common among the spacecraft. Therefore, an optimal, limited bandwidth data downlink would take advantage of this commonality. Also, motivated by techniques in ionospheric radar, we hoped to investigate the possibility of employing aperiodic sampling in order to gain access to a wider spatial spectrum without suffering aliasing in k-space.

  9. Cannabinoid signaling system

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, María; Hernández, Mariluz

    2008-01-01

    The cannabinoid signaling system is located during brain development in a position concordant with playing a modulatory function in the regulation of neuronal and glial cell proliferation and migration, survival of neural progenitors, axonal elongation and synaptogenesis and differentiation of oligodendrocytes and formation of myelin. This assumption is based on the fact that CB1 receptors and their ligands emerge early in brain development and are transiently expressed in certain brain regions that play key roles in these processes. We have recently proposed that this modulatory action might be exerted through regulating L1 and other cell adhesion molecules, that are also key elements for those processes. The present commentary will address these two questions trying to summarize all the available evidence and to suggest the future directions for research. PMID:19262157

  10. [Signal Processing Suite Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahr, John D.; Mir, Hasan; Morabito, Andrew; Grossman, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Our role in this project was to participate in the design of the signal processing suite to analyze plasma density measurements on board a small constellation (3 or 4) satellites in Low Earth Orbit. As we are new to space craft experiments, one of the challenges was to simply gain understanding of the quantity of data which would flow from the satellites, and possibly to interact with the design teams in generating optimal sampling patterns. For example, as the fleet of satellites were intended to fly through the same volume of space (displaced slightly in time and space), the bulk plasma structure should be common among the spacecraft. Therefore, an optimal, limited bandwidth data downlink would take advantage of this commonality. Also, motivated by techniques in ionospheric radar, we hoped to investigate the possibility of employing aperiodic sampling in order to gain access to a wider spatial spectrum without suffering aliasing in k-space.

  11. Signal conditioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahzah, Mohamad (Inventor); Korkosz, Gregory J. (Inventor); Bohr, Gerald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A current-driven signal conditioning system comprising a first terminal, a second terminal, a strain gauge, and an instrumentation amplifier is disclosed. The strain gauge is adapted to measure a deformation of a structure and to generate a resistance which corresponds to the measured deformation. The instrumentation amplifier is adapted to be connected between the first terminal and the second terminal. The instrumentation amplifier is further adapted to be connected to the strain gauge and to place an output current on the second terminal. The output current is proportional to the resistance generated by the strain gauge. An output resister is coupled between the strain gauge and the second terminal, and a capacitor is coupled between the resister and the first terminal. A zenor diode is coupled between the first terminal and the strain gauge, and a diode is also coupled between the first terminal and the strain gauge.

  12. Adipogenesis and WNT signalling

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulides, Constantinos; Lagathu, Claire; Sethi, Jaswinder K.; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An inability of adipose tissue to expand consequent to exhausted capacity to recruit new adipocytes might underlie the association between obesity and insulin resistance. Adipocytes arise from mesenchymal precursors whose commitment and differentiation along the adipocytic lineage is tightly regulated. These regulatory factors mediate cross-talk between adipose cells, ensuring that adipocyte growth and differentiation are coupled to energy storage demands. The WNT family of autocrine and paracrine growth factors regulates adult tissue maintenance and remodelling and, consequently, is well suited to mediate adipose cell communication. Indeed, several recent reports, summarized in this review, implicate WNT signalling in regulating adipogenesis. Manipulating the WNT pathway to alter adipose cellular makeup, therefore, constitutes an attractive drug-development target to combat obesity-associated metabolic complications. PMID:19008118

  13. Surface electromyogram signal modelling.

    PubMed

    McGill, K C

    2004-07-01

    The paper reviews the fundamental components of stochastic and motor-unit-based models of the surface electromyogram (SEMG). Stochastic models used in ergonomics and kinesiology consider the SEMG to be a stochastic process whose amplitude is related to the level of muscle activation and whose power spectral density reflects muscle conduction velocity. Motor-unit-based models for describing the spatio-temporal distribution of individual motor-unit action potentials throughout the limb are quite robust, making it possible to extract precise information about motor-unit architecture from SEMG signals recorded by multi-electrode arrays. Motor-unit-based models have not yet been proven as successful, however, for extracting information about recruitment and firing rates throughout the full range of contraction. The relationship between SEMG and force during natural dynamic movements is much too complex to model in terms of single motor units.

  14. Interactive digital signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mish, W. H.; Wenger, R. M.; Behannon, K. W.; Byrnes, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Interactive Digital Signal Processor (IDSP) is examined. It consists of a set of time series analysis Operators each of which operates on an input file to produce an output file. The operators can be executed in any order that makes sense and recursively, if desired. The operators are the various algorithms used in digital time series analysis work. User written operators can be easily interfaced to the sysatem. The system can be operated both interactively and in batch mode. In IDSP a file can consist of up to n (currently n=8) simultaneous time series. IDSP currently includes over thirty standard operators that range from Fourier transform operations, design and application of digital filters, eigenvalue analysis, to operators that provide graphical output, allow batch operation, editing and display information.

  15. Biasing GPCR signaling from inside.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Arun K

    2014-01-28

    The discovery of "functional selectivity" or "biased signaling" through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has redefined the classical GPCR signaling paradigm. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of biased signaling by and biased ligands for GPCRs is changing the landscape of GPCR drug discovery. The concept of biased signaling has primarily been developed and discussed in the context of ligands that bind to the extracellular regions of GPCRs. However, two recent reports demonstrate that it is also possible to bias GPCR signaling from inside the cell by targeting intracellular regions of these receptors. These findings present a novel handle for delineating the functional outcomes of biased signaling by GPCRs. Moreover, these approaches also uncover a previously unexplored framework for biasing GPCR signaling for drug discovery.

  16. Signaling on the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    McPherson, P S; Kay, B K; Hussain, N K

    2001-06-01

    Ligand binding to receptor tyrosine kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors initiates signal transduction events and induces receptor endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits and vesicles. While receptor-mediated endocytosis has been traditionally considered an effective mechanism to attenuate ligand-activated responses, more recent studies demonstrate that signaling continues on the endocytic pathway. In fact, certain signaling events, such as the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases, appear to require endocytosis. Protein components of signal transduction cascades can assemble at clathrin coated pits and remain associated with endocytic vesicles following their dynamin-dependent release from the plasma membrane. Thus, endocytic vesicles can function as a signaling compartment distinct from the plasma membrane. These observations demonstrate that endocytosis plays an important role in the activation and propagation of signaling pathways.

  17. EEG signal analysis: a survey.

    PubMed

    Subha, D Puthankattil; Joseph, Paul K; Acharya U, Rajendra; Lim, Choo Min

    2010-04-01

    The EEG (Electroencephalogram) signal indicates the electrical activity of the brain. They are highly random in nature and may contain useful information about the brain state. However, it is very difficult to get useful information from these signals directly in the time domain just by observing them. They are basically non-linear and nonstationary in nature. Hence, important features can be extracted for the diagnosis of different diseases using advanced signal processing techniques. In this paper the effect of different events on the EEG signal, and different signal processing methods used to extract the hidden information from the signal are discussed in detail. Linear, Frequency domain, time - frequency and non-linear techniques like correlation dimension (CD), largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), Hurst exponent (H), different entropies, fractal dimension(FD), Higher Order Spectra (HOS), phase space plots and recurrence plots are discussed in detail using a typical normal EEG signal.

  18. Systemic signaling during plant defense.

    PubMed

    Kachroo, Aardra; Robin, Guillaume P

    2013-08-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a type of pathogen-induced broad-spectrum resistance in plants. During SAR, primary infection-induced rapid generation and transportation of mobile signal(s) 'prepare' the rest of the plant for subsequent infections. Several, seemingly unrelated, mobile chemical inducers of SAR have been identified, at least two of which function in a feed-back regulatory loop with a lipid transfer-like protein. Signal(s) perception in the systemic tissues relies on the presence of an intact cuticle, the waxy layer covering all aerial parts of the plant. SAR results in chromatin modifications, which prime systemic tissues for enhanced and rapid signaling derived from salicylic acid, which along with its signaling components is key for SAR induction. This review summarizes recent findings related to SAR signal generation, movement, and perception. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxytocin receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Devost, Dominic; Wrzal, Paulina; Zingg, Hans H

