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Sample records for cdk2 associating protein

  1. Interaction of the CDK2-associated protein-1, p12(DOC-1/CDK2AP1), with its homolog, p14(DOC-1R).

    PubMed

    Buajeeb, Waranun; Zhang, Xue; Ohyama, Hiroe; Han, David; Surarit, Rudee; Kim, Yong; Wong, David T W

    2004-03-19

    Human DOC-1/CDK2AP1 gene encodes a growth suppressor protein of 12kDa (p12(DOC-1/CDK2AP1)). Recently, p12(DOC-1/CDK2AP1) has been shown to associate with cell cycle proteins including CDK2 and DNA polymerase alpha/primase. It negatively regulates CDK2 activities and suppresses DNA replication. Therefore, identification of other p12(DOC-1/CDK2AP1) interacting proteins might clarify its role in the cell cycle regulation and carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to identify additional p12(DOC-1/CDK2AP1) interacting proteins using the yeast two-hybrid system. Using human p12(DOC-1/CDK2AP1) as a bait in a liver cDNA library screening, cDNA clones identical to human DOC-1R transcript were identified. The interaction between p12(DOC-1/CDK2AP1) and p14(DOC-1R) was verified in vitro and in cells. GST pull-down assay and immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the interaction between the two proteins. The critical region for p12(DOC-1/CDK2AP1)'s interaction with p14(DOC-1R) was defined to amino acids 20-25 by using a series of deletion mutants as baits in the yeast two-hybrid system. Our data indicated that p12(DOC-1/CDK2AP1) could associate with its homologous protein, p14(DOC-1R).

  2. Identification and characterization of CAC1 as a novel CDK2-associated cullin.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying; Nan, Kejun; Yin, Yuxin

    2009-11-01

    Cell cycle progression is tightly controlled by cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). CDK2 plays a crucial role in regulating cell cycle progression, but how CDK2 is regulated is still incompletely understood. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of a novel gene CAC1 that regulates CDK2 activity. The open reading frame sequence of this gene encodes a protein of 369 amino acids which contains a Cullin domain, and this protein is physically associated with CDK2. As such, we have designated it Cdk-Associated Cullin1, or CAC1. CAC1 is highly expressed in cancer tissues and cancer cell lines. Interestingly, CAC1 is expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner and its expression is high in late G(1) to S phase. Knockdown of CAC1 by RNAi inhibits cell proliferation and induces G(1)/S arrest. Since CAC1 interacts with CDK2 and promotes the kinase activity of CDK2 protein, we propose that CAC1 is a novel cell cycle associated protein capable of promoting cell proliferation. Our data provide insight into the mechanism by which CDK2 is regulated and the molecular basis of cell cycle progression in cancer.

  3. Preliminary analysis of CDK2 sequence and its nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Luo, Yang; Jiang, Li; Zhou, Wei-Qiang; Man, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Xue

    2004-05-01

    We constructed the plasmids encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged wild type cyclin-dependent kinase 2(CDK2) (pEGFP-CDK2) and CDK2 deletion mutants (pEGFP-CDK2N and pEGFP-CDK2C, lacking the last C-terminal and the first N-terminal 97 amino acids of CDK2, respectively) and transfected them into HeLa cell line and CHO cell line. After synchronization, green fluorescent signals were detected mainly in nucleus of the cells transfected with pEGFP-CDK2 and predominantly in cytoplasm of the cells transfected with the two mutant CDK2 constructs. Our results suggested that there were no nuclear-import signals in CDK2 and that CDK2 nuclear import might be mediated by association with other proteins through the three-dimensional structure formed by amino acids including those from the N- and C-terminal regions of CDK2.

