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Sample records for cdk2 associating protein

  1. Cdi1, a human G1 and S phase protein phosphatase that associates with Cdk2.

    PubMed

    Gyuris, J; Golemis, E; Chertkov, H; Brent, R

    1993-11-19

    We used the interaction trap, a yeast genetic selection for interacting proteins, to isolate human cyclin-dependent kinase interactor 1 (Cdi1). In yeast, Cdi1 interacts with cyclin-dependent kinases, including human Cdc2, Cdk2, and Cdk3, but not with Ckd4. In HeLa cells, Cdi1 is expressed at the G1 to S transition, and the protein forms stable complexes with Cdk2. Cdi1 bears weak sequence similarity to known tyrosine and dual specificity phosphatases. In vitro, Cdi1 removes phosphate from tyrosine residues in model substrates, but a mutant protein that bears a lesion in the putative active site cysteine does not. Overexpression of wild-type Cdi1 delays progression through the cell cycle in yeast and HeLa cells; delay is dependent on Cdi1 phosphatase activity. These experiments identify Cdi1 as a novel type of protein phosphatase that forms complexes with cyclin-dependent kinases. PMID:8242750

  2. Centriolar satellites assemble centrosomal microcephaly proteins to recruit CDK2 and promote centriole duplication.

    PubMed

    Kodani, Andrew; Yu, Timothy W; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Jayaraman, Divya; Johnson, Tasha L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Sztriha, Lāszló; Partlow, Jennifer N; Kim, Hanjun; Krup, Alexis L; Dammermann, Alexander; Krogan, Nevan J; Walsh, Christopher A; Reiter, Jeremy F

    2015-01-01

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) associated proteins CDK5RAP2, CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 colocalize at the centrosome. We found that they interact to promote centriole duplication and form a hierarchy in which each is required to localize another to the centrosome, with CDK5RAP2 at the apex, and CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 at sequentially lower positions. MCPH proteins interact with distinct centriolar satellite proteins; CDK5RAP2 interacts with SPAG5 and CEP72, CEP152 with CEP131, WDR62 with MOONRAKER, and CEP63 with CEP90 and CCDC14. These satellite proteins localize their cognate MCPH interactors to centrosomes and also promote centriole duplication. Consistent with a role for satellites in microcephaly, homozygous mutations in one satellite gene, CEP90, may cause MCPH. The satellite proteins, with the exception of CCDC14, and MCPH proteins promote centriole duplication by recruiting CDK2 to the centrosome. Thus, centriolar satellites build a MCPH complex critical for human neurodevelopment that promotes CDK2 centrosomal localization and centriole duplication. PMID:26297806

  3. Centriolar satellites assemble centrosomal microcephaly proteins to recruit CDK2 and promote centriole duplication

    PubMed Central

    Kodani, Andrew; Yu, Timothy W; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Jayaraman, Divya; Johnson, Tasha L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Sztriha, Lāszló; Partlow, Jennifer N; Kim, Hanjun; Krup, Alexis L; Dammermann, Alexander; Krogan, Nevan J; Walsh, Christopher A; Reiter, Jeremy F

    2015-01-01

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) associated proteins CDK5RAP2, CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 colocalize at the centrosome. We found that they interact to promote centriole duplication and form a hierarchy in which each is required to localize another to the centrosome, with CDK5RAP2 at the apex, and CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 at sequentially lower positions. MCPH proteins interact with distinct centriolar satellite proteins; CDK5RAP2 interacts with SPAG5 and CEP72, CEP152 with CEP131, WDR62 with MOONRAKER, and CEP63 with CEP90 and CCDC14. These satellite proteins localize their cognate MCPH interactors to centrosomes and also promote centriole duplication. Consistent with a role for satellites in microcephaly, homozygous mutations in one satellite gene, CEP90, may cause MCPH. The satellite proteins, with the exception of CCDC14, and MCPH proteins promote centriole duplication by recruiting CDK2 to the centrosome. Thus, centriolar satellites build a MCPH complex critical for human neurodevelopment that promotes CDK2 centrosomal localization and centriole duplication. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07519.001 PMID:26297806

  4. Centriolar satellites assemble centrosomal microcephaly proteins to recruit CDK2 and promote centriole duplication.

    PubMed

    Kodani, Andrew; Yu, Timothy W; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Jayaraman, Divya; Johnson, Tasha L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Sztriha, Lāszló; Partlow, Jennifer N; Kim, Hanjun; Krup, Alexis L; Dammermann, Alexander; Krogan, Nevan J; Walsh, Christopher A; Reiter, Jeremy F

    2015-08-22

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) associated proteins CDK5RAP2, CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 colocalize at the centrosome. We found that they interact to promote centriole duplication and form a hierarchy in which each is required to localize another to the centrosome, with CDK5RAP2 at the apex, and CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 at sequentially lower positions. MCPH proteins interact with distinct centriolar satellite proteins; CDK5RAP2 interacts with SPAG5 and CEP72, CEP152 with CEP131, WDR62 with MOONRAKER, and CEP63 with CEP90 and CCDC14. These satellite proteins localize their cognate MCPH interactors to centrosomes and also promote centriole duplication. Consistent with a role for satellites in microcephaly, homozygous mutations in one satellite gene, CEP90, may cause MCPH. The satellite proteins, with the exception of CCDC14, and MCPH proteins promote centriole duplication by recruiting CDK2 to the centrosome. Thus, centriolar satellites build a MCPH complex critical for human neurodevelopment that promotes CDK2 centrosomal localization and centriole duplication.

  5. Successive phosphorylation of p27(KIP1) protein at serine-10 and C terminus crucially controls its potency to inactivate Cdk2.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Atish R; Kan, Qiuming; Srivastava, Saumya; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Arakawa-Takeuchi, Shiho; Fujita, Naoya; Okayama, Hiroto

    2012-06-22

    During the G(1)-S transition, the activity of Cdk2 is regulated by its association with p27(KIP1), which in rodent fibroblasts undergoes phosphorylation mainly at serine 10, threonine 187, and C-terminal threonine 197 by KIS, Cdk2, and Pim or ROCK, respectively. Recently Cdc6 the AAA+ ATPase, identified initially to assemble pre-replicative complexes on origins of replication and later to activate p21(CIP1)-inactivated Cdk2, was found also to activate p27-bound Cdk2 but only after the bound p27 is C-terminally phosphorylated. On the other hand, the biological significance of the serine 10 phosphorylation remains elusive aside from its involvement in the stability of p27 itself. We report here that serine 10 phosphorylation is required for efficient C-terminal phosphorylation of its own by PIM and ROCK kinases and critically controls the potency of p27 as a Cdk2 inhibitor. In vitro, PIM1 and active ROCK1 efficiently phosphorylated free as well as Cdk2-bound p27 but only when the p27 was phosphorylated at Ser-10 in advance. Consistently, a Ser-10 nonphosphorylatable mutant p27 protein was not phosphorylated at the C terminus in vivo. Furthermore, when double-phosphorylated, free p27 was no longer a potent inhibitor of Cdk2, and Cdk2-bound p27 could be removed by Cdc6 to reactivate the Cdk2. Thus, phosphorylation at these two sites crucially controls the potency of this CDK inhibitor in two distinct modes.

  6. Association of Cdk2/cyclin E and NF-kappa B complexes at G1/S phase.

    PubMed

    Chen, E; Li, C C

    1998-08-28

    NF-kappa B/Rel family plays a pivotal role in a wide variety of cellular functions including growth, development, apoptosis and stress responses. Recent studies indicated that NF-kappa B is also involved in the cell cycle regulation, and high expression of c-Rel results in a cell cycle arrest at the G1/S-phase transition (Bash, J., Zong, W,-X., and Gelinas, C. (1997) Mol. Cell. Biol. 17, 6526-6536). Here we report the detection of Cdk2, a critical kinase responsible for the G1/S-phase transition, in immune complexes precipitated by the NF-kappa B antisera. Cdk2 and NF-kappa B association was detected by co-precipitation in the nuclear lysates of the G1/S-phase cells, and was found in cultured cell lines and in T cells purified from human peripheral blood. Using an affinity column containing the C-terminal peptide of human c-Rel, we isolated cyclin E, the regulatory subunit of the Cdk2 complex, as a c-Rel-binding protein. These findings support and provide physical basis for the involvement of NF-kappa B in the G1/S-phase cell cycle control, and suggest an important role played by the C-terminal sequence of c-Rel. PMID:9731206

  7. C-reactive protein promotes acute kidney injury via Smad3-dependent inhibition of CDK2/cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Lai, Weiyan; Tang, Ying; Huang, Xiao R; Ming-Kuen Tang, Patrick; Xu, Anping; Szalai, Alexander J; Lou, Tan-Qi; Lan, Hui Y

    2016-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is exacerbated in C-reactive protein transgenic mice but alleviated in Smad3 knockout mice. Here we used C-reactive protein transgenic/Smad3 wild-type and C-reactive protein transgenic/Smad3 knockout mice to investigate the signaling mechanisms by which C-reactive protein promotes AKI. Serum creatinine was elevated, and the extent of tubular epithelial cell necrosis following ischemia/reperfusion-induced AKI was greater in C-reactive protein transgenics but was blunted when Smad3 was deleted. Exacerbation of AKI in C-reactive protein transgenics was associated with increased TGF-β/Smad3 signaling and expression of the cyclin kinase inhibitor p27, but decreased phosphorylated CDK2 and expression of cyclin E. Concomitantly, tubular epithelial cell proliferation was arrested at the G1 phase in C-reactive protein transgenics with fewer cells entering the S-phase cell cycle as evidenced by fewer bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells. In contrast, the protection from AKI in C-reactive protein transgenic/Smad3 knockout mice was associated with decreased expression of p27 and promotion of CDK2/cyclin E-dependent G1/S transition of tubular epithelial cells. In vitro studies using tubular epithelial cells showed that C-reactive protein activates Smad3 via both TGF-β-dependent and ERK/MAPK cross talk mechanisms, Smad3 bound directly to p27, and blockade of Smad3 or the Fc receptor CD32 prevented C-reactive protein-induced p27-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. In vivo, treatment of C-reactive protein transgenics with a Smad3 inhibitor largely improved AKI outcomes. Thus, C-reactive protein may promote AKI by impairing tubular epithelial cell regeneration via the CD32-Smad3-p27-driven inhibition of the CDK2/cyclin E complex. Targeting Smad3 may offer a new treatment approach for AKI. PMID:27470679

  8. Cdc6 protein activates p27KIP1-bound Cdk2 protein only after the bound p27 protein undergoes C-terminal phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Yamamoto, Hanako; Park, Jung-ha; Mohanty, Atish R; Arakawa-Takeuchi, Shiho; Jinno, Shigeki; Okayama, Hiroto

    2012-02-24

    In mammalian cells Cdk2 activity during the G(1)-S transition is mainly controlled by p27(KIP1). Although the amount and subcellular localization of p27 influence Cdk2 activity, how Cdk2 activity is regulated during this phase transition still remains virtually unknown. Here we report an entirely new mechanism for this regulation. Cdc6 the AAA+ ATPase, known to assemble prereplicative complexes on chromosomal replication origins and activate p21(CIP1)-bound Cdk2, also activated p27-bound Cdk2 in its ATPase and cyclin binding motif-dependent manner but only after the p27 bound to the Cdk2 was phosphorylated at the C terminus. ROCK, which mediates a signal for cell anchorage to the extracellular matrix and activates the mTORC1 cascade as well as controls cytoskeleton assembly, was partly responsible for C-terminal phosphorylation of the p27. In vitro reconstitution demonstrated ROCK (Rho-associated kinase)-mediated phosphorylation of Cdk2-bound p27 at the C terminus and subsequent activation of the Cdk2 by Cdc6.

  9. HIV-1 Tat-associated RNA polymerase C-terminal domain kinase, CDK2, phosphorylates CDK7 and stimulates Tat-mediated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nekhai, Sergei; Zhou, Meisheng; Fernandez, Anne; Lane, William S; Lamb, Ned J C; Brady, John; Kumar, Ajit

    2002-01-01

    HIV-1 gene expression is regulated by a viral transactivator protein (Tat) which induces transcriptional elongation of HIV-1 long tandem repeat (LTR). This induction requires hyperphosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) repeats of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). To achieve CTD hyperphosphorylation, Tat stimulates CTD kinases associated with general transcription factors of the promoter complex, specifically TFIIH-associated CDK7 and positive transcription factor b-associated CDK9 (cyclin-dependent kinase 9). Other studies indicate that Tat may bind an additional CTD kinase that regulates the target-specific phosphorylation of RNA Pol II CTD. We previously reported that Tat-associated T-cell-derived kinase (TTK), purified from human primary T-cells, stimulates Tat-dependent transcription of HIV-1 LTR in vivo [Nekhai, Shukla, Fernandez, Kumar and Lamb (2000) Virology 266, 246-256]. In the work presented here, we characterized the components of TTK by biochemical fractionation and the function of TTK in transcription assays in vitro. TTK uniquely co-purified with CDK2 and not with either CDK9 or CDK7. Tat induced the TTK-associated CDK2 kinase to phosphorylate CTD, specifically at Ser-2 residues. The TTK fraction restored Tat-mediated transcription activation of HIV-1 LTR in a HeLa nuclear extract immunodepleted of CDK9, but not in the HeLa nuclear extract double-depleted of CDK9 and CDK7. Direct microinjection of the TTK fraction augmented Tat transactivation of HIV-1 LTR in human primary HS68 fibroblasts. The results argue that TTK-associated CDK2 may function to maintain target-specific phosphorylation of RNA Pol II that is essential for Tat transactivation of HIV-1 promoter. They are also consistent with the observed cell-cycle-specific induction of viral gene transactivation. PMID:12049628

  10. Cdk2 catalytic activity is essential for meiotic cell division in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sangeeta; Diril, M Kasim; Lee, Joanna H S; Bisteau, Xavier; Manoharan, Vanessa; Adhikari, Deepak; Ratnacaram, Chandrahas Koumar; Janela, Baptiste; Noffke, Juliane; Ginhoux, Florent; Coppola, Vincenzo; Liu, Kui; Tessarollo, Lino; Kaldis, Philipp

    2016-09-15

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) control the eukaryotic cell cycle by phosphorylating serine and threonine residues in key regulatory proteins, but some Cdk family members may exert kinase-independent functions that cannot easily be assessed using gene knockout approaches. While Cdk2-deficient mice display near-normal mitotic cell proliferation due to the compensatory activities of Cdk1 and Cdk4, they are unable to undergo meiotic generation of gametes and are consequently sterile. To investigate whether Cdk2 regulates meiosis via protein phosphorylation or by alternative kinase-independent mechanisms, we generated two different knockin mouse strains in which Cdk2 point mutations ablated enzyme activity without altering protein expression levels. Mice homozygous for the mutations Cdk2(D145N/D145N) or Cdk2(T160A/T160A) expressed only 'kinase-dead' variants of Cdk2 under the control of the endogenous promoter, and despite exhibiting normal expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and complexes, both mutations rendered mice sterile. Mouse cells that expressed only 'kinase-dead' variants of Cdk2 displayed normal mitotic cell cycle progression and proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that loss of Cdk2 kinase activity exerted little effect on this mode of cell division. In contrast, the reproductive organs of Cdk2 mutant mice exhibited abnormal morphology and impaired function associated with defective meiotic cell division and inability to produce gametes. Cdk2 mutant animals were therefore comparable to gene knockout mice, which completely lack the Cdk2 protein. Together, our data indicate that the essential meiotic functions of Cdk2 depend on its kinase activity, without which the generation of haploid cells is disrupted, resulting in sterility of otherwise healthy animals. PMID:27371320

  11. HPV16 E1E4 protein is phosphorylated by Cdk2/cyclin A and relocalizes this complex to the cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Davy, Clare E. . E-mail: cdavy@nimr.mrc.ac.uk; Ayub, Mahmood . E-mail: mahmood.ayub@imperial.ac.uk; Jackson, Deborah J. . E-mail: djackso@nimr.mrc.ac.uk; Das, Papia . E-mail: pdas@nimr.mrc.ac.uk; McIntosh, Pauline . E-mail: pmcinto@nimr.mrc.ac.uk; Doorbar, John . E-mail: jdoorba@nimr.mrc.ac.uk

    2006-05-25

    The human papillomavirus type 16 E1E4 protein is expressed abundantly in cells supporting viral DNA amplification, but its expression is lost during malignant progression. In cell culture, 16E1E4 causes G2 cell cycle arrest by associating with and preventing the nuclear entry of Cdk1/cyclin B1 complexes. Here, we show that 16E1E4 is also able to associate with cyclin A and Cdk2 during the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Only a weak association was apparent during S-phase, and progression through S-phase appeared unaffected. As with cyclin B1, the interaction of 16E1E4 with cyclin A is dependent on residues T22/T23 and results in the accumulation of cyclin A in the cytoplasm where it colocalizes with 16E1E4. 16E1E4 serine 32 was found to be phosphorylated by Cdk2/cyclin A. We hypothesize that the interaction of 16E1E4 with cyclin A may serve to increase the efficiency with which 16E1E4 is able to prevent mitotic entry.

  12. Biochemical characterizations reveal different properties between CDK4/cyclin D1 and CDK2/cyclin A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Myung; Yang, Kyungmi; Yang, Beom-Seok

    2003-10-31

    CDK2 and CDK4 known promoter of cell cycling catalyze phosphorylation of RB protein. Enzyme specificity between two CDKs that work at a different cell cycle phase is not clearly understood. In order to define kinase properties of CDK2 and CDK4 in complex with cycline A or cycline D1 in relation to their respective role in cell cycling regulation, we examined enzymatic properties of both CDK4/cycline D1 and CDK2/cycline A in vitro. Association constant, Km for ATP in CDK4/cyclin D1 was found as 418 microM, a value unusually high whereas CDK2/cyclin A was 23 microM, a value close to most of other regulatory protein kinases. Turnover value for both CDK4/cyclin D1 and CDK2/cyclin A were estimated as 3.4 and 3.9 min(-1) respectively. Kinetic efficiency estimation indicates far over one order magnitude less efficiency for CDK4/cyclin D1 than the value of CDK2/cycline A (9.3 pM(-1) min(-1) and 170 pM(-1) min(-1) respectively). In addition, inhibition of cellular CDK4 caused increase of cellular levels of ATP, even though inhibition of CDK2 did not change it noticeably. These data suggest cellular CDK4/cyclin D1 activity is tightly associated with cellular ATP concentration. Also, analysis of phosphorylated serine/threonine sites on RB catalyzed by CDK4/cyclin D1 and CDK2/cyclin A showed significant differences in their preference of phosphorylation sites in RB C-terminal domain. Since RB is known to regulate various cellular proteins by binding and this binding is controlled by its phosphorylation, these data shown here clearly indicate significant difference in their biochemical properties between CDK4/cyclin D1 and CDK2/cyclin A affecting regulation of cellular RB function. PMID:14646596

  13. Mechanism of p27 Unfolding for CDK2 Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Soumya Lipsa; Senapati, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cycle regulatory protein, CDK2 is active when bound to its complementary partner protein, CyclinA or E. Recent discovery of the Kip/Cip family of proteins has indicated that the activity of CDK2 is also regulated by a member protein, p27. Although, the mechanism of CDK2 inhibition by p27 binding is known from crystal structure, little is known about the mechanism of CDK2 reactivation. Here, we execute classical and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of unphosphorylated- and phosphorylated-p27 bound CDK2/CyclinA to unravel the CDK2 reactivation mechanism at molecular-to-atomic detail. Results suggest that the phosphorylation of p27 Y88 residue (pY88-p27) first disrupts the p27/CDK2 hybrid β-sheet and subsequently ejects the p27 310 helix from CDK2 catalytic cleft. The unbinding of p27 from CDK2/CyclinA complex, thus, follows a two-step unfolding mechanism, where the 310 helix ejection constitutes the rate-limiting step. Interestingly, the unfolding of p27 leaves CDK2/CyclinA in an active state, where the prerequisite CDK2-CyclinA interfacial contacts were regained and ATP achieved its native position for smooth transfer of phosphate. Our findings match very well with NMR chemical shift data that indicated the flip-out of p27 310 helix from CDK2 pocket and kinetic experiments that exhibited significant kinase activity of CDK2 when saturated with pY88-p27. PMID:27211815

  14. ING5 Is Phosphorylated by CDK2 and Controls Cell Proliferation Independently of p53

    PubMed Central

    Linzen, Ulrike; Lilischkis, Richard; Pandithage, Ruwin; Schilling, Britta; Ullius, Andrea; Lüscher-Firzlaff, Juliane; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Lüscher, Bernhard; Vervoorts, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of growth (ING) proteins have multiple functions in the control of cell proliferation, mainly by regulating processes associated with chromatin regulation and gene expression. ING5 has been described to regulate aspects of gene transcription and replication. Moreover deregulation of ING5 is observed in different tumors, potentially functioning as a tumor suppressor. Gene transcription in late G1 and in S phase and replication is regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) in complex with cyclin E or cyclin A. CDK2 complexes phosphorylate and regulate several substrate proteins relevant for overcoming the restriction point and promoting S phase. We have identified ING5 as a novel CDK2 substrate. ING5 is phosphorylated at a single site, threonine 152, by cyclin E/CDK2 and cyclin A/CDK2 in vitro. This site is also phosphorylated in cells in a cell cycle dependent manner, consistent with it being a CDK2 substrate. Furthermore overexpression of cyclin E/CDK2 stimulates while the CDK2 inhibitor p27KIP1 represses phosphorylation at threonine 152. This site is located in a bipartite nuclear localization sequence but its phosphorylation was not sufficient to deregulate the subcellular localization of ING5. Although ING5 interacts with the tumor suppressor p53, we could not establish p53-dependent regulation of cell proliferation by ING5 and by phospho-site mutants. Instead we observed that the knockdown of ING5 resulted in a strong reduction of proliferation in different tumor cell lines, irrespective of the p53 status. This inhibition of proliferation was at least in part due to the induction of apoptosis. In summary we identified a phosphorylation site at threonine 152 of ING5 that is cell cycle regulated and we observed that ING5 is necessary for tumor cell proliferation, without any apparent dependency on the tumor suppressor p53. PMID:25860957

  15. A computational study of the protein-ligand interactions in CDK2 inhibitors: using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics interaction energy as a predictor of the biological activity.

    PubMed

    Alzate-Morales, Jans H; Contreras, Renato; Soriano, Alejandro; Tuñon, Iñaki; Silla, Estanislao

    2007-01-15

    We report a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study to determine the protein-ligand interaction energy between CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and five inhibitors with the N(2)-substituted 6-cyclohexyl-methoxy-purine scaffold. The computational results in this work show that the QM/MM interaction energy is strongly correlated to the biological activity and can be used as a predictor, at least within a family of substrates. A detailed analysis of the protein-ligand structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations shows specific interactions within the active site that, in some cases, have not been reported before to our knowledge. The computed interaction energy gauges the strength of protein-ligand interactions. Finally, energy decomposition and multiple regression analyses were performed to check the contribution of the electrostatic and van der Waals energies to the total interaction energy and to show the capabilities of the computational model to identify new potent inhibitors.

  16. p12CDK2-AP1 interacts with CD82 to regulate the proliferation and survival of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chai, Juan; Ju, Jun; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Shen, Zhi-Yuan; Liang, Liang; Yang, Xiang-Ming; Ma, Chao; Ni, Qian-Wei; Sun, Mo-Yi

    2016-08-01

    p12 cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2)-associating protein 1 (p12CDK2-AP1) has been demonstrated to negatively regulate the activity of CDK2. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We aimed to determine the potential binding proteins of p12CDK2-AP1 and to elucidate the role of p12CDK2-AP1 in the regulation of the proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, and in vivo growth of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. The protein-protein interaction was predicted using computational decision templates. The predicted p12CDK2‑AP1 interacting proteins were overexpressed in human oral squamous cell carcinoma OSCC-15 cells, and the protein binding was examined using co-precipitation (Co-IP). Cell proliferation and invasion were determined via MTT assay and Transwell system, respectively. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining followed by flow cytometric analysis. The in vivo growth of OSCC-15 cells was examined in nude mouse tumor xenografts. We found that overexpression of either p12CDK2-AP1 or CD82 significantly suppressed the proliferation and invasion but promoted the apoptosis of OSCC-15 cells (P<0.05). Importantly, combined overexpression of p12CDK2-AP1 and CD82 showed synergistic antitumor activity compared with the overexpression of a single protein alone (P<0.05). Additionally, the simultaneous overexpression of p12CDK2-AP1 and CD82 significantly suppressed the in vivo tumor growth of OSCC-15 cells in nude mice compared with the negative control (P<0.05). Our findings indicate that p12CDK2-AP1 interacts with CD82 to play a functional role in suppressing the in vitro and in vivo growth of OSCC-15 cells. PMID:27349208

  17. NF-κB induces abnormal centrosome amplification by upregulation of CDK2 in laryngeal squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Li; Ma, Hui-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Li; Sun, Shao-Hua; Guo, Xing; Li, Fu-Cai

    2011-10-01

    Centrosome amplification can drive chromosomal instability (CIN) which is a major source of tumor initiation. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) on centrosome amplification of Hep-2 cells. Immunofluorescence was performed to display centrosomes. BAY11-7082 was used as an inhibitor of NF-κB to assess the inhibition of centrosome amplification, and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), ensuring cell cycle cycle coordination with centrosome cycle was detected by Western blotting. Furthermore, a 1556-bp fragment of the CDK2 promoter was analyzed using the TRANSFAC-TESS software. Luciferase assay, including a series of truncated CDK2 promoters and site mutations, was carried out to determine NF-κB binding sites in the CDK2 promoter. Electrophoresis mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were applied to confirm whether NF-κB indeed binds to the 5'-promoter region of the CDK2 gene. To reveal the clinical significance of CDK2 expression in laryngeal squamous cell cancer, mRNA and protein levels were assessed by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. We found that the transcription factor NF-κB plays a role in centrosome amplification in Hep-2 cells. Centrosome amplification is reduced by inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Moreover, expression of the p65 subunit of NF-κB is sufficient to promote centrosome amplification and increase in CDK2 protein levels. We further identified a functional NF-κB binding site located in the CDK2 promoter. Single mutation of the NF-κB site III (construct mutIII) however resulted in 76±5% (p<0.01) luciferase activity reduction. Electromobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitaton results suggest that NF-κB indeed binds to this responsive element associating with CDK2 expression and centrosome amplification. RT-PCR and Western blotting results revealed that both mRNA and protein levels of CDK2 were significantly higher in tumor tissues than those in paired

  18. c-Jun induces apoptosis of starved BM2 monoblasts by activating cyclin A-CDK2

    SciTech Connect

    Vanhara, Petr; Bryja, Vitezslav; Horvath, Viktor; Kozubik, Alois; Hampl, Ales; Smarda, Jan . E-mail: smarda@sci.muni.cz

    2007-02-02

    c-Jun is one of the major components of the activating protein-1 (AP-1), the transcription factor that participates in regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, we explored functional interactions of the c-Jun protein with several regulators of the G1/S transition in serum-deprived v-myb-transformed chicken monoblasts BM2. We show that the c-Jun protein induces expression of cyclin A, thus up-regulating activity of cyclin A-associated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), and causing massive programmed cell death of starved BM2cJUN cells. Specific inhibition of CDK2 suppresses frequency of apoptosis of BM2cJUN cells. We conclude that up-regulation of cyclin A expression and CDK2 activity can represent important link between the c-Jun protein, cell cycle machinery, and programmed cell death pathway in leukemic cells.

  19. CDK2 activation in mouse epidermis induces keratinocyte proliferation but does not affect skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; De Siervi, Adriana; Conti, Claudio J; Senderowicz, Adrian M; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2008-08-01

    It has been widely assumed that elevated CDK2 kinase activity plays a contributory role in tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that mice overexpressing CDK4 under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK4 mice) develop epidermal hyperplasia and increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. In this model, CDK4 overexpression results in increased CDK2 activity associated with the noncatalytic function of CDK4, sequestration of p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Furthermore, we have shown that ablation of Cdk2 reduces Ras-Cdk4 tumorigenesis, suggesting that increased CDK2 activity plays an important role in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated two transgenic mouse models of elevated CDK2 kinase activity, K5Cdk2 and K5Cdk4(D158N) mice. The D158N mutation blocks CDK4 kinase activity without interfering with its binding capability. CDK2 activation via overexpression of CDK4(D158N), but not of CDK2, resulted in epidermal hyperplasia. We observed elevated levels of p21(Cip1) in K5Cdk2, but not in K5Cdk4(D158N), epidermis, suggesting that CDK2 overexpression elicits a p21(Cip1) response to maintain keratinocyte homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that neither CDK2 overexpression nor the indirect activation of CDK2 enhanced skin tumor development. Thus, although the indirect activation of CDK2 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte hyperproliferation, activation of CDK2 alone does not induce malignant progression in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis.

  20. CDK2 Activation in Mouse Epidermis Induces Keratinocyte Proliferation but Does Not Affect Skin Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Everardo; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; De Siervi, Adriana; Conti, Claudio J.; Senderowicz, Adrian M.; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2008-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that elevated CDK2 kinase activity plays a contributory role in tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that mice overexpressing CDK4 under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK4 mice) develop epidermal hyperplasia and increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. In this model, CDK4 overexpression results in increased CDK2 activity associated with the noncatalytic function of CDK4, sequestration of p21Cip1 and p27Kip1. Furthermore, we have shown that ablation of Cdk2 reduces Ras-Cdk4 tumorigenesis, suggesting that increased CDK2 activity plays an important role in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated two transgenic mouse models of elevated CDK2 kinase activity, K5Cdk2 and K5Cdk4D158N mice. The D158N mutation blocks CDK4 kinase activity without interfering with its binding capability. CDK2 activation via overexpression of CDK4D158N, but not of CDK2, resulted in epidermal hyperplasia. We observed elevated levels of p21Cip1 in K5Cdk2, but not in K5Cdk4D158N, epidermis, suggesting that CDK2 overexpression elicits a p21Cip1 response to maintain keratinocyte homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that neither CDK2 overexpression nor the indirect activation of CDK2 enhanced skin tumor development. Thus, although the indirect activation of CDK2 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte hyperproliferation, activation of CDK2 alone does not induce malignant progression in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:18599613

  1. Foxo3 circular RNA retards cell cycle progression via forming ternary complexes with p21 and CDK2

    PubMed Central

    Du, William W.; Yang, Weining; Liu, Elizabeth; Yang, Zhenguo; Dhaliwal, Preet; Yang, Burton B.

    2016-01-01

    Most RNAs generated by the human genome have no protein-coding ability and are termed non-coding RNAs. Among these include circular RNAs, which include exonic circular RNAs (circRNA), mainly found in the cytoplasm, and intronic RNAs (ciRNA), predominantly detected in the nucleus. The biological functions of circular RNAs remain largely unknown, although ciRNAs have been reported to promote gene transcription, while circRNAs may function as microRNA sponges. We demonstrate that the circular RNA circ-Foxo3 was highly expressed in non-cancer cells and were associated with cell cycle progression. Silencing endogenous circ-Foxo3 promoted cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of circ-Foxo3 repressed cell cycle progression by binding to the cell cycle proteins cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (also known as cell division protein kinase 2 or CDK2) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (or p21), resulting in the formation of a ternary complex. Normally, CDK2 interacts with cyclin A and cyclin E to facilitate cell cycle entry, while p21works to inhibit these interactions and arrest cell cycle progression. The formation of this circ-Foxo3-p21-CDK2 ternary complex arrested the function of CDK2 and blocked cell cycle progression. PMID:26861625

  2. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Jingxiao; Gao, Weimin; Zhang, Lilei; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding site (Site I) and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III). In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV). All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate). In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2. PMID:25918937

  3. SUMOylation of Rb enhances its binding with CDK2 and phosphorylation at early G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fengxi; Qian, Jiang; Yue, Han; Li, Xiaofeng; Xue, Kang

    2016-07-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) is a prototypical tumor suppressor that is vital to the negative regulation of the cell cycle and tumor progression. Hypo-phosphorylated Rb is associated with G0/G1 arrest by suppressing E2F transcription factor activity, whereas Rb hyper-phosphorylation allows E2F release and cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S phase. However, the factors that regulate cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK)-dependent hyper-phosphorylation of Rb during the cell cycle remain obscure. In this study, we show that throughout the cell cycle, Rb is specifically small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)ylated at early G1 phase. SUMOylation of Rb stimulates its phosphorylation level by recruiting a SUMO-interaction motif (SIM)-containing kinase CDK2, leading to Rb hyper-phosphorylation and E2F-1 release. In contrast, a SUMO-deficient Rb mutant results in reduced SUMOylation and phosphorylation, weakened CDK2 binding, and attenuated E2F-1 sequestration. Furthermore, we reveal that Rb SUMOylation is required for cell proliferation. Therefore, our study describes a novel mechanism that regulates Rb phosphorylation during cell cycle progression. PMID:27163259

  4. SUMOylation of Rb enhances its binding with CDK2 and phosphorylation at early G1 phase

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fengxi; Qian, Jiang; Yue, Han; Li, Xiaofeng; Xue, Kang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) is a prototypical tumor suppressor that is vital to the negative regulation of the cell cycle and tumor progression. Hypo-phosphorylated Rb is associated with G0/G1 arrest by suppressing E2F transcription factor activity, whereas Rb hyper-phosphorylation allows E2F release and cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S phase. However, the factors that regulate cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK)-dependent hyper-phosphorylation of Rb during the cell cycle remain obscure. In this study, we show that throughout the cell cycle, Rb is specifically small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)ylated at early G1 phase. SUMOylation of Rb stimulates its phosphorylation level by recruiting a SUMO-interaction motif (SIM)-containing kinase CDK2, leading to Rb hyper-phosphorylation and E2F-1 release. In contrast, a SUMO-deficient Rb mutant results in reduced SUMOylation and phosphorylation, weakened CDK2 binding, and attenuated E2F-1 sequestration. Furthermore, we reveal that Rb SUMOylation is required for cell proliferation. Therefore, our study describes a novel mechanism that regulates Rb phosphorylation during cell cycle progression. PMID:27163259

  5. Cdk2 phosphorylation of Bcl-xL after stress converts it to a pro-apoptotic protein mimicking Bax/Bak

    PubMed Central

    Megyesi, J; Tarcsafalvi, A; Seng, NSHL; Hodeify, R; Price, PM

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a regulated form of cell death that proceeds by defined biochemical pathways. Most apoptosis is controlled by interactions between pro-survival and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in which death is often the consequence of permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Many drugs affect this equilibrium to favor apoptosis but this process is not completely understood. We show that the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin initiates an apoptotic pathway by phosphorylation of a pro-survival Bcl-2 family member, Bcl-xL, by cyclin-dependent kinase 2. The phosphorylation occurred at a previously unreported site and its biologic significance was demonstrated by a phosphomimetic modification of Bcl-xL that was able to induce apoptosis without addition of cisplatin. The mechanism of cell death induction was similar to that initiated by pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, that is, phosphorylated Bcl-xL translocated to the mitochondrial membrane, and formed pores in the membrane. This initiated cytochrome c release and caspase activation that resulted in cell death. PMID:27226901

  6. The cloning of the cdk2 transcript and the localization of its expression during gametogenesis in the freshwater giant prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Liu, Ping; Li, Zhen; Chen, Ying; Qiu, Gao-Feng

    2013-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) are key regulators of the cell cycle. In mammals, cdk2 plays an essential role in the meiosis of spermatocytes and oocytes. To investigate the role of cdk2 kinase during gametogenesis in crustaceans, we cloned a complete cDNA sequence of cdk2 from the freshwater giant prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, and examined its localization and expression in the developing gonads. The prawn cdk2 cDNA is 1,745 bp in length and encodes a putative protein of 305 amino acids. The deduced protein contains a conserved cyclin binding motif PSTAIRE and shares high homology with reported cdk2 kinases of other species. RT-PCR analysis showed a wide distribution of the cdk2 mRNA in all tested organs including the testis, ovary, heart, muscles, hepatopancreas and gills, and the highest level of expression in the ovary and testis. Localization by in situ hybridization of cdk2 mRNA in the ovary showed high expression in the ooplasm of previtellogenic and the nuclei of late vitellogenic oocytes. In testicular sections, cdk2 transcript is low in spermatogonia, high in spermatocytes, but reduced in spermatids and sperm. The high expression of the cdk2 transcripts in meiotic spermatocytes and oocytes indicated that the cdk2 gene has the conservative function in the germ cells meiosis during gametogenesis.

  7. Involvement of the CDK2-E2F1 pathway in cisplatin cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang; Megyesi, Judit; Safirstein, Robert L; Price, Peter M

    2007-07-01

    E2F1 is a key regulator that links cell cycle progression and cell death. E2F1 activity is controlled by Cdk2-cyclin complexes via several mechanisms, such as phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) to release E2F1, direct phosphorylation, and stable physical interaction. We have demonstrated that cisplatin cytotoxicity depends on Cdk2 activity, and Cdk2 inhibition protects kidney cells from cisplatin-induced cell death in vitro and in vivo. Now we show that E2F1 is an important downstream effector of Cdk2 that accumulates in mouse kidneys and in cultured mouse proximal tubular cells (TKPTS) after cisplatin exposure by a Cdk2-dependent mechanism. Direct inhibition of E2F1 by transduction with adenoviruses expressing an E2F1-binding protein (TopBP1) protected TKPTS cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis, whereas overexpression of E2F1 caused cell death. Moreover, E2F1 knockout mice were markedly protected against cisplatin nephrotoxicity by both functional and histological criteria. Collectively, cisplatin-induced cell death is dependent on Cdk2 activity, which is at least partly through the Cdk2-E2F1 pathway both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Essential role of the Cdk2 activator RingoA in meiotic telomere tethering to the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Mikolcevic, Petra; Isoda, Michitaka; Shibuya, Hiroki; del Barco Barrantes, Ivan; Igea, Ana; Suja, José A.; Shackleton, Sue; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Nebreda, Angel R.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play key roles in cell cycle regulation. Genetic analysis in mice has revealed an essential role for Cdk2 in meiosis, which renders Cdk2 knockout (KO) mice sterile. Here we show that mice deficient in RingoA, an atypical activator of Cdk1 and Cdk2 that has no amino acid sequence homology to cyclins, are sterile and display meiotic defects virtually identical to those observed in Cdk2 KO mice including non-homologous chromosome pairing, unrepaired double-strand breaks, undetectable sex-body and pachytene arrest. Interestingly, RingoA is required for Cdk2 targeting to telomeres and RingoA KO spermatocytes display severely affected telomere tethering as well as impaired distribution of Sun1, a protein essential for the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope. Our results identify RingoA as an important activator of Cdk2 at meiotic telomeres, and provide genetic evidence for a physiological function of mammalian Cdk2 that is not dependent on cyclins. PMID:27025256

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Classical Multidimensional Scaling Unveil New Metastable States in the Conformational Landscape of CDK2

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Pasquale; Rastelli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases are key regulatory nodes in cellular networks and their function has been shown to be intimately coupled with their structural flexibility. However, understanding the key structural mechanisms of large conformational transitions remains a difficult task. CDK2 is a crucial regulator of cell cycle. Its activity is finely tuned by Cyclin E/A and the catalytic segment phosphorylation, whereas its deregulation occurs in many types of cancer. ATP competitive inhibitors have failed to be approved for clinical use due to toxicity issues raised by a lack of selectivity. However, in the last few years type III allosteric inhibitors have emerged as an alternative strategy to selectively modulate CDK2 activity. In this study we have investigated the conformational variability of CDK2. A low dimensional conformational landscape of CDK2 was modeled using classical multidimensional scaling on a set of 255 crystal structures. Microsecond-scale plain and accelerated MD simulations were used to populate this landscape by using an out-of-sample extension of multidimensional scaling. CDK2 was simulated in the apo-form and in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonic acid (ANS). The apo-CDK2 landscape analysis showed a conformational equilibrium between an Src-like inactive conformation and an active-like form. These two states are separated by different metastable states that share hybrid structural features with both forms of the kinase. In contrast, the CDK2/ANS complex landscape is compatible with a conformational selection picture where the binding of ANS in proximity of the αC helix causes a population shift toward the inactive conformation. Interestingly, the new metastable states could enlarge the pool of candidate structures for the development of selective allosteric CDK2 inhibitors. The method here presented should not be limited to the CDK2 case but could be used to systematically unmask similar mechanisms throughout the human

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Classical Multidimensional Scaling Unveil New Metastable States in the Conformational Landscape of CDK2.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Pasquale; Caporuscio, Fabiana; Carlino, Luca; Rastelli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases are key regulatory nodes in cellular networks and their function has been shown to be intimately coupled with their structural flexibility. However, understanding the key structural mechanisms of large conformational transitions remains a difficult task. CDK2 is a crucial regulator of cell cycle. Its activity is finely tuned by Cyclin E/A and the catalytic segment phosphorylation, whereas its deregulation occurs in many types of cancer. ATP competitive inhibitors have failed to be approved for clinical use due to toxicity issues raised by a lack of selectivity. However, in the last few years type III allosteric inhibitors have emerged as an alternative strategy to selectively modulate CDK2 activity. In this study we have investigated the conformational variability of CDK2. A low dimensional conformational landscape of CDK2 was modeled using classical multidimensional scaling on a set of 255 crystal structures. Microsecond-scale plain and accelerated MD simulations were used to populate this landscape by using an out-of-sample extension of multidimensional scaling. CDK2 was simulated in the apo-form and in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonic acid (ANS). The apo-CDK2 landscape analysis showed a conformational equilibrium between an Src-like inactive conformation and an active-like form. These two states are separated by different metastable states that share hybrid structural features with both forms of the kinase. In contrast, the CDK2/ANS complex landscape is compatible with a conformational selection picture where the binding of ANS in proximity of the αC helix causes a population shift toward the inactive conformation. Interestingly, the new metastable states could enlarge the pool of candidate structures for the development of selective allosteric CDK2 inhibitors. The method here presented should not be limited to the CDK2 case but could be used to systematically unmask similar mechanisms throughout the human

  11. Easy Identification of Residues Involved on Structural Differences Between Nonphosphorylated and Phosphorylated CDK2Cyclin A Complexes Using Two-Dimensional Networks.

    PubMed

    Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio

    2014-02-01

    The structures of proteins in Protein Data Bank (PDB) contain a lot of information that can be revealed through the use of tools to facilitate their organization and analysis. The increase in available structural data of nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated CDK2cyclin A (npCDK2cycA and pCDK2cycA) complexes has enabled a more realistic description of the fine structural details of the interface residues of these proteins. This work reports the application of two-dimensional network representations (TDNRs) to the structures deposited in PDB to distinguish the differences in the surface between both complexes due to phosphorylation. As a result, a detailed map of the hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions between the T-loop residues of CDK2 and the residues of cycA that are different among nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated complexes were described. In addition, we found some interesting subtle differences in the CDK2cycA interface between nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated complexes due to residues that are not located at the T-loop of CDK2. We noted that some HB interactions in CDK2cycA complex are reinforced when the CDK2 is phosphorylated. PMID:27485571

  12. Molecular simulation studies on the binding selectivity of 2-anilino-4-(thiazol-5-yl)-pyrimidines in complexes with CDK2 and CDK7.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Tahir Ali; Qian, Hai-Yan; Pan, You-Lu; Chen, Jian-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) was regarded as a potentially therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Since the CDK family includes couples of high homology members, designing CDK2-selective inhibitors would provide valuable opportunities for the development of anticancer drugs with optimal efficacy. In this study, three thiazo-5-yl-pyrimidines as CDK2 inhibitors with different selectivity over cyclin dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) were examined to study the selectivity mechanism using a combined approach of computational techniques of flexible docking, EasyMIFs, molecular electrostatic potential (MESP), natural bond orbital (NBO), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and binding free energy calculations. Molecular simulations elicited new chemical insights into steric and electronic complementarities of these molecules to the binding sites of CDK2 and CDK7. The computed binding free energies were consistent with the ranking of their experimental binding affinities on CDK2 and CDK7. We also conducted in silico mutations of three key amino acids (CDK2: Gln85, Lys89, Asp145) to examine their impact on ligand binding with MD simulations and binding free energy calculations. The results indicated that these residues exhibited a strong tendency to mediate ligand-protein interactions through the H-bond and vdW interaction with CDK2-selective inhibitor. The present work may provide a better structural understanding of the molecular mechanism of CDK2 selective inhibition. The new computational insights presented in this study are expected to be valuable for the guidelines and development of new potent CDK2 inhibitors. PMID:26565382

  13. Extra precision docking, free energy calculation and molecular dynamics simulation studies of CDK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Muttineni, Ravikumar; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2013-10-01

    Molecular docking, free energy calculation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies have been performed, to explore the putative binding modes of 3,5-diaminoindazoles, imidazo(1,2-b)pyridazines and triazolo(1,5-a) pyridazines series of Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK2) inhibitors. To evaluate the effectiveness of docking protocol in flexible docking, we have selected crystallographic bound compound to validate our docking procedure as evident from root mean square deviations (RMSDs). We found different binding sites namely catalytic, inhibitory phosphorylation, cyclin binding and CKS-binding site of the CDK2 contributing towards the binding of these compounds. Moreover, correlation between free energy of binding and biological activity yielded a statistically significant correlation coefficient. Finally, three representative protein-ligand complexes were subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to determine the stability of the predicted conformations. The low value of the RMSDs between the initial complex structure and the energy minimized final average complex structure suggests that the derived docked complexes are close to equilibrium. We suggest that the phenylacetyl type of substituents and cyclohexyl moiety make the favorable interactions with a number of residues in the active site, and show better inhibitory activity to improve the pharmacokinetic profile of compounds against CDK2. The structure-based drug design strategy described in this study will be highly useful for the development of new inhibitors with high potency and selectivity.

  14. CDK2 Is Required for the DNA Damage Response During Porcine Early Embryonic Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, HaiYang; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 inhibition plays a central role in DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and DNA repair. However, whether CDK2 also influences early porcine embryo development is unknown. In this study, we examined whether CDK2 is involved in the regulation of oocyte meiosis and early embryonic development of porcine embryos. We found that disrupting CDK2 activity with RNAi or an inhibitor did not affect meiotic resumption or meiosis II arrest. However, CDK2 inhibitor-treated embryos showed delayed cleavage and ceased development before the blastocyst stage. Disrupting CDK2 activity is able to induce sustained DNA damage, as demonstrated by the formation of distinct gammaH2AX foci in nuclei of Day-3 and Day-5 embryos. Inhibiting CDK2 triggers a DNA damage checkpoint by activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-P53-P21 pathway. However, the mRNA expression of genes involved in nonhomologous end joining or homologous recombination pathways for double-strand break repair were reduced after administering CDK2 inhibitor to 5-day-old embryos. Furthermore, CDK2 inhibition caused apoptosis in Day-7 blastocysts. Thus, our results indicate that an ATM-P53-P21 DNA damage checkpoint is intact in the absence of CDK2; however, CDK2 is important for proper repair of the damaged DNA by either directly or indirectly influencing DNA repair-related gene expression. PMID:27307074

  15. Functional ablation of pRb activates Cdk2 and causes antiestrogen resistance in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Varma, Hemant; Skildum, Andrew J; Conrad, Susan E

    2007-12-05

    Estrogens are required for the proliferation of hormone dependent breast cancer cells, making estrogen receptor (ER) positive tumors amenable to endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens. However, resistance to these agents remains a significant cause of treatment failure. We previously demonstrated that inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) family tumor suppressors causes antiestrogen resistance in MCF-7 cells, a widely studied model of estrogen responsive human breast cancers. In this study, we investigate the mechanism by which pRb inactivation leads to antiestrogen resistance. Cdk4 and cdk2 are two key cell cycle regulators that can phosphorylate and inactivate pRb, therefore we tested whether these kinases are required in cells lacking pRb function. pRb family members were inactivated in MCF-7 cells by expressing polyomavirus large tumor antigen (PyLT), and cdk activity was inhibited using the cdk inhibitors p16(INK4A) and p21(Waf1/Cip1). Cdk4 activity was no longer required in cells lacking functional pRb, while cdk2 activity was required for proliferation in both the presence and absence of pRb function. Using inducible PyLT cell lines, we further demonstrated that pRb inactivation leads to increased cyclin A expression, cdk2 activation and proliferation in antiestrogen arrested cells. These results demonstrate that antiestrogens do not inhibit cdk2 activity or proliferation of MCF-7 cells in the absence of pRb family function, and suggest that antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cells resulting from pRb pathway inactivation would be susceptible to therapies that target cdk2.

  16. The mechanism of inhibition of the cyclin-dependent kinase-2 as revealed by the molecular dynamics study on the complex CDK2 with the peptide substrate HHASPRK

    PubMed Central

    Bártová, Iveta; Otyepka, Michal; KřÍž, Zdeněk; Koča, Jaroslav

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to explain structural details of cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) inhibition by phosphorylation at T14 and/or Y15 located in the glycine-rich loop (G-loop). Ten-nanosecond-long simulations of fully active CDK2 in a complex with a short peptide (HHASPRK) substrate and of CDK2 inhibited by phosphorylation of T14 and/or Y15 were produced. The inhibitory phosphorylations at T14 and/or Y15 show namely an ATP misalignment and a G-loop shift (~5 Å) causing the opening of the substrate binding box. The biological functions of the G-loop and GxGxxG motif evolutionary conservation in protein kinases are discussed. The position of the ATP γ-phosphate relative to the phosphorylation site (S/T) of the peptide substrate in the active CDK2 is described and compared with inhibited forms of CDK2. The MD results clearly provide an explanation previously not known as to why a basic residue (R/K) is preferred at the P2 position in phosphorylated S/T peptide substrates. PMID:15632290

  17. Structure-based drug design to the discovery of new 2-aminothiazole CDK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vulpetti, Anna; Casale, Elena; Roletto, Fulvia; Amici, Raffaella; Villa, Manuela; Pevarello, Paolo

    2006-03-01

    N-(5-Bromo-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)butanamide (compound 1) was found active (IC50=808 nM) in a high throughput screening (HTS) for CDK2 inhibitors. By exploiting crystal structures of several complexes between CDK2 and inhibitors and applying structure-based drug design (SBDD), we rapidly discovered a very potent and selective CDK2 inhibitor 4-[(5-isopropyl-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)amino] benzenesulfonamide (compound 4, IC50=20 nM). The syntheses, structure-based analog design, kinases inhibition data and X-ray crystallographic structures of CDK2/inhibitor complexes are reported.

  18. A kinetic model of the cyclin E/Cdk2 developmental timer in Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Ciliberto, Andrea; Petrus, Matthew J; Tyson, John J; Sible, Jill C

    2003-07-01

    Early cell cycles of Xenopus laevis embryos are characterized by rapid oscillations in the activity of two cyclin-dependent kinases. Cdk1 activity peaks at mitosis, driven by periodic degradation of cyclins A and B. In contrast, Cdk2 activity oscillates twice per cell cycle, despite a constant level of its partner, cyclin E. Cyclin E degrades at a fixed time after fertilization, normally corresponding to the midblastula transition. Based on published data and new experiments, we constructed a mathematical model in which: (1) oscillations in Cdk2 activity depend upon changes in phosphorylation, (2) Cdk2 participates in a negative feedback loop with the inhibitory kinase Wee1; (3) cyclin E is cooperatively removed from the oscillatory system; and (4) removed cyclin E is degraded by a pathway activated by cyclin E/Cdk2 itself. The model's predictions about embryos injected with Xic1, a stoichiometric inhibitor of cyclin E/Cdk2, were experimentally validated. PMID:12914904

  19. Conformational Adaption May Explain the Slow Dissociation Kinetics of Roniciclib (BAY 1000394), a Type I CDK Inhibitor with Kinetic Selectivity for CDK2 and CDK9.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Pelin; Andres, Dorothee; Kwiatkowski, Dennis A; Kolbe, Carl-Christian; Lienau, Philip; Siemeister, Gerhard; Lücking, Ulrich; Stegmann, Christian M

    2016-06-17

    Roniciclib (BAY 1000394) is a type I pan-CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibitor which has revealed potent efficacy in xenograft cancer models. Here, we show that roniciclib displays prolonged residence times on CDK2 and CDK9, whereas residence times on other CDKs are transient, thus giving rise to a kinetic selectivity of roniciclib. Surprisingly, variation of the substituent at the 5-position of the pyrimidine scaffold results in changes of up to 3 orders of magnitude of the drug-target residence time. CDK2 X-ray cocrystal structures have revealed a DFG-loop adaption for the 5-(trifluoromethyl) substituent, while for hydrogen and bromo substituents the DFG loop remains in its characteristic type I inhibitor position. In tumor cells, the prolonged residence times of roniciclib on CDK2 and CDK9 are reflected in a sustained inhibitory effect on retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation, indicating that the target residence time on CDK2 may contribute to sustained target engagement and antitumor efficacy. PMID:27090615

  20. CDK2 and mTOR are direct molecular targets of isoangustone A in the suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eunjung; Son, Joe Eun; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yeong A; Liu, Kangdong; Kim, Jiyoung; Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2013-10-01

    Licorice extract which is used as a natural sweetener has been shown to possess inhibitory effects against prostate cancer, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Here, we report a compound, isoangustone A (IAA) in licorice that potently suppresses the growth of aggressive prostate cancer and sought to clarify its mechanism of action. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on the growth of PTEN-deleted human prostate cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Administration of IAA significantly attenuated the growth of prostate cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. These effects were found to be attributable to inhibition of the G1/S phase cell cycle transition and the accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. The elevated p27{sup kip1} expression levels were concurrent with the decrease of its phosphorylation at threonine 187 through suppression of CDK2 kinase activity and the reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473 by diminishing the kinase activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Further analysis using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitated cell lysates determined that IAA exerts suppressive effects against CDK2 and mTOR kinase activity by direct binding with both proteins. These findings suggested that the licorice compound IAA is a potent molecular inhibitor of CDK2 and mTOR, with strong implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, licorice-derived extracts with high IAA content warrant further clinical investigation for nutritional sources for prostate cancer patients. - Highlights: • Isoangustone A suppresses growth of PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. • Administration of isoangustone A inhibits tumor growth in mice. • Treatment of isoangustone A induces cell cycle arrest and accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. • Isoangustone A inhibits CDK2 and mTOR activity. • Isoangustone A directly binds with CDK2 and mTOR complex in prostate cancer cells.

  1. CK1δ activity is modulated by CDK2/E- and CDK5/p35-mediated phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ianes, Chiara; Xu, Pengfei; Werz, Natalie; Meng, Zhigang; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Bischof, Joachim; Knippschild, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    CK1 protein kinases form a family of serine/threonine kinases which are highly conserved through different species and ubiquitously expressed. CK1 family members can phosphorylate numerous substrates thereby regulating different biological processes including membrane trafficking, cell cycle regulation, circadian rhythm, apoptosis, and signal transduction. Deregulation of CK1 activity and/or expression contributes to the development of neurological diseases and cancer. Therefore, CK1 became an interesting target for drug development and it is relevant to further understand the mechanisms of its regulation. In the present study, Cyclin-dependent kinase 2/Cyclin E (CDK2/E) and Cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p35 (CDK5/p35) were identified as cellular kinases able to modulate CK1δ activity through site-specific phosphorylation of its C-terminal domain. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CK1δ with CDK2/E or CDK5/p35 reduces CK1δ activity in vitro, indicating a functional impact of the interaction between CK1δ and CDK/cyclin complexes. Interestingly, inhibition of Cyclin-dependent kinases by Dinaciclib increases CK1δ activity in pancreatic cancer cells. In summary, these results suggest that CK1δ activity can be modulated by the interplay between CK1δ and CDK2/E or CDK5/p35. These findings extend our knowledge about CK1δ regulation and may be of use for future development of CK1-related therapeutic strategies in the treatment of neurological diseases or cancer. PMID:26464264

  2. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    PubMed

    Kokontis, John M; Lin, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yu; Fukuchi, Junichi; Hiipakka, Richard A; Chung, Chi-Jung; Chan, Tzu-Min; Liao, Shutsung; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR) and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1); and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1) and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  3. TNFα Signaling Regulates Cystic Epithelial Cell Proliferation through Akt/mTOR and ERK/MAPK/Cdk2 Mediated Id2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Julie X.; Fan, Lucy X.; Li, Xiaoyan; Calvet, James P.; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is present in cyst fluid and promotes cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). However, the cross-talk between TNFα and PKD associated signaling pathways remains elusive. In this study, we found that stimulation of renal epithelial cells with TNFα or RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand), a member of the TNFα cytokine family, activated either the PI3K pathway, leading to AKT and mTOR mediated the increase of Id2 protein, or MAPK and Cdk2 to induce Id2 nuclear translocation. The effects of TNFα/RANKL on increasing Id2 protein and its nuclear translocation caused significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of the Cdk inhibitor p21, allowing increased cell proliferation. TNFα levels increase in cystic kidneys in response to macrophage infiltration and thus might contribute to cyst growth and enlargement during the progression of disease. As such, this study elucidates a novel mechanism for TNFα signaling in regulating cystic renal epithelial cell proliferation in ADPKD. PMID:26110849

  4. CUL4B promotes replication licensing by up-regulating the CDK2-CDC6 cascade.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongxin; Mi, Jun; Wang, Wenxing; Lu, Juanjuan; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Zhaojian; Hu, Huili; Yang, Yang; Gao, Xiaoxing; Jiang, Baichun; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2013-03-18

    Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) participate in the regulation of diverse cellular processes including cell cycle progression. Mutations in the X-linked CUL4B, a member of the cullin family, cause mental retardation and other developmental abnormalities in humans. Cells that are deficient in CUL4B are severely selected against in vivo in heterozygotes. Here we report a role of CUL4B in the regulation of replication licensing. Strikingly, CDC6, the licensing factor in replication, was positively regulated by CUL4B and contributed to the loading of MCM2 to chromatin. The positive regulation of CDC6 by CUL4B depends on CDK2, which phosphorylates CDC6, protecting it from APC(CDH1)-mediated degradation. Thus, aside being required for cell cycle reentry from quiescence, CDK2 also contributes to pre-replication complex assembly in G1 phase of cycling cells. Interestingly, the up-regulation of CDK2 by CUL4B is achieved via the repression of miR-372 and miR-373, which target CDK2. Our findings thus establish a CUL4B-CDK2-CDC6 cascade in the regulation of DNA replication licensing.

  5. CDK2-dependent phosphorylation of Suv39H1 is involved in control of heterochromatin replication during cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Hyung; Yu, Seung Eun; Chai, Young Gyu; Jang, Yeun Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Although several studies have suggested that the functions of heterochromatin regulators may be regulated by post-translational modifications during cell cycle progression, regulation of the histone methyltransferase Suv39H1 is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate a direct link between Suv39H1 phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. We show that CDK2 phosphorylates Suv39H1 at Ser391 and these phosphorylation levels oscillate during the cell cycle, peaking at S phase and maintained during S-G2-M phase. The CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of Suv39H1 at Ser391 results in preferential dissociation from chromatin. Furthermore, phosphorylation-mediated dissociation of Suv39H1 from chromatin causes an enhanced occupancy of JMJD2A histone demethylase on heterochromatin and alterations in inactive histone marks. Overexpression of phospho-mimic Suv39H1 induces early replication of heterochromatin, suggesting the importance of Suv39H1 phosphorylation in the replication of heterochromatin. Moreover, overexpression of phospho-defective Suv39H1 caused altered replication timing of heterochromatin and increases sensitivity to replication stress. Collectively, our data suggest that phosphorylation-mediated modulation of Suv39H1-chromatin association may be an initial step in heterochromatin replication. PMID:24728993

  6. Staurosporine resistance accompanies DNA tumor virus-induced immortalization and is independent of the expression and activities of ERK1, ERK2, cyclin A, cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 2, and cdk4.

    PubMed

    Chang, T; Khalsa, O; Wang, H; Lee, M E; Schlegel, R

    1996-03-01

    Staurosporine, a potent protein kinase inhibitor, has been shown to arrest the growth of a number of normal cell types in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, while having little effect on several transformed lines. We wished to determine whether increased resistance to staurosporine was a common feature of virus-immortalized human cells and whether this phenotype was an early event following the expression of SV40 tumor antigens. Human foreskin keratinocytes immortalized by the SV40 DNA tumor virus displayed an increased resistance to staurosporine-induced growth arrest when compared with normal parental cells, as has been seen in human diploid fibroblasts. Keratinocytes immortalized by human papillomaviruses, or by just the human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes were also staurosporine resistant, suggesting that this phenotype often accompanies the immortalization of human cells by DNA tumor viruses. Acquisition of staurosporine resistance was a late event during immortalization, because precrisis human diploid fibroblasts that expressed the SV40 large T and small t antigens were not resistant to staurosporine. The same parental cells that were fully immortalized by SV40 were resistant. Staurosporine resistance was not the result of increased activities and/or expression of cyclin A, cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 2, cdk4, or the mitogen-activated kinases ERK1 and ERK2. Although increased activities and/or expression of cyclin A and cdk2 and cdk4 proteins, but not ERK1 or ERK2, were associated with immortalization, similar increases were found in staurosporine-sensitive precrisis cells expressing SV40 tumor antigens.

  7. Cdk2 deficiency decreases ras/CDK4-dependent malignant progression, but not myc-induced tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Kim, Yongbaek; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2007-10-15

    We have previously shown that forced expression of CDK4 in mouse skin (K5CDK4 mice) results in increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development in a chemical carcinogenesis protocol. This protocol induces skin papilloma development, causing a selection of cells bearing activating Ha-ras mutations. We have also shown that myc-induced epidermal proliferation and oral tumorigenesis (K5Myc mice) depends on CDK4 expression. Biochemical analysis of K5CDK4 and K5Myc epidermis as well as skin tumors showed that keratinocyte proliferation is mediated by CDK4 sequestration of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and activation of CDK2. Here, we studied the role of CDK2 in epithelial tumorigenesis. In normal skin, loss of CDK2 rescues CDK4-induced, but not myc-induced epidermal hyperproliferation. Ablation of CDK2 in K5CDK4 mice results in decreased incidences and multiplicity of skin tumors as well as malignant progression to SCC. Histopathologic analysis showed that K5CDK4 tumors are drastically more aggressive than K5CDK4/CDK2-/- tumors. On the other hand, we show that CDK2 is dispensable for myc-induced tumorigenesis. In contrast to our previous report of K5Myc/CDK4-/-, K5Myc/CDK2-/- mice developed oral tumors with the same frequency as K5Myc mice. Overall, we have established that ras-induced tumors are more susceptible to CDK2 ablation than myc-induced tumors, suggesting that the efficacy of targeting CDK2 in tumor development and malignant progression is dependent on the oncogenic pathway involved.

  8. Cdk2 deficiency decrease ras/cdk4-dependent malignant progression, but not myc-induced tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Everardo; Kim, Yongbaek; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that forced expression of CDK4 in mouse skin (K5CDK4 mice) results in increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) development in a chemical carcinogenesis protocol. This protocol induces skin papilloma development causing a selection of cells bearing activating Ha-ras mutations. We have also demonstrated that myc-induced epidermal proliferation and oral tumorigenesis (K5Myc mice) depends on CDK4 expression. Biochemical analysis of K5CDK4 and K5Myc epidermis as well as skin tumors showed that keratinocyte proliferation is mediated by CDK4 sequestration of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and activation of CDK2. Here, we studied the role of CDK2 in epithelial tumorigenesis. In normal skin loss of CDK2 rescues CDK4-induced, but not myc-induce epidermal hyperproliferation. Ablation of CDK2 in K5CDK4 mice results in decrease incidences and multiplicity of skin tumors as well as malignant progression to SCC. Histopathological analysis showed that K5CDK4 tumors are drastically more aggressive than K5CDK4/CDK2−/− tumors. On the other hand, we show that CDK2 is dispensable for myc-induced tumorigenesis. In contrast to our previous report K5Myc/CDK4−/− mice, K5Myc/CDK2−/− mice developed oral tumors with the same frequency as K5Myc mice. Overall we have established that ras-induced tumors are more susceptible to CDK2 ablation than myc-induced tumors, suggesting that the efficacy of targeting CDK2 in tumor development and malignant progression is dependent on the oncogenic pathway involved. PMID:17942901

  9. Benzamide capped peptidomimetics as non-ATP competitive inhibitors of CDK2 using the REPLACE strategy.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Craig, Sandra N; Liu, Shu; McInnes, Campbell

    2016-08-01

    Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) in complex with cyclin A in G1/S phase of the cell cycle has been shown to promote selective apoptosis of cancer cells through the E2F1 pathway. An alternative approach to catalytic inhibition is to target the substrate recruitment site also known as the cyclin binding groove (CBG) to generate selective non-ATP competitive inhibitors. The REPLACE strategy has been applied to identify fragment alternatives and substituted benzoic acid derivatives were evaluated as a promising scaffold to present appropriate functionality to mimic key peptide determinants. Fragment Ligated Inhibitory Peptides (FLIPs) are described which potently inhibit both CDK2/cyclin A and CDK4/cyclin D1 and have preliminary anti-tumor activity. A structural rationale for binding was obtained through molecular modeling further demonstrating their potential for further development as next generation non ATP competitive CDK inhibitors.