    2008-01-01

    The great diversity of the expression sites and proposed function of the oxytocin (OXT) receptor (OXTR) is paralleled by a diversity of its signalling pathways, many of which have still remained unexplored. We have used different approaches to discover novel pathways. By means of a phosphoproteomics approach, we have detected several distinct OXT-induced changes in tyrosine as well as threonine phosphorylation states of intracellular protein in myometrial cells. The most prominent change involved dephosphorylation of a 95-kDa phosphothreonine moiety. By N-terminal amino acid microsequence analysis, this moiety was shown to correspond to eukaryotic translation factor eEF2. This protein is a key regulator of protein synthesis and mediates, upon dephosphorylation, the translocation step of peptide chain elongation. These findings define a novel mechanism by which OXT assumes a so far unrecognized trophic function. We next elucidated the intracellular pathway(s) involved. We found that this effect is not mediated by any of the known pathways known to induce eEF2 dephosphorylation (mTOR, ERK1/2 or p38) but by protein kinase C. Consistent with this idea, we also found that direct stimulation of protein kinase C with a phorbol ester induced eEF2 dephosphorylation in myometrial cells. Using phosphoERK antibodies, we discovered by Western blotting that OXT induced phosphorylation of a higher molecular weight ERK-related protein. We were able to show that this band corresponded to "big MAP kinase1" or ERK5. ERK5 is part of a distinct MAPK cascade and promotes expression of the myosin light chain gene and plays an obligatory role in muscle cell development and differentiation. The role of ERK5 in myometrium has remained unexplored, but it is likely to represent an important novel pathway mediating OXT's effects on smooth muscle function. Further elucidation of these novel signalling pathways will have significant relevance for the development of novel pathway-specific OXTR

  20. Harnessing tumor necrosis factor receptors to enhance antitumor activities of drugs.

    PubMed

    Muntané, Jordi

    2011-10-17

    Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in the U.S. behind heart disease and over stroke. The hallmarks of cancer comprise six biological capabilities acquired during the multistep development of human tumors. The inhibition of cell death pathways is one of these tumor characteristics which also include sustained proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressor signaling, replicative immortality, angiogenesis, and promotion of invasion and metastasis. Cell death is mediated through death receptor (DR) stimulation initiated by specific ligands that transmit signaling to the cell death machinery or through the participation of mitochondria. Cell death involving DR is mediated by the superfamily of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R) which includes TNF-R type I, CD95, DR3, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor-1 (TRAIL-R1) and -2 (TRAIL-R2), DR6, ectodysplasin A (EDA) receptor (EDAR), and the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor (NGFR). The expression of these receptors in healthy and tumor cells induces treatment side effects that limit the systemic administration of cell death-inducing therapies. The present review is focused on the different therapeutic strategies such as targeted antibodies or small molecules addressed to selective stimulated DR-mediated apoptosis or reduce cell proliferation in cancer cells.

  1. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Integrin containing focal adhesions (FAs) transmit extracellular signals across the plasma membrane to modulate cell adhesion, signalling and survival. Although integrins are known to undergo continuous endo/exocytic traffic, potential impact of endocytic traffic on integrin-induced signals is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to cell-ECM adhesions and identify an endosomal signalling platform that supports integrin signalling away from the plasma membrane. We show that active focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an established marker of integrin-ECM downstream signalling, localises with active integrins on endosomes. Integrin endocytosis positively regulates adhesion-induced FAK activation, which is early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) and small GTPase Rab21 dependent. FAK binds directly to purified endosomes and becomes activated on them, suggesting a role for endocytosis in enhancing distinct integrin downstream signalling events. Finally, endosomal integrin signalling contributes to cancer-related processes such as anoikis resistance, anchorage-independence and metastasis. Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion receptors functioning as integrators of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) driven cues, the cellular cytoskeleton and the cellular signalling apparatus 1.Upon adhesion, integrins trigger the formation of plasma-membrane proximal large mechanosensing and signal-transmitting protein clusters depicted as “adhesomes” 2, 3. In addition, integrins undergo constant endocytic traffic to facilitate focal adhesion turnover, cell migration, invasion and cytokinesis 4. For other receptor systems it is well established that endocytic membrane traffic regulates bioavailability of cell-surface molecules and therefore the intensity and/or specificity of receptor-initiated signals 5, 6. Although active integrins and their ligands have been detected in endosomes 7–9 and increased integrin recycling to the plasma membrane contributes

  2. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K) inhibitor GS-1101 synergistically potentiates histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis through the inactivation of PI3K and extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Bodo, Juraj; Zhao, Xiaoxian; Sharma, Arishya; Hill, Brian T; Portell, Craig A; Lannutti, Brian J; Almasan, Alexandru; Hsi, Eric D

    2013-10-01

    Previously, we showed that inhibition of the protein kinase C β (PKCβ)/AKT pathway augments engagement of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI)-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and mechanisms of cell death induced by the delta isoform-specific phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, GS-1101, in combination with the HDI, panobinostat (LBH589) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Lymphoma cell lines, primary non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells were simultaneously treated with the HDI, LBH589 and GS-1101. An interaction of the LBH589/GS-1101 combination was formally examined by using various concentrations of LBH589 and GS-1101. Combined treatment resulted in a synergistic inhibition of proliferation and showed synergistic effect on apoptotic induction in all tested cell lines and primary NHL and CLL cells. This study indicates that interference with PI3K signalling dramatically increases HDI-mediated apoptosis in malignant haematopoietic cells, possibly through both AKT-dependent or AKT- independent mechanisms. Moreover, the increase in HDI-related apoptosis observed in PI3K inhibitor-treated cells appears to be related to the disruption of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway. This study provides a strong rational for testing the combination of PI3K inhibitors and HDI in the clinic.

  3. Crosstalk between Photoreceptor and Sugar Signaling Modulates Floral Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Matsoukas, Ianis G.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, integrated genetic, cellular, proteomic and genomic approaches have begun to unravel the surprisingly crosstalk between photoreceptors and sugar signaling in regulation of floral signal transduction. Although a number of physiological factors in the pathway have been identified, the molecular genetic interactions of some components are less well understood. The further elucidation of the crosstalk mechanisms between photoreceptors and sugar signaling will certainly contribute to our better understanding of the developmental circuitry that controls floral signal transduction. This article summarizes our current knowledge of this crosstalk, which has not received much attention, and suggests possible directions for future research. PMID:28659814

  4. Crosstalk between Photoreceptor and Sugar Signaling Modulates Floral Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Matsoukas, Ianis G

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, integrated genetic, cellular, proteomic and genomic approaches have begun to unravel the surprisingly crosstalk between photoreceptors and sugar signaling in regulation of floral signal transduction. Although a number of physiological factors in the pathway have been identified, the molecular genetic interactions of some components are less well understood. The further elucidation of the crosstalk mechanisms between photoreceptors and sugar signaling will certainly contribute to our better understanding of the developmental circuitry that controls floral signal transduction. This article summarizes our current knowledge of this crosstalk, which has not received much attention, and suggests possible directions for future research.

  5. Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    sensitive to Fas-mediated apoptosis , while the BCSCs part is more sensitive to the death induced by the elimination of CD95 (a phenomenon we have recently...simultaneously inducing apoptosis and DICE in breast cancer cells, with many potential therapeutic applications. I could also demonstrate the involvement...published in conferences and scientific journals. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fas, FasL, Cancer, Cancer Stem cells, Apoptosis , miRNA, EMT, cell death. 16. SECURITY

  6. Steganography in arrhythmic electrocardiogram signal.

    PubMed

    Edward Jero, S; Ramu, Palaniappan; Ramakrishnan, S

    2015-08-01

    Security and privacy of patient data is a vital requirement during exchange/storage of medical information over communication network. Steganography method hides patient data into a cover signal to prevent unauthenticated accesses during data transfer. This study evaluates the performance of ECG steganography to ensure secured transmission of patient data where an abnormal ECG signal is used as cover signal. The novelty of this work is to hide patient data into two dimensional matrix of an abnormal ECG signal using Discrete Wavelet Transform and Singular Value Decomposition based steganography method. A 2D ECG is constructed according to Tompkins QRS detection algorithm. The missed R peaks are computed using RR interval during 2D conversion. The abnormal ECG signals are obtained from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. Metrics such as Peak Signal to Noise Ratio, Percentage Residual Difference, Kullback-Leibler distance and Bit Error Rate are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach.

  7. Calcium signalling remodelling and disease.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    A wide range of Ca2+ signalling systems deliver the spatial and temporal Ca2+ signals necessary to control the specific functions of different cell types. Release of Ca2+ by InsP3 (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) plays a central role in many of these signalling systems. Ongoing transcriptional processes maintain the integrity and stability of these cell-specific signalling systems. However, these homoeostatic systems are highly plastic and can undergo a process of phenotypic remodelling, resulting in the Ca2+ signals being set either too high or too low. Such subtle dysregulation of Ca2+ signals have been linked to some of the major diseases in humans such as cardiac disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Purinergic signaling in special senses.

    PubMed

    Housley, Gary D; Bringmann, Andreas; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    We consider the impact of purinergic signaling on the physiology of the special senses of vision, smell, taste and hearing. Purines (particularly ATP and adenosine) act as neurotransmitters, gliotransmitters and paracrine factors in the sensory retina, nasal olfactory epithelium, taste buds and cochlea. The associated purinergic receptor signaling underpins the sensory transduction and information coding in these sense organs. The P2 and P1 receptors mediate fast transmission of sensory signals and have modulatory roles in the regulation of synaptic transmitter release, for example in the adaptation to sensory overstimulation. Purinergic signaling regulates bidirectional neuron-glia interactions and is involved in the control of blood supply, extracellular ion homeostasis and the turnover of sensory epithelia by modulating apoptosis and progenitor proliferation. Purinergic signaling is an important player in pathophysiological processes in sensory tissues, and has both detrimental (pro-apoptotic) and supportive (e.g. initiation of cytoprotective stress-signaling cascades) effects.