  4. CDK2 Inhibition Causes Anaphase Catastrophe in Lung Cancer through the Centrosomal Protein CP110

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shanhu; Danilov, Alexey V.; Godek, Kristina; Orr, Bernardo; Tafe, Laura J.; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Behrens, Carmen; Mino, Barbara; Moran, Cesar A.; Memoli, Vincent A.; Mustachio, Lisa Maria; Galimberti, Fabrizio; Ravi, Saranya; DeCastro, Andrew; Lu, Yun; Sekula, David; Andrew, Angeline S; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Freemantle, Sarah; Compton, Duane A.; Dmitrovsky, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy is frequently detected in human cancers and is implicated in carcinogenesis. Pharmacological targeting of aneuploidy is an attractive therapeutic strategy as this would preferentially eliminate malignant over normal cells. We previously discovered that CDK2 inhibition causes lung cancer cells with more than two centrosomes to undergo multipolar cell division leading to apoptosis, defined as anaphase catastrophe. Cells with activating KRAS mutations were especially sensitive to CDK2 inhibition. Mechanisms of CDK2-mediated anaphase catastrophe and how activated KRAS enhances this effect were investigated. Live-cell imaging provided direct evidence that following CDK2 inhibition, lung cancer cells develop multipolar anaphase and undergo multipolar cell division with the resulting progeny apoptotic. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated repression of the CDK2 target and centrosome protein CP110 induced anaphase catastrophe of lung cancer cells. In contrast, CP110 overexpression antagonized CDK2 inhibitor-mediated anaphase catastrophe. Furthermore, activated KRAS mutations sensitized lung cancer cells to CDK2 inhibition by deregulating CP110 expression. Thus, CP110 is a critical mediator of CDK2-inhibition-driven anaphase catastrophe. Independent examination of murine and human paired normal-malignant lung tissues revealed marked upregulation of CP110 in malignant versus normal lung. Human lung cancers with KRAS mutations had significantly lower CP110 expression as compared to KRAS wild-type cancers. Thus, a direct link was found between CP110 and CDK2 inhibitor antineoplastic response. CP110 plays a mechanistic role in response of lung cancer cells to CDK2 inhibition, especially in the presence of activated KRAS mutations. PMID:25808870

  5. Centriolar satellites assemble centrosomal microcephaly proteins to recruit CDK2 and promote centriole duplication.

    PubMed

    Kodani, Andrew; Yu, Timothy W; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Jayaraman, Divya; Johnson, Tasha L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Sztriha, Lāszló; Partlow, Jennifer N; Kim, Hanjun; Krup, Alexis L; Dammermann, Alexander; Krogan, Nevan J; Walsh, Christopher A; Reiter, Jeremy F

    2015-08-22

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) associated proteins CDK5RAP2, CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 colocalize at the centrosome. We found that they interact to promote centriole duplication and form a hierarchy in which each is required to localize another to the centrosome, with CDK5RAP2 at the apex, and CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 at sequentially lower positions. MCPH proteins interact with distinct centriolar satellite proteins; CDK5RAP2 interacts with SPAG5 and CEP72, CEP152 with CEP131, WDR62 with MOONRAKER, and CEP63 with CEP90 and CCDC14. These satellite proteins localize their cognate MCPH interactors to centrosomes and also promote centriole duplication. Consistent with a role for satellites in microcephaly, homozygous mutations in one satellite gene, CEP90, may cause MCPH. The satellite proteins, with the exception of CCDC14, and MCPH proteins promote centriole duplication by recruiting CDK2 to the centrosome. Thus, centriolar satellites build a MCPH complex critical for human neurodevelopment that promotes CDK2 centrosomal localization and centriole duplication.

  6. Centriolar satellites assemble centrosomal microcephaly proteins to recruit CDK2 and promote centriole duplication

    PubMed Central

    Kodani, Andrew; Yu, Timothy W; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Jayaraman, Divya; Johnson, Tasha L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Sztriha, Lāszló; Partlow, Jennifer N; Kim, Hanjun; Krup, Alexis L; Dammermann, Alexander; Krogan, Nevan J; Walsh, Christopher A; Reiter, Jeremy F

    2015-01-01

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) associated proteins CDK5RAP2, CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 colocalize at the centrosome. We found that they interact to promote centriole duplication and form a hierarchy in which each is required to localize another to the centrosome, with CDK5RAP2 at the apex, and CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 at sequentially lower positions. MCPH proteins interact with distinct centriolar satellite proteins; CDK5RAP2 interacts with SPAG5 and CEP72, CEP152 with CEP131, WDR62 with MOONRAKER, and CEP63 with CEP90 and CCDC14. These satellite proteins localize their cognate MCPH interactors to centrosomes and also promote centriole duplication. Consistent with a role for satellites in microcephaly, homozygous mutations in one satellite gene, CEP90, may cause MCPH. The satellite proteins, with the exception of CCDC14, and MCPH proteins promote centriole duplication by recruiting CDK2 to the centrosome. Thus, centriolar satellites build a MCPH complex critical for human neurodevelopment that promotes CDK2 centrosomal localization and centriole duplication. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07519.001 PMID:26297806