  10. Benzamide capped peptidomimetics as non-ATP competitive inhibitors of CDK2 using the REPLACE strategy.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Craig, Sandra N; Liu, Shu; McInnes, Campbell

    2016-08-01

    Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) in complex with cyclin A in G1/S phase of the cell cycle has been shown to promote selective apoptosis of cancer cells through the E2F1 pathway. An alternative approach to catalytic inhibition is to target the substrate recruitment site also known as the cyclin binding groove (CBG) to generate selective non-ATP competitive inhibitors. The REPLACE strategy has been applied to identify fragment alternatives and substituted benzoic acid derivatives were evaluated as a promising scaffold to present appropriate functionality to mimic key peptide determinants. Fragment Ligated Inhibitory Peptides (FLIPs) are described which potently inhibit both CDK2/cyclin A and CDK4/cyclin D1 and have preliminary anti-tumor activity. A structural rationale for binding was obtained through molecular modeling further demonstrating their potential for further development as next generation non ATP competitive CDK inhibitors. PMID:27297568

  11. Multiple CDK inhibitor dinaciclib suppresses neuroblastoma growth via inhibiting CDK2 and CDK9 activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenghu; Wang, Zhenyu; Pang, Jonathan C.; Yu, Yang; Bieerkehazhi, Shayahati; Lu, Jiaxiong; Hu, Ting; Zhao, Yanling; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Hong; Yi, Joanna S.; Liu, Shangfeng; Yang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, is responsible for approximately 15% of cancer-related mortality in children. Aberrant activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) has been shown to contribute to tumor cell progression in many cancers including NB. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors of CDKs comprise a strategic option in cancer therapy. Here we show that a novel multiple-CDK inhibitor, dinaciclib (SCH727965, MK-7965), exhibits potent anti-proliferative effects on a panel of NB cell lines by blocking the activity of CDK2 and CDK9. Dinaciclib also significantly sensitized NB cell lines to the treatment of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin (Dox) and etoposide (VP-16). Furthermore, dinaciclib revealed in vivo antitumor efficacy in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model of two NB cell lines and blocked tumor development in the TH-MYCN transgenic NB mouse model. Taken together, this study suggests that CDK2 and CDK9 are potential therapeutic targets in NB and that abrogating CDK2 and CDK9 activity by small molecules like dinaciclib is a promising strategy and a treatment option for NB patients. PMID:27378523

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits cancer cell growth via p27Kip1, CDK2, ERK1/ERK2, and retinoblastoma phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naim A; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Aires, Virginie; Yamashita, Tomoko; Oaxaca-Castillo, David; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2006-10-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a PUFA of the n-3 family, inhibited the growth of FM3A mouse mammary cancer cells by arresting their progression from the late-G(1) to the S phase of the cell cycle. DHA upregulated p27(Kip1) levels by inhibiting phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, i.e., ERK1/ERK2. Indeed, inhibition of ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation by DHA, U0126 [chemical MAPK extracellularly signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor], and MEK(SA) (cells expressing dominant negative constructs of MEK) resulted in the accumulation of p27(Kip1). MAP kinase (MAPK) inhibition by DHA did not increase p27(Kip1) mRNA levels. Rather, this fatty acid stabilized p27(Kip1) contents and inhibited MAPK-dependent proteasomal degradation of this protein. DHA also diminished cyclin E phosphorylation, cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) activity, and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein in these cells. Our study shows that DHA arrests cell growth by modulating the phosphorylation of cell cycle-related proteins.

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans Cyclin D/CDK4 and Cyclin E/CDK2 Induce Distinct Cell Cycle Re-Entry Programs in Differentiated Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korzelius, Jerome; The, Inge; Ruijtenberg, Suzan; Prinsen, Martine B. W.; Portegijs, Vincent; Middelkoop, Teije C.; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J.; Holstege, Frank C. P.; Boxem, Mike; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2011-01-01

    Cell proliferation and differentiation are regulated in a highly coordinated and inverse manner during development and tissue homeostasis. Terminal differentiation usually coincides with cell cycle exit and is thought to engage stable transcriptional repression of cell cycle genes. Here, we examine the robustness of the post-mitotic state, using Caenorhabditis elegans muscle cells as a model. We found that expression of a G1 Cyclin and CDK initiates cell cycle re-entry in muscle cells without interfering with the differentiated state. Cyclin D/CDK4 (CYD-1/CDK-4) expression was sufficient to induce DNA synthesis in muscle cells, in contrast to Cyclin E/CDK2 (CYE-1/CDK-2), which triggered mitotic events. Tissue-specific gene-expression profiling and single molecule FISH experiments revealed that Cyclin D and E kinases activate an extensive and overlapping set of cell cycle genes in muscle, yet failed to induce some key activators of G1/S progression. Surprisingly, CYD-1/CDK-4 also induced an additional set of genes primarily associated with growth and metabolism, which were not activated by CYE-1/CDK-2. Moreover, CYD-1/CDK-4 expression also down-regulated a large number of genes enriched for catabolic functions. These results highlight distinct functions for the two G1 Cyclin/CDK complexes and reveal a previously unknown activity of Cyclin D/CDK-4 in regulating metabolic gene expression. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that many cell cycle genes can still be transcriptionally induced in post-mitotic muscle cells, while maintenance of the post-mitotic state might depend on stable repression of a limited number of critical cell cycle regulators. PMID:22102824

  14. Centrosomal Localization of Cyclin E-Cdk2 is Required for Initiation of DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Rebecca L.; Maller, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cyclin E-Cdk2 is known to regulate both DNA replication and centrosome duplication during the G1-S transition in the cell cycle [1–4], and disruption of centrosomes results in a G1 arrest in some cell types [5–7]. Localization of cyclin E on centrosomes is mediated by a 20 amino acid domain termed the centrosomal localization sequence (CLS), and expression of the GFP-tagged CLS displaces both cyclin E and cyclin A from the centrosome [8]. In asynchronous cells CLS expression inhibits the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) into DNA, an effect proposed to reflect a G1 arrest. Here we show in synchronized cells that the reduction in BrdU incorporation reflects not a G1 arrest but rather direct inhibition of the initiation of DNA replication in S phase. The loading of essential DNA replication factors such as Cdc45 and PCNA onto chromatin is blocked by CLS expression, but DNA synthesis can be rescued by retargeting active cyclin E-Cdk2 to the centrosome. These results suggest that initial steps of DNA replication require centrosomally localized Cdk activity and link the nuclear cycle with the centrosome cycle at the G1-S transition. PMID:20399658

  15. Inferring Protein Associations Using Protein Pulldown Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Julia L.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Borkowski, John J.; Cannon, William R.

    2007-02-01

    Background: One method to infer protein-protein associations is through a “bait-prey pulldown” assay using a protein affinity agent and an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry)-based protein identification method. False positive and negative protein identifications are not uncommon, however, leading to incorrect inferences. Methods: A pulldown experiment generates a protein association matrix wherein each column represents a sample from one bait protein, each row represents one prey protein and each cell contains a presence/absence association indicator. Our method evaluates the presence/absence pattern across a prey protein (row) with a Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT), computing its p-value with simulated LRT test statistic distributions after a check with simulated binomial random variates disqualified the large sample 2 test. A pulldown experiment often involves hundreds of tests so we apply the false discovery rate method to control the false positive rate. Based on the p-value, each prey protein is assigned a category (specific association, non-specific association, or not associated) and appraised with respect to the pulldown experiment’s goal and design. The method is illustrated using a pulldown experiment investigating the protein complexes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Results: The Monte Carlo simulated LRT p-values objectively reveal specific and ubiquitous prey, as well as potential systematic errors. The example analysis shows the results to be biologically sensible and more realistic than the ad hoc screening methods previously utilized. Conclusions: The method presented appears to be informative for screening for protein-protein associations.

  16. CDK2 differentially controls normal cell senescence and cancer cell proliferation upon exposure to reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Chae Young; Lee, Seung-Min; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} differently adjusted senescence and proliferation in normal and cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently decreased PCNA levels in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently increased CDK2 activity in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup Cip1} is likely dispensable when H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces senescence in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggestively, CDK2 and PCNA play critical roles in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell fate decision. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species modulate cell fate in a context-dependent manner. Sublethal doses of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreased the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in normal cells (including primary human dermal fibroblasts and IMR-90 cells) without affecting cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, leading to cell cycle arrest and subsequent senescence. In contrast, exposure of cancer cells (such as HeLa and MCF7 cells) to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased CDK2 activity with no accompanying change in the PCNA level, leading to cell proliferation. A CDK2 inhibitor, CVT-313, prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cancer cell proliferation. These results support the notion that the cyclin/CDK2/p21{sup Cip1}/PCNA complex plays an important role as a regulator of cell fate decisions.

  17. Microtubules, Tubulins and Associated Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raxworthy, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews much of what is known about microtubules, which are biopolymers consisting predominantly of subunits of the globular protein, tubulin. Describes the functions of microtubules, their structure and assembly, microtube associated proteins, and microtubule-disrupting agents. (TW)

  18. Immunohistochemical study of cyclins D and E and cyclin dependent kinase (cdk) 2 and 4 in human endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Sasano, H; Yoshida, Y; Sato, S; Yajima, A

    1998-01-01

    We studied the immunolocalization of cyclins D1 and E and their corresponding partner cyclin dependent kinases (cdk), cdk4 and cdk2 in 39 cases of human endometrioid endometrial carcinoma and examined the correlations between the labeling indexes of the cyclins, cdks and clinicopathologic parameters and the clinical outcome of the patients. Cyclin D1 immunoreactivity was observed exclusively in the nuclei of tumor cells in 22/39 (56%) of the cases examined. Immunoreactivity for cyclin E, cdk2, and cdk4 was detected in carcinoma cells of 37/39 (95%), 39/39 and 36/39 cases, respectively. There were no significant correlations between the labeling indices of any of the parameters examined. Cyclins D1 and E labeling indices were not significantly correlated with any of the clinicopathologic parameters examined. However, there was a significant correlation between cdk2 labeling index and the histological grade of carcinoma (p < 0.0001), and a significant correlation (p = 0.015) was also detected between the cdk4 labeling index and pathologic stages. There was no significant difference in clinical outcome of the patients according to the cyclin and ckd4 immunostaining patterns. These results indicate that cdk2 and cdk4 overexpression may be involved in the development and/or progression of human endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. PMID:9673386

  19. CDK2-dependent activation of PARP-1 is required for hormonal gene regulation in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Roni H.G.; Castellano, Giancarlo; Bonet, Jaume; Le Dily, Francois; Font-Mateu, Jofre; Ballaré, Cecilia; Nacht, A. Silvina; Soronellas, Daniel; Oliva, Baldo; Beato, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene regulation implies that transcription factors gain access to genomic information via poorly understood processes involving activation and targeting of kinases, histone-modifying enzymes, and chromatin remodelers to chromatin. Here we report that progestin gene regulation in breast cancer cells requires a rapid and transient increase in poly-(ADP)-ribose (PAR), accompanied by a dramatic decrease of cellular NAD that could have broad implications in cell physiology. This rapid increase in nuclear PARylation is mediated by activation of PAR polymerase PARP-1 as a result of phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2. Hormone-dependent phosphorylation of PARP-1 by CDK2, within the catalytic domain, enhances its enzymatic capabilities. Activated PARP-1 contributes to the displacement of histone H1 and is essential for regulation of the majority of hormone-responsive genes and for the effect of progestins on cell cycle progression. Both global chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) and gene expression analysis show a strong overlap between PARP-1 and CDK2. Thus, progestin gene regulation involves a novel signaling pathway that connects CDK2-dependent activation of PARP-1 with histone H1 displacement. Given the multiplicity of PARP targets, this new pathway could be used for the pharmacological management of breast cancer. PMID:22948662

  20. In Silico Identification and In Vitro and In Vivo Validation of Anti-Psychotic Drug Fluspirilene as a Potential CDK2 Inhibitor and a Candidate Anti-Cancer Drug.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xi-Nan; Li, Hongjian; Yao, Hong; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Lu, Di; Wong, Man-Hon; Lin, Marie Chia-mi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Surgical resection and conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy ultimately fail due to tumor recurrence and HCC's resistance. The development of novel therapies against HCC is thus urgently required. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) pathways are important and well-established targets for cancer treatment. In particular, CDK2 is a key factor regulating the cell cycle G1 to S transition and a hallmark for cancers. In this study, we utilized our free and open-source protein-ligand docking software, idock, prospectively to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 FDA-approved small molecule drugs using a repurposing strategy and an ensemble docking methodology. Sorted by average idock score, nine compounds were purchased and tested in vitro. Among them, the anti-psychotic drug fluspirilene exhibited the highest anti-proliferative effect in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Huh7 cells. We demonstrated for the first time that fluspirilene treatment significantly increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase, and decreased the expressions of CDK2, cyclin E and Rb, as well as the phosphorylations of CDK2 on Thr160 and Rb on Ser795. We also examined the anti-cancer effect of fluspirilene in vivo in BALB/C nude mice subcutaneously xenografted with human hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7 cells. Our results showed that oral fluspirilene treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth. Fluspirilene (15 mg/kg) exhibited strong anti-tumor activity, comparable to that of the leading cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (10 mg/kg). Moreover, the cocktail treatment with fluspirilene and 5-fluorouracil exhibited the highest therapeutic effect. These results suggested for the first time that fluspirilene is a potential CDK2 inhibitor and a candidate anti-cancer drug for the treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma. In view of the fact that fluspirilene has a long history of safe human

  1. In Silico Identification and In Vitro and In Vivo Validation of Anti-Psychotic Drug Fluspirilene as a Potential CDK2 Inhibitor and a Candidate Anti-Cancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Lu, Di; Wong, Man-Hon; Lin, Marie Chia-mi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Surgical resection and conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy ultimately fail due to tumor recurrence and HCC’s resistance. The development of novel therapies against HCC is thus urgently required. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) pathways are important and well-established targets for cancer treatment. In particular, CDK2 is a key factor regulating the cell cycle G1 to S transition and a hallmark for cancers. In this study, we utilized our free and open-source protein-ligand docking software, idock, prospectively to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 FDA-approved small molecule drugs using a repurposing strategy and an ensemble docking methodology. Sorted by average idock score, nine compounds were purchased and tested in vitro. Among them, the anti-psychotic drug fluspirilene exhibited the highest anti-proliferative effect in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Huh7 cells. We demonstrated for the first time that fluspirilene treatment significantly increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase, and decreased the expressions of CDK2, cyclin E and Rb, as well as the phosphorylations of CDK2 on Thr160 and Rb on Ser795. We also examined the anti-cancer effect of fluspirilene in vivo in BALB/C nude mice subcutaneously xenografted with human hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7 cells. Our results showed that oral fluspirilene treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth. Fluspirilene (15 mg/kg) exhibited strong anti-tumor activity, comparable to that of the leading cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (10 mg/kg). Moreover, the cocktail treatment with fluspirilene and 5-fluorouracil exhibited the highest therapeutic effect. These results suggested for the first time that fluspirilene is a potential CDK2 inhibitor and a candidate anti-cancer drug for the treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma. In view of the fact that fluspirilene has a long history of safe human

  2. Structural basis for specificity and potency of a flavonoid inhibitor of human CDK2, a cell cycle kinase.

    PubMed Central

    De Azevedo, W F; Mueller-Dieckmann, H J; Schulze-Gahmen, U; Worland, P J; Sausville, E; Kim, S H

    1996-01-01

    The central role of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) in cell cycle regulation makes them a promising target for studying inhibitory molecules that can modify the degree of cell proliferation. The discovery of specific inhibitors of CDKs such as polyhydroxylated flavones has opened the way to investigation and design of antimitotic compounds. A novel flavone, (-)-cis-5,7-dihydroxyphenyl-8-[4-(3-hydroxy-1-methyl)piperidinyl] -4H-1-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride hemihydrate (L868276), is a potent inhibitor of CDKs. A chlorinated form, flavopiridol, is currently in phase I clinical trials as a drug against breast tumors. We determined the crystal structure of a complex between CDK2 and L868276 at 2.33 angstroms resolution and refined to an Rfactor 20.3%. The aromatic portion of the inhibitor binds to the adenine-binding pocket of CDK2, and the position of the phenyl group of the inhibitor enables the inhibitor to make contacts with the enzyme not observed in the ATP complex structure. The analysis of the position of this phenyl ring not only explains the great differences of kinase inhibition among the flavonoid inhibitors but also explains the specificity of L868276 to inhibit CDK2 and CDC2. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8610110

  3. Epstein-Barr virus Rta-mediated transactivation of p21 and 14-3-3σ arrests cells at the G1/S transition by reducing cyclin E/CDK2 activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Yen; Hsieh, Min-Jie; Chen, Chu-Ying; Chen, Yen-Ju; Chen, Jen-Yang; Chen, Mei-Ru; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Lin, Su-Fang; Hsu, Tsuey-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Many herpesviral immediate-early proteins promote their robust lytic phase replications by hijacking the cell cycle machinery. Previously, lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was found to be concurrent with host cell cycle arrest. In this study, we showed that ectopic expression of EBV immediate-early protein Rta in HEp-2 cells resulted in increased G1/S population, hypophosphorylation of pRb and decreased incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. In addition, EBV Rta transcriptionally upregulates the expressions of p21 and 14-3-3σ in HEp-2 cells, 293 cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma TW01 cells. Although p21 and 14-3-3σ are known targets for p53, Rta-mediated p21 and 14-3-3σ transactivation can be detected in the absence of p53. In addition, results from luciferase reporter assays indicated that direct binding of Rta to either promoter sequences is not required for activation. On the other hand, a special class of Sp1-responsive elements was involved in Rta-mediated transcriptional activation on both promoters. Finally, Rta-induced p21 expression diminished the activity of CDK2/cyclin E complex, and, Rta-induced 14-3-3σ expression sequestered CDK1 and CDK2 in the cytoplasm. Based on these results, we hypothesize that through the disruption of CDK1 and CDK2 activities, EBV Rta might contribute to cell cycle arrest in EBV-infected epithelial cells during viral reactivation. PMID:21918011

  4. Human carbon catabolite repressor protein (CCR4)-associative factor 1: cloning, expression and characterization of its interaction with the B-cell translocation protein BTG1.

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, J A; Adams-Burton, C; Pedicord, D L; Sukovich, D A; Benfield, P A; Corjay, M H; Stoltenborg, J K; Dicker, I B

    1998-01-01

    The human BTG1 protein is thought to be a potential tumour suppressor because its overexpression inhibits NIH 3T3 cell proliferation. However, little is known about how BTG1 exerts its anti-proliferative activity. In this study, we used the yeast 'two-hybrid' system to screen for interacting protein partners and identified human carbon catabolite repressor protein (CCR4)-associative factor 1 (hCAF-1), a homologue of mouse CAF-1 (mCAF-1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yCAF-1/POP2. In vitro the hCAF-1/BTG1 complex formation was dependent on the phosphorylation of a putative p34cdc2 kinase site on BTG1 (Ser-159). In yeast, the Ala-159 mutant did not interact with hCAF-1. In addition, phosphorylation of Ser-159 in vitro showed specificity for the cell cycle kinases p34CDK2/cyclin E and p34CDK2/cyclin A, but not for p34CDK4/cyclin D1 or p34cdc2/cyclin B. Cell synchrony experiments with primary cultures of rat aortic smooth-muscle cells (RSMCs) demonstrated that message and protein levels of rat CAF-1 (rCAF-1) were up-regulated under conditions of cell contact, as previously reported for BTG1 [Wilcox, Scott, Subramanian, Ross, Adams-Burton, Stoltenborg and Corjay (1995) Circulation 92, I34-I35]. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis showed that rCAF-1 localizes to the nucleus of contact-inhibited RSMCs, where it was physically associated with BTG1, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation with anti-hCAF-1 antisera. Overexpression of hCAF-1 in NIH 3T3 and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells was itself anti-proliferative with colony formation reduced by 67% and 90% respectively. Taken together, these results indicate that formation of the hCAF-1/BTG1 complex is driven by phosphorylation at BTG1 (Ser-159) and implicates this complex in the signalling events of cell division that lead to changes in cellular proliferation associated with cell-cell contact. PMID:9820826

  5. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated protein induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human hepatocellular carcinoma by activating the p53–Fbxw7 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haihe; Yang, Zhanchun; Liu, Chunbo; Huang, Shishun; Wang, Hongzhi; Chen, Yingli; Chen, Guofu

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. • RITA can significantly inhibit the in vitro growth of SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. • RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC. - Abstract: Aberrant Notch signaling is observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and has been associated with the modulation of cell growth. However, the role of Notch signaling in HCC and its underlying mechanism remain elusive. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated (RITA) mediates the nuclear export of RBP-J to tubulin fibers and downregulates Notch-mediated transcription. In this study, we found that RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. These changes led to growth inhibition and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. Our findings indicate that RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC.

  6. Proteolysis of Xenopus Cip-type CDK inhibitor, p16Xic2, is regulated by PCNA binding and CDK2 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell division is positively regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) partnered with cyclins and negatively regulated by CDK inhibitors. In the frog, Xenopus laevis, three types of CDK inhibitors have been described: p27Xic1 (Xic1) which shares sequence homology with both p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 from mammals, p16Xic2 (Xic2) which shares sequence homology with p21Cip1, and p17Xic3 (Xic3) which shares sequence homology with p27Kip1. While past studies have demonstrated that during DNA polymerase switching, Xic1 is targeted for protein turnover dependent upon DNA, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), and the ubiquitin ligase CRL4Cdt2, little is known about the processes that regulate Xic2 or Xic3. Methods We used the Xenopus interphase egg extract as a model system to examine the regulation of Xic2 by proteolysis and phosphorylation. Results Our studies indicated that following primer synthesis during the initiation of DNA replication, Xic2 is targeted for DNA- and PCNA-dependent ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and that Cdt2 can promote Xic2 turnover. Additionally, during interphase, Xic2 is phosphorylated by CDK2 at Ser-98 and Ser-131 in a DNA-independent manner, inhibiting Xic2 turnover. In the presence of double-stranded DNA ends, Xic2 is also phosphorylated at Ser-78 and Ser-81 by a caffeine-sensitive kinase, but this phosphorylation does not alter Xic2 turnover. Conversely, in the presence or absence of DNA, Xic3 was stable in the Xenopus interphase egg extract and did not exhibit a shift indicative of phosphorylation. Conclusions During interphase, Xic2 is targeted for DNA- and PCNA-dependent proteolysis that is negatively regulated by CDK2 phosphorylation. During a response to DNA damage, Xic2 may be alternatively regulated by phosphorylation by a caffeine-sensitive kinase. Our studies suggest that the three types of Xenopus CDK inhibitors, Xic1, Xic2, and Xic3 appear to be uniquely regulated which may reflect their specialized roles during cell

  7. Bufalin induces G0/G1 phase arrest through inhibiting the levels of cyclin D, cyclin E, CDK2 and CDK4, and triggers apoptosis via mitochondrial signaling pathway in T24 human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Wen; Yang, Jai-Sing; Pai, Shu-Jen; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chang, Shu-Jen; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Fan, Ming-Jen; Chiou, Shang-Ming; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Yeh, Chin-Chung; Chen, Po-Yuan; Tsuzuki, Minoru; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-04-01

    Most of the chemotherapy treatments for bladder cancer aim to kill the cancer cells, but a high recurrence rate after medical treatments is still occurred. Bufalin from the skin and parotid venom glands of toad has been shown to induce apoptotic cell death in many types of cancer cell lines. However, there is no report addressing that bufalin induced cell death in human bladder cancer cells. The purpose of this study was investigated the mechanisms of bufalin-induced apoptosis in a human bladder cancer cell line (T24). We demonstrated the effects of bufalin on the cell growth and apoptosis in T24 cells by using DAPI/TUNEL double staining, a PI exclusion and flow cytometric analysis. The effects of bufalin on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the level of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and DNA content including sub-G1 (apoptosis) in T24 cells were also determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of G(0)/G(1) phase-regulated and apoptosis-associated protein levels in bufalin-treated T24 cells. The results indicated that bufalin significantly decreased the percentage of viability, induced the G(0)/G(1) phase arrest and triggered apoptosis in T24 cells. The down-regulation of the protein levels for cyclin D, CDK4, cyclin E, CDK2, phospho-Rb, phospho-AKT and Bcl-2 with the simultaneous up-regulation of the cytochrome c, Apaf-1, AIF, caspase-3, -7 and -9 and Bax protein expressions and caspase activities were observed in T24 cells after bufalin treatment. Based on our results, bufalin induces apoptotic cell death in T24 cells through suppressing AKT activity and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein as well as inducing pro-apoptotic Bax protein. The levels of caspase-3, -7 and -9 are also mediated apoptosis in bufalin-treated T24 cells. Therefore, bufalin might be used as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of human bladder cancer in the future.

  8. Bufalin induces G0/G1 phase arrest through inhibiting the levels of cyclin D, cyclin E, CDK2 and CDK4, and triggers apoptosis via mitochondrial signaling pathway in T24 human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Wen; Yang, Jai-Sing; Pai, Shu-Jen; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chang, Shu-Jen; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Fan, Ming-Jen; Chiou, Shang-Ming; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Yeh, Chin-Chung; Chen, Po-Yuan; Tsuzuki, Minoru; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-04-01

    Most of the chemotherapy treatments for bladder cancer aim to kill the cancer cells, but a high recurrence rate after medical treatments is still occurred. Bufalin from the skin and parotid venom glands of toad has been shown to induce apoptotic cell death in many types of cancer cell lines. However, there is no report addressing that bufalin induced cell death in human bladder cancer cells. The purpose of this study was investigated the mechanisms of bufalin-induced apoptosis in a human bladder cancer cell line (T24). We demonstrated the effects of bufalin on the cell growth and apoptosis in T24 cells by using DAPI/TUNEL double staining, a PI exclusion and flow cytometric analysis. The effects of bufalin on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the level of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and DNA content including sub-G1 (apoptosis) in T24 cells were also determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of G(0)/G(1) phase-regulated and apoptosis-associated protein levels in bufalin-treated T24 cells. The results indicated that bufalin significantly decreased the percentage of viability, induced the G(0)/G(1) phase arrest and triggered apoptosis in T24 cells. The down-regulation of the protein levels for cyclin D, CDK4, cyclin E, CDK2, phospho-Rb, phospho-AKT and Bcl-2 with the simultaneous up-regulation of the cytochrome c, Apaf-1, AIF, caspase-3, -7 and -9 and Bax protein expressions and caspase activities were observed in T24 cells after bufalin treatment. Based on our results, bufalin induces apoptotic cell death in T24 cells through suppressing AKT activity and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein as well as inducing pro-apoptotic Bax protein. The levels of caspase-3, -7 and -9 are also mediated apoptosis in bufalin-treated T24 cells. Therefore, bufalin might be used as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of human bladder cancer in the future. PMID:22285700

  9. Interphase APC/C–Cdc20 inhibition by cyclin A2–Cdk2 ensures efficient mitotic entry

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Jamin B.; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Proper cell-cycle progression requires tight temporal control of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), a large ubiquitin ligase that is activated by one of two co-activators, Cdh1 or Cdc20. APC/C and Cdc20 are already present during interphase but APC/C–Cdc20 regulation during this window of the cell cycle, if any, is unknown. Here we show that cyclin A2–Cdk2 binds and phosphorylates Cdc20 in interphase and this inhibits APC/C–Cdc20 activity. Preventing Cdc20 phosphorylation results in pre-mature activation of the APC/C–Cdc20 and several substrates, including cyclin B1 and A2, are destabilized which lengthens G2 and slows mitotic entry. Expressing non-degradable cyclin A2 but not cyclin B1 restores mitotic entry in these cells. We have thus uncovered a novel positive feedback loop centred on cyclin A2–Cdk2 inhibition of interphase APC/C–Cdc20 to allow further cyclin A2 accumulation and mitotic entry. PMID:26960431

  10. HBx-upregulated lncRNA UCA1 promotes cell growth and tumorigenesis by recruiting EZH2 and repressing p27Kip1/CDK2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiao-Jiao; Song, Wei; Zhang, Shao-Dan; Shen, Xiao-Hui; Qiu, Xue-Mei; Wu, Hua-Zhang; Gong, Pi-Hai; Lu, Sen; Zhao, Zhu-Jiang; He, Ming-Liang; Fan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    It is well accepted that HBx plays the major role in hepatocarcinogenesis associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. However, little was known about its role in regulating long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a large group of transcripts regulating a variety of biological processes including carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Here we report that HBx upregulates UCA1 genes and downregulates p27 genes in hepatic LO2 cells. Further studies show that the upregulated UCA1 promotes cell growth by facilitating G1/S transition through CDK2 in both hepatic and hepatoma cells. Knock down of UCA1 in HBx-expressing hepatic and hepatoma cells resulted in markedly increased apoptotic cells by elevating the cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-8. More importantly, UCA1 is found to be physically associated with enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), which suppresses p27Kip1 through histone methylation (H3K27me3) on p27Kip1 promoter. We also show that knockdown of UCA1 in hepatoma cells inhibits tumorigenesis in nude mice. In a clinic study, UCA1 is found to be frequently up-regulated in HBx positive group tissues in comparison with the HBx negative group, and exhibits an inverse correlation between UCA1 and p27Kip1 levels. Our findings demonstrate an important mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis through the signaling of HBx-UCA1/EZH2-p27Kip1 axis, and a potential target of HCC. PMID:27009634

  11. HBx-upregulated lncRNA UCA1 promotes cell growth and tumorigenesis by recruiting EZH2 and repressing p27Kip1/CDK2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiao-Jiao; Song, Wei; Zhang, Shao-Dan; Shen, Xiao-Hui; Qiu, Xue-Mei; Wu, Hua-Zhang; Gong, Pi-Hai; Lu, Sen; Zhao, Zhu-Jiang; He, Ming-Liang; Fan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    It is well accepted that HBx plays the major role in hepatocarcinogenesis associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. However, little was known about its role in regulating long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a large group of transcripts regulating a variety of biological processes including carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Here we report that HBx upregulates UCA1 genes and downregulates p27 genes in hepatic LO2 cells. Further studies show that the upregulated UCA1 promotes cell growth by facilitating G1/S transition through CDK2 in both hepatic and hepatoma cells. Knock down of UCA1 in HBx-expressing hepatic and hepatoma cells resulted in markedly increased apoptotic cells by elevating the cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-8. More importantly, UCA1 is found to be physically associated with enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), which suppresses p27Kip1 through histone methylation (H3K27me3) on p27Kip1 promoter. We also show that knockdown of UCA1 in hepatoma cells inhibits tumorigenesis in nude mice. In a clinic study, UCA1 is found to be frequently up-regulated in HBx positive group tissues in comparison with the HBx negative group, and exhibits an inverse correlation between UCA1 and p27Kip1 levels. Our findings demonstrate an important mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis through the signaling of HBx-UCA1/EZH2-p27Kip1 axis, and a potential target of HCC. PMID:27009634

  12. Novel miR-5582-5p functions as a tumor suppressor by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells through direct targeting of GAB1, SHC1, and CDK2.

    PubMed

    An, Hyun-Ju; Kwak, Seo-Young; Yoo, Je-Ok; Kim, Jae-Sung; Bae, In-Hwa; Park, Myung-Jin; Cho, Mee-Yon; Kim, Joon; Han, Young-Hoon

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play pivotal roles in tumorigenesis as either tumor suppressors or oncogenes. In the present study, we discovered and demonstrated the tumor suppressive function of a novel miRNA miR-5582-5p. miR-5582-5p induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells, but not in normal cells. GAB1, SHC1, and CDK2 were identified as direct targets of miR-5582-5p. Knockdown of GAB1/SHC1 or CDK2 phenocopied the apoptotic or cell cycle arrest-inducing function of miR-5582-5p, respectively. The expression of miR-5582-5p was lower in tumor tissues than in adjacent normal tissues of colorectal cancer patients, while the expression of the target proteins exhibited patterns opposite to that of miR-5582-5p. Intratumoral injection of a miR-5582-5p mimic or induced expression of miR-5582-5p in tumor cells suppressed tumor growth in HCT116 xenografts. Collectively, our results suggest a novel tumor suppressive function for miR-5582-5p and its potential applicability for tumor control.

  13. A subset of cancer cell lines is acutely sensitive to the Chk1 inhibitor MK-8776 as monotherapy due to CDK2 activation in S phase

    PubMed Central

    Sakurikar, Nandini; Thompson, Ruth; Montano, Ryan; Eastman, Alan

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage activates Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) to halt cell cycle progression thereby preventing further DNA replication and mitosis until the damage has been repaired. Consequently, Chk1 inhibitors have emerged as promising anticancer therapeutics in combination with DNA damaging drugs, but their single agent activity also provides a novel approach that may be particularly effective in a subset of patients. From analysis of a large panel of cell lines, we demonstrate that 15% are very sensitive to the Chk1 inhibitor MK-8776. Upon inhibition of Chk1, sensitive cells rapidly accumulate DNA double-strand breaks in S phase in a CDK2- and cyclin A-dependent manner. In contrast, resistant cells can continue to grow for at least 7 days despite continued inhibition of Chk1. Resistance can be circumvented by inhibiting Wee1 kinase and thereby directly activating CDK2. Hence, sensitivity to Chk1 inhibition is regulated upstream of CDK2 and correlates with accumulation of CDC25A. We conclude that cells poorly tolerate CDK2 activity in S phase and that a major function of Chk1 is to ensure it remains inactive. Indeed, inhibitors of CDK1 and CDK2 arrest cells in G1 or G2, respectively, but do not prevent progression through S phase demonstrating that neither kinase is required for S phase progression. Inappropriate activation of CDK2 in S phase underlies the sensitivity of a subset of cell lines to Chk1 inhibitors, and this may provide a novel therapeutic opportunity for appropriately stratified patients. PMID:26595527

  14. A subset of cancer cell lines is acutely sensitive to the Chk1 inhibitor MK-8776 as monotherapy due to CDK2 activation in S phase.

    PubMed

    Sakurikar, Nandini; Thompson, Ruth; Montano, Ryan; Eastman, Alan

    2016-01-12

    DNA damage activates Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) to halt cell cycle progression thereby preventing further DNA replication and mitosis until the damage has been repaired. Consequently, Chk1 inhibitors have emerged as promising anticancer therapeutics in combination with DNA damaging drugs, but their single agent activity also provides a novel approach that may be particularly effective in a subset of patients. From analysis of a large panel of cell lines, we demonstrate that 15% are very sensitive to the Chk1 inhibitor MK-8776. Upon inhibition of Chk1, sensitive cells rapidly accumulate DNA double-strand breaks in S phase in a CDK2- and cyclin A-dependent manner. In contrast, resistant cells can continue to grow for at least 7 days despite continued inhibition of Chk1. Resistance can be circumvented by inhibiting Wee1 kinase and thereby directly activating CDK2. Hence, sensitivity to Chk1 inhibition is regulated upstream of CDK2 and correlates with accumulation of CDC25A. We conclude that cells poorly tolerate CDK2 activity in S phase and that a major function of Chk1 is to ensure it remains inactive. Indeed, inhibitors of CDK1 and CDK2 arrest cells in G1 or G2, respectively, but do not prevent progression through S phase demonstrating that neither kinase is required for S phase progression. Inappropriate activation of CDK2 in S phase underlies the sensitivity of a subset of cell lines to Chk1 inhibitors, and this may provide a novel therapeutic opportunity for appropriately stratified patients. PMID:26595527

  15. Nuclear export of human papillomavirus type 31 E1 is regulated by Cdk2 phosphorylation and required for viral genome maintenance.

    PubMed

    Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Moody, Cary; Laimins, Laimonis A; Archambault, Jacques

    2010-11-01

    The initiator protein E1 from human papillomavirus (HPV) is a helicase essential for replication of the viral genome. E1 contains three functional domains: a C-terminal enzymatic domain that has ATPase/helicase activity, a central DNA-binding domain that recognizes specific sequences in the origin of replication, and a N-terminal region necessary for viral DNA replication in vivo but dispensable in vitro. This N-terminal portion of E1 contains a conserved nuclear export signal (NES) whose function in the viral life cycle remains unclear. In this study, we provide evidence that nuclear export of HPV31 E1 is inhibited by cyclin E/A-Cdk2 phosphorylation of two serines residues, S92 and S106, located near and within the E1 NES, respectively. Using E1 mutant proteins that are confined to the nucleus, we determined that nuclear export of E1 is not essential for transient viral DNA replication but is important for the long-term maintenance of the HPV episome in undifferentiated keratinocytes. The findings that E1 nuclear export is not required for viral DNA replication but needed for genome maintenance over multiple cell divisions raised the possibility that continuous nuclear accumulation of E1 is detrimental to cellular growth. In support of this possibility, we observed that nuclear accumulation of E1 dramatically reduces cellular proliferation by delaying cell cycle progression in S phase. On the basis of these results, we propose that nuclear export of E1 is required, at least in part, to limit accumulation of this viral helicase in the nucleus in order to prevent its detrimental effect on cellular proliferation.

  16. Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities

    2008-05-28

    The Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities (BEPro3) is a software tool for estimating probabilities of protein-protein association between bait and prey protein pairs using data from multiple-bait, multiple-replicate, protein LC-MS/MS affinity isolation experiments. BEPro3 is public domain software, has been tested on Windows XP and version 10.4 or newer of the Mac OS 10.4, and is freely available. A user guide, example dataset with analysis and additional documentation are included with the BEPro3 download.

  17. Iron depletion results in Src kinase inhibition with associated cell cycle arrest in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardana, Gamini; Seligman, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Iron is required for cellular proliferation. Recently, using systematic time studies of neuroblastoma cell growth, we better defined the G1 arrest caused by iron chelation to a point in mid-G1, where cyclin E protein is present, but the cyclin E/CDK2 complex kinase activity is inhibited. In this study, we again used the neuroblastoma SKNSH cells lines to pinpoint the mechanism responsible for this G1 block. Initial studies showed in the presence of DFO, these cells have high levels of p27 and after reversal of iron chelation p27 is degraded allowing for CDK2 kinase activity. The initial activation of CDK2 kinase allows cells to exit G1 and enter S phase. Furthermore, we found that inhibition of p27 degradation by DFO is directly associated with inhibition of Src kinase activity measured by lack of phosphorylation of Src at the 416 residue. Activation of Src kinase occurs very early after reversal from the DFO G1 block and is temporally associated with initiation of cellular proliferation associated with entry into S phase. For the first time therefore we show that iron chelation inhibits Src kinase activity and this activity is a requirement for cellular proliferation. PMID:25825542

  18. Iron depletion results in Src kinase inhibition with associated cell cycle arrest in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Siriwardana, Gamini; Seligman, Paul A

    2015-03-01

    Iron is required for cellular proliferation. Recently, using systematic time studies of neuroblastoma cell growth, we better defined the G1 arrest caused by iron chelation to a point in mid-G1, where cyclin E protein is present, but the cyclin E/CDK2 complex kinase activity is inhibited. In this study, we again used the neuroblastoma SKNSH cells lines to pinpoint the mechanism responsible for this G1 block. Initial studies showed in the presence of DFO, these cells have high levels of p27 and after reversal of iron chelation p27 is degraded allowing for CDK2 kinase activity. The initial activation of CDK2 kinase allows cells to exit G1 and enter S phase. Furthermore, we found that inhibition of p27 degradation by DFO is directly associated with inhibition of Src kinase activity measured by lack of phosphorylation of Src at the 416 residue. Activation of Src kinase occurs very early after reversal from the DFO G1 block and is temporally associated with initiation of cellular proliferation associated with entry into S phase. For the first time therefore we show that iron chelation inhibits Src kinase activity and this activity is a requirement for cellular proliferation.

  19. Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) promotes human gallbladder tumor growth via activation of the AXL/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Maolan; Lu, Jianhua; Zhang, Fei; Li, Huaifeng; Zhang, Bingtai; Wu, Xiangsong; Tan, Zhujun; Zhang, Lin; Gao, Guofeng; Mu, Jiasheng; Shu, Yijun; Bao, Runfa; Ding, Qichen; Wu, Wenguang; Dong, Ping; Gu, Jun; Liu, Yingbin

    2014-12-28

    The transcriptional coactivator Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), a key regulator of cell proliferation and organ size in vertebrates, has been implicated in various malignancies. However, little is known about the expression and biological function of YAP1 in human gallbladder cancer (GBC). In this study we examined the clinical significance and biological functions of YAP1 in GBC and found that nuclear YAP1 and its target gene AXL were overexpressed in GBC tissues. We also observed a significant correlation between high YAP1 and AXL expression levels and worse prognosis. The depletion of YAP1 using lentivirus shRNAs significantly inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest in S phase in concordance with the decrease of CDK2, CDC25A, and cyclin A, and resulted in increased cell apoptosis and invasive repression in GBC cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, knockdown of YAP1 also inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that the activation of the AXL/MAPK pathway was involved in the oncogenic functions of YAP1 in GBC. These results demonstrated that YAP1 is a putative oncogene and represents a prognostic marker and potentially a novel therapeutic target for GBC.

  20. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of N-alkyl or aryl substituted isoindigo derivatives as potential dual cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2)/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Li, Yanzhong; Gao, Guangwei; Wang, Shuai; Yan, Yun; Zhan, Xiaoping; Liu, Zenglu; Mao, Zhenmin; Chen, Shaoxiong; Wang, Liqun

    2014-10-30

    A series of N-alkyl or aryl substituted isoindigo derivatives have been synthesized and their anti-proliferative activity was evaluated by Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Some of the target compounds exhibited significant antitumor activity, including compounds 6h and 6k (against K562 cells), 6i (against HeLa cells) and 6j (against A549 cells). N-(p-methoxy-phenyl)-isoindigo (6k) exhibited a high and selective anti-proliferative activity against K562 cells (IC50 7.8 μM) and induced the apoptosis of K562 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Compound 6k arrested the cell cycle at S phase in K562 cells by decreasing the expression of cyclin A and CDK2, which played critical roles in DNA replication and passage through G2 phase. Moreover, compound 6k down-regulated the expression of p-GSK-3β (Ser9), β-catenin and c-myc proteins, up-regulated the expression of GSK-3β, consequently, suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and induced the apoptosis of K562 cells. The binding mode of compound 6k with GSK-3β was simulated using molecular docking tools. All of these studies gave a better understanding to the molecular mechanisms of this class of agents and clues to develop dual CDK2/GSK-3β (Ser9) phosphorylation inhibitors applied in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25151579

  1. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, George; Dudkin, Sergii; Borkin, Dmitry; Ni, Wendi; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2015-04-29

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes.

  2. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Pyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidine CDK2 Inhibitors as Anti-Tumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    El-Moghazy, Samir M.; Ibrahim, Diaa A.; Abdelgawad, Nagwa M.; Farag, Nahla A. H.; El-Khouly, Ahmad S.

    2011-01-01

    A series of 2,5,7-trisubstituted pyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidine cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK2) inhibitors is designed and synthesized. 6-Amino-2-thiouracil is reacted with an aldehyde and thiourea to prepare the pyrimido[4,5-d]-pyrimidines. Alkylation and amination of the latter ones give different amino derivatives. These compounds show potent and selective CDK inhibitory activities and inhibit in vitro cellular proliferation in cultured human tumor cells. PMID:21886895

  3. DEC1 regulates breast cancer cell proliferation by stabilizing cyclin E protein and delays the progression of cell cycle S phase

    PubMed Central

    Bi, H; Li, S; Qu, X; Wang, M; Bai, X; Xu, Z; Ao, X; Jia, Z; Jiang, X; Yang, Y; Wu, H

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer that is accompanied by a high level of cyclin E expression usually exhibits poor prognosis and clinical outcome. Several factors are known to regulate the level of cyclin E during the cell cycle progression. The transcription factor DEC1 (also known as STRA13 and SHARP2) plays an important role in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Nevertheless, the mechanism of its role in cell proliferation is poorly understood. In this study, using the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, we showed that DEC1 could inhibit the cell cycle progression of breast cancer cells independently of its transcriptional activity. The cell cycle-dependent timing of DEC1 overexpression could affect the progression of the cell cycle through regulating the level of cyclin E protein. DEC1 stabilized cyclin E at the protein level by interacting with cyclin E. Overexpression of DEC1 repressed the interaction between cyclin E and its E3 ligase Fbw7α, consequently reducing the level of polyunbiquitinated cyclin E and increased the accumulation of non-ubiquitinated cyclin E. Furthermore, DEC1 also promoted the nuclear accumulation of Cdk2 and the formation of cyclin E/Cdk2 complex, as well as upregulating the activity of the cyclin E/Cdk2 complex, which inhibited the subsequent association of cyclin A with Cdk2. This had the effect of prolonging the S phase and suppressing the growth of breast cancers in a mouse xenograft model. These events probably constitute the essential steps in DEC1-regulated cell proliferation, thus opening up the possibility of a protein-based molecular strategy for eliminating cancer cells that manifest a high-level expression of cyclin E. PMID:26402517

  4. Cyclin E/Cdk2, P/CAF, and E1A regulate the transactivation of the c-myc promoter by FOXM1

    SciTech Connect

    Wierstra, Inken Alves, Juergen

    2008-03-28

    FOXM1c transactivates the c-myc promoter by binding directly to its TATA-boxes. The present study demonstrates that the transactivation of the c-myc promoter by FOXM1c is enhanced by the key proliferation signal cyclin E/Cdk2, but repressed by P/CAF and the adenoviral oncoprotein E1A. Furthermore, FOXM1c interacts with the coactivator and histone acetyltransferase P/CAF. This study shows that, on the c-myc-P1 TATA-box, FOXM1c does not function simply as normal transcription factor just binding to an unusual site. Moreover, the inhibitory N-terminus of FOXM1c does not inhibit its transrepression domain or its EDA. Others reported that a cyclin/Cdk-binding LXL-motif of the splice variant FoxM1b is required for its interaction with Cdk2, Cdk1, and p27, its phosphorylation by Cdk1 and its activation by Cdc25B. In contrast, we now demonstrate that this LXL-motif is not required for the activation of FOXM1c by cyclin D1/Cdk4, cyclin E/Cdk and cyclin A/Cdk2 or for the repression of FOXM1c by p27.

  5. Briefly Bound to Activate: Transient Binding of a Second Catalytic Magnesium Activates the Structure and Dynamics of CDK2 Kinase for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Zhao Qin; Jacobsen, Douglas M.; Young, Matthew A.

    2014-10-02

    We have determined high-resolution crystal structures of a CDK2/Cyclin A transition state complex bound to ADP, substrate peptide, and MgF{sub 3}{sup -}. Compared to previous structures of active CDK2, the catalytic subunit of the kinase adopts a more closed conformation around the active site and now allows observation of a second Mg{sup 2+} ion in the active site. Coupled with a strong [Mg{sup 2+}] effect on in vitro kinase activity, the structures suggest that the transient binding of the second Mg{sup 2+} ion is necessary to achieve maximum rate enhancement of the chemical reaction, and Mg{sup 2+} concentration could represent an important regulator of CDK2 activity in vivo. Molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the simultaneous binding of substrate peptide, ATP, and two Mg{sup 2+} ions is able to induce a more rigid and closed organization of the active site that functions to orient the phosphates, stabilize the buildup of negative charge, and shield the subsequently activated {gamma}-phosphate from solvent.

  6. DAPD: A Knowledgebase for Diabetes Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Krishnasamy; Jayakumararaj, Ramaraj; Karthikeyan, Muthusamy

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in genomics and proteomics provide a solid foundation for understanding the pathogenesis of diabetes. Proteomics of diabetes associated pathways help to identify the most potent target for the management of diabetes. The relevant datasets are scattered in various prominent sources which takes much time to select the therapeutic target for the clinical management of diabetes. However, additional information about target proteins is needed for validation. This lacuna may be resolved by linking diabetes associated genes, pathways and proteins and it will provide a strong base for the treatment and planning management strategies of diabetes. Thus, a web source "Diabetes Associated Proteins Database (DAPD)" has been developed to link the diabetes associated genes, pathways and proteins using PHP, MySQL. The current version of DAPD has been built with proteins associated with different types of diabetes. In addition, DAPD has been linked to external sources to gain the access to more participatory proteins and their pathway network. DAPD will reduce the time and it is expected to pave the way for the discovery of novel anti-diabetic leads using computational drug designing for diabetes management. DAPD is open accessed via following url www.mkarthikeyan.bioinfoau.org/dapd. PMID:26357271

  7. Peptide inhibitors of CDK2-cyclin A that target the cyclin recruitment-site: structural variants of the C-terminal Phe.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Gail E; Cowan, Angela; McInnes, Campbell; Zheleva, Daniella I; Fischer, Peter M; Chan, Weng C

    2002-09-16

    A focused series of octapeptides based on the lead compound H-His-Ala-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu-Ile-Phe-NH(2) 1, in which the C-terminal phenylalanine residue was replaced by alpha and/or beta-modified variants, was synthesized using solid-phase chemistry. Both the L-threo-beta-hydroxy-phenylalanine (beta-phenylserine, Pse) and (2S)-phenylalaninol derivatives, as competitive binders at the cyclin-recruitment site, displayed potent inhibitory activity towards the CDK2-cyclin A complex. Unexpectedly, the D-threo-Pse derivatives also showed inhibitory activity. PMID:12182847

  8. Tracking Membrane Protein Association in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Reffay, Myriam; Gambin, Yann; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Phan, Gilles; Taulier, Nicolas; Ducruix, Arnaud; Hodges, Robert S.; Urbach, Wladimir

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue. We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well. After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 Å, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the bilayers. We

  9. Membrane association of presynaptic cytomatrix protein bassoon.

    PubMed

    Sanmartí-Vila, L; tom Dieck, S; Richter, K; Altrock, W; Zhang, L; Volknandt, W; Zimmermann, H; Garner, C C; Gundelfinger, E D; Dresbach, T

    2000-08-18

    Components of the specialized cytomatrix at active zones of presynaptic nerve terminals are thought to be involved in organizing synaptic events such as immobilisation or translocation of synaptic vesicles and assemblingactive zone components. The 420-kDa non-transmembraneprotein Bassoon is a specific componentof the presynaptic cytomatrix that shares features with both cytoskeleton-associated and peripheral-membrane proteins. Using immunogold electron microscopy we show here that synapse associated Bassoon is distributed in a subregion of active zones. Using a biochemical assay we show that a fraction of Bassoon is membrane associated. Electron microscopy performed on the same biochemical fraction further revealed that Bassoon is associated with vesicular structures. Together these data suggest that at least a fraction of Bassoon is associated with a membraneous compartment in neurons.

  10. Membrane-associated proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Lensink, Marc F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the practical aspects of setting up molecular dynamics simulations of membrane-associated proteins and peptides, and the analysis thereof. Topology files for selected lipids are provided and selected analysis tools presented. These include tools for the creation of lipid bilayers of mixed lipid content (DOPE) and easy extraction of lipid coordinates (g_zcoor, g_xycoor), the calculation of helical axes (g_helixaxis) and aromatic order parameters (g_arom), the determination of peptide- or protein-interacting lipids (g_under), and the investigation of lipid-specific interactions through the calculation of lipid-bridged residue-residue contacts (g_prolip). PMID:25330961

  11. Multifunctional Microtubule-Associated Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Krtková, Jana; Benáková, Martina; Schwarzerová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are involved in key processes in plant cells, including cell division, growth and development. MT-interacting proteins modulate MT dynamics and organization, mediating functional and structural interaction of MTs with other cell structures. In addition to conventional microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) in plants, there are many other MT-binding proteins whose primary function is not related to the regulation of MTs. This review focuses on enzymes, chaperones, or proteins primarily involved in other processes that also bind to MTs. The MT-binding activity of these multifunctional MAPs is often performed only under specific environmental or physiological conditions, or they bind to MTs only as components of a larger MT-binding protein complex. The involvement of multifunctional MAPs in these interactions may underlie physiological and morphogenetic events, e.g., under specific environmental or developmental conditions. Uncovering MT-binding activity of these proteins, although challenging, may contribute to understanding of the novel functions of the MT cytoskeleton in plant biological processes. PMID:27148302

  12. Transforming growth factor beta stabilizes p15INK4B protein, increases p15INK4B-cdk4 complexes, and inhibits cyclin D1-cdk4 association in human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, C; Garbe, J; Bhattacharya, N; Daksis, J; Pan, C H; Yaswen, P; Koh, J; Slingerland, J M; Stampfer, M R

    1997-01-01

    The effects of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) were studied in closely related human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), both finite-life-span 184 cells and immortal derivatives, 184A1S, and 184A1L5R, which differ in their cell cycle responses to TGF-beta but express type I and type II TGF-beta receptors and retain TGF-beta induction of extracellular matrix. The arrest-resistant phenotype was not due to loss of cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors. TGF-beta was shown to regulate p15INK4B expression at at least two levels: mRNA accumulation and protein stability. In TGF-beta-arrested HMEC, there was not only an increase in p15 mRNA but also a major increase in p5INK4B protein stability. As cdk4- and cdk6-associated p15INK4B increased during TGF-beta arrest of sensitive cells, there was a loss of cyclin D1, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1 from these kinase complexes, and cyclin E-cdk2-associated p27Kip1 increased. In HMEC, p15INK4B complexes did not contain detectable cyclin. p15INK4B from both sensitive and resistant cells could displace in vitro cyclin D1, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1 from cdk4 isolated from sensitive cells. Cyclin D1 could not be displaced from cdk4 in the resistant 184A1L5R cell lysates. Thus, in TGF-beta arrest, p15INK4B may displace already associated cyclin D1 from cdks and prevent new cyclin D1-cdk complexes from forming. Furthermore, p27Kip1 binding shifts from cdk4 to cyclin E-cdk2 during TGF-beta-mediated arrest. The importance of posttranslational regulation of p15INK4B by TGF-beta is underlined by the observation that in TGF-beta-resistant 184A1L5R, although the p15 transcript increased, p15INK4B protein was not stabilized and did not accumulate, and cyclin D1-cdk association and kinase activation were not inhibited. PMID:9111314

  13. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein–Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes. PMID:25423142

  14. Ribosome-associated protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Brandman, Onn; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis by the ribosome can fail for numerous reasons including faulty mRNA, insufficient availability of charged tRNAs and genetic errors. All organisms have evolved mechanisms to recognize stalled ribosomes and initiate pathways for recycling, quality control and stress signaling. Here we review the discovery and molecular dissection of the eukaryotic ribosome-associated quality-control pathway for degradation of nascent polypeptides arising from interrupted translation. PMID:26733220

  15. Adaptable Lipid Matrix Promotes Protein-Protein Association in Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey S; Polyansky, Anton A; Fleck, Markus; Volynsky, Pavel E; Efremov, Roman G

    2015-09-01

    The cell membrane is "stuffed" with proteins, whose transmembrane (TM) helical domains spontaneously associate to form functionally active complexes. For a number of membrane receptors, a modulation of TM domains' oligomerization has been shown to contribute to the development of severe pathological states, thus calling for detailed studies of the atomistic aspects of the process. Despite considerable progress achieved so far, several crucial questions still remain: How do the helices recognize each other in the membrane? What is the driving force of their association? Here, we assess the dimerization free energy of TM helices along with a careful consideration of the interplay between the structure and dynamics of protein and lipids using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in the hydrated lipid bilayer for three different model systems - TM fragments of glycophorin A, polyalanine and polyleucine peptides. We observe that the membrane driven association of TM helices exhibits a prominent entropic character, which depends on the peptide sequence. Thus, a single TM peptide of a given composition induces strong and characteristic perturbations in the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, which may facilitate the initial "communication" between TM helices even at the distances of 20-30 Å. Upon tight helix-helix association, the immobilized lipids accommodate near the peripheral surfaces of the dimer, thus disturbing the packing of the surrounding. The dimerization free energy of the modeled peptides corresponds to the strength of their interactions with lipids inside the membrane being the lowest for glycophorin A and similarly higher for both homopolymers. We propose that the ability to accommodate lipid tails determines the dimerization strength of TM peptides and that the lipid matrix directly governs their association. PMID:26575933

  16. Structure prediction of magnetosome-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Hila; Zarivach, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are Gram-negative bacteria that can navigate along geomagnetic fields. This ability is a result of a unique intracellular organelle, the magnetosome. These organelles are composed of membrane-enclosed magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) crystals ordered into chains along the cell. Magnetosome formation, assembly, and magnetic nano-crystal biomineralization are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins (MAPs). Most MAP-encoding genes are located in a conserved genomic region - the magnetosome island (MAI). The MAI appears to be conserved in all MTB that were analyzed so far, although the MAI size and organization differs between species. It was shown that MAI deletion leads to a non-magnetic phenotype, further highlighting its important role in magnetosome formation. Today, about 28 proteins are known to be involved in magnetosome formation, but the structures and functions of most MAPs are unknown. To reveal the structure-function relationship of MAPs we used bioinformatics tools in order to build homology models as a way to understand their possible role in magnetosome formation. Here we present a predicted 3D structural models' overview for all known Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 MAPs.

  17. A marginal band-associated protein has properties of both microtubule- and microfilament-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The marginal band of nucleated erythrocytes is a microtubule organelle under rigorous quantitative and spatial control, with properties quite different from those of the microtubule organelles of cultured cells. Previous results suggest that proteins other than tubulin may participate in organizing the marginal band, and may interact with elements of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton in addition to microtubules. To identify such species, we raised mAbs against the proteins that assemble from chicken brain homogenates with tubulin. One such antibody binds to a single protein in chicken erythrocytes, and produces an immunofluorescence pattern colocalizing with marginal band microtubules. Several properties of this protein are identical to those of ezrin, a protein isolated from brush border and localized to motile elements of cultured cells. A significant proportion of the antigen is not soluble in erythrocytes, as determined by extraction with nonionic detergent. This cytoskeleton-associated fraction is unaffected by treatments that solubilize the marginal band microtubules. The protein has properties of both microtubule- and microfilament-associated proteins. In the accompanying manuscript (Goslin, K., E. Birgbauer, G. Banker, and F. Solomon. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:1621-1631), we show that the same antibody recognizes a component of growth cones with a similar dual nature. In early embryonic red blood cells, the antigen is dispersed throughout the cell and does not colocalize with assembled tubulin. Its confinement to the marginal band during development follows rather than precedes that of microtubules. These results, along with previous work, suggest models for the formation of the marginal band. PMID:2677023

  18. Shedding Light on Selenium Biomineralization: Proteins Associated with Bionanominerals ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Markus; Kolvenbach, Boris; Gygax, Benjamin; Moes, Suzette; Corvini, Philippe F. X.

    2011-01-01

    Selenium-reducing microorganisms produce elemental selenium nanoparticles with particular physicochemical properties due to an associated organic fraction. This study identified high-affinity proteins associated with such bionanominerals and with nonbiogenic elemental selenium. Proteins with an anticipated functional role in selenium reduction, such as a metalloid reductase, were found to be associated with nanoparticles formed by one selenium respirer, Sulfurospirillum barnesii. PMID:21602371

  19. CDK2 and PKA Mediated-Sequential Phosphorylation Is Critical for p19INK4d Function in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Marazita, Mariela C.; Ogara, M. Florencia; Sonzogni, Silvina V.; Martí, Marcelo; Dusetti, Nelson J.; Pignataro, Omar P.; Cánepa, Eduardo T.

    2012-01-01

    DNA damage triggers a phosphorylation-based signaling cascade known as the DNA damage response. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK4/6 inhibitors, has been reported to participate in the DNA damage response promoting DNA repair and cell survival. Here, we provide mechanistic insight into the activation mechanism of p19INK4d linked to the response to DNA damage. Results showed that p19INK4d becomes phosphorylated following UV radiation, β-amyloid peptide and cisplatin treatments. ATM-Chk2/ATR-Chk1 signaling pathways were found to be differentially involved in p19INK4d phosphorylation depending on the type of DNA damage. Two sequential phosphorylation events at serine 76 and threonine 141 were identified using p19INK4d single-point mutants in metabolic labeling assays with 32P-orthophosphate. CDK2 and PKA were found to participate in p19INK4d phosphorylation process and that they would mediate serine 76 and threonine 141 modifications respectively. Nuclear translocation of p19INK4d induced by DNA damage was shown to be dependent on serine 76 phosphorylation. Most importantly, both phosphorylation sites were found to be crucial for p19INK4d function in DNA repair and cell survival. In contrast, serine 76 and threonine 141 were dispensable for CDK4/6 inhibition highlighting the independence of p19INK4d functions, in agreement with our previous findings. These results constitute the first description of the activation mechanism of p19INK4d in response to genotoxic stress and demonstrate the functional relevance of this activation following DNA damage. PMID:22558186

  20. A protein associated with prodigiosin formation in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Ichikawa, Y

    1989-01-01

    A protein associated to prodigiosin formation was found in Serratia marcescens. The protein was not found in nonpigmented strains and was correlated with the pigment level. The protein was about 100 kilodaltons (kDa) and was also found in nonpigmented bacteria of the pigmented strain grown in glucose medium, at high temperature, or under anaerobic condition. The 100 kDa protein was found not in the outer membrane and the periplasm, but in the inner membrane and/or the cytoplasm. The protein was also found singly or dominantly in pigment-protein complexes and pigment-localizing vesicles described in previous reports. These results suggest that the 100 kDa protein is associated with prodigiosin formation.

  1. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 phosphorylates s/t-p sites in the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain and is incorporated into viral capsids.

    PubMed

    Ludgate, Laurie; Ning, Xiaojun; Nguyen, David H; Adams, Christina; Mentzer, Laura; Hu, Jianming

    2012-11-01

    Phosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is important for viral RNA packaging, reverse transcription, and subcellular localization. Hepadnavirus capsids also package a cellular kinase. The identity of the host kinase that phosphorylates the core CTD or gets packaged remains to be resolved. In particular, both the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core CTDs harbor several conserved serine/threonine-proline (S/T-P) sites whose phosphorylation state is known to regulate CTD functions. We report here that the endogenous kinase in the HBV capsids was blocked by chemical inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), in particular, CDK2 inhibitors. The kinase phosphorylated the HBV CTD at the serine-proline (S-P) sites. Furthermore, we were able to detect CDK2 in purified HBV capsids by immunoblotting. Purified CDK2 phosphorylated the S/T-P sites of the HBV and DHBV CTD in vitro. Inhibitors of CDKs, of CDK2 in particular, decreased both HBV and DHBV CTD phosphorylation in vivo. Moreover, CDK2 inhibitors blocked DHBV CTD phosphorylation, specifically at the S/T-P sites, in a mammalian cell lysate. These results indicate that cellular CDK2 phosphorylates the functionally critical S/T-P sites of the hepadnavirus core CTD and is incorporated into viral capsids.

  2. A novel calcium-binding protein is associated with tau proteins in tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Irving E.; Traverso, Edwin E.; Ferrer-Acosta, Yancy; Matos, Eduardo; Colon, Migdalisel; Gonzalez, John; Dickson, Dennis; Hutton, Michael; Lewis, Jada; Yen, Shu H.

    2013-01-01

    Tauopathies are a group of neurological disorders characterized by the presence of intraneuronal hyperphosphorylated and filamentous tau. Mutations in the tau gene have been found in kindred with tauopathy. The expression of the human tau mutant in transgenic mice induced neurodegeneration, indicating that tau plays a central pathological role. However, the molecular mechanism leading to tau-mediated neurodegeneration is poorly understood. To gain insights into the role that tau plays in neurodegeneration, human tau proteins were immunoprecipitated from brain lysates of the tauopathy mouse model JNPL3, which develops neurodegeneration in age-dependent manner. In the present work, a novel EF-hand domain-containing protein was found associated with tau proteins in brain lysate of 12-month-old JNPL3 mice. The association between tau proteins and the novel identified protein appears to be induced by the neurodegeneration process as these two proteins were not found associated in young JNPL3 mice. Consistently, the novel protein co-purified with the pathological sarkosyl insoluble tau in terminally ill JNPL3 mice. Calcium-binding assays demonstrated that this protein binds calcium effectively. Finally, the association between tau and the novel calcium-binding protein is conserved in human and enriched in Alzheimer's disease brain. Taken together, the identification of a novel calcium-binding protein associated with tau protein in terminally ill tauopathy mouse model and its confirmation in human brain lysate suggests that this association may play an important physiological and/or pathological role. PMID:18346207

  3. Association of bovine β-casein protein variant I with milk production and milk protein composition.

    PubMed

    Visker, M H P W; Dibbits, B W; Kinders, S M; van Valenberg, H J F; van Arendonk, J A M; Bovenhuis, H

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to detect new polymorphisms in the bovine β-casein (β-CN) gene and to evaluate association of (new) β-CN protein variants with milk production traits and milk protein composition. Screening of the β-CN gene in genomic DNA from 72 Holstein Friesian (HF) bulls resulted in detection of 19 polymorphisms and revealed the presence of β-CN protein variant I in the Dutch HF population. Studies of association of β-CN protein variants with milk composition usually do not discriminate protein variant I from variant A2. Association of β-CN protein variants with milk composition was studied in 1857 first-lactation HF cows and showed that associations of protein variants A2 and I were quite different for several traits. β-CN protein variant I was significantly associated with protein percentage and protein yield, and with αs1 -casein (αs1 -CN), αs2 -casein (αs2 -CN), κ-casein (κ-CN), α-lactalbumin (α-LA), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), casein index and casein yield. Inferring β-κ-CN haplotypes showed that β-CN protein variant I occurred only with κ-CN variant B. Consequently, associations of β-κ-CN haplotype IB with protein percentage, κ-CN, α-LA, β-LG and casein index are likely resulting from associations of κ-CN protein variant B, while associations of β-κ-CN haplotype IB with αs1 -CN and αs2 -CN seem to be resulting from associations of β-CN variant I.