  9. Signaling pathways affecting skeletal health.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pierre J

    2012-09-01

    Skeletal health is dependent on the balance between bone resorption and formation during bone remodeling. Multiple signaling pathways play essential roles in the maintenance of skeletal integrity by positively or negatively regulating bone cells. During the last years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the essential signaling pathways that regulate bone cell commitment, differentiation and survival. New signaling anabolic pathways triggered by parathyroid hormone, local growth factors, Wnt signaling, and calcium sensing receptor have been identified. Novel signals induced by interactions between bone cells-matrix (integrins), osteoblasts/osteocytes (cadherins, connexins), and osteoblasts/osteoclast (ephrins, Wnt-RhoA, semaphorins) have been discovered. Recent studies revealed the key pathways (MAPK, PI3K/Akt) that critically control bone cells and skeletal mass. This review summarizes the most recent knowledge on the major signaling pathways that control bone cells, and their potential impact on the development of therapeutic strategies to improve human bone health.

  10. Signal processor packaging design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarley, Paul L.; Phipps, Mickie A.

    1993-10-01

    The Signal Processor Packaging Design (SPPD) program was a technology development effort to demonstrate that a miniaturized, high throughput programmable processor could be fabricated to meet the stringent environment imposed by high speed kinetic energy guided interceptor and missile applications. This successful program culminated with the delivery of two very small processors, each about the size of a large pin grid array package. Rockwell International's Tactical Systems Division in Anaheim, California developed one of the processors, and the other was developed by Texas Instruments' (TI) Defense Systems and Electronics Group (DSEG) of Dallas, Texas. The SPPD program was sponsored by the Guided Interceptor Technology Branch of the Air Force Wright Laboratory's Armament Directorate (WL/MNSI) at Eglin AFB, Florida and funded by SDIO's Interceptor Technology Directorate (SDIO/TNC). These prototype processors were subjected to rigorous tests of their image processing capabilities, and both successfully demonstrated the ability to process 128 X 128 infrared images at a frame rate of over 100 Hz.

  11. Optical signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorey, J.

    The theoretical principles, design, and application of optical signal-processing devices are examined in a general review and illustrated with diagrams, with an emphasis on their use in radar, sonar, and lidar systems. Topics discussed include Fourier and Fresnel transforms, coherent-light computer techniques (film, electrooptical acoustooptical, and hybrid recording methods; processing of SLAR data; the convolution theorem in coherent optics; and the use of spatial or temporal integration in acoustooptic components), and incoherent-light techniques (the Mertz setup, mask correlation, elimination of spurious components, localization and imaging of EM or IR sources by a mobile-mask technique, and processing of vectors and matrices). The need to compress the output data of high-speed optical processors by detection, thresholding, or (possibly nonlinear) block-recognition functions related to extraction and decision-making processes is stressed, since otherwise digital processing of the output causes a bottleneck effect which negates the speed advantages of optical systems over all-digital solutions.

  12. Pten signaling in gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Knobbe, Christiane B.; Merlo, Adrian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the PTEN gene (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) was identified as a tumor suppressor gene on the long arm of chromosome 10. Since then, important progress has been made with respect to the understanding of the role of the Pten protein in the normal development of the brain as well as in the molecular pathogenesis of human gliomas. This review summarizes the current state of the art concerning the involvement of aberrant Pten function in the development of different biologic features of malignant gliomas, such as loss of cell-cycle control and uncontrolled cell proliferation, escape from apoptosis, brain invasion, and aberrant neoangiogenesis. Most of the tumor-suppressive properties of Pten are dependent on its lipid phosphatase activity, which inhibits the phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway through dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)-triphosphate. The additional function of Pten as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase may also play a role in glioma pathogenesis. Besides the wealth of data elucidating the functional roles of Pten, recent studies suggest a diagnostic significance of PTEN gene alterations as a molecular marker for poor prognosis in anaplastic astrocytomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Furthermore, the possibility of selective targeting of PTEN mutant tumor cells by specific pharmacologic inhibitors of members of the Pten/PI3K/Akt pathway opens up new perspectives for a targeted molecular therapy of malignant gliomas. PMID:12084351

  13. Transmembrane signaling proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Couchman, John R

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all metazoan cells contain at least one and usually several types of transmembrane proteoglycans. These are varied in protein structure and type of polysaccharide, but the total number of vertebrate genes encoding transmembrane proteoglycan core proteins is less than 10. Some core proteins, including those of the syndecans, always possess covalently coupled glycosaminoglycans; others do not. Syndecan has a long evolutionary history, as it is present in invertebrates, but many other transmembrane proteoglycans are vertebrate inventions. The variety of proteins and their glycosaminoglycan chains is matched by diverse functions. However, all assume roles as coreceptors, often working alongside high-affinity growth factor receptors or adhesion receptors such as integrins. Other common themes are an ability to signal through their cytoplasmic domains, often to the actin cytoskeleton, and linkage to PDZ protein networks. Many transmembrane proteoglycans associate on the cell surface with metzincin proteases and can be shed by them. Work with model systems in vivo and in vitro reveals roles in growth, adhesion, migration, and metabolism. Furthermore, a wide range of phenotypes for the core proteins has been obtained in mouse knockout experiments. Here some of the latest developments in the field are examined in hopes of stimulating further interest in this fascinating group of molecules.

  14. Volatile signals during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vaglio, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Scents play a key role in mediating reproductive interactions in many vertebrates including mammals. Nowadays, several studies indicate that humans seem to use remarkably olfactory communication and are even able to produce and perceive pheromones. Furthermore, over the past several years, it became increasingly clear that pheromone-like chemical signals probably play a role in offspring identification and mother recognition. Recently developed technical procedures (solid-phase microextraction and dynamic headspace extraction) now allow investigators to characterize volatile compounds with high reliability. We analyzed the volatile compounds in sweat patch samples collected from the para-axillary and nipple-areola regions of women during pregnancy and after childbirth. We hypothesized that, at the time of birth and during the first weeks of life, the distinctive olfactory pattern of the para-axillary area is probably useful to newborn babies for recognizing and distinguishing their own mother, whereas the characteristic pattern of the nipple-areola region is probably useful as a guide to nourishment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Synchronous Photodiode-Signal Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primus, Howard K.

    1988-01-01

    Synchronous sampling circuit increases signal-to-noise ratio of measurements of chopped signal of known phase and frequency in presence of low-frequency or dc background noise. Used with linear array of photoelectric sensors for locating edge of metal plate. Multiplexing circuit cycles through 16 light-emitting-diode/photodiode pairs, under computer control. Synchronized with multiplexer so edge detector makes one background-subtracted signal measurement per emitter/detector pair in turn.

  16. Wavelet Preprocessing of Acoustic Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    wavelet transform to preprocess acoustic broadband signals in a system that discriminates between different classes of acoustic bursts. This is motivated by the similarity between the proportional bandwidth filters provided by the wavelet transform and those found in biological hearing systems. The experiment involves comparing statistical pattern classifier effects of wavelet and FFT preprocessed acoustic signals. The data used was from the DARPA Phase I database, which consists of artificially generated signals with real ocean background. The

  17. Visualizing and quantifying adhesive signals

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Wu, Yi; Hahn, Klaus; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the structural adaptation and signaling of adhesion sites in response to mechanical stimuli requires in situ characterization of the dynamic activation of a large number of adhesion components. Here, we review high resolution live cell imaging approaches to measure forces, assembly and interaction of adhesion components, and the activation of adhesion-mediated signals. We conclude by outlining computational multiplexing as a framework for the integration of these data into comprehensive models of adhesion signaling pathways. PMID:18586481

  18. Theoretical aspects of calcium signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencea, Corneliu Stefan

    2001-08-01

    Experiments investigating intracellular calcium dynamics have revealed that calcium signals differentially affect a variety of intracellular processes, from fertilization and cell development and differentiation to subsequent cellular activity, ending with cell death. As an intracellular messenger, calcium transmits information within and between cells, thus regulating their activity. To control such a variety of processes, calcium signals have to be very flexible and also precisely regulated. The cell uses a calcium signaling ``toolkit'', where calcium ions can act in different contexts of space, amplitude and time. For different tasks, the cell selects the particular signal, or combination of signals, that triggers the appropriate physiological response. The physical foundations of such a versatile cellular signaling toolkit involving calcium are not completely understood, despite important experimental and theoretical progress made recently. The declared goal of this work is to investigate physical mechanisms on which the propagation of differential signals can be based. The dynamics of calcium near a cluster of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) activated calcium channels has been investigated analytically and numerically. Our work has demonstrated that clusters of different IP3 receptors can show similar bistable behavior, but differ in both the transient and long term dynamics. We have also investigated the conditions under which a calcium signal propagates between a pair of localized stores. We have shown that the propagation of the signal across a random distribution of such stores shows a percolation transition manifested in the shape of the wave front. More importantly, our work indicates that specific distribution of stores can be interpreted as calcium circuits that can perform important signal analyzing task, from unidirectional propagation and coincidence detection to a complete set of logic gates. We believe that phenomena like the ones described are

  19. Protein modules and signalling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawson, Tony

    1995-02-01

    Communication between cells assumes particular importance in multicellular organisms. The growth, migration and differentiation of cells in the embryo, and their organization into specific tissues, depend on signals transmitted from one cell to another. In the adult, cell signalling orchestrates normal cellular behaviour and responses to wounding and infection. The consequences of breakdowns in this signalling underlie cancer, diabetes and disorders of the immune and cardiovascular systems. Conserved protein domains that act as key regulatory participants in many of these different signalling pathways are highlighted.