  7. HIV-1 Tat interaction with RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) and a dynamic association with CDK2 induce CTD phosphorylation and transcription from HIV-1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Deng, Longwen; Ammosova, Tatyana; Pumfery, Anne; Kashanchi, Fatah; Nekhai, Sergei

    2002-09-13

    Human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), Tat protein activates viral gene expression through promoting transcriptional elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). In this process Tat enhances phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII by activating cell cycle-dependent kinases (CDKs) associated with general transcription factors of the promoter complex, specifically CDK7 and CDK9. We reported a Tat-associated T-cell-derived kinase, which contained CDK2. Here, we provide further evidence that CDK2 is involved in Tat-mediated CTD phosphorylation and in HIV-1 transcription in vitro. Tat-mediated CTD phosphorylation by CDK2 required cysteine 22 in the activation domain of Tat and amino acids 42-72 of Tat. CDK2 phosphorylated Tat itself, apparently by forming dynamic contacts with amino acids 15-24 and 36-49 of Tat. Also, amino acids 24-36 and 45-72 of Tat interacted with CTD. CDK2 associated with RNAPII and was found in elongation complexes assembled on HIV-1 long-terminal repeat template. Recombinant CDK2/cyclin E stimulated Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcription in reconstituted transcription assay. Immunodepletion of CDK2/cyclin E in HeLa nuclear extract blocked Tat-dependent transcription. We suggest that CDK2 is part of a transcription complex that is required for Tat-dependent transcription and that interaction of Tat with CTD and a dynamic association of Tat with CDK2/cyclin E stimulated CTD phosphorylation by CDK2.

  8. Expression of serine/threonine protein-kinases and related factors in normal monkey and human retinas: the mechanistic understanding of a CDK2 inhibitor induced retinal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Saturno, Grazia; Pesenti, Manuela; Cavazzoli, Cristiano; Rossi, Anna; Giusti, Anna M; Gierke, Berthold; Pawlak, Michael; Venturi, Miro

    2007-12-01

    Protein-kinase inhibitors are among the most advanced compounds in development using the new drug discovery paradigm of developing small-molecule drugs against specific molecular targets in cancer. After treatment with a cyclin dependent kinase CDK2 inhibitor in monkey, histopathological analysis of the eye showed specific cellular damage in the photoreceptor layer. Since this CDK2 inhibitor showed activity also on other CDKs, in order to investigate the mechanism of toxicity of this compound, we isolated cones and rods from the retina of normal monkey and humans by Laser Capture Microdissection. Using Real-Time PCR we first measured the expression of cyclin dependent protein-kinases (CDK)1, 2, 4, 5, Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) and microtubule associated protein TAU. We additionally verified the presence of these proteins in monkey eye sections by immuno-histochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis and afterwards quantified GSK3beta, phospho-GSK3beta and TAU by Reverse Phase Protein Microarrays. With this work we demonstrate how complementary gene expression and protein-based technologies constitute a powerful tool for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of a CDK2 inhibitor induced toxicity. Moreover, this investigative approach is helpful to better understand and characterize the mechanism of species-specific toxicities and further support a rational, molecular mechanism-based safety assessment in humans.

  9. Cyclin E-CDK2 protein phosphorylates plant homeodomain finger protein 8 (PHF8) and regulates its function in the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liping; Huang, Yan; Wei, Qian; Tong, Xiaomei; Cai, Rong; Nalepa, Grzegorz; Ye, Xin

    2015-02-13

    Cyclin E-CDK2 is a key regulator in G1/S transition. Previously, we identified a number of CDK2-interacting proteins, including PHF8 (plant homeodomain finger protein 8). In this report, we confirmed that PHF8 is a novel cyclin E-CDK2 substrate. By taking the approach of mass spectrometry, we identified that PHF8 Ser-844 is phosphorylated by cyclin E-CDK2. Immunoblotting analysis indicated that WT PHF8 demethylates histone H3K9me2 more efficiently than the cyclin E-CDK2 phosphorylation-deficient PHF8-S844A mutant. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that WT PHF8 promotes S phase progression more robustly than PHF8-S844A. Real-time PCR results demonstrated that PHF8 increases transcription of cyclin E, E2F3, and E2F7 to significantly higher levels compared with PHF8-S844A. Further analysis by ChIP assay indicated that PHF8 binds to the cyclin E promoter stronger than PHF8-S844A and reduces the H3K9me2 level at the cyclin E promoter more efficiently than PHF8-S844A. In addition, we found that cyclin E-CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of PHF8 Ser-844 promotes PHF8-dependent rRNA transcription in luciferase reporter assays and real-time PCR. Taken together, these results indicate that cyclin E-CDK2 phosphorylates PHF8 to stimulate its demethylase activity to promote rRNA transcription and cell cycle progression.