  4. A Novel High-Throughput 3D Screening System for EMT Inhibitors: A Pilot Screening Discovered the EMT Inhibitory Activity of CDK2 Inhibitor SU9516

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Takanori; Rahman, M. Mamunur; Sakamoto, Ruriko; Masuda, Norio; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Calderwood, Stuart K.; Kozaki, Ken-ichi; Itoh, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial pathological event in cancer, particularly in tumor cell budding and metastasis. Therefore, control of EMT can represent a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer. Here, we introduce an innovative three-dimensional (3D) high-throughput screening (HTS) system that leads to an identification of EMT inhibitors. For the establishment of the novel 3D-HTS system, we chose NanoCulture Plates (NCP) that provided a gel-free micro-patterned scaffold for cells and were independent of other spheroid formation systems using soft-agar. In the NCP-based 3D cell culture system, A549 lung cancer cells migrated, gathered, and then formed multiple spheroids within 7 days. Live cell imaging experiments showed that an established EMT-inducer TGF-β promoted peripheral cells around the core of spheroids to acquire mesenchymal spindle shapes, loss of intercellular adhesion, and migration from the spheroids. Along with such morphological change, EMT-related gene expression signatures were altered, particularly alteration of mRNA levels of ECAD/CDH1, NCAD/CDH2, VIM and ZEB1/TCF8. These EMT-related phenotypic changes were blocked by SB431542, a TGF-βreceptor I (TGFβR1) inhibitor. Inside of the spheroids were highly hypoxic; in contrast, spheroid-derived peripheral migrating cells were normoxic, revealed by visualization and quantification using Hypoxia Probe. Thus, TGF-β-triggered EMT caused spheroid hypoplasia and loss of hypoxia. Spheroid EMT inhibitory (SEMTIN) activity of SB431542 was calculated from fluorescence intensities of the Hypoxia Probe, and then was utilized in a drug screening of EMT-inhibitory small molecule compounds. In a pilot screening, 9 of 1,330 compounds were above the thresholds of the SEMTIN activity and cell viability. Finally, two compounds SB-525334 and SU9516 showed SEMTIN activities in a dose dependent manner. SB-525334 was a known TGFβR1 inhibitor. SU9516 was a cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) inhibitor

  5. A Novel High-Throughput 3D Screening System for EMT Inhibitors: A Pilot Screening Discovered the EMT Inhibitory Activity of CDK2 Inhibitor SU9516.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kazuya; Eguchi, Takanori; Rahman, M Mamunur; Sakamoto, Ruriko; Masuda, Norio; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Calderwood, Stuart K; Kozaki, Ken-Ichi; Itoh, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial pathological event in cancer, particularly in tumor cell budding and metastasis. Therefore, control of EMT can represent a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer. Here, we introduce an innovative three-dimensional (3D) high-throughput screening (HTS) system that leads to an identification of EMT inhibitors. For the establishment of the novel 3D-HTS system, we chose NanoCulture Plates (NCP) that provided a gel-free micro-patterned scaffold for cells and were independent of other spheroid formation systems using soft-agar. In the NCP-based 3D cell culture system, A549 lung cancer cells migrated, gathered, and then formed multiple spheroids within 7 days. Live cell imaging experiments showed that an established EMT-inducer TGF-β promoted peripheral cells around the core of spheroids to acquire mesenchymal spindle shapes, loss of intercellular adhesion, and migration from the spheroids. Along with such morphological change, EMT-related gene expression signatures were altered, particularly alteration of mRNA levels of ECAD/CDH1, NCAD/CDH2, VIM and ZEB1/TCF8. These EMT-related phenotypic changes were blocked by SB431542, a TGF-βreceptor I (TGFβR1) inhibitor. Inside of the spheroids were highly hypoxic; in contrast, spheroid-derived peripheral migrating cells were normoxic, revealed by visualization and quantification using Hypoxia Probe. Thus, TGF-β-triggered EMT caused spheroid hypoplasia and loss of hypoxia. Spheroid EMT inhibitory (SEMTIN) activity of SB431542 was calculated from fluorescence intensities of the Hypoxia Probe, and then was utilized in a drug screening of EMT-inhibitory small molecule compounds. In a pilot screening, 9 of 1,330 compounds were above the thresholds of the SEMTIN activity and cell viability. Finally, two compounds SB-525334 and SU9516 showed SEMTIN activities in a dose dependent manner. SB-525334 was a known TGFβR1 inhibitor. SU9516 was a cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) inhibitor

  6. Programming Molecular Association and Viscoelastic Behavior in Protein Networks.

    PubMed

    Dooling, Lawrence J; Buck, Maren E; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Tirrell, David A

    2016-06-01

    A set of recombinant artificial proteins that can be cross-linked, by either covalent bonds or association of helical domains or both, is described. The designed proteins can be used to construct molecular networks in which the mechanism of crosslinking determines the time-dependent responses to mechanical deformation. PMID:27061171

  7. Associations between milk protein polymorphisms and milk production traits.

    PubMed

    Bovenhuis, H; Van Arendonk, J A; Korver, S

    1992-09-01

    Associations between milk protein genotypes and milk production traits were estimated from 6803 first lactation records. Exact tests of associated hypotheses and unbiased estimates of genotype effects were from an animal model. Milk protein genotype effects were estimated using a model in which each milk protein gene was analyzed separately (single-gene analysis) and a model in which all milk protein genes were analyzed simultaneously (multigene analysis). The results of the two models indicate that some effects ascribed to certain milk protein genes in the single-gene analysis are not effects of the milk protein gene itself but of linked genes. Results from this study and from literature indicate that the kappa-casein gene or a very closely linked gene affects protein percentage, and the beta-lactoglobulin gene or a very closely linked gene affects fat percentage. Furthermore, effects of beta-casein genotypes on milk production, fat percentage, and protein yield were significant, and beta-lactoglobulin genotypes had significant effects on milk production and protein yield. It is less clear whether those effects are due to effects of milk protein genes themselves or to effects of linked genes.

  8. BioID Identification of Lamin-Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mehus, Aaron A; Anderson, Ruthellen H; Roux, Kyle J

    2016-01-01

    A- and B-type lamins support the nuclear envelope, contribute to heterochromatin organization, and regulate a myriad of nuclear processes. The mechanisms by which lamins function in different cell types and the mechanisms by which lamin mutations cause over a dozen human diseases (laminopathies) remain unclear. The identification of proteins associated with lamins is likely to provide fundamental insight into these mechanisms. BioID (proximity-dependent biotin identification) is a unique and powerful method for identifying protein-protein and proximity-based interactions in living cells. BioID utilizes a mutant biotin ligase from bacteria that is fused to a protein of interest (bait). When expressed in living cells and stimulated with excess biotin, this BioID-fusion protein promiscuously biotinylates directly interacting and vicinal endogenous proteins. Following biotin-affinity capture, the biotinylated proteins can be identified using mass spectrometry. BioID thus enables screening for physiologically relevant protein associations that occur over time in living cells. BioID is applicable to insoluble proteins such as lamins that are often refractory to study by other methods and can identify weak and/or transient interactions. We discuss the use of BioID to elucidate novel lamin-interacting proteins and its applications in a broad range of biological systems, and provide detailed protocols to guide new applications.

  9. Protein function prediction using guilty by association from interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Damiano; Giollo, Manuel; Ferrari, Carlo; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2015-12-01

    Protein function prediction from sequence using the Gene Ontology (GO) classification is useful in many biological problems. It has recently attracted increasing interest, thanks in part to the Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA) challenge. In this paper, we introduce Guilty by Association on STRING (GAS), a tool to predict protein function exploiting protein-protein interaction networks without sequence similarity. The assumption is that whenever a protein interacts with other proteins, it is part of the same biological process and located in the same cellular compartment. GAS retrieves interaction partners of a query protein from the STRING database and measures enrichment of the associated functional annotations to generate a sorted list of putative functions. A performance evaluation based on CAFA metrics and a fair comparison with optimized BLAST similarity searches is provided. The consensus of GAS and BLAST is shown to improve overall performance. The PPI approach is shown to outperform similarity searches for biological process and cellular compartment GO predictions. Moreover, an analysis of the best practices to exploit protein-protein interaction networks is also provided.

  10. Identifying Protein-Protein Associations at the Nuclear Envelope with BioID.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae In; Jensen, Samuel C; Roux, Kyle J

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) is a critical cellular structure whose constituents and roles in a myriad of cellular processes seem ever expanding. To determine the underlying mechanisms by which the NE constituents participate in various cellular events, it is necessary to understand the nature of their protein-protein associations. BioID (proximity-dependent biotin identification) is a recently established method to generate a history of protein-protein associations as they occur over time in living cells. BioID is based on fusion of a bait protein to a promiscuous biotin ligase. Expression of the BioID fusion protein in a relevant cellular environment enables biotinylation of vicinal and interacting proteins of the bait protein, permitting isolation and identification by conventional biotin-affinity capture and mass-spec analysis. In this way, BioID provides unique capabilities to identify protein-protein associations at the NE. In this chapter we provide a detailed protocol for the application of BioID to the study of NE proteins.

  11. Low protein silage associated with rumen impaction in suckler cows.

    PubMed

    2016-04-23

    Rumen impaction associated with low protein diets in a suckler cowCampylobacteriosis in suckler cowsPlant toxicity in ewesListerial encephalitis in ewes ITALIC! Chorioptes bovis-associated infertility in ramsThese are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for January 2016 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS).

  12. Identification of tuberculosis-associated proteins in whole blood supernatant

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biological parameters are useful tools for understanding and monitoring complicated disease processes. In this study, we attempted to identify proteins associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) using a proteomic approach. Methods To assess TB-associated changes in the composition of human proteins, whole blood supernatants were collected from patients with active TB and healthy control subjects. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) was performed to analyze proteins with high molecular weights (approximately >20 kDa). Baseline protein levels were initially compared between patients with active TB and control subjects. Possible changes of protein patterns in active TB were also compared ex vivo between whole blood samples incubated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific antigens (stimulated condition) and under unstimulated conditions. Immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were performed to confirm differences in identified proteins. Results Under the baseline condition, we found that the levels of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), fetuin-A (also called α-HS-glycoprotein), and vitamin D-binding protein differed between patients with active TB and control subjects on 2D gels. Immunoblotting results confirmed differential expression of RBP4 and fetuin-A. ELISA results further confirmed significantly lower levels of these two proteins in samples from patients with active TB than in control subjects (P < 0.0001). Mtb-specific antigen stimulation ex vivo altered clusterin expression in whole blood samples collected from patients with active TB. Conclusions We identified TB-associated proteins in whole blood supernatants. The dynamics of protein expression during disease progression may improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of TB. PMID:21418657

  13. Nanoparticles-cell association predicted by protein corona fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchetti, S.; Digiacomo, L.; Pozzi, D.; Peruzzi, G.; Micarelli, E.; Mahmoudi, M.; Caracciolo, G.

    2016-06-01

    In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface chemistry (unmodified and PEGylated) to investigate the relationships between NP physicochemical properties (nanoparticle size, aggregation state and surface charge), protein corona fingerprints (PCFs), and NP-cell association. We found out that none of the NPs' physicochemical properties alone was exclusively able to account for association with human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). For the entire library of NPs, a total of 436 distinct serum proteins were detected. We developed a predictive-validation modeling that provides a means of assessing the relative significance of the identified corona proteins. Interestingly, a minor fraction of the HC, which consists of only 8 PCFs were identified as main promoters of NP association with HeLa cells. Remarkably, identified PCFs have several receptors with high level of expression on the plasma membrane of HeLa cells.In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface

  14. The Cdc48 machine in endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Dieter H; Stolz, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The AAA-type ATPase Cdc48 (named p97/VCP in mammals) is a molecular machine in all eukaryotic cells that transforms ATP hydrolysis into mechanic power to unfold and pull proteins against physical forces, which make up a protein's structure and hold it in place. From the many cellular processes, Cdc48 is involved in, its function in endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation (ERAD) is understood best. This quality control process for proteins of the secretory pathway scans protein folding and discovers misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the organelle, destined for folding of these proteins and their further delivery to their site of action. Misfolded lumenal and membrane proteins of the ER are detected by chaperones and lectins and retro-translocated out of the ER for degradation. Here the Cdc48 machinery, recruited to the ER membrane, takes over. After polyubiquitylation of the protein substrate, Cdc48 together with its dimeric co-factor complex Ufd1-Npl4 pulls the misfolded protein out and away from the ER membrane and delivers it to down-stream components for degradation by a cytosolic proteinase machine, the proteasome. The known details of the Cdc48-Ufd1-Npl4 motor complex triggered process are subject of this review article. PMID:21945179

  15. The association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Rudd, C E; Finberg, R W

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are nonmembrane spanning cell surface proteins that have been demonstrated to be signal transduction molecules. Because these proteins do not extend into the cytoplasm, the mechanism by which cross-linking of these molecules leads to intracellular signal transduction events is obscure. Previous analysis has indicated that these proteins are associated with src family member tyrosine kinases; however, the role this interaction plays in the generation of intracellular signals is not clear. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins are associated with alpha subunits of heterotrimeric GTP binding proteins (G proteins) in both human and murine lymphocytes. When the GPI-anchored proteins CD59, CD48, and Thy-1 were immunoprecipitated from various cell lines or freshly isolated lymphocytes, all were found to be associated with a 41-kDa phosphoprotein that we have identified, by using specific antisera, as a mixture of tyrosine phosphorylated G protein alpha subunits: a small amount of Gialpha1, and substantial amounts of Gialpha2 and Gialpha3. GTP binding assays performed with immunoprecipitations of CD59 indicated that there was GTP-binding activity associated with this molecule. Thus, we have shown by both immunochemical and functional criteria that GPI-anchored proteins are physically associated with G proteins. These experiments suggest a potential role of G proteins in the transduction of signals generated by GPI-anchored molecules expressed on lymphocytes of both mouse and human. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8650218

  16. Engineering nanoparticle-protein associations for protein crystal nucleation and nanoparticle arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Denise N.

    Engineering the nanoparticle - protein association offers a new way to form protein crystals as well as new approaches for arrangement of nanoparticles. Central to this control is the nanoparticle surface. By conjugating polymers on the surface with controlled molecular weights many properties of the nanoparticle can be changed including its size, stability in buffers and the association of proteins with its surface. Large molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings allow for weak associations between proteins and nanoparticles. These interactions can lead to changes in how proteins crystallize. In particular, they decrease the time to nucleation and expand the range of conditions over which protein crystals form. Interestingly, when PEG chain lengths are too short then protein association is minimized and these effects are not observed. One important feature of protein crystals nucleated with nanoparticles is that the nanoparticles are incorporated into the crystals. What results are nanoparticles placed at well-defined distances in composite protein-nanoparticle crystals. Crystals on the size scale of 10 - 100 micrometers exhibit optical absorbance, fluorescence and super paramagnetic behavior derivative from the incorporated nanomaterials. The arrangement of nanoparticles into three dimensional arrays also gives rise to new and interesting physical and chemical properties, such as fluorescence enhancement and varied magnetic response. In addition, anisotropic nanomaterials aligned throughout the composite crystal have polarization dependent optical properties.

  17. PCTAIRE Kinase 3/Cyclin-dependent Kinase 18 Is Activated through Association with Cyclin A and/or Phosphorylation by Protein Kinase A*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Shinya; Kominato, Kyohei; Koide-Yoshida, Shizuyo; Miyamoto, Kenji; Isshiki, Kinuka; Tsuji, Akihiko; Yuasa, Keizo

    2014-01-01

    PCTAIRE kinase 3 (PCTK3)/cyclin-dependent kinase 18 (CDK18) is an uncharacterized member of the CDK family because its activator(s) remains unidentified. Here we describe the mechanisms of catalytic activation of PCTK3 by cyclin A2 and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Using a pulldown experiment with HEK293T cells, cyclin A2 and cyclin E1 were identified as proteins that interacted with PCTK3. An in vitro kinase assay using retinoblastoma protein as the substrate showed that PCTK3 was specifically activated by cyclin A2 but not by cyclin E1, although its activity was lower than that of CDK2. Furthermore, immunocytochemistry analysis showed that PCTK3 colocalized with cyclin A2 in the cytoplasm and regulated cyclin A2 stability. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that PCTK3 contained four putative PKA phosphorylation sites. In vitro and in vivo kinase assays showed that PCTK3 was phosphorylated by PKA at Ser12, Ser66, and Ser109 and that PCTK3 activity significantly increased via phosphorylation at Ser12 by PKA even in the absence of cyclin A2. In the presence of cyclin A2, PCTK3 activity was comparable to CDK2 activity. We also found that PCTK3 knockdown in HEK293T cells induced polymerized actin accumulation in peripheral areas and cofilin phosphorylation. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence for the mechanisms of catalytic activation of PCTK3 by cyclin A2 and PKA and a physiological function of PCTK3. PMID:24831015

  18. Prioritizing disease candidate proteins in cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks based on "guilt by association" analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wan; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming; Li, Weiguo; Qu, Xiaoli; Liang, Binhua; Gao, Qianping; Feng, Chenchen; Jia, Xu; Lv, Yana; Zhang, Siya; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    The cardiomyopathies are a group of heart muscle diseases which can be inherited (familial). Identifying potential disease-related proteins is important to understand mechanisms of cardiomyopathies. Experimental identification of cardiomyophthies is costly and labour-intensive. In contrast, bioinformatics approach has a competitive advantage over experimental method. Based on "guilt by association" analysis, we prioritized candidate proteins involving in human cardiomyopathies. We first built weighted human cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks for three subtypes of cardiomyopathies using the known disease proteins from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man as seeds. We then developed a method in prioritizing disease candidate proteins to rank candidate proteins in the network based on "guilt by association" analysis. It was found that most candidate proteins with high scores shared disease-related pathways with disease seed proteins. These top ranked candidate proteins were related with the corresponding disease subtypes, and were potential disease-related proteins. Cross-validation and comparison with other methods indicated that our approach could be used for the identification of potentially novel disease proteins, which may provide insights into cardiomyopathy-related mechanisms in a more comprehensive and integrated way.

  19. VAMP-1: a synaptic vesicle-associated integral membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, W S; Cowan, D M; Scheller, R H

    1988-01-01

    Several proteins are associated with, or are integral components of, the lipid bilayer that forms the delineating membrane of neuronal synaptic vesicles. To characterize these molecules, we used a polyclonal antiserum raised against purified cholinergic synaptic vesicles from Torpedo to screen a cDNA expression library constructed from mRNA of the electromotor nucleus. One clone encodes VAMP-1 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 1), a nervous-system-specific protein of 120 amino acids whose primary sequence can be divided into three domains: a proline-rich amino terminus, a highly charged internal region, and a hydrophobic carboxyl-terminal domain that is predicted to comprise a membrane anchor. Tryptic digestion of intact and lysed vesicles suggests that the protein faces the cytoplasm, where it may play a role in packaging, transport, or release of neurotransmitters. Images PMID:3380805

  20. Quantitative protein localization signatures reveal an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins.

    PubMed

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  1. Proteins associated with RNase E in a multicomponent ribonucleolytic complex.

    PubMed Central

    Miczak, A; Kaberdin, V R; Wei, C L; Lin-Chao, S

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli endoribonuclease RNase E is essential for RNA processing and degradation. Earlier work provided evidence that RNase E exists intracellularly as part of a multicomponent complex and that one of the components of this complex is a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, polynucleotide phosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.8). To isolate and identify other components of the RNase E complex, FLAG-epitope-tagged RNase E (FLAG-Rne) fusion protein was purified on a monoclonal antibody-conjugated agarose column. The FLAG-Rne fusion protein, eluted by competition with the synthetic FLAG peptide, was found to be associated with other proteins. N-terminal sequencing of these proteins revealed the presence in the RNase E complex not only of polynucleotide phosphorylase but also of DnaK, RNA helicase, and enolase (EC 4.2.1.11). Another protein associated only with epitope-tagged temperature-sensitive (Rne-3071) mutant RNase E but not with the wild-type enzyme is GroEL. The FLAG-Rne complex has RNase E activity in vivo and in vitro. The relative amount of proteins associated with wild-type and Rne-3071 expressed at an elevated temperature differed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8632981

  2. Protein-Based Three-Dimensional Memories and Associative Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birge, Robert

    2008-03-01

    The field of bioelectronics has benefited from the fact that nature has often solved problems of a similar nature to those which must be solved to create molecular electronic or photonic devices that operate with efficiency and reliability. Retinal proteins show great promise in bioelectronic devices because they operate with high efficiency (˜0.65%), high cyclicity (>10^7), operate over an extended wavelength range (360 -- 630 nm) and can convert light into changes in voltage, pH, absorption or refractive index. This talk will focus on a retinal protein called bacteriorhodopsin, the proton pump of the organism Halobacterium salinarum. Two memories based on this protein will be described. The first is an optical three-dimensional memory. This memory stores information using volume elements (voxels), and provides as much as a thousand-fold improvement in effective capacity over current technology. A unique branching reaction of a variant of bacteriorhodopsin is used to turn each protein into an optically addressed latched AND gate. Although three working prototypes have been developed, a number of cost/performance and architectural issues must be resolved prior to commercialization. The major issue is that the native protein provides a very inefficient branching reaction. Genetic engineering has improved performance by nearly 500-fold, but a further order of magnitude improvement is needed. Protein-based holographic associative memories will also be discussed. The human brain stores and retrieves information via association, and human intelligence is intimately connected to the nature and enormous capacity of this associative search and retrieval process. To a first order approximation, creativity can be viewed as the association of two seemingly disparate concepts to form a totally new construct. Thus, artificial intelligence requires large scale associative memories. Current computer hardware does not provide an optimal environment for creating artificial

  3. Comparative effects of cryosolvents on tubulin association, thermal stability, and binding of microtubule-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Pajot-Augy, E

    1993-06-01

    Organic cryosolvents essential for cryopreservation of living cells have a colligative effect on water properties, but also affect cellular structures such as the membrane, actin, or tubulin cytoskeleton. The effects of cryosolvents on actin and its binding proteins are starting to be well investigated. In parallel, tubulin assembly characteristics were investigated comparatively, with 0-30% 1,2-propanediol, dimethyl sulfoxide, or glycerol, and with or without microtubule-associated proteins, at 37 or 4 degrees C. Tubulin association was monitored by spectrometry and sedimentation, providing the concentration in free protein, cold-depolymerizable microtubules, and cold-resistant associations. At 37 degrees C, 1,2-propanediol and dimethyl sulfoxide induce a similar association level and cold stability of the assemblies. Glycerol yields a lower level of tubulin association. Cold stability of the assemblies requires the presence of solvent, the amount of which is modulated by microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs): 15% 1,2-propanediol or dimethyl sulfoxide, decreasing down to 10% with MAPs, or 10% glycerol with MAPs only. At 4 degrees C, some cold-stable association is promoted by 1,2-propanediol or dimethyl sulfoxide above 10-15%, in the presence or absence of MAPs, but not with glycerol. In addition, protein content of the various fractions obtained with MAPs and 30% solvent was examined by densitometry of electrophoresis gels. Cold-labile associations obtained at 37 degrees C with 1,2-propanediol or dimethyl sulfoxide are lacking in tubulin and enriched in tau proteins relative to control or glycerol. Associations formed at 37 degrees C and stable to subsequent cold treatment, or at 4 degrees C, regardless of the solvent, present a large tubulin content, as well as few tau proteins and high-molecular-weight MAPs.

  4. Virulent strain associated outer membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Skare, J T; Shang, E S; Foley, D M; Blanco, D R; Champion, C I; Mirzabekov, T; Sokolov, Y; Kagan, B L; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated and purified outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Borrelia burgdorferi strain B31 based on methods developed for isolation of Treponema pallidum OMV. Purified OMV exhibited distinct porin activities with conductances of 0.6 and 12.6 nano-Siemen and had no detectable beta-NADH oxidase activity indicating their outer membrane origin and their lack of inner membrane contamination, respectively. Hydrophobic proteins were identified by phase partitioning with Triton X-114. Most of these hydrophobic membrane proteins were not acylated, suggesting that they are outer membrane-spanning proteins. Identification of palmitate-labeled lipoproteins revealed that several were enriched in the OMV, several were enriched in the protoplasmic cylinder inner membrane fraction, and others were found exclusively associated with the inner membrane. The protein composition of OMV changed significantly with successive in vitro cultivation of strain B31. Using antiserum with specificity for virulent strain B31, we identified OMV antigens on the surface of the spirochete and identified proteins whose presence in OMV could be correlated with virulence and protective immunity in the rabbit Lyme disease model. These virulent strain associated outer membrane-spanning proteins may provide new insight into the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Images PMID:7593626

  5. Jupiter, a new Drosophila protein associated with microtubules.

    PubMed

    Karpova, Nina; Bobinnec, Yves; Fouix, Sylvaine; Huitorel, Philippe; Debec, Alain

    2006-05-01

    In this study we describe a novel Drosophila protein Jupiter, which shares properties with several structural microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) including TAU, MAP2, MAP4. Jupiter is a soluble unfolded molecule with the high net positive charge, rich in Glycine. It possesses two degenerated repeats around the sequence PPGG, separated by a Serine-rich region. Jupiter associates with microtubules in vitro and, fused with the green fluorescent protein (GFP), is an excellent marker to follow microtubule dynamics in vivo. In a jupiter transgenic Drosophila strain generated by the "protein-trap" technique, Jupiter:GFP fusion protein localizes to the microtubule network through the cell cycle at the different stages of development. We found particularly high Jupiter:GFP concentrations in the young embryo, larval nervous system, precursors of eye photoreceptors and adult ovary. Moreover, from jupiter:gfp embryos we have established two permanent cell lines presenting strongly fluorescent microtubules during the whole cell cycle. In these cells, the distribution of the Jupiter:GFP fusion protein reproduces microtubule behavior upon treatment by the drugs colchicine and taxol. The jupiter cell lines and fly strain should be of wide interest for biologists interested in in vivo analysis of microtubule dynamics.

  6. Protein landscape at Drosophila melanogaster telomere-associated sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Antão, José M; Mason, James M; Déjardin, Jérôme; Kingston, Robert E

    2012-06-01

    The specific set of proteins bound at each genomic locus contributes decisively to regulatory processes and to the identity of a cell. Understanding of the function of a particular locus requires the knowledge of what factors interact with that locus and how the protein composition changes in different cell types or during the response to internal and external signals. Proteomic analysis of isolated chromatin segments (PICh) was developed as a tool to target, purify, and identify proteins associated with a defined locus and was shown to allow the purification of human telomeric chromatin. Here we have developed this method to identify proteins that interact with the Drosophila telomere-associated sequence (TAS) repeats. Several of the purified factors were validated as novel TAS-bound proteins by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and the Brahma complex was confirmed as a dominant modifier of telomeric position effect through the use of a genetic test. These results offer information on the efficacy of applying the PICh protocol to loci with sequence more complex than that found at human telomeres and identify proteins that bind to the TAS repeats, which might contribute to TAS biology and chromatin silencing. PMID:22493064

  7. Proteins that associate with lamins: Many faces, many functions

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Eric C. . E-mail: e.schirmer@ed.ac.uk; Foisner, Roland . E-mail: roland.foisner@meduniwien.ac.at

    2007-06-10

    Lamin-associated polypeptides (LAPs) comprise inner nuclear membrane proteins tightly associated with the peripheral lamin scaffold as well as proteins forming stable complexes with lamins in the nucleoplasm. The involvement of LAPs in a wide range of human diseases may be linked to an equally bewildering range of their functions, including sterol reduction, histone modification, transcriptional repression, and Smad- and {beta}-catenin signaling. Many LAPs are likely to be at the center of large multi-protein complexes, components of which may dictate their functions, and a few LAPs have defined enzymatic activities. Here we discuss the definition of LAPs, review their many binding partners, elaborate their functions in nuclear architecture, chromatin organization, gene expression and signaling, and describe what is currently known about their links to human disease.

  8. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphisms are associated with coronary artery calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is a key regulator of vascular calcification. Genetic variation at the MGP locus could modulate the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). We examined the cross-sectional association between MGP SNPs [rs1800802 (T-138C), rs1800801 (G-7A),and rs4236 (Ala102Thr)...

  9. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  10. Lipid nanotechnologies for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Grushin, Kirill; Dalm, Daniela; Miller, Jaimy

    2014-11-01

    We present a methodology of lipid nanotubes (LNT) and nanodisks technologies optimized in our laboratory for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins at close to physiological conditions. The application of these lipid nanotechnologies for structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is fundamental for understanding and modulating their function. The LNTs in our studies are single bilayer galactosylceramide based nanotubes of ∼20 nm inner diameter and a few microns in length, that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. The lipid nanodisks (NDs) are self-assembled discoid lipid bilayers of ∼10 nm diameter, which are stabilized in aqueous solutions by a belt of amphipathic helical scaffold proteins. By combining LNT and ND technologies, we can examine structurally how the membrane curvature and lipid composition modulates the function of the membrane-associated proteins. As proof of principle, we have engineered these lipid nanotechnologies to mimic the activated platelet's phosphtaidylserine rich membrane and have successfully assembled functional membrane-bound coagulation factor VIII in vitro for structure determination by cryo-EM. The macromolecular organization of the proteins bound to ND and LNT are further defined by fitting the known atomic structures within the calculated three-dimensional maps. The combination of LNT and ND technologies offers a means to control the design and assembly of a wide range of functional membrane-associated proteins and complexes for structural studies by cryo-EM. The presented results confirm the suitability of the developed methodology for studying the functional structure of membrane-associated proteins, such as the coagulation factors, at a close to physiological environment.

  11. Chicken Egg Shell Membrane Associated Proteins and Peptides.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Sarbjeet; Liyanage, Rohana; Kannan, Lakshmi; Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Lay, Jack O; Rath, Narayan C

    2015-11-11

    Egg shells are poultry industry byproducts with potential for use in various biological and agricultural applications. We have been interested in the membranes underlying the calcareous shell as a feed supplement, which showed potential to improve immunity and performance of post hatch poultry. Therefore, to determine their protein and peptide profiles, we extracted the egg shell membranes (ESM) from fresh unfertilized eggs with methanol and guanidine hydrochloride (GdHCl) to obtain soluble proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. The methanol extract was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), high-performance reverse phase liquid chromatographic separation (HPLC), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to determine its peptide and protein profiles. The GdHCl extract was subjected to ESI-HPLC-MS/MS following trypsin digestion of reduced/alkylated proteins. Nine proteins from the methanol extract and >275 proteins from the GdHCl extract were tentatively identified. The results suggested the presence of several abundant proteins from egg whites, such as ovoalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme as well as many others associated with antimicrobial, biomechanical, cytoskeletal organizational, cell signaling, and enzyme activities. Collagens, keratin, agrin, and laminin were some of the structural proteins present in the ESM. The methanol-soluble fraction contained several clusterin peptides and defensins, particularly, two isoforms of gallin. The ratios of the two isoforms of gallin differed between the membranes obtained from brown and white eggs. The high abundance of several antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and other bioactive proteins in the ESM along with its potential to entrap various microbes and antigens may make it a suitable vehicle for oral immunization of post hatch poultry and improve their disease resistance.

  12. Root carbon and protein metabolism associated with heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bingru; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Xu, Jichen

    2012-05-01

    Extensive past efforts have been taken toward understanding heat tolerance mechanisms of the aboveground organs. Root systems play critical roles in whole-plant adaptation to heat stress, but are less studied. This review discusses recent research results revealing some critical physiological and metabolic factors underlying root thermotolerance, with a focus on temperate perennial grass species. Comparative analysis of differential root responses to supraoptimal temperatures by a heat-adapted temperate C3 species, Agrostis scabra, which can survive high soil temperatures up to 45 °C in geothermal areas in Yellow Stone National Park, and a heat-sensitive cogeneric species, Agrostis stolonifera, suggested that efficient carbon and protein metabolism is critical for root thermotolerance. Superior root thermotolerance in a perennial grass was associated with a greater capacity to control respiratory costs through respiratory acclimation, lowering carbon investment in maintenance for protein turnover, and efficiently partitioning carbon into different metabolic pools and alternative respiration pathways. Proteomic analysis demonstrated that root thermotolerance was associated with an increased maintenance of stability and less degradation of proteins, particularly those important for metabolism and energy production. In addition, thermotolerant roots are better able to maintain growth and activity during heat stress by activating stress defence proteins such as those participating in antioxidant defence (i.e. superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase) and chaperoning protection (i.e. heat shock protein).

  13. Root carbon and protein metabolism associated with heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bingru; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Xu, Jichen

    2012-05-01

    Extensive past efforts have been taken toward understanding heat tolerance mechanisms of the aboveground organs. Root systems play critical roles in whole-plant adaptation to heat stress, but are less studied. This review discusses recent research results revealing some critical physiological and metabolic factors underlying root thermotolerance, with a focus on temperate perennial grass species. Comparative analysis of differential root responses to supraoptimal temperatures by a heat-adapted temperate C3 species, Agrostis scabra, which can survive high soil temperatures up to 45 °C in geothermal areas in Yellow Stone National Park, and a heat-sensitive cogeneric species, Agrostis stolonifera, suggested that efficient carbon and protein metabolism is critical for root thermotolerance. Superior root thermotolerance in a perennial grass was associated with a greater capacity to control respiratory costs through respiratory acclimation, lowering carbon investment in maintenance for protein turnover, and efficiently partitioning carbon into different metabolic pools and alternative respiration pathways. Proteomic analysis demonstrated that root thermotolerance was associated with an increased maintenance of stability and less degradation of proteins, particularly those important for metabolism and energy production. In addition, thermotolerant roots are better able to maintain growth and activity during heat stress by activating stress defence proteins such as those participating in antioxidant defence (i.e. superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase) and chaperoning protection (i.e. heat shock protein). PMID:22328905

  14. ProtPhylo: identification of protein-phenotype and protein-protein functional associations via phylogenetic profiling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yiming; Perocchi, Fabiana

    2015-07-01

    ProtPhylo is a web-based tool to identify proteins that are functionally linked to either a phenotype or a protein of interest based on co-evolution. ProtPhylo infers functional associations by comparing protein phylogenetic profiles (co-occurrence patterns of orthology relationships) for more than 9.7 million non-redundant protein sequences from all three domains of life. Users can query any of 2048 fully sequenced organisms, including 1678 bacteria, 255 eukaryotes and 115 archaea. In addition, they can tailor ProtPhylo to a particular kind of biological question by choosing among four main orthology inference methods based either on pair-wise sequence comparisons (One-way Best Hits and Best Reciprocal Hits) or clustering of orthologous proteins across multiple species (OrthoMCL and eggNOG). Next, ProtPhylo ranks phylogenetic neighbors of query proteins or phenotypic properties using the Hamming distance as a measure of similarity between pairs of phylogenetic profiles. Candidate hits can be easily and flexibly prioritized by complementary clues on subcellular localization, known protein-protein interactions, membrane spanning regions and protein domains. The resulting protein list can be quickly exported into a csv text file for further analyses. ProtPhylo is freely available at http://www.protphylo.org.

  15. Role of Yes-associated protein in cancer: An update

    PubMed Central

    Abylkassov, Ramazan; Xie, Yingqiu

    2016-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is an oncoprotein located in the cytoplasm in an inactive form, and when activated, it translocates to the nucleus and activates the transcription of genes responsible for cell division and apoptosis. YAP is one of the downstream regulatory proteins in the Hippo signaling pathway, which is important in cell proliferation and regeneration. Due to its great importance, YAP is regulated very strictly by different regulatory systems. The present review will focus on the canonical pathways of YAP, and will provide details on the most recent findings regarding its regulation and role in tumorigenesis, specifically in prostate tumor progression. PMID:27698789

  16. Role of Yes-associated protein in cancer: An update

    PubMed Central

    Abylkassov, Ramazan; Xie, Yingqiu

    2016-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is an oncoprotein located in the cytoplasm in an inactive form, and when activated, it translocates to the nucleus and activates the transcription of genes responsible for cell division and apoptosis. YAP is one of the downstream regulatory proteins in the Hippo signaling pathway, which is important in cell proliferation and regeneration. Due to its great importance, YAP is regulated very strictly by different regulatory systems. The present review will focus on the canonical pathways of YAP, and will provide details on the most recent findings regarding its regulation and role in tumorigenesis, specifically in prostate tumor progression.

  17. Balanced Protein–Water Interactions Improve Properties of Disordered Proteins and Non-Specific Protein Association

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Some frequently encountered deficiencies in all-atom molecular simulations, such as nonspecific protein–protein interactions being too strong, and unfolded or disordered states being too collapsed, suggest that proteins are insufficiently well solvated in simulations using current state-of-the-art force fields. To address these issues, we make the simplest possible change, by modifying the short-range protein–water pair interactions, and leaving all the water–water and protein–protein parameters unchanged. We find that a modest strengthening of protein–water interactions is sufficient to recover the correct dimensions of intrinsically disordered or unfolded proteins, as determined by direct comparison with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data. The modification also results in more realistic protein-protein affinities, and average solvation free energies of model compounds which are more consistent with experiment. Most importantly, we show that this scaling is small enough not to affect adversely the stability of the folded state, with only a modest effect on the stability of model peptides forming α-helix and β-sheet structures. The proposed adjustment opens the way to more accurate atomistic simulations of proteins, particularly for intrinsically disordered proteins, protein–protein association, and crowded cellular environments. PMID:25400522

  18. Statistically Inferring Protein-Protein Associations with Affinity Isolation LC-MS/MS Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Julia L.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Cannon, Bill; Auberry, Deanna L; Schmoyer, Denise D; McDonald, W Hayes; White, Amanda M.; Hooker, Brian; Victry, Kristin D; Buchanan, Michelle V; Kerry, Vladimir; Wiley, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Affinity isolation of protein complexes followed by protein identification by LC-MS/MS is an increasingly popular approach for mapping protein interactions. However, systematic and random assay errors from multiple sources must be considered to confidently infer authentic protein-protein interactions. To address this issue, we developed a general, robust statistical method for inferring authentic interactions from protein prey-by-bait frequency tables using a binomial-based likelihood ratio test (LRT) coupled with Bayes Odds estimation. We then applied our LRT-Bayes algorithm experimentally using data from protein complexes isolated from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Our algorithm, in conjunction with the experimental protocol, inferred with high confidence authentic interacting proteins from abundant, stable complexes, but few or no authentic interactions for lower-abundance complexes. We conclude that the experimental protocol including the LRT-Bayes algorithm produces results with high confidence but moderate sensitivity. We also found that Monte Carlo simulation is a feasible tool for checking modeling assumptions, estimating parameters, and evaluating the significance of results in protein association studies.

  19. Characterization of associated proteins and phospholipids in natural rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Sansatsadeekul, Jitlada; Sakdapipanich, Jitladda; Rojruthai, Porntip

    2011-06-01

    Non-rubber components present in natural rubber (NR) latex, such as proteins and phospholipids, are presumed to be distributed in the serum fraction as well as surrounding the rubber particle surface. The phospholipid-protein layers covering the rubber particle surface are especially interesting due to their ability to enhance the colloidal stability of NR latex. In this study, we have characterized the components surrounding the NR particle surface and investigated their role in the colloidal stability of NR particles. Proteins from the cream fraction were proteolytically removed from the NR latex and compare to those from the serum fractions using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealing that both fractions contained similar proteins in certain molecular weights such as 14.5, 25 and 27 kDa. Phospholipids removed from latex by treatment with NaOH were analyzed using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and several major signals were assignable to -(CH(2))(n)-, -CH(2)OP, -CH(2)OC═O and -OCH(2)CH(2)NH-. These signals are important evidence that indicates phospholipids associate with the rubber chain. The colloidal behavior of rubber lattices before and after removal of protein-lipid membrane was evaluated by zeta potential analysis and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The lowest zeta potential value of NR particles was observed at pH 10, consequently leading to the highest stability of rubber particles. Additionally, SEM micrographs clearly displayed a gray ring near the particle surface corresponding to the protein-lipid membrane layer.

  20. Repeat-containing protein effectors of plant-associated organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Hamiaux, Cyril; Templeton, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-associated organisms, including microbes, nematodes, and insects, deliver effector proteins into the apoplast, vascular tissue, or cell cytoplasm of their prospective hosts. These effectors function to promote colonization, typically by altering host physiology or by modulating host immune responses. The same effectors however, can also trigger host immunity in the presence of cognate host immune receptor proteins, and thus prevent colonization. To circumvent effector-triggered immunity, or to further enhance host colonization, plant-associated organisms often rely on adaptive effector evolution. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that several effectors of plant-associated organisms are repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) that carry tandem or non-tandem arrays of an amino acid sequence or structural motif. In this review, we highlight the diverse roles that these repeat domains play in RCP effector function. We also draw attention to the potential role of these repeat domains in adaptive evolution with regards to RCP effector function and the evasion of effector-triggered immunity. The aim of this review is to increase the profile of RCP effectors from plant-associated organisms. PMID:26557126

  1. Large-scale de novo prediction of physical protein-protein association.

    PubMed

    Elefsinioti, Antigoni; Saraç, Ömer Sinan; Hegele, Anna; Plake, Conrad; Hubner, Nina C; Poser, Ina; Sarov, Mihail; Hyman, Anthony; Mann, Matthias; Schroeder, Michael; Stelzl, Ulrich; Beyer, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Information about the physical association of proteins is extensively used for studying cellular processes and disease mechanisms. However, complete experimental mapping of the human interactome will remain prohibitively difficult in the near future. Here we present a map of predicted human protein interactions that distinguishes functional association from physical binding. Our network classifies more than 5 million protein pairs predicting 94,009 new interactions with high confidence. We experimentally tested a subset of these predictions using yeast two-hybrid analysis and affinity purification followed by quantitative mass spectrometry. Thus we identified 462 new protein-protein interactions and confirmed the predictive power of the network. These independent experiments address potential issues of circular reasoning and are a distinctive feature of this work. Analysis of the physical interactome unravels subnetworks mediating between different functional and physical subunits of the cell. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the network for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of complex diseases by applying it to genome-wide association studies of neurodegenerative diseases. This analysis provides new evidence implying TOMM40 as a factor involved in Alzheimer's disease. The network provides a high-quality resource for the analysis of genomic data sets and genetic association studies in particular. Our interactome is available via the hPRINT web server at: www.print-db.org.

  2. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    PubMed

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  3. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    PubMed

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  4. Ghrelin augments murine T-cell proliferation by activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Patel, Kalpesh; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lustig, Ana; Kim, Jie Wan; Mattson, Mark P; Taub, Dennis D

    2014-12-20

    Thymic atrophy occurs during normal aging, and is accelerated by exposure to chronic stressors that elevate glucocorticoid levels and impair the naïve T cell output. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin was recently shown to attenuate age-associated thymic atrophy. Here, we report that ghrelin enhances the proliferation of murine CD4+ primary T cells and a CD4+ T-cell line. Ghrelin induced activation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways, via upstream activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and protein kinase C, to enhance T-cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin induced expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and retinoblastoma phosphorylation. Finally, ghrelin activated the above-mentioned signaling pathways and stimulated thymocyte proliferation in young and older mice in vivo. PMID:25447526

  5. Ghrelin augments murine T-cell proliferation by activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Patel, Kalpesh; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lustig, Ana; Kim, Jie Wan; Mattson, Mark P.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Thymic atrophy occurs during normal aging, and is accelerated by exposure to chronic stressors that elevate glucocorticoid levelsand impair the naïve T cell output. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin was recently shown to attenuate age-associated thymic atrophy. Here, we report that ghrelin enhances the proliferation of murine CD4+ primary T cells and a CD4+ T-cell line. Ghrelin induced activation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways, via upstream activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and protein kinase C, to enhance T-cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin induced expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and retinoblastoma phosphorylation. Finally, ghrelin activated the above-mentioned signaling pathways and stimulated thymocyte proliferation in young and older mice in vivo. PMID:25447526

  6. Fluoranthene metabolism and associated proteins in Mycobacterium sp. JS14.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Seo, Jong-Su; Keum, Young-Soo; Lee, Kwang-Jun; Li, Qing X

    2007-06-01

    Fluoranthene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) commonly present in PAH-contaminated soils. We studied fluoranthene catabolism and associated proteins in Mycobacterium sp. JS14, a bacterium isolated from a PAH-contaminated soil in Hilo (HI, USA). Fluoranthene degrades in at least three separated pathways via 1-indanone, 2',3'-dihydroxybiphenyl-2,3,-dicarboxylic acid, and naphthalene-1,8-dicarboxylic acid. Part of the diverse catabolism is converged into phthalate catabolism. An increased expression of 25 proteins related to fluoranthene catabolism is found with 1-D PAGE or 2-DE and nano-LC-MS/MS. Detection of fluoranthene catabolism associated proteins coincides well with its multiple degradation pathways that are mapped via metabolites identified. Among the up-regulated proteins, PAH ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase alpha-subunit and beta-subunit and 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase are notably induced. The up-regulation of trans-2-carboxybenzalpyruvate hydratase suggests that some of fluoranthene metabolites may be further degraded through aromatic dicarboxylic acid pathways. Catalase and superoxide dismutase were up-regulated to control unexpected oxidative stress during the fluoranthene catabolism. The up-regulation of chorismate synthase and nicotine-nucleotide phosphorylase may be necessary for sustaining shikimate pathway and pyrimidine biosynthesis, respectively. A fluoranthene degradation pathway for Mycobacterium sp. JS14 was proposed and confirmed by proteomic study by identifying almost all the enzymes required during the initial steps of fluoranthene degradation. PMID:17514677

  7. MAP3: characterization of a novel microtubule-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies we have characterized a brain protein that copurifies with microtubules. We identify it as a microtubule- associated protein (MAP) by the following criteria: it copolymerizes with tubulin through repeated cycles of microtubule assembly in vitro; it is not associated with any brain subcellular fraction other than microtubules; in double-label immunofluorescence experiments antibodies against this protein stain the same fibrous elements in cultured cells as are stained by antitubulin; and this fibrous staining pattern is dispersed when cytoplasmic microtubules are disrupted by colchicine. Because it is distinct from previously described MAPs we designate this novel species MAP3. The MAP3 protein consists of a closely spaced pair of polypeptides on SDS gels, Mr 180,000, which are present in both glial (glioma C6) and neuronal (neuroblastoma B104) cell lines. In brain the MAP3 antigen is present in both neurons and glia. In nerve cells its distribution is strikingly restricted: anti-MAP3 staining is detectable only in neurofilament-rich axons. It is not, however, a component of isolated brain intermediate filaments. PMID:3968174

  8. Why are proteins with glutamine- and asparagine-rich regions associated with protein misfolding diseases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor

    2005-12-01

    The possibility that vibrational excited states (VESs) are the drivers of protein folding and function (the VES hypothesis) is explored to explain the reason why Gln- and Asn-rich proteins are associated with degenerative diseases. The Davydov/Scott model is extended to describe energy transfer from the water solution to the protein and vice versa. Computer simulations show that, on average, Gln and Asn residues lead to an initial larger absorption of energy from the environment to the protein, something that can explain the greater structural instability of prions. The sporadic, inherited and infectious character of prion diseases is discussed in the light of the VES hypothesis. An alternative treatment for prion diseases is suggested.

  9. Identification of extensin protein associated with sugar beet pectin.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Alberto; Fishman, Marshall L; Fortis, Laurie L; Cooke, Peter H; Hotchkiss, Arland T

    2009-11-25

    Several studies have suggested that the emulsification properties associated with pectin obtained from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) are due to the presence of a protein-pectin complex. Nevertheless, the identity of the protein has remained elusive. Pectin, extracted from sugar beet pulp by microwave-assisted extraction, and a commercial sample were both subjected to protease digestion with trypsin. The resulting peptides were separated from the pectin solution by ultrafiltration using a 3 kDa molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) membrane and analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization with tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The partial sequences derived from the mass spectrometry analyses of the resulting tryptic peptides are found to be highly consistent with extensin protein matched from the B. vulgaris Genetic Index database and also correspond to previously reported extensin peptides found in sugar beet cell suspension cultures. Further attempts were made to disassociate the protein from pectin using 1 M NaCl and a 100 kDa MWCO membrane; however, no peptides were observed following trypsin digestion of the permeate solution. This evidence suggests the existence of a complex between the pectin and extensin that is not due to ionic interactions. Trypsin digestion of commercial sugar beet pectin also produced the peptide profile observed with the microwave-assisted extracted pectin sample. Atomic force microscopy established that the number of rod-like elements decreased following protease treatment compared to the untreated sample.

  10. An aquaporin protein is associated with drought stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Ban, Liping; Wen, Hongyu; Wang, Zan; Dzyubenko, Nikolay; Chapurin, Vladimir; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Xuemin

    2015-04-01

    Water channel proteins known as aquaporins (AQPs) regulate the movement of water and other small molecules across plant vacuolar and plasma membranes; they are associated with plant tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, a PIP type AQPs gene, designated as GoPIP1, was cloned from Galega orientalis, a high value leguminous forage crop. The GoPIP1 gene consists of an 870 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 289 amino acids, and belongs to the PIP1 subgroup of the PIP subfamily. The transcript level of GoPIP1 was higher in the root of G. orientalis than in the leaf and stem. The level of GoPIP1 transcript increased significantly when treated with 200 mM NaCl or 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000. Transient expression of GoPIP1 in onion epidermal cells revealed that the GoPIP1 protein was localized to the plasma membrane. Over-expression of GoPIP1 increased the rosette/root ratio and increased sensitivity to drought in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. However, GoPIP1 over-expression in Arabidopsis had no significant effect under saline condition. The present data provides a gene resource that contributes to furthering our understanding of water channel protein and their application in plant stress tolerance.

  11. Hydroxocobalamin association during cell culture results in pink therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Kenneth M; Gillespie, Ronald; Lewis, Nathan; Fujimori, Kiyoshi; McCoy, Rebecca; Bach, Julia; Connell-Crowley, Lisa; Eakin, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    Process control of protein therapeutic manufacturing is central to ensuring the product is both safe and efficacious for patients. In this work, we investigate the cause of pink color variability in development lots of monoclonal antibody (mAb) and Fc-fusion proteins. Results show pink-colored product generated during manufacturing is due to association of hydroxocobalamin (OH-Cbl), a form of vitamin B12. OH-Cbl is not part of the product manufacturing process; however we found cyanocobalamin (CN-Cbl) in cell culture media converts to OH-Cbl in the presence of light. OH-Cbl can be released from mAb and Fc-fusion proteins by conversion with potassium cyanide to CN-Cbl, which does not bind. By exploiting the differential binding of CN-Cbl and OH-Cbl, we developed a rapid and specific assay to accurately measure B12 levels in purified protein. Analysis of multiple products and lots using this technique gives insight into color variability during manufacturing. PMID:23924851

  12. Association between milk protein gene variants and protein composition traits in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Peñagaricano, F; Ahmad, K R; Lucey, J A; Weigel, K A; Khatib, H

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify DNA markers in the 4 casein genes (CSN1S1, CSN1S2, CSN2, and CSN3) and the 2 major whey protein genes (LALBA and LGB) that show associations with milk protein profile measured by reverse-phase HPLC. Fifty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were genotyped for cows in a unique resource population consisting of purebred Holstein and (Holstein × Jersey) × Holstein crossbred animals. Seven traits were analyzed, including concentrations of α(S)-casein (CN), β-CN, κ-CN, α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and 2 additional secondary traits, the total concentration of the above 5 milk proteins and the α(S)-CN to β-CN ratio. A substantial fraction of phenotypic variation could be explained by the additive genetic component for the 7 milk protein composition traits studied. Moreover, several SNP were significantly associated with all examined traits at an experiment-wise error rate of 0.05, except for α-lactalbumin. Importantly, the significant SNP explained a large proportion of the phenotypic variation of milk protein composition. Our findings could be used for selecting animals that produce milk with desired composition or desired processing and manufacturing properties.

  13. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liang; Huang, Jianbin; Ma, Zhixin; Zhang, Jing; Zou, Yapeng; Gao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html.

  14. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html. PMID:26044949

  15. Suppression of death-associated protein kinase 2 by interaction with 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Keizo; Ota, Reina; Matsuda, Shinya; Isshiki, Kinuka; Inoue, Masahiro; Tsuji, Akihiko

    2015-08-14

    Death-associated protein kinase 2 (DAPK2), a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-regulated serine/threonine kinase, induces apoptosis. However, the signaling mechanisms involved in this process are unknown. Using a proteomic approach, we identified 14-3-3 proteins as novel DAPK2-interacting proteins. The 14-3-3 family has the ability to bind to phosphorylated proteins via recognition of three conserved amino acid motifs (mode 1-3 motifs), and DAPK2 contains the mode 3 motif ((pS/pT)X1-2-COOH). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with DAPK2 was dependent on the phosphorylation of Thr(369), and effectively suppressed DAPK2 kinase activity and DAPK2-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we revealed that the 14-3-3 binding site Thr(369) of DAPK2 was phosphorylated by the survival kinase Akt. Our findings suggest that DAPK2-induced apoptosis is negatively regulated by Akt and 14-3-3 proteins.

  16. Protein aggregates are associated with replicative aging without compromising protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Saarikangas, Juha; Barral, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of cellular lineages is facilitated by asymmetric segregation of fate determinants between dividing cells. In budding yeast, various aging factors segregate to the aging (mother)-lineage, with poorly understood consequences. In this study, we show that yeast mother cells form a protein aggregate during early replicative aging that is maintained as a single, asymmetrically inherited deposit over the remaining lifespan. Surprisingly, deposit formation was not associated with stress or general decline in proteostasis. Rather, the deposit-containing cells displayed enhanced degradation of cytosolic proteasome substrates and unimpaired clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates. Deposit formation was dependent on Hsp42, which collected non-random client proteins of the Hsp104/Hsp70-refolding machinery, including the prion Sup35. Importantly, loss of Hsp42 resulted in symmetric inheritance of its constituents and prolonged the lifespan of the mother cell. Together, these data suggest that protein aggregation is an early aging-associated differentiation event in yeast, having a two-faceted role in organismal fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06197.001 PMID:26544680

  17. The evolution and diversification of plant microtubule-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, John

    2013-07-01

    Plant evolution is marked by major advances in structural characteristics that facilitated the highly successful colonization of dry land. Underlying these advances is the evolution of genes encoding specialized proteins that form novel microtubular arrays of the cytoskeleton. This review investigates the evolution of plant families of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) through the recently sequenced genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Selaginella moellendorffii, Physcomitrella patens, Volvox carteri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The families of MAPs examined are AIR9, CLASP, CRIPT, MAP18, MOR1, TON, EB1, AtMAP70, SPR2, SPR1, WVD2 and MAP65 families (abbreviations are defined in the footnote to Table 1). Conjectures are made regarding the evolution of MAPs in plants in relation to the evolution of multicellularity, oriented cell division and vasculature. Angiosperms in particular have high numbers of proteins that are involved in promotion of helical growth or its suppression, and novel plant microtubular structures may have acted as a catalyst for the development of novel plant MAPs. Comparisons of plant MAP gene families with those of animals show that animals may have more flexibility in the structure of their microtubule cytoskeletons than plants, but with both plants and animals possessing many MAP splice variants. PMID:23551562

  18. Associated proteins and renal epithelial Na+ channel function.

    PubMed

    Ismailov, I I; Berdiev, B K; Bradford, A L; Awayda, M S; Fuller, C M; Benos, D J

    1996-01-01

    The hypothesis that amiloride-sensitive Na+ channel complexes immunopurified from bovine renal papillary collecting tubules contain, as their core conduction component, an ENaC subunit, was tested by functional and immunological criteria. Disulfide bond reduction with dithiothreitol (DTT) of renal Na+ channels incorporated into planar lipid bilayers caused a reduction of single channel conductance from 40 pS to 13 pS, and uncoupled PKA regulation of this channel. The cation permeability sequence, as assessed from bi-ionic reversal potential measurements, and apparent amiloride equilibrium dissociation constant (K(amil)i) of the Na+ channels were unaltered by DTT treatment. Like ENaC, the DTT treated renal channel became mechanosensitive, and displayed a substantial decrease in K(amil)i following stretch (0.44 +/- 0.12 microM versus 6.9 +/- 1.0 microM). Moreover, stretch activation induced a loss in the channel's ability to discriminate between monovalent cations, and even allowed Ca2+ to permeate. Polyclonal antibodies generated against a fusion protein of alpha bENaC recognized a 70 kDa polypeptide component of the renal Na+ channel complex. These data suggest that ENaC is present in the immunopurified renal Na+ channel protein complex, and that PKA sensitivity is conferred by other associated proteins. PMID:8834119

  19. Computing Protein-Protein Association Affinity with Hybrid Steered Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Roberto A; Yu, Lili; Chen, Liao Y

    2015-09-01

    Computing protein-protein association affinities is one of the fundamental challenges in computational biophysics/biochemistry. The overwhelming amount of statistics in the phase space of very high dimensions cannot be sufficiently sampled even with today's high-performance computing power. In this article, we extend a potential of mean force (PMF)-based approach, the hybrid steered molecular dynamics (hSMD) approach we developed for ligand-protein binding, to protein-protein association problems. For a protein complex consisting of two protomers, P1 and P2, we choose m (≥3) segments of P1 whose m centers of mass are to be steered in a chosen direction and n (≥3) segments of P2 whose n centers of mass are to be steered in the opposite direction. The coordinates of these m + n centers constitute a phase space of 3(m + n) dimensions (3(m + n)D). All other degrees of freedom of the proteins, ligands, solvents, and solutes are freely subject to the stochastic dynamics of the all-atom model system. Conducting SMD along a line in this phase space, we obtain the 3(m + n)D PMF difference between two chosen states: one single state in the associated state ensemble and one single state in the dissociated state ensemble. This PMF difference is the first of four contributors to the protein-protein association energy. The second contributor is the 3(m + n - 1)D partial partition in the associated state accounting for the rotations and fluctuations of the (m + n - 1) centers while fixing one of the m + n centers of the P1-P2 complex. The two other contributors are the 3(m - 1)D partial partition of P1 and the 3(n - 1)D partial partition of P2 accounting for the rotations and fluctuations of their m - 1 or n - 1 centers while fixing one of the m/n centers of P1/P2 in the dissociated state. Each of these three partial partitions can be factored exactly into a 6D partial partition in multiplication with a remaining factor accounting for the small fluctuations while fixing three

  20. Hepatitis B virus X protein mediates yes-associated protein 1 upregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuzhuo; Zhang, Junhe; Zhang, Huaihong; Zhai, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) is implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP) is an important proto-oncogene, which is a downstream effector molecule in the Hippo signaling pathway. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between HBx expression in HCC samples and YAP expression in the Hippo pathway. A total of 20 pathologically confirmed HCC samples, 20 corresponding adjacent non-tumor liver tissues and 5 normal liver tissue samples were collected. The expression of HBx and YAP in the tissues was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The intensity and location of YAP expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. YAP mRNA and protein expression levels in HCC samples infected with HBV were significantly higher than those of normal liver tissues. Furthermore, YAP expression was positively correlated with HBx expression in HBV-positive HCC samples. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that YAP was predominantly expressed in the nuclei in HBV-positive HCC tissues. YAP expression was significantly decreased in the normal liver tissue and corresponding adjacent liver tissue when compared with the HCC tissues and by contrast to HCC tissues, YAP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm. In conclusion, these results indicate that the YAP gene is a key driver of HBx-induced liver cancer. Therefore, YAP may present a novel target in the treatment of HBV-associated HCC. PMID:27602122

  1. Hepatitis B virus X protein mediates yes-associated protein 1 upregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuzhuo; Zhang, Junhe; Zhang, Huaihong; Zhai, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) is implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP) is an important proto-oncogene, which is a downstream effector molecule in the Hippo signaling pathway. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between HBx expression in HCC samples and YAP expression in the Hippo pathway. A total of 20 pathologically confirmed HCC samples, 20 corresponding adjacent non-tumor liver tissues and 5 normal liver tissue samples were collected. The expression of HBx and YAP in the tissues was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The intensity and location of YAP expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. YAP mRNA and protein expression levels in HCC samples infected with HBV were significantly higher than those of normal liver tissues. Furthermore, YAP expression was positively correlated with HBx expression in HBV-positive HCC samples. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that YAP was predominantly expressed in the nuclei in HBV-positive HCC tissues. YAP expression was significantly decreased in the normal liver tissue and corresponding adjacent liver tissue when compared with the HCC tissues and by contrast to HCC tissues, YAP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm. In conclusion, these results indicate that the YAP gene is a key driver of HBx-induced liver cancer. Therefore, YAP may present a novel target in the treatment of HBV-associated HCC.

  2. Novel proteins associated with human dilated cardiomyopathy: selective reduction in α(1A)-adrenergic receptors and increased desensitization proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Moravec, Christine S; Perez, Dianne M

    2013-04-01

    Abstract Therapeutics to treat human heart failure (HF) and the identification of proteins associated with HF are still limited. We analyzed α(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes in human HF and performed proteomic analysis on more uniform samples to identify novel proteins associated with human HF. Six failing hearts with end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and four non-failing heart controls were subjected to proteomic analysis. Out of 48 identified proteins, 26 proteins were redundant between samples. Ten of these 26 proteins were previously reported to be associated with HF. Of the newly identified proteins, we found several muscle proteins and mitochondrial/electron transport proteins, while novel were functionally similar to previous reports. However, we also found novel proteins involved in functional classes such as β-oxidation and G-protein coupled receptor signaling and desensitization not previously associated with HF. We also performed radioligand-binding studies on the heart samples and not only confirmed a large loss of β(1)-ARs in end-stage DCM, but also found a selective decrease in the α(1A)-AR subtype not previously reported. We have identified new proteins and functional categories associated with end-stage DCM. We also report that similar to the previously characterized loss of β(1)-AR in HF, there is also a concomitant loss of α(1A)-ARs, which are considered cardioprotective proteins.

  3. Conservation of Oxidative Protein Stabilization in an Insect Homologue of Parkinsonism-Associated Protein DJ-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiusheng; Prahlad, Janani; Wilson, Mark A.

    2012-08-21

    DJ-1 is a conserved, disease-associated protein that protects against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in multiple organisms. Human DJ-1 contains a functionally essential cysteine residue (Cys106) whose oxidation is important for regulating protein function by an unknown mechanism. This residue is well-conserved in other DJ-1 homologues, including two (DJ-1{alpha} and DJ-1{beta}) in Drosophila melanogaster. Because D. melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying DJ-1 function, we have determined the crystal structure and impact of cysteine oxidation on Drosophila DJ-1{beta}. The structure of D. melanogaster DJ-1{beta} is similar to that of human DJ-1, although two important residues in the human protein, Met26 and His126, are not conserved in DJ-1{beta}. His126 in human DJ-1 is substituted with a tyrosine in DJ-1{beta}, and this residue is not able to compose a putative catalytic dyad with Cys106 that was proposed to be important in the human protein. The reactive cysteine in DJ-1 is oxidized readily to the cysteine-sulfinic acid in both flies and humans, and this may regulate the cytoprotective function of the protein. We show that the oxidation of this conserved cysteine residue to its sulfinate form (Cys-SO{sub 2{sup -}}) results in considerable thermal stabilization of both Drosophila DJ-1{beta} and human DJ-1. Therefore, protein stabilization is one potential mechanism by which cysteine oxidation may regulate DJ-1 function in vivo. More generally, most close DJ-1 homologues are likely stabilized by cysteine-sulfinic acid formation but destabilized by further oxidation, suggesting that they are biphasically regulated by oxidative modification.

  4. Atomistic Simulation of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Associated Cellulosomal Protein Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Crowley, Michael F; Smith, Jeremy C

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations have been performed to obtain an atomic-level understanding of lignocellulose structure and the assembly of its associated cellulosomal protein complexes. First, a CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived and validated by performing a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal of a lignin fragment molecule and comparing simulation-derived structural features with experimental results. Together with the existing force field for polysaccharides, this work provides the basis for full simulations of lignocellulose. Second, the underlying molecular mechanism governing the assembly of various cellulosomal modules is investigated by performing a novel free-energy calculation of the cohesin-dockerin dissociation. Our calculation indicates a free-energy barrier of ~17 kcal/mol and further reveals a stepwise dissociation pathway involving both the central -sheet interface and its adjacent solvent-exposed loop/turn regions clustered at both ends of the -barrel structure.

  5. Microtubule organization and microtubule-associated proteins in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Plants have unique microtubule (MT) arrays, cortical MTs, preprophase band, mitotic spindle, and phragmoplast, in the processes of evolution. These MT arrays control the directions of cell division and expansion especially in plants and are essential for plant morphogenesis and developments. Organizations and functions of these MT arrays are accomplished by diverse MT-associated proteins (MAPs). This review introduces 10 of conserved MAPs in eukaryote such as γ-TuC, augmin, katanin, kinesin, EB1, CLASP, MOR1/MAP215, MAP65, TPX2, formin, and several plant-specific MAPs such as CSI1, SPR2, MAP70, WVD2/WDL, RIP/MIDD, SPR1, MAP18/PCaP, EDE1, and MAP190. Most of the studies cited in this review have been analyzed in the particular model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. The significant knowledge of A. thaliana is the important established base to understand MT organizations and functions in plants. PMID:25262237

  6. Caleosins: Ca2+-binding proteins associated with lipid bodies.

    PubMed

    Naested, H; Frandsen, G I; Jauh, G Y; Hernandez-Pinzon, I; Nielsen, H B; Murphy, D J; Rogers, J C; Mundy, J

    2000-11-01

    We have previously identified a rice gene encoding a 27 kDa protein with a single Ca2+-binding EF-hand and a putative membrane anchor. We report here similar genes termed caleosins, CLO, in other plants and fungi; they comprise a multigene family of at least five members in Arabidopsis (AtClo1-5). Northern hybridization demonstrated that AtClo2-4 mRNAs levels were low in various tissues, while AtClo1 mRNA levels were high in developing embryos and mature seeds. Analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the GUS reporter under control of the AtClo1 promoter showed strong levels of expression in developing embryos and also in root tip cells. Antibodies raised against AtCLO1 were used to detect caleosin in cellular fractions of Arabidopsis and rapeseed. This indicated that caleosins are a novel class of lipid body proteins, which may also be associated with an ER subdomain. PMID:11197322

  7. Initiation of DNA synthesis by human papillomavirus E7 oncoproteins is resistant to p21-mediated inhibition of cyclin E-cdk2 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ruesch, M N; Laimins, L A

    1997-01-01

    The E6 and E7 proteins from the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) bind and inactivate the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and Rb, respectively. In HPV-positive cells, expression of E6 proteins from high-risk types results in increased turnover of p53, which leads to an abrogation of p21-mediated G1/S arrest in response to DNA-damaging agents. In contrast, keratinocytes which express E7 alone have increased levels of p53 but, interestingly, also fail to undergo a G1/S arrest. We investigated the mechanism by which E7 bypasses this p21 arrest by using both keratinocytes which stably express E7 as well as U20S cells which stably or transiently express E7. We observed that E7 does not affect the induction of p21 synthesis by p53. While glutathione S-transferase (GST)-E7 bound a low level of in vitro-translated p21, we were unable to detect E7 and p21 in the same complex by GST-E7 binding assays or immunoprecipitations from cell extracts. Furthermore, E7 did not prevent p21-mediated inhibition of cyclin E kinase activity. In keratinocytes expressing E7, increased levels of p53, p21, and cyclin E, as well as increased cyclin E kinase activity, were observed. To determine if this increase in cyclin E activity was necessary for E7's ability to overcome p21-mediated G1/S arrest, we examined U20S cells in which cyclin E levels are not increased in response to E7 expression. U20S cells which stably express E7 were found to initiate DNA synthesis in the presence of DNA-damaging agents despite the inhibition of cyclin E activity by p21. In transient assays, cotransfection of E7 or E2F-1 along with p21 into U20S cells rescued G1 arrest and resulted in S-phase entry, as measured by the ability to incorporate bromodeoxyuridine. These data indicate that E7 is able to overcome G1/S arrest without directly affecting p21 function and likely acts through deregulation of E2F activity. PMID:9188631

  8. Identification of Associated Proteins by Immunoprecipitation and Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiumei; Yan, Jianshe

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play central roles in intercellular and intracellular signal transduction. Impairment of protein-protein interactions causes many diseases such as cancer, cardiomyopathies, diabetes, microbial infections, and genetic and neurodegenerative disorders. Immunoprecipitation is a technique in which a target protein of interest bound by an antibody is used to pull down the protein complex out of cell lysates, which can be identified by mass spectrometry. Here, we describe the protocol to immunoprecipitate and identify the components of the protein complexes of ElmoE in Dictyostelium discoideum cells. PMID:27271899

  9. Weighted-ensemble Brownian dynamics simulations for protein association reactions.

    PubMed

    Huber, G A; Kim, S

    1996-01-01

    A new method, weighted-ensemble Brownian dynamics, is proposed for the simulation of protein-association reactions and other events whose frequencies of outcomes are constricted by free energy barriers. The method features a weighted ensemble of trajectories in configuration space with energy levels dictating the proper correspondence between "particles" and probability. Instead of waiting a very long time for an unlikely event to occur, the probability packets are split, and small packets of probability are allowed to diffuse almost immediately into regions of configuration space that are less likely to be sampled. The method has been applied to the Northrup and Erickson (1992) model of docking-type diffusion-limited reactions and yields reaction rate constants in agreement with those obtained by direct Brownian simulation, but at a fraction of the CPU time (10(-4) to 10(-3), depending on the model). Because the method is essentially a variant of standard Brownian dynamics algorithms, it is anticipated that weighted-ensemble Brownian dynamics, in conjunction with biophysical force models, can be applied to a large class of association reactions of interest to the biophysics community.