  20. Semaphorin signaling in cardiovascular development.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Jonathan A; Aghajanian, Haig; Singh, Manvendra K

    2015-02-03

    Semaphorins were originally identified as neuronal guidance molecules mediating their attractive or repulsive signals by forming complexes with plexin and neuropilin receptors. Subsequent research has identified functions for semaphorin signaling in many organs and tissues outside of the nervous system. Vital roles for semaphorin signaling in vascular patterning and cardiac morphogenesis have been demonstrated, and impaired semaphorin signaling has been associated with various human cardiovascular disorders, including persistent truncus arteriosus, sinus bradycardia and anomalous pulmonary venous connections. Here, we review the functions of semaphorins and their receptors in cardiovascular development and disease and highlight important recent discoveries in the field.

  1. Enhancement Of Optical Registration Signals Through Digital Signal Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Daniel R.; Lazo-Wasem, Jeanne

    1988-01-01

    Alignment and setup of lighography processes has largely been conducted on special test wafers. Actual product level optimization has been limited to manual techniques such as optical verniers. This is especially time consuming and prone to inconsistencies when the registration characteristics of lithographic systems are being measured. One key factor obstructing the use of automated metrology equipment on product level wafers is the inability to discern reliably, metrology features from the background noise and variations in optical registration signals. This is often the case for metal levels such as aluminum and tungsten. This paper discusses methods for enhancement of typical registration signals obtained from difficult semiconductor process levels. Brightfield and darkfield registration signals are obtained using a microscope and a 1024 element linear photodiode array. These signals are then digitized and stored on the hard disk of a computer. The techniques utilized include amplitude selective and adaptive and non-adaptive frequency domain filtering techniques. The effect of each of these techniques upon calculated registration values is analyzed by determining the positional variation of the center location of a two line registration feature. Plots of raw and processed signals obtained are presented as are plots of the power spectral density of ideal metrology feature signal and noise patterns. It is concluded that the proper application of digital signal processing (DSP) techniques to problematic optical registration signals greatly enhances the applicability of automated optical registration measurement techniques to difficult semiconductor process levels.

  2. Signal transduction abnormalities in suicide: focus on phosphoinositide signaling system.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2013-11-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern and each year about one million people die by suicide worldwide. Recent studies suggest that suicide may be associated with specific neurobiological abnormalities. Earlier studies of neurobiology of suicide focused on abnormalities of the serotonergic mechanism. These studies suggested that some serotonin receptor subtypes may be abnormal in the postmortem brain of suicide victims. Since these receptors are linked to signal transduction pathways, abnormalities of signaling mechanisms have been recently studied in the postmortem brain of suicide victims. Of particular interest is the 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor-linked phosphoinositide signaling system. Several studies have focused on the abnormalities on the component of this signaling system and these studies suggest the abnormalities of G proteins, the effectors phospholipase C and the second or the third messenger systems, such as protein kinase A. Further studies revealed abnormalities in the downstream transcription factors such as the cyclic AMP response element binding protein and some of the targeted genes of these transcription factors. The most important gene in this aspect which has been studied in the suicide is the brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Here we critically review the studies focusing on these components of the phosphoinositide signaling system in the postmortem brain of both adult and teenage suicide victims. These studies provide a better understanding of the signal transduction abnormalities in suicide focusing on the phosphoinositide signaling pathway. These studies may lead to new therapeutic agents targeting specific sites in this signaling cascade.

  3. Recognition of a signal peptide by the signal recognition particle

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Claudia Y.; Li, Jade; Oubridge, Chris; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V.; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Targeting of proteins to appropriate sub-cellular compartments is a crucial process in all living cells. Secretory and membrane proteins usually contain an N-terminal signal peptide, which is recognised by the signal recognition particle (SRP) when nascent polypeptide chains emerge from the ribosome. The SRP-ribosome nascent chain complex is then targeted through its GTP-dependent interaction with SRP-receptor to the protein-conducting channel on endoplasmic reticulum membrane in eukaryotes or plasma membrane in bacteria. A universally conserved component of SRP1, 2, SRP54 or its bacterial homolog, fifty-four homolog (Ffh), binds the signal peptides which have a highly divergent sequence divisible into a positively charged n-region, an h-region commonly containing 8-20 hydrophobic residues and a polar c-region 3-5. No structure has been reported that exemplified SRP54 binding of any signal sequence. We have produced a fusion protein between Sulfolobus solfataricus SRP54 and a signal peptide connected via a flexible linker. This fusion protein oligomerises in solution, through interaction between the SRP54 and signal peptide moieties belonging to different chains, and it is functional, able to bind SRP RNA and SRP-receptor FtsY. Here we present the crystal structure at 3.5 Å resolution of an SRP54-signal peptide complex in the dimer, which reveals how a signal sequence is recognised by SRP54. PMID:20364120

  4. Signal integration between IFNgamma and TLR signalling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schroder, Kate; Sweet, Matthew J; Hume, David A

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages are major effector cells of the innate immune system, and appropriate regulation of macrophage function requires the integration of multiple signalling inputs derived from the recognition of host factors (e.g. interferon-gamma/IFNgamma) and pathogen products (e.g. toll-like receptor/TLR agonists). The profound effects of IFNgamma pre-treatment ("priming") on TLR-induced macrophage activation have long been recognised, but many of the mechanisms underlying the priming phenotype have only recently been identified. This review summarises the known mechanisms of integration between the IFNgamma and TLR signalling pathways. Synergy occurs at multiple levels, ranging from signal recognition to convergence of signals at the promoters of target genes. In particular, the cross-talk between the IFNgamma, and LPS and CpG DNA signalling pathways is discussed.

  5. Adenosinergic signaling in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev

    2016-05-01

    Despite the introduction of at least 20 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) into clinical practice over the past decades, about one third of all epilepsies remain refractory to conventional forms of treatment. In addition, currently used AEDs have been developed to suppress neuronal hyperexcitability, but not necessarily to address pathogenic mechanisms involved in epilepsy development or progression (epileptogenesis). For those reasons endogenous seizure control mechanisms of the brain may provide alternative therapeutic opportunities. Adenosine is a well characterized endogenous anticonvulsant and seizure terminator of the brain. Several lines of evidence suggest that endogenous adenosine-mediated seizure control mechanisms fail in chronic epilepsy, whereas therapeutic adenosine augmentation effectively prevents epileptic seizures, even those that are refractory to conventional AEDs. New findings demonstrate that dysregulation of adenosinergic mechanisms are intricately involved in the development of epilepsy and its comorbidities, whereas adenosine-associated epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in epileptogenesis. The first goal of this review is to discuss how maladaptive changes of adenosinergic mechanisms contribute to the expression of seizures (ictogenesis) and the development of epilepsy (epileptogenesis) by focusing on pharmacological (adenosine receptor dependent) and biochemical (adenosine receptor independent) mechanisms as well as on enzymatic and transport based mechanisms that control the availability (homeostasis) of adenosine. The second goal of this review is to highlight innovative adenosine-based opportunities for therapeutic intervention aimed at reconstructing normal adenosine function and signaling for improved seizure control in chronic epilepsy. New findings suggest that transient adenosine augmentation can have lasting epigenetic effects with disease modifying and antiepileptogenic outcome. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled

  6. Echolocation signals of wild dolphins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, W. W. L.

    2004-07-01

    Most of our understanding of dolphin echolocation has come from studies of captive dolphins performing various echolocation tasks. Recently, measurements of echolocation signals in the wild have expanded our understanding of the characteristics of these signals in a natural setting. Measuring undistorted dolphin echolocation signals with free swimming dolphins in the field can be a challenging task. A four hydrophone array arranged in a symmetrical star pattern was used to measure the echolocation signals of four species of dolphins in the wild. Echolocation signals of the following dolphins have been measured with the symmetrical star array: white-beaked dolphins in Iceland, Atlantic spotted dolphins in the Bahamas, killer whales in British Columbia, and dusky dolphins in New Zealand. There are many common features in the echolocation signals of the different species. Most of the signals had spectra that were bimodal: two peaks, one at low frequencies and another about an octave higher in frequency. The source level of the sonar transmission varies as a function of 20log R, suggesting a form of time-varying gain but on the transmitting end of the sonar process rather than the receiving end. The results of the field work call into question the issue of whether the signals used by captive dolphins may be shaped by the task they are required to perform rather than what they would do more naturally.