  10. Molecular cloning and identification of two types of hamster cyclin-dependent kinases: cdk2 and cdk2L.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, E; Sekiguchi, T; Yamashita, K; Nishimoto, T

    1993-12-30

    We isolated two types of hamster cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) cDNAs from BHK21 cells derived from Golden hamsters. One type of cdk2 (cdk2hm) encodes the 32 kDa protein consisting of 298 predicted amino acids and shows strong homology to the cdk2 cDNAs of humans and Xenopus. The other cdk2 (cdk2Lhm) encodes the 38 kDa protein containing the insertion of 48 amino acids in the cdk2hm protein. Immunoblotting analysis suggested that these two types of cdk2 protein exist in mammalian cells. The cdk2hm has the activity of protein kinase, while the cdk2Lhm does not, however, both bind with cyclin E.

  11. HIV-1 Tat-associated RNA polymerase C-terminal domain kinase, CDK2, phosphorylates CDK7 and stimulates Tat-mediated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nekhai, Sergei; Zhou, Meisheng; Fernandez, Anne; Lane, William S; Lamb, Ned J C; Brady, John; Kumar, Ajit

    2002-01-01

    HIV-1 gene expression is regulated by a viral transactivator protein (Tat) which induces transcriptional elongation of HIV-1 long tandem repeat (LTR). This induction requires hyperphosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) repeats of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). To achieve CTD hyperphosphorylation, Tat stimulates CTD kinases associated with general transcription factors of the promoter complex, specifically TFIIH-associated CDK7 and positive transcription factor b-associated CDK9 (cyclin-dependent kinase 9). Other studies indicate that Tat may bind an additional CTD kinase that regulates the target-specific phosphorylation of RNA Pol II CTD. We previously reported that Tat-associated T-cell-derived kinase (TTK), purified from human primary T-cells, stimulates Tat-dependent transcription of HIV-1 LTR in vivo [Nekhai, Shukla, Fernandez, Kumar and Lamb (2000) Virology 266, 246-256]. In the work presented here, we characterized the components of TTK by biochemical fractionation and the function of TTK in transcription assays in vitro. TTK uniquely co-purified with CDK2 and not with either CDK9 or CDK7. Tat induced the TTK-associated CDK2 kinase to phosphorylate CTD, specifically at Ser-2 residues. The TTK fraction restored Tat-mediated transcription activation of HIV-1 LTR in a HeLa nuclear extract immunodepleted of CDK9, but not in the HeLa nuclear extract double-depleted of CDK9 and CDK7. Direct microinjection of the TTK fraction augmented Tat transactivation of HIV-1 LTR in human primary HS68 fibroblasts. The results argue that TTK-associated CDK2 may function to maintain target-specific phosphorylation of RNA Pol II that is essential for Tat transactivation of HIV-1 promoter. They are also consistent with the observed cell-cycle-specific induction of viral gene transactivation. PMID:12049628

  12. The assembly, activation, and substrate specificity of Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Stephan C.; Law, Mary E.; Corsino, Patrick E.; Rowe, Thomas C.; Davis, Bradley J.; Law, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting data regarding Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes and, considering the widespread overexpression of Cyclin D1 in cancer, it is important to fully understand their relevance. While many have shown Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes to form active complexes, others have failed to show activity or association. Here, using a novel p21-PCNA fusion protein as well as p21 mutant proteins, we show that p21 is a required scaffolding protein, with Cyclin D1 and Cdk2 failing to complex in its absence. These p21/Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes are active and also bind the trimeric PCNA complex, with each trimer capable of independently binding distinct Cyclin/Cdk complexes. We also show that increased p21 levels due to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents result in increased formation and kinase activity of Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes, and that Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes are able to phosphorylate a number of substrates in addition to Rb. Nucleophosmin and Cdh1, two proteins important for centrosome replication and implicated in the chromosomal instability of cancer are shown to be phosphorylated by Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes. Additionally, PSF is identified as a novel Cdk2 substrate, being phosphorylated by Cdk2 complexed with either Cyclin E or Cyclin D1, and given the many functions of PSF, it could have important implications on cellular activity. PMID:23627734