  10. Staphylococcus saprophyticus surface-associated protein (Ssp) is associated with lifespan reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Florian; Mohner, Amelie; Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören G

    2013-10-01

    Staphylococcal lipases have been proposed as pathogenicity factors. In Staphylococcus saprophyticus the surface-associated protein (Ssp) has been previously characterized as a cell wall-associated true lipase. A S. saprophyticus Δssp::ermB mutant has been described as less virulent in an in vivo model of urinary tract infection compared with its wild-type. This is the first report showing that S. saprophyticus induced a lifespan reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans similar to that of S. aureus RN4220. In two S. saprophyticus Δssp::ermB mutants lifespan reduction in C. elegans was partly abolished. In order to attribute virulence to the lipase activity itself and distinguish this phenomenon from the presence of the Ssp-protein, the conserved active site of the lipase was modified by site-directed ligase-independent mutagenesis and lipase activity-deficient mutants were constructed. These results indicate that the Ssp is associated with pathogenicity in C. elegans and one could speculate that the lipase activity itself is responsible for this virulence.

  11. Hepatitis B virus x protein induces autophagy via activating death-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H-T; Chen, G G; Hu, B-G; Zhang, Z-Y; Yun, J-P; He, M-L; Lai, P B S

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus x protein (HBX), a product of hepatitis B virus (HBV), is a multifunctional protein that regulates viral replication and various cellular functions. Recently, HBX has been shown to induce autophagy; however, the responsible mechanism is not fully known. In this study, we established stable HBX-expressing epithelial Chang cells as the platform to study how HBX induced autophagy. The results showed that the overexpression of HBX resulted in starvation-induced autophagy. HBX-induced autophagy was related to its ability to dephosphorylate/activate death-associated protein kinase (DAPK). The block of DAPK by its siRNA significantly counteracted HBX-mediated autophagy, confirming the positive role of DAPK in this process. HBX also induced Beclin 1, which functions at the downstream of the DAPK-mediated autophagy pathway. Although HBX could activate JNK, a kinase known to participate in autophagy in certain conditions, the change in JNK failed to influence HBX-induced autophagy. In conclusion, HBX induces autophagy via activating DAPK in a pathway related to Beclin 1, but not JNK. This new finding should help us to understand the role of autophagy in HBX-mediated pathogenesis and thus may provide targets for intervening HBX-related disorders.

  12. Promyelocytic leukemia protein enhances apoptosis of gastric cancer cells through Yes-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhipeng; Chen, Jiamin; Shao, Liming; Ma, Wangqian; Xu, Dingting

    2015-09-01

    It has been shown that Yes-associated protein (YAP) acts as a transcriptional co-activator to regulate p73-dependent apoptosis in response to DNA damage in some cell types, and promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is involved in the regulation loop through stabilization of YAP through sumoylation. Although YAP has been shown to be significantly upregulated in gastric cancer, whether the YAP/PML/p73 regulation loop also functions in gastric cancer is unknown. Here, we show significantly higher levels of YAP and significantly lower levels of PML in the gastric cancer specimen. Overexpression of YAP in gastric cancer cells significantly increased cell growth, but did not affect apoptosis. However, overexpression of PML in gastric cancer cells significantly increased cell apoptosis, resulting in decreases in cell growth, which seemed to require the presence of YAP. The effect of PML on apoptosis appeared to be conducted through p73-mediated modulation of apoptosis-associated genes, Bcl-2, Bak, and caspase9. Thus, our study suggests the presence of a YAP/PML/p73 regulatory loop in gastric cancer, and highlights PML as a promising tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through YAP-coordinated cancer cell apoptosis.

  13. Revealing the potential pathogenesis of glioma by utilizing a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiran; Li, Gang; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the potential mechanism of glioma through bioinformatic approaches. The gene expression profile (GSE4290) of glioma tumor and non-tumor samples was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 180 samples were available, including 23 non-tumor and 157 tumor samples. Then the raw data were preprocessed using robust multiarray analysis, and 8,890 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by using t-test (false discovery rate < 0.0005). Furthermore, 16 known glioma related genes were abstracted from Genetic Association Database. After mapping 8,890 DEGs and 16 known glioma related genes to Human Protein Reference Database, a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network (GAPN) was constructed. In addition, 51 sub-networks in GAPN were screened out through Molecular Complex Detection (score ≥ 1), and sub-network 1 was found to have the closest interaction (score = 3). What' more, for the top 10 sub-networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis (p value < 0.05) was performed, and DEGs involved in sub-network 1 and 2, such as BRMS1L and CCNA1, were predicted to regulate cell growth, cell cycle, and DNA replication via interacting with known glioma related genes. Finally, the overlaps of DEGs and human essential, housekeeping, tissue-specific genes were calculated (p value = 1.0, 1.0, and 0.00014, respectively) and visualized by Venn Diagram package in R. About 61% of human tissue-specific genes were DEGs as well. This research shed new light on the pathogenesis of glioma based on DEGs and GAPN, and our findings might provide potential targets for clinical glioma treatment.

  14. Immunoprecipitation of Plasma Membrane Receptor-Like Kinases for Identification of Phosphorylation Sites and Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are difficult to study for numerous reasons. The surface of membrane proteins is relatively hydrophobic and sometimes very unstable, additionally requiring detergents for their extraction from the membrane. This leads to challenges at all levels, including expression, solubilization, purification, identification of associated proteins, and the identification of post-translational modifications. However, recent advances in immunoprecipitation technology allow to isolate membrane proteins efficiently, facilitating the study of protein-protein interactions, the identification of novel associated proteins, and to identify post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Here, we describe an optimized immunoprecipitation protocol for plant plasma membrane receptor-like kinases. PMID:26577786

  15. Iroquois homeobox transcription factor (Irx5) promotes G1/S-phase transition in vascular smooth muscle cells by CDK2-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi; Bacanamwo, Methode; Anderson, Leonard M

    2016-08-01

    The Iroquois homeobox (Irx5) gene is essential in embryonic development and cardiac electrophysiology. Although recent studies have reported that IRX5 protein is involved in regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, little is known about the role of IRX5 in the adult vasculature. Here we report novel observations on the role of IRX5 in adult vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) during proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Comparative studies using primary human endothelial cells, VSMCs, and intact carotid arteries to determine relative expression of Irx5 in the peripheral vasculature demonstrate significantly higher expression in VSMCs. Sprague-Dawley rat carotid arteries were subjected to balloon catherization, and the presence of IRX5 was examined by immunohistochemistry after 2 wk. Results indicate markedly elevated IRX5 signal at 14 days compared with uninjured controls. Total RNA was isolated from injured and uninjured arteries, and Irx5 expression was measured by RT-PCR. Results demonstrate a significant increase in Irx5 expression at 3-14 days postinjury compared with controls. Irx5 genetic gain- and loss-of-function studies using thymidine and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation assays resulted in modulation of DNA synthesis in primary rat aortic VSMCs. Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27(kip1)), E2F transcription factor 1 (E2f1), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) expression in Irx5-transduced VSMCs compared with controls. Subsequently, apoptosis was observed and confirmed by morphological observation, caspase-3 cleavage, and enzymatic activation compared with control conditions. Taken together, these results indicate that Irx5 plays an important role in VSMC G1/S-phase cell cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis. PMID:27170637

  16. Regenerating livers of old rats contain high levels of C/EBPalpha that correlate with altered expression of cell cycle associated proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Timchenko, N A; Wilde, M; Kosai, K I; Heydari, A; Bilyeu, T A; Finegold, M J; Mohamedali, K; Richardson, A; Darlington, G J

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha) is expressed at high levels in the liver and inhibits growth in cultured cells. We have tested the correlation between C/EBPalpha levels, cell cycle proteins and hepatocyte proliferation in old and young animals as an in vivo model system in which the proliferative response to partial hepatectomy (PH) has been shown to be reduced and delayed in old animals. Here we present evidence that the expression of C/EBPalpha in old rats (24 months) differs from its expression in young animals (6-10 months) during liver regeneration. Induction of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a marker of DNA synthesis, occurs at 24 h after PH in young rats but is delayed and reduced in old animals. Induction of the mitotic-specific protein, cdc2 p34, is 3-4-fold less in regenerating liver of old rats than in the liver of young animals, confirming the reduced proliferative response in old animals. In young rats, the normal regenerative response involves a reduction of 3-4-fold in the levels of C/EBPalpha protein at 3-24 h. In old animals, C/EBPalpha is not reduced within 24 h after PH, but a decrease of C/EBPalpha protein levels can be detected at 72 h after PH. Induction of C/EBPbeta, another member of the C/EBP family, is delayed in old animals. Changes in the expression of C/EBP proteins are accompanied by alteration of the CDK inhibitor, p21, which is also decreased in young rats after PH, but in old animals remains unchanged. High levels of p21 protein in older animals correlate with the lack of cdk2 activation. We suggest that the failure to reduce the amount of C/EBPalpha and p21 is a critical event in the dysregulation of hepatocyte proliferation in old animals following PH. PMID:9628932

  17. Self-association of the Lentivirus protein, Nef

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The HIV-1 pathogenic factor, Nef, is a multifunctional protein present in the cytosol and on membranes of infected cells. It has been proposed that a spatial and temporal regulation of the conformation of Nef sequentially matches Nef's multiple functions to the process of virion production. Further, it has been suggested that dimerization is required for multiple Nef activities. A dimerization interface has been proposed based on intermolecular contacts between Nefs within hexagonal Nef/FynSH3 crystals. The proposed dimerization interface consists of the hydrophobic B-helix and flanking salt bridges between R105 and D123. Here, we test whether Nef self-association is mediated by this interface and address the overall significance of oligomerization. Results By co-immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrated that HIV-1Nef exists as monomers and oligomers with about half of the Nef protomers oligomerized. Nef oligomers were found to be present in the cytosol and on membranes. Removal of the myristate did not enhance the oligomerization of soluble Nef. Also, SIVNef oligomerizes despite lacking a dimerization interface functionally homologous to that proposed for HIV-1Nef. Moreover, HIV-1Nef and SIVNef form hetero-oligomers demonstrating the existence of homologous oligomerization interfaces that are distinct from that previously proposed (R105-D123). Intracellular cross-linking by formaldehyde confirmed that SF2Nef dimers are present in intact cells, but surprisingly self-association was dependent on R105, but not D123. SIVMAC239Nef can be cross-linked at its only cysteine, C55, and SF2Nef is also cross-linked, but at C206 instead of C55, suggesting that Nefs exhibit multiple dimeric structures. ClusPro dimerization analysis of HIV-1Nef homodimers and HIV-1Nef/SIVNef heterodimers identified a new potential dimerization interface, including a dibasic motif at R105-R106 and a six amino acid hydrophobic surface. Conclusions We have demonstrated significant

  18. ADAMTS-12 Associates with and Degrades Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuan-ju; Kong, Wei; Xu, Ke; Luan, Yi; Ilalov, Kiril; Sehgal, Bantoo; Yu, Shuang; Howell, Ronald D.; Cesare, Paul E. Di

    2006-01-01

    Loss of articular cartilage because of extracellular matrix breakdown is the hallmark of arthritis. Degradative fragments of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a prominent noncollagenous matrix component in articular cartilage, have been observed in the cartilage, synovial fluid, and serum of arthritis patients. The molecular mechanism of COMP degradation and the enzyme(s) responsible for it, however, remain largely unknown. ADAMTS-12 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) was shown to associate with COMP both in vitro and in vivo. ADAMTS-12 selectively binds to only the epidermal growth factor-like repeat domain of COMP of the four functional domains tested. The four C-terminal TSP-1-like repeats of ADAMTS-12 are shown to be necessary and sufficient for its interaction with COMP. Recombinant ADAMTS-12 is capable of digesting COMP in vitro. The COMP-degrading activity of ADAMTS-12 requires the presence of Zn2+ and appropriate pH (7.5-9.5), and the level of ADAMTS-12 in the cartilage and synovium of patients with both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis is significantly higher than in normal cartilage and synovium. Together, these findings indicate that ADAMTS-12 is a new COMP-interacting and -degrading enzyme and thus may play an important role in the COMP degradation in the initiation and progression of arthritis. PMID:16611630

  19. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in atherosclerosis (Review).

    PubMed

    Plakkal Ayyappan, Janeesh; Paul, Antoni; Goo, Young-Hwa

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of atherosclerotic plaques in arterial walls leads to major cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Macrophages/foam cells are central components of atherosclerotic plaques, which populate the arterial wall in order to remove harmful modified low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, resulting in the accumulation of lipids, mostly LDL‑derived cholesterol ester, in cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). At present, LDs are recognized as dynamic organelles that govern cellular metabolic processes. LDs consist of an inner core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and free cholesterol, and contain LD‑associated proteins (LDAPs) that regulate LD functions. Foam cells are characterized by an aberrant accumulation of cytosolic LDs, and are considered a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions through all stages of development. Previous studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying foam cell formation, aiming to discover therapeutic strategies that target foam cells and intervene against atherosclerosis. It is well established that LDAPs have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases caused by dysfunction of lipid metabolism, and several studies have linked LDAPs to the development of atherosclerosis. In this review, several foam cell‑targeting pathways have been described, with an emphasis on the role of LDAPs in cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. In addition, the potential of LDAPs as therapeutic targets to prevent the progression and/or facilitate the regression of the disease has been discussed. PMID:27082419

  20. Lacritin and other autophagy associated proteins in ocular surface health.

    PubMed

    Karnati, Roy; Talla, Venu; Peterson, Katherine; Laurie, Gordon W

    2016-03-01

    Advantage may be taken of macroautophagy ('autophagy') to promote ocular health. Autophagy continually captures aged or damaged cellular material for lysosomal degradation and recyling. When autophagic flux is chronically elevated, or alternatively deficient, health suffers. Chronic elevation of flux and stress are the consequence of inflammatory cytokines or of dry eye tears but not normal tears invitro. Exogenous tear protein lacritin transiently accelerates flux to restore homeostasis invitro and corneal health invivo, and yet the monomeric active form of lacritin appears to be selectively deficient in dry eye. Tissue transglutaminase-dependent cross-linking of monomer decreases monomer quantity and monomer affinity for coreceptor syndecan-1 thereby abrogating activity. Tissue transglutaminase is elevated in dry eye. Mutation of arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal 3, mucolipin, or Niemann-Pick disease type C1 respectively underlie several diseases of apparently insufficient autophagic flux that affect the eye, including: metachromatic leukodystrophy, mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, juvenile-onset Batten disease, mucolipidosis IV, and Niemann-Pick type C associated with myelin sheath destruction of corneal sensory and ciliary nerves and of the optic nerve; corneal clouding, ocular hypertension, glaucoma and optic nerve atrophy; accumulation of 'ceroid-lipofuscin' in surface conjunctival cells, and in ganglion and neuronal cells; decreased visual acuity and retinal dystrophy; and neurodegeneration. For some, enzyme or gene replacement, or substrate reduction, therapy is proving to be successful. Here we discuss examples of restoring ocular surface homeostasis through alteration of autophagy, with particular attention to lacritin.

  1. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in atherosclerosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    AYYAPPAN, JANEESH PLAKKAL; PAUL, ANTONI; GOO, YOUNG-HWA

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of atherosclerotic plaques in arterial walls leads to major cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Macrophages/foam cells are central components of atherosclerotic plaques, which populate the arterial wall in order to remove harmful modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, resulting in the accumulation of lipids, mostly LDL-derived cholesterol ester, in cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). At present, LDs are recognized as dynamic organelles that govern cellular metabolic processes. LDs consist of an inner core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and free cholesterol, and contain LD-associated proteins (LDAPs) that regulate LD functions. Foam cells are characterized by an aberrant accumulation of cytosolic LDs, and are considered a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions through all stages of development. Previous studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying foam cell formation, aiming to discover therapeutic strategies that target foam cells and intervene against atherosclerosis. It is well established that LDAPs have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases caused by dysfunction of lipid metabolism, and several studies have linked LDAPs to the development of atherosclerosis. In this review, several foam cell-targeting pathways have been described, with an emphasis on the role of LDAPs in cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. In addition, the potential of LDAPs as therapeutic targets to prevent the progression and/or facilitate the regression of the disease has been discussed. PMID:27082419

  2. Lacritin and other autophagy associated proteins in ocular surface health.

    PubMed

    Karnati, Roy; Talla, Venu; Peterson, Katherine; Laurie, Gordon W

    2016-03-01

    Advantage may be taken of macroautophagy ('autophagy') to promote ocular health. Autophagy continually captures aged or damaged cellular material for lysosomal degradation and recyling. When autophagic flux is chronically elevated, or alternatively deficient, health suffers. Chronic elevation of flux and stress are the consequence of inflammatory cytokines or of dry eye tears but not normal tears invitro. Exogenous tear protein lacritin transiently accelerates flux to restore homeostasis invitro and corneal health invivo, and yet the monomeric active form of lacritin appears to be selectively deficient in dry eye. Tissue transglutaminase-dependent cross-linking of monomer decreases monomer quantity and monomer affinity for coreceptor syndecan-1 thereby abrogating activity. Tissue transglutaminase is elevated in dry eye. Mutation of arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal 3, mucolipin, or Niemann-Pick disease type C1 respectively underlie several diseases of apparently insufficient autophagic flux that affect the eye, including: metachromatic leukodystrophy, mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, juvenile-onset Batten disease, mucolipidosis IV, and Niemann-Pick type C associated with myelin sheath destruction of corneal sensory and ciliary nerves and of the optic nerve; corneal clouding, ocular hypertension, glaucoma and optic nerve atrophy; accumulation of 'ceroid-lipofuscin' in surface conjunctival cells, and in ganglion and neuronal cells; decreased visual acuity and retinal dystrophy; and neurodegeneration. For some, enzyme or gene replacement, or substrate reduction, therapy is proving to be successful. Here we discuss examples of restoring ocular surface homeostasis through alteration of autophagy, with particular attention to lacritin. PMID:26318608

  3. Extracellular matrix-associated proteins form an integral and dynamic system during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Sun, Jin; Ding, Wei; Lin, Jinshui; Tian, Renmao; Lu, Liang; Liu, Xiaofen; Shen, Xihui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Though the essential role of extracellular matrix in biofilm development has been extensively documented, the function of matrix-associated proteins is elusive. Determining the dynamics of matrix-associated proteins would be a useful way to reveal their functions in biofilm development. Therefore, we applied iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to evaluate matrix-associated proteins isolated from different phases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 biofilms. Among the identified 389 proteins, 54 changed their abundance significantly. The increased abundance of stress resistance and nutrient metabolism-related proteins over the period of biofilm development was consistent with the hypothesis that biofilm matrix forms micro-environments in which cells are optimally organized to resist stress and use available nutrients. Secreted proteins, including novel putative effectors of the type III secretion system were identified, suggesting that the dynamics of pathogenesis-related proteins in the matrix are associated with biofilm development. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the abundance changes of matrix-associated proteins and their expression. Further analysis revealed complex interactions among these modulated proteins, and the mutation of selected proteins attenuated biofilm development. Collectively, this work presents the first dynamic picture of matrix-associated proteins during biofilm development, and provides evidences that the matrix-associated proteins may form an integral and well regulated system that contributes to stress resistance, nutrient acquisition, pathogenesis and the stability of the biofilm. PMID:26029669

  4. PLASMA PROTEIN METABOLISM—NORMAL AND ASSOCIATED WITH SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Fink, R. M.; Enns, T.; Kimball, C. P.; Silberstein, H. E.; Bale, W. F.; Madden, S. C.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    Labeled plasma proteins are produced by administering to dogs the amino acid lysine synthesized with heavy nitrogen. Such labeled proteins are apparently indistinguishable biologically from proteins of normal isotope concentration. Labeled plasma proteins, as plasma, injected into normal dogs pass out of the blood stream at an initially rapid but constantly decreasing non-logarithmic rate. This outflow is balanced by a simultaneous inflow of plasma proteins from the tissues. Fifty per cent of the labeled protein is out of the blood stream in about 24 hours; 75 per cent in about 6 days. Shock due to trauma of intestine or leg shows a dilution curve of labeled plasma protein not unlike that of the normal dog. If anything, dilution appears a little less rapid in shock. Since the usual shrinkage of plasma volume and plasma protein mass is present in these shocked dogs, these data are compatible with a decreased inflow of protein into the plasma during shock. Methods are described which are suitable for the use of heavy nitrogen incorporated in the epsilon group of lysine and its subsequent analysis in body fluids. These data may indicate that the plasma proteins are normally in constant and rapid exchange with a mobile pool of body protein. PMID:19871430

  5. Fusions involving protein kinase C and membrane-associated proteins in benign fibrous histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Płaszczyca, Anna; Nilsson, Jenny; Magnusson, Linda; Brosjö, Otte; Larsson, Olle; Vult von Steyern, Fredrik; Domanski, Henryk A; Lilljebjörn, Henrik; Fioretos, Thoas; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Mandahl, Nils; Nord, Karolin H; Mertens, Fredrik

    2014-08-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) is a mesenchymal tumor that most often occurs in the skin (so-called dermatofibroma), but may also appear in soft tissues (so-called deep BFH) and in the skeleton (so-called non-ossifying fibroma). The origin of BFH is unknown, and it has been questioned whether it is a true neoplasm. Chromosome banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, RNA sequencing, RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to search for recurrent somatic mutations in a series of BFH. BFHs were found to harbor recurrent fusions of genes encoding membrane-associated proteins (podoplanin, CD63 and LAMTOR1) with genes encoding protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms PRKCB and PRKCD. PKCs are serine-threonine kinases that through their many phosphorylation targets are implicated in a variety of cellular processes, as well as tumor development. When inactive, the amino-terminal, regulatory domain of PKCs suppresses the activity of their catalytic domain. Upon activation, which requires several steps, they typically translocate to cell membranes, where they interact with different signaling pathways. The detected PDPN-PRKCB, CD63-PRKCD and LAMTOR1-PRKCD gene fusions are all predicted to result in chimeric proteins consisting of the membrane-binding part of PDPN, CD63 or LAMTOR1 and the entire catalytic domain of the PKC. This novel pathogenetic mechanism should result in constitutive kinase activity at an ectopic location. The results show that BFH indeed is a true neoplasm, and that distorted PKC activity is essential for tumorigenesis. The findings also provide means to differentiate BFH from other skin and soft tissue tumors. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Rare cancers.

  6. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis.

  7. PANADA: Protein Association Network Annotation, Determination and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alberto J. M.; Walsh, Ian; Domenico, Tomás Di; Mičetić, Ivan; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly large numbers of proteins require methods for functional annotation. This is typically based on pairwise inference from the homology of either protein sequence or structure. Recently, similarity networks have been presented to leverage both the ability to visualize relationships between proteins and assess the transferability of functional inference. Here we present PANADA, a novel toolkit for the visualization and analysis of protein similarity networks in Cytoscape. Networks can be constructed based on pairwise sequence or structural alignments either on a set of proteins or, alternatively, by database search from a single sequence. The Panada web server, executable for download and examples and extensive help files are available at URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/panada/. PMID:24265686

  8. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis. PMID:26776680

  9. Surface association of Pht proteins of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Plumptre, Charles D; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Paton, James C

    2013-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen responsible for massive global morbidity and mortality. The pneumococcus attaches a variety of proteins to its cell surface, many of which contribute to virulence; one such family are the polyhistidine triad (Pht) proteins PhtA, PhtB, PhtD, and PhtE. In this study, we have examined the mechanism of Pht surface attachment using PhtD as a model. Analysis of deletion and point mutants identified a three-amino-acid region of PhtD (Q27-H28-R29) that is critical for the process. The analogous region in PhtE was also necessary for its attachment to the cell surface. Furthermore, we show that a large proportion of the total amount of each Pht protein is released into bacterial culture supernatants. Other surface proteins were also released, albeit to lesser extents, and this was not due to pneumococcal autolysis. The extent of release of surface proteins was strain dependent and was not affected by the capsule. Lastly, we compared the fitness of wild-type and ΔphtABDE pneumococci in vivo in a mouse coinfection model. Release of Pht proteins by the wild type did not complement the mutant strain, consistent with surface-attached rather than soluble forms of the Pht proteins playing the major role in virulence. The significant degree of release of Pht proteins from intact bacteria may have implications for the use of these proteins in novel vaccines.

  10. Correcting for the study bias associated with protein-protein interaction measurements reveals differences between protein degree distributions from different cancer types.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Martin H; Serrano, Luis; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are associated with multiple types of biases partly rooted in technical limitations of the experimental techniques. Another source of bias are the different frequencies with which proteins have been studied for interaction partners. It is generally believed that proteins with a large number of interaction partners tend to be essential, evolutionarily conserved, and involved in disease. It has been repeatedly reported that proteins driving tumor formation have a higher number of PPI partners. However, it has been noticed before that the degree distribution of PPI networks is biased toward disease proteins, which tend to have been studied more often than non-disease proteins. At the same time, for many poorly characterized proteins no interactions have been reported yet. It is unclear to which extent this study bias affects the observation that cancer proteins tend to have more PPI partners. Here, we show that the degree of a protein is a function of the number of times it has been screened for interaction partners. We present a randomization-based method that controls for this bias to decide whether a group of proteins is associated with significantly more PPI partners than the proteomic background. We apply our method to cancer proteins and observe, in contrast to previous studies, no conclusive evidence for a significantly higher degree distribution associated with cancer proteins as compared to non-cancer proteins when we compare them to proteins that have been equally often studied as bait proteins. Comparing proteins from different tumor types, a more complex picture emerges in which proteins of certain cancer classes have significantly more interaction partners while others are associated with a smaller degree. For example, proteins of several hematological cancers tend to be associated with a higher number of interaction partners as expected by chance. Solid tumors, in contrast, are usually associated with a degree

  11. Identification of microtubule-associated proteins in the meiotic spindle of surf clam oocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Meiotic spindles isolated from surf clam oocytes to morphological purity are biochemically complex, consisting of many polypeptides. These proteins fall into two classes: (a) polypeptides that are apparently cytoplasmic proteins and are not specifically associated with the spindle; and (b) polypeptides that are specifically associated with the spindle. A subset of the spindle-associated proteins, including a 250,000 mol wt component, remain with spindle tubulin through cycles of cold depolymerization and warm polymerization, showing that they are microtubule-associated proteins. PMID:7189754

  12. Systematically Ranking the Tightness of Membrane Association for Peripheral Membrane Proteins (PMPs)*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Liyan; Ge, Haitao; Huang, Xiahe; Liu, Kehui; Zhang, Yuanya; Xu, Wu; Wang, Yingchun

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale quantitative evaluation of the tightness of membrane association for nontransmembrane proteins is important for identifying true peripheral membrane proteins with functional significance. Herein, we simultaneously ranked more than 1000 proteins of the photosynthetic model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for their relative tightness of membrane association using a proteomic approach. Using multiple precisely ranked and experimentally verified peripheral subunits of photosynthetic protein complexes as the landmarks, we found that proteins involved in two-component signal transduction systems and transporters are overall tightly associated with the membranes, whereas the associations of ribosomal proteins are much weaker. Moreover, we found that hypothetical proteins containing the same domains generally have similar tightness. This work provided a global view of the structural organization of the membrane proteome with respect to divergent functions, and built the foundation for future investigation of the dynamic membrane proteome reorganization in response to different environmental or internal stimuli. PMID:25505158

  13. ERdj4 and ERdj5 are required for endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation of misfolded surfactant protein C.

    PubMed

    Dong, Mei; Bridges, James P; Apsley, Karen; Xu, Yan; Weaver, Timothy E

    2008-06-01

    Mutations in the SFTPC gene associated with interstitial lung disease in human patients result in misfolding, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention, and degradation of the encoded surfactant protein C (SP-C) proprotein. In this study, genes specifically induced in response to transient expression of two disease-associated mutations were identified by microarray analyses. Immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) and two heat shock protein 40 family members, endoplasmic reticulum-localized DnaJ homologues ERdj4 and ERdj5, were significantly elevated and exhibited prolonged and specific association with the misfolded proprotein; in contrast, ERdj3 interacted with BiP, but it did not associate with either wild-type or mutant SP-C. Misfolded SP-C, ERdj4, and ERdj5 coprecipitated with p97/VCP indicating that the cochaperones remain associated with the misfolded proprotein until it is dislocated to the cytosol. Knockdown of ERdj4 and ERdj5 expression increased ER retention and inhibited degradation of misfolded SP-C, but it had little effect on the wild-type protein. Transient expression of ERdj4 and ERdj5 in X-box binding protein 1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts substantially restored rapid degradation of mutant SP-C proprotein, whereas transfection of HPD mutants failed to rescue SP-C endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation. ERdj4 and ERdj5 promote turnover of misfolded SP-C and this activity is dependent on their ability to stimulate BiP ATPase activity. PMID:18400946

  14. Apoptosis induced by the nuclear death domain protein p84N5 is inhibited by association with Rb protein.

    PubMed

    Doostzadeh-Cizeron, J; Evans, R; Yin, S; Goodrich, D W

    1999-10-01

    Rb protein inhibits both cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Interaction of specific cellular proteins, including E2F1, with Rb C-terminal domains mediates cell cycle regulation. In contrast, the nuclear N5 protein associates with an Rb N-terminal domain with unknown function. The N5 protein contains a region of sequence similarity to the death domain of proteins involved in apoptotic signaling. We demonstrate here that forced N5 expression potently induces apoptosis in several tumor cell lines. Mutation of conserved residues within the death domain homology compromise N5-induced apoptosis, suggesting that it is required for normal function. Endogenous N5 protein is specifically altered in apoptotic cells treated with ionizing radiation. Furthermore, dominant interfering death domain mutants compromise cellular responses to ionizing radiation. Finally, physical association with Rb protein inhibits N5-induced apoptosis. We propose that N5 protein plays a role in the regulation of apoptosis and that Rb directly coordinates cell proliferation and apoptosis by binding specific proteins involved in each process through distinct protein binding domains. PMID:10512864

  15. Polysomes of Trypanosoma brucei: Association with Initiation Factors and RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Klein, Cornelia; Terrao, Monica; Inchaustegui Gil, Diana; Clayton, Christine

    2015-01-01

    We report here the results of experiments designed to identify RNA-binding proteins that might be associated with Trypanosoma brucei polysomes. After some preliminary mass spectrometry of polysomal fractions, we investigated the distributions of selected tagged proteins using sucrose gradients and immunofluorescence. As expected, the polysomal fractions contained nearly all annotated ribosomal proteins, the translation-associated protein folding complex, and many translation factors, but also many other abundant proteins. Results suggested that cap-binding proteins EIF4E3 and EIF4E4 were associated with both free and membrane-bound polysomes. The EIF4E binding partners EIF4G4 and EIF4G3 were present but the other EIF4E and EIF4G paralogues were not detected. The dominant EIF4E in the polysomal fraction is EIF4E4 and very few polysomal mRNAs are associated with EIF4G. Thirteen potential mRNA-binding proteins were detected in the polysomes, including the known polysome-associated protein RBP42. The locations of two of the other proteins were tested after epitope tagging: RBP29 was in the nucleus and ZC3H29 was in the cytoplasm. Quantitative analyses showed that specific association of an RNA-binding protein with the polysome fraction in sucrose gradients will not be detected if the protein is in more than 25-fold molar excess over its target binding sites.

  16. Polysomes of Trypanosoma brucei: Association with Initiation Factors and RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Cornelia; Terrao, Monica; Inchaustegui Gil, Diana; Clayton, Christine

    2015-01-01

    We report here the results of experiments designed to identify RNA-binding proteins that might be associated with Trypanosoma brucei polysomes. After some preliminary mass spectrometry of polysomal fractions, we investigated the distributions of selected tagged proteins using sucrose gradients and immunofluorescence. As expected, the polysomal fractions contained nearly all annotated ribosomal proteins, the translation-associated protein folding complex, and many translation factors, but also many other abundant proteins. Results suggested that cap-binding proteins EIF4E3 and EIF4E4 were associated with both free and membrane-bound polysomes. The EIF4E binding partners EIF4G4 and EIF4G3 were present but the other EIF4E and EIF4G paralogues were not detected. The dominant EIF4E in the polysomal fraction is EIF4E4 and very few polysomal mRNAs are associated with EIF4G. Thirteen potential mRNA-binding proteins were detected in the polysomes, including the known polysome-associated protein RBP42. The locations of two of the other proteins were tested after epitope tagging: RBP29 was in the nucleus and ZC3H29 was in the cytoplasm. Quantitative analyses showed that specific association of an RNA-binding protein with the polysome fraction in sucrose gradients will not be detected if the protein is in more than 25-fold molar excess over its target binding sites. PMID:26287607

  17. Expression of Yes-associated protein modulates Survivin expression in primary liver malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F; Lam-Himlin, Dora M; Klein, Alison P; Nayar, Suresh K; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies, the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing, and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice after genetic manipulation of Yes-associated protein, a transcription coactivator. Here, we comprehensively documented Yes-associated protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression is significantly increased in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. We found that increased Yes-associated protein levels in hepatocellular carcinoma are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification and transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. We found that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress Yes-associated protein in the liver, we found that Survivin messenger RNA expression depends upon Yes-associated protein levels. Our findings suggested that Yes-associated protein contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression.

  18. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphism, but not concentrations, is associated with radiographic hand osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. Factors associated with mineralization and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis (OA) are incompletely understood. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a mineralization inhibitor, have been associated clinically with conditions of abnormal calcification. We therefore evalua...

  19. High affinity DNA-microtubule associated protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Marx, K A

    1992-07-01

    We have isolated the MAP/tau proteins from twice-cycled chick brain microtubule preparations and demonstrated that they are responsible for the nitrocellulose DNA binding activity we and others have measured. Using the isolated MAP/tau proteins we then measured the apparent affinity constant K(app) for the homologous chick DNA interaction and found evidence for two equilibrium affinity classes-a K(app) = 6 x 10(7) M-1, responsible for the bulk of the DNA binding activity and a small (less than 10%) higher affinity K(app) = 10(8) - 10(9) M-1, likely due to sequence specific binding protein species. Using the same chick brain MAP-tau protein, a heterologous interaction with D. melanogaster DNA, was found to possess just the lower affinity class-K(app) = 2 x 10(7) M-1. Under stringent binding conditions we carried out equilibrium nitrocellulose filter binding experiments in a ternary reaction mixture at constant MAP/tau protein and 35S radiolabelled chick DNA concentration using increasing and excess concentrations of competitor DNAs of different sources. The order of competitor strengths found was-chick DNA greater than mouse DNA greater than D. melanogaster = E. coli. DNA. These data and specifically the homologous DNA: protein case being the strongest competitor corroborate our previous studies using total microtubule protein and provide new evidence for a conserved interaction of a small DNA sequence class with MAP/tau protein species. Moreover, these data allow us to conclude that the conserved DNA sequence: MAP/tau protein interactions do not critically depend upon any energetic feature co-involving tubulin for their properties since tubulin is absent from these preparations.

  20. G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1), a ubiquitous tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoyi; Chang, Frank; Zhang, Xinmin; Rothman, Vicki L; Tuszynski, George P

    2012-08-01

    Using an innovative "2-D high performance liquid electrophoresis" (2-D HPLE) technology we identified that a specific fragment of G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1) was present in the sera of breast cancer patients and was over-expressed in early and late stage breast tumors (Tuszynski, G.P. et al., 2011). In this study we further investigated the significance of GASP-1 as a tumor marker by investigating the expression GASP-1 in different kinds of tumors as well as in the sera of patients with various cancers. Over expression of GASP-1 was detected in brain, pancreatic, and breast cancers as compared to their respective normal tissues as assessed by immunohistochemical staining of tissue arrays using a "peptide specific" GASP-1 antibody. We found that across these cancers, GASP-1 was expressed approximately 10 fold more in the cancer as compared to normal tissue. The increase in GASP-1 expression was also seen in hyperplastic and inflammatory lesions of breast and pancreatic cancers as compared to normal tissue. GASP-1 was primarily expressed in the tumor epithelium of the epithelial-derived cancers and in the transformed glial cells of the brain tumors. Using a sensitive "competitive ELISA" for GASP-1, we found that sera from patients with brain, liver, breast and lung cancers expressed 4-7 fold more GASP-1 peptide than sera from normal healthy individuals. These studies identify GASP-1 as a potential new serum and tumor biomarker for several cancers and suggest that GASP-1 may be a novel target for development of cancer therapeutics. PMID:22483848

  1. Simulation of protein association: Kinetic pathways towards crystal contacts.

    PubMed

    Taudt, Aaron; Arnold, Axel; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    We conducted molecular dynamics simulations combined with distance-based umbrella sampling and forward flux sampling to investigate the early stages of protein crystallization. Formation of contacts with long-range interactions and/or an exposed position on the protein surface was kinetically preferred over more stable hydrophobic contacts with a shorter attractive range, while the thermodynamic stability of the protein crystal was provided by hydrophobic interactions. Contacts with a large interaction area showed complex dissociation pathways that were not detected by distance-based umbrella sampling. Instead, forward flux sampling simulations of contact dissociation identified long-range attractive interactions.

  2. Structure and function of seed lipid-body-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Purkrtova, Zita; Jolivet, Pascale; Miquel, Martine; Chardot, Thierry

    2008-10-01

    Many organisms among the different kingdoms store reserve lipids in discrete subcellular organelles called lipid bodies. In plants, lipid bodies can be found in seeds but also in fruits (olives, ...), and in leaves (plastoglobules). These organelles protect plant lipid reserves against oxidation and hydrolysis until seed germination and seedling establishment. They can be stabilized by specific structural proteins, namely the oleosins and caleosins, which act as natural emulsifiers. Considering the putative role of some of them in controlling the size of lipid bodies, these proteins may constitute important targets for seed improvement both in term of oil seed yield and optimization of technological processes for extraction of oil and storage proteins. We present here an overview of the data on the structure of these proteins, which are scarce, and sometimes contradictory and on their functional roles. PMID:18926488

  3. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    PubMed

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    Many processes, cell motility being an example, require cells to remodel the actin cytoskeleton in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton involves the rapid disassembly and reassembly of actin filaments, a phenomenon regulated by the action of particular actin-binding proteins. In recent years, an interest in studying actin regulation in unicellular organisms has arisen. Parasitic protozoan are among these organisms and studies of the cytoskeleton functions of these protozoan are relevant related to either cell biology or pathogenicity. To discuss recent data in this field, a symposium concerning "Actin and actin-binding proteins in protists" was held on May 8-11 in Paris, France, during the XXXV meeting of the French Society of Protistology. As a brief summary of the symposium we report here findings concerning the in vitro actin dynamic assembly, as well as the characterization of several actin-binding proteins from the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis and Plasmodium knowlesi. In addition, localization of actin in non-pathogen protists such as Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii is also presented. The data show that some actin-binding proteins facilitate organization of filaments into higher order structures as pseudopods, while others have regulatory functions, indicating very particular roles for actin-binding proteins. One of the proteins discussed during the symposium, the actin depolymerizing factor ADF, was shown to enhance the treadmilling rate of actin filaments. In vitro, ADF binds to the ADP-bound forms of G-actin and F-actin, thereby participating in and changing the rate of actin assembly. Biochemical approaches allowed the identification of a protein complex formed by HSP/C70-cap32-34 which might also be involved in depolymerization of F-actin in P. knowlesi. Molecular and cellular approaches were used to identify proteins such as ABP-120 and myosin

  4. Methyl-accepting protein associated with bacterial sensory phodopsin I

    SciTech Connect

    Spudich, E.N.; Hasselbacher, C.A. ); Spudich, J.L. )

    1988-09-01

    In vivo radiolabeling of Halaobacterium halobium phototaxis mutants and revertants with L-(methyl-{sup 3}H) methionine implicated seven methyl-accepting protein bands with apparent molecular masses from 65 to 150 kilodaltons (kDa) in adaptation of the organism to chemo and photo stimuli, and one of these (94 kDa) was specifically implicated in photoaxis. The lability of the radiolabeled bands to mild base treatment indicated the the methyl linkages are carboxylmethylesters, as is the case in the eubacterial chemotaxis receptor-transducers. The 94-kDa protein was present in increased amounts in an overproducer of the apoprotein of sensory rhodopsin I, one of two retinal-containing photoaxis receptors in H. halobium. It was absent in a strain the contained sensory rhodopsin II and that lacked sensory rhodopsin I and was also absent in a mutant that lacked both photoreceptors. Based in the role of methyl-accepting proteins in chemotaxis in other bacteria, we suggest that the 94-kDa protein is the signal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. By ({sup 3}H)retinal labeling studies, we previously identified a 25-kDa retinal-binding polypeptide that was derived from photochemically reactive sensory rhodopsin I. When H. halobium membranes containing sensory rhodopsin I were treated by a procedure that stably reduced ({sup 3}H) retinal onto the 25-kDa apoprotein, a 94-kDa protein was also found to be radiolabeled. Protease digestion confirmed that the 94-kDa retinal-labeled protein was the same as the methyl-accepting protein that was suggested above to be the siginal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. Possible models are that the 25- and 94-kDa proteins are tightly interacting components of the photosensory signaling machinery or that both are forms of sensory rhodopsin I.

  5. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J.; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D.; Meade, Bryan R.; Dowdy, Steven F.

    2015-01-01

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms. PMID:25586224

  6. ASSOCIATIONS OF PROTEIN INTAKE AND PROTEIN SOURCE WITH BONE MINERAL DENSITY AND FRACTURE RISK: A POPULATION-BASED COHORT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    LANGSETMO, L.; BARR, S.I.; BERGER, C.; KREIGER, N.; RAHME, E.; ADACHI, J.D.; PAPAIOANNOU, A.; KAISER, S. M; PRIOR, J.C.; HANLEY, D.A.; KOVACS, C.S.; JOSSE, R.G.; GOLTZMAN, D.

    2016-01-01

    High dietary protein has been hypothesized to cause lower bone mineral density (BMD) and greater fracture risk. Previous results are conflicting and few studies have assessed potential differences related to differing protein sources. Objective To determine associations between total protein intake, and protein intake by source (dairy, non-dairy animal, plant) with BMD, BMD change, and incident osteoporotic fracture. Design/Setting Prospective cohort study (Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study). Participants/Measures Protein intake was assessed as percent of total energy intake (TEI) at Year 2 (1997–99) using a food frequency questionnaire (N=6510). Participants were contacted annually to ascertain incident fracture. Total hip and lumbar spine BMD was measured at baseline and Year 5. Analyses were stratified by group (men 25–49 y, men 50+ y, premenopausal women 25–49 y, and postmenopausal women 50+ y) and adjusted for major confounders. Fracture analyses were limited to those 50+ y. Results Intakes of dairy protein (with adjustment for BMI) were positively associated with total hip BMD among men and women aged 50+ y, and in men aged 25–49. Among adults aged 50+ y, those with protein intakes of <12% TEI (women) and <11% TEI (men) had increased fracture risk compared to those with intakes of 15% TEI. Fracture risk did not significantly change as intake increased above 15% TEI, and was not significantly associated with protein source. Conclusions In contrast to hypothesized risk of high protein, we found that for adults 50+ y, low protein intake (below 15% TEI) may lead to increased fracture risk. Source of protein was a determinant of BMD, but not fracture risk. PMID:26412291

  7. Protein oxidation associated with aging is reduced by dietary restriction of protein or calories.

    PubMed Central

    Youngman, L D; Park, J Y; Ames, B N

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of unrepaired oxidative damage products may be a major factor in cellular aging. Both oxidative lesions in DNA and oxidatively damaged proteins have been shown to accumulate during aging. The accumulation of oxidized proteins in Fischer 344 rats was compared for animals consuming protein-restricted and calorically restricted diets--both of which have been shown to extend lifespan. Rats were fed diets restricted in either protein (5% or 10% of the diet as compared with the normal 20% casein), or calories (25% or 40% less than normal), or total diet (40% less than normal). In addition, some of the rats fed a diet providing 5% or 20% protein were irradiated twice weekly (125 rads per exposure; 1 rad = 0.01 Gy). The level of oxidative damage to proteins (protein carbonyls) was determined in rats sacrificed at various times. The oxidative damage to proteins increased with aging and with radiation. Either protein or calorie restriction markedly inhibited the accumulation of oxidatively damaged proteins. Protein restriction reduced the accumulation of oxidatively damaged proteins during the oxidative stress of chronic irradiation. PMID:1409611

  8. Associations between heat shock protein 70 genetic polymorphisms and calving traits in crossbred Brahman cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stressors such as heat, cold, toxins, and oxygen deprivation are known to induce heat shock proteins. Genetic polymorphisms associated with heat shock protein genes have been associated with decreased male and female fertility. Our objectives were to 1) confirm single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) ...

  9. Free energy landscapes of encounter complexes in protein-protein association.

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, C J; Weng, Z; Vajda, S; DeLisi, C

    1999-01-01

    We report the computer generation of a high-density map of the thermodynamic properties of the diffusion-accessible encounter conformations of four receptor-ligand protein pairs, and use it to study the electrostatic and desolvation components of the free energy of association. Encounter complex conformations are generated by sampling the translational/rotational space of the ligand around the receptor, both at 5-A and zero surface-to-surface separations. We find that partial desolvation is always an important effect, and it becomes dominant for complexes in which one of the reactants is neutral or weakly charged. The interaction provides a slowly varying attractive force over a small but significant region of the molecular surface. In complexes with no strong charge complementarity this region surrounds the binding site, and the orientation of the ligand in the encounter conformation with the lowest desolvation free energy is similar to the one observed in the fully formed complex. Complexes with strong opposite charges exhibit two types of behavior. In the first group, represented by barnase/barstar, electrostatics exerts strong orientational steering toward the binding site, and desolvation provides some added adhesion within the local region of low electrostatic energy. In the second group, represented by the complex of kallikrein and pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, the overall stability results from the rather nonspecific electrostatic attraction, whereas the affinity toward the binding region is determined by desolvation interactions. PMID:10049302

  10. Programmable protein arrays for immunoprofiling HPV-associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Ewaisha, Radwa; Meshay, Ian; Resnik, Jack; Katchman, Benjamin A; Anderson, Karen S

    2016-04-01

    Over 600,000 cancers each year are attributed to the human papillomavirus (HPV), including cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers (OPC). A key challenge in understanding HPV immunobiology is the diversity of oncogenic HPV types and the need for multiplexed display of HPV antigens to measure antibody responses. We have generated custom HPV protein microarrays displaying 98 proteins as C-terminal GST fusion proteins, representing eight antigens of two low-risk HPV types (HPV6 and 11) and ten oncogenic high-risk HPV types (HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52 and 58). We demonstrate robust and reproducible protein expression of 96/98 of the antigens using a human cell lysate expression system. The target epitopes and specificities of four monoclonal antibodies were identified. Using sera from ten patients with newly diagnosed OPC and ten controls, we demonstrate specific IgG seroreactivity to HPV16 E1, E2, and E7 (a fold increase of 1.52, 2.19 and 1.35 in cases vs. controls, respectively, all p < 0.005), confirming our prior data on an ELISA platform. We also detect HPV52 E7 Abs in serum from a patient with cervical cancer. The HPV protein array has potential for rapid identification of serologic responses to 12 HPV types. PMID:27089055

  11. The Escherichia coli uropathogenic-specific-protein-associated immunity protein 3 (Imu3) has nucleic acid -binding activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Escherichia coli uropathogenic-specific protein (Usp) is a bacteriocin-like genotoxin, active against mammalian cells and associated with E. coli strains that provoke pyelonephritis, prostatitis and bacteraemia. Usp is encoded by a small pathogenicity island with three downstream small open reading frames (Imu1-3) that are believed to provide immunity to the producer. To prevent host suicide, colicins, bacteriocins of E. coli, form tight complexes with their cognate immunity proteins. Colicin – immunity protein complexes are among the strongest protein complexes known. Here, the Usp associated immunity protein 3 (Imu3) was partially characterized to gain insight into its role and mechanism of activity. Results Isolation and partial characterisation of the Usp-associated immunity protein-3 (Imu3) revealed that, while Usp and Imu3 do not form a high affinity complex, Imu3 exhibits DNA and RNA binding activity. Imu3 was also shown to protect DNA against degradation by colicin E7. Conclusions Our data infer that nonspecific DNA binding of the Imu3 immunity protein, prevents suicide of E. coli producing the genotoxin Usp. PMID:24472116

  12. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in alcoholic liver disease: a potential linkage with hepatocellular damage

    PubMed Central

    Ikura, Yoshihiro; Caldwell, Stephen H

    2015-01-01

    Steatosis is a characteristic morphological change of alcoholic liver disease, but its pathologic significance is still obscure. Regardless of cell types, intracellular lipid droplets are coated with a phospholipid monolayer, on which many kinds of lipid droplet-associated proteins are present. These proteins, such as the perilipin family of proteins and the cell death inducing DNA fragmentation factor (DFF) 45-like effectors, are recognized to play important roles in lipid metabolism in the physiological settings. In addition, recent lipidology studies have revealed that expression of the lipid droplet-associated proteins possibly participate in the pathologic processes of many metabolic disorders, including fatty liver and insulin resistance. Hence, controlling protein expressions is expected to offer novel therapeutic options. In this review, we summarize collected data concerning the potential contribution of the lipid droplet-associated proteins to the development of alcoholic fatty liver. Without exception, existing data indicates that the lipid droplet-associated proteins, especially the perilipin family proteins, are important factors in alcoholic fatty liver. These proteins exert a prosteatotic effect, and their expression is closely associated with lipotoxicity based on endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative injury. Although suppression of their expression may be beneficial, careful consideration is required because these proteins simultaneously function as protective factors against lipotoxicity. PMID:26464614

  13. Possible association between phages, Hoc protein, and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Dabrowska, K; Switała-Jeleń, K; Opolski, A; Górski, A

    2006-02-01

    Mammals have become "an environment" for enterobacterial phage life cycles. Therefore it could be expected that bacteriophages adapt to them. This adaptation must comprise bacteriophage proteins. Gp Hoc seems to have significance neither for phage particle structure nor for phage antibacterial activity. It is evidently not necessary for the "typical" antibacterial actions of bacteriophages. But the rules of evolution make it improbable that gp Hoc really has no function, and non-essential genes of T4-type phages are probably important for phages' adaptation to their particular lifestyle. More interesting is the eukaryotic origin of gp Hoc: a resemblance to immunoglobulin-like proteins that reflects their evolutionary relation. Substantial differences in biological activity between T4 and a mutant that lacks gp Hoc were observed in a mammalian system. Hoc protein seems to be one of the molecules predicted to interact with mammalian organisms and/or modulate these interactions. PMID:16195787

  14. Computational Framework for Prediction of Peptide Sequences That May Mediate Multiple Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debasree; Patra, Piya; Ghosh, Abhirupa; Saha, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    A considerable proportion of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in the cell are estimated to be mediated by very short peptide segments that approximately conform to specific sequence patterns known as linear motifs (LMs), often present in the disordered regions in the eukaryotic proteins. These peptides have been found to interact with low affinity and are able bind to multiple interactors, thus playing an important role in the PPI networks involving date hubs. In this work, PPI data and de novo motif identification based method (MEME) were used to identify such peptides in three cancer-associated hub proteins-MYC, APC and MDM2. The peptides corresponding to the significant LMs identified for each hub protein were aligned, the overlapping regions across these peptides being termed as overlapping linear peptides (OLPs). These OLPs were thus predicted to be responsible for multiple PPIs of the corresponding hub proteins and a scoring system was developed to rank them. We predicted six OLPs in MYC and five OLPs in MDM2 that scored higher than OLP predictions from randomly generated protein sets. Two OLP sequences from the C-terminal of MYC were predicted to bind with FBXW7, component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex involved in proteasomal degradation of MYC. Similarly, we identified peptides in the C-terminal of MDM2 interacting with FKBP3, which has a specific role in auto-ubiquitinylation of MDM2. The peptide sequences predicted in MYC and MDM2 look promising for designing orthosteric inhibitors against possible disease-associated PPIs. Since these OLPs can interact with other proteins as well, these inhibitors should be specific to the targeted interactor to prevent undesired side-effects. This computational framework has been designed to predict and rank the peptide regions that may mediate multiple PPIs and can be applied to other disease-associated date hub proteins for prediction of novel therapeutic targets of small molecule PPI modulators. PMID

  15. Expressions of Senescence-Associated β-Galactosidase and Senescence Marker Protein-30 are Associated with Lens Epithelial Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Yin, Dan; Xiao, Fang; Hao, Jie

    2015-11-30

    BACKGROUND To investigate associations of senescence marker protein-30 and senescence-associated β-galactosidase expression with lens epithelial cells apoptosis among Chinese age-related cataract patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 145 age-related cataract patients (69 cases with nuclear cataract in 91 eyes and 76 cases of cortical cataract with 102 eyes) were enrolled in our study. An annular tear of the central part of anterior lens capsules was performed for each patient. Immunohistochemical staining and real-time PCR were used to detect the protein and mRNA expression levels, and TUNEL was used to assess lens epithelial cells apoptosis. Comparisons of protein expression levels and lens epithelial cells apoptosis were made between the 2 groups. RESULTS The results showed a higher protein expression level of senescence marker protein-30 in surrounding parts of the anterior lens capsule compared with the central part of the anterior lens capsule; however, the positive rate of senescence-associated β-galactosidase was remarkably higher in the central part than in the surrounding part. Compared with cortical cataract patients, nuclear cataract patients had elevated senescence marker protein-30 protein and mRNA expression levels, but had a decreased positive rate of senescence-associated β-galactosidase. TUNEL results showed that the lens epithelial cell apoptosis rate was higher in the central part of the anterior lens capsule than in the surrounding part in both groups. Within either central or surrounding area of anterior lens capsule, cortical cataract patients exhibited a significantly higher lens epithelial cell apoptosis rate in contrast with nuclear cataract patients. CONCLUSIONS Our study results suggest that senescence marker protein-30 and senescence-associated β-galactosidase expressions in both nuclear cataract and cortical cataract patients were associated with lens epithelial cells apoptosis.

  16. Expressions of Senescence-Associated β-Galactosidase and Senescence Marker Protein-30 are Associated with Lens Epithelial Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dan; Yin, Dan; Xiao, Fang; Hao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate associations of senescence marker protein-30 and senescence-associated β-galactosidase expression with lens epithelial cells apoptosis among Chinese age-related cataract patients. Material/Methods A total of 145 age-related cataract patients (69 cases with nuclear cataract in 91 eyes and 76 cases of cortical cataract with 102 eyes) were enrolled in our study. An annular tear of the central part of anterior lens capsules was performed for each patient. Immunohistochemical staining and real-time PCR were used to detect the protein and mRNA expression levels, and TUNEL was used to assess lens epithelial cells apoptosis. Comparisons of protein expression levels and lens epithelial cells apoptosis were made between the 2 groups. Results The results showed a higher protein expression level of senescence marker protein-30 in surrounding parts of the anterior lens capsule compared with the central part of the anterior lens capsule; however, the positive rate of senescence-associated β-galactosidase was remarkably higher in the central part than in the surrounding part. Compared with cortical cataract patients, nuclear cataract patients had elevated senescence marker protein-30 protein and mRNA expression levels, but had a decreased positive rate of senescence-associated β-galactosidase. TUNEL results showed that the lens epithelial cell apoptosis rate was higher in the central part of the anterior lens capsule than in the surrounding part in both groups. Within either central or surrounding area of anterior lens capsule, cortical cataract patients exhibited a significantly higher lens epithelial cell apoptosis rate in contrast with nuclear cataract patients. Conclusions Our study results suggest that senescence marker protein-30 and senescence-associated β-galactosidase expressions in both nuclear cataract and cortical cataract patients were associated with lens epithelial cells apoptosis. PMID:26619319

  17. Localized mRNA translation and protein association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    Recent direct observations of localization of mRNAs and proteins both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells can be related to slowdown of diffusion of these species due to macromolecular crowding and their ability to aggregate and form immobile or slowly mobile complexes. Here, a generic kinetic model describing both these factors is presented and comprehensively analyzed. Although the model is non-linear, an accurate self-consistent analytical solution of the corresponding reaction-diffusion equation has been constructed, the types of localized protein distributions have been explicitly shown, and the predicted kinetic regimes of gene expression have been classified.

  18. Association of the P6 Protein of Cauliflower mosaic virus with Plasmodesmata and Plasmodesmal Proteins1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Andres; Angel, Carlos A.; Lutz, Lindy; Leisner, Scott M.; Nelson, Richard S.; Schoelz, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The P6 protein of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is responsible for the formation of inclusion bodies (IBs), which are the sites for viral gene expression, replication, and virion assembly. Moreover, recent evidence indicates that ectopically expressed P6 inclusion-like bodies (I-LBs) move in association with actin microfilaments. Because CaMV virions accumulate preferentially in P6 IBs, we hypothesized that P6 IBs have a role in delivering CaMV virions to the plasmodesmata. We have determined that the P6 protein interacts with a C2 calcium-dependent membrane-targeting protein (designated Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana] Soybean Response to Cold [AtSRC2.2]) in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid screen and have confirmed this interaction through coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization assays in the CaMV host Nicotiana benthamiana. An AtSRC2.2 protein fused to red fluorescent protein (RFP) was localized to the plasma membrane and specifically associated with plasmodesmata. The AtSRC2.2-RFP fusion also colocalized with two proteins previously shown to associate with plasmodesmata: the host protein Plasmodesmata-Localized Protein1 (PDLP1) and the CaMV movement protein (MP). Because P6 I-LBs colocalized with AtSRC2.2 and the P6 protein had previously been shown to interact with CaMV MP, we investigated whether P6 I-LBs might also be associated with plasmodesmata. We examined the colocalization of P6-RFP I-LBs with PDLP1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and aniline blue (a stain for callose normally observed at plasmodesmata) and found that P6-RFP I-LBs were associated with each of these markers. Furthermore, P6-RFP coimmunoprecipitated with PDLP1-GFP. Our evidence that a portion of P6-GFP I-LBs associate with AtSRC2.2 and PDLP1 at plasmodesmata supports a model in which P6 IBs function to transfer CaMV virions directly to MP at the plasmodesmata. PMID:25239023

  19. Associations of total, dairy, and meat protein with markers for bone turnover in healthy, prepubertal boys.

    PubMed

    Budek, Alicja Z; Hoppe, Camilla; Michaelsen, Kim F; Bügel, Susanne; Mølgaard, Christian

    2007-04-01

    We previously reported that high intake of milk, but not meat, equal in protein content, increased serum insulin-like growth factor-I (sIGF-I) in prepubertal boys. sIGF-I plays a key role in bone metabolism. Therefore, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate associations of total, dairy, and meat protein intake with markers for bone turnover and sIGF-I in prepubertal, healthy boys (n = 81). We measured bone turnover (enzyme-linked immunoassay) in serum osteocalcin (sOC), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (sBAP), and C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type-I (sCTX); dietary intake was estimated from a 3-d weighed food record. sIGF-I and its binding protein-3 were assessed (immunoassay) in a subgroup of 56 boys. All statistical models included effects of age, BMI, and energy intake. Dairy protein was negatively associated with sOC (P = 0.05) but not significantly associated with sBAP and sCTX. Further analyses showed that dairy protein decreased (P = 0.05) sOC at a high meat protein intake (>0.8 g/kg), whereas meat protein increased (P = 0.03) sOC at a low dairy protein intake (<0.4 g/kg). Total and meat protein intake was positively associated with sBAP (P < or = 0.04) but not significantly associated with sOC and sCTX. Free sIGF-I was positively associated with total (P < 0.01) and dairy (P = 0.06) protein but not with meat protein. Our results indicate that dairy and meat protein may exhibit a distinct regulatory effect on different markers for bone turnover. Future studies should focus on differential effects of dairy and meat protein on bone health during growth.

  20. Computational Framework for Prediction of Peptide Sequences That May Mediate Multiple Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debasree; Patra, Piya; Ghosh, Abhirupa; Saha, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    A considerable proportion of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in the cell are estimated to be mediated by very short peptide segments that approximately conform to specific sequence patterns known as linear motifs (LMs), often present in the disordered regions in the eukaryotic proteins. These peptides have been found to interact with low affinity and are able bind to multiple interactors, thus playing an important role in the PPI networks involving date hubs. In this work, PPI data and de novo motif identification based method (MEME) were used to identify such peptides in three cancer-associated hub proteins—MYC, APC and MDM2. The peptides corresponding to the significant LMs identified for each hub protein were aligned, the overlapping regions across these peptides being termed as overlapping linear peptides (OLPs). These OLPs were thus predicted to be responsible for multiple PPIs of the corresponding hub proteins and a scoring system was developed to rank them. We predicted six OLPs in MYC and five OLPs in MDM2 that scored higher than OLP predictions from randomly generated protein sets. Two OLP sequences from the C-terminal of MYC were predicted to bind with FBXW7, component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex involved in proteasomal degradation of MYC. Similarly, we identified peptides in the C-terminal of MDM2 interacting with FKBP3, which has a specific role in auto-ubiquitinylation of MDM2. The peptide sequences predicted in MYC and MDM2 look promising for designing orthosteric inhibitors against possible disease-associated PPIs. Since these OLPs can interact with other proteins as well, these inhibitors should be specific to the targeted interactor to prevent undesired side-effects. This computational framework has been designed to predict and rank the peptide regions that may mediate multiple PPIs and can be applied to other disease-associated date hub proteins for prediction of novel therapeutic targets of small molecule PPI modulators. PMID

  1. Immunochemical characterization of a protein associated with Mycobacterium leprae cell wall.

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, T P; Miller, R A; Young, D B; Khanolkar, S R; Buchanan, T M

    1985-01-01

    A panel of nine monoclonal antibodies to Mycobacterium leprae were used to characterize a protein antigen of the bacillus. Two monoclonal antibodies (IVD8 and IIIE9) were specific for M. leprae and reacted with an epitope (CWPa) present on a protein molecule associated with the cell wall fraction of M. leprae. This protein, designated cell wall-associated protein (CWP), lost its immunoreactivity upon treatment with trypsin and had an apparent molecular weight of 65,000, though additional lower-molecular-weight forms of the protein were observed by immunoblotting. Four other cross-reactive epitopes (CWPb, CWPc, CWPd, and CWPe) were defined on the same molecule using seven independent monoclonal antibodies. Therefore, M. leprae possesses a trypsin-sensitive, heat-stable protein associated with the cell wall which contains at least one species-specific and four cross-reactive antigenic determinants. Images PMID:3894233

  2. Co-Association of Cytochrome f Catabolites and Plastid-Lipid-Associated Protein with Chloroplast Lipid Particles1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew D.; Licatalosi, Donny D.; Thompson, John E.

    2000-01-01

    Distinguishable populations of lipid particles isolated from chloroplasts of yellow wax bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Kinghorn Wax) leaves have been found to contain plastid-lipid-associated protein (J. Pozueta-Romero, F. Rafia, G. Houlné, C. Cheniclet, J.P. Carde, M.-L. Schantz, R. Schantz [1997] Plant Physiol 115: 1185–1194). One population is comprised of plastoglobuli obtained from sonicated chloroplasts by flotation centrifugation. Higher density lipid-protein particles isolated from chloroplast stroma by ultrafiltration constitute a second population. Inasmuch as the stromal lipid-protein particles contain plastid-lipid-associated protein, but are distinguishable from plastoglobuli in terms of their lipid and protein composition, they appear to be plastoglobuli-like particles. Of particular interest is the finding that plastoglobuli and the higher density lipid-protein particles both contain catabolites of the thylakoid protein, cytochrome f. These observations support the view that there are distinguishable populations of plastoglobuli-like particles in chloroplasts. They further suggest that the formation of these particles may allow removal of protein catabolites from the thylakoid membrane that are destined for degradation as part of normal thylakoid turnover. PMID:10982436

  3. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation.

  4. Identification of proteins associated with RNA polymerase III using a modified tandem chromatin affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Thuy-Trinh; Saguez, Cyril; Conesa, Christine; Lefebvre, Olivier; Acker, Joël

    2015-02-01

    To identify the proteins associated with the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) machinery in exponentially growing yeast cells, we developed our own tandem chromatin affinity purification procedure (TChAP) after in vivo cross-link, allowing a reproducible and good recovery of the protein bait and its associated partners. In contrast to TFIIIA that could only be purified as a free protein, this protocol allows us to capture free Pol III together with Pol III bound on its target genes. Transcription factors, elongation factors, RNA-associated proteins and proteins involved in Pol III biogenesis were identified by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the presence of all the TFIIIB subunits found associated with Pol III together with the absence of TFIIIC and chromatin factors including histones suggest that DNA-bound Pol III purified using TChAP is mainly engaged in transcription reinitiation.