  7. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  8. Signals in Communication Engineering History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consonni, Denise; Silva, Magno T. M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a study of various electric signals, which have been employed throughout the history of communication engineering in its two main landmarks: the telegraph and the telephone. The signals are presented in their time and frequency domain representations. The historical order has been followed in the presentation: wired systems, spark…

  9. Hybrid respiration-signal conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinard, G. A.; Steffen, D. A.; Sturm, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid impedance-pneumograph and respiration-rate signal conditioner element of hand-held vital signs monitor measures changes in impedance of chest during breathing cycle and generates analog respiration signal as output along with synchronous square wave that can be monitored by breath-rate processor.

  10. Bioelectric signal analysis and measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Nonstationary time series techniques are used to analyze EEG signals for the estimation of alertness. A time varying order is extracted in sequential time series measurement of these data and strategies are devised for obtaining optimal representation of the EEG signal.

  11. Signals in Communication Engineering History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consonni, Denise; Silva, Magno T. M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a study of various electric signals, which have been employed throughout the history of communication engineering in its two main landmarks: the telegraph and the telephone. The signals are presented in their time and frequency domain representations. The historical order has been followed in the presentation: wired systems, spark…

  12. Attention to natural auditory signals.

    PubMed

    Caporello Bluvas, Emily; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2013-11-01

    The challenge of understanding how the brain processes natural signals is compounded by the fact that such signals are often tied closely to specific natural behaviors and natural environments. This added complexity is especially true for auditory communication signals that can carry information at multiple hierarchical levels, and often occur in the context of other competing communication signals. Selective attention provides a mechanism to focus processing resources on specific components of auditory signals, and simultaneously suppress responses to unwanted signals or noise. Although selective auditory attention has been well-studied behaviorally, very little is known about how selective auditory attention shapes the processing on natural auditory signals, and how the mechanisms of auditory attention are implemented in single neurons or neural circuits. Here we review the role of selective attention in modulating auditory responses to complex natural stimuli in humans. We then suggest how the current understanding can be applied to the study of selective auditory attention in the context natural signal processing at the level of single neurons and populations in animal models amenable to invasive neuroscience techniques. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Communication Sounds and the Brain: New Directions and Perspectives".

  13. Thermocouple-Signal-Conditioning Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    Thermocouple-signal-conditioning circuit acting in conjunction with thermocouple, exhibits electrical behavior of voltage in series with resistance. Combination part of input bridge circuit of controller. Circuit configured for either of two specific applications by selection of alternative resistances and supply voltages. Includes alarm circuit detecting open circuit in thermocouple and provides off-scale output to signal malfunctions.

  14. Intracellular Signal Modulation by Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Boland, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems and the resulting activation of signal transduction pathways is essential for the development of safe and consumer friendly nanotechnology. Here we present an overview of signaling pathways induced by nanomaterial exposures and describe the possible correlation of their physicochemical characteristics with biological outcomes. In addition to the hierarchical oxidative stress model and a review of the intrinsic and cell-mediated mechanisms of reactive Oxygen species (ROS) generating capacities of nanomaterials, we also discuss other oxidative stress dependent and independent cellular signaling pathways. Induction of the inflammasome, calcium signaling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress are reviewed. Furthermore, the uptake mechanisms can crucially affect the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and membrane-dependent signaling pathways can be responsible for cellular effects of nanomaterials. Epigenetic regulation by nanomaterials effects of nanoparticle-protein interactions on cell signaling pathways, and the induction of various cell death modalities by nanomaterials are described. We describe the common trigger mechanisms shared by various nanomaterials to induce cell death pathways and describe the interplay of different modalities in orchestrating the final outcome after nanomaterial exposures. A better understanding of signal modulations induced by nanomaterials is not only essential for the synthesis and design of safer nanomaterials but will also help to discover potential nanomedical applications of these materials. Several biomedical applications based on the different signaling pathways induced by nanomaterials are already proposed and will certainly gain a great deal of attraction in the near future. PMID:24683030

  15. Revisiting intracellular calcium signaling semantics.

    PubMed

    Haiech, Jacques; Audran, Emilie; Fève, Marie; Ranjeva, Raoul; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2011-12-01

    Cells use intracellular free calcium concentration changes for signaling. Signal encoding occurs through both spatial and temporal modulation of the free calcium concentration. The encoded message is detected by an ensemble of intracellular sensors forming the family of calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) which must faithfully translate the message using a new syntax that is recognized by the cell. The cell is home to a significant although limited number of genes coding for proteins involved in the signal encoding and decoding processes. In a cell, only a subset of this ensemble of genes is expressed, leading to a genetic regulation of the calcium signal pathways. Calmodulin (CaM), the most ubiquitous expressed intracellular calcium-binding protein, plays a major role in calcium signal translation. Similar to a hub, it is central to a large and finely tuned network, receiving information, integrating it and dispatching the cognate response. In this review, we examine the different steps starting with an external stimulus up to a cellular response, with special emphasis on CaM and the mechanism by which it decodes calcium signals and translates it into exquisitely coordinated cellular events. By this means, we will revisit the calcium signaling semantics, hoping that we will ease communication between scientists dealing with calcium signals in different biological systems and different domains.

  16. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  17. Signaling equilibria in sensorimotor interactions.

    PubMed

    Leibfried, Felix; Grau-Moya, Jordi; Braun, Daniel A

    2015-08-01

    Although complex forms of communication like human language are often assumed to have evolved out of more simple forms of sensorimotor signaling, less attention has been devoted to investigate the latter. Here, we study communicative sensorimotor behavior of humans in a two-person joint motor task where each player controls one dimension of a planar motion. We designed this joint task as a game where one player (the sender) possesses private information about a hidden target the other player (the receiver) wants to know about, and where the sender's actions are costly signals that influence the receiver's control strategy. We developed a game-theoretic model within the framework of signaling games to investigate whether subjects' behavior could be adequately described by the corresponding equilibrium solutions. The model predicts both separating and pooling equilibria, in which signaling does and does not occur respectively. We observed both kinds of equilibria in subjects and found that, in line with model predictions, the propensity of signaling decreased with increasing signaling costs and decreasing uncertainty on the part of the receiver. Our study demonstrates that signaling games, which have previously been applied to economic decision-making and animal communication, provide a framework for human signaling behavior arising during sensorimotor interactions in continuous and dynamic environments.

  18. Intracellular signal modulation by nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Boland, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems and the resulting activation of signal transduction pathways is essential for the development of safe and consumer friendly nanotechnology. Here we present an overview of signaling pathways induced by nanomaterial exposures and describe the possible correlation of their physicochemical characteristics with biological outcomes. In addition to the hierarchical oxidative stress model and a review of the intrinsic and cell-mediated mechanisms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating capacities of nanomaterials, we also discuss other oxidative stress dependent and independent cellular signaling pathways. Induction of the inflammasome, calcium signaling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress are reviewed. Furthermore, the uptake mechanisms can be of crucial importance for the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and membrane-dependent signaling pathways have also been shown to be responsible for cellular effects of nanomaterials. Epigenetic regulation by nanomaterials, effects of nanoparticle-protein interactions on cell signaling pathways, and the induction of various cell death modalities by nanomaterials are described. We describe the common trigger mechanisms shared by various nanomaterials to induce cell death pathways and describe the interplay of different modalities in orchestrating the final outcome after nanomaterial exposures. A better understanding of signal modulations induced by nanomaterials is not only essential for the synthesis and design of safer nanomaterials but will also help to discover potential nanomedical applications of these materials. Several biomedical applications based on the different signaling pathways induced by nanomaterials are already proposed and will certainly gain a great deal of attraction in the near future.

  19. Piezoelectric extraction of ECG signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al

    2016-11-01

    The monitoring and early detection of abnormalities or variations in the cardiac cycle functionality are very critical practices and have significant impact on the prevention of heart diseases and their associated complications. Currently, in the field of biomedical engineering, there is a growing need for devices capable of measuring and monitoring a wide range of cardiac cycle parameters continuously, effectively and on a real-time basis using easily accessible and reusable probes. In this paper, the revolutionary generation and extraction of the corresponding ECG signal using a piezoelectric transducer as alternative for the ECG will be discussed. The piezoelectric transducer pick up the vibrations from the heart beats and convert them into electrical output signals. To this end, piezoelectric and signal processing techniques were employed to extract the ECG corresponding signal from the piezoelectric output voltage signal. The measured electrode based and the extracted piezoelectric based ECG traces are well corroborated. Their peaks amplitudes and locations are well aligned with each other.