  13. Phosphorylation of ribonucleotide reductase R2 protein: in vivo and in vitro evidence of a role for p34cdc2 and CDK2 protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Chan, A K; Litchfield, D W; Wright, J A

    1993-11-30

    Ribonucleotide reductase is responsible for supplying the deoxyribonucleotides required for DNA synthesis and repair. The active enzyme consists of two dissimilar protein components called R1 and R2. Immunoprecipitation of R1 and R2 proteins from [32P]orthophosphate-labeled exponentially growing mouse L cells showed that the R2 protein but not the R1 protein of ribonucleotide reductase could be phosphorylated in vivo. Two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping experiments of trypsin-digested R2 protein showed a major spot containing more than 90% of the total radioactivity and a minor spot with the remaining radioactivity. Phosphoamino acid analysis of R2 phosphorylated protein indicated that phosphorylation occurred exclusively on serine. Protein kinase C, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, p34cdc2, and CDK2 were capable of phosphorylating the R2 protein in vitro, whereas casein kinase II was not. To determine whether any of these enzymes could phosphorylate peptides observed to be phosphorylated in actively growing cells, tryptic phosphopeptide maps of R2 that had been phosphorylated in vitro were compared with maps of R2 that had been isolated from [32P]-labeled cells. Only the phosphopeptide maps obtained with p34cdc2 and CDK2 matched the pattern found in [32P]-labeled cells. Experiments in which tryptic digests from different samples were mixed prior to two-dimensional separation demonstrated comigration of phosphopeptides obtained by in vivo phosphorylation with phosphopeptides derived from p34cdc2 or CDK2 obtained by in vitro phosphorylations. These studies indicate that protein R2 phosphorylation may play an important role in the regulation of ribonucleotide reduction, DNA synthesis, and cell cycle progression, and suggest a potentially important p34cdc2 and/or CDK2 regulation point in DNA replication.

  14. The N-terminal domains of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory proteins block the phosphorylation of cdk2/Cyclin E by the CDK-activating kinase.

    PubMed

    Rank, K B; Evans, D B; Sharma, S K

    2000-05-10

    It has been suggested that binding of p27 and p21 kinase inhibitory proteins (KIPs) to cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) render them inaccessible to cdk-activating kinase (CAK), presumably by steric hindrance by the C-terminal residues. However, this common mechanism of inhibition is inconsistent with the known structural divergence in the p27 and p21 C-terminal domains. Therefore, we studied the direct binding of N-terminal minimal domain of p27 (amino acids 28-81) to cdk2/cyclin E. An unlabeled p27 minimal domain, mutated in the N-terminal LFG motif, was unable to compete with a labeled minimal domain for binding to cdk2/cyclin E. The p27 and its minimal domain inhibited CAK-mediated phosphorylation of cdk2/cyclin E. This inhibitory effect was significantly diminished with p27 minimal domain mutated in the LFG motif. A synthetic peptide, ACRRLFGPVDSE, from the N-terminal residues 17-28 of p21, was also a potent inhibitor of CAK-mediated cdk2/cyclin E phosphorylation. Taken together, these results show that anchoring of p27 or p21 KIPs to cyclin E via the N-terminal LFG-containing motif can block CAK access to its cdk2/cyclin E substrate.

  15. Interaction of Heat Shock Protein Cpn10 with the Cyclin E/Cdk2 Substrate Nuclear Protein Ataxia-Telangiectasia (NPAT) Is Involved in Regulating Histone Transcription.