  5. Identification of a novel protein-protein interaction motif mediating interaction of GPCR-associated sorting proteins with G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Bornert, Olivier; Møller, Thor C; Boeuf, Julien; Candusso, Marie-Pierre; Wagner, Renaud; Martinez, Karen L; Simonin, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    GPCR desensitization and down-regulation are considered key molecular events underlying the development of tolerance in vivo. Among the many regulatory proteins that are involved in these complex processes, GASP-1 have been shown to participate to the sorting of several receptors toward the degradation pathway. This protein belongs to the recently identified GPCR-associated sorting proteins (GASPs) family that comprises ten members for which structural and functional details are poorly documented. We present here a detailed structure-function relationship analysis of the molecular interaction between GASPs and a panel of GPCRs. In a first step, GST-pull down experiments revealed that all the tested GASPs display significant interactions with a wide range of GPCRs. Importantly, the different GASP members exhibiting the strongest interaction properties were also characterized by the presence of a small, highly conserved and repeated "GASP motif" of 15 amino acids. We further showed using GST-pull down, surface plasmon resonance and co-immunoprecipitation experiments that the central domain of GASP-1, which contains 22 GASP motifs, is essential for the interaction with GPCRs. We then used site directed mutagenesis and competition experiments with synthetic peptides to demonstrate that the GASP motif, and particularly its highly conserved core sequence SWFW, is critically involved in the interaction with GPCRs. Overall, our data show that several members of the GASP family interact with GPCRs and highlight the presence within GASPs of a novel protein-protein interaction motif that might represent a new target to investigate the involvement of GASPs in the modulation of the activity of GPCRs. PMID:23441177

  6. Identification of novel γ-secretase-associated proteins in detergent-resistant membranes from brain.

    PubMed

    Hur, Ji-Yeun; Teranishi, Yasuhiro; Kihara, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Natsuko Goto; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Hosia, Waltteri; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Winblad, Bengt; Frykman, Susanne; Tjernberg, Lars O

    2012-04-01

    In Alzheimer disease, oligomeric amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) species lead to synapse loss and neuronal death. γ-Secretase, the transmembrane protease complex that mediates the final catalytic step that liberates Aβ from its precursor protein (APP), has a multitude of substrates, and therapeutics aimed at reducing Aβ production should ideally be specific for APP cleavage. It has been shown that APP can be processed in lipid rafts, and γ-secretase-associated proteins can affect Aβ production. Here, we use a biotinylated inhibitor for affinity purification of γ-secretase and associated proteins and mass spectrometry for identification of the purified proteins, and we identify novel γ-secretase-associated proteins in detergent-resistant membranes from brain. Furthermore, we show by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of gene expression that a subset of the γ-secretase-associated proteins, in particular voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) and contactin-associated protein 1 (CNTNAP1), reduced Aβ production (Aβ40 and Aβ42) by around 70%, whereas knockdown of presenilin 1, one of the essential γ-secretase complex components, reduced Aβ production by 50%. Importantly, these proteins had a less pronounced effect on Notch processing. We conclude that VDAC1 and CNTNAP1 associate with γ-secretase in detergent-resistant membranes and affect APP processing and suggest that molecules that interfere with this interaction could be of therapeutic use for Alzheimer disease. PMID:22315232

  7. Identification of Novel γ-Secretase-associated Proteins in Detergent-resistant Membranes from Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Ji-Yeun; Teranishi, Yasuhiro; Kihara, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Natsuko Goto; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Hosia, Waltteri; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Winblad, Bengt; Frykman, Susanne; Tjernberg, Lars O.

    2012-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease, oligomeric amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) species lead to synapse loss and neuronal death. γ-Secretase, the transmembrane protease complex that mediates the final catalytic step that liberates Aβ from its precursor protein (APP), has a multitude of substrates, and therapeutics aimed at reducing Aβ production should ideally be specific for APP cleavage. It has been shown that APP can be processed in lipid rafts, and γ-secretase-associated proteins can affect Aβ production. Here, we use a biotinylated inhibitor for affinity purification of γ-secretase and associated proteins and mass spectrometry for identification of the purified proteins, and we identify novel γ-secretase-associated proteins in detergent-resistant membranes from brain. Furthermore, we show by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of gene expression that a subset of the γ-secretase-associated proteins, in particular voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) and contactin-associated protein 1 (CNTNAP1), reduced Aβ production (Aβ40 and Aβ42) by around 70%, whereas knockdown of presenilin 1, one of the essential γ-secretase complex components, reduced Aβ production by 50%. Importantly, these proteins had a less pronounced effect on Notch processing. We conclude that VDAC1 and CNTNAP1 associate with γ-secretase in detergent-resistant membranes and affect APP processing and suggest that molecules that interfere with this interaction could be of therapeutic use for Alzheimer disease. PMID:22315232

  8. Effect of the microtubule-associated protein tau on dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparacino, J.; Farías, M. G.; Lamberti, P. W.

    2014-02-01

    Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with nonmotile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al., Science 319, 1086 (2008), 10.1126/science.1152993] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduces experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

  9. The Drosophila centrosomal protein Nuf is required for recruiting Dah, a membrane associated protein, to furrows in the early embryo.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, W F; Zhang, C X; Zelano, C; Hsieh, T S; Sullivan, W

    1999-09-01

    During mitosis of the Drosophila cortical syncytial divisions, actin-based membrane furrows separate adjacent spindles. Our genetic analysis indicates that the centrosomal protein Nuf is specifically required for recruitment of components to the furrows and the membrane-associated protein Dah is primarily required for the inward invagination of the furrow membrane. Recruitment of actin, anillin and peanut to the furrows occurs normally in dah-derived embryos. However, subsequent invagination of the furrows fails in dah-derived embryos and the septins become dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. This indicates that stable septin localization requires Dah-mediated furrow invagination. Close examination of actin and Dah localization in wild-type embryos reveals that they associate in adjacent particles during interphase and co-localize in the invaginating furrows during prophase and metaphase. We show that the Nuf centrosomal protein is required for recruiting the membrane-associated protein Dah to the furrows. In nuf-mutant embryos, much of the Dah does not reach the furrows and remains in a punctate distribution. This suggests that Dah is recruited to the furrows in vesicles and that the recruiting step is disrupted in nuf mutants. These studies lead to a model in which the centrosomes play an important role in the transport of membrane-associated proteins and other components to the developing furrows.

  10. Tetratricopeptide repeat protein-associated proteins contribute to the virulence of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yoshio; Ohara, Naoya; Sato, Keiko; Yoshimura, Mamiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Naito, Mariko; Fujiwara, Taku; Nakayama, Koji

    2010-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the most etiologically important microorganisms in periodontal disease. We found in a previous study that PG1385 (TprA) protein, a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein, was upregulated in P. gingivalis wild-type cells placed in a mouse subcutaneous chamber and that a tprA mutant was clearly less virulent in the mouse subcutaneous abscess model (M. Yoshimura et al., Oral Microbiol. Immunol. 23:413-418, 2008). In the present study, we investigated the gene expression profile of tprA mutant cells placed in a mouse subcutaneous chamber and found that 9 genes, including PG2102 (tapA), PG2101 (tapB), and PG2100 (tapC) genes, were downregulated in the tprA mutant compared with those in the wild type. Expression of a cluster of tapA, tapB, and tapC genes of the mutant was also downregulated in an in vitro culture with enriched brain heart infusion medium. The TprA protein has three TPR motifs known as a protein-protein interaction module. Yeast two-hybrid system analysis and in vitro protein binding assays with immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance detection revealed that the TprA protein could bind to TapA and TapB proteins. TprA and TapB proteins were located in the periplasmic space, whereas TapA, which appeared to be one of the C-terminal domain family proteins, was located at the outer membrane. We constructed tapA, tapB, and tapC single mutants and a tapA-tapB-tapC deletion mutant. In the mouse subcutaneous infection experiment, all of the mutants were less virulent than the wild type. These results suggest that TprA, TapA, TapB, and TapC are cooperatively involved in P. gingivalis virulence. PMID:20351137

  11. Association of filamin A and vimentin with hepatitis C virus proteins in infected human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Ahrens, W A; Phatak, S U; Hwang, S; Schrum, L W; Bonkovsky, H L

    2011-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease and remains a major therapeutic challenge. A variety of host proteins interact with HCV proteins. The definitive role of cytoskeletal (CS) proteins in HCV infection remains to be determined. In this study, our aim was to determine the expression profile of differentially regulated and expressed selected CS proteins and their association with HCV proteins in infected hepatocytes as possible therapeutic targets. Using proteomics, qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence techniques, we revealed that filamin A (fila) and vimentin (vim) were prominently increased proteins in HCV-expressing human hepatoma cells compared with parental cells and in liver biopsies from patients with CHC vs controls. HCV nonstructural (NS) 3 and NS5A proteins were associated with fila, while core protein partially with fila and vim. Immunoprecipitation showed interactions among fila and NS3 and NS5A proteins. Cells treated with interferon-α showed a dose- and time-dependent decrease in CS and HCV proteins. NS proteins clustered at the perinuclear region following cytochalasin b treatment, whereas disperse cytoplasmic and perinuclear distribution was observed in the no-treatment group. This study demonstrates and signifies that changes occur in the expression of CS proteins in HCV-infected hepatocytes and, for the first time, shows the up-regulation and interaction of fila with HCV proteins. Association between CS and HCV proteins may have implications in future design of CS protein-targeted therapy for the treatment for HCV infection.

  12. A novel ER J-protein DNAJB12 accelerates ER-associated degradation of membrane proteins including CFTR.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yo-hei; Kimura, Taiji; Momohara, Shuku; Takeuchi, Masato; Tani, Tokio; Kimata, Yukio; Kadokura, Hiroshi; Kohno, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Cytosolic Hsc70/Hsp70 are known to contribute to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation of membrane proteins. However, at least in mammalian cells, its partner ER-localized J-protein for this cellular event has not been identified. Here we propose that this missing protein is DNAJB12. Protease protection assay and immunofluorescence study revealed that DNAJB12 is an ER-localized single membrane-spanning protein carrying a J-domain facing the cytosol. Using co-immunoprecipitation assay, we found that DNAJB12 is able to bind Hsc70 and thus can recruit Hsc70 to the ER membrane. Remarkably, cellular overexpression of DNAJB12 accelerated the degradation of misfolded membrane proteins including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), but not a misfolded luminal protein. The DNAJB12-dependent degradation of CFTR was compromised by a proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin, suggesting that this process requires the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Conversely, knockdown of DNAJB12 expression attenuated the degradation of CFTR. Thus, DNAJB12 is a novel mammalian ER-localized J-protein that plays a vital role in the quality control of membrane proteins.

  13. Deficiency of cyclase-associated protein 2 promotes arrhythmias associated with connexin43 maldistribution and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Peche, Vivek Shahaji; Linhart, Markus; Nickenig, Georg; Noegel, Angelika Anna; Schrickel, Jan Wilko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cyclase-associated protein 2 (CAP2) plays a major role in regulating the actin cytoskeleton. Since inactivation of CAP2 in a mouse model by a gene trap approach (Cap2gt/gt) results in cardiomyopathy and increased mortality, we hypothesized that CAP2 has a major impact on arrhythmias and electrophysiological parameters. Material and methods We performed long-term-ECG recordings in transgenic CAP2 deficient mice (C57BL/6) to detect spontaneous arrhythmias. In vivo electrophysiological studies by right heart catheterization and ex vivo epicardial mapping were used to analyze electrophysiological parameters, the inducibility of arrhythmias, and conduction velocities. Expression and distribution of cardiac connexins and the amount of cardiac fibrosis were evaluated. Results Spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias could be detected in Cap2gt/gt during the long-term-ECG recording. Cap2gt/gt showed marked conduction delays at atrial and ventricular levels, including a reduced heart rate (421.0 ±40.6 bpm vs. 450.8 ±27.9 bpm; p < 0.01), and prolongations of PQ (46.3 ±4.1 ms vs. 38.6 ±6.5 ms; p < 0.01), QRS (16.2 ±2.6 ms vs. 12.6 ±1.4 ms; p < 0.01), and QTc interval (55.8 ±6.0 ms vs. 45.2 ±3.3 ms; p = 0.02) in comparison to wild type mice. The PQ prolongation was due to an infra-Hisian conduction delay (HV: 9.7 ±2.1 ms vs. 6.5 ±3.1 ms; p = 0.02). The inducibility of ventricular tachycardias during the electrophysiological studies was significantly elevated in the mutant mice (inducible animals: 88% vs. 33%; p = 0.04). Cap2gt/gt showed more abnormal distribution of connexin43 compared to WT (23.0 ±4.7% vs. 2.9 ±0.8%; p < 0.01). Myocardial fibrosis was elevated in Cap2gt/gt hearts (9.1 ±6.7% vs. 5.5 ±3.3%; p < 0.01). Conclusions Loss of CAP2 results in marked electrophysiological disturbances including impaired sinus node function, conduction delays, and susceptibility to malignant arrhythmias. Structural changes in Cap2gt/gt are associated with

  14. Type VI secretion apparatus and phage tail-associated protein complexes share a common evolutionary origin

    SciTech Connect

    Leiman, Petr G.; Basler, Marek; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Sauder, J. Michael; Pukatzki, Stefan; Burley, Stephen K.; Almo, Steven C.; Mekalanos, John J.

    2009-04-22

    Protein secretion is a common property of pathogenic microbes. Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use at least 6 distinct extracellular protein secretion systems to export proteins through their multilayered cell envelope and in some cases into host cells. Among the most widespread is the newly recognized Type VI secretion system (T6SS) which is composed of 15--20 proteins whose biochemical functions are not well understood. Using crystallographic, biochemical, and bioinformatic analyses, we identified 3 T6SS components, which are homologous to bacteriophage tail proteins. These include the tail tube protein; the membrane-penetrating needle, situated at the distal end of the tube; and another protein associated with the needle and tube. We propose that T6SS is a multicomponent structure whose extracellular part resembles both structurally and functionally a bacteriophage tail, an efficient machine that translocates proteins and DNA across lipid membranes into cells.

  15. Detergent-associated Solution Conformations of Helical and Beta-barrel Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Yiming; Lee, Byung-Kwon; Ankner, John Francis; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin; Heller, William T

    2008-01-01

    Membrane proteins present major challenges for structural biology. In particular, the production of suitable crystals for high-resolution structural determination continues to be a significant roadblock for developing an atomic-level understanding of these vital cellular systems. The use of detergents for extracting membrane proteins from the native membrane for either crystallization or reconstitution into model lipid membranes for further study is assumed to leave the protein with the proper fold with a belt of detergent encompassing the membrane-spanning segments of the structure. Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to probe the detergent-associated solution conformations of three membrane proteins, namely bacteriorhodopsin (BR), the Ste2p G-protein coupled receptor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the Escherichia coli porin OmpF. The results demonstrate that, contrary to the traditional model of a detergent-associated membrane protein, the helical proteins BR and Ste2p are not in the expected, compact conformation and associated with detergent micelles, while the ?-barrel OmpF is indeed embedded in a disk-like micelle in a properly folded state. The comparison provided by the BR and Ste2p, both members of the 7TM family of helical membrane proteins, further suggests that the interhelical interactions between the transmembrane helices of the two proteins differ, such that BR, like other rhodopsins, can properly refold to crystallize, while Ste2p continues to prove resistant to crystallization from an initially detergent-associated state.

  16. Cellular Proteins Associated with the Interior and Exterior of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; Hwang, Sun-Il; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2014-01-01

    Virus particles (virions) often contain not only virus-encoded but also host-encoded proteins. Some of these host proteins are enclosed within the virion structure, while others, in the case of enveloped viruses, are embedded in the host-derived membrane. While many of these host protein incorporations are likely accidental, some may play a role in virus infectivity, replication and/or immunoreactivity in the next host. Host protein incorporations may be especially important in therapeutic applications where large numbers of virus particles are administered. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is the prototypic rhabdovirus and a candidate vaccine, gene therapy and oncolytic vector. Using mass spectrometry, we previously examined cell type dependent host protein content of VSV virions using intact (“whole”) virions purified from three cell lines originating from different species. Here we aimed to determine the localization of host proteins within the VSV virions by analyzing: i) whole VSV virions; and ii) whole VSV virions treated with Proteinase K to remove all proteins outside the viral envelope. A total of 257 proteins were identified, with 181 identified in whole virions and 183 identified in Proteinase K treated virions. Most of these proteins have not been previously shown to be associated with VSV. Functional enrichment analysis indicated the most overrepresented categories were proteins associated with vesicles, vesicle-mediated transport and protein localization. Using western blotting, the presence of several host proteins, including some not previously shown in association with VSV (such as Yes1, Prl1 and Ddx3y), was confirmed and their relative quantities in various virion fractions determined. Our study provides a valuable inventory of virion-associated host proteins for further investigation of their roles in the replication cycle, pathogenesis and immunoreactivity of VSV. PMID:25105980

  17. Cellular proteins associated with the interior and exterior of vesicular stomatitis virus virions.

    PubMed

    Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; Hwang, Sun-Il; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2014-01-01

    Virus particles (virions) often contain not only virus-encoded but also host-encoded proteins. Some of these host proteins are enclosed within the virion structure, while others, in the case of enveloped viruses, are embedded in the host-derived membrane. While many of these host protein incorporations are likely accidental, some may play a role in virus infectivity, replication and/or immunoreactivity in the next host. Host protein incorporations may be especially important in therapeutic applications where large numbers of virus particles are administered. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is the prototypic rhabdovirus and a candidate vaccine, gene therapy and oncolytic vector. Using mass spectrometry, we previously examined cell type dependent host protein content of VSV virions using intact ("whole") virions purified from three cell lines originating from different species. Here we aimed to determine the localization of host proteins within the VSV virions by analyzing: i) whole VSV virions; and ii) whole VSV virions treated with Proteinase K to remove all proteins outside the viral envelope. A total of 257 proteins were identified, with 181 identified in whole virions and 183 identified in Proteinase K treated virions. Most of these proteins have not been previously shown to be associated with VSV. Functional enrichment analysis indicated the most overrepresented categories were proteins associated with vesicles, vesicle-mediated transport and protein localization. Using western blotting, the presence of several host proteins, including some not previously shown in association with VSV (such as Yes1, Prl1 and Ddx3y), was confirmed and their relative quantities in various virion fractions determined. Our study provides a valuable inventory of virion-associated host proteins for further investigation of their roles in the replication cycle, pathogenesis and immunoreactivity of VSV.

  18. Identification of Mitosis-Specific Phosphorylation in Mitotic Chromosome-Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shinya; Kimura, Michiko; Takagi, Shunsuke; Toramoto, Iyo; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2016-09-01

    During mitosis, phosphorylation of chromosome-associated proteins is a key regulatory mechanism. Mass spectrometry has been successfully applied to determine the complete protein composition of mitotic chromosomes, but not to identify post-translational modifications. Here, we quantitatively compared the phosphoproteome of isolated mitotic chromosomes with that of chromosomes in nonsynchronized cells. We identified 4274 total phosphorylation sites and 350 mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites in mitotic chromosome-associated proteins. Significant mitosis-specific phosphorylation in centromere/kinetochore proteins was detected, although the chromosomal association of these proteins did not change throughout the cell cycle. This mitosis-specific phosphorylation might play a key role in regulation of mitosis. Further analysis revealed strong dependency of phosphorylation dynamics on kinase consensus patterns, thus linking the identified phosphorylation sites to known key mitotic kinases. Remarkably, chromosomal axial proteins such as non-SMC subunits of condensin, TopoIIα, and Kif4A, together with the chromosomal periphery protein Ki67 involved in the establishment of the mitotic chromosomal structure, demonstrated high phosphorylation during mitosis. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for regulation of chromosome restructuring in mitosis via protein phosphorylation. Our study generated a large quantitative database on protein phosphorylation in mitotic and nonmitotic chromosomes, thus providing insights into the dynamics of chromatin protein phosphorylation at mitosis onset.

  19. RAID: a comprehensive resource for human RNA-associated (RNA–RNA/RNA–protein) interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wu, Deng; Chen, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinxurong; Fan, Dandan; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Mingyue; Tan, Puwen; Xu, Jintian; Yi, Ying; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Hua; Hu, Yongfei; Fan, Kaili; Kang, Juanjuan; Huang, Yan; Miao, Zhengqiang; Bi, Miaoman; Jin, Nana; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Xu, Jianzhen; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity in the eukaryote transcriptome, which includes not only protein-coding transcripts but also an expanding catalog of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Diverse coding and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) perform functions through interaction with each other in various cellular processes. In this project, we have developed RAID (http://www.rna-society.org/raid), an RNA-associated (RNA–RNA/RNA–protein) interaction database. RAID intends to provide the scientific community with all-in-one resources for efficient browsing and extraction of the RNA-associated interactions in human. This version of RAID contains more than 6100 RNA-associated interactions obtained by manually reviewing more than 2100 published papers, including 4493 RNA–RNA interactions and 1619 RNA–protein interactions. Each entry contains detailed information on an RNA-associated interaction, including RAID ID, RNA/protein symbol, RNA/protein categories, validated method, expressing tissue, literature references (Pubmed IDs), and detailed functional description. Users can query, browse, analyze, and manipulate RNA-associated (RNA–RNA/RNA–protein) interaction. RAID provides a comprehensive resource of human RNA-associated (RNA–RNA/RNA–protein) interaction network. Furthermore, this resource will help in uncovering the generic organizing principles of cellular function network. PMID:24803509

  20. RAID: a comprehensive resource for human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wu, Deng; Chen, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinxurong; Fan, Dandan; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Mingyue; Tan, Puwen; Xu, Jintian; Yi, Ying; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Hua; Hu, Yongfei; Fan, Kaili; Kang, Juanjuan; Huang, Yan; Miao, Zhengqiang; Bi, Miaoman; Jin, Nana; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Xu, Jianzhen; Wang, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity in the eukaryote transcriptome, which includes not only protein-coding transcripts but also an expanding catalog of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Diverse coding and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) perform functions through interaction with each other in various cellular processes. In this project, we have developed RAID (http://www.rna-society.org/raid), an RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction database. RAID intends to provide the scientific community with all-in-one resources for efficient browsing and extraction of the RNA-associated interactions in human. This version of RAID contains more than 6100 RNA-associated interactions obtained by manually reviewing more than 2100 published papers, including 4493 RNA-RNA interactions and 1619 RNA-protein interactions. Each entry contains detailed information on an RNA-associated interaction, including RAID ID, RNA/protein symbol, RNA/protein categories, validated method, expressing tissue, literature references (Pubmed IDs), and detailed functional description. Users can query, browse, analyze, and manipulate RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction. RAID provides a comprehensive resource of human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction network. Furthermore, this resource will help in uncovering the generic organizing principles of cellular function network.

  1. Peroxymonosulfate Rapidly Inactivates the Disease-Associated Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    Chesney, Alexandra R; Booth, Clarissa J; Lietz, Christopher B; Li, Lingjun; Pedersen, Joel A

    2016-07-01

    Prions, the etiological agents in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, exhibit remarkable resistance to most methods of inactivation that are effective against conventional pathogens. Prions are composed of pathogenic conformers of the prion protein (PrP(TSE)). Some prion diseases are transmitted, in part, through environmental routes. The recalcitrance of prions to inactivation may lead to a persistent reservoir of infectivity that contributes to the environmental maintenance of epizootics. At present, few methods exist to remediate prion-contaminated land surfaces. Here we conducted a proof-of-principle study to examine the ability of peroxymonosulfate to degrade PrP(TSE). We find that peroxymonosulfate rapidly degrades PrP(TSE) from two species. Transition-metal-catalyzed decomposition of peroxymonosulfate to produce sulfate radicals appears to enhance degradation. We further demonstrate that exposure to peroxymonosulfate significantly reduced PrP(C) to PrP(TSE) converting ability as measured by protein misfolding cyclic amplification, used as a proxy for infectivity. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed that exposure to peroxymonosulfate results in oxidative modifications to methionine and tryptophan residues. This study indicates that peroxymonosulfate may hold promise for decontamination of prion-contaminated surfaces. PMID:27247993

  2. Adeno-associated virus protects the retinoblastoma family of proteins from adenoviral-induced functional inactivation.

    PubMed

    Batchu, Ramesh B; Shammas, Masood A; Wang, Jing Yi; Freeman, John; Rosen, Nancy; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2002-05-15

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is known to inhibit virally mediated oncogenic transformation. One of the early events of adenovirus (Ad) infection is the functional inactivation of cell cycle regulatory retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins, which consists of retinoblastoma protein (pRB), p107, and p130. In an effort to understand the molecular basis of anti-oncogenic properties of AAV, we studied the effects of AAV expression on these proteins in cells infected with Ad. Western blot analysis showed that AAV interferes with the adenoviral-induced degradation and hyperphosphorylation of the pRB family of proteins in normal human fibroblasts as well as in HeLa and 293 cell lines. RNase protection assay showed enhanced expression of pocket protein gene by AAV expression. We also demonstrate that Rep proteins, the major AAV regulatory proteins, bind to E1A, the immediate early gene of Ad responsible for hyperphosphorylation and dissociation of pRB-E2F complex. This binding of AAV Rep proteins to E1A leads to decreased association between E1A and pRB leading to protection of pocket proteins from degradation, decreased expression of S phase genes and inhibition of cell cycle progression. These results suggest that the antiproliferative activity of AAV against Ad is mediated, at least in part, by effects of AAV Rep proteins on the Rb family of proteins.

  3. Cyclin E-dependent protein kinase activity regulates niche retention of Drosophila ovarian follicle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu A.; Kalderon, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Whether stem cells have unique cell cycle machineries and how they integrate with niche interactions remains largely unknown. We identified a hypomorphic cyclin E allele WX that strongly impairs the maintenance of follicle stem cells (FSCs) in the Drosophila ovary but does not reduce follicle cell proliferation or germline stem cell maintenance. CycEWX protein can still bind to the cyclin-dependent kinase catalytic subunit Cdk2, but forms complexes with reduced protein kinase activity measured in vitro. By creating additional CycE variants with different degrees of kinase dysfunction and expressing these and CycEWX at different levels, we found that higher CycE-Cdk2 kinase activity is required for FSC maintenance than to support follicle cell proliferation. Surprisingly, cycEWX FSCs were lost from their niches rather than arresting proliferation. Furthermore, FSC function was substantially restored by expressing either excess DE-cadherin or excess E2F1/DP, the transcription factor normally activated by CycE-Cdk2 phosphorylation of retinoblastoma proteins. These results suggest that FSC maintenance through niche adhesion is regulated by inputs that normally control S phase entry, possibly as a quality control mechanism to ensure adequate stem cell proliferation. We speculate that a positive connection between central regulators of the cell cycle and niche retention may be a common feature of highly proliferative stem cells. PMID:19966222

  4. Bisphenol A accelerates capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation of rat sperm by activating protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaofeng; Ru, Yanfei; Chu, Chen; Ni, Zimei; Zhou, Yuchuan; Wang, Shoulin; Zhou, Zuomin; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic estrogen-mimic chemical. It has been shown to affect many reproductive endpoints. However, the effect of BPA on the mature sperm and the mechanism of its action are not clear yet. Here, our in vitro studies indicated that BPA could accelerate sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in time- and dose-dependent manners. In vivo, the adult male rats exposed to a high dose of BPA could result in a significant increase in sperm activity. Further investigation demonstrated that BPA could accelerate capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation even if sperm were incubated in medium devoid of BSA, HCO3 (-), and Ca(2+) However, this action of BPA stimulation could be blocked by H89, a highly selective blocker of protein kinase A (PKA), but not by KH7, a specific inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase. These data suggest that BPA may activate PKA to affect sperm functions and male fertility. PMID:27174873

  5. Integrins and Integrin-Associated Proteins in the Cardiac Myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric, transmembrane receptors that are expressed in all cells, including those in the heart. They participate in multiple critical cellular processes including adhesion, extracellular matrix organization, signaling, survival, and proliferation. Particularly relevant for a contracting muscle cell, integrins are mechanotransducers, translating mechanical to biochemical information. While it is likely that cardiovascular clinicians and scientists have highest recognition of integrins in the cardiovascular system from drugs used to inhibit platelet aggregation, the focus of this article will be on the role of integrins specifically in the cardiac myocyte. Following a general introduction to integrin biology, the manuscript will discuss important work on integrin signaling, mechanotransduction, and lessons learned about integrin function from a range of model organisms. Then we will detail work on integrin-related proteins in the myocyte, how integrins may interact with ion channels and mediate viral uptake into cells, and also play a role in stem cell biology. Finally, we will discuss directions for future study. PMID:24481847

  6. Presence of proteolipid protein in coelacanth brain myelin demonstrates tetrapod affinities and questions a chondrichthyan association.

    PubMed

    Waehneldt, T V; Malotka, J

    1989-06-01

    The protein and glycoprotein compositions of CNS myelin from the living coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An unglycosylated component of 25 kilodaltons showed substantially stronger immunoblot reactivity with antibodies against mammalian proteolipid protein (PLP) than lungfish glycosylated PLP. DM-20 (intermediate protein) was not detectable in either fish. The presence of unglycosylated PLP in CNS myelin of the actinistian coelacanth contradicts an association with cartilaginous fishes but supports tetrapod affinities closer than those of lungfish.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma Specimens Identifies Patient Outcome–Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Thomas M.; Du, Peicheng; Kawachi, Nicole; Belbin, Thomas J.; Wang, Yanhua; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Ow, Thomas J.; Keller, Christian E.; Childs, Geoffrey J.; Smith, Richard V.; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Prystowsky, Michael B.; Lim, Jihyeon

    2015-01-01

    Context Global proteomic analysis of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma was performed to identify changes that reflect patient outcomes. Objectives To identify differentially expressed proteins associated with patient outcomes and to explore the use of imaging mass spectrometry as a clinical tool to identify clinically relevant proteins. Design Two-dimensional separation of digested peptides generated from 43 specimens with high-resolution mass spectrometry identified proteins associated with disease-specific death, distant metastasis, and loco-regional recurrence. RNA expressions had been correlated to protein levels to test transcriptional regulation of clinically relevant proteins. Imaging mass spectrometry explored an alternative platform for assessing clinically relevant proteins that would complement surgical pathologic diagnosis. Results Seventy-two peptide features were found to be associated with 3 patient outcomes: disease-specific death (9), distant metastasis (16), and loco-regional recurrence (39); 8 of them were associated with multiple outcomes. Functional ontology revealed major changes in cell adhesion and calcium binding. Thirteen RNAs showed strong correlation with their encoded proteins, implying transcriptional control. Reduction of DSP, PKP1, and TRIM29 was associated with significantly shorter time to onset of distant metastasis. Reduction of PKP1 and TRIM29 correlated with poorer disease-specific survival. Additionally, S100A8 and S100A9 reductions were verified for their association with poor prognosis using imaging mass spectrometry, a platform more adaptable for use with surgical pathology. Conclusions Using global proteomic analysis, we have identified proteins associated with clinical outcomes. The list of clinically relevant proteins observed will provide a means to develop clinical assays for prognosis and optimizing treatment selection. PMID:25295583

  8. HCC-associated protein HCAP1, a variant of GEMIN4, interacts with zinc-finger proteins.

    PubMed

    Di, Yujun; Li, Jinjun; Zhang, Yu; He, Xianghuo; Lu, Hong; Xu, Dongbin; Ling, Jiqiang; Huo, Keke; Wan, Dafang; Li, Yu-Yang; Gu, Jianren

    2003-06-01

    The gene HCAP1 (HCC-associated Protein 1), one variant of GEMIN4, has been mapped in a minimum LOH region on chromosome 17p13.3 and encodes a 1047-amino acid protein. Function predictions based on the amino acid sequence of protein HCAP1 revealed it to contain one helix-loop-helix motif and one leucine zipper domain. Using yeast two-hybrid screening, five zinc-finger proteins were identified as HCAP1-interacting proteins. Among them, NDP52 (nuclear dot protein 52) appeared most frequently in positive clones and was the most strongly interacting protein. Then, the interaction between HCAP1 and NDP52 was confirmed by GST pull-down assay and a coimmunoprecipitation experiment. Moreover, an immunofluorescent staining assay indicated that NDP52 colocalizes with HCAP1 in the cytoplasm. By deletion analysis, the leucine zipper domain of HCAP1 and the zinc finger domain of NDP52 were identified as important regions responsible for the interaction. PMID:12869526

  9. The surface-associated proteins of wheat starch granules: suitability of wheat starch for celiac patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat starch is used to make baked products for celiac patients in several European countries, but is avoided in the US because of uncertainty about the amounts of associated grain storage (gluten) proteins. People with celiac disease (CD) must avoid wheat, rye and barley proteins and products that...

  10. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with a liquid protein diet for the treatment of obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Lantigua, R.A.; Amatruda, J.M.; Biddle, T.L.; Forbes, G.B.; Lockwood, D.H.

    1980-09-25

    Our data demonstrate that a liquid protein diet is frequently associated with potentially life-threatening arrhythmias that are not detected on routine electrocardiography. Several studies of metabolic balance failed to reveal a cause for these arrhythmias. We recommended that the use of liquid protein diets should be terminated pending further investigation of the causes and prevention of the cardiac toxicity.

  11. Elevated cyclin A associated kinase activity promotes sensitivity of metastatic human cancer cells to DNA antimetabolite drug

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIN; YIN, HAILIN; PANANDIKAR, ASHWINI; GANDHI, VARSHA; SEN, SUBRATA

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle in successful systemic therapy of metastatic cancer. We analyzed the involvement of cell cycle regulatory proteins in eliciting response to N (phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA), an inhibitor of de novo pyrimidine synthesis, in two metastatic variants of human cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 isolated from lung (L-2) and brain (Br-1) in nude mouse, respectively. L-2 and Br-l cells markedly differed in their sensitivity to PALA. While both cell types displayed an initial S phase delay/arrest, Br-l cells proliferated but most L-2 cells underwent apoptosis. There was distinct elevation in cyclin A, and phosphorylated Rb proteins concomitant with decreased expression of bcl-2 protein in the PALA treated L-2 cells undergoing apoptosis. Markedly elevated cyclin A associated and cdk2 kinase activities together with increased E2F1-DNA binding were detected in these L-2 cells. Induced ectopic cyclin A expression sensitized Br-l cells to PALA by activating an apoptotic pathway. Our findings demonstrate that elevated expression of cyclin A and associated kinase can activate an apoptotic pathway in cells exposed to DNA antimetabolites. Abrogation of this pathway can lead to resistance against these drugs in metastatic variants of human carcinoma cells. PMID:26058363

  12. Thanatos-associated protein 7 associates with template activating factor-Ibeta and inhibits histone acetylation to repress transcription.

    PubMed

    Macfarlan, Todd; Parker, J Brandon; Nagata, Kyosuke; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2006-02-01

    The posttranslational modifications of histones on chromatin or a lack thereof is critical in transcriptional regulation. Emerging studies indicate a role for histone-binding proteins in transcriptional activation and repression. We have previously identified template-activating factor-Ibeta (TAF-Ibeta, also called PHAPII, SET, and I(2)(pp2A)) as a component of a cellular complex called inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) that masks histone acetylation in vitro and blocks histone acetyltransferase (HAT)-dependent transcription in living cells. TAF-Ibeta has also been shown to associate with transcription factors, including nuclear receptors, to regulate their activities. To identify novel interactors of TAF-Ibeta, we employed a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified a previously uncharacterized human protein called thanatos-associated protein-7 (THAP7), a member of a large family of THAP domain-containing putative DNA-binding proteins. In this study we demonstrate that THAP7 associates with TAF-Ibeta in vitro and map their association domains to a C-terminal predicted coiled-coil motif on THAP7 and the central region of TAF-Ibeta. Similarly, stably transfected THAP7 associates with endogenous TAF-Ibeta in intact cells. Like TAF-Ibeta, THAP7 associates with histone H3 and histone H4 and inhibits histone acetylation. The histone-interacting domain of THAP7 is sufficient for this activity in vitro. Promoter-targeted THAP7 can also recruit TAF-Ibeta and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid receptors/nuclear hormone receptor corepressor (NCoR) proteins to promoters, and knockdown of TAF-Ibeta by small interfering RNA relieves THAP7-mediated repression, indicating that, like nuclear hormone receptors, THAP7 may represent a novel class of transcription factor that uses TAF-Ibeta as a corepressor to maintain histones in a hypoacetylated, repressed state. PMID:16195249

  13. Integrin-associated protein: a 50-kD plasma membrane antigen physically and functionally associated with integrins

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Phagocytosis by monocytes or neutrophils can be enhanced by interaction with several proteins or synthetic peptides containing the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence. Recently we showed that an mAb, B6H12, specifically inhibited this enhancement of neutrophil phagocytosis by inhibiting Arg-Gly-Asp binding to the leukocyte response integrin (Gresham, H. D., J. L. Goodwin, P. M. Allen, D. C. Anderson, and E. J. Brown. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:1935-1943). Now, we have purified the antigen recognized by B6H12 to homogeneity. Surprisingly, it is a 50-kD molecule that is expressed on the plasma membranes of all hematopoietic cells, including erythrocytes, which express no known integrins. On platelets and placenta, but not on erythrocytes, this protein is associated with an integrin that can be recognized by an anti-beta 3 antibody. In addition, both the anti-beta 3 and several mAbs recognizing the 50-kD protein inhibit Arg-Gly-Asp stimulation of phagocytosis. These data demonstrate an association between integrins and the 50-kD protein on several cell types. For this reason, we call it Integrin-associated Protein (IAP). We hypothesize that IAP may play a role in signal transduction for enhanced phagocytosis by Arg-Gly-Asp ligands. PMID:2277087

  14. Analysis of disease-associated protein expression using quantitative proteomics—fibulin-5 is expressed in association with hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bracht, Thilo; Schweinsberg, Vincent; Trippler, Martin; Kohl, Michael; Ahrens, Maike; Padden, Juliet; Naboulsi, Wael; Barkovits, Katalin; Megger, Dominik A; Eisenacher, Martin; Borchers, Christoph H; Schlaak, Jörg F; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius; Weber, Frank; Baba, Hideo A; Meyer, Helmut E; Sitek, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis are major health problems worldwide. Until now, highly invasive biopsy remains the diagnostic gold standard despite many disadvantages. To develop noninvasive diagnostic assays for the assessment of liver fibrosis, it is urgently necessary to identify molecules that are robustly expressed in association with the disease. We analyzed biopsied tissue samples from 95 patients with HBV/HCV-associated hepatic fibrosis using three different quantification methods. We performed a label-free proteomics discovery study to identify novel disease-associated proteins using a subset of the cohort (n = 27). Subsequently, gene expression data from all available clinical samples were analyzed (n = 77). Finally, we performed a targeted proteomics approach, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), to verify the disease-associated expression in samples independent from the discovery approach (n = 68). We identified fibulin-5 (FBLN5) as a novel protein expressed in relation to hepatic fibrosis. Furthermore, we confirmed the altered expression of microfibril-associated glycoprotein 4 (MFAP4), lumican (LUM), and collagen alpha-1(XIV) chain (COL14A1) in association to hepatic fibrosis. To our knowledge, no tissue-based quantitative proteomics study for hepatic fibrosis has been performed using a cohort of comparable size. By this means, we add substantial evidence for the disease-related expression of the proteins examined in this study.

  15. Inhibition of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) impairs mitochondrial fission and mitotic catastrophe after x-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamamori, Tohru; Ike, Satoshi; Bo, Tomoki; Sasagawa, Tomoya; Sakai, Yuri; Suzuki, Motofumi; Yamamoto, Kumiko; Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-12-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial dynamics is crucial for the maintenance of cellular quality control and function in response to various stresses. However, the role of mitochondrial dynamics in cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR) is still largely unknown. In this study, we provide evidence that IR triggers mitochondrial fission mediated by the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). We also show IR-induced mitotic catastrophe (MC), which is a type of cell death associated with defective mitosis, and aberrant centrosome amplification in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). These are attenuated by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Drp1. Whereas radiation-induced aberrant centrosome amplification and MC are suppressed by the inhibition of Plk1 and CDK2 in wild-type MEFs, the inhibition of these kinases is ineffective in Drp1-deficient MEFs. Furthermore, the cyclin B1 level after irradiation is significantly higher throughout the time course in Drp1-deficient MEFs than in wild-type MEFs, implying that Drp1 is involved in the regulation of cyclin B1 level. These findings strongly suggest that Drp1 plays an important role in determining the fate of cells after irradiation via the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics.

  16. Inhibition of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) impairs mitochondrial fission and mitotic catastrophe after x-irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamori, Tohru; Ike, Satoshi; Bo, Tomoki; Sasagawa, Tomoya; Sakai, Yuri; Suzuki, Motofumi; Yamamoto, Kumiko; Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial dynamics is crucial for the maintenance of cellular quality control and function in response to various stresses. However, the role of mitochondrial dynamics in cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR) is still largely unknown. In this study, we provide evidence that IR triggers mitochondrial fission mediated by the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). We also show IR-induced mitotic catastrophe (MC), which is a type of cell death associated with defective mitosis, and aberrant centrosome amplification in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). These are attenuated by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Drp1. Whereas radiation-induced aberrant centrosome amplification and MC are suppressed by the inhibition of Plk1 and CDK2 in wild-type MEFs, the inhibition of these kinases is ineffective in Drp1-deficient MEFs. Furthermore, the cyclin B1 level after irradiation is significantly higher throughout the time course in Drp1-deficient MEFs than in wild-type MEFs, implying that Drp1 is involved in the regulation of cyclin B1 level. These findings strongly suggest that Drp1 plays an important role in determining the fate of cells after irradiation via the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:26466676

  17. The Bmi-1 polycomb protein antagonizes the (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate-dependent suppression of skin cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Adhikary, Gautam; Eckert, Richard L

    2010-03-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of gene expression that enhance cell survival. This regulation is achieved via action of two multiprotein PcG complexes--PRC2 (EED) and PRC1 [B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1)]. These complexes modulate gene expression by increasing histone methylation and reducing acetylation--leading to a closed chromatin conformation. Activity of these proteins is associated with increased cell proliferation and survival. We show increased expression of key PcG proteins in immortalized keratinocytes and skin cancer cell lines. We examine the role of two key PcG proteins, Bmi-1 and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), and the impact of the active agent in green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), on the function of these regulators. EGCG treatment of SCC-13 cells reduces Bmi-1 and Ezh2 level and this is associated with reduced cell survival. The reduction in survival is associated with a global reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, a hallmark of PRC2 complex action. This change in PcG protein expression is associated with reduced expression of key proteins that enhance progression through the cell cycle [cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin A and cyclin B1] and increased expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression (p21 and p27). Apoptosis is also enhanced, as evidenced by increased caspase 9, 8 and 3 cleavage and increased poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase cleavage. EGCG treatment also increases Bax and suppresses Bcl-xL expression. Vector-mediated enhanced Bmi-1 expression reverses these EGCG-dependent changes. These findings suggest that green tea polyphenols reduce skin tumor cell survival by influencing PcG-mediated epigenetic regulatory mechanisms.

  18. Systematic Analysis of Endometrial Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins Based on Text Mining

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huiqiao; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to systematically characterize the expression of endometrial cancer- (EC-) associated genes and to analysis the functions, pathways, and networks of EC-associated hub proteins. Methods. Gene data for EC were extracted from the PubMed (MEDLINE) database using text mining based on NLP. PPI networks and pathways were integrated and obtained from the KEGG and other databases. Proteins that interacted with at least 10 other proteins were identified as the hub proteins of the EC-related genes network. Results. A total of 489 genes were identified as EC-related with P < 0.05, and 32 pathways were identified as significant (P < 0.05, FDR < 0.05). A network of EC-related proteins that included 271 interactions was constructed. The 17 proteins that interact with 10 or more other proteins (P < 0.05, FDR < 0.05) were identified as the hub proteins of this PPI network of EC-related genes. These 17 proteins are EGFR, MET, PDGFRB, CCND1, JUN, FGFR2, MYC, PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PIK3R2, KRAS, MAPK3, CTNNB1, RELA, JAK2, AKT1, and AKT2. Conclusion. Our data may help to reveal the molecular mechanisms of EC development and provide implications for targeted therapy for EC. However, corrections between certain proteins and EC continue to require additional exploration. PMID:26366417

  19. A proteomic study reveals the diversified distribution of plasma membrane-associated proteins in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuanwen; Cao, Jia; Jin, Qihui; Xie, Chunliang; He, Quanyuan; Cao, Rui; Xiong, Jixian; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xianchun; Liang, Songping

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the heterogeneous protein composition of highly polarized hepatocyte plasma membrane (PM), three PM-associated subfractions were obtained from freshly isolated rat hepatocytes using density gradient centrifugation. The origins of the three subfractions were determined by morphological analysis and western blotting. The proteins were subjected to either one-dimensional (1-D) SDS-PAGE or two-dimensional (2-D) benzyldimethyl-n-hexadecylammonium chloride (BAC)/SDS-PAGE before nano-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization--tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-ESI-MS/MS). A total of 613 non-redundant proteins were identified, among which 371 (60.5%) proteins were classified as PM or membrane-associated proteins according to GO annotations and the literatures and 32.4% had transmembrane domains. PM proteins from microsomal portion possessed the highest percentage of transmembrane domain, about 46.5% of them containing at least one transmembrane domain. In addition to proteins known to be located at polarized liver PM regions, such as asialoglycoprotein receptor 2, desmoplakin and bile salt export pump, several proteins which had the potential to become novel subfraction-specific proteins were also identified, such as annexin a6, pannexin and radixin. Our analysis also evaluated the application of 1-D SDS-PAGE and 2-D 16-BAC/SDS-PAGE on the separation of integral membrane proteins.

  20. Comparative proteomics analysis of oral cancer cell lines: identification of cancer associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A limiting factor in performing proteomics analysis on cancerous cells is the difficulty in obtaining sufficient amounts of starting material. Cell lines can be used as a simplified model system for studying changes that accompany tumorigenesis. This study used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) to compare the whole cell proteome of oral cancer cell lines vs normal cells in an attempt to identify cancer associated proteins. Results Three primary cell cultures of normal cells with a limited lifespan without hTERT immortalization have been successfully established. 2DE was used to compare the whole cell proteome of these cells with that of three oral cancer cell lines. Twenty four protein spots were found to have changed in abundance. MALDI TOF/TOF was then used to determine the identity of these proteins. Identified proteins were classified into seven functional categories – structural proteins, enzymes, regulatory proteins, chaperones and others. IPA core analysis predicted that 18 proteins were related to cancer with involvements in hyperplasia, metastasis, invasion, growth and tumorigenesis. The mRNA expressions of two proteins – 14-3-3 protein sigma and Stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1 – were found to correlate with the corresponding proteins’ abundance. Conclusions The outcome of this analysis demonstrated that a comparative study of whole cell proteome of cancer versus normal cell lines can be used to identify cancer associated proteins. PMID:24422745

  1. Genetic variation in heat shock protein 70 is associated with septic shock: narrowing the association to a specific haplotype.

    PubMed

    Kee, C; Cheong, K Y; Pham, K; Waterer, G W; Temple, S E L

    2008-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) plays a major role in immune responses. Polymorphisms within the gene have been associated with development of septic shock. This study refines the region of the HSP70 gene associated with development of septic shock and confirms its functionality. Subjects (n = 31) were grouped into one of three haplotypes based on their HSPA1B-179C>T and HSPA1B1267A>G genotypes. Mononuclear cells from these subjects were stimulated with heat-killed bacteria (10(7 )colony-forming units/mL Escherichia coli or Streptococcus pneumoniae) for 8 and 21 h. HSP70 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA and protein levels were measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and ELISA, respectively. The HSPA1B-179*C:1267*A haplotype was associated with significantly lower levels of HSPA1B mRNA and protein and higher production of TNF mRNA and protein compared to the other haplotypes. Induction of HSP70 was TNF independent. These results suggest that the HSPA1B-179C>T:1267A>G haplotype is functional and may explain the association of the HSP70 gene with development of septic shock.

  2. G-protein from Medicago sativa: functional association to photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Muschietti, J P; Martinetto, H E; Coso, O A; Farber, M D; Torres, H N; Flawia, M M

    1993-01-01

    G-protein subunits were characterized from Medicago sativa (alfalfa) seedlings. Crude membranes and GTP-Sepharose-purified fractions were electrophoresed on SDS/polyacrylamide gels and analysed by Western blotting with 9193 (anti-alpha common) and AS/7 (anti-alpha t, anti-alpha i1 and anti-alpha i2) polyclonal antibodies. These procedures led to the identification of a specific polypeptide band of about 43 kDa. Another polypeptide reacting with the SW/1 (anti-beta) antibody, of about 37 kDa, was also detected. The 43 kDa polypeptide bound specifically [alpha-32P]GTP by a photoaffinity reaction and was ADP-ribosylated by activated cholera toxin, but not by pertussis toxin. Irradiation of etiolated Medicago sativa protoplast preparations at 660 nm for 1 min produced a maximal increase in the guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[35S])-binding rate. After this period of irradiation, the binding rate tended to decrease. The effect of a red-light (660 nm) pulse on the binding rate was reversed when it was immediately followed by a period of far-red (> 730 nm) illumination. These results may suggest that activation of GTP[S]-binding rate was a consequence of conversion of phytochrome Pr into the Ptr form. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8484719

  3. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  4. Human MHC class I antigens are associated with a 90-kDa cell surface protein.

    PubMed

    Ferm, M T; Grönberg, A

    1991-08-01

    Human MHC class I proteins are expressed on almost all nucleated cells as a heavy chain (about 45 kDa) non-covalently associated with beta 2-microglobulin (12 kDa). In this report we show that MHC class I (MHC-I) proteins can also be associated with a 90-kDa protein in the cell membrane. Surface-radiolabelled cells were treated with dithiobis succinimidyl propionate (DSP) in order to preserve multimer protein complexes during cell lysis. The lysates were immunoprecipitated and analysed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Immunoprecipitation of human MHC-I proteins co-precipitated another protein of about 90 kDa in molecular weight-p90. p90 was coprecipitated from all the MHC-I expressing cells tested: U937, Raji, Molt-4 and IFN-gamma treated K562, but not from untreated, MHC-I negative K562. A 90-kDa protein was also co-precipitated with MHC-I from fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Furthermore, p90 was coprecipitated by different MoAbs to the MHC-I heavy chain or beta 2-microglobulin, but not by control antibodies. Two additional co-precipitating proteins at 34 kDa and 28 kDa were seen in MHC-I precipitates from Raji cells. Our results suggest that MHC-I proteins and the 90-kDa protein are associated in the cell membrane, probably by a close but weak, non-covalent interaction. Two additional cell surface proteins at 34 kDa and 28 kDa seem to be MHC-I associated on Raji Burkitt's lymphoma cells.

  5. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1 ×, DE3 ×, ME3 ×, NEL3 ×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P = 0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P = 0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P = 0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st

  6. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-15

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1×, DE3×, ME3×, NEL3×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P=0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P=0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P=0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P=0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P=0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P=0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P=0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P=0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P=0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st and 2nd amide groups (P

  7. Identification of Tetrahymena 14-nm filament-associated protein as elongation factor 1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Kurasawa, Y; Numata, O; Katoh, M; Hirano, H; Chiba, J; Watanabe, Y

    1992-11-01

    Tetrahymena 14-nm filament-forming protein has dual functions as a citrate synthase in mitochondria and as a cytoskeletal protein involved in oral morphogenesis and in pronuclear behavior during conjugation. By immunoblotting using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies following two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we demonstrated that the 14-nm filament protein fraction contained two 49-kDa proteins whose isoelectric points were 8.0 and 9.0; a monoclonal antibody (MAb) 26B4 and a polyclonal antibody 49KI reacted only to a pI 8.0 protein, while two other MAbs, 11B6 and 11B8, reacted only to a pI 9.0 protein. From the N-terminal amino acid sequences, the pI 8.0 protein was identified as the previously reported 14-nm filament-forming protein/citrate synthase, but the pI 9.0 protein N-terminal sequence had no similarity with that of the pI 8.0 protein. The pI 9.0 protein is considered to be a 14-nm filament-associated protein since the pI 9.0 protein copurifies with the pI 8.0 protein during two cycles of an assembly and disassembly purification protocol. Cloning and sequencing the pI 9.0 protein gene from a Tetrahymena pyriformis cDNA library, we identified the pI 9.0 protein as elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) based on it sharing 73-76% sequence identity with EF-1 alpha from several species. PMID:1385189

  8. Intersectin adaptor proteins are associated with actin-regulating protein WIP in invadopodia.

    PubMed

    Gryaznova, Tetyana; Kropyvko, Sergii; Burdyniuk, Mariia; Gubar, Olga; Kryklyva, Valentyna; Tsyba, Liudmyla; Rynditch, Alla

    2015-07-01

    Invasive cancer cells form actin-rich membrane protrusions called invadopodia that degrade extracellular matrix and facilitate cell invasion and metastasis. WIP (WASP-interacting protein) together with N-WASP (neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) are localized in invadopodia and play a crucial role in their formation. Here we show that WIP interacts with endocytic adaptor proteins of the intersectin (ITSN) family, ITSN1 and ITSN2. The interaction is mediated by the SH3 domains of ITSNs and the middle part of the WIP proline-rich motifs. We have also demonstrated that ITSN1, WIP and N-WASP can form a complex in cells. Endogenous ITSN1 and ITSN2 are located in invasive protrusions of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Moreover, data from immunofluorescent analysis revealed co-localization of ITSN1 and WIP at sites of invadopodia formation and in clathrin-coated pits. Together, these findings provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of invadopodia formation and identify ITSNs as scaffold proteins involved in this process.

  9. Huntington’s Disease Protein Huntingtin Associates with its own mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Brady P.; DeClercq, Josh; Dolgalev, Igor; Yu, Man Shan; Ma, Bin; Heguy, Adriana; Tanese, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Huntington’s disease (HD) protein huntingtin (Htt) plays a role in multiple cellular pathways. Deregulation of one or more of these pathways by the mutant Htt protein has been suggested to contribute to the disease pathogenesis. Our recent discovery-based proteomics studies have uncovered RNA binding proteins and translation factors associated with the endogenous Htt protein purified from mouse brains, suggesting a potential new role for Htt in RNA transport and translation. Objective: To investigate how Htt might affect RNA metabolism we set out to purify and analyze RNA associated with Htt. Methods: RNA was extracted from immunopurified Htt-containing protein complexes and analyzed by microarrays and RNA-Seq. Results: Surprisingly, the most enriched mRNA that co-purified with Htt was Htt mRNA itself. The association of Htt protein and Htt mRNA was detected independent of intact ribosomes suggesting that it is not an RNA undergoing translation. Furthermore, we identified the recently reported mis-spliced Htt mRNA encoding a truncated protein comprised of exon 1 and a portion of the downstream intron in the immunoprecipitates containing mutant Htt protein. We show that Htt protein co-localizes with Htt mRNA and that wild-type Htt reduces expression of a reporter construct harboring the Htt 3’ UTR. Conclusions: HD protein is found in a complex with its own mRNA and RNA binding proteins and translation factors. Htt may be involved in modulating its expression through post-transcriptional pathways. It is possible that Htt shares mechanistic properties similar to RNA binding proteins such as TDP-43 and FUS implicated in other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26891106

  10. DnaJ/Hsc70 chaperone complexes control the extracellular release of neurodegenerative-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Sarah N; Zheng, Dali; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Martin, Mackenzie D; Chaput, Dale; Darling, April; Trotter, Justin H; Stothert, Andrew R; Nordhues, Bryce A; Lussier, April; Baker, Jeremy; Shelton, Lindsey; Kahn, Mahnoor; Blair, Laura J; Stevens, Stanley M; Dickey, Chad A

    2016-07-15

    It is now known that proteins associated with neurodegenerative disease can spread throughout the brain in a prionlike manner. However, the mechanisms regulating the trans-synaptic spread propagation, including the neuronal release of these proteins, remain unknown. The interaction of neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins with the molecular chaperone Hsc70 is well known, and we hypothesized that much like disaggregation, refolding, degradation, and even normal function, Hsc70 may dictate the extracellular fate of these proteins. Here, we show that several proteins, including TDP-43, α-synuclein, and the microtubule-associated protein tau, can be driven out of the cell by an Hsc70 co-chaperone, DnaJC5. In fact, DnaJC5 overexpression induced tau release in cells, neurons, and brain tissue, but only when activity of the chaperone Hsc70 was intact and when tau was able to associate with this chaperone. Moreover, release of tau from neurons was reduced in mice lacking the DnaJC5 gene and when the complement of DnaJs in the cell was altered. These results demonstrate that the dynamics of DnaJ/Hsc70 complexes are critically involved in the release of neurodegenerative disease proteins. PMID:27261198

  11. Prediction of nanoparticles-cell association based on corona proteins and physicochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Jiang, Wen; Walkey, Carl D.; Chan, Warren C. W.; Cohen, Yoram

    2015-05-01

    Cellular association of nanoparticles (NPs) in biological fluids is affected by proteins adsorbed onto the NP surface, forming a ``protein corona'', thereby impacting cellular bioactivity. Here we investigate, based on an extensive gold NPs protein corona dataset, the relationships between NP-cell association and protein corona fingerprints (PCFs) as well as NP physicochemical properties. Accordingly, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed based on both linear and non-linear support vector regression (SVR) models making use of a sequential forward floating selection of descriptors. The SVR model with only 6 serum proteins and zeta potential had higher accuracy (R2 = 0.895) relative to the linear model (R2 = 0.850) with 11 PCFs. Considering the initial pool of 148 descriptors, the APOB, A1AT, ANT3, and PLMN serum proteins along with NP zeta potential were identified as most significant to correlating NP-cell association. The present study suggests that QSARs exploration of NP-cell association data, considering the role of both NP protein corona and physicochemical properties, can support the planning and interpretation of toxicity studies and guide the design of NPs for biomedical applications.

  12. Prediction of nanoparticles-cell association based on corona proteins and physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Jiang, Wen; Walkey, Carl D; Chan, Warren C W; Cohen, Yoram

    2015-06-01

    Cellular association of nanoparticles (NPs) in biological fluids is affected by proteins adsorbed onto the NP surface, forming a "protein corona", thereby impacting cellular bioactivity. Here we investigate, based on an extensive gold NPs protein corona dataset, the relationships between NP-cell association and protein corona fingerprints (PCFs) as well as NP physicochemical properties. Accordingly, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed based on both linear and non-linear support vector regression (SVR) models making use of a sequential forward floating selection of descriptors. The SVR model with only 6 serum proteins and zeta potential had higher accuracy (R(2) = 0.895) relative to the linear model (R(2) = 0.850) with 11 PCFs. Considering the initial pool of 148 descriptors, the APOB, A1AT, ANT3, and PLMN serum proteins along with NP zeta potential were identified as most significant to correlating NP-cell association. The present study suggests that QSARs exploration of NP-cell association data, considering the role of both NP protein corona and physicochemical properties, can support the planning and interpretation of toxicity studies and guide the design of NPs for biomedical applications.

  13. Dietary protein intake is associated with lean body mass in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Geirsdottir, Olof G; Arnarson, Atli; Ramel, Alfons; Jonsson, Palmi V; Thorsdottir, Inga

    2013-08-01

    Lean body mass (LBM) is important to maintain physical function during aging. We hypothesized that dietary protein intake and leisure-time physical activity are associated with LBM in community-dwelling older adults. To test the hypothesis, participants (n = 237; age, 65-92 years) did 3-day weighed food records and reported physical activity. Body composition was assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Protein intake was 0.98 ± 0.28 and 0.95 ± 0.29 g/kg body weight in male and female participants, respectively. Protein intake (in grams per kilogram of body weight) was associated with LBM (in kilograms); that is, the differences in LBM were 2.3 kg (P < .05) and 2.0 kg (P = .054) between the fourth vs the first and the fourth vs the second quartiles of protein intake, respectively. Only a minor part of this association was explained by increased energy intake, which follows an increased protein intake. Our study shows that dietary protein intake was positively associated with LBM in older adults with a mean protein intake higher than the current recommended daily allowance of 0.8 g/kg per day. Leisure-time physical activity, predominantly consisting of endurance type exercises, was not related to LBM in this group.

  14. A review on protein-protein interaction network of APE1/Ref-1 and its associated biological functions.

    PubMed

    Thakur, S; Dhiman, M; Tell, G; Mantha, A K

    2015-04-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a classic example of functionally variable protein. Besides its well-known role in (i) DNA repair of oxidative base damage, APE1 also plays a critical role in (ii) redox regulation of transcription factors controlling gene expression for cell survival pathways, for which it is also known as redox effector factor 1 (Ref-1), and recent evidences advocates for (iii) coordinated control of other non-canonical protein-protein interaction(s) responsible for significant biological functions in mammalian cells. The diverse functions of APE1 can be ascribed to its ability to interact with different protein partners, owing to the attainment of unfolded domains during evolution. Association of dysregulation of APE1 with various human pathologies, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases and neurodegeneration, is attributable to its multifunctional nature, and this makes APE1 a potential therapeutic target. This review covers the important aspects of APE1 in terms of its significant protein-protein interaction(s), and this knowledge is required to understand the onset and development of human pathologies and to design or improve the strategies to target such interactions for treatment and management of various human diseases.

  15. Synthesis and secretion of proteins by perifused caput epididymal tubules, and association of secreted proteins with spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Klinefelter, G.R.; Hamilton, D.W.

    1985-11-01

    We have used perifusion organ culture of proximal and distal caput epididymal tubules of the rat to study the secretion of proteins by epididymal epithelium and uptake of the luminal radioactive proteins by sperm. The amount of incorporation of L-(35S)methionine into luminal fluid proteins was time dependent and completely inhibited by cycloheximide. The association of labeled proteins with cultured sperm was also dependent on time and continuous, with sperm still acquiring labeled luminal proteins after protein synthesis was arrested. A Mr = 46,000 molecule was found to be heavily labeled in luminal fluid and sperm extracts. Fluorograms of all L-(35S)methionine extracts immunoprecipitated using an antiepididymal alpha-lactalbumin antibody (Klinefelter and Hamilton, 1984) showed labeling of an Mr = 18,000 molecule and, in addition, the Mr = 46,000 molecule, but immunostaining was specific only for the Mr = 18,000 molecule and the heavy chain of the immunoglobulin. We suggest that the Mr = 46,000 molecule may be galactosyltransferase. Galactose oxidase-NaB(3H)4 labeling of the cultured caput sperm cell surface revealed a Mr = 23,000 molecule that was able to be immunoprecipitated with antiepididymal alpha-lactalbumin antibody. Our data suggest that this cell surface molecule is similar to one component of the fluid epididymal alpha-lactalbumin-like complex and, in addition, show that glycosylation of the sperm surface can occur in the caput epididymidis.

  16. Identification of a new class of lipid droplet-associated proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; James, Christopher N; Gidda, Satinder K; Kilaru, Aruna; Dyer, John M; Mullen, Robert T; Ohlrogge, John B; Chapman, Kent D

    2013-08-01

    Lipid droplets in plants (also known as oil bodies, lipid bodies, or oleosomes) are well characterized in seeds, and oleosins, the major proteins associated with their surface, were shown to be important for stabilizing lipid droplets during seed desiccation and rehydration. However, lipid droplets occur in essentially all plant cell types, many of which may not require oleosin-mediated stabilization. The proteins associated with the surface of nonseed lipid droplets, which are likely to influence the formation, stability, and turnover of this compartment, remain to be elucidated. Here, we have combined lipidomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies of avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp to identify two new lipid droplet-associated proteins, which we named LDAP1 and LDAP2. These proteins are highly similar to each other and also to the small rubber particle proteins that accumulate in rubber-producing plants. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog to LDAP1 and LDAP2, At3g05500, was localized to the surface of lipid droplets after transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells that were induced to accumulate triacylglycerols. We propose that small rubber particle protein-like proteins are involved in the general process of binding and perhaps the stabilization of lipid-rich particles in the cytosol of plant cells and that the avocado and Arabidopsis protein members reveal a new aspect of the cellular machinery that is involved in the packaging of triacylglycerols in plant tissues. PMID:23821652

  17. Identification of a new class of lipid droplet-associated proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; James, Christopher N; Gidda, Satinder K; Kilaru, Aruna; Dyer, John M; Mullen, Robert T; Ohlrogge, John B; Chapman, Kent D

    2013-08-01

    Lipid droplets in plants (also known as oil bodies, lipid bodies, or oleosomes) are well characterized in seeds, and oleosins, the major proteins associated with their surface, were shown to be important for stabilizing lipid droplets during seed desiccation and rehydration. However, lipid droplets occur in essentially all plant cell types, many of which may not require oleosin-mediated stabilization. The proteins associated with the surface of nonseed lipid droplets, which are likely to influence the formation, stability, and turnover of this compartment, remain to be elucidated. Here, we have combined lipidomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies of avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp to identify two new lipid droplet-associated proteins, which we named LDAP1 and LDAP2. These proteins are highly similar to each other and also to the small rubber particle proteins that accumulate in rubber-producing plants. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog to LDAP1 and LDAP2, At3g05500, was localized to the surface of lipid droplets after transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells that were induced to accumulate triacylglycerols. We propose that small rubber particle protein-like proteins are involved in the general process of binding and perhaps the stabilization of lipid-rich particles in the cytosol of plant cells and that the avocado and Arabidopsis protein members reveal a new aspect of the cellular machinery that is involved in the packaging of triacylglycerols in plant tissues.

  18. Human fallopian tube proteome shows high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenyuan; Liu, Yang; Chang, Cheng; Wu, Songfeng; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Yingjie; Zhong, Fan; Deng, Gaopi

    2016-01-01

    The object of this research was to report a draft proteome of human fallopian tube (hFT) comprises 5416 identified proteins, which could be considered as a physiological reference to complement Human Proteome Draft. The proteomic raw data and metadata were stored in an integrated proteome resources centre iProX (IPX00034300). This hFT proteome contains many hFT markers newly identified by mass spectrum. This hFT proteome comprises 660 high-, 3605 medium- and 1181 low-abundant proteins. Ribosome, cytoskeleton, vesicle and protein folding associated proteins showed obvious tendency to be higher abundance in hFT. The extraordinary high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-associated proteins were identified in this hFT proteome, which highly supported that hFT should contain a plenty of MSCs. PMID:26759384

  19. Microtubule-associated protein tau epitopes are present in fiber lesions in diverse muscle disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Lübke, U.; Six, J.; Villanova, M.; Boons, J.; Vandermeeren, M.; Ceuterick, C.; Cras, P.; Martin, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau is a major cytoskeletal protein involved in the neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer's disease. Although tau is predominantly a neuronal protein, it has been demonstrated in glia and other nonneuronal cells. We describe the presence of microtubule-associated protein tau epitopes in various muscle fiber lesions in oculopharyngeal and Becker muscular dystrophy, dermatomyositis, central core disease, neurogenic atrophy, and in the recovery phase of an attack of malignant hyperthermia. Western blot demonstrated a 100- to 110-kd tau-immunoreactive protein probably corresponding to 'big tau' as described in peripheral nerves. Tau immunoreactivity in muscle fiber lesions usually co-localized with tubulin, although electron microscopy failed to show an increase in microtubules. Tau and tubulin reactivity also correlated with the presence of desmin and vimentin epitopes. Possible explanations for the presence of tau are briefly discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7518193

  20. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  1. The Parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1/Park7 prevents glycation damage in human keratinocyte.