  20. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  1. Engineering Cell-Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Daniel F.; Natividad, Robert J.; Asthagiri, Anand R.

    2014-01-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cells (cell surface engineering and synthetic gene circuits) to modulate juxtacrine cell-cell signaling. In addition, significant progress has been made in elucidating design rules and strategies to modulate juxtacrine signaling based on quantitative, engineering analysis of the mechanical and regulatory role of juxtacrine signals in the context of other cues and physical constraints in the microenvironment. These advances in engineering juxtacrine signaling lay a strong foundation for an integrative approach to utilizing synthetic cells, advanced ‘chassis’ and predictive modeling to engineer the form and function of living tissues. PMID:23856592

  2. Engineering cell-cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Blagovic, Katarina; Gong, Emily S; Milano, Daniel F; Natividad, Robert J; Asthagiri, Anand R

    2013-10-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cells (cell surface engineering and synthetic gene circuits) to modulate juxtacrine cell-cell signaling. In addition, significant progress has been made in elucidating design rules and strategies to modulate juxtacrine signaling on the basis of quantitative, engineering analysis of the mechanical and regulatory role of juxtacrine signals in the context of other cues and physical constraints in the microenvironment. These advances in engineering juxtacrine signaling lay a strong foundation for an integrative approach to utilize synthetic cells, advanced 'chassis' and predictive modeling to engineer the form and function of living tissues.

  3. Perception and Signaling of Strigolactones.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs), a recently discovered class of phytohormones, are important regulators of plant growth and development. While the biosynthetic pathway of these molecules is well documented, until recently there was not much known about the molecular mechanisms underlying SL perception and signal transduction in plants. Certain aspects of their perception and signaling, including the hormone-mediated interaction between receptor and F-box protein, degradation of suppressor proteins and activation of transcription factors, are also found in other phytohormones. However, some of SL signaling features seem to be specific for the SL signaling pathway. These include the enzymatic activity of the SL receptor and its destabilization caused by SLs. This review summarizes the current knowledge about SL signaling pathway in plants.

  4. Perception and Signaling of Strigolactones

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs), a recently discovered class of phytohormones, are important regulators of plant growth and development. While the biosynthetic pathway of these molecules is well documented, until recently there was not much known about the molecular mechanisms underlying SL perception and signal transduction in plants. Certain aspects of their perception and signaling, including the hormone-mediated interaction between receptor and F-box protein, degradation of suppressor proteins and activation of transcription factors, are also found in other phytohormones. However, some of SL signaling features seem to be specific for the SL signaling pathway. These include the enzymatic activity of the SL receptor and its destabilization caused by SLs. This review summarizes the current knowledge about SL signaling pathway in plants. PMID:27602041

  5. Endocytosis and Signaling during Development

    PubMed Central

    Bökel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms relies on an intricate choreography of intercellular communication events that pattern the embryo and coordinate the formation of tissues and organs. It is therefore not surprising that developmental biology, especially using genetic model organisms, has contributed significantly to the discovery and functional dissection of the associated signal-transduction cascades. At the same time, biophysical, biochemical, and cell biological approaches have provided us with insights into the underlying cell biological machinery. Here we focus on how endocytic trafficking of signaling components (e.g., ligands or receptors) controls the generation, propagation, modulation, reception, and interpretation of developmental signals. A comprehensive enumeration of the links between endocytosis and signal transduction would exceed the limits of this review. We will instead use examples from different developmental pathways to conceptually illustrate the various functions provided by endocytic processes during key steps of intercellular signaling. PMID:24591521

  6. Endocytosis and signaling during development.

    PubMed

    Bökel, Christian; Brand, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The development of multicellular organisms relies on an intricate choreography of intercellular communication events that pattern the embryo and coordinate the formation of tissues and organs. It is therefore not surprising that developmental biology, especially using genetic model organisms, has contributed significantly to the discovery and functional dissection of the associated signal-transduction cascades. At the same time, biophysical, biochemical, and cell biological approaches have provided us with insights into the underlying cell biological machinery. Here we focus on how endocytic trafficking of signaling components (e.g., ligands or receptors) controls the generation, propagation, modulation, reception, and interpretation of developmental signals. A comprehensive enumeration of the links between endocytosis and signal transduction would exceed the limits of this review. We will instead use examples from different developmental pathways to conceptually illustrate the various functions provided by endocytic processes during key steps of intercellular signaling.

  7. Piezoelectric extraction of ECG signal.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al

    2016-11-17

    The monitoring and early detection of abnormalities or variations in the cardiac cycle functionality are very critical practices and have significant impact on the prevention of heart diseases and their associated complications. Currently, in the field of biomedical engineering, there is a growing need for devices capable of measuring and monitoring a wide range of cardiac cycle parameters continuously, effectively and on a real-time basis using easily accessible and reusable probes. In this paper, the revolutionary generation and extraction of the corresponding ECG signal using a piezoelectric transducer as alternative for the ECG will be discussed. The piezoelectric transducer pick up the vibrations from the heart beats and convert them into electrical output signals. To this end, piezoelectric and signal processing techniques were employed to extract the ECG corresponding signal from the piezoelectric output voltage signal. The measured electrode based and the extracted piezoelectric based ECG traces are well corroborated. Their peaks amplitudes and locations are well aligned with each other.

  8. Wavelet preprocessing of acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. Y.; Solorzano, M. R.

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes results using the wavelet transform to preprocess acoustic broadband signals in a system that discriminates between different classes of acoustic bursts. This is motivated by the similarity between the proportional bandwidth filters provided by the wavelet transform and those found in biological hearing systems. The experiment involves comparing statistical pattern classifier effects of wavelet and FFT preprocessed acoustic signals. The data used was from the DARPA Phase 1 database, which consists of artificially generated signals with real ocean background. The results show that the wavelet transform did provide improved performance when classifying in a frame-by-frame basis. The DARPA Phase 1 database is well matched to proportional bandwidth filtering; i.e., signal classes that contain high frequencies do tend to have shorter duration in this database. It is also noted that the decreasing background levels at high frequencies compensate for the poor match of the wavelet transform for long duration (high frequency) signals.

  9. Zinc signaling through glucocorticoid and glutamate signaling in stressful circumstances.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna

    2010-11-01

    Humans and animals are constantly exposed to environmental stress. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responds to stress, followed by glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal glands. This response serves to maintain homeostasis in the living body through energy mobilization or to restore it. The brain is an important target for glucocorticoids. The hippocampus participates in the regulation of the HPA axis. Stress activates glutamatergic neurons in the hippocampus, and serious stress induces dyshomeostasis of extracellular glutamate. This dyshomeostasis, which is potentiated by glucocorticoids, modifies cognitive and emotional behavior. On the other hand, zinc is necessary for glucocorticoid signaling and is released from glutamatergic (zincergic) neurons to modulate synaptic glutamate signaling. Stress also induces dyshomeostasis of extracellular zinc, which may be linked to dyshomeostasis of extracellular glutamate. Thus, glucocorticoid signaling might also contribute to dyshomeostasis of extracellular zinc. It is likely that zinc signaling participates in cognitive and emotional behavior through glucocorticoid and glutamate signaling under stressful circumstances. This Mini-Review analyzes the relationship among signals of glucocorticoid, glutamate, and zinc under stressful circumstances to elucidate the significance of the zinc signaling in response to stress.

  10. Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed signal excision software: User's manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parliament, Hugh A.

    1992-05-01

    The Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) signal excision software is a set of programs that provide real-time processing functions for the excision of interfering tones from a live spread-spectrum signal as well as off-line functions for the analysis of the effectiveness of the excision technique. The processing functions provided by the ASPT signal excision software are real-time adaptive filtering of live data, storage to disk, and file sorting and conversion. The main off-line analysis function is bit error determination. The purpose of the software is to measure the effectiveness of an adaptive filtering algorithm to suppress interfering or jamming signals in a spread spectrum signal environment. A user manual for the software is provided, containing information on the different software components available to perform signal excision experiments: the real-time excision software, excision host program, file processing utilities, and despreading and bit error rate determination software. In addition, information is presented describing the excision algorithm implemented, the real-time processing framework, the steps required to add algorithms to the system, the processing functions used in despreading, and description of command sequences for post-run analysis of the data.

  11. Controlling of explicit internal signal stochastic resonance by external signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya Ping; Wang, Pin; Li, Qian Shu

    2004-09-01

    Explicit internal signal stochastic resonance (EISSR) is investigated in a model of energy transduction of molecular machinery when noise is added to the region of oscillation in the presence of external signal (ES). It is found that EISSR could be controlled, i.e., enhanced or suppressed by adjusting frequency (ωe) and amplitude (A) of ES, and that there exits an optimal frequency for ES, which makes EISSR strength reach the maximum. Meanwhile, a critical amplitude (Ac) is found, which is a threshold of occurrence of EISSR. Finally, the difference and similarity between EISSR and IISSR (implicit internal signal stochastic resonance) are discussed.