    PubMed

    Ling Zheng, Li; Wang, Fei Ya; Cong, Xiao Xia; Shen, Yue; Rao, Xi Sheng; Huang, Dao Sheng; Fan, Wei; Yi, Peng; Wang, Xin Bao; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Yi Ting; Luo, Yan

    2015-12-04

    Precise modulation of histone gene transcription is critical for cell cycle progression. As a direct substrate of Cyclin E/CDK2, nuclear protein ataxia-telangiectasia (NPAT) is a crucial factor in regulating histone transcription and cell cycle progression. Here we identified that Cpn10/HSPE, a 10-kDa heat shock protein, is a novel interacting partner of NPAT. A pool of Cpn10 is colocalized with NPAT foci during G1 and S phases in nuclei. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments unraveled an essential role of Cpn10 in histone transcription. A conserved DLFD motif within Cpn10 was critical for targeting NPAT and modulating histone transcription. More importantly, knockdown of Cpn10 disrupted the focus formation of both NPAT and FADD-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-associated huge protein without affecting Coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Finally, Cpn10 is important for S phase progression and cell proliferation. Taken together, our finding revealed a novel role of Cpn10 in the spatial regulation of NPAT signaling and disclosed a previously unappreciated link between the heat shock protein and histone transcription regulation.

  16. Interaction of Heat Shock Protein Cpn10 with the Cyclin E/Cdk2 Substrate Nuclear Protein Ataxia-Telangiectasia (NPAT) Is Involved in Regulating Histone Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Ling Zheng, Li; Wang, Fei Ya; Cong, Xiao Xia; Shen, Yue; Rao, Xi Sheng; Huang, Dao Sheng; Fan, Wei; Yi, Peng; Wang, Xin Bao; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Yi Ting; Luo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Precise modulation of histone gene transcription is critical for cell cycle progression. As a direct substrate of Cyclin E/CDK2, nuclear protein ataxia-telangiectasia (NPAT) is a crucial factor in regulating histone transcription and cell cycle progression. Here we identified that Cpn10/HSPE, a 10-kDa heat shock protein, is a novel interacting partner of NPAT. A pool of Cpn10 is colocalized with NPAT foci during G1 and S phases in nuclei. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments unraveled an essential role of Cpn10 in histone transcription. A conserved DLFD motif within Cpn10 was critical for targeting NPAT and modulating histone transcription. More importantly, knockdown of Cpn10 disrupted the focus formation of both NPAT and FADD-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-associated huge protein without affecting Coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Finally, Cpn10 is important for S phase progression and cell proliferation. Taken together, our finding revealed a novel role of Cpn10 in the spatial regulation of NPAT signaling and disclosed a previously unappreciated link between the heat shock protein and histone transcription regulation. PMID:26429916

  17. Knockdown of CDK2AP1 in Primary Human Fibroblasts Induces p53 Dependent Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Alsayegh, Khaled N.; Gadepalli, Venkat S.; Iyer, Shilpa; Rao, Raj R.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin Dependent Kinase-2 Associated Protein-1 (CDK2AP1) is known to be a tumor suppressor that plays a role in cell cycle regulation by sequestering monomeric CDK2, and targeting it for proteolysis. A reduction of CDK2AP1 expression is considered to be a negative prognostic indicator in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and also associated with increased invasion in human gastric cancer tissue. CDK2AP1 overexpression was shown to inhibit growth, reduce invasion and increase apoptosis in prostate cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the effect of CDK2AP1 downregulation in primary human dermal fibroblasts. Using a short-hairpin RNA to reduce its expression, we found that knockdown of CDK2AP1in primary human fibroblasts resulted in reduced proliferation and in the induction of senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity. CDK2AP1 knockdown also resulted in a significant reduction in the percentage of cells in the S phase and an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Immunocytochemical analysis also revealed that the CDK2AP1 knockdown significantly increased the percentage of cells that exhibited γ-H2AX foci, which could indicate presence of DNA damage. CDK2AP1 knockdown also resulted in increased mRNA levels of p53, p21, BAX and PUMA and p53 protein levels. In primary human fibroblasts in which p53 and CDK2AP1 were simultaneously downregulated, there was: (a) no increase in senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity, (b) decrease in the number of cells in the G1-phase and increase in number of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle, and (c) decrease in the mRNA levels of p21, BAX and PUMA when compared with CDK2AP1 knockdown only fibroblasts. Taken together, this suggests that the observed phenotype is p53 dependent. We also observed a prominent increase in the levels of ARF protein in the CDK2AP1 knockdown cells, which suggests a possible role of ARF in p53 stabilization following CDK2AP1 knockdown. Altogether

  18. C/EBPalpha arrests cell proliferation through direct inhibition of Cdk2 and Cdk4.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Iakova, P; Wilde, M; Welm, A; Goode, T; Roesler, W J; Timchenko, N A