    PubMed

    Advedissian, Tamara; Deshayes, Frédérique; Poirier, Françoise; Viguier, Mireille; Richarme, Gilbert

    2016-04-22

    Reducing sugars and dicarbonyls form covalent adducts with proteins through a nonenzymatic process known as glycation, which inactivates proteins, is increased in diabetic patients and is associated with diabetic complications, including retinopathy, cataracts, nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiomyopathy and skin defects. We recently characterized DJ-1/Park7 as a protein deglycase that repairs proteins from glycation by glyoxal and methylglyoxal, two major glycating agents which are responsible for up to 65% of glycation events. In this study, we investigated the ability of DJ-1 to prevent protein glycation in keratinocytes. Glycation of collagen and keratinocyte proteins was tested by measuring ultraviolet absorption and fluorescence emission. Protein glycation in HaCaT keratinocytes was investigated by immunodetection with anti-advanced glycation endproduct antibodies, after DJ-1 depletion or overexpression. In vitro, DJ-1 prevented glycation of collagen and keratinocyte protein extracts. In cell culture, DJ-1 depletion by small interfering RNAs resulted in a 3-fold increase in protein glycation levels. Moreover, protein glycation levels were decreased several-fold in cells overexpressing DJ-1 after addition of the Nrf2 inducer sulforaphane or after transfection with a DJ-1 plasmid. Thus, the DJ-1 deglycase plays a major role in preventing protein glycation in eukaryotic cells and might be important for preventing skin glycation. PMID:26995087

  2. Identification of lncRNA functions in lung cancer based on associated protein-protein interaction modules

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chih-Hsun; Hsu, Chia-Lang; Lu, Pei-Chun; Lin, Wen-Chang; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been found to play important roles in various biological processes; however, many of their functions remain unclear. In this study, we present a novel approach to identify the lncRNA-associated protein-protein interaction (PPI) modules and ascertain their functions in human lung squamous cell carcinoma. We collected lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles of lung squamous cell carcinoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas. To identify the lncRNA-associated PPI modules, lncRNA-mRNA co-expression networks were first constructed based on the mutual ranks of expression correlations. Next, we examined whether the co-expressed mRNAs of a specific lncRNA were closely connected by PPIs. For this, a significantly connected mRNA set was considered to be the lncRNA-associated PPI module. Finally, the prospective functions of a lncRNA was inferred using Gene Ontology enrichment analysis on the associated module. We found that lncRNA-associated PPI modules were subtype-dependent and each subtype had unique molecular mechanisms. In addition, antisense lncRNAs and sense genes tended to be functionally associated. Our results might provide new directions for understanding lncRNA regulations in lung cancer. The analysis pipeline was implemented in a web tool, available at http://lncin.ym.edu.tw/. PMID:27786280

  3. Conformational modulation mediated by polyglutamine expansion in CAG repeat expansion disease-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Verani, Margherita; Bustamante, Maria; Martufi, Paola; Daldin, Manuel; Cariulo, Cristina; Azzollini, Lucia; Fodale, Valentina; Puglisi, Francesca; Weiss, Andreas; Macdonald, Douglas; Petricca, Lara; Caricasole, Andrea

    2016-09-16

    We have previously reported TR-FRET based immunoassays to detect a conformational change imparted on huntingtin protein by the polyglutamine expansion, which we confirmed using biophysical methodologies. Using these immunoassays, we now report that polyglutamine expansion influences the conformational properties of other polyglutamine disease proteins, exemplified by the androgen receptor (associated with spinal bulbar muscular atrophy) and TATA binding protein (associated with spinocerebellar ataxia 17). Using artificial constructs bearing short or long polyglutamine expansions or a multimerized, unrelated epitope (mimicking the increase in anti-polyglutamine antibody epitopes present in polyglutamine repeats of increasing length) we confirmed that the conformational TR-FRET based immunoassay detects an intrinsic conformational property of polyglutamine repeats. The TR-FRET based conformational immunoassay may represent a rapid, scalable tool to identify modulators of polyglutamine-mediated conformational change in different proteins associated with CAG triplet repeat disorders. PMID:27520369

  4. Emerging roles for centromere-associated proteins in DNA repair and genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2013-12-01

    Centromere proteins CENP-S and CENP-X are members of the constitutive centromere-associated network, which is a conserved group of proteins that are needed for the assembly and function of kinetochores at centromeres. Intriguingly CENP-S and CENP-X have alter egos going by the names of MHF1 (FANCM-associated histone-fold protein 1) and MHF2 respectively. In this guise they function with a DNA translocase called FANCM (Fanconi's anemia complementation group M) to promote DNA repair and homologous recombination. In the present review we discuss current knowledge of the biological roles of CENP-S and CENP-X and how their dual existence may be a common feature of CCAN (constitutive centromere-associated network) proteins.

  5. Protein profiles associated with context fear conditioning and their modulation by memantine.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Md Mahiuddin; Dhanasekaran, A Ranjitha; Block, Aaron; Tong, Suhong; Costa, Alberto C S; Gardiner, Katheleen J

    2014-04-01

    Analysis of the molecular basis of learning and memory has revealed details of the roles played by many genes and the proteins they encode. Because most individual studies focus on a small number of proteins, many complexities of the relationships among proteins and their dynamic responses to stimulation are not known. We have used the technique of reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) to assess the levels of more than 80 proteins/protein modifications in subcellular fractions from hippocampus and cortex of mice trained in Context Fear Conditioning (CFC). Proteins include components of signaling pathways, several encoded by immediate early genes or involved in apoptosis and inflammation, and subunits of glutamate receptors. At one hour after training, levels of more than half the proteins had changed in one or more fractions, among them multiple components of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAPK, and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin, MTOR, pathways, subunits of glutamate receptors, and the NOTCH pathway modulator, NUMB homolog (Drosophila). Levels of 37 proteins changed in the nuclear fraction of hippocampus alone. Abnormalities in levels of thirteen proteins analyzed have been reported in brains of patients with Alzheimer's Disease. We therefore further investigated the protein profiles of mice treated with memantine, a drug approved for treatment of AD. In hippocampus, memantine alone induced many changes similar to those seen after CFC and altered the levels of seven proteins associated with Alzheimer's Disease abnormalities. Lastly, to further explore the relevance of these datasets, we superimposed responses to CFC and memantine onto components of the long term potentiation pathway, a process subserving learning and memory formation. Fourteen components of the long term potentiation pathway and 26 proteins interacting with components responded to CFC and/or memantine. Together, these datasets provide a novel view of the diversity and complexity in protein

  6. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins influences subunit association and translation of poly (U) in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Mikulík, Karel; Bobek, Jan; Ziková, Alice; Smětáková, Magdalena; Bezoušková, Silvie

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of phosphorylated proteins in ribosomes of Streptomyces coelicolor was investigated. Little is known about which biological functions these posttranslational modifications might fulfil. A protein kinase associated with ribosomes phosphorylated six ribosomal proteins of the small subunit (S3, S4, S12, S13, S14 and S18) and seven ribosomal proteins of the large subunit (L2, L3, L7/L12, L16, L17, L23 and L27). The ribosomal proteins were phosphorylated mainly on the Ser/Thr residues. Phosphorylation of the ribosomal proteins influences ribosomal subunits association. Ribosomes with phosphorylated proteins were used to examine poly (U) translation activity. Phosphorylation induced about 50% decrease in polyphenylalanine synthesis. After preincubation of ribosomes with alkaline phosphatase the activity of ribosomes was greatly restored. Small differences were observed between phosphorylated and unphosphorylated ribosomes in the kinetic parameters of the binding of Phe-tRNA to the A-site of poly (U) programmed ribosomes, suggesting that the initial binding of Phe-tRNA is not significantly affected by phosphorylation. On contrary, the rate of peptidyl transferase was about two-fold lower than that in unphosphorylated ribosomes. The data presented demonstrate that phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins affects critical steps of protein synthesis.

  7. CARDIO-PRED: an in silico tool for predicting cardiovascular-disorder associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prerna; Thukral, Nitin; Gahlot, Lokesh Kumar; Hasija, Yasha

    2015-06-01

    Interactions between proteins largely govern cellular processes and this has led to numerous efforts culminating in enormous information related to the proteins, their interactions and the function which is determined by their interactions. The main concern of the present study is to present interface analysis of cardiovascular-disorder (CVD) related proteins to shed lights on details of interactions and to emphasize the importance of using structures in network studies. This study combines the network-centred approach with three dimensional studies to comprehend the fundamentals of biology. Interface properties were used as descriptors to classify the CVD associated proteins and non-CVD associated proteins. Machine learning algorithm was used to generate a classifier based on the training set which was then used to predict potential CVD related proteins from a set of polymorphic proteins which are not known to be involved in any disease. Among several classifying algorithms applied to generate models, best performance was achieved using Random Forest with an accuracy of 69.5 %. The tool named CARDIO-PRED, based on the prediction model is present at http://www.genomeinformatics.dce.edu/CARDIO-PRED/. The predicted CVD related proteins may not be the causing factor of particular disease but can be involved in pathways and reactions yet unknown to us thus permitting a more rational analysis of disease mechanism. Study of their interactions with other proteins can significantly improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of diseases.

  8. Protein kinase C phosphorylates a recently identified membrane skeleton-associated calmodulin-binding protein in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ling, E; Gardner, K; Bennett, V

    1986-10-25

    A membrane skeleton-associated protein with calmodulin-binding activity recently has been purified and characterized from human erythrocytes (Gardner, K. and Bennett, V. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 1339-1348). This new protein (CaM-BP103/97) has now been identified as a major substrate for protein kinase C in erythrocytes since phosphorylation of both of its subunits (Mr = 103,000 and 97,000) is elevated 3-15-fold in the presence of the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol beta-acetate (TPA), under the following conditions: ghost membranes incubated with protein kinase C purified from rat brain, ghost membranes from erythrocytes pretreated with TPA, and intact erythrocytes metabolically labeled with 32PO4 and stimulated by TPA. The sites of phosphorylation of this protein by exogenous and endogenous protein kinase C are identical since two-dimensional 32P-peptide maps of both subunits labeled by either endogenous or exogenous enzyme are indistinguishable. Each subunit of CaM-BP103/97 accepts up to 3 mol of phosphate/polypeptide chain. In the presence of low calcium concentrations and in the absence of cytosol, the phosphorylation of CaM-BP103/97 is, on a molar basis, equal to or greater than that of proteins 4.1 and 4.9. As a target for both calmodulin and protein kinase C, CaM-BP103/97 is likely to play a key role in the effect of calcium on erythrocyte membrane shape and stability.

  9. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxin serotype a and associated proteins across the intestinal epithelia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most poisonous natural toxins and considered to be a major venue of bioterrorist threat. BoNTs associate with neurotoxin associated proteins (NAPs), forming large complexes. NAPs have been shown to shield the BoNT holotoxin from the harsh environment of ...

  10. Telomerase and telomere-associated proteins: structural insights into mechanism and evolution.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Karen A; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2012-01-11

    Recent advances in our structural understanding of telomerase and telomere-associated proteins have contributed significantly to elucidating the molecular mechanisms of telomere maintenance. The structures of telomerase TERT domains have provided valuable insights into how experimentally identified conserved motifs contribute to the telomerase reverse transcriptase reaction. Additionally, structures of telomere-associated proteins in a variety of organisms have revealed that, across evolution, telomere-maintenance mechanisms employ common structural elements. For example, the single-stranded 3' overhang of telomeric DNA is specifically and tightly bound by an OB-fold in nearly all species, including ciliates (TEBP and Pot1a), fission yeast (SpPot1), budding yeast (Cdc13), and humans (hPOT1). Structures of the yeast Cdc13, Stn1, and Ten1 proteins demonstrated that telomere maintenance is regulated by a complex that bears significant similarity to the RPA heterotrimer. Similarly, proteins that specifically bind double-stranded telomeric DNA in divergent species use homeodomains to execute their functions (human TRF1 and TRF2 and budding yeast ScRap1). Likewise, the conserved protein Rap1, which is found in budding yeast, fission yeast, and humans, contains a structural motif that is known to be critical for protein-protein interaction. In addition to revealing the common underlying themes of telomere maintenance, structures have also elucidated the specific mechanisms by which many of these proteins function, including identifying a telomere-specific domain in Stn1 and how the human TRF proteins avoid heterodimerization. In this review, we summarize the high-resolution structures of telomerase and telomere-associated proteins and discuss the emergent common structural themes among these proteins. We also address how these high-resolution structures complement biochemical and cellular studies to enhance our understanding of telomere maintenance and function.

  11. Depletion of ribosomal protein S19 causes a reduction of rRNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Juli, Giada; Gismondi, Angelo; Monteleone, Valentina; Caldarola, Sara; Iadevaia, Valentina; Aspesi, Anna; Dianzani, Irma; Proud, Christopher G.; Loreni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis plays key roles in cell growth by providing increased capacity for protein synthesis. It requires coordinated production of ribosomal proteins (RP) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA), including the processing of the latter. Here, we show that, the depletion of RPS19 causes a reduction of rRNA synthesis in cell lines of both erythroid and non-erythroid origin. A similar effect is observed upon depletion of RPS6 or RPL11. The deficiency of RPS19 does not alter the stability of rRNA, but instead leads to an inhibition of RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) activity. In fact, results of nuclear run-on assays and ChIP experiments show that association of Pol I with the rRNA gene is reduced in RPS19-depleted cells. The phosphorylation of three known regulators of Pol I, CDK2, AKT and AMPK, is altered during ribosomal stress and could be involved in the observed downregulation. Finally, RNA from patients with Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA), shows, on average, a lower level of 47S precursor. This indicates that inhibition of rRNA synthesis could be one of the molecular alterations at the basis of DBA. PMID:27734913

  12. Heavy metal-associated isoprenylated plant protein (HIPP): characterization of a family of proteins exclusive to plants.

    PubMed

    de Abreu-Neto, João Braga; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia C; de Oliveira, Luiz Felipe Valter; Zanettini, Maria Helena Bodanese; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia

    2013-04-01

    Metallochaperones are key proteins for the safe transport of metallic ions inside the cell. HIPPs (heavy metal-associated isoprenylated plant proteins) are metallochaperones that contain a metal binding domain (HMA) and a C-terminal isoprenylation motif. In this study, we provide evidence that proteins of this family are found only in vascular plants and may be separated into five distinct clusters. HIPPs may be involved in (a) heavy metal homeostasis and detoxification mechanisms, especially those involved in cadmium tolerance, (b) transcriptional responses to cold and drought, and (c) plant-pathogen interactions. In particular, our results show that the rice (Oryza sativa) HIPP OsHIPP41 gene is highly expressed in response to cold and drought stresses, and its product is localized in the cytosol and the nucleus. The results suggest that HIPPs play an important role in the development of vascular plants and in plant responses to environmental changes.

  13. Two Rab proteins, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2) and secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs), are present on immunoisolated parietal cell tubulovesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, B C; Goldenring, J R

    1997-01-01

    The tubulovesicles of gastric parietal cells sequester H+/K+-ATPase molecules within resting parietal cells. Stimulation of parietal cell secretion elicits delivery of intracellular H+/K+-ATPase to the apically oriented secretory canaliculus. Previous investigations have suggested that this process requires the regulated fusion of intracellular tubulovesicles with the canalicular target membrane. We have sought to investigate the presence of critical putative regulators of vesicle fusion on immunoisolated gastric parietal cell tubulovesicles. Highly purified tubulovesicles were prepared by gradient fractionation and immunoisolation on magnetic beads coated with monoclonal antibodies against the alpha subunit of H+/K+-ATPase. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of Rab11, Rab25, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2) and secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) on immunoisolated vesicles. The same cohort of proteins was recovered on vesicles immunoisolated with monoclonal antibodies against SCAMPs and VAMP-2. In contrast, whereas immunoreactivities for syntaxin 1A/1B and synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP-25) were present in gradient-isolated vesicles, none of the immunoreactivity was associated with immunoisolated vesicles. The observation of VAMP-2 and two Rab proteins on immunoisolated H+/K+-ATPase-containing tubulovesicles supports the role for tubulovesicles in a regulated vesicle fusion process. In addition, the presence of SCAMPs along with Rab11 and Rab25 implicates the tubulovesicles as a critical apical recycling vesicle population. PMID:9230141

  14. Protein-energy malnutrition alters hippocampal plasticity-associated protein expression following global ischemia in the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Prosser-Loose, Erin J; Verge, Valerie M K; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2010-11-01

    Previously it has been demonstrated that protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) impairs habituation in the open field test following global ischemia. The present study examined the hypothesis that PEM exerts some of its deleterious effects on functional outcome by altering the post-ischemic expression of the plasticity-associated genes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB), and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Male, Mongolian gerbils (11-12 wk) were randomized to either control diet (12.5% protein) or PEM (2% protein) for 4 wk, and then underwent 5 min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion or sham surgery. Tympanic temperature was maintained at 36.5 ± 0.5°C during surgery. Brains collected at 1, 3 and 7 d post-surgery were processed by in-situ hybridization or immunofluorescence. BDNF and trkB mRNA expression was increased in hippocampal CA1 neurons after ischemia at all time points and was not significantly influenced by diet. However, increased trkB protein expression after ischemia was exacerbated by PEM at 7 d in the CA1 region. Post-ischemic GAP-43 protein increased at 3 and 7 d in the CA1 region, and PEM intensified this response and extended it to the CA3 and hilar regions. PEM exerted these effects without exacerbating CA1 neuron loss caused by global ischemia. The findings suggest that PEM increases the stress response and/or hyper-excitability in the hippocampus after global ischemia. Nutritional care appears to have robust effects on plasticity mechanisms important to recovery after brain ischemia.

  15. Functional Analysis of Keratin-Associated Proteins in Intestinal Epithelia: Heat-Shock Protein Chaperoning and Kinase Rescue.

    PubMed

    Mashukova, Anastasia; Forteza, Radia; Salas, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence from several laboratories points at nonmechanical functions of keratin intermediate filaments (IF), such as control of apoptosis, modulation of signaling, or regulation of innate immunity, among others. While these functions are generally assigned to the ability of IF to scaffold other proteins, direct mechanistic causal relationships between filamentous keratins and the observed effects of keratin knockout or mutations are still missing. We have proposed that the scaffolding of chaperones such as Hsp70/40 may be key to understand some IF nonmechanical functions if unique features or specificity of the chaperoning activity in the IF scaffold can be demonstrated. The same criteria of uniqueness could be applied to other biochemical functions of the IF scaffold. Here, we describe a subcellular fractionation technique based on established methods of keratin purification. The resulting keratin-enriched fraction contains several proteins tightly associated with the IF scaffold, including Hsp70/40 chaperones. Being nondenaturing, this fractionation method enables direct testing of chaperoning and other enzymatic activities associated with IF, as well as supplementation experiments to determine the need for soluble (cytosolic) proteins. This method also permits to analyze inhibitory activity of cytosolic proteins at independently characterized physiological concentrations. When used as complementary approaches to knockout, knockdown, or site-directed mutagenesis, these techniques are expected to shed light on molecular mechanisms involved in the effects of IF loss of function.

  16. Detection of D-aspartate in tau proteins associated with Alzheimer paired helical filaments.

    PubMed

    Kenessey, A; Yen, S H; Liu, W K; Yang, X R; Dunlop, D S

    1995-03-27

    Paired helical filaments (PHF) characteristic of Alzheimer neurofibrillary lesions are known to contain a modified form of microtubule associated protein tau. These proteins, PHF-tau, differ from normal tau in the extent and the site of phosphorylation. To determine whether PHF-tau, tau proteins from normal adult brains (N-tau), tau proteins from Alzheimer brains not associated with PHF (A-tau), and tau proteins from fetal brains (F-tau) differ in racemization, these proteins were compared for their D-aspartate content. The results demonstrated that PHF-tau contain more D-aspartate than N-tau, A-tau and F-tau. The average percentage D-aspartate for these proteins, after a correction for background, are 4.9%, 2.8%, 1.6%, and 1% for PHF-tau, N-tau, A-tau and F-tau, respectively. It remains to be determined if the increase in D-aspartate is a consequence of PHF formation. It is also unknown if the change in D-aspartate content in PHF-tau is associated with phosphorylation, which alters the susceptibility of tau to proteolysis.

  17. Multiple cellular proteins modulate the dynamics of K-ras association with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Bhagatji, Pinkesh; Leventis, Rania; Rich, Rebecca; Lin, Chen-ju; Silvius, John R

    2010-11-17

    Although specific proteins have been identified that regulate the membrane association and facilitate intracellular transport of prenylated Rho- and Rab-family proteins, it is not known whether cellular proteins fulfill similar roles for other prenylated species, such as Ras-family proteins. We used a previously described method to evaluate how several cellular proteins, previously identified as potential binding partners (but not effectors) of K-ras4B, influence the dynamics of K-ras association with the plasma membrane. Overexpression of either PDEδ or PRA1 enhances, whereas knockdown of either protein reduces, the rate of dissociation of K-ras from the plasma membrane. Inhibition of calmodulin likewise reduces the rate of K-ras dissociation from the plasma membrane, in this case in a manner specific for the activated form of K-ras. By contrast, galectin-3 specifically reduces the rate of plasma membrane dissociation of activated K-ras, an effect that is blocked by the K-ras antagonist farnesylthiosalicylic acid (salirasib). Multiple cellular proteins thus control the dynamics of membrane association and intercompartmental movement of K-ras to an important degree even under basal cellular conditions.

  18. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  19. Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) is a cGMP-dependent kinase anchoring protein (GKAP) specific for the cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iβ isoform.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Eleonora; Burgers, Pepijn P; Plank, Michael; Heck, Albert J R; Scholten, Arjen

    2015-03-20

    Protein-protein interactions are important in providing compartmentalization and specificity in cellular signal transduction. Many studies have hallmarked the well designed compartmentalization of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) through its anchoring proteins. Much less data are available on the compartmentalization of its closest homolog, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), via its own PKG anchoring proteins (GKAPs). For the enrichment, screening, and discovery of (novel) PKA anchoring proteins, a plethora of methodologies is available, including our previously described chemical proteomics approach based on immobilized cAMP or cGMP. Although this method was demonstrated to be effective, each immobilized cyclic nucleotide did not discriminate in the enrichment for either PKA or PKG and their secondary interactors. Hence, with PKG signaling components being less abundant in most tissues, it turned out to be challenging to enrich and identify GKAPs. Here we extend this cAMP-based chemical proteomics approach using competitive concentrations of free cyclic nucleotides to isolate each kinase and its secondary interactors. Using this approach, we identified Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) as a putative novel GKAP. Through sequence alignment with known GKAPs and secondary structure prediction analysis, we defined a small sequence domain mediating the interaction with PKG Iβ but not PKG Iα. In vitro binding studies and site-directed mutagenesis further confirmed the specificity and affinity of HAP1 binding to the PKG Iβ N terminus. These data fully support that HAP1 is a GKAP, anchoring specifically to the cGMP-dependent protein kinase isoform Iβ, and provide further evidence that also PKG spatiotemporal signaling is largely controlled by anchoring proteins.

  20. Functional genomics of intraflagellar transport-associated proteins in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Peter N; Blacque, Oliver E; Leroux, Michel R

    2009-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans presents numerous advantages for the identification and molecular analysis of intraflagellar transport (IFT)-associated proteins, which play a critical role in the formation of cilia. Many proteins were first described as participating in IFT in this organism, including IFTA-1 (IFT121), DYF-1 (fleer/IFT70), DYF-2 (IFT144), DYF-3 (Qilin), DYF-11 (MIP-T3/IFT54), DYF-13, XBX-1 (dynein light intermediate chain), XBX-2 (dynein light chain), CHE-13 (IFT57/HIPPI), orthologs of Bardet-Biedl syndrome proteins, and potential regulatory protein, IFTA-2 (RABL5/IFT22). Transgenic animals bearing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins can be generated with ease, and in vivo imaging of IFT in both wild-type and cilia mutant strains can be performed quickly. The analyses permit detailed information on the localization and dynamic properties (velocities along the ciliary axoneme) of the relevant proteins, providing insights into their potential functions in processes such as anterograde and retrograde transport and cilium formation, as well as association with distinct modules of the IFT machinery (e.g., IFT subcomplexes A or B). Behavioral studies of the corresponding IFT-associated gene mutants further enable an understanding of the ciliary role of the proteins-e.g., in chemosensation, lipid homeostasis, lifespan control, and signaling-in a multicellular animal. In this chapter, we discuss how C. elegans can be used for the identification and characterization of IFT-associated proteins, focusing on methods for the generation of GFP-tagged IFT reporter strains, time-lapse microscopy, and IFT rate measurements. PMID:20409822

  1. Variations in the association of papillomavirus E2 proteins with mitotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jaquelline G.; Colf, Leremy A.; McBride, Alison A.

    2006-01-01

    The E2 protein segregates episomal bovine papillomavirus (BPV) genomes to daughter cells by tethering them to mitotic chromosomes, thus ensuring equal distribution and retention of viral DNA. To date, only the BPV1 E2 protein has been shown to bind to mitotic chromosomes. We assessed the localization of 13 different animal and human E2 proteins from seven papillomavirus genera, and we show that most of them are stably bound to chromosomes throughout mitosis. Furthermore, in contrast to the random association of BPV1 E2 with mitotic chromosomes, several of these proteins appear to bind to more specific regions of mitotic chromosomes. Using human papillomavirus (HPV) type 8 E2, we show that this region is adjacent to centromeres/kinetochores. Therefore, E2 proteins from both HPV and animal papillomavirus bind to mitotic chromosomes, and there are variations in the specificity of this binding. Only the α-papillomavirus E2 proteins do not stably associate with mitotic chromatin throughout mitosis. These proteins closely associate with prophase chromosomes and bind to chromosomes in telophase but not in metaphase. However, extraction of mitotic cells before fixation results in α-E2 proteins binding to the pericentromeric region of metaphase chromosomes, as observed for HPV8 E2. We postulate that this is the authentic target of these E2 proteins but that additional factors or a specialized cellular environment is required to stabilize this association. Thus, E2-mediated tethering of viral genomes to mitotic chromosomes is a common strategy of papillomaviruses, but different viruses have evolved different variations of this theme. PMID:16415162

  2. Methylation of translation-associated proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Identification of methylated lysines and their methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Couttas, Timothy A; Raftery, Mark J; Padula, Matthew P; Herbert, Ben R; Wilkins, Marc R

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to identify sites of lysine methylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the associated methyltransferases. Hexapeptide ligand affinity chromatography was used to normalize the abundance levels of proteins in whole cell lysate. MS/MS, in association with antibody-based detection, was then used to identify lysine methylated proteins and the precise sites of modification. Lysine methylation was found on the proteins elongation factor (EF) 1-α, 2, and 3A, as well as ribosomal proteins 40S S18-A/B, 60S L11-A/B, L18-A/B, and L42-A/B. Precise sites were mapped in all cases. Single-gene knockouts of known and putative methyltransferase(s), in association with MS/MS, showed that EF1-α is monomethylated by Efm1 at lysin 30 and dimethylated by See1 at lysine 316. Methyltransferase Rkm1 was found to monomethylate 40S ribosomal protein S18-A/B at lysine 48. Knockout analysis also revealed that putative methyltransferase YBR271W affects the methylation of proteins EF2 and 3A; this was detected by Western blotting and immunodetection. This methyltransferase shows strong interspecies conservation and a tryptophan-containing motif associated with its active site. We suggest that enzyme YBR271W is named EF methyltransferase 2 (Efm2), in line with the recent naming of YHL039W as Efm1. PMID:22522802

  3. Highly efficient extraction of cellular nucleic acid associated proteins in vitro with magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hu, Zhengyan; Qin, Hongqiang; Wei, Xiaoluan; Cheng, Kai; Liu, Fangjie; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-12-01

    Nucleic acid associated proteins (NAaP) play the essential roles in gene regulation and protein expression. The global analysis of cellular NAaP would give a broad insight to understand the interaction between nucleic acids and the associated proteins, such as the important proteinous regulation factors on nucleic acids. Proteomic analysis presents a novel strategy to investigate a group of proteins. However, the large scale analysis of NAaP is yet impossible due to the lack of approaches to harvest target protein groups with a high efficiency. Herein, a simple and efficient method was developed to collect cellular NAaP using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes based on the strong interaction between carbon nanotubes and nucleic acids along with corresponding associated proteins. We found that the magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes demonstrated a nearly 100% extraction efficiency for intracellular nucleic acids from cells in vitro. Importantly, the proteins associated on nucleic acids could be highly efficiently harvested using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes due to the binding of NAaP on nucleic acids. 1594 groups of nuclear NAaP and 2595 groups of cellular NAaP were extracted and identified from about 1,000,000 cells, and 803 groups of NAaP were analyzed with only about 10,000 cells, showing a promising performance for the proteomic analysis of NAaP from minute cellular samples. This highly efficient extraction strategy for NAaP is a simple approach to identify cellular nucleic acid associated proteome, and we believed this strategy could be further applied in systems biology to understand the gene expression and regulation.

  4. Purified thick filaments from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: evidence for multiple proteins associated with core structures

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The thick filaments of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, arising predominantly from the body-wall muscles, contain two myosin isoforms and paramyosin as their major proteins. The two myosins are located in distinct regions of the surfaces, while paramyosin is located within the backbones of the filaments. Tubular structures constitute the cores of the polar regions, and electron-dense material is present in the cores of the central regions (Epstein, H.F., D.M. Miller, I. Ortiz, and G.C. Berliner. 1985. J. Cell Biol. 100:904-915). Biochemical, genetic, and immunological experiments indicate that the two myosins and paramyosin are not necessary core components (Epstein, H.F., I. Ortiz, and L.A. Traeger Mackinnon. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:985-993). The existence of the core structures suggests, therefore, that additional proteins may be associated with thick filaments in C. elegans. To biochemically detect minor associated proteins, a new procedure for the isolation of thick filaments of high purity and structural preservation has been developed. The final step, glycerol gradient centrifugation, yielded fractions that are contaminated by, at most, 1-2% with actin, tropomyosin, or ribosome-associated proteins on the basis of Coomassie Blue staining and electron microscopy. Silver staining and radioautography of gel electrophoretograms of unlabeled and 35S-labeled proteins, respectively, revealed at least 10 additional bands that cosedimented with thick filaments in glycerol gradients. Core structures prepared from wild-type thick filaments contained at least six of these thick filament-associated protein bands. The six proteins also cosedimented with thick filaments purified by gradient centrifugation from CB190 mutants lacking myosin heavy chain B and from CB1214 mutants lacking paramyosin. For these reasons, we propose that the six associated proteins are potential candidates for putative components of core structures in the thick filaments of body-wall muscles of

  5. Association of atypical protein kinase C isotypes with the docker protein FRS2 in fibroblast growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y P; Low, B C; Lim, J; Wong, E S; Guy, G R

    1999-07-01

    FRS2 is a docker protein that recruits signaling proteins to the plasma membrane in fibroblast growth factor signal transduction. We report here that FRS2 was associated with PKC lambda when Swiss 3T3 cells were stimulated with basic fibroblast growth factor. PKC zeta, the other member of the atypical PKC subfamily, could also bind FRS2. The association between FRS2 and PKC lambda is likely to be direct as shown by yeast two-hybrid analysis. The C-terminal fragments of FRS2 (amino acid residues 300-508) and SNT2 (amino acids 281-492), an isoform bearing 50% identity to FRS2, interacted with PKC lambda at a region (amino acids 240-562) that encompasses the catalytic domain. In vitro kinase assays revealed neither FRS2 nor SNT2 was a substrate of PKC lambda or zeta. Mutation of the alanine residue (Ala-120) to glutamate in the pseudo-substrate region of PKC lambda results in a constitutively active kinase that exhibited more than 2-fold greater binding to FRS2 in vitro than its "closed" wild-type counterpart. Tyrosine phosphorylation of FRS2 did not affect its binding to the constitutively active PKC lambda mutant, suggesting that the activation of PKC lambda is necessary and sufficient for its association with FRS2. It is likely that FRS2 serves as an anchoring protein for targeting activated atypical PKCs to the cell plasma membrane in signaling pathways.

  6. Physicochemical principles that regulate the competition between functional and dysfunctional association of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pechmann, Sebastian; Levy, Emmanuel D; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2009-06-23

    To maintain protein homeostasis, a variety of quality control mechanisms, such as the unfolded protein response and the heat shock response, enable proteins to fold and to assemble into functional complexes while avoiding the formation of aberrant and potentially harmful aggregates. We show here that a complementary contribution to the regulation of the interactions between proteins is provided by the physicochemical properties of their amino acid sequences. The results of a systematic analysis of the protein-protein complexes in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) show that interface regions are more prone to aggregate than other surface regions, indicating that many of the interactions that promote the formation of functional complexes, including hydrophobic and electrostatic forces, can potentially also cause abnormal intermolecular association. We also show, however, that aggregation-prone interfaces are prevented from triggering uncontrolled assembly by being stabilized into their functional conformations by disulfide bonds and salt bridges. These results indicate that functional and dysfunctional association of proteins are promoted by similar forces but also that they are closely regulated by the presence of specific interactions that stabilize native states. PMID:19502422

  7. Predicting Cell Association of Surface-Modified Nanoparticles Using Protein Corona Structure - Activity Relationships (PCSAR).

    PubMed

    Kamath, Padmaja; Fernandez, Alberto; Giralt, Francesc; Rallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are likely to interact in real-case application scenarios with mixtures of proteins and biomolecules that will absorb onto their surface forming the so-called protein corona. Information related to the composition of the protein corona and net cell association was collected from literature for a library of surface-modified gold and silver nanoparticles. For each protein in the corona, sequence information was extracted and used to calculate physicochemical properties and statistical descriptors. Data cleaning and preprocessing techniques including statistical analysis and feature selection methods were applied to remove highly correlated, redundant and non-significant features. A weighting technique was applied to construct specific signatures that represent the corona composition for each nanoparticle. Using this basic set of protein descriptors, a new Protein Corona Structure-Activity Relationship (PCSAR) that relates net cell association with the physicochemical descriptors of the proteins that form the corona was developed and validated. The features that resulted from the feature selection were in line with already published literature, and the computational model constructed on these features had a good accuracy (R(2)LOO=0.76 and R(2)LMO(25%)=0.72) and stability, with the advantage that the fingerprints based on physicochemical descriptors were independent of the specific proteins that form the corona.

  8. Evolutionary conservation of mammalian sperm proteins associates with overall, not tyrosine, phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia; Ramljak, Sanja; Asif, Abdul R; Schaffrath, Michael; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2013-12-01

    We investigated possible associations between sequence evolution of mammalian sperm proteins and their phosphorylation status in humans. As a reference, spermatozoa from three normozoospermic men were analyzed combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. We identified 99 sperm proteins (thereof 42 newly described) and determined the phosphorylation status for most of them. Sequence evolution was studied across six mammalian species using nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS) and amino acid distances. Site-specific purifying selection was assessed employing average ratios of evolutionary rates at phosphorylated versus nonphosphorylated amino acids (α). According to our data, mammalian sperm proteins do not show statistically significant sequence conservation difference, no matter if the human ortholog is a phosphoprotein with or without tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation. In contrast, overall phosphorylation of human sperm proteins, i.e., phosphorylation at serine (S), threonine (T), and/or Y residues, associates with above-average conservation of sequences. Complementary investigations suggest that numerous protein-protein interactants constrain sequence evolution of sperm phosphoproteins. Although our findings reject a special relevance of Y phosphorylation for sperm functioning, they still indicate that overall phosphorylation substantially contributes to proper functioning of sperm proteins. Hence, phosphorylated sperm proteins might be considered as prime candidates for diagnosis and treatment of reduced male fertility.

  9. Proneural proteins Achaete and Scute associate with nuclear actin to promote formation of external sensory organs.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yun-Ling; Chen, Yu-Ju; Chang, Yi-Jie; Yeh, Hsiao-Fong; Huang, Yi-Chun; Pi, Haiwei

    2014-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proneural proteins promote neurogenesis through transcriptional regulation. Although much is known about the tissue-specific regulation of proneural gene expression, how proneural proteins interact with transcriptional machinery to activate downstream target genes is less clear. Drosophila proneural proteins Achaete (Ac) and Scute (Sc) induce external sensory organ formation by activating neural precursor gene expression. Through co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric analyses, we found that nuclear but not cytoplasmic actin associated with the Ac and Sc proteins in Drosophila S2 cells. Daughterless (Da), the common heterodimeric partner of Drosophila bHLH proteins, was observed to associate with nuclear actin through proneural proteins. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that the binding specificity between actin and Ac or Sc was conserved in yeast nuclei without the presence of additional Drosophila factors. We further show that actin is required in external sensory organ formation. Reduction in actin gene activity impaired proneural-protein-dependent expression of the neural precursor genes, as well as formation of neural precursors. Furthermore, increased nuclear actin levels, obtained by expression of nucleus-localized actin, elevated Ac-Da-dependent gene transcription as well as Ac-mediated external sensory organ formation. Taken together, our in vivo and in vitro observations suggest a novel link for actin in proneural-protein-mediated transcriptional activation and neural precursor differentiation.

  10. Heterochromatin-Associated Proteins HP1a and Piwi Collaborate to Maintain the Association of Achiasmate Homologs in Drosophila Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Giauque, Christopher C; Bickel, Sharon E

    2016-05-01

    Accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis depends on their ability to remain physically connected throughout prophase I. For homologs that achieve a crossover, sister chromatid cohesion distal to the chiasma keeps them attached until anaphase I. However, in Drosophila melanogaster wild-type oocytes, chromosome 4 never recombines, and the X chromosome fails to cross over in 6-10% of oocytes. Proper segregation of these achiasmate homologs relies on their pericentric heterochromatin-mediated association, but the mechanism(s) underlying this attachment remains poorly understood. Using an inducible RNA interference (RNAi) strategy combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to monitor centromere proximal association of the achiasmate FM7a/X homolog pair, we asked whether specific heterochromatin-associated proteins are required for the association and proper segregation of achiasmate homologs in Drosophila oocytes. When we knock down HP1a, H3K9 methytransferases, or the HP1a binding partner Piwi during mid-prophase, we observe significant disruption of pericentric heterochromatin-mediated association of FM7a/X homologs. Furthermore, for both HP1a and Piwi knockdown oocytes, transgenic coexpression of the corresponding wild-type protein is able to rescue RNAi-induced defects, but expression of a mutant protein with a single amino acid change that disrupts the HP1a-Piwi interaction is unable to do so. We show that Piwi is stably bound to numerous sites along the meiotic chromosomes, including centromere proximal regions. In addition, reduction of HP1a or Piwi during meiotic prophase induces a significant increase in FM7a/X segregation errors. We present a speculative model outlining how HP1a and Piwi could collaborate to keep achiasmate chromosomes associated in a homology-dependent manner. PMID:26984058

  11. Proteins that appear to be associated with pili in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Muir, L L; Strugnell, R A; Davies, J K

    1988-01-01

    Pili of Neisseria gonorrhoeae are thought to be composed entirely of identical subunits, called pilin, that self-assemble in vitro. Previous pilus purification methods have relied on this latter point, and dissociation and reassociation of pilin subunits has yielded pilin preparations of high purity. Such a procedure could result in the loss of any pilus-associated proteins. We have developed a procedure for the isolation of intact native pili in a deoxycholate-urea buffer in which the pili are fractionated on the basis of size and hydrophobicity. Electron microscopy indicates that the pili are largely free from outer membrane vesicles and other cellular material. Electrophoretic analysis has shown that a number of proteins copurify with pilin. Antibodies to these proteins could be removed from an antiserum against whole piliated cells by absorption with piliated cells but not by absorption with nonpiliated cells. Hence, our results indicate that these proteins could be pilus associated. Images PMID:2898429

  12. Wool Keratin-Associated Protein Genes in Sheep—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hua; Zhou, Huitong; Forrest, Rachel H. J.; Li, Shaobin; Wang, Jiqing; Dyer, Jolon M.; Luo, Yuzhu; Hickford, Jon G. H.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of sheep’s wool in making textiles has inspired extensive research into its structure and the underlying genetics since the 1960s. Wool keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are a key structural component of the wool fibre. The characterisation of the genes encoding these proteins has progressed rapidly with advances in the nucleotide and protein sequencing. This review describes our knowledge of ovine KAPs, their categorisation into families, polymorphism in the proteins and genes, the clustering and chromosomal location of the genes, some characteristics of gene expression and some potential effects of the KAPs on wool traits. The extent and nature of genetic variation in wool KAP genes and its association with fibre characteristics, provides an opportunity for the development of gene-markers for selective breeding of sheep to produce better wool with properties highly matched to specific end-uses. PMID:27240405

  13. Identification of a gamma subunit associated with the adenylyl cyclase regulatory proteins Ns and Ni.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, J D; Codina, J; Risinger, R; Birnbaumer, L

    1984-02-25

    The subunit composition of the Ns and Ni, the human erythrocyte stimulatory and inhibitory regulatory proteins of adenylyl cyclase, respectively, were analyzed by a sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing discontinuous urea and polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis system designed for the study of low molecular weight polypeptides. This system disclosed that these proteins, in addition to their known alpha and beta subunits, contain an additional small peptide of apparent molecular weight of 5,000 (5K). This "5K peptide" is also present in preparations of another protein which we termed "40K protein" on the basis of its hydrodynamic behavior and whose primary protein constituent is the Mr 35,000 beta subunit of the above regulatory proteins. Analyzing Ni, the 5K peptide was functionally related to the protein by showing that its apparent Stokes radius changes from 5.9 to 5.1 nm after treatment with guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate and magnesium in parallel with the alpha and beta subunits. These data are interpreted as evidence for the existence of a third subunit associated with the regulatory proteins of adenylyl cyclase. We call this subunit gamma and propose a minimum subunit structure for these proteins of the alpha beta gamma type. PMID:6321456

  14. Postranslational modifications significantly alter the binding-folding pathways of proteins associating with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoian, Garegin

    2012-02-01

    Many important regulators of gene activity are natively disordered, but fully or partially order when they bind to their targets on DNA. Interestingly, the ensembles of disordered states for such free proteins are not structurally featureless, but can qualitatively differ from protein to protein. In particular, in random coil like states the chains are swollen, making relatively few contacts, while in molten globule like states a significant collapse occurs, with ensuing high density of intra-protein interactions. Furthermore, since many DNA binding proteins are positively charged polyelectrolytes, the electrostatic self-repulsion also influences the degree of collapse of the chain and its conformational preferences in the free state and upon binding to DNA. In our work, we have found that the nature of the natively disordered ensemble significantly affects the way the protein folds upon binding to DNA. In particular, we showed that posttranslational modifications of amino acid residues, such as lysine acetylation, can alter the degree of collapse and conformational preferences for a free protein, and also profoundly impact the binding affinity and pathways for the protein DNA association. These trends will be discussed in the context of DNA interacting with various histone tails and the p53 protein.

  15. Impaired cognitive performance in neuronal nitric oxide synthase knockout mice is associated with hippocampal protein derangements.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Liselotte; Weitzdoerfer, Rachel; Hoeger, Harald; Url, Angelika; Schmidt, Peter; Engelmann, Mario; Villar, Santiago Rosell; Fountoulakis, Michael; Lubec, Gert; Lubec, Barbara

    2004-12-01

    Nitric oxide is implicated in modulation of memory and pharmacological as well as genetic inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) leads to impaired cognitive function. We therefore decided to study learning and memory functions and cognitive flexibility in the Morris water maze (MWM) in 1-month-old male mice lacking nNOS (nNOS KO). Hippocampal protein profiling was carried out to possibly link protein derangement to impaired cognitive function. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with in-gel digestion of spots and subsequent MALDI-TOF identification of proteins and quantification of proteins using specific software was applied. In the memory as well as in the relearning task of the MWM, most of the nNOS KO failed to find the submerged platform within a given time. Proteomic evaluation of hippocampus, the main anatomical structure computing cognitive functions, revealed aberrant expression of a synaptosomal associated protein of the exocytotic machinery (NSF), glycolytic enzymes, chaperones 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, T-complex protein 1; the signaling structure guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H of the splicing machinery. We conclude that nNOS knockout mice show impaired spatial performance in the MWM, a finding that may be either linked to direct effects of nNOS/NO and/or to specific hippocampal protein derangements.

  16. Processing of cholinesterase-like α/β-hydrolase fold proteins: alterations associated with congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    De Jaco, Antonella; Comoletti, Davide; Dubi, Noga; Camp, Shelley; Taylor, Palmer

    2012-02-01

    The α/β hydrolase fold family is perhaps the largest group of proteins presenting significant structural homology with divergent functions, ranging from catalytic hydrolysis to heterophilic cell adhesive interactions to chaperones in hormone production. All the proteins of the family share a common three-dimensional core structure containing the α/β hydrolase fold domain that is crucial for proper protein function. Several mutations associated with congenital diseases or disorders have been reported in conserved residues within the α/β-hydrolase fold domain of cholinesterase-like proteins, neuroligins, butyrylcholinesterase and thyroglobulin. These mutations are known to disrupt the architecture of the common structural domain either globally or locally. Characterization of the natural mutations affecting the α/β-hydrolase fold domain in these proteins has shown that they mainly impair processing and trafficking along the secretory pathway causing retention of the mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. Studying the processing of α/β-hydrolase fold mutant proteins should uncover new functions for this domain, that in some cases require structural integrity for both export of the protein from the ER and for facilitating subunit dimerization. A comparative study of homologous mutations in proteins that are closely related family members, along with the definition of new three-dimensional crystal structures, will identify critical residues for the assembly of the α/β-hydrolase fold.

  17. Soybean nodule autoregulation receptor kinase phosphorylates two kinase-associated protein phosphatases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Akira; Hirani, Tripty A; Oakes, Marie; Kereszt, Attila; Kobe, Bostjan; Djordjevic, Michael A; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2008-09-12

    The NARK (nodule autoregulation receptor kinase) gene, a negative regulator of cell proliferation in nodule primordia in several legumes, encodes a receptor kinase that consists of an extracellular leucine-rich repeat and an intracellular serine/threonine protein kinase domain. The putative catalytic domain of NARK was expressed and purified as a maltose-binding or a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant NARK proteins showed autophosphorylation activity in vitro. Several regions of the NARK kinase domain were shown by mass spectrometry to possess phosphoresidues. The kinase-inactive protein K724E failed to autophosphorylate, as did three other proteins corresponding to phenotypically detected mutants defective in whole plant autoregulation of nodulation. A wild-type NARK fusion protein transphosphorylated a kinase-inactive mutant NARK fusion protein, suggesting that it is capable of intermolecular autophosphorylation in vitro. In addition, Ser-861 and Thr-963 in the NARK kinase catalytic domain were identified as phosphorylation sites through site-directed mutagenesis. The genes coding for the kinase-associated protein phosphatases KAPP1 and KAPP2, two putative interacting components of NARK, were isolated. NARK kinase domain phosphorylated recombinant KAPP proteins in vitro. Autophosphorylated NARK kinase domain was, in turn, dephosphorylated by both KAPP1 and KAPP2. Our results suggest a model for signal transduction involving NARK in the control of nodule development.

  18. Evolutionary Diversification of the Sm Family of RNA-Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Sm family of proteins is closely associated with RNA metabolism throughout all life. These proteins form homomorphic and heteromorphic rings consisting of six or seven subunits with a characteristic central pore, the presence of which is critical for binding U-rich regions of single-stranded RNA. Eubacteria and Archaea typically carry one or two forms of Sm proteins and assemble one homomorphic ring per Sm protein. Eukaryotes typically carry 16 or more Sm proteins that assemble to form heteromorphic rings which lie at the center of a number of critical RNA-associated small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). High Sm protein diversity and heteromorphic Sm rings are features stretching back to the origin of eukaryotes; very deep phylogenetic divisions among existing Sm proteins indicate simultaneous evolution across essentially all existing eukaryotic life. Two basic forms of heteromorphic Sm rings are found in eukaryotes. Fixed Sm rings are highly stable and static and are assembled around an RNA cofactor. Flexible Sm rings also stabilize and chaperone RNA but assemble in the absence of an RNA substrate and, more significantly, associate with and dissociate from RNA substrates more freely than fixed rings. This suggests that the conformation of flexible Sm rings might be modified in some specific manner to facilitate association and dissociation with RNA. Diversification of eukaryotic Sm proteins may have been initiated by gene transfers and/or genome clashes that accompanied the origin of the eukaryotic cell itself, with further diversification driven by a greater need for steric specificity within increasingly complex snRNPs. PMID:18687770

  19. Protein-like fully reversible tetramerisation and super-association of an aminocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolajski, Melanie; Adams, Gary G.; Gillis, Richard B.; Besong, David Tabot; Rowe, Arthur J.; Heinze, Thomas; Harding, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Unusual protein-like, partially reversible associative behaviour has recently been observed in solutions of the water soluble carbohydrates known as 6-deoxy-6-(ω-aminoalkyl)aminocelluloses, which produce controllable self-assembling films for enzyme immobilisation and other biotechnological applications. Now, for the first time, we have found a fully reversible self-association (tetramerisation) within this family of polysaccharides. Remarkably these carbohydrate tetramers are then seen to associate further in a regular way into supra-molecular complexes. Fully reversible oligomerisation has been hitherto completely unknown for carbohydrates and instead resembles in some respects the assembly of polypeptides and proteins like haemoglobin and its sickle cell mutation. Our traditional perceptions as to what might be considered ``protein-like'' and what might be considered as ``carbohydrate-like'' behaviour may need to be rendered more flexible, at least as far as interaction phenomena are concerned.

  20. Arabinogalactan protein and wall-associated kinase in a plasmalemmal reticulum with specialized vertices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gens, J. S.; Fujiki, M.; Pickard, B. G.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Arabinogalactan protein and wall-associated kinase (WAK) are suspected to be regulatory players at the interface between cytoplasm and cell wall. Both WAK(s) and arabinogalactan shown likely to represent arabinogalactan protein(s) have been visualized there with computational optical-sectioning microscopy. The arabinogalactan occurs in a polyhedral array at the external face of the cell membrane. WAK, and other proteins as yet unidentified, appear to fasten the membrane to the wall at vertices of the array. Evidence is presented that the array bears an important part of the mechanical stress experienced by the membrane, and it is speculated that the architectural organization of arabinogalactan protein, WAK, and other components of the array is critical for coordination of endomembrane activities, growth, and differentiation. The array has been named the plasmalemmal reticulum.

  1. Conformational dynamics of nonsynonymous variants at protein interfaces reveals disease association.

    PubMed

    Butler, Brandon M; Gerek, Z Nevin; Kumar, Sudhir; Ozkan, S Banu

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the protein interface sites between individual monomeric units in biological assemblies are enriched in disease-associated non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs). To elucidate the mechanistic underpinning of this observation, we investigated the conformational dynamic properties of protein interface sites through a site-specific structural dynamic flexibility metric (dfi) for 333 multimeric protein assemblies. dfi measures the dynamic resilience of a single residue to perturbations that occurred in the rest of the protein structure and identifies sites contributing the most to functionally critical dynamics. Analysis of dfi profiles of over a thousand positions harboring variation revealed that amino acid residues at interfaces have lower average dfi (31%) than those present at non-interfaces (50%), which means that protein interfaces have less dynamic flexibility. Interestingly, interface sites with disease-associated nsSNVs have significantly lower average dfi (23%) as compared to those of neutral nsSNVs (42%), which directly relates structural dynamics to functional importance. We found that less conserved interface positions show much lower dfi for disease nsSNVs as compared to neutral nsSNVs. In this case, dfi is better as compared to the accessible surface area metric, which is based on the static protein structure. Overall, our proteome-wide conformational dynamic analysis indicates that certain interface sites play a critical role in functionally related dynamics (i.e., those with low dfi values), therefore mutations at those sites are more likely to be associated with disease.

  2. G-protein. alpha. -subunit expression, myristoylation, and membrane association in COS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mumby, S.M.; Gilman, A.G. ); Heukeroth, R.O.; Gordon, J.I. )

    1990-01-01

    Myristolyation of seven different {alpha} subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) was examined by expressing these proteins in monkey kidney COS cells. Metabolic labeling studies of cells transfected with cytomegalovirus-based expression vectors indicated that ({sup 3}H)myristate was incorporated into {alpha}{sub i1}, {alpha}{sub i2}, {alpha}{sub i3}, {alpha}{sub 0}, and {alpha}{sub 1}, and {alpha}{sub z} but not {alpha}{sub s} subunits. The role of myristoylation in the association of {alpha} subunits with membranes was analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis and by substitution of myristate with a less hydrophobic analog, 10-(propoxy)decanoate (11-oxamyristate). Myristoylation of {alpha}{sub 0} was blocked when an alanine residue was substituted for its amino-terminal glycine, as was association of the protein with membranes. Substitution of the myristoyl group with 11-oxamyristate affected the cellular distribution of a subset of acylated {alpha} subunits. The results are consistent with a model wherein the hydrophobic interaction of myristate with the bilayer permits continued association of the protein with the plasma membrane when G-protein {alpha} subunits dissociated from {beta}{gamma}.

  3. Characterization of the fission yeast mcs2 cyclin and its associated protein kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Molz, L; Beach, D

    1993-01-01

    We have previously described the isolation of mcs2-75, a mutation obtained as an allele-specific suppressor of a dominant allele of cdc2. mcs2 was cloned and determined to be an essential gene, the product of which shares homology with the cyclin family of proteins. In contrast to the behavior of some, but not all cyclins, the mcs2 protein is constant in its abundance and localization throughout the cell cycle. A kinase activity that co-precipitates with mcs2 can be detected when myelin basic protein (MBP) is provided as an exogenous substrate. This kinase activity is constant throughout the cell cycle. mcs2 does not appear to associate with the cdc2 protein kinase or an antigenically related kinase. Finally, a protein kinase termed csk1 (cyclin suppressing kinase) was isolated as a high copy suppressor of an mcs2 mutation. csk1 is not essential, however, the level of kinase activity that co-precipitates with mcs2 is reduced approximately 3-fold in strains harboring a csk1 null allele. Therefore, csk1 may encode a protein kinase physically associated with mcs2 or alternatively may function as an upstream activator of the mcs2-associated kinase. Images PMID:8467814

  4. Protein phosphorylation associated with epipodophyllotoxin-induced apoptosis of lymphoid cells: role of a serine/threonine protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Ye, X; Mody, N S; Hingley, S T; Coffman, F D; Cohen, S; Fresa, K L

    1998-11-01

    We have previously shown that apoptosis induced in thymocytes by dexamethasone or teniposide (VM-26) could be inhibited by 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7) and sangivamycin, both relatively specific inhibitors for protein kinase C, but not by N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA1004), a more specific inhibitor for cAMP-dependent protein kinases. Apoptosis in this model system was not blocked by EGTA and no increase in cytosolic Ca2+ was observed during apoptosis induced by either dexamethasone or VM-26, suggesting that this kinase was Ca2+-independent. In the present study, we demonstrate that addition of 10 microM sangivamycin to thymocyte cultures up to 2 h after addition of either inducer resulted in virtually complete inhibition of apoptosis. Addition of 10 microM sangivamycin at 3 or 4 h after addition of inducer resulted in partial inhibition of apoptosis. Computerized image analysis of two-dimensional PAGE analyses of whole-cell lysates demonstrated that treatment of mouse thymocytes with VM-26 resulted in a limited number of de novo phosphorylation events within 1 h of treatment. The most prominent phosphorylation events associated with VM-26-induced apoptosis were that two intracellular protein species (Protein 1: m.w. = 22.9 kDa, pI, 5.11; and Protein 2: m.w. = 22.9 kDa, pI, 4.98). Similar phosphorylation events were seen in cells treated with dexamethasone. Finally, Western blot analysis suggests that de novo protein phosphorylation induced by VM-26 is on serine/threonine residues. These results provide further evidence that the mechanism of VM-26-induced apoptosis of murine thymocytes involves the action of one or more serine/threonine kinases. PMID:9787113

  5. Identification of a cellulose synthase-associated protein required for cellulose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Kaplinsky, Nick; Bringmann, Martin; Cobb, Alex; Carroll, Andrew; Sampathkumar, Arun; Baskin, Tobias I; Persson, Staffan; Somerville, Chris R

    2010-07-20

    Cellulose synthase-interactive protein 1 (CSI1) was identified in a two-hybrid screen for proteins that interact with cellulose synthase (CESA) isoforms involved in primary plant cell wall synthesis. CSI1 encodes a 2,150-amino acid protein that contains 10 predicted Armadillo repeats and a C2 domain. Mutations in CSI1 cause defective cell elongation in hypocotyls and roots and reduce cellulose content. CSI1 is associated with CESA complexes, and csi1 mutants affect the distribution and movement of CESA complexes in the plasma membrane. PMID:20616083

  6. Interaction with the Yes-associated protein (YAP) allows TEAD1 to positively regulate NAIP expression.

    PubMed

    Landin Malt, André; Georges, Adrien; Silber, Joël; Zider, Alain; Flagiello, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Although the expression of the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene is considered involved in apoptosis suppression as well as in inflammatory response, the molecular basis of the NAIP gene expression is poorly understood. Here we show that the TEA domain protein 1 (TEAD1) is able to positively activate the transcription of NAIP. We further demonstrate that this regulation is mediated by the presence of the endogenous Yes associated protein (YAP) cofactor, and requires the interaction with YAP. We finally identified an intronic region of the NAIP gene responding to TEAD1/YAP activity, suggesting that regulation of NAIP by TEAD1/YAP is at the transcriptional level. PMID:23994529

  7. Laser capture microdissection to identify septum-associated proteins in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Fischer, Reinhard; Teichert, Ines; Kück, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    To spatially resolve genetic differences at the cellular level, the laser-capture microdissection technique was developed. With this method cells can be cut from tissues with a laser beam and analyzed for DNA, RNA or protein composition. Here we adapted the technique to isolate septal microtubule-organizing center (MTOC)-associated proteins in Aspergillus nidulans About 3000 septa were collected and subjected to peptide fingerprinting by mass-spectrometric analysis. We identified the microtubule polymerase AlpA and found it interacts with ApsB specifically at sMTOCs, suggesting that AlpA might be involved in the assembly or the functioning of this protein complex. PMID:26951366

  8. Interaction with the Yes-associated protein (YAP) allows TEAD1 to positively regulate NAIP expression.

    PubMed

    Landin Malt, André; Georges, Adrien; Silber, Joël; Zider, Alain; Flagiello, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Although the expression of the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene is considered involved in apoptosis suppression as well as in inflammatory response, the molecular basis of the NAIP gene expression is poorly understood. Here we show that the TEA domain protein 1 (TEAD1) is able to positively activate the transcription of NAIP. We further demonstrate that this regulation is mediated by the presence of the endogenous Yes associated protein (YAP) cofactor, and requires the interaction with YAP. We finally identified an intronic region of the NAIP gene responding to TEAD1/YAP activity, suggesting that regulation of NAIP by TEAD1/YAP is at the transcriptional level.

  9. Isolation and Analysis of Keratins and Keratin-Associated Proteins from Hair and Wool.

    PubMed

    Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Plowman, Jeffrey E; Harland, Duane P

    2016-01-01

    The presence of highly cross-linked protein networks in hair and wool makes them very difficult substrates for protein extraction, a prerequisite for further protein analysis and characterization. It is therefore imperative that these cross-links formed by disulfide bridges are first disrupted for the efficient extraction of proteins. Chaotropes such as urea are commonly used as efficient extractants. However, a combination of urea and thiourea not only improves recovery of proteins but also results in improved resolution of the keratins in 2DE gels. Reductants also play an important role in protein dissolution. Dithiothreitol effectively removes keratinous material from the cortex, whereas phosphines, like Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, remove material from the exocuticle. The relative extractability of the keratins and keratin-associated proteins is also dependent on the concentration of chaotropes, reductants, and pH, thus providing a means to preferentially extract these proteins. Ionic liquids such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM(+)[Cl](-)) are known to solubilize wool by disrupting noncovalent interactions, specifically intermolecular hydrogen bonds. BMIM(+)[Cl](-) proved to be an effective extractant of wool proteins and complementary in nature to chaotropes such as urea and thiourea for identifying unique peptides of wool proteins using mass spectrometry (MS). Successful identification of proteins resolved by one- or two-dimensional electrophoresis and MS is highly dependent on the optimal recovery of its protease-digested peptides with an efficient removal of interfering substances. The detergent sodium deoxycholate used in conjunction with Empore™ disks improved identification of proteins by mass spectrometry leading to higher percentage sequence coverage, identification of unique peptides and higher score.

  10. Isolation and Analysis of Keratins and Keratin-Associated Proteins from Hair and Wool.

    PubMed

    Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Plowman, Jeffrey E; Harland, Duane P

    2016-01-01

    The presence of highly cross-linked protein networks in hair and wool makes them very difficult substrates for protein extraction, a prerequisite for further protein analysis and characterization. It is therefore imperative that these cross-links formed by disulfide bridges are first disrupted for the efficient extraction of proteins. Chaotropes such as urea are commonly used as efficient extractants. However, a combination of urea and thiourea not only improves recovery of proteins but also results in improved resolution of the keratins in 2DE gels. Reductants also play an important role in protein dissolution. Dithiothreitol effectively removes keratinous material from the cortex, whereas phosphines, like Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, remove material from the exocuticle. The relative extractability of the keratins and keratin-associated proteins is also dependent on the concentration of chaotropes, reductants, and pH, thus providing a means to preferentially extract these proteins. Ionic liquids such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM(+)[Cl](-)) are known to solubilize wool by disrupting noncovalent interactions, specifically intermolecular hydrogen bonds. BMIM(+)[Cl](-) proved to be an effective extractant of wool proteins and complementary in nature to chaotropes such as urea and thiourea for identifying unique peptides of wool proteins using mass spectrometry (MS). Successful identification of proteins resolved by one- or two-dimensional electrophoresis and MS is highly dependent on the optimal recovery of its protease-digested peptides with an efficient removal of interfering substances. The detergent sodium deoxycholate used in conjunction with Empore™ disks improved identification of proteins by mass spectrometry leading to higher percentage sequence coverage, identification of unique peptides and higher score. PMID:26795475

  11. Several Novel Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Identified in Skeletal Muscle Have Cytoskeletal Associations*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Gavin S.; Korfali, Nadia; Swanson, Selene K.; Malik, Poonam; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; de las Heras, Jose; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair R. W.; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelopes from liver and a neuroblastoma cell line have previously been analyzed by proteomics; however, most diseases associated with the nuclear envelope affect muscle. To determine whether muscle has unique nuclear envelope proteins, rat skeletal muscle nuclear envelopes were prepared and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology. Many novel muscle-specific proteins were identified that did not appear in previous nuclear envelope data sets. Nuclear envelope residence was confirmed for 11 of these by expression of fusion proteins and by antibody staining of muscle tissue cryosections. Moreover, transcript levels for several of the newly identified nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins increased during muscle differentiation using mouse and human in vitro model systems. Some of these proteins tracked with microtubules at the nuclear surface in interphase cells and accumulated at the base of the microtubule spindle in mitotic cells, suggesting they may associate with complexes that connect the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. The finding of tissue-specific proteins in the skeletal muscle nuclear envelope proteome argues the importance of analyzing nuclear envelopes from all tissues linked to disease and suggests that general investigation of tissue differences in organellar proteomes might yield critical insights. PMID:20876400

  12. Topography of Lipid Droplet-Associated Proteins: Insights from Freeze-Fracture Replica Immunogold Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Robenek, Horst; Buers, Insa; Robenek, Mirko J.; Hofnagel, Oliver; Ruebel, Anneke; Troyer, David; Severs, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid droplets are not merely storage depots for superfluous intracellular lipids in times of hyperlipidemic stress, but metabolically active organelles involved in cellular homeostasis. Our concepts on the metabolic functions of lipid droplets have come from studies on lipid droplet-associated proteins. This realization has made the study of proteins, such as PAT family proteins, caveolins, and several others that are targeted to lipid droplets, an intriguing and rapidly developing area of intensive inquiry. Our existing understanding of the structure, protein organization, and biogenesis of the lipid droplet has relied heavily on microscopical techniques that lack resolution and the ability to preserve native cellular and protein composition. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling overcomes these disadvantages and can be used to define at high resolution the precise location of lipid droplet-associated proteins. In this paper illustrative examples of how freeze-fracture immunocytochemistry has contributed to our understanding of the spatial organization in the membrane plane and function of PAT family proteins and caveolin-1 are presented. By revisiting the lipid droplet with freeze-fracture immunocytochemistry, new perspectives have emerged which challenge prevailing concepts of lipid droplet biology and may hopefully provide a timely impulse for many ongoing studies. PMID:21490801

  13. Arabidopsis resistance protein SNC1 activates immune responses through association with a transcriptional corepressor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhaohai; Xu, Fang; Zhang, Yaxi; Cheng, Yu Ti; Wiermer, Marcel; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2010-01-01

    In both plants and animals, nucleotide-binding (NB) domain and leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing proteins (NLR) function as sensors of pathogen-derived molecules and trigger immune responses. Although NLR resistance (R) proteins were first reported as plant immune receptors more than 15 years ago, how these proteins activate downstream defense responses is still unclear. Here we report that the Toll-like/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-NB-LRR R protein, suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1 (SNC1) functions through its associated protein, Topless-related 1 (TPR1). Knocking out TPR1 and its close homologs compromises immunity mediated by SNC1 and several other TIR-NB-LRR–type R proteins, whereas overexpression of TPR1 constitutively activates SNC1-mediated immune responses. TPR1 functions as a transcriptional corepressor and associates with histone deacetylase 19 in vivo. Among the target genes of TPR1 are Defense no Death 1 (DND1) and Defense no Death 2 (DND2), two known negative regulators of immunity that are repressed during pathogen infection, suggesting that TPR1 activates R protein-mediated immune responses through repression of negative regulators. PMID:20647385

  14. Several novel nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins identified in skeletal muscle have cytoskeletal associations.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Gavin S; Korfali, Nadia; Swanson, Selene K; Malik, Poonam; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; de las Heras, Jose; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair R W; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelopes from liver and a neuroblastoma cell line have previously been analyzed by proteomics; however, most diseases associated with the nuclear envelope affect muscle. To determine whether muscle has unique nuclear envelope proteins, rat skeletal muscle nuclear envelopes were prepared and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology. Many novel muscle-specific proteins were identified that did not appear in previous nuclear envelope data sets. Nuclear envelope residence was confirmed for 11 of these by expression of fusion proteins and by antibody staining of muscle tissue cryosections. Moreover, transcript levels for several of the newly identified nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins increased during muscle differentiation using mouse and human in vitro model systems. Some of these proteins tracked with microtubules at the nuclear surface in interphase cells and accumulated at the base of the microtubule spindle in mitotic cells, suggesting they may associate with complexes that connect the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. The finding of tissue-specific proteins in the skeletal muscle nuclear envelope proteome argues the importance of analyzing nuclear envelopes from all tissues linked to disease and suggests that general investigation of tissue differences in organellar proteomes might yield critical insights. PMID:20876400

  15. PTMcode: a database of known and predicted functional associations between post-translational modifications in proteins.