  12. Inactivation of Akt by arsenic trioxide induces cell death via mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling in SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Hao-Peng; Yang, Shu-Meng; Yang, Yue; Ma, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Yan-Mei

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been recognized as a potential chemotherapeutic agent, yet the details concerning its mechanism of action in solid cancers remain undetermined. The present study assessed the role of Akt in the cell death induced by As2O3. The MTT assay showed that As2O3 suppressed the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Characteristic apoptotic changes were observed in the As2O3‑treated cells by Hoechst 33342 staining, and FACS analysis showed that As2O3 caused dose-dependent apoptotic cell death. As2O3 activated caspase-3 and -9, and PARP cleavage in a dose-dependent manner. Compromised mitochondrial membrane potential and an increased protein level of Bax indicated involvement of mitochondia. As2O3 decreased the levels of p-Akt (Ser473), p-Akt (Thr308) and p-GSK-3β (Ser9), suggesting that As2O3 inactivated Akt kinase. In addition, LY294002 (a PI3 kinase inhibitor) augmented the apoptosis induced by As2O3. These results demonstrated that inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling was involved in As2O3-induced apoptosis of gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.

  13. The autophagy pathway maintained signaling crosstalk with the Keap1-Nrf2 system through p62 in auditory cells under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken; Dan, Katsuaki; Goto, Fumiyuki; Tshuchihashi, Nana; Nomura, Yasuyuki; Fujioka, Masato; Kanzaki, Sho; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2015-02-01

    The main purposes of our study were to consider the effect of autophagy on auditory cells under oxidative stress, and the function of possible crosstalk among p62, Keap1 and Nrf2 in autophagy-deficient auditory cells. First, we described how cell death was induced in auditory cell line (HEI-OC1) exposed to H2O2. We found that the decision for the cell death of auditory cells under oxidative stress depends on the balance between autophagy and necrosis due to ATP depletion, and autophagy plays a cytoprotective function in oxidative stress-induced necrosis. Our data clearly suggested that autophagy was a cell survival mechanism in H2O2-induced cell death, based on the observation that suppression of autophagy by knockdown of Atg7 sensitized, whereas activation of autophagy by rapamycin protected against H2O2-induced cell death. Next, our results regarding the relationship among p62, Nrf2 and Keap1 by siRNA paradoxically showed that p62 creates a positive feedback loop in the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway. Autophagy impaired by Atg7 knockdown degrades Keap1 in a p62-dependent manner, whereas Nrf2 is activated. As a result, the cell death induced by H2O2 was promoted in auditory cells. Taken together, these results suggested that the autophagy pathway maintained signaling crosstalk with the Keap1-Nrf2 system through p62 in auditory cells under oxidative stress.

  14. Mutant p53 (G199V) gains antiapoptotic function through signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Sang Yull; Rho, Jee Hyun; Jeong, Na Young; Soung, Young Hwa; Jo, Wol Soon; Kang, Do-Young; Kim, Sung-Heun; Yoo, Young Hyun

    2009-10-01

    In the present study, we identified a missense mutation (G199V) in KAT-18 cell line established from primary cultures of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). Notably, knockdown of this mutant (mt) p53 reduced cell viability and exerted antitumor activity equivalent to high doses of several chemotherapeutic agents. We showed that p53 knockdown had an antitumor effect via the induction of apoptosis. We further examined the underlying mechanism by which mt p53 (G199V) gains antiapoptotic function in KAT-18 cells. Microarray analysis revealed that p53 knockdown modified the expression of numerous apoptosis-related genes. Importantly, p53 knockdown led to downregulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) gene expression. We further observed that p53 knockdown induced the downregulation of STAT3 protein. We also observed that a STAT3 inhibitor augmented the reduction of cell viability induced by p53 knockdown, whereas interleukin-6 treatment alleviated this effect. In addition, overexpression of STAT3 protected ATC cells against cell death induced by p53 knockdown. Taken together, these data show that mt p53 (G199V) gains antiapoptotic function mediated by STAT3 in ATC cells. Inhibition of the function of mt p53 (G199V) could be a novel and useful therapeutic strategy for decreasing the extent and severity of toxicity due to chemotherapeutic agents.

  15. Quorum Quenching Revisited—From Signal Decays to Signalling Confusion

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kar-Wai; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-01-01

    In a polymicrobial community, while some bacteria are communicating with neighboring cells (quorum sensing), others are interrupting the communication (quorum quenching), thus creating a constant arms race between intercellular communication. In the past decade, numerous quorum quenching enzymes have been found and initially thought to inactivate the signalling molecules. Though this is widely accepted, the actual roles of these quorum quenching enzymes are now being uncovered. Recent evidence extends the role of quorum quenching to detoxification or metabolism of signalling molecules as food and energy source; this includes “signalling confusion”, a term coined in this paper to refer to the phenomenon of non-destructive modification of signalling molecules. While quorum quenching has been explored as a novel anti-infective therapy targeting, quorum sensing evidence begins to show the development of resistance against quorum quenching. PMID:22666051

  16. Insulin signalling in the heart.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Luc; Horman, Sandrine; Beauloye, Christophe; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis

    2008-07-15

    The main role of insulin in the heart under physiological conditions is obviously the regulation of substrate utilization. Indeed, insulin promotes glucose uptake and its utilization via glycolysis. In addition, insulin participates in the regulation of long-chain fatty acid uptake, protein synthesis, and vascular tonicity. Significant advancements have been made over the last 20 years in the understanding of the signal transduction elements involved in these insulin effects. Among these molecular mechanisms, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway is thought to play a crucial role. Under pathological conditions, such as type-2 diabetes, myocardial ischaemia, and cardiac hypertrophy, insulin signal transduction pathways and action are clearly modified. These molecular signalling alterations are often linked to atypical crosstalks with other signal transduction pathways. On the other hand, pharmacological modifications of parallel and interdependent signalling components, such as the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway, are now considered to be a good therapeutic approach to treat insulin-signalling defects such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. In this review, we will focus on the description of the molecular signalling elements involved in insulin action in the heart and vasculature under these different physiological, pathological, and therapeutical conditions.

  17. Signal Relay During Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Rericha, Erin; Ott, Edward; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We developed a signal relay model to quantify the effect of intercellular communication in presence of an external signal, during the motion of groups of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. A key parameter is the ratio of amplitude of the cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) a signaling chemical secreted from individual cells versus the external cAMP field, which defines a time scale. Another time scale is set by the degradation rate of the cAMP. In our simulations, the competition between these two time scales results rich dynamics including uniform motion, as well as streaming and clustering instabilities. The simulations are compared to experiments for a wide range of different external signal strengths for both cells that secrete cAMP and a mutant which cannot relay cAMP. Under different strength of external linear cAMP gradient, the wild type cells form streams and exhibit clustering due to the intercellular signaling through individual cAMP secretion. In contrast, cells lacking signal relay move relatively straight. We find that the model captures both independent motion and the formation of aggregates when cells relay the signal.

  18. Targeting FGFR Signaling in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Touat, Mehdi; Ileana, Ecaterina; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; André, Fabrice; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2015-06-15

    The fibroblast growth factor signaling pathway (FGFR signaling) is an evolutionary conserved signaling cascade that regulates several basic biologic processes, including tissue development, angiogenesis, and tissue regeneration. Substantial evidence indicates that aberrant FGFR signaling is involved in the pathogenesis of cancer. Recent developments of deep sequencing technologies have allowed the discovery of frequent molecular alterations in components of FGFR signaling among several solid tumor types. Moreover, compelling preclinical models have demonstrated the oncogenic potential of these aberrations in driving tumor growth, promoting angiogenesis, and conferring resistance mechanisms to anticancer therapies. Recently, the field of FGFR targeting has exponentially progressed thanks to the development of novel agents inhibiting FGFs or FGFRs, which had manageable safety profiles in early-phase trials. Promising treatment efficacy has been observed in different types of malignancies, particularly in tumors harboring aberrant FGFR signaling, thus offering novel therapeutic opportunities in the era of precision medicine. The most exciting challenges now focus on selecting patients who are most likely to benefit from these agents, increasing the efficacy of therapies with the development of novel potent compounds and combination strategies, and overcoming toxicities associated with FGFR inhibitors. After examination of the basic and translational research studies that validated the oncogenic potential of aberrant FGFR signaling, this review focuses on recent data from clinical trials evaluating FGFR targeting therapies and discusses the challenges and perspectives for the development of these agents.