    2001-10-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha) is a strong inhibitor of cell proliferation. We found that C/EBPalpha directly interacts with cdk2 and cdk4 and arrests cell proliferation by inhibiting these kinases. We mapped a short growth inhibitory region of C/EBPalpha between amino acids 175 and 187. This portion of C/EBPalpha is responsible for direct inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases and causes growth arrest in cultured cells. C/EBPalpha inhibits cdk2 activity by blocking the association of cdk2 with cyclins. Importantly, the activities of cdk4 and cdk2 are increased in C/EBPalpha knockout livers, leading to increased proliferation. Our data demonstrate that the liver-specific transcription factor C/EBPalpha brings about growth arrest through direct inhibition of cdk2 and cdk4.

  19. PKCeta associates with cyclin E/Cdk2 complex in serum-starved MCF-7 and NIH-3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Shtutman, Marat; Hershko, Tzippi; Maissel, Adva; Fima, Eyal; Livneh, Etta

    2003-05-15

    Protein kinase C (PKC) encodes a family of enzymes implicated in cellular differentiation, growth control, and tumor promotion. However, very little is known with respect to the molecular mechanisms that link protein kinase C to cell cycle control. Here we report that PKCeta associates with the cyclin E/Cdk2 complex. This is shown for the ectopically overexpressed PKCeta in NIH-3T3 cells, the inducibly expressed PKCeta in MCF-7 cells (under control of the tetracycline-responsive promoter), and the endogenously expressed PKCeta in mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cells. Subcellular cell fractionation experiments revealed that the complex with cyclin E is formed mostly in the nuclear fractions, although in these cells PKCeta is predominantly expressed in the cytosolic fractions. The complex of PKCeta and cyclin E was studied at various phases of the cell cycle, in serum-starved quiescent cells and in cells stimulated with serum to reenter the cell cycle. Interestingly, the interaction between PKCeta and cyclin E was most prominent in serum-starved cells and was disintegrated when cells entered the cells cycle. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that in serum-starved cells PKCeta is concentrated at the perinuclear zone, which is also the site of its colocalization with cyclin E. Colocalization of PKCeta and cyclin E in the perinuclear region was observed in serum-starved cells, and less in proliferating cells. These experiments suggest that the interaction between PKCeta and cyclin E is carefully regulated, and is correlated with the inactivated form of the cyclin E/Cdk2 complex. Thus, our studies support an important link between PKC and cell cycle control.

  20. A mutant E2F-1 transcription factor that affects the phenotype of NIH3T3 fibroblasts inefficiency associates with cyclin A-cdk2.

    PubMed

    Jordan-Sciutto, K L; Hall, D J

    1998-01-01

    The amino-terminal domain of the E2F1 transcription factor is the site of association with cyclin A-cdk2, mapping to residues 87-94. A mutant of E2F1 lacking the first 87 amino acids (termed E2F1d87) has a number of potent effects on cellular phenotype when constitutively expressed in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. For example, in these fibroblasts the duration of S phase and the sensitivity to S phase chemotherapeutic agents are both increased. Since E2F1d87 only partially truncates the cyclin A-cdk2 binding domain, it was important to determine the level of cyclin A-cdk2 association with this mutant to correlate any reduction in association with the observed effects on the cell cycle. It was found that cyclin A-cdk2 binds E2F1d87 in an in vitro assay but that this binding is reduced approximately 8 fold compared with binding to full-length E2F1, whereas no detectable binding was seen to a mutant E2F1 that lacks the first 117 amino acids. Correspondingly, H1 kinase activity in E2F1d87 immunoprecipitates from E2F1d87-expressing cells was significantly reduced compared with that seen for full-length E2F1. From these data it appears that E2F1 with reduced cyclin A-cdk2 binding activity mediates the alteration in cell cycle parameters seen in these cells.