    PubMed

    Minguez, Pablo; Letunic, Ivica; Parca, Luca; Bork, Peer

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are involved in the regulation and structural stabilization of eukaryotic proteins. The combination of individual PTM states is a key to modulate cellular functions as became evident in a few well-studied proteins. This combinatorial setting, dubbed the PTM code, has been proposed to be extended to whole proteomes in eukaryotes. Although we are still far from deciphering such a complex language, thousands of protein PTM sites are being mapped by high-throughput technologies, thus providing sufficient data for comparative analysis. PTMcode (http://ptmcode.embl.de) aims to compile known and predicted PTM associations to provide a framework that would enable hypothesis-driven experimental or computational analysis of various scales. In its first release, PTMcode provides PTM functional associations of 13 different PTM types within proteins in 8 eukaryotes. They are based on five evidence channels: a literature survey, residue co-evolution, structural proximity, PTMs at the same residue and location within PTM highly enriched protein regions (hotspots). PTMcode is presented as a protein-based searchable database with an interactive web interface providing the context of the co-regulation of nearly 75 000 residues in >10 000 proteins.

  16. Identification of Biofilm Matrix-Associated Proteins from an Acid Mine Drainage Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yongqin; D'Haeseleer, Patrik M; Dill, Brian; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.; Thelen, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    In microbial communities, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), also called the extracellular matrix, provide the spatial organization and structural stability during biofilm development. One of the major components of EPS is protein, but it is not clear what specific functions these proteins contribute to the extracellular matrix or to microbial physiology. To investigate this in biofilms from an extremely acidic environment, we used shotgun proteomics analyses to identify proteins associated with EPS in biofilms at two developmental stages, designated DS1 and DS2. The proteome composition of the EPS was significantly different from that of the cell fraction, with more than 80% of the cellular proteins underrepresented or undetectable in EPS. In contrast, predicted periplasmic, outer membrane, and extracellular proteins were overrepresented by 3- to 7-fold in EPS. Also, EPS proteins were more basic by 2 pH units on average and about half the length. When categorized by predicted function, proteins involved in motility, defense, cell envelope, and unknown functions were enriched in EPS. Chaperones, such as histone-like DNA binding protein and cold shock protein, were overrepresented in EPS. Enzymes, such as protein peptidases, disulfide-isomerases, and those associated with cell wall and polysaccharide metabolism, were also detected. Two of these enzymes, identified as -N-acetylhexosaminidase and cellulase, were confirmed in the EPS fraction by enzymatic activity assays. Compared to the differences between EPS and cellular fractions, the relative differences in the EPS proteomes between DS1 and DS2 were smaller and consistent with expected physiological changes during biofilm development.

  17. Serum Proteins Alteration in Association with Body Mass Index in Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Madhuvanthi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Serum proteins are an important indicator of the nutritional status in an individual. There is a worldwide prevalence of both undernourishment and obesity. It has been suggested that low Body Mass Index (BMI) is associated with a decrease in serum protein levels predisposing them to other illnesses. Overweight and obese individuals carry risk for various other non-communicable diseases. Aim To compare the serum protein levels in underweight, overweight and obese individuals with that of normal body mass index individuals. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted in subjects who attended the master health checkup clinic of PSG hospitals. Subjects in the age group of 20-50 years were selected. Their serum proteins and BMI was measured. Twenty subjects each of underweight, normal, overweight and obese individuals were selected, categorized and compared. Results The serum protein level of normal individuals (Group I) was compared with underweight (Group II), overweight (Group III) and obese subjects (Group IV) by one-way ANOVA analysis. The mean serum total proteins in gm/dl in group I controls was 7.555±0.37 compared to Group II (underweight) which was 7.295±0.419. Low BMI was found to be associated with a decrease in serum protein level which was not statistically significant. Elevated BMI as in overweight and obese subjects showed no significant alterations in serum protein levels with p >0.05 and the changes were found to be independent of the body mass index. Conclusion Underweight individuals showed a decrease in serum protein levels whereas there were no significant changes in the serum protein levels in overweight and obese individuals. PMID:27504281

  18. Different Transmembrane Domains Associate with Distinct Endoplasmic Reticulum Components during Membrane Integration of a Polytopic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meacock, Suzanna L.; Lecomte, Fabienne J.L.; Crawshaw, Samuel G.; High, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We have been studying the insertion of the seven transmembrane domain (TM) protein opsin to gain insights into how the multiple TMs of polytopic proteins are integrated at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We find that the ER components associated with the first and second TMs of the nascent opsin polypeptide chain are clearly distinct. The first TM (TM1) is adjacent to the α and β subunits of the Sec61 complex, and a novel component, a protein associated with the ER translocon of 10 kDa (PAT-10). The most striking characteristic of PAT-10 is that it remains adjacent to TM1 throughout the biogenesis and membrane integration of the full-length opsin polypeptide. TM2 is also found to be adjacent to Sec61α and Sec61β during its membrane integration. However, TM2 does not form any adducts with PAT-10; rather, a transient association with the TRAM protein is observed. We show that the association of PAT-10 with opsin TM1 does not require the N-glycosylation of the nascent chain and occurs irrespective of the amino acid sequence and transmembrane topology of TM1. We conclude that the precise makeup of the ER membrane insertion site can be distinct for the different transmembrane domains of a polytopic protein. We find that the environment of a particular TM can be influenced by both the “stage” of nascent chain biosynthesis reached, and the TM's relative location within the polypeptide. PMID:12475939

  19. Endobrevin, a Novel Synaptobrevin/VAMP-Like Protein Preferentially Associated with the Early Endosome

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Siew Heng; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Yue; Subramaniam, V. Nathan; Griffiths, Gareth; Hong, Wanjin

    1998-01-01

    Synaptobrevins/vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) together with syntaxins and a synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) are the main components of a protein complex involved in the docking and/or fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic membrane. We report here the molecular, biochemical, and cell biological characterization of a novel member of the synaptobrevin/VAMP family. The amino acid sequence of endobrevin has 32, 33, and 31% identity to those of synaptobrevin/VAMP-1, synaptobrevin/VAMP-2, and cellubrevin, respectively. Membrane fractionation studies demonstrate that endobrevin is enriched in membrane fractions that are also enriched in the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy establishes that endobrevin is primarily associated with the perinuclear vesicular structures of the early endocytic compartment. The preferential association of endobrevin with the early endosome was further established by electron microscopy (EM) immunogold labeling. In vitro binding assays show that endobrevin interacts with immobilized recombinant α-SNAP fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Our results highlight the general importance of members of the synaptobrevin/VAMP protein family in membrane traffic and provide new avenues for future functional and mechanistic studies of this protein as well as the endocytotic pathway. PMID:9614193

  20. Regulation of neddylation and deneddylation of cullin1 in SCFSkp2 ubiquitin ligase by F-box protein and substrate

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Gil; Ganoth, Dvora; Hershko, Avram

    2006-01-01

    The activity of cullin-containing ubiquitin protein ligase complexes is stimulated by linkage to cullin of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 (“neddylation”). Neddylation is inhibited by the tight binding of cullins to CAND1 (cullin-associated and neddylation-dissociated 1) protein, and Nedd8 is removed from cullins by specific isopeptidase activity of the COP9/signalosome (CSN) complex. The mechanisms that regulate neddylation and deneddylation of cullins were unknown. We examined this problem for the case of SCFSkp2, a cullin1 (Cul1)-containing ubiquitin ligase complex that contains the S phase-associated protein Skp2 as the substrate-binding F-box protein subunit. SCFSkp2 targets for degradation the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p27 in the G1-to-S phase transition, a process that requires its phosphorylation and binding to cdk2-cyclin E. Because levels of Skp2, cyclin E, and the accessory protein Cks1 (cyclin kinase subunit 1) all rise at the end of G1 phase, it seemed possible that the neddylation of Cul1 in SCFSkp2 is regulated by the availability of the F-box protein and/or the substrate. We found that the supplementation of Skp2–Skp1 and substrate (along with further components necessary for substrate presentation to the ubiquitin ligase) to extracts of HeLa cells synergistically increased levels of neddylated Cul1. Skp2–Skp1 abrogates the inhibitory influence of CAND1 on the neddylation of Cul1 by promoting the dissociation of the cullin–CAND1 complex, whereas substrate, together with substrate-presenting components, prevents the action of CSN to deneddylate cullin. We propose a sequence of events in which the increased availability of Skp2 and substrate in the transition of cells to S phase promotes the neddylation and assembly of the SCFSkp2 ubiquitin ligase complex. PMID:16861300

  1. Protein-Carbohydrate Interaction between Sperm and the Egg-Coating Envelope and Its Regulation by Dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis Zona Pellucida Protein-Associated Protein.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Naofumi

    2015-05-22

    Protein-carbohydrate interaction regulates multiple important processes during fertilization, an essential biological event where individual gametes undergo intercellular recognition to fuse and generate a zygote. In the mammalian female reproductive tract, sperm temporarily adhere to the oviductal epithelium via the complementary interaction between carbohydrate-binding proteins on the sperm membrane and carbohydrates on the oviductal cells. After detachment from the oviductal epithelium at the appropriate time point following ovulation, sperm migrate and occasionally bind to the extracellular matrix, called the zona pellucida (ZP), which surrounds the egg, thereafter undergoing the exocytotic acrosomal reaction to penetrate the envelope and to reach the egg plasma membrane. This sperm-ZP interaction also involves the direct interaction between sperm carbohydrate-binding proteins and carbohydrates within the ZP, most of which have been conserved across divergent species from mammals to amphibians and echinoderms. This review focuses on the carbohydrate-mediated interaction of sperm with the female reproductive tract, mainly the interaction between sperm and the ZP, and introduces the fertilization-suppressive action of dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis ZP protein-associated protein. The action of dicalcin correlates significantly with a dicalcin-dependent change in the lectin-staining pattern within the ZP, suggesting a unique role of dicalcin as an inherent protein that is capable of regulating the affinity between the lectin and oligosaccharides attached on its target glycoprotein.

  2. Cytoskeletal proteins in cortical development and disease: actin associated proteins in periventricular heterotopia

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Gewei; Sheen, Volney L.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton regulates many important cellular processes in the brain, including cell division and proliferation, migration, and cytokinesis and differentiation. These developmental processes can be regulated through actin dependent vesicle and organelle movement, cell signaling, and the establishment and maintenance of cell junctions and cell shape. Many of these processes are mediated by extensive and intimate interactions of actin with cellular membranes and proteins. Disruption in the actin cytoskeleton in the brain gives rise to periventricular heterotopia (PH), a malformation of cortical development, characterized by abnormal neurons clustered deep in the brain along the lateral ventricles. This disorder can give rise to seizures, dyslexia and psychiatric disturbances. Anatomically, PH is characterized by a smaller brain (impaired proliferation), heterotopia (impaired initial migration) and disruption along the neuroependymal lining (impaired cell-cell adhesion). Genes causal for PH have also been implicated in actin-dependent processes. The current review provides mechanistic insight into actin cytoskeletal regulation of cortical development in the context of this malformation of cortical development. PMID:25883548

  3. Electrostatic interaction between oxysterol-binding protein and VAMP-associated protein A revealed by NMR and mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-04-23

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-A(MSP)) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBP(F)) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-A(MSP), OSBP(F), and the complex. Our results show that OSBP(F) is disordered in the free state, and VAP-A(MSP) and OSBP(F) form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain. PMID:20178991

  4. Electrostatic interaction between oxysterol-binding protein and VAMP-associated protein A revealed by NMR and mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-04-23

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-A(MSP)) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBP(F)) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-A(MSP), OSBP(F), and the complex. Our results show that OSBP(F) is disordered in the free state, and VAP-A(MSP) and OSBP(F) form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain.

  5. Electrostatic Interaction between Oxysterol-binding Protein and VAMP-associated Protein A Revealed by NMR and Mutagenesis Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-AMSP) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBPF) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-AMSP, OSBPF, and the complex. Our results show that OSBPF is disordered in the free state, and VAP-AMSP and OSBPF form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain. PMID:20178991

  6. The surface-associated protein of Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a lipase.

    PubMed

    Sakinc, Türkan; Woznowski, Magdalena; Ebsen, Michael; Gatermann, Sören G

    2005-10-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus surface-associated protein (Ssp) was the first surface protein described for this organism. Ssp-positive strains display a fuzzy layer of surface-associated material in electron micrographs, whereas Ssp-negative strains appear to be smooth. The physiologic function of Ssp, however, has remained elusive. To clone the associated gene, we determined the N-terminal sequence, as well as an internal amino acid sequence, of the purified protein. We derived two degenerate primers from these peptide sequences, which we used to identify the ssp gene from genomic DNA of S. saprophyticus 7108. The gene was cloned by PCR techniques and was found to be homologous to genes encoding staphylococcal lipases. In keeping with this finding, strains 7108 and 9325, which are Ssp positive, showed lipase activity on tributyrylglycerol agar plates, whereas the Ssp-negative strain CCM883 did not. Association of enzyme activity with the cloned DNA was proven by introducing the gene into Staphylococcus carnosus TM300. When wild-type strain 7108 and an isogenic mutant were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, strain 7108 exhibited the fuzzy surface layer, whereas the mutant appeared to be smooth. Lipase activity and the surface appendages could be restored by reintroduction of the cloned gene into the mutant. Experiments using immobilized collagen type I did not provide evidence for the involvement of Ssp in adherence to this matrix protein. Our experiments thus provided evidence that Ssp is a surface-associated lipase of S. saprophyticus.

  7. The Xanthomonas citri effector protein PthA interacts with citrus proteins involved in nuclear transport, protein folding and ubiquitination associated with DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Mariane Noronha; De Souza, Tiago Antonio; Cernadas, Raúl Andrés; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza Peixoto; Docena, Cássia; Farah, Chuck Shaker; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2010-09-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri utilizes the type III effector protein PthA to modulate host transcription to promote citrus canker. PthA proteins belong to the AvrBs3/PthA family and carry a domain comprising tandem repeats of 34 amino acids that mediates protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. We show here that variants of PthAs from a single bacterial strain localize to the nucleus of plant cells and form homo- and heterodimers through the association of their repeat regions. We hypothesize that the PthA variants might also interact with distinct host targets. Here, in addition to the interaction with alpha-importin, known to mediate the nuclear import of AvrBs3, we describe new interactions of PthAs with citrus proteins involved in protein folding and K63-linked ubiquitination. PthAs 2 and 3 preferentially interact with a citrus cyclophilin (Cyp) and with TDX, a tetratricopeptide domain-containing thioredoxin. In addition, PthAs 2 and 3, but not 1 and 4, interact with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex formed by Ubc13 and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme variant (Uev), required for K63-linked ubiquitination and DNA repair. We show that Cyp, TDX and Uev interact with each other, and that Cyp and Uev localize to the nucleus of plant cells. Furthermore, the citrus Ubc13 and Uev proteins complement the DNA repair phenotype of the yeast Deltaubc13 and Deltamms2/uev1a mutants, strongly indicating that they are also involved in K63-linked ubiquitination and DNA repair. Notably, PthA 2 affects the growth of yeast cells in the presence of a DNA damage agent, suggesting that it inhibits K63-linked ubiquitination required for DNA repair.

  8. The Evolutionary History of MAPL (Mitochondria-Associated Protein Ligase) and Other Eukaryotic BAM/GIDE Domain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Jeremy G; Moore, Blake P

    2015-01-01

    MAPL (mitochondria-associated protein ligase, also called MULAN/GIDE/MUL1) is a multifunctional mitochondrial outer membrane protein found in human cells that contains a unique BAM (beside a membrane) domain and a C-terminal RING-finger domain. MAPL has been implicated in several processes that occur in animal cells such as NF-kB activation, innate immunity and antiviral signaling, suppression of PINK1/parkin defects, mitophagy in skeletal muscle, and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Previous studies demonstrated that the BAM domain is present in diverse organisms in which most of these processes do not occur, including plants, archaea, and bacteria. Thus the conserved function of MAPL and its BAM domain remains an open question. In order to gain insight into its conserved function, we investigated the evolutionary origins of MAPL by searching for homologues in predicted proteomes of diverse eukaryotes. We show that MAPL proteins with a conserved BAM-RING architecture are present in most animals, protists closely related to animals, a single species of fungus, and several multicellular plants and related green algae. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic MAPL proteins originate from a common ancestor and not from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We also determined that two independent duplications of MAPL occurred, one at the base of multicellular plants and another at the base of vertebrates. Although no other eukaryote genome examined contained a verifiable MAPL orthologue, BAM domain-containing proteins were identified in the protists Bigelowiella natans and Ectocarpus siliculosis. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that these proteins are more closely related to prokaryotic BAM proteins and therefore likely arose from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We conclude that MAPL proteins with BAM-RING architectures have been present in the holozoan and viridiplantae lineages since their very beginnings. Our work paves

  9. The Evolutionary History of MAPL (Mitochondria-Associated Protein Ligase) and Other Eukaryotic BAM/GIDE Domain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Jeremy G; Moore, Blake P

    2015-01-01

    MAPL (mitochondria-associated protein ligase, also called MULAN/GIDE/MUL1) is a multifunctional mitochondrial outer membrane protein found in human cells that contains a unique BAM (beside a membrane) domain and a C-terminal RING-finger domain. MAPL has been implicated in several processes that occur in animal cells such as NF-kB activation, innate immunity and antiviral signaling, suppression of PINK1/parkin defects, mitophagy in skeletal muscle, and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Previous studies demonstrated that the BAM domain is present in diverse organisms in which most of these processes do not occur, including plants, archaea, and bacteria. Thus the conserved function of MAPL and its BAM domain remains an open question. In order to gain insight into its conserved function, we investigated the evolutionary origins of MAPL by searching for homologues in predicted proteomes of diverse eukaryotes. We show that MAPL proteins with a conserved BAM-RING architecture are present in most animals, protists closely related to animals, a single species of fungus, and several multicellular plants and related green algae. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic MAPL proteins originate from a common ancestor and not from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We also determined that two independent duplications of MAPL occurred, one at the base of multicellular plants and another at the base of vertebrates. Although no other eukaryote genome examined contained a verifiable MAPL orthologue, BAM domain-containing proteins were identified in the protists Bigelowiella natans and Ectocarpus siliculosis. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that these proteins are more closely related to prokaryotic BAM proteins and therefore likely arose from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We conclude that MAPL proteins with BAM-RING architectures have been present in the holozoan and viridiplantae lineages since their very beginnings. Our work paves

  10. Bactericidal Permeability Increasing Protein Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases in the Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Can, Güray; Akın, Hakan; Özdemir, Filiz T.; Can, Hatice; Yılmaz, Bülent; Eren, Fatih; Atuğ, Özlen; Ünsal, Belkıs; Hamzaoğlu, Hülya O.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease, a chronic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology, affects the small and large bowel at different levels. It is increasingly considered that innate immune system may have a central position in the pathogenesis of the disease. As a part of the innate immune system, bactericidal permeability increasing protein has an important role in the recognition and neutralization of gram-negative bacteria. The aim of our study was to investigate the involvement of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism (bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu) in inflammatory bowel disease in a large group of Turkish patients. Patients and Methods: The present study included 528 inflammatory bowel disease patients, 224 with Crohn's disease and 304 with ulcerative colitis, and 339 healthy controls. Results: Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism was found to be associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (P = 0.0001). The frequency of the Glu/Glu genotype was significantly lower in patients using steroids and in those with steroid dependence (P = 0.012, OR, 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68-0.94; P = 0.0286, OR, 0.75; 95% CI: 0.66-0.86, respectively). There was no other association between bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism and phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease. Conclusions: Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism is associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This is the first study reporting the association of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism with steroid use and dependence in Crohn's disease. PMID:26228368

  11. Salivary Proteins Associated with Periodontitis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hang Haw; Rahim, Zubaidah H. A.; Jessie, Kala; Hashim, Onn H.; Taiyeb-Ali, Tara B.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the salivary proteins that are associated with periodontitis in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Volunteers for the study were patients from the Diabetic Unit, University of Malaya Medical Centre, whose periodontal status was determined. The diabetic volunteers were divided into two groups, i.e., patients with periodontitis and those who were periodontally healthy. Saliva samples were collected and treated with 10% TCA/acetone/20 mM DTT to precipitate the proteins, which were then separated using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel images were scanned using the GS-800TM Calibrated Densitometer. The protein spots were analyzed and expressed in percentage volumes. The percentage volume of each protein spot was subjected to Mann-Whitney statistical analysis using SPSS software and false discovery rate correction. When the expression of the salivary proteins was compared between the T2DM patients with periodontitis with those who were periodontally healthy, seven proteins, including polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, plastin-2, actin related protein 3, leukocyte elastase inhibitor, carbonic anhydrases 6, immunoglobulin J and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, were found to be differentially expressed (p < 0.01304). This implies that the proteins may have the potential to be used as biomarkers for the prediction of T2DM patients who may be prone to periodontitis. PMID:22606001

  12. Ciliary membrane tubulin and associated proteins: a complex stable to Triton X-114 dissociation.

    PubMed

    Stephens, R E

    1985-12-19

    When either membranes from scallop gill cilia or reconstituted membranes from the same source are solubilized with Triton X-114 and the detergent is condensed by warming, no significant fraction of any major membrane protein partitions into the micellar detergent. Rather, most of the membrane lipids condense with the detergent phase, forming mixed micelles from which nearly pure lipid vesicles may be produced by adsorption of detergent with polystyrene beads. One minor membrane protein, with a molecular weight of about 20 000, is associated consistently with these vesicles. The aqueous phase contains a fairly homogeneous protein-Triton X-114 micelle sedimenting at 2.6 S in the analytical ultracentrifuge. Sucrose gradient velocity analysis in a detergent-free gradient indicates moderate size polydispersity but constant polypeptide composition throughout the sedimenting protein zone. Sucrose gradient equilibrium analysis (also in a detergent-free gradient) results in a protein-detergent complex banding at a density of 1.245 g/cm3. Sedimentation of the protein-detergent complex in the ultracentrifuge, followed by fixation and normal processing for electron microscopy, reveals a fine, reticular material consisting of 5-10-nm granules. These data are consistent with previous evidence that membrane tubulin and most other membrane proteins exist together as a discrete lipid-protein complex in molluscan gill ciliary membranes.

  13. Cardiomyopathy Is Associated with Ribosomal Protein Gene Haplo-Insufficiency in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Casad, Michelle E.; Abraham, Dennis; Kim, Il-Man; Frangakis, Stephan; Dong, Brian; Lin, Na; Wolf, Matthew J.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    The Minute syndrome in Drosophila melanogaster is characterized by delayed development, poor fertility, and short slender bristles. Many Minute loci correspond to disruptions of genes for cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins, and therefore the phenotype has been attributed to alterations in translational processes. Although protein translation is crucial for all cells in an organism, it is unclear why Minute mutations cause effects in specific tissues. To determine whether the heart is sensitive to haplo-insufficiency of genes encoding ribosomal proteins, we measured heart function of Minute mutants using optical coherence tomography. We found that cardiomyopathy is associated with the Minute syndrome caused by haplo-insufficiency of genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. While mutations of genes encoding non-Minute cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins are homozygous lethal, heterozygous deficiencies spanning these non-Minute genes did not cause a change in cardiac function. Deficiencies of genes for non-Minute mitochondrial ribosomal proteins also did not show abnormal cardiac function, with the exception of a heterozygous disruption of mRpS33. We demonstrate that cardiomyopathy is a common trait of the Minute syndrome caused by haplo-insufficiency of genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. In contrast, most cases of heterozygous deficiencies of genes encoding non-Minute ribosomal proteins have normal heart function in adult Drosophila. PMID:21890737

  14. Localization of Drosophila retinal degeneration B, a membrane- associated phosphatidylinositol transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The Drosophila retinal degeneration B (rdgB) mutation causes abnormal photoreceptor response and light-enhanced retinal degeneration. Immunoblots using polyclonal anti-rdgB serum showed that rdgB is a 160- kD membrane protein. The antiserum localized the rdgB protein in photoreceptors, antennae, and regions of the Drosophila brain, indicating that the rdgB protein functions in many sensory and neuronal cells. In photoreceptors, the protein localized adjacent to the rhabdomeres, in the vicinity of the subrhabdomeric cisternae. The rdgB protein's amino-terminal 281 residues are > 40% identical to the rat brain phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PI-TP). A truncated rdgB protein, which contains only this amino-terminal domain, possesses a phosphatidylinositol transfer activity in vitro. The remaining 773 carboxyl terminal amino acids have additional functional domains. Nitrocellulose overlay experiments reveal that an acidic amino acid domain, adjacent to the PI transfer domain, binds 45Ca+2. Six hydrophobic segments are found in the middle of the putative translation product and likely function as membrane spanning domains. These results suggest that the rdgB protein, unlike the small soluble PI-TPs, is a membrane-associated PI-TP, which may be directly regulated by light-induced changes in intracellular calcium. PMID:8354691

  15. Identification of a nonhistone chromosomal protein associated with heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster and its gene.

    PubMed Central

    James, T C; Elgin, S C

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against a fraction of nuclear proteins of Drosophila melanogaster identified as tightly binding to DNA. Four of these antibodies were directed against a 19-kilodalton nuclear protein; immunofluorescence staining of the polytene chromosomes localized the antigen to the alpha, beta, and intercalary heterochromatic regions. Screening of a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library with one of the monoclonal antibodies identified a recombinant DNA phage clone that produced a fusion protein immunologically similar to the heterochromatin-associated protein. Polyclonal sera directed against the bacterial lacZ fusion protein recognized the same nuclear protein on Western blots. A full-length cDNA clone was isolated from a lambda gt10 library, and its DNA sequence was obtained. Analysis of the open reading frame revealed an 18,101-dalton protein encoded by this cDNA. Two overlapping genomic DNA clones were isolated from a Charon 4 library of D. melanogaster with the cDNA clone, and a restriction map was obtained. In situ hybridization with these probes indicated that the gene maps to a single chromosome location at 29A on the 2L chromosome. This general strategy should be effective for cloning the genes and identifying the genetic loci of chromosomal proteins which cannot be readily assayed by other means. Images PMID:3099166

  16. Topology of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Cellular and Viral Proteins Determined with Split-GFP.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seong-In; Maruri-Avidal, Liliana; Moss, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    The split green fluorescent protein (GFP) system was adapted for investigation of the topology of ER-associated proteins. A 215-amino acid fragment of GFP (S1-10) was expressed in the cytoplasm as a free protein or fused to the N-terminus of calnexin and in the ER as an intraluminal protein or fused to the C-terminus of calnexin. A 16-amino acid fragment of GFP (S11) was fused to the N- or C-terminus of the target protein. Fluorescence occurred when both GFP fragments were in the same intracellular compartment. After validation with the cellular proteins PDI and tapasin, we investigated two vaccinia virus proteins (L2 and A30.5) of unknown topology that localize to the ER and are required for assembly of the viral membrane. Our results indicated that the N- and C-termini of L2 faced the cytoplasmic and luminal sides of the ER, respectively. In contrast both the N- and C-termini of A30.5 faced the cytoplasm. The system offers advantages for quickly determining the topology of intracellular proteins: the S11 tag is similar in length to commonly used epitope tags; multiple options are available for detecting fluorescence in live or fixed cells; transfection protocols are adaptable to numerous expression systems and can enable high throughput applications.

  17. Nucleosome-associated proteins and phosphoproteins of differentiating Friend erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, J; Whittaker, R; Blanchard, B; Ingram, V

    1978-01-01

    Mononucleosomes derived from brief digestion of uninduced Friend cell nuclei with micrococcal nuclease contain a set of non-histone chromosomal proteins which are partly or altogether missing in the oligomeric nucleosomes. On the other hand, the latter contain a protein of Mr 190,000 not seen in the mononucleosomes. Longer digestion removes most of these non-histone proteins, excepting the Mr 190,000 protein. Brief digestion of nuclei from Friend cells induced by DMSO or by n-butyrate removes most of the non-histone proteins from the nucleosomes, as did the prolonged digestion of uninduced nuclei. The Mr 190,000 protein remains, while a protein of Mr 27,000 is increased. The rate of phosphorylation of histone H1 associated with mononucleosomes was 3 to 4-fold greater in cells induced with DMSO. The major phosphoprotein and most of the other phosphorylated non-histones were modified at the same rate in control and induced cells. However, a Mr 95,000 protein was less phosphorylated in the induced cells. Images PMID:566435

  18. Microparticle Surface Proteins are Associated with Experimental Venous Thrombosis: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Newaj M.; Kachman, Maureen; Walker, Angela; Hawley, Angela E.; Wrobleski, Shirely K.; Myers, Daniel D.; Strahler, John R.; Andrews, Philip C.; Michailidis, George C.; Henke, Peter K.; Wakefield, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Microparticles (MPs) are small membrane vesicles released from activated cells and are associated with thrombosis and inflammation. Microparticles contain a unique subset of surface proteins derived from the parent cell and may be responsible for their diverse biological functions. To identify these proteins juvenile baboons (Papio anubis, n=4) underwent iliac vein thrombosis with six-hour balloon occlusion. Plasma samples were taken at baseline and at 2 days post thrombosis for MP analysis. Microparticles were extracted from platelet-poor plasma, digested separately with trypsin and tagged using iTRAQ reagents. The digests were subjected to 2-D LC separation followed by MALDI tandem mass spectrometry. Peak lists were generated and searched against all primate sequences. For protein identity, a minimum of two peptides at 95% confidence was required. Later, iTRAQ ratios were generated comparing relative protein level of day-2 to baseline. The proteomic analysis was performed twice for each blood sample, totaling 8 experiments. Proteins were considered elevated or depressed if the iTRAQ ratio deviated by 20% change from normal and a p-value less than 0.05. Significantly, 7 proteins were differentially expressed on day-2 compared to baseline, and appeared in at least two animals and regulated in at least 4 experiments, and appeared in at least three animals and regulated in at least four experiments. Among these 7 proteins, up-regulated proteins include various forms of fibrinogen and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, and down-regulated proteins include immunoglobulins. These proteins influence thrombosis and inflammation through hemostatic plug formation (fibrinogen), inhibiting neutrophil adhesion (alpha-1-antichymoptrypsin), and immunoregulation (immunoglobulins). Further studies are needed to confirm the mechanistic role of these proteins in the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis. PMID:19028772

  19. Dietary protein intake is associated with better physical function and muscle strength among elderly women.

    PubMed

    Isanejad, Masoud; Mursu, Jaakko; Sirola, Joonas; Kröger, Heikki; Rikkonen, Toni; Tuppurainen, Marjo; Erkkilä, Arja T

    2016-04-14

    Dietary protein intake might be beneficial to physical function (PF) in the elderly. We examined the cross-sectional and prospective associations of protein intake of g/kg body weight (BW), fat mass (FM) and lean mass (LM) with PF in 554 women aged 65·3-71·6 years belonging to the Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Fracture Prevention Study. Participants filled a questionnaire on lifestyle factors and 3-d food record in 2002. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and PF measures were performed at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. Sarcopaenia was defined using European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People criteria. At the baseline, women with higher protein intake (≥ 1·2 g/kg BW) had better performance in hand-grip strength/body mass (GS/BM) (P=0·001), knee extension/BM (P=0·003), one-leg stance (P=0·047), chair rise (P=0·043), squat (P=0·019), squat to the ground (P=0·001), faster walking speed for 10 m (P=0·005) and higher short physical performance battery score (P=0·004) compared with those with moderate and lower intakes (0·81-1·19 and ≤ 0·8 g/kg BW, respectively). In follow-up results, higher protein intake was associated with less decline in GS/BM, one-leg stance and tandem walk for 6 m over 3 years. Overall, results were no longer significant after controlling for FM. Associations were detected between protein intake and PF in non-sarcopaenic women but not in sarcopaenic women, except for change of GS (P=0·037). Further, FM but not LM was negatively associated with PF measures (P<0·050). This study suggests that higher protein intake and lower FM might be positively associated with PF in elderly women.

  20. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    SciTech Connect

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V.; Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H.; Murzin, Alexey G.; Meijer, Wim G.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2014-08-01

    VapD is one of a set of highly homologous virulence-associated proteins from the multi-host pathogen Rhodococcus equi. The crystal structure reveals an eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel fold and a glycine rich ‘bald’ surface. Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins.

  1. A method for computing association rate constants of atomistically represented proteins under macromolecular crowding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Sanbo; Cai, Lu; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-12-01

    In cellular environments, two protein molecules on their way to form a specific complex encounter many bystander macromolecules. The latter molecules, or crowders, affect both the energetics of the interaction between the test molecules and the dynamics of their relative motion. In earlier work (Zhou and Szabo 1991 J. Chem. Phys. 95 5948-52), it has been shown that, in modeling the association kinetics of the test molecules, the presence of crowders can be accounted for by their energetic and dynamic effects. The recent development of the transient-complex theory for protein association in dilute solutions makes it possible to easily incorporate the energetic and dynamic effects of crowders. The transient complex refers to a late on-pathway intermediate, in which the two protein molecules have near-native relative separation and orientation, but have yet to form the many short-range specific interactions of the native complex. The transient-complex theory predicts the association rate constant as ka = ka0exp( - ΔG*el/kBT), where ka0 is the ‘basal’ rate constant for reaching the transient complex by unbiased diffusion, and the Boltzmann factors captures the influence of long-range electrostatic interactions between the protein molecules. Crowders slow down the diffusion, therefore reducing the basal rate constant (to kac0), and induce an effective interaction energy ΔGc. We show that the latter interaction energy for atomistic proteins in the presence of spherical crowders is ‘long’-ranged, allowing the association rate constant under crowding to be computed as kac = kac0exp[ - (ΔG*el + ΔG*c)/kBT]. Applications demonstrate that this computational method allows for realistic modeling of protein association kinetics under crowding.

  2. A diverse family of proteins containing tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor domains.

    PubMed

    Zapata, J M; Pawlowski, K; Haas, E; Ware, C F; Godzik, A; Reed, J C

    2001-06-29

    We have identified three new tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated factor (TRAF) domain-containing proteins in humans using bioinformatics approaches, including: MUL, the product of the causative gene in Mulibrey Nanism syndrome; USP7 (HAUSP), an ubiquitin protease; and SPOP, a POZ domain-containing protein. Unlike classical TRAF family proteins involved in TNF family receptor (TNFR) signaling, the TRAF domains (TDs) of MUL, USP7, and SPOP are located near the NH(2) termini or central region of these proteins, rather than carboxyl end. MUL and USP7 are capable of binding in vitro via their TDs to all of the previously identified TRAF family proteins (TRAF1, TRAF2, TRAF3, TRAF4, TRAF5, and TRAF6), whereas the TD of SPOP interacts weakly with TRAF1 and TRAF6 only. The TD of MUL also interacted with itself, whereas the TDs of USP7 and SPOP did not self-associate. Analysis of various MUL and USP7 mutants by transient transfection assays indicated that the TDs of these proteins are necessary and sufficient for suppressing NF-kappaB induction by TRAF2 and TRAF6 as well as certain TRAF-binding TNF family receptors. In contrast, the TD of SPOP did not inhibit NF-kappaB induction. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy indicated that MUL localizes to cytosolic bodies, with targeting to these structures mediated by a RBCC tripartite domain within the MUL protein. USP7 localized predominantly to the nucleus, in a TD-dependent manner. Data base searches revealed multiple proteins containing TDs homologous to those found in MUL, USP7, and SPOP throughout eukaryotes, including yeast, protists, plants, invertebrates, and mammals, suggesting that this branch of the TD family arose from an ancient gene. We propose the moniker TEFs (TD-encompassing factors) for this large family of proteins.

  3. RABL6A, a Novel RAB-Like Protein, Controls Centrosome Amplification and Chromosome Instability in Primary Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P.; Smith, Tarik; Coombs, Gary S.; Eischen, Christine M.; Mackie, Duncan I.; Roman, David L.; Van Rheeden, Richard; Darbro, Benjamin; Tompkins, Van S.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2013-01-01

    RABL6A (RAB-like 6 isoform A) is a novel protein that was originally identified based on its association with the Alternative Reading Frame (ARF) tumor suppressor. ARF acts through multiple p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to prevent cancer. How RABL6A functions, to what extent it depends on ARF and p53 activity, and its importance in normal cell biology are entirely unknown. We examined the biological consequences of RABL6A silencing in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) that express or lack ARF, p53 or both proteins. We found that RABL6A depletion caused centrosome amplification, aneuploidy and multinucleation in MEFs regardless of ARF and p53 status. The centrosome amplification in RABL6A depleted p53−/− MEFs resulted from centrosome reduplication via Cdk2-mediated hyperphosphorylation of nucleophosmin (NPM) at threonine-199. Thus, RABL6A prevents centrosome amplification through an ARF/p53-independent mechanism that restricts NPM-T199 phosphorylation. These findings demonstrate an essential role for RABL6A in centrosome regulation and maintenance of chromosome stability in non-transformed cells, key processes that ensure genomic integrity and prevent tumorigenesis. PMID:24282525

  4. The ciliopathy-associated CPLANE proteins direct basal body recruitment of intraflagellar transport machinery.

    PubMed

    Toriyama, Michinori; Lee, Chanjae; Taylor, S Paige; Duran, Ivan; Cohn, Daniel H; Bruel, Ange-Line; Tabler, Jacqueline M; Drew, Kevin; Kelly, Marcus R; Kim, Sukyoung; Park, Tae Joo; Braun, Daniela A; Pierquin, Ghislaine; Biver, Armand; Wagner, Kerstin; Malfroot, Anne; Panigrahi, Inusha; Franco, Brunella; Al-Lami, Hadeel Adel; Yeung, Yvonne; Choi, Yeon Ja; Duffourd, Yannis; Faivre, Laurence; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Chen, Jiang; Liu, Karen J; Marcotte, Edward M; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Krakow, Deborah; Jackson, Peter K; Wallingford, John B

    2016-06-01

    Cilia use microtubule-based intraflagellar transport (IFT) to organize intercellular signaling. Ciliopathies are a spectrum of human diseases resulting from defects in cilia structure or function. The mechanisms regulating the assembly of ciliary multiprotein complexes and the transport of these complexes to the base of cilia remain largely unknown. Combining proteomics, in vivo imaging and genetic analysis of proteins linked to planar cell polarity (Inturned, Fuzzy and Wdpcp), we identified and characterized a new genetic module, which we term CPLANE (ciliogenesis and planar polarity effector), and an extensive associated protein network. CPLANE proteins physically and functionally interact with the poorly understood ciliopathy-associated protein Jbts17 at basal bodies, where they act to recruit a specific subset of IFT-A proteins. In the absence of CPLANE, defective IFT-A particles enter the axoneme and IFT-B trafficking is severely perturbed. Accordingly, mutation of CPLANE genes elicits specific ciliopathy phenotypes in mouse models and is associated with ciliopathies in human patients. PMID:27158779

  5. RBM45 homo-oligomerization mediates association with ALS-linked proteins and stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Collins, Mahlon; Geiser, Rachel; Bakkar, Nadine; Riascos, David; Bowser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of RNA-binding proteins is a pathological hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). RBM45 is an RNA-binding protein that forms cytoplasmic inclusions in neurons and glia in ALS and FTLD. To explore the role of RBM45 in ALS and FTLD, we examined the contribution of the protein’s domains to its function, subcellular localization, and interaction with itself and ALS-linked proteins. We find that RBM45 forms homo-oligomers and physically associates with the ALS-linked proteins TDP-43 and FUS in the nucleus. Nuclear localization of RBM45 is mediated by a bipartite nuclear-localization sequence (NLS) located at the C-terminus. RBM45 mutants that lack a functional NLS accumulate in the cytoplasm and form TDP-43 positive stress granules. Moreover, we identify a novel structural element, termed the homo-oligomer assembly (HOA) domain, that is highly conserved across species and promote homo-oligomerization of RBM45. RBM45 mutants that fail to form homo-oligomers exhibit significantly reduced association with ALS-linked proteins and inclusion into stress granules. These results show that RMB45 may function as a homo-oligomer and that its oligomerization contributes to ALS/FTLD RNA-binding protein aggregation. PMID:26391765

  6. Fucoidan improves bioactivity and vasculogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells in murine hind limb ischemia associated with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hee; Ryu, Jung Min; Han, Yong-Seok; Zia, Mohammad Farid; Kwon, Hyog Young; Noh, Hyunjin; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Sang Hun

    2016-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease. Although mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of ischemic diseases associated with CKD, the associated pathophysiological conditions lead to low survival and proliferation of transplanted MSCs. To address these limitations, we investigated the effects of fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide, on the bioactivity of adipose tissue-derived MSCs and the potential of fucoidan-treated MSCs to improve neovascularization in ischemic tissues of CKD mice. Treatment of MSCs with fucoidan increased their proliferative potential and the expression of cell cycle-associated proteins, such as cyclin E, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 2, cyclin D1, and CDK4, via focal adhesion kinase and the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase-Akt axis. Moreover, fucoidan enhanced the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs through the ERK-IDO-1 signal cascade. Fucoidan was found to augment the proliferation, incorporation, and endothelial differentiation of transplanted MSCs at ischemic sites in CKD mice hind limbs. In addition, transplantation of fucoidan-treated MSCs enhanced the ratio of blood flow and limb salvage in CKD mice with hind limb ischemia. To our knowledge, our findings are the first to reveal that fucoidan enhances the bioactivity of MSCs and improves their neovascularization in ischemic injured tissues of CKD. In conclusion, fucoidan-treated MSCs may provide an important pathway toward therapeutic neovascularization in patients with CKD.

  7. Phase Transitions of Spindle-Associated Protein Regulate Spindle Apparatus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Shusheng; Huang, Yuejia; He, Xiaonan; Cui, Honggang; Zhu, Xueliang; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    Spindle assembly required during mitosis depends on microtubule polymerization. We demonstrate that the evolutionarily conserved low-complexity protein, BuGZ, undergoes phase transition or coacervation to promote assembly of both spindles and their associated components. BuGZ forms temperature-dependent liquid droplets alone or on microtubules in physiological buffers. Coacervation in vitro or in spindle and spindle matrix depends on hydrophobic residues in BuGZ. BuGZ coacervation and its binding to microtubules and tubulin are required to promote assembly of spindle and spindle matrix in Xenopus egg extract and in mammalian cells. Since several previously identified spindle-associated components also contain low complexity regions, we propose that coacervating proteins may be a hallmark of proteins that comprise a spindle matrix that functions to promote assembly of spindles by concentrating its building blocks. PMID:26388440

  8. The Rh protein family: gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Han; Ye, Mao

    2010-04-01

    The Rh (Rhesus) genes encode a family of conserved proteins that share a structural fold of 12 transmembrane helices with members of the major facilitator superfamily. Interest in this family has arisen from the discovery of Rh factor's involvement in hemolytic disease in the fetus and newborn, and of its homologs widely expressed in epithelial tissues. The Rh factor and Rh-associated glycoprotein (RhAG), with epithelial cousins RhBG and RhCG, form four subgroups conferring upon vertebrates a genealogical commonality. The past decade has heralded significant advances in understanding the phylogenetics, allelic diversity, crystal structure, and biological function of Rh proteins. This review describes recent progress on this family and the molecular insights gleaned from its gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association. The focus is on its long evolutionary history and surprising structural conservation from prokaryotes to humans, pointing to the importance of its functional role, related to but distinct from ammonium transport proteins.

  9. The evolutionarily conserved Krueppel-associated box domain defines a subfamily of eukaryotic multifingered proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bellefroid, E.J.; Poncelet, D.A.; Lecocq, P.J.; Revelant, O.; Martial, J.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The authors have previously shown that the human genome includes hundreds of genes coding for putative factors related to the Krueppel zinc-finger protein, which regulates Drosophila segmentation. They report herein that about one-third of these genes code for proteins that share a very conserved region of about 75 amino acids in their N-terminal nonfinger portion. Homologous regions are found in a number of previously described finger proteins, including mouse Zfp-1 and Xenopus Xfin. They named this region the Krueppel-associated box (KRAB). This domain has the potential to form two amphipathic {alpha}-helices. Southern blot analysis of zoo blots suggests that the Krueppel-associated box is highly conserved during evolution. Northern blot analysis shows that these genes are expressed in most adult tissues and are down-regulated during in vitro terminal differentiation of human myeloid cells.

  10. Evaluating age-associated phenotypes in a mouse model of protein dyshomeostasis.

    PubMed

    Min, Jin-Na; Patterson, Cam

    2011-03-01

    Proteotoxicity caused by an imbalanced protein quality control surveillance system is believed to contribute to the phenotypes associated with aging as well as many neurodegenerative diseases. Understanding and monitoring the impact of proteotoxicity in these processes offers researchers keen insight into the biology of aging, as well as other conditions that share similar pathological etiologies. In Section 2, we present various technical approaches that can be used to calculate and characterize the phenotypes associated with aging that are linked to increased proteotoxicity. Methods such as the measurement of oligomer protein expression and the capacity of proteasome function are useful tools in observing both aging phenotypes and neurodegenerative diseases, both of which share the phenomenon of impaired protein homeostasis.

  11. Homologous recombination and human health: the roles of BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Rohit; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Weiran; Jasin, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells, the defining step of which is homologous strand exchange directed by the RAD51 protein. The physiological importance of HR is underscored by the observation of genomic instability in HR-deficient cells and, importantly, the association of cancer predisposition and developmental defects with mutations in HR genes. The tumor suppressors BRCA1 and BRCA2, key players at different stages of HR, are frequently mutated in familial breast and ovarian cancers. Other HR proteins, including PALB2 and RAD51 paralogs, have also been identified as tumor suppressors. This review summarizes recent findings on BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins involved in human disease with an emphasis on their molecular roles and interactions. PMID:25833843

  12. Identification of a human homologue of the vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-associated protein of 33 kDa (VAP-33): a broadly expressed protein that binds to VAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Weir, M L; Klip, A; Trimble, W S

    1998-01-01

    We report the identification of a human homologue of the vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-associated protein (hVAP-33) that has been implicated in neuronal exocytosis in Aplysia californica. This hVAP-33 shared 50% amino acid identity with the A. californica form and had similar length, structural organization and VAMP-binding abilities. However, in contrast with the neuron-specific expression seen in A. californica, hVAP-33 was broadly expressed, suggesting possible roles in vesicle fusion in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. PMID:9657962

  13. [Dynamic model of protein behavior in water. Possible mechanism of association and dissociation of specific complexes].

    PubMed

    Kiaiviariainen, A I

    1979-01-01

    The proposed mechanism of association and dissociation of specific protein complex with ligands is based on the assumption that thermal fluctuations in the non-polar cavities of protein are interrelated due to the co-operative properties of macromolecules. The non-polar cavities, representing the active centres and clefts in the globule jump from the "open" state to the "closed" one with a certain amount of water being removed to the external medium. It is assumed that the association of ligand with the active centre is accompanied by stabilization of the chest state and destibilization of the open one, dissociation being a reverse process. A rapid change in the state of the active centre under the influence of ligand induces a slow relaxation process resulting in similar alterations in the state of the auxiliary non-polar cavities of protein. As a result, the binding constant of ligand increases, while the free energy of protein decreases. Expressions have been obtained which relate the rate constants of association, dissociation and the binding constant to the rate-constant of the nonpolar cavities transitions from the closed state to the open one, and vice versa. They gave a possibility for a qualitative interpretation of the effect of some specific and non-specific agents upon the stability of immunoglobulins, on the influence of salts upon the association and dissociation of antibody-antigene complexes and on the increase in the constant of binding between antibodies and haptens in the course of prolonged immunisation.

  14. Solitary intraparenchymal pulmonary plasmacytoma associated with production of an M-protein: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Wile, A; Olinger, G; Peter, J B; Dornfeld, L

    1976-05-01

    A case of a 40-year old man who underwent surgical extirpation of a solitary intraparenchymal pulmonary plasmacytoma is reported. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case associated with the production of an M-protien. The production of protein fell dramatically following removal of the tumor.

  15. A Commensal Strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis Overexpresses Membrane Proteins Associated with Pathogenesis When Grown in Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Águila-Arcos, S; Ding, S; Aloria, K; Arizmendi, J M; Fearnley, I M; Walker, J E; Goñi, F M; Alkorta, I

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as one of the major nosocomial pathogens associated with infections of implanted medical devices. The most important factor in the pathogenesis of these infections is the formation of bacterial biofilms. Bacteria grown in biofilms are more resistant to antibiotics and to the immune defence system than planktonic bacteria. In these infections, the antimicrobial therapy usually fails and the removal of the biofilm-coated implanted device is the only effective solution. In this study, three proteomic approaches were performed to investigate membrane proteins associated to biofilm formation: (i) sample fractionation by gel electrophoresis, followed by isotopic labelling and LC-MS/MS analysis, (ii) in-solution sample preparation, followed by isotopic labelling and LC-MS/MS analysis and (iii) in-solution sample preparation and label-free LC-MS/MS analysis. We found that the commensal strain S. epidermidis CECT 231 grown in biofilms expressed higher levels of five membrane and membrane-associated proteins involved in pathogenesis: accumulation-associated protein, staphylococcal secretory antigen, signal transduction protein TRAP, ribonuclease Y and phenol soluble modulin beta 1 when compared with bacteria grown under planktonic conditions. These results indicate that a commensal strain can acquire a pathogenic phenotype depending on the mode of growth.

  16. Detection of the disease associated form of the prion protein in biological samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are neurodegenerative diseases that occur in a variety of mammals. In these diseases, a chromosomally encoded protein (PrP**c) undergoes a conformational change to the disease associated form (PrP**d), and PrP**d is capable inducing ...

  17. Senescence-Associated Vacuoles, a Specific Lytic Compartment for Degradation of Chloroplast Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Cristian A.; Martínez, Dana E.; Costa, M. Lorenza; Guiamet, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of chloroplasts and chloroplast components is a distinctive feature of leaf senescence. In spite of its importance in the nutrient economy of plants, knowledge about the mechanism(s) involved in the breakdown of chloroplast proteins is incomplete. A novel class of vacuoles, “senescence-associated vacuoles” (SAVs), characterized by intense proteolytic activity appear during senescence in chloroplast-containing cells of leaves. Since SAVs contain some chloroplast proteins, they are candidate organelles to participate in chloroplast breakdown. In this review we discuss the characteristics of SAVs, and their possible involvement in the degradation of Rubisco, the most abundant chloroplast protein. Finally, SAVs are compared with other extra-plastidial protein degradation pathways operating in senescing leaves. PMID:27135516

  18. Topology association analysis in weighted protein interaction network for gene prioritization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shunyao; Shao, Fengjing; Zhang, Qi; Ji, Jun; Xu, Shaojie; Sun, Rencheng; Sun, Gengxin; Du, Xiangjun; Sui, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Although lots of algorithms for disease gene prediction have been proposed, the weights of edges are rarely taken into account. In this paper, the strengths of topology associations between disease and essential genes are analyzed in weighted protein interaction network. Empirical analysis demonstrates that compared to other genes, disease genes are weakly connected with essential genes in protein interaction network. Based on this finding, a novel global distance measurement for gene prioritization with weighted protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. Positive and negative flow is allocated to disease and essential genes, respectively. Additionally network propagation model is extended for weighted network. Experimental results on 110 diseases verify the effectiveness and potential of the proposed measurement. Moreover, weak links play more important role than strong links for gene prioritization, which is meaningful to deeply understand protein interaction network.

  19. Nuclear envelope-associated endosomes deliver surface proteins to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chaumet, Alexandre; Wright, Graham D; Seet, Sze Hwee; Tham, Keit Min; Gounko, Natalia V; Bard, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis directs molecular cargo along three main routes: recycling to the cell surface, transport to the Golgi apparatus or degradation in endolysosomes. Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE) is a bacterial protein that typically traffics to the Golgi and then the endoplasmic reticulum before translocating to the cytosol. Here we show that a substantial fraction of internalized PE is also located in nuclear envelope-associated endosomes (NAE), which display limited mobility, exhibit a propensity to undergo fusion and readily discharge their contents into the nuclear envelope. Electron microscopy and protein trapping in the nucleus indicate that NAE mediate PE transfer into the nucleoplasm. RNAi screening further revealed that NAE-mediated transfer depends on the nuclear envelope proteins SUN1 and SUN2, as well as the Sec61 translocon complex. These data reveal a novel endosomal route from the cell surface to the nucleoplasm that facilitates the accumulation of extracellular and cell surface proteins in the nucleus. PMID:26356418

  20. Identification of a putative protein profile associating with tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, A. M.; Look, Maxime P.; Meijer-van Gelder, M. E.; den Bakker, Michael A.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W.; Luider, Theo M.; Foekens, John A.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2009-06-01

    Tamoxifen-resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that associate with tamoxifen-resistance is a first step towards better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy-resistance in breast cancer, using nanoLC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on ~5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to ~550 ng protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n=24 and n=27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag (AMT) reference databases.

  1. Modulation of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Interleukin-6 Function by Hypoxia-Upregulated Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Louise; Yan, Feng; Major, M. Ben

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also called human herpesvirus 8) is linked to the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). KSHV expresses several proteins that modulate host cell signaling pathways. One of these proteins is viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), which is a homolog of human IL-6 (hIL-6). vIL-6 is able to prevent apoptosis and promote proinflammatory signaling, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. Although it can be secreted, vIL-6 is mainly an intracellular protein that is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We performed affinity purification and mass spectrometry to identify novel vIL-6 binding partners and found that a cellular ER chaperone, hypoxia-upregulated protein 1 (HYOU1), interacts with vIL-6. Immunohistochemical staining reveals that both PEL and KS tumor tissues express significant amounts of HYOU1. We also show that HYOU1 increases endogenous vIL-6 protein levels and that HYOU1 facilitates vIL-6-induced JAK/STAT signaling, migration, and survival in endothelial cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that HYOU1 also modulates vIL-6's ability to induce CCL2, a chemokine involved in cell migration. Finally, we investigated the impact of HYOU1 on cellular hIL-6 signaling. Collectively, our data indicate that HYOU1 is important for vIL-6 function and may play a role in the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated cancers. IMPORTANCE KSHV vIL-6 is detectable in all KSHV-associated malignancies and promotes tumorigenesis and inflammation. We identified a cellular protein, called hypoxia-upregulated protein 1 (HYOU1), that interacts with KSHV vIL-6 and is present in KSHV-infected tumors. Our data suggest that HYOU1 facilitates the vIL-6-induced signaling, migration, and survival of endothelial cells. PMID:24920810

  2. Identification of a common protein association region in the neuronal Cdk5 activator.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Ching, Y P; Lam, W H; Qi, Z; Zhang, M; Wang, J H

    2000-10-13

    Cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (Cdk5) depends on the association with neuronal Cdk5 activator (Nck5a) for kinase activity. A variety of cellular proteins have been shown to undergo high affinity association with Nck5a, including three novel proteins, C42, C48, and C53 found by a yeast two-hybrid screen (Ching, Y. P., Qi, Z., and Wang, J. H. (2000) Gene 242, 285-294). The three proteins show competitive binding to Nck5a suggesting that they bind at a common site. The binding site has been mapped to a region of 26 amino acid residues (residues 145 to 170) at the N-terminal boundary of the kinase activation domain of Nck5a. This region of Nck5a contains an amphipathic alpha-helix whose hydrophobic face is involved in Cdk5 activation (Chin, K. T., Ohki, S, Tang, D., Cheng, H. C., Wang, J. H. , and Zhang, M. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 7120-7127). Several lines of evidence suggest that Nck5a interacts with the binding proteins at the hydrophilic face of the amphipathic alpha-helix. First, the Nck5a-(145-170) peptide can bind Cdk5 and Nck5a-binding proteins simultaneously. Second, the association of Nck5a-(145-170) to C48 can be markedly reduced by high ionic strength whereas the interaction between Nck5a and Cdk5 is not affected. Third, substitution of Glu(157) by glutamine in Nck5a-(145-170) abolishes the peptide's ability to bind to the three Nck5a-binding proteins without diminishing its Cdk5 binding activity. PMID:10915792

  3. Rapid induction of chromatin-associated DNA mismatch repair proteins after MNNG treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schroering, Allen G.; Williams, Kandace J.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with low concentrations of monofunctional alkylating agents induces a G2 arrest only after the second round of DNA synthesis in mammalian cells and requires a proficient mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. Here we have investigated rapid alkylation-induced recruitment of DNA repair proteins to chromosomal DNA within synchronized populations of MMR proficient cells (HeLa MR) after MNNG treatment. Within the first hour, the concentrations of MutSα and PCNA increase well beyond their constitutive chromosomally bound levels and MutLα is newly recruited to the chromatin-bound MutSα. Remarkably, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate rapid association of these proteins on the alkylation-damaged chromatin, even when DNA replication is completely blocked. The extent of association of PCNA and MMR proteins on the chromatin is dependent upon the concentration of MNNG and on the specific type of replication block. A subpopulation of the MutSα-associated PCNA also becomes monoubiquitinated, a known requirement for PCNA to interact with translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases. In addition, chromatin-bound SMC1 and NBS1 proteins, associated with DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs), become phosphorylated within one to two hours of exposure to MNNG. However, these activated proteins are not colocalized on the chromatin with MutSα in response to MNNG exposure. PCNA, MutSα/MutLα and activated SMC1/NBS1 remain chromatin-bound for at least 6–8 hours after alkylation damage. Thus, cells that are exposed to low levels of alkylation treatment undergo rapid recruitment to and/or activation of key proteins already on the chromatin without the requirement for DNA replication, apparently via different DNA-damage signaling pathways. PMID:18468964

  4. Rapamycin-binding FKBP25 associates with diverse proteins that form large intracellular entities

    SciTech Connect

    Galat, Andrzej Thai, Robert

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The hFKBP25 interacts with diverse components of macromolecular entities. • We show that the endogenous human FKBP25 is bound to polyribosomes. • The endogenous hFKBP25 co-immunoprecipitated with nucleosomal proteins. • FKBP25 could induce conformational switch in macromolecular complexes. - Abstract: In this paper, we show some evidence that a member of the FK506-binding proteins, FKBP25 is associated to diverse components that are part of several different intracellular large-molecular mass entities. The FKBP25 is a high-affinity rapamycin-binding immunophilin, which has nuclear translocation signals present in its PPIase domain but it was detected both in the cytoplasm compartment and in the nuclear proteome. Analyses of antiFKBP25-immunoprecipitated proteins have revealed that the endogenous FKBP25 is associated to the core histones of the nucleosome, and with several proteins forming spliceosomal complexes and ribosomal subunits. Using polyclonal antiFKBP25 we have detected FKBP25 associated with polyribosomes. Added RNAs or 0.5 M NaCl release FKBP25 that was associated with the polyribosomes indicating that the immunophilin has an intrinsic capacity to form complexes with polyribonucleotides via its charged surface patches. Rapamycin or FK506 treatments of the polyribosomes isolated from porcine brain, HeLa and K568 cells caused a residual release of the endogenous FKBP25, which suggests that the immunophilin also binds to some proteins via its PPIase cavity. Our proteomics study indicates that the nuclear pool of the FKBP25 targets various nuclear proteins that are crucial for packaging of DNA, chromatin remodeling and pre-mRNA splicing whereas the cytosolic pool of this immunophilin is bound to some components of the ribosome.

  5. Association of milk protein genes with fertilization rate and early embryonic development in Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Peñagaricano, Francisco; Khatib, Hasan

    2012-02-01

    Concomitant with intensive selection for increased milk yield, reproductive performance of dairy cows has declined in the last decades, in part due to an unfavourable genetic relationship between these traits. Given that the six main milk protein genes (i.e. whey proteins and caseins) are directly involved in milk production and hence have been a target of the strong selection aimed at improving milk yield in dairy cattle, we hypothesized that these genes could show selection footprints associated with fertility traits. In this study, we used an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) system to test genetic association between 66 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the four caseins (αS1-casein, αS2-casein, β-casein and κ-casein) and the two whey protein genes (α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin) with fertilization rate and early embryonic development in the Holstein breed. A total of 6893 in-vitro fertilizations were performed and a total of 4661 IVF embryos were produced using oocytes from 399 ovaries and semen samples from 12 bulls. Associations between SNPs and fertility traits were analysed using a mixed linear model with genotype as fixed effect and ovary and bull as random effects. A multiple testing correction approach was used to account for the correlation between SNPs due to linkage disequilibrium. After correction, polymorphisms in the LALBA and LGB genes showed significant associations with fertilization success and blastocyst rate. No significant associations were detected between SNPs located in the casein region and IVF fertility traits. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the association between whey protein genes and fertility have not yet been characterized, this study provides the first evidence of association between these genes and fertility traits. Furthermore, these results could shed light on the antagonistic relationship that exists between milk yield and fertility in dairy cattle.

  6. RNA helicase: a novel activity associated with a protein encoded by a positive strand RNA virus.

    PubMed Central

    Laín, S; Riechmann, J L; García, J A

    1990-01-01

    Most positive strand RNA viruses infecting plants and animals encode proteins containing the so-called nucleotide binding motif (NTBM) (1) in their amino acid sequences (2). As suggested from the high level of sequence similarity of these viral proteins with the recently described superfamilies of helicase-like proteins (3-5), the NTBM-containing cylindrical inclusion (CI) protein from plum pox virus (PPV), which belongs to the potyvirus group of positive strand RNA viruses, is shown to be able to unwind RNA duplexes. This activity was found to be dependent on the hydrolysis of NTP to NDP and Pi, and thus it can be considered as an RNA helicase activity. In the in vitro assay used, the PPV CI protein was only able to unwind double strand RNA substrates with 3' single strand overhangs. This result indicates that the helicase activity of the PPV CI protein functions in the 3' to 5' direction (6). To our knowledge, this is the first report on a helicase activity associated with a protein encoded by an RNA virus. Images PMID:2263459

  7. Selecting Targets for Tumor Imaging: An Overview of Cancer-Associated Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Martin C.; de Geus, Susanna W.L.; Prevoo, Hendrica A.J.M.; Hawinkels, Lukas J.A.C.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Sier, Cornelis F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor targeting is a booming business: The global therapeutic monoclonal antibody market accounted for more than $78 billion in 2012 and is expanding exponentially. Tumors can be targeted with an extensive arsenal of monoclonal antibodies, ligand proteins, peptides, RNAs, and small molecules. In addition to therapeutic targeting, some of these compounds can also be applied for tumor visualization before or during surgery, after conjugation with radionuclides and/or near-infrared fluorescent dyes. The majority of these tumor-targeting compounds are directed against cell membrane-bound proteins. Various categories of targetable membrane-bound proteins, such as anchoring proteins, receptors, enzymes, and transporter proteins, exist. The functions and biological characteristics of these proteins determine their location and distribution on the cell membrane, making them more, or less, accessible, and therefore, it is important to understand these features. In this review, we evaluate the characteristics of cancer-associated membrane proteins and discuss their overall usability for cancer targeting, especially focusing on imaging applications. PMID:27721658

  8. RGA protein associates with a TRPV ion channel during biosynthesis and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Barnhill, Jason C; Stokes, Alexander J; Koblan-Huberson, Murielle; Shimoda, Lori M N; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Adra, Chaker N; Turner, Helen

    2004-03-01

    TRPV ion channels transduce a range of temperature stimuli. We proposed that analysis of the protein-protein interactions made by TRPV2 might give insight into the key issues surrounding this channel. These issues include the potential functional significance of TRPV2 in non-sensory tissues, the molecules involved in transducing its activation signal(s) and the mechanism by which its trafficking to the cell surface is regulated. Here we describe the interaction of TRPV2 channel with the RGA gene product. RGA is a four-transmembrane domain, intracellularly localized protein. RGA associates with TRPV2 in a rat mast cell line that is a native context for both proteins. The interaction between TRPV2 and RGA is transient and occurs intracellularly. RGA does not accompany TRPV2 to the cell surface. Formation of the TRPV2/RGA complex is dependent upon a cellular glycosylation event, suggesting that RGA may play a chaperone or targeting role for TRPV2 during the maturation of the ion channel protein. These data record a novel protein-protein interaction for TRPV2 and provide a foundation for future study of the potential regulatory contribution of RGA to TRPV2 function.

  9. THE DELICATE BALANCE BETWEEN SECRETED PROTEIN FOLDING AND ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM-ASSOCIATED DEGRADATION IN HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding is a complex, error-prone process that often results in an irreparable protein by-product. These by-products can be recognized by cellular quality control machineries and targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation. The folding of proteins in the secretory pathway adds another layer to the protein folding “problem,” as the endoplasmic reticulum maintains a unique chemical environment within the cell. In fact, a growing number of diseases are attributed to defects in secretory protein folding, and many of these by-products are targeted for a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Since its discovery, research on the mechanisms underlying the ERAD pathway has provided new insights into how ERAD contributes to human health during both normal and diseases states. Links between ERAD and disease are evidenced from the loss of protein function as a result of degradation, chronic cellular stress when ERAD fails to keep up with misfolded protein production, and the ability of some pathogens to coopt the ERAD pathway. The growing number of ERAD substrates has also illuminated the differences in the machineries used to recognize and degrade a vast array of potential clients for this pathway. Despite all that is known about ERAD, many questions remain, and new paradigms will likely emerge. Clearly, the key to successful disease treatment lies within defining the molecular details of the ERAD pathway and in understanding how this conserved pathway selects and degrades an innumerable cast of substrates. PMID:22535891

  10. Coordinate regulation of proteins associated with radiation resistance in cultured insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, A.; Koval, T.M.