  19. Subplasma membrane Ca2+ signals.

    PubMed

    McCarron, John G; Chalmers, Susan; Olson, Marnie L; Girkin, John M

    2012-07-01

    Ca(2+) may selectively activate various processes in part by the cell's ability to localize changes in the concentration of the ion to specific subcellular sites. Interestingly, these Ca(2+) signals begin most often at the plasma membrane space so that understanding subplasma membrane signals is central to an appreciation of local signaling. Several experimental procedures have been developed to study Ca(2+) signals near the plasma membrane, but probably the most prevalent involve the use of fluorescent Ca(2+) indicators and fall into two general approaches. In the first, the Ca(2+) indicators themselves are specifically targeted to the subplasma membrane space to measure Ca(2+) only there. Alternatively, the indicators are allowed to be dispersed throughout the cytoplasm, but the fluorescence emanating from the Ca(2+) signals at the subplasma membrane space is selectively measured using high resolution imaging procedures. Although the targeted indicators offer an immediate appeal because of selectivity and ease of use, their limited dynamic range and slow response to changes in Ca(2+) are a shortcoming. Use of targeted indicators is also largely restricted to cultured cells. High resolution imaging applied with rapidly responding small molecule Ca(2+) indicators can be used in all cells and offers significant improvements in dynamic range and speed of response of the indicator. The approach is technically difficult, however, and realistic calibration of signals is not possible. In this review, a brief overview of local subplasma membrane Ca(2+) signals and methods for their measurement is provided.

  20. Ramentaceone, a Naphthoquinone Derived from Drosera sp., Induces Apoptosis by Suppressing PI3K/Akt Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawiak, Anna; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway plays an important role in processes critical for breast cancer progression and its upregulation confers increased resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy and radiation. The present study aimed at determining the activity of ramentaceone, a constituent of species in the plant genera Drosera, toward breast cancer cells and defining the involvement of PI3K/Akt inhibition in ramentaceone-mediated cell death induction. The results showed that ramentaceone exhibited high antiproliferative activity toward breast cancer cells, in particular HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. The mode of cell death induced by ramentaceone was through apoptosis as determined by cytometric analysis of caspase activity and Annexin V staining. Apoptosis induction was found to be mediated by inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling and through targeting its downstream anti-apoptotic effectors. Ramentaceone inhibited PI3-kinase activity, reduced the expression of the PI3K protein and inhibited the phosphorylation of the Akt protein in breast cancer cells. The expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein was decreased and the levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins, Bax and Bak, were elevated. Moreover, inhibition of PI3K and silencing of Akt expression increased the sensitivity of cells to ramentaceone-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our results indicate that ramentaceone induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells through PI3K/Akt signaling inhibition. These findings suggest further investigation of ramentaceone as a potential therapeutic agent in breast cancer therapy, in particular HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:26840401

  1. Study of Bioreductive Anticancer Agent RH-1-Induced Signals Leading the Wild-Type p53-Bearing Lung Cancer A549 Cells to Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Stulpinas, Aurimas; Imbrasaitė, Aušra; Krestnikova, Natalija; Šarlauskas, Jonas; Čėnas, Narimantas; Kalvelytė, Audronė Valerija

    2016-01-19

    Aziridinylquinone RH-1 (2,5-diaziridinyl-3-hydroxymethyl-6-methyl-cyclohexa-2,5-diene-1,4-dione) is a potential anticancer agent. RH-1 action is associated with quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) which reduces this diaziridinylbenzoquinone into DNA-alkylating hydroquinone and is overexpressed in many tumors. Another suggested mechanism of RH-1 toxicity is the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) arising from its redox cycling. In order to improve anticancer action of this and similar antitumor quinones, we investigated the involvement of different signaling molecules in cytotoxicity induced by RH-1 by using wild-type tumor suppressor p53 bearing nonsmall cell lung carcinoma A549 cells as a model. Gradual and prolonged increase of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK, P38, and JNK phosphorylation was observed during 24-h RH-1 treatment. In parallel, activation of DNA damage-sensing ATM kinase, upregulation, and phosphorylation of TP53 (human p53) took place. Inhibition studies revealed that RH-1-induced A549 apoptosis involved the NQO1-ATM-p53 signaling pathway and ROS generation. TP53 participated in ROS- and DNA damage-induced cell death differently. Moreover, MAP kinase JNK was another TP53 activator and death inducer in A549 cells. At the same time, rapid and prolonged activation of AKT kinase during RH-1 treatment was found, and it proved to be antiapoptotic kinase in our model system. Therefore, we identified that different and opposite cell death regulating signaling pathways, which may counteract one another, are induced in cancer cells during chemotherapeutic RH-1 treatment.

  2. Preconditioning c-Kit-positive Human Cardiac Stem Cells with a Nitric Oxide Donor Enhances Cell Survival through Activation of Survival Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Teng, Lei; Bennett, Edward; Cai, Chuanxi

    2016-04-29

    Cardiac stem cell therapy has shown very promising potential to repair the infarcted heart but is severely limited by the poor survival of donor cells. Nitric oxide (NO) has demonstrated cytoprotective properties in various cells, but its benefits are unknown specifically for human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs). Therefore, we investigated whether pretreatment of hCSCs with a widely used NO donor, diethylenetriamine nitric oxide adduct (DETA-NO), promotes cell survival. Results from lactate dehydrogenase release assays showed a dose- and time-dependent attenuation of cell death induced by oxidative stress after DETA-NO preconditioning; this cytoprotective effect was abolished by the NO scavenger. Concomitant up-regulation of several cell signaling molecules after DETA-NO preconditioning was observed by Western blotting, including elevated phosphorylation of NRF2, NFκB, STAT3, ERK, and AKT, as well as increased protein expression of HO-1 and COX2. Furthermore, pharmaceutical inhibition of ERK, STAT3, and NFκB activities significantly diminished NO-induced cytoprotection against oxidative stress, whereas inhibition of AKT or knockdown of NRF2 only produced a minor effect. Blocking PI3K activity or knocking down COX2 expression did not alter the protective effect of DETA-NO on cell survival. The crucial roles of STAT3 and NFκB in NO-mediated signaling pathways were further confirmed by stable expression of gene-specific shRNAs in hCSCs. Thus, preconditioning hCSCs with DETA-NO promotes cell survival and resistance to oxidative stress by activating multiple cell survival signaling pathways. These results will potentially provide a simple and effective strategy to enhance survival of hCSCs after transplantation and increase their efficacy in repairing infarcted myocardium. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Ramentaceone, a Naphthoquinone Derived from Drosera sp., Induces Apoptosis by Suppressing PI3K/Akt Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawiak, Anna; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway plays an important role in processes critical for breast cancer progression and its upregulation confers increased resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy and radiation. The present study aimed at determining the activity of ramentaceone, a constituent of species in the plant genera Drosera, toward breast cancer cells and defining the involvement of PI3K/Akt inhibition in ramentaceone-mediated cell death induction. The results showed that ramentaceone exhibited high antiproliferative activity toward breast cancer cells, in particular HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. The mode of cell death induced by ramentaceone was through apoptosis as determined by cytometric analysis of caspase activity and Annexin V staining. Apoptosis induction was found to be mediated by inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling and through targeting its downstream anti-apoptotic effectors. Ramentaceone inhibited PI3-kinase activity, reduced the expression of the PI3K protein and inhibited the phosphorylation of the Akt protein in breast cancer cells. The expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein was decreased and the levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins, Bax and Bak, were elevated. Moreover, inhibition of PI3K and silencing of Akt expression increased the sensitivity of cells to ramentaceone-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our results indicate that ramentaceone induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells through PI3K/Akt signaling inhibition. These findings suggest further investigation of ramentaceone as a potential therapeutic agent in breast cancer therapy, in particular HER2-positive breast cancer.

  4. Coupling of D2R Short but not D2R Long receptor isoform to the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway renders striatal neurons vulnerable to mutant huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Galan-Rodriguez, Beatriz; Martin, Elodie; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Déglon, Nicole; Betuing, Sandrine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease, an inherited neurodegenerative disorder, results from abnormal polyglutamine extension in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin protein. This mutation causes preferential degeneration of striatal projection neurons. We previously demonstrated, in vitro, that dopaminergic D2 receptor stimulation acted in synergy with expanded huntingtin to increase aggregates formation and striatal death through activation of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway. In vivo, in a lentiviral-mediated model of expanded huntingtin expression in the rat striatum, we found that the D2 antagonist haloperidol protects striatal neurons against expanded huntingtin-mediated toxicity. Two variant transcripts are generated by alternative splicing of the of D2 receptor gene, the D2R-Long and the D2R-Short, which are thought to play different functional roles. We show herein that overexpression of D2R-Short, but not D2R-Long in cell lines is associated with activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. In striatal neurons in culture, the selective D2 agonist Quinpirole triggers phosphorylation of cofilin, a downstream effector of ROCK, which is abrogated by siRNAs that knockdown both D2R-Long and D2R-Short, but not by siRNAs targeting D2R-Long alone. Aggregate formation and neuronal death induced by expanded huntingtin, were potentiated by Quinpirole. This D2 agonist-mediated effect was selectively inhibited by the siRNA targeting both D2R-Long and D2R-Short but not D2R-Long alone. Our data provide evidence for a specific coupling of D2R-Short to the RhoA/ROCK/cofilin pathway, and its involvement in striatal vulnerability to expanded huntingtin. A new route for targeting Rho-ROCK