    1994-04-01

    Cultured TN-368 lepidopteran insect cells exhibit a pronounced resistance to the lethal effects of a variety of physical agents, including X rays and 254 nm UV light, as well as a large number of chemicals. The resistance to ionizing radiation has previously been associated with an inducible process which is not expressed in unirradiated cells or cells receiving less than some minimal amount of radiation necessary for activating the process. The studies in this paper were initiated in an attempt to identify and characterize the inducible proteins associated with the marked radiation resistance of the TN-368 cells. Cells were exposed to doses of 0, 25, 64 or 350 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays and incubated either for 3 h in medium containing [{sup 35}S]methionine or for 2 h without labeling. Labeled cells were separated into nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions and proteins were analyzed on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. Unlabeled cells were used to isolate total RNA which was translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system with {sup 35}S label. These translation products were also analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Gamma irradiation of the TN-368 cells resulted in the de novo synthesis of several proteins as well as the complete inhibition of others. The number of such proteins identified was 19. These proteins ranged in size from 18-73 kDa, with a pI distribution of 4.7 to 6.1. In addition to the unique proteins, a large number of other proteins were also either up- or down-regulated. These observations were made in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions as well as in the translation products of RNA produced after irradiation. These studies indicate that RNA and protein synthesis in lepidopteran cells are coordinately regulated in response to ionizing radiation and may participate in the pronounced radioresistance of the TN-368 cells. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Is a Novel Biological Target for Neurofibromatosis Type 1-associated Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Daiki; Hirayama, Mio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Mizuguchi, Souhei; Wilson Morifuji, Masayo; Ihn, Hironobu; Takeya, Motohiro; Kuramochi, Akira; Araki, Norie

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disease that predisposes individuals to develop benign neurofibromas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Due to the lack of information on the molecular mechanism of NF1-associated tumor pathogenesis or biomarkers/therapeutic targets, an effective treatment for NF1 tumors has not been established. In this study, the novel NF1-associated protein, translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), was identified by integrated proteomics and found to be up-regulated via activated MAPK/PI3K-AKT signaling in response to growth factors in NF1-deficient Schwann cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of NF1-associated tumors revealed that the TCTP expression level correlated with tumorigenicity. In NF1-deficient MPNST cells, TCTP protein but not mRNA was down-regulated by NF1 GTPase-activating protein-related domain or MAPK/PI3K inhibitors, and this correlated with suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. mTOR inhibition by rapamycin also down-regulated TCTP protein expression, whereas knockdown or overexpression of TCTP suppressed or activated mTOR signaling, respectively, and affected cell viability. These results suggest that a positive feedback loop between TCTP and mTOR contributes to NF1-associated tumor formation. Last, the anti-tumor effect of artesunate, which binds to and degrades TCTP, was evaluated. Artesunate significantly suppressed the viability of MPNST cells but not normal Schwann cells, and the TCTP level inversely correlated with artesunate sensitivity. Moreover, combinational use of artesunate and rapamycin enhanced the cytotoxic effect on MPNST cells. These findings suggest that TCTP is functionally implicated in the progression of NF1-associated tumors and could serve as a biological target for their therapy. PMID:25092287

  12. Identification of a Putative Protein Profile Associated with Tamoxifen Therapy Resistance in Breast Cancer*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, Annemieke M.; Look, Maxime P.; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E.; den Bakker, Michael A.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W. M.; Luider, Theo M.; Foekens, John A.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Tamoxifen resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that are associated with tamoxifen resistance is a first step toward better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer using nano-LC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on ∼5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to ∼550 ng of protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n = 24 and n = 27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag reference databases. A total of 17,263 unique peptides were identified that corresponded to 2,556 non-redundant proteins identified with ≥2 peptides. 1,713 overlapping proteins between the two data sets were used for further analysis. Comparative proteome analysis revealed 100 putatively differentially abundant proteins between tamoxifen-sensitive and tamoxifen-resistant tumors. The presence and relative abundance for 47 differentially abundant proteins were verified by targeted nano-LC-MS/MS in a selection of unpooled, non-microdissected discovery set tumor tissue extracts. ENPP1, EIF3E, and GNB4 were significantly associated with progression-free survival upon tamoxifen treatment for recurrent disease. Differential abundance of our top discriminating protein, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, was validated by tissue microarray in an independent patient cohort (n = 156). Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer levels were higher in therapy

  13. EBNA-LP Associates with Cellular Proteins Including DNA-PK and HA95

    PubMed Central

    Han, Innoc; Harada, Shizuko; Weaver, David; Xue, Yong; Lane, William; Orstavik, Sigurd; Skalhegg, Bjorn; Kieff, Elliott

    2001-01-01

    EBNA-LP-associated proteins were identified by sequencing proteins that immunoprecipitated with Flag epitope-tagged EBNA-LP (FLP) from lymphoblasts in which FLP was stably expressed. The association of EBNA-LP with Hsp70 (72/73) was confirmed, and sequences of DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), HA95, Hsp27, prolyl 4-hydroxylase α-1 subunit, α-tubulin, and β-tubulin were identified. The fraction of total cellular HA95 that associated with FLP was very high, while progressively lower fractions of the total DNA-PKcs, Hsp70, Hsp 27, α-tubulin, and β-tubulin specifically associated with EBNA-LP as determined by immunoblotting with antibodies to these proteins. EBNA-LP bound to two domains in the DNA-PKcs C terminus and DNA-PKcs associated with the EBNA-LP repeat domain. DNA-PKcs that was bound to EBNA-LP phosphorylated p53 or EBNA-LP in vitro, and the phosphorylation of EBNA-LP was inhibited by Wortmannin, a specific in vitro inhibitor of DNA-PKcs. PMID:11160753

  14. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Matteotti, Christel; Yip, Cassandre; Liu, Jian; Leroy, Baptiste; Hubeau, Céline; Gerbaux, Cécile; Cloet, Samuel; Wauters, Armelle; Zorbo, Sabrina; Meyer, Pierre; Pirson, Isabelle; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wattiez, Ruddy; Harper, Scott Q.; Belayew, Alexandra; Coppée, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX) genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain) and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain). Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs were

  15. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Eidahl, Jocelyn O; Lancelot, Céline; Tassin, Alexandra; Matteotti, Christel; Yip, Cassandre; Liu, Jian; Leroy, Baptiste; Hubeau, Céline; Gerbaux, Cécile; Cloet, Samuel; Wauters, Armelle; Zorbo, Sabrina; Meyer, Pierre; Pirson, Isabelle; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wattiez, Ruddy; Harper, Scott Q; Belayew, Alexandra; Coppée, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX) genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain) and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain). Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs were

  16. Association of the Adenovirus DNA-Binding Protein with RNA Both in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleghon, Vaughn G.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    1986-12-01

    The multifunctional DNA-binding protein (DBP) encoded by human adenovirus binds RNA. The association of purified DBP with RNA in vitro was demonstrated by using either a gel filtration or a filter binding assay. This association is sensitive to ionic strength and exhibits no apparent sequence specificity. DBP also interacts with RNA in vivo; it can be crosslinked to polyadenylylated RNA by UV-irradiation of intact cells during the late phase of adenovirus infections. The 46-kDa carboxyl-terminal domain of DBP binds RNA in vitro and was found to be associated with polyadenylylated RNA in vivo. This is the same domain that interacts with DNA. However, the differences in sensitivity of DBP to trypsin when bound to RNA versus DNA suggest that RNA and DNA either bind at different sites within this domain or induce different conformational changes within the protein.

  17. Downregulation of the microtubule associated protein tau impairs process outgrowth and myelin basic protein mRNA transport in oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Seiberlich, Veronika; Bauer, Nina G; Schwarz, Lisa; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Goldbaum, Olaf; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelin forming cells of the CNS, are characterized by their numerous membranous extensions, which enwrap neuronal axons and form myelin sheaths. During differentiation oligodendrocytes pass different morphological stages, downregulate the expression of the proteoglycan NG2, and acquire major myelin specific proteins, such as myelin basic proteins (MBP) and proteolipid protein. MBP mRNA is transported in RNA granules along the microtubules (MTs) to the periphery and translated locally. MTs participate in the elaboration and stabilization of the myelin forming extensions and are essential for cellular sorting processes. Their dynamic properties are regulated by microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). The MAP tau is present in oligodendrocytes and involved in the regulation and stabilization of the MT network. To further elucidate the functional significance of tau in oligodendrocytes, we have downregulated tau by siRNA technology and studied the effects on cell differentiation and neuron-glia contact formation. The data show that tau knockdown impairs process outgrowth and leads to a decrease in MBP expression. Furthermore, MBP mRNA transport to distant cellular extensions is impaired and cells remain in the NG2 stage. In myelinating cocultures with dorsal root ganglion neurons, oligodendrocyte precursor cells after tau miR RNA lentiviral knockdown develop into NG2 positive cells with very long and thin processes, contacting axons loosely, but fail to form internodes. This demonstrates that tau is important for MBP mRNA transport and involved in process formation. The disturbance of the balance of tau leads to abnormalities in oligodendrocyte differentiation, neuron-glia contact formation and the early myelination process.

  18. Metastasis-associated Protein 1 Drives Tumor Cell Migration and Invasion through Transcriptional Repression of RING Finger Protein 144A*

    PubMed Central

    Marzook, Hezlin; Li, Da-Qiang; Nair, Vasudha S.; Mudvari, Prakriti; Reddy, Sirigiri Divijendra Natha; Pakala, Suresh B.; Santhoshkumar, T. R.; Pillai, M. Radhakrishna; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1), a component of the nucleosome-remodeling and histone deacetylase complex, is widely up-regulated in human cancers and significantly correlated with tumor invasion and metastasis, but the mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. Here, we report that MTA1 transcriptionally represses the expression of RING finger protein 144A (RNF144A), an uncharacterized gene whose protein product possesses potential E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, by recruiting the histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (c/EBPα) co-repressor complex onto human RNF144A promoter. Furthermore, an inverse correlation between the expression levels of MTA1 and RNF144A was demonstrated in publicly available breast cancer microarray datasets and the MCF10 breast cancer progression model system. To address functional aspects of MTA1 regulation of RNF144A, we demonstrate that RNF144A is a novel suppressor of cancer migration and invasion, two requisite steps of metastasis in vivo, and knockdown of endogenous RNF144A by small interfering RNAs accelerates the migration and invasion of MTA1-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that RNF144A is partially responsible for MTA1-mediated migration and invasion and that MTA1 overexpression in highly metastatic cancer cells drives cell migration and invasion by, at least in part, interfering with the suppressive function of RNF144A through transcriptional repression of RNF144A expression. Together, these findings provide novel mechanistic insights into regulation of tumor progression and metastasis by MTA1 and highlight a previously unrecognized role of RNF144A in MTA1-driven cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:22184113

  19. No Evidence for Association of Autism with Rare Heterozygous Point Mutations in Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2), or in Other Contactin-Associated Proteins or Contactins

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, John D.; Gupta, Abha R.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Walker, Michael F.; Keaney, John; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Murtha, Michael T.; Anyanwu, Samuel; Ober, Gordon T.; Raubeson, Melanie J.; DiLullo, Nicholas M.; Villa, Natalie; Waqar, Zainabdul; Sullivan, Catherine; Gonzalez, Luis; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Choe, So-Yeon; Neale, Benjamin M.; Daly, Mark J.; State, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Contactins and Contactin-Associated Proteins, and Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2) in particular, have been widely cited as autism risk genes based on findings from homozygosity mapping, molecular cytogenetics, copy number variation analyses, and both common and rare single nucleotide association studies. However, data specifically with regard to the contribution of heterozygous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) have been inconsistent. In an effort to clarify the role of rare point mutations in CNTNAP2 and related gene families, we have conducted targeted next-generation sequencing and evaluated existing sequence data in cohorts totaling 2704 cases and 2747 controls. We find no evidence for statistically significant association of rare heterozygous mutations in any of the CNTN or CNTNAP genes, including CNTNAP2, placing marked limits on the scale of their plausible contribution to risk. PMID:25621974

  20. No evidence for association of autism with rare heterozygous point mutations in Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2), or in Other Contactin-Associated Proteins or Contactins.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, John D; Gupta, Abha R; Sanders, Stephan J; Walker, Michael F; Keaney, John; Fernandez, Thomas V; Murtha, Michael T; Anyanwu, Samuel; Ober, Gordon T; Raubeson, Melanie J; DiLullo, Nicholas M; Villa, Natalie; Waqar, Zainabdul; Sullivan, Catherine; Gonzalez, Luis; Willsey, A Jeremy; Choe, So-Yeon; Neale, Benjamin M; Daly, Mark J; State, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    Contactins and Contactin-Associated Proteins, and Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2) in particular, have been widely cited as autism risk genes based on findings from homozygosity mapping, molecular cytogenetics, copy number variation analyses, and both common and rare single nucleotide association studies. However, data specifically with regard to the contribution of heterozygous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) have been inconsistent. In an effort to clarify the role of rare point mutations in CNTNAP2 and related gene families, we have conducted targeted next-generation sequencing and evaluated existing sequence data in cohorts totaling 2704 cases and 2747 controls. We find no evidence for statistically significant association of rare heterozygous mutations in any of the CNTN or CNTNAP genes, including CNTNAP2, placing marked limits on the scale of their plausible contribution to risk.

  1. HIV1-viral protein R (Vpr) mutations: associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies.

    PubMed

    Soares, Rui; Rocha, Graça; Meliço-Silvestre, António; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 30 years, research into HIV has advanced the knowledge of virus genetics and the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) is a specialized and multifunctional protein that plays important roles at multiple stages of the HIV-1 viral life cycle. This protein interacts with a number of cellular and viral proteins and with multiple activities including nuclear transport of the pre-integration complex (PIC) to the nucleus, transcriptional activation, cell cycle arrest at G2/M transition phase and induction of cell death via apoptosis. Specifically, Vpr has been shown to control many host cell functions through a variety of biological processes and by interaction with several cellular pathways. The different functions of Vpr may enhance viral replication and impair the immune system in HIV-1 infected patients. Importantly, functional defects induced by mutations in the Vpr protein correlate with slow disease progression of HIV-infected patients. Vpr is also associated with other concomitant pathologies developed by these patients, which may lead it to be considered as a potential novel therapeutic target. This review will focus on HIV-1 Vpr, mainly on the importance of its structural mutations on the progression of HIV infection, associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mass spectrometric approach for identifying putative plasma membrane proteins of Arabidopsis leaves associated with cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2003-10-01

    Although enhancement of freezing tolerance in plants during cold acclimation is closely associated with an increase in the cryostability of plasma membrane, the molecular mechanism for the increased cryostability of plasma membrane is still to be elucidated. In Arabidopsis, enhanced freezing tolerance was detectable after cold acclimation at 2 degrees C for as short as 1 day, and maximum freezing tolerance was attained after 1 week. To identify the plasma membrane proteins that change in quantity in response to cold acclimation, a highly purified plasma membrane fraction was isolated from leaves before and during cold acclimation, and the proteins in the fraction were separated with gel electrophoresis. We found that there were substantial changes in the protein profiles after as short as 1 day of cold acclimation. Subsequently, using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we identified 38 proteins that changed in quantity during cold acclimation. The proteins that changed in quantity during the first day of cold acclimation include those that are associated with membrane repair by membrane fusion, protection of the membrane against osmotic stress, enhancement of CO2 fixation, and proteolysis.

  3. HIV1-viral protein R (Vpr) mutations: associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies.

    PubMed

    Soares, Rui; Rocha, Graça; Meliço-Silvestre, António; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 30 years, research into HIV has advanced the knowledge of virus genetics and the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) is a specialized and multifunctional protein that plays important roles at multiple stages of the HIV-1 viral life cycle. This protein interacts with a number of cellular and viral proteins and with multiple activities including nuclear transport of the pre-integration complex (PIC) to the nucleus, transcriptional activation, cell cycle arrest at G2/M transition phase and induction of cell death via apoptosis. Specifically, Vpr has been shown to control many host cell functions through a variety of biological processes and by interaction with several cellular pathways. The different functions of Vpr may enhance viral replication and impair the immune system in HIV-1 infected patients. Importantly, functional defects induced by mutations in the Vpr protein correlate with slow disease progression of HIV-infected patients. Vpr is also associated with other concomitant pathologies developed by these patients, which may lead it to be considered as a potential novel therapeutic target. This review will focus on HIV-1 Vpr, mainly on the importance of its structural mutations on the progression of HIV infection, associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27264019

  4. Animal Models of Congenital Cardiomyopathies Associated With Mutations in Z-Line Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bang, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac Z-line at the boundary between sarcomeres is a multiprotein complex connecting the contractile apparatus with the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The Z-line is important for efficient force generation and transmission as well as the maintenance of structural stability and integrity. Furthermore, it is a nodal point for intracellular signaling, in particular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. Mutations in various genes encoding Z-line proteins have been associated with different cardiomyopathies, including dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction, and mutations even within the same gene can cause widely different pathologies. Animal models have contributed to a great advancement in the understanding of the physiological function of Z-line proteins and the pathways leading from mutations in Z-line proteins to cardiomyopathy, although genotype-phenotype prediction remains a great challenge. This review presents an overview of the currently available animal models for Z-line and Z-line associated proteins involved in human cardiomyopathies with special emphasis on knock-in and transgenic mouse models recapitulating the clinical phenotypes of human cardiomyopathy patients carrying mutations in Z-line proteins. Pros and cons of mouse models will be discussed and a future outlook will be given. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 38-52, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27171814

  5. Association of the GTP-binding protein Rab3A with bovine adrenal chromaffin granules

    SciTech Connect

    Darchen, F.; Hammel, F.; Monteils, M.P.; Scherman, D. ); Zahraoui, A.; Tavitian, A. )

    1990-08-01

    The Rab3A protein belongs to a large family of small GTP-binding proteins that are present in eukaryotic cells and that share amino acid identities with the Ras proteins (products of the ras protooncogenes). Rab3A, which is specifically located in nervous and endocrine tissues, is suspected to play a key role in secretion. Its localization was investigated in bovine adrenal gland by using a polyclonal antibody. Rab3A was detected in adrenal medulla but not in adrenal cortex. In cultured adrenal medulla cells, Rab3A was specifically expressed in the catecholamine-secreting chromaffin cells. Subcellular fractionation suggested that Rab3A is about 30% cytosolic and that particulate Rab3A is associated with the membrane of chromaffin granules (the catecholamine storage organelles) and with a second compartment likely to be the plasma membrane. The Rab3A localization on chromaffin granule membranes was confirmed by immunoadsorption with an antibody against dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase. Rab3A was not extracted from this membrane by NaCl or KBr but was partially extracted by urea and totally solubilized by Triton X-100, suggesting either an interaction with an intrinsic protein or a membrane association through fatty acid acylation. This study suggests that Rab3A, which may also be located on other secretory vesicles containing noncharacterized small GTP-binding proteins, is involved in their biogenesis or in the regulated secretion process.

  6. Epidemic Spreading Model to Characterize Misfolded Proteins Propagation in Aging and Associated Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Sotero, Roberto C.; Toussaint, Paule J.; Evans, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Misfolded proteins (MP) are a key component in aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders. For example, misfolded Amyloid-ß (Aß) and tau proteins are two neuropathogenic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Mechanisms underlying intra-brain MP propagation/deposition remain essentially uncharacterized. Here, is introduced an epidemic spreading model (ESM) for MP dynamics that considers propagation-like interactions between MP agents and the brain's clearance response across the structural connectome. The ESM reproduces advanced Aß deposition patterns in the human brain (explaining 46∼56% of the variance in regional Aß loads, in 733 subjects from the ADNI database). Furthermore, this model strongly supports a) the leading role of Aß clearance deficiency and early Aß onset age during Alzheimer's disease progression, b) that effective anatomical distance from Aß outbreak region explains regional Aß arrival time and Aß deposition likelihood, c) the multi-factorial impact of APOE e4 genotype, gender and educational level on lifetime intra-brain Aß propagation, and d) the modulatory impact of Aß propagation history on tau proteins concentrations, supporting the hypothesis of an interrelated pathway between Aß pathophysiology and tauopathy. To our knowledge, the ESM is the first computational model highlighting the direct link between structural brain networks, production/clearance of pathogenic proteins and associated intercellular transfer mechanisms, individual genetic/demographic properties and clinical states in health and disease. In sum, the proposed ESM constitutes a promising framework to clarify intra-brain region to region transference mechanisms associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25412207

  7. Epidemic spreading model to characterize misfolded proteins propagation in aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Sotero, Roberto C; Toussaint, Paule J; Evans, Alan C

    2014-11-01

    Misfolded proteins (MP) are a key component in aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders. For example, misfolded Amyloid-ß (Aß) and tau proteins are two neuropathogenic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Mechanisms underlying intra-brain MP propagation/deposition remain essentially uncharacterized. Here, is introduced an epidemic spreading model (ESM) for MP dynamics that considers propagation-like interactions between MP agents and the brain's clearance response across the structural connectome. The ESM reproduces advanced Aß deposition patterns in the human brain (explaining 46∼56% of the variance in regional Aß loads, in 733 subjects from the ADNI database). Furthermore, this model strongly supports a) the leading role of Aß clearance deficiency and early Aß onset age during Alzheimer's disease progression, b) that effective anatomical distance from Aß outbreak region explains regional Aß arrival time and Aß deposition likelihood, c) the multi-factorial impact of APOE e4 genotype, gender and educational level on lifetime intra-brain Aß propagation, and d) the modulatory impact of Aß propagation history on tau proteins concentrations, supporting the hypothesis of an interrelated pathway between Aß pathophysiology and tauopathy. To our knowledge, the ESM is the first computational model highlighting the direct link between structural brain networks, production/clearance of pathogenic proteins and associated intercellular transfer mechanisms, individual genetic/demographic properties and clinical states in health and disease. In sum, the proposed ESM constitutes a promising framework to clarify intra-brain region to region transference mechanisms associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. LAPTM4B-35 protein is a weak tumor-associated antigen candidate

    PubMed Central

    SHI, GUILAN; ZHOU, CHUNXIA; WANG, DONGMEI; MA, WENBO; ZHANG, SHUREN

    2014-01-01

    Lysosome-associated protein transmembrane 4β (LAPTM4B) is a gene that has been indicated to be involved in cancer. It is located at chromosome 8q22 and is composed of seven exons and six introns. LAPTM4B encodes two protein isoforms: LAPTM4B-35 and LAPTM4B-24. LAPTM4B-35 is markedly upregulated and LAPTM4B-24 is downregulated in several types of cancer. LAPTM4B-35 is 91 amino acids (N91) longer than LAPTM4B-24 at the N-terminus. In the present study, western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot analysis and the B16F10-N91 tumor bearing-mice experiments were used to evaluate whether the overexpression of N91 indicates its potential as a candidate tumor-associated antigen. The results revealed that N91 was expressed in a wide range of normal mouse tissues and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, with varying expression levels. The weak immunogenicity of N91 protein suggested it was a weak candidate antigen; however, the N91 protein was associated with cell proliferation. PMID:24396432

  9. Analyses of structure of photoreceptor organelle and blepharismin-associated protein in unicellular eukaryote Blepharisma.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, T; Tokumori, D; Kotsuki, H; Ishida, M; Matsushita, M; Kimura, S; Itoh, T; Checcucci, G

    2000-11-01

    In the ciliated protozoan Blepharisma, step-up photophobic response is believed to be mediated by a novel type of photosensory pigment known as "blepharismins" (BL) that are contained in the pigment granules located just beneath the plasma membrane. We examined the ultrastructure of the pigment granules by freeze-fracture and thin-section electron microscopy and proposed a schematic diagram showing the granules' three-dimensional inner membranous structure. Some of the BL are suggested to be associated with 200 kDa membrane protein. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis of pigment species associated with 200 kDa protein obtained from blue forms of Blepharisma (oxyblepharisma) revealed that the 200 kDa protein was associated with five types of oxyblepharismin. The fluorescence intensity was increased when the pigments were dissociated from the 200 kDa protein. The result supports the hypothesis that the pigment-200 kDa complex is able to transduce light energy into signals mediating the photobehavior of Blepharisma.

  10. Synaptopodin: An Actin-associated Protein in Telencephalic Dendrites and Renal Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mundel, Peter; Heid, Hans W.; Mundel, Thomas M.; Krüger, Meike; Reiser, Jochen; Kriz, Wilhelm

    1997-01-01

    Synaptopodin is an actin-associated protein of differentiated podocytes that also occurs as part of the actin cytoskeleton of postsynaptic densities (PSD) and associated dendritic spines in a subpopulation of exclusively telencephalic synapses. Amino acid sequences determined in purified rat kidney and forebrain synaptopodin and derived from human and mouse brain cDNA clones show no significant homology to any known protein. In particular, synaptopodin does not contain functional domains found in receptor-clustering PSD proteins. The open reading frame of synaptopodin encodes a polypeptide with a calculated Mr of 73.7 kD (human)/74.0 kD (mouse) and an isoelectric point of 9.38 (human)/9.27 (mouse). Synaptopodin contains a high amount of proline (∼20%) equally distributed along the protein, thus virtually excluding the formation of any globular domain. Sequence comparison between human and mouse synaptopodin revealed 84% identity at the protein level. In both brain and kidney, in vivo and in vitro, synaptopodin gene expression is differentiation dependent. During postnatal maturation of rat brain, synaptopodin is first detected by Western blot analysis at day 15 and reaches maximum expression in the adult animal. The exclusive synaptopodin synthesis in the telencephalon has been confirmed by in situ hybridization, where synaptopodin mRNA is only found in perikarya of the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, striatum, and hippocampus, i.e., the expression is restricted to areas of high synaptic plasticity. From these results and experiments with cultured cells we conclude that synaptopodin represents a novel kind of proline-rich, actin-associated protein that may play a role in modulating actin-based shape and motility of dendritic spines and podocyte foot processes. PMID:9314539

  11. Association of the Astrovirus Structural Protein VP90 with Membranes Plays a Role in Virus Morphogenesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Ernesto; Aguirre-Crespo, Gabriela; Zavala, Guadalupe; Arias, Carlos F.

    2007-01-01

    VP90, the capsid polyprotein precursor of human astrovirus Yuc8, is assembled into viral particles, and its processing at the carboxy terminus by cellular caspases, to yield VP70, has been correlated with the cell release of the virus. Here, we characterized the effect of the VP90-VP70 processing on the properties of these proteins, as well as on their intracellular distribution. VP90 was found in membrane-enriched fractions (mVP90), as well as in fractions enriched in cytosolic proteins (cVP90), while VP70 was found exclusively in the latter fractions. Upon trypsin activation, infectivity was detected in all VP90-containing fractions, confirming that both mVP90 and cVP90 are able to assemble into particles; however, the two forms of VP90 showed differential sensitivities to trypsin, especially at their carboxy termini, which in the case of mVP90 was shown to remain membrane associated after protease digestion. Structural protein oligomers were detected in purified VP70-containing viruses, as well as in membrane-enriched fractions, but they were less evident in cytosolic fractions. Ultrastructural studies of infected cells revealed different types of viral particles, some of which appeared to be associated with membranes. By immunoelectron microscopy, structural proteins were shown to form virus particles in clusters and to associate with the edges of vesicles induced during infection, which also appear to contain subviral particles inside. Nonstructural proteins and viral RNA colocalized with mVP90, but not with cVP90, suggesting that mVP90 might represent the form of the protein that is initially assembled into particles, at the sites where the virus genome is being replicated. PMID:17652389

  12. E6 proteins from diverse Papillomaviruses self-associate both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zanier, Katia; Ruhlmann, Christine; Melin, Frederic; Masson, Murielle; Sidi, Abdellahi ould M’hamed ould; Bernard, Xavier; Fischer, Benoit; Brino, Laurent; Ristriani, Tutik; Rybin, Vladimir; Baltzinger, Mireille; Pol, Scott Vande; Hellwig, Petra; Schultz, Patrick; Travé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Papillomavirus (PV) E6 oncoproteins bind and often provoke the degradation of many cellular proteins important for the control of cell proliferation and/or cell death. Structural studies on E6 proteins have long been hindered by the difficulties of obtaining highly concentrated samples of recombinant E6. Here we show that recombinant E6 proteins from eight human and one bovine PV strains exist as oligomeric as well as multimeric species. These species were characterized using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques including analytical gel filtration, activity assays, SPR, EM and FTIR. The characterization of E6 oligomers is facilitated by the fusion to the maltose binding protein (MBP), which slows down the formation of higher-order multimeric species. The proportion of each oligomeric form vary depending on the viral strain considered. Oligomers appear to consist of folded units, which, in the case of high-risk mucosal HPV E6, retain binding to the ubiquitin ligase E6AP and the capacity to degrade the pro-apoptotic protein p53. In addition to the small-size oligomers, E6 proteins spontaneously assemble into large organized multimeric structures, a process which is accompanied by a significant increase in the β-sheet secondary structure content. Finally, co-localisation experiments using E6 equipped with different tags further demonstrate the occurrence of E6 self-association in eukaryotic cells. The ensemble of these data suggest that self-association is a general property of E6 proteins which occurs both in vitro and in vivo and might therefore be functionally relevant. PMID:19917295

  13. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cells Identified Mitochondrial Proteins Associated with Paclitaxel Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Tan, Aik-Choon; Sun, Xiaer; Olson, Matthew T; Xie, Zhi; Jinawath, Natini; Chan, Daniel W.; Shih, Ie-Ming; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Paclitaxel has been widely used as an anti-mitotic agent in chemotherapy for a variety of cancers and adds substantial efficacy as the first-line chemotherapeutic regimen for ovarian cancers. However, the frequent occurrence of paclitaxel resistance limits its function in long-term management. Despite abundant clinical and cellular demonstration of paclitaxel resistant tumors, the molecular mechanisms leading to paclitaxel resistance are poorly understood. Using genomic approaches, we have previously identified an association between a BTB/POZ gene, Nac1, and paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer. The experiments presented here have applied multiple quantitative proteomic methods to identify protein changes associated with paclitaxel resistance and Nac1 function. The SKOV-3 ovarian serous carcinoma cell line, which has inducible expression of dominant negative Nac1, was used to determine the paclitaxel treatment associated changes in the presence and absence of functional Nac1. Quantitative proteomic analyses were performed using iTRAQ labeling and mass spectrometry. Two label-free quantitative proteomic methods: LC-MS and spectral count were used to increase confidence of proteomic quantification. A total of 1371 proteins were quantified by at least one of the quantitative proteomic methods. Candidate proteins related to paclitaxel and NAC1 function were identified in this study. Go analysis of the protein changes identified upon paclitaxel resistance revealed that cell component enrichment related to mitochondria. Moreover, tubulin and mitochondrial proteins were the major cellular components with changes associated with paclitaxel treatment. This suggests that mitochondria may play a role in paclitaxel resistance. PMID:21113235

  14. Association and regulation of casein kinase 2 activity by adenomatous polyposis coli protein

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Miwako Kato; Li, Dongxia; Krebs, Edwin G.; Yuasa, Yasuhito; Homma, Yoshimi

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis coli and also sporadic colorectal cancer development. By using antibodies raised against the N-terminal region of APC protein, we have detected the variable masses of endogenous APC proteins in individual cell lines established from human colorectal carcinomas caused by nonsense mutations of the gene. Phosphorylation of immunoprecipitates of full-length and truncated APC were observed in in vitro kinase reaction, indicating association of APC with protein kinase activity. The kinase activity complexed with APC was sensitive to heparin and used GTP as phosphoryl donor, suggesting an involvement of casein kinase 2 (CK2). Both CK2α- and β-subunits were found to associate with APC in immunoprecipitates as well as in pull-down assays, with preferential interaction of APC with tetrameric CK2 holoenzyme. In synchronized cell populations, the association of APC with CK2 was cell cycle dependent, with the highest association in G2/M. Unexpectedly, APC immunoprecipitates containing full-length APC protein inhibited CK2 in vitro, whereas immunoprecipitates of truncated APC had little effect. This was confirmed by using recombinant APC, and the inhibitory region was localized to the C terminus of APC between residues 2086 and 2394. Overexpression of this fragment in SW480 cells suppressed cell proliferation rates as well as tumorigenesis. These results demonstrate a previously uncharacterized functional interaction between the tumor suppressor protein APC and CK2 and suggest that growth-inhibitory effects of APC may be regulated by inhibition of CK2. PMID:11972058

  15. ChIP-seq Data Processing for PcG Proteins and Associated Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Bogdanovic, Ozren; van Heeringen, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin Immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-sequencing) has emerged as an essential technique to study the genome-wide location of DNA- or chromatin-associated proteins, such as the Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. After being generated by the sequencer, raw ChIP-seq sequence reads need to be processed by a data analysis pipeline. Here we describe the computational steps required to process PcG ChIP-seq data, including alignment, peak calling, and downstream analysis. PMID:27659973

  16. Human cytomegalovirus latency-associated protein LUNA is expressed during HCMV infections in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bego, Mariana G; Keyes, Lisa R; Maciejewski, Jarek; St Jeor, Stephen C

    2011-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency is poorly understood. We previously described a novel HCMV latency-associated transcript, UL81-82ast, coding for a protein designated LUNA (latency unique natural antigen). The aim of this study was to confirm the presence of LUNA in HCMV-seropositive donors. Standard co-immunoprecipitation and ELISA assays were used to detect antibodies against the LUNA protein in the sera of HCMV-seropositive donors. Specific antibodies against LUNA were detected in all HCMV-seropositive donors but in none of the seronegative donors. These data confirm that LUNA is expressed during in vivo infections and is capable of eliciting an immune response.

  17. Identification of ZASP, a novel protein associated to Zona occludens-2

    SciTech Connect

    Lechuga, Susana; Alarcon, Lourdes; Solano, Jesus; Huerta, Miriam; Lopez-Bayghen, Esther; Gonzalez-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2010-11-15

    With the aim of discovering new molecular interactions of the tight junction protein ZO-2, a two-hybrid screen was performed on a human kidney cDNA library using as bait the middle segment of ZO-2. Through this assay we identified a 24-kDa novel protein herein named ZASP for ZO-2 associated speckle protein. ZO-2/ZASP interaction further confirmed by pull down and immunoprecipitation experiments, requires the presence of the intact PDZ binding motif SQV of ZASP and the third PDZ domain of ZO-2. ZASP mRNA and protein are present in the kidney and in several epithelial cell lines. Endogenous ZASP is expressed primarily in nuclear speckles in co-localization with splicing factor SC-35. Nocodazole treatment and wash out reveals that ZASP disappears from the nucleus during mitosis in accordance with speckle disassembly during metaphase. ZASP amino acid sequence exhibits a canonical nuclear exportation signal and in agreement the protein exits the nucleus through a process mediated by exportin/CRM1. ZASP over-expression blocks the inhibitory activity of ZO-2 on cyclin D1 gene transcription and protein expression. The identification of ZASP helps to unfold the complex nuclear molecular arrays that form on ZO-2 scaffolds.

  18. Identification of ZASP, a novel protein associated to Zona occludens-2.

    PubMed

    Lechuga, Susana; Alarcón, Lourdes; Solano, Jesús; Huerta, Miriam; Lopez-Bayghen, Esther; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2010-11-15

    With the aim of discovering new molecular interactions of the tight junction protein ZO-2, a two-hybrid screen was performed on a human kidney cDNA library using as bait the middle segment of ZO-2. Through this assay we identified a 24-kDa novel protein herein named ZASP for ZO-2 associated speckle protein. ZO-2/ZASP interaction further confirmed by pull down and immunoprecipitation experiments, requires the presence of the intact PDZ binding motif SQV of ZASP and the third PDZ domain of ZO-2. ZASP mRNA and protein are present in the kidney and in several epithelial cell lines. Endogenous ZASP is expressed primarily in nuclear speckles in co-localization with splicing factor SC-35. Nocodazole treatment and wash out reveals that ZASP disappears from the nucleus during mitosis in accordance with speckle disassembly during metaphase. ZASP amino acid sequence exhibits a canonical nuclear exportation signal and in agreement the protein exits the nucleus through a process mediated by exportin/CRM1. ZASP over-expression blocks the inhibitory activity of ZO-2 on cyclin D1 gene transcription and protein expression. The identification of ZASP helps to unfold the complex nuclear molecular arrays that form on ZO-2 scaffolds.

  19. Z-scan Fluorescence Profile Deconvolution of Cytosolic and Membrane-associated Protein Populations

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth M.; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a technique that characterizes the spatial distribution of peripheral membrane proteins that associate reversibly with the plasma membrane. An axial scan through the cell generates a z-scan intensity profile of a fluorescently labeled peripheral membrane protein. This profile is analytically separated into membrane and cytoplasmic components by accounting for both the cell geometry and the point spread function. We experimentally validated the technique and characterized both the resolvability and stability of z-scan measurements. Further, using the cellular brightness of green fluorescent protein, we were able to convert the fluorescence intensities into concentrations at the membrane and in the cytoplasm. We applied the technique to study the translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 labeled with green fluorescent protein upon ionomycin treatment. Analysis of the z-scan fluorescence profiles revealed protein-specific cell height changes and allowed for comparison between the observed fluorescence changes and predictions based on the cellular surface area to volume ratio. The quantitative capability of z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution offers opportunities for investigating peripheral membrane proteins in the living cell that were previously not accessible. PMID:25862080

  20. Identification and Characterization of Outer Membrane Vesicle-Associated Proteins in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jaewoo; Kim, Seul I; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a primary cause of enteric diseases and has acquired a variety of virulence factors during its evolution into a pathogen. Secreted virulence factors interact with commensal flora and host cells and enable Salmonella to survive and thrive in hostile environments. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from many Gram-negative bacteria function as a mechanism for the secretion of complex mixtures, including virulence factors. We performed a proteomic analysis of OMVs that were isolated under standard laboratory and acidic minimal medium conditions and identified 14 OMV-associated proteins that were observed in the OMV fraction isolated only under the acidic minimal medium conditions, which reproduced the nutrient-deficient intracellular milieu. The inferred roles of these 14 proteins were diverse, including transporter, enzyme, and transcriptional regulator. The absence of these proteins influenced Salmonella survival inside murine macrophages. Eleven of these proteins were predicted to possess secretion signal sequences at their N termini, and three (HupA, GlnH, and PhoN) of the proteins were found to be translocated into the cytoplasm of host cells. The comparative proteomic profiling of OMVs performed in this study revealed different protein compositions in the OMVs isolated under the two different conditions, which indicates that the OMV cargo depends on the growth conditions and provides a deeper insight into how Salmonella utilizes OMVs to adapt to environmental changes. PMID:24935973

  1. Downregulation of the Yes-Associated Protein Is Associated with Extracellular Matrix Disorders in Ascending Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyang; Jiang, Wenjian; Ren, Weihong; Guo, Dong; Guo, Jialong; Wang, Xiaolong; Liu, Yuyong; Lan, Feng; Du, Jie; Zhang, Hongjia

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that extracellular matrix (ECM) disorders lead to the apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMCs), which impairs the aortic wall by reducing the generation of elastic fibers, and ultimately result in ascending aortic aneurysm. The critical role of the Yes-associated protein (YAP) has been elucidated in cardiac/SMC proliferation during cardiovascular development. However, the association of YAP expression and extracellular matrix disorders in ascending aortic aneurysms is not clear. Here, we present for the first time that the downregulation of YAP in VSMCs is associated with ECM disorders of the media in ascending aortic aneurysms. We found that aortic ECM deteriorated with increased apoptotic VSMCs. Moreover, expression of YAP was dramatically reduced in the aortic walls of patients with ascending aortic aneurysms, while the normal aortic samples exhibited abundant YAP in the VSMCs. These results suggest that downregulation of YAP leads to apoptosis of VSMCs, which are essential for the homeostasis of the aortic wall. The resultant ECM disorders affect aortic structure and function and contribute to the development of ascending aortic aneurysms. In summary, through assessment of clinical samples, we revealed the association between downregulation of YAP in VSMCs and the development of ascending aortic aneurysms, providing new insight into the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26904131

  2. Identification of indicator proteins associated with flooding injury in soybean seedlings using label-free quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Nanjo, Yohei; Nakamura, Takuji; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-11-01

    Flooding injury is one of the abiotic constraints on soybean growth. An experimental system established for evaluating flooding injury in soybean seedlings indicated that the degree of injury is dependent on seedling density in floodwater. Dissolved oxygen levels in the floodwater were decreased by the seedlings and correlated with the degree of injury. To understand the molecular mechanism responsible for the injury, proteomic alterations in soybean seedlings that correlated with severity of stress were analyzed using label-free quantitative proteomics. The analysis showed that the abundance of proteins involved in cell wall modification, such as polygalacturonase inhibitor-like and expansin-like B1-like proteins, which may be associated with the defense system, increased dependence on stress at both the protein and mRNA levels in all organs during flooding. The manner of alteration in abundance of these proteins was distinct from those of other responsive proteins. Furthermore, proteins also showing specific changes in abundance in the root tip included protein phosphatase 2A subunit-like proteins, which are possibly involved in flooding-induced root tip cell death. Additionally, decreases in abundance of cell wall synthesis-related proteins, such as cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase and cellulose synthase-interactive protein-like proteins, were identified in hypocotyls of seedlings grown for 3 days after flooding, and these proteins may be associated with suppression of growth after flooding. These flooding injury-associated proteins can be defined as indicator proteins for severity of flooding stress in soybean.

  3. Development of a Novel Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Binding Assay to Study the Association of Plakins with Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    PubMed

    Favre, Bertrand; Begré, Nadja; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Borradori, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are fundamental for most biological processes, such as the formation of cellular structures and enzymatic complexes or in signaling pathways. The identification and characterization of protein-protein interactions are therefore essential for understanding the mechanisms and regulation of biological systems. The organization and dynamics of the cytoskeleton, as well as its anchorage to specific sites in the plasma membrane and organelles, are regulated by the plakins. These structurally related proteins anchor different cytoskeletal networks to each other and/or to other cellular structures. The association of several plakins with intermediate filaments (IFs) is critical for maintenance of the cytoarchitecture. Pathogenic mutations in the genes encoding different plakins can lead to dramatic manifestations, occurring principally in the skin, striated muscle, and/or nervous system, due to cytoskeletal disorganization resulting in abnormal cell fragility. Nevertheless, it is still unclear how plakins bind to IFs, although some general rules are slowly emerging. We here describe in detail a recently developed protein-protein fluorescence binding assay, based on the production of recombinant proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and their use as fluid-phase fluorescent ligands on immobilized IF proteins. Using this method, we have been able to assess the ability of C-terminal regions of GFP-tagged plakin proteins to bind to distinct IF proteins and IF domains. This simple and sensitive technique, which is expected to facilitate further studies in this area, can also be potentially employed for any kind of protein-protein interaction studies.

  4. Bioinformatic analysis of functional proteins involved in obesity associated with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Allam Appa; Tayaru, N Manga; Thota, Hanuman; Changalasetty, Suresh Babu; Thota, Lalitha Saroja; Gedela, Srinubabu

    2008-03-01

    The twin epidemic of diabetes and obesity pose daunting challenges worldwide. The dramatic rise in obesity-associated diabetes resulted in an alarming increase in the incidence and prevalence of obesity an important complication of diabetes. Differences among individuals in their susceptibility to both these conditions probably reflect their genetic constitutions. The dramatic improvements in genomic and bioinformatic resources are accelerating the pace of gene discovery. It is tempting to speculate the key susceptible genes/proteins that bridges diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this regard, we evaluated the role of several genes/proteins that are believed to be involved in the evolution of obesity associated diabetes by employing multiple sequence alignment using ClustalW tool and constructed a phylogram tree using functional protein sequences extracted from NCBI. Phylogram was constructed using Neighbor-Joining Algorithm a bioinformatic tool. Our bioinformatic analysis reports resistin gene as ominous link with obesity associated diabetes. This bioinformatic study will be useful for future studies towards therapeutic inventions of obesity associated type 2 diabetes. PMID:23675069

  5. Chromatin proteins and RNA are associated with DNA during all phases of mitosis

    PubMed Central

    L Black, Kathryn; Petruk, Svetlana; Fenstermaker, Tyler K; Hodgson, Jacob W; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Brock, Hugh W; Mazo, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis brings about major changes to chromosome and nuclear structure. We used recently developed proximity ligation assay-based techniques to investigate the association with DNA of chromatin-associated proteins and RNAs in Drosophila embryos during mitosis. All groups of tested proteins, histone-modifying and chromatin-remodeling proteins and methylated histones remained in close proximity to DNA during all phases of mitosis. We also found that RNA transcripts are associated with DNA during all stages of mitosis. Reduction of H3K27me3 levels or elimination of RNAs had no effect on the association of the components of PcG and TrxG complexes to DNA. Using a combination of proximity ligation assay-based techniques and super-resolution microscopy, we found that the number of protein–DNA and RNA–DNA foci undergoes significant reduction during mitosis, suggesting that mitosis may be accompanied by structural re-arrangement or compaction of specific chromatin domains. PMID:27807477

  6. Protein self-association induced by macromolecular crowding: a quantitative analysis by magnetic relaxation dispersion.

    PubMed

    Snoussi, Karim; Halle, Bertil

    2005-04-01

    In the presence of high concentrations of inert macromolecules, the self-association of proteins is strongly enhanced through an entropic, excluded-volume effect variously called macromolecular crowding or depletion attraction. Despite the predicted large magnitude of this universal effect and its far-reaching biological implications, few experimental studies of macromolecular crowding have been reported. Here, we introduce a powerful new technique, fast field-cycling magnetic relaxation dispersion, for investigating crowding effects on protein self-association equilibria. By recording the solvent proton spin relaxation rate over a wide range of magnetic field strengths, we determine the populations of coexisting monomers and decamers of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor in the presence of dextran up to a macromolecular volume fraction of 27%. Already at a dextran volume fraction of 14%, we find a 30-fold increase of the decamer population and 510(5)-fold increase of the association constant. The analysis of these results, in terms of a statistical-mechanical model that incorporates polymer flexibility as well as the excluded volume of the protein, shows that the dramatic enhancement of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor self-association can be quantitatively rationalized in terms of hard repulsive interactions. PMID:15665132

  7. The SAP, a new family of proteins, associate and function positively with the SIT4 phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Luke, M M; Della Seta, F; Di Como, C J; Sugimoto, H; Kobayashi, R; Arndt, K T

    1996-01-01

    SIT4 is the catalytic subunit of a type 2A-related protein phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is required for G1 cyclin transcription and for bud formation. SIT4 associates with several high-molecular-mass proteins in a cell cycle-dependent fashion. We purified two SIT4-associated proteins, SAP155 and SAP190, and cloned the corresponding genes. By sequence homology, we isolated two additional SAP genes, SAP185 and SAP4. Through such an association is not yet proven for SAP4, each of SAP155, SAP185, and SAP190 physically associates with SIT4 in separate complexes. The SAPs function positively with SIT4, and by several criteria, the loss of all four SAPs is equivalent to the loss of SIT4. The data suggest that the SAPs are not functional in the absence of SIT4 and likewise that SIT4 is not functional in the absence of the SAPs. The SAPs are hyperphoshorylated in cells lacking SIT4, raising the possibility that the SAPs are substrates of SIT4. By sequence similarity, the SAPs fall into two groups, the SAP4/SAP155 group and the SAP185/SAP190 group. Overexpression of a SAP from one group does not suppress the defects due to the loss of the other group. These findings and others indicate that the SAPs have distinct functions. PMID:8649382

  8. Targeting Toxoplasma Tubules: Tubulin, Microtubules, and Associated Proteins in a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that causes serious opportunistic infections, birth defects, and blindness in humans. Microtubules are critically important components of diverse structures that are used throughout the Toxoplasma life cycle. As in other eukaryotes, spindle microtubules are required for chromosome segregation during replication. Additionally, a set of membrane-associated microtubules is essential for the elongated shape of invasive “zoites,” and motility follows a spiral trajectory that reflects the path of these microtubules. Toxoplasma zoites also construct an intricate, tubulin-based apical structure, termed the conoid, which is important for host cell invasion and associates with proteins typically found in the flagellar apparatus. Last, microgametes specifically construct a microtubule-containing flagellar axoneme in order to fertilize macrogametes, permitting genetic recombination. The specialized roles of these microtubule populations are mediated by distinct sets of associated proteins. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of tubulin, microtubule populations, and associated proteins in Toxoplasma; these components are used for both novel and broadly conserved processes that are essential for parasite survival. PMID:25380753

  9. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Skin-Associated Genes Encoding Membrane and Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Martinez, Cynthia; Schrumpf, Holger; Gasis, Marcia; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115), and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7). Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics. PMID:23840300

  10. Overexpressed HDAC4 is associated with poor survival and promotes tumor progression in esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Shi-Juan; Wang, Meng-He; Zhang, Mei-Yin; Zheng, X.F. Steven; Wang, Hui-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) mediate histone deacetylation, leading to transcriptional repression, which is involved in many diseases, including age-related tissue degeneration, heart failure and cancer. In this study, we were aimed to investigate the expression, clinical significance and biological function of HDAC4 in esophageal carcinoma (EC). We found that HDAC4 mRNA and protein are overexpressed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues and cell lines. HDAC4 overexpression is associated with higher tumor grade, advanced clinical stage and poor survival. Mechanistically, HDAC4 promotes proliferation and G1/S cell cycle progression in EC cells by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21 and p27 and up-regulating CDK2/4 and CDK-dependent Rb phosphorylation. HDAC4 also enhances ESCC cell migration. Furthermore, HDAC4 positively regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by increasing the expression of Vimentin and decreasing the expression of E-Cadherin/α-Catenin. Together, our study shows that HDAC4 overexpression is important for the oncogenesis of EC, which may serve as a useful prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for this malignancy. PMID:27295551

  11. Association of brominated proteins and changes in protein expression in the rat kidney with subcarcinogenic to carcinogenic doses of bromate

    SciTech Connect

    Kolisetty, Narendrababu; Bull, Richard J.; Muralidhara, Srinivasa; Costyn, Leah J.; Delker, Don A.; Guo, Zhongxian; Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Cummings, Brian S.

    2013-10-15

    The water disinfection byproduct bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup −}) produces cytotoxic and carcinogenic effects in rat kidneys. Our previous studies demonstrated that BrO{sub 3}{sup −} caused sex-dependent differences in renal gene and protein expression in rats and the elimination of brominated organic carbon in their urine. The present study examined changes in renal cell apoptosis and protein expression in male and female F344 rats treated with BrO{sub 3}{sup −} and associated these changes with accumulation of 3-bromotyrosine (3-BT)-modified proteins. Rats were treated with 0, 11.5, 46 and 308 mg/L BrO{sub 3}{sup −} in drinking water for 28 days and renal sections were prepared and examined for apoptosis (TUNEL-staining), 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxoG), 3-BT, osteopontin, Kim-1, clusterin, and p-21 expression. TUNEL-staining in renal proximal tubules increased in a dose-related manner beginning at 11.5 mg BrO{sub 3}{sup −}/L in female rats and 46 mg/L in males. Increased 8-oxoG staining was observed at doses as low as 46 mg/L. Osteopontin expression also increased in a dose-related manner after treatment with 46 mg/L, in males only. In contrast, Kim-1 expression increased in a dose-related manner in both sexes, although to a greater extent in females at the highest dose. Clusterin and p21 expression also increased in a dose-related manner in both sexes. The expression of 3-BT-modified proteins only increased in male rats, following a pattern previously reported for accumulation of α-2{sub u}-globulin. Increases in apoptosis in renal proximal tubules of male and female rats at the lowest doses suggest a common mode of action for renal carcinogenesis for the two sexes that is independent of α-2{sub u}-globulin nephropathy. - Highlights: • Bromate induced nephrotoxicity in both male and female rats by similar mechanisms. • Apoptosis was seen in both male and female rats at the lowest doses tested. • Bromate-induced apoptosis correlated to 8-oxo

  12. Structural proteins of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus antagonize p53-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, P; Konrad, A; Jochmann, R; Lausen, B; Holz, P; Naschberger, E; Neipel, F; Britzen-Laurent, N; Stürzl, M

    2015-01-29

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a central regulatory molecule of apoptosis and is commonly mutated in tumors. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-related malignancies express wild-type p53. Accordingly, KSHV encodes proteins that counteract the cell death-inducing effects of p53. Here, the effects of all KSHV genes on the p53 signaling pathway were systematically analyzed using the reversely transfected cell microarray technology. With this approach we detected eight KSHV-encoded genes with potent p53 inhibiting activity in addition to the previously described inhibitory effects of KSHV genes ORF50, K10 and K10.5. Interestingly, the three most potent newly identified inhibitors were KSHV structural proteins, namely ORF22 (glycoprotein H), ORF25 (major capsid protein) and ORF64 (tegument protein). Validation of these results with a classical transfection approach showed that these proteins inhibited p53 signaling in a dose-dependent manner and that this effect could be reversed by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of the respective viral gene. All three genes inhibited p53-mediated apoptosis in response to Nutlin-3 treatment in non-infected and KSHV-infected cells. Addressing putative mechanisms, we could show that these proteins could also inhibit the transactivation of the promoters of apoptotic mediators of p53 such as BAX and PIG3. Altogether, we demonstrate for the first time that structural proteins of KSHV can counteract p53-induced apoptosis. These proteins are expressed in the late lytic phase of the viral life cycle and are incorporated into the KSHV virion. Accordingly, these genes may inhibit cell death in the productive and in the early entrance phase of KSHV infection. PMID:24469037

  13. Age- and Hypertension-Associated Protein Aggregates in Mouse Heart Have Similar Proteomic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Mercanti, Federico; Wang, Xianwei; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Tackett, Alan J; Prayaga, Sastry V S; Romeo, Francesco; Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are largely defined by protein aggregates in affected tissues. Aggregates contain some shared components as well as proteins thought to be specific for each disease. Aggregation has not previously been reported in the normal, aging heart or the hypertensive heart. Detergent-insoluble protein aggregates were isolated from mouse heart and characterized on 2-dimensional gels. Their levels increased markedly and significantly with aging and after sustained angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Of the aggregate components identified by high-resolution proteomics, half changed in abundance with age (392/787) or with sustained hypertension (459/824), whereas 30% (273/901) changed concordantly in both, each P<0.05. One fifth of these proteins were previously associated with age-progressive neurodegenerative or cardiovascular diseases, or both (eg, ApoE, ApoJ, ApoAIV, clusterin, complement C3, and others involved in stress-response and protein-homeostasis pathways). Because fibrosis is a characteristic of both aged and hypertensive hearts, we posited that aging of fibroblasts may contribute to the aggregates observed in cardiac tissue. Indeed, as cardiac myofibroblasts "senesced" (approached their replicative limit) in vitro, they accrued aggregates with many of the same constituent proteins observed in vivo during natural aging or sustained hypertension. In summary, we have shown for the first time that compact (detergent-insoluble) protein aggregates accumulate during natural aging, chronic hypertension, and in vitro myofibroblast senescence, sharing many common proteins. Thus, aggregates that arise from disparate causes (aging, hypertension, and replicative senescence) may have common underlying mechanisms of accrual.

  14. Topogenesis of a nucleolar protein: determination of molecular segments directing nucleolar association.

    PubMed Central

    Zirwes, R F; Kouzmenko, A P; Peters, J M; Franke, W W; Schmidt-Zachmann, M S

    1997-01-01

    To identify the element(s) in nucleolar proteins which determine nucleolus-specific topogenesis, we have used different kinds of cDNA constructs encoding various chimeric combinations of mutants of the constitutive nucleolar protein NO38 (B23): 1) with an amino terminally placed short "myc tag"; 2) with two different carboxyl terminally attached large alpha-helical coiled coil structures, the lamin A rod domain or the rod domain of vimentin; 3) with the sequence-related nucleoplasmic histone-binding protein nucleo-plasmin; and 4) with the soluble cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase. To avoid the problem of formation of complexes with endogenous wild-type (wt) molecules and "piggyback" localization, special care was taken to secure that the mutants and chimeras used did not oligomerize as is typical of protein NO38 (B23). Using microinjection and transfection of cultured cells, we found that the segment comprising the amino-terminal 123 amino acids (aa) alone was sufficient to effect nucleolar accumulation of the construct molecules, including the chimeras with the entire rod domains of lamin A and vimentin. However, when the amino-terminal 109 aa were deleted, the molecules still associated with the nucleolus. The results of further deletion experiments and of domain swaps with nucleoplasmin all point to the topogenic importance of two independent molecular regions located at both the amino- and carboxyl-terminal end. Our definition of dominant elements determining the nucleolar localization of protein NO38 (B23) as well as of diverse nonnucleolar proteins will help to identify its local binding partner(s) and functions, the construction of probes examining other proteins or sequence elements within the nucleolar microenvironment, and the generation of cells with an altered nuclear architecture. Images PMID:9190204

  15. Identification of proteins associated with the yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase by tandem affinity purification

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Dmitriy A; Savkina, Maria; Anikin, Michael; Del Campo, Mark; Ecker, Karen; Lambowitz, Alan M; De Gnore, Jon P; McAllister, William T

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of mitochondrial (mt) transcripts varies under different conditions, and is thought to depend upon rates of transcription initiation, transcription termination/attenuation and RNA processing/degradation. The requirement to maintain the balance between RNA synthesis and processing may involve coordination between these processes; however, little is known about factors that regulate the activity of mtRNA polymerase (mtRNAP). Recent attempts to identify mtRNAP–protein interactions in yeast by means of a generalized tandem affinity purification (TAP) protocol were not successful, most likely because they involved a C-terminal mtRNAP–TAP fusion (which is incompatible with mtRNAP function) and because of the use of whole-cell solubilization protocols that did not preserve the integrity of mt protein complexes. Based upon the structure of T7 RNAP (to which mtRNAPs show high sequence similarity), we identified positions in yeast mtRNAP that allow insertion of a small affinity tag, confirmed the mature N-terminus, constructed a functional N-terminal TAP–mtRNAP fusion, pulled down associated proteins, and identified them by LC–MS–MS. Among the proteins found in the pull-down were a DEAD-box protein (Mss116p) and an RNA-binding protein (Pet127p). Previous genetic experiments suggested a role for these proteins in linking transcription and RNA degradation, in that a defect in the mt degradadosome could be suppressed by overexpression of either of these proteins or, independently, by mutations in either mtRNAP or its initiation factor Mtf1p. Further, we found that Mss116p inhibits transcription by mtRNAP in vitro in a steady-state reaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Mss116p and Pet127p are involved in modulation of mtRNAP activity. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:19536766

  16. The state of association of band 3 protein of the human erythrocyte membrane in solutions of nonionic detergents.

    PubMed

    Pappert, G; Schubert, D

    1983-04-21

    Band 3 protein, the anion transport protein of the human erythrocyte membrane, was solubilized and purified in aqueous solutions of two nonionic detergents: Ammonyx-LO (dimethyl laurylamine oxide) and C12E9 (nonaethylene glycol lauryl ether). The state of association of the purified protein was studied by analytical ultracentrifugation. Band 3 protein solubilized and studied in solutions of Ammonyx-LO was found to be in a monomer/dimer/tetramer association equilibrium. Band 3 protein freshly prepared in C12 E9 showed the same behaviour; however, during aging the protein was converted into stable noncovalent dimers. The conversion was retarded by the presence of beta-mercaptoethanol or by treatment of the samples with iodoacetamide; it seems to be due to oxidation of the protein by degradation products of the detergent. It is concluded that a monomer/dimer/tetramer association equilibrium is the native state of association of band 3 protein solubilized by nonionic detergents. Since nonionic detergents are assumed not to interfere with protein-protein interactions among membrane proteins, the results strongly support the claim that, in the erythrocyte membrane, band 3 is in a monomer/dimer/tetramer association equilibrium (Dorst, H.-J. and Schubert, D. (1979) Hoppe-Seyler's Z. Physiol. Chem. 360, 1605-1618).

  17. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm flagellar proteins, outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2, is associated with impaired motility during capacitation of hamster spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Mariappa, Daniel; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H; Dasari, Santosh K; Sreekumar, Arun; Wolkowicz, Michael; van der Hoorn, Frans; Seshagiri, Polani B

    2010-02-01

    In mammals, acquisition of fertilization competence of spermatozoa is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the critical molecular events of sperm capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that a specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin-A47, inhibited hamster sperm capacitation, accompanied by a reduced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, a high percentage of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa exhibited circular motility, which was associated with a distinct hypo-tyrosine phosphorylation of flagellar proteins, predominantly of Mr 45,000-60,000. In this study, we provide evidence on the localization of capacitation-associated tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins to the nonmembranous, structural components of the sperm flagellum. Consistent with this, we show their ultrastructural localization in the outer dense fiber, axoneme, and fibrous sheath of spermatozoa. Among hypo-tyrosine phosphorylated major proteins of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa, we identified the 45 kDa protein as outer dense fiber protein-2 and the 51 kDa protein as tektin-2, components of the sperm outer dense fiber and axoneme, respectively. This study shows functional association of hypo-tyrosine-phosphorylation status of outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2 with impaired flagellar bending of spermatozoa, following inhibition of EGFR-tyrosine kinase, thereby showing the critical importance of flagellar protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation and hyperactivation of hamster spermatozoa.

  18. Quantification of DNA-associated proteins inside eukaryotic cells using single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Etheridge, Thomas J; Boulineau, Rémi L; Herbert, Alex; Watson, Adam T; Daigaku, Yasukazu; Tucker, Jem; George, Sophie; Jönsson, Peter; Palayret, Matthieu; Lando, David; Laue, Ernest; Osborne, Mark A; Klenerman, David; Lee, Steven F; Carr, Antony M

    2014-10-29

    Development of single-molecule localization microscopy techniques has allowed nanometre scale localization accuracy inside cells, permitting the resolution of ultra-fine cell structure and the elucidation of crucial molecular mechanisms. Application of these methodologies to understanding processes underlying DNA replication and repair has been limited to defined in vitro biochemical analysis and prokaryotic cells. In order to expand these techniques to eukaryotic systems, we have further developed a photo-activated localization microscopy-based method to directly visualize DNA-associated proteins in unfixed eukaryotic cells. We demonstrate that motion blurring of fluorescence due to protein diffusivity can be used to selectively image the DNA-bound population of proteins. We designed and tested a simple methodology and show that it can be used to detect changes in DNA binding of a replicative helicase subunit, Mcm4, and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, between different stages of the cell cycle and between distinct genetic backgrounds.

  19. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, and chromosomal localization of the human pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Dusetti, N.J.; Frigerio, J.M.; Dagorn, J.C.; Iovanna, J.L. ); Fox, M.F.; Swallow, D.M. )

    1994-01-01

    Pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) is a secretory pancreatic protein present in small amounts in normal pancreas and overexpressed during the acute phase of pancreatitis. In this paper, the authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human PAP gene. The gene spans 2748 bp and contains six exons interrupted by five introns. The gene has a typical promoter containing the sequences TATAAA and CCAAT 28 and 52 bp upstream of the cap site, respectively. They found striking similarities in genomic organization as well as in the promoter sequences between the human and rat PAP genes. The human PAP gene was mapped to chromosome 2p12 using rodent-human hybrid cells and in situ chromosomal hybridization. This localization coincides with that of the reg/lithostathine gene, which encodes a pancreatic secretory protein structurally related to PAP, suggesting that both genes derived from the same ancestral gene by duplication. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The sequence, and its evolutionary implications, of a Thermococcus celer protein associated with transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaine, B. P.; Mehr, I. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    Through random search, a gene from Thermococcus celer has been identified and sequenced that appears to encode a transcription-associated protein (110 amino acid residues). The sequence has clear homology to approximately the last half of an open reading frame reported previously for Sulfolobus acidocaldarius [Langer, D. & Zillig, W. (1993) Nucleic Acids Res. 21, 2251]. The protein translations of these two archaeal genes in turn are homologs of a small subunit found in eukaryotic RNA polymerase I (A12.2) and the counterpart of this from RNA polymerase II (B12.6). Homology is also seen with the eukaryotic transcription factor TFIIS, but it involves only the terminal 45 amino acids of the archaeal proteins. Evolutionary implications of these homologies are discussed.

  1. Role of host lysosomal associated membrane protein (LAMP) in Trypanosoma cruzi invasion and intracellular development

    PubMed Central

    Albertti, L.A.G.; Macedo, A.M.; Chiari, E.; Andrews, N.W.; Andrade, L.O.

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi host cell entry depends on lysosomes for the formation of the parasitophorous vacuole. Lysosome internal surface is covered by two major proteins, highly sialilated, Lysosome Associated Membrane Proteins 1 and 2. T. cruzi, on the other hand, needs to acquire sialic acid from its host cell through the activity of trans-sialidase, an event that contributes to host cell invasion and later for parasite vacuole escape. Using LAMP1/2 knock out cells we were able to show that these two proteins are important for T. cruzi infection of host cells, both in entrance and intracellular development, conceivably by being the major source of sialic acid for T. cruzi. PMID:20561595

  2. The role of islet neogenesis-associated protein (INGAP) in islet neogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lipsett, Mark; Hanley, Stephen; Castellarin, Mauro; Austin, Emily; Suarez-Pinzon, Wilma L; Rabinovitch, Alex; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Islet Neogenesis-Associated Protein (INGAP) is a member of the Reg family of proteins implicated in various settings of endogenous pancreatic regeneration. The expression of INGAP and other RegIII proteins has also been linked temporally and spatially with the induction of islet neogenesis in animal models of disease and regeneration. Furthermore, administration of a peptide fragment of INGAP (INGAP peptide) has been demonstrated to reverse chemically induced diabetes as well as improve glycemic control and survival in an animal model of type 1 diabetes. Cultured human pancreatic tissue has also been shown to be responsive to INGAP peptide, producing islet-like structures with function, architecture and gene expression matching that of freshly isolated islets. Likewise, studies in normoglycemic animals show evidence of islet neogenesis. Finally, recent clinical studies suggest an effect of INGAP peptide to improve insulin production in type 1 diabetes and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

  3. Evaluation of molecular weight distribution of unreduced wheat gluten proteins associated with noodle quality.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Nisha; Dangi, Priya; Khatkar, B S

    2016-06-01

    Unreduced gluten proteins of Indian wheat varieties viz.C306, DBW16, HI977 and HW2004 were separated using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Statistical correlation of area % of eluted peaks with properties of flour, dough and noodles was elucidated. Chromatograms of gluten proteins were cla