  1. Cyclin A2 and CDK2 as Novel Targets of Aspirin and Salicylic Acid: A Potential Role in Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Dachineni, Rakesh; Ai, Guoqiang; Kumar, D Ramesh; Sadhu, Satya S; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-03-01

    Data emerging from the past 10 years have consolidated the rationale for investigating the use of aspirin as a chemopreventive agent; however, the mechanisms leading to its anticancer effects are still being elucidated. We hypothesized that aspirin's chemopreventive actions may involve cell-cycle regulation through modulation of the levels or activity of cyclin A2/cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2). In this study, HT-29 and other diverse panel of cancer cells were used to demonstrate that both aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decreased cyclin A2 (CCNA2) and CDK2 protein and mRNA levels. The downregulatory effect of either drugs on cyclin A2 levels was prevented by pretreatment with lactacystin, an inhibitor of proteasomes, suggesting the involvement of 26S proteasomes. In-vitro kinase assays showed that lysates from cells treated with salicylic acid had lower levels of CDK2 activity. Importantly, three independent experiments revealed that salicylic acid directly binds to CDK2. First, inclusion of salicylic acid in naïve cell lysates, or in recombinant CDK2 preparations, increased the ability of the anti-CDK2 antibody to immunoprecipitate CDK2, suggesting that salicylic acid may directly bind and alter its conformation. Second, in 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate (ANS)-CDK2 fluorescence assays, preincubation of CDK2 with salicylic acid dose-dependently quenched the fluorescence due to ANS. Third, computational analysis using molecular docking studies identified Asp145 and Lys33 as the potential sites of salicylic acid interactions with CDK2. These results demonstrate that aspirin and salicylic acid downregulate cyclin A2/CDK2 proteins in multiple cancer cell lines, suggesting a novel target and mechanism of action in chemoprevention. Biochemical and structural studies indicate that the antiproliferative actions of aspirin are mediated through cyclin A2/CDK2. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Spliceosomal protein E regulates neoplastic cell growth by modulating expression of Cyclin E/CDK2 and G2/M checkpoint proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z; Pützer, B M

    2008-01-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins are essential splicing factors. We previously identified the spliceosomal protein E (SmE) as a downstream effector of E2F1 in p53-deficient human carcinoma cells. Here, we investigated the biological relevance of SmE in determining the fate of cancer and non-tumourigenic cells. Adenovirus-mediated expression of SmE selectively reduces growth of cancerous cells due to decreased cell proliferation but not apoptosis. A similar growth inhibitory effect for SmD1 suggests that this is a general function of Sm-family members. Deletion of Sm-motifs reveals the importance of the Sm-1 domain for growth suppression. Consistently, SmE overexpression leads to inhibition of DNA synthesis and G2 arrest as shown by BrdU-incorporation and MPM2-staining. Real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting showed that growth arrest by SmE directly correlates with the reduction of cyclin E, CDK2, CDC25C and CDC2 expression, and up-regulation of p27Kip. Importantly, SmE activity was not associated with enhanced expression of other spliceosome components such as U1 SnRNP70, suggesting that the growth inhibitory effect of SmE is distinct from its pre-mRNA splicing function. Furthermore, specific inactivation of SmE by shRNA significantly increased the percentage of cells in S phase, whereas the amount of G2/M arrested cells was reduced. Our data provide evidence that Sm proteins function as suppressors of tumour cell growth and may have major implications as cancer therapeutics. PMID:18208561

  3. Spliceosomal protein E regulates neoplastic cell growth by modulating expression of cyclin E/CDK2 and G2/M checkpoint proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Pützer, B M

    2008-12-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins are essential splicing factors. We previously identified the spliceosomal protein E (SmE) as a downstream effector of E2F1 in p53-deficient human carcinoma cells. Here, we investigated the biological relevance of SmE in determining the fate of cancer and non-tumourigenic cells. Adenovirus-mediated expression of SmE selectively reduces growth of cancerous cells due to decreased cell proliferation but not apoptosis. A similar growth inhibitory effect for SmD1 suggests that this is a general function of Sm-family members. Deletion of Sm-motifs reveals the importance of the Sm-1 domain for growth suppression. Consistently, SmE overexpression leads to inhibition of DNA synthesis and G2 arrest as shown by BrdU-incorporation and MPM2-staining. Real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting showed that growth arrest by SmE directly correlates with the reduction of cyclin E, CDK2, CDC25C and CDC2 expression, and up-regulation of p27Kip. Importantly, SmE activity was not associated with enhanced expression of other spliceosome components such as U1 SnRNP70, suggesting that the growth inhibitory effect of SmE is distinct from its pre-mRNA splicing function. Furthermore, specific inactivation of SmE by shRNA significantly increased the percentage of cells in S phase, whereas the amount of G2/M arrested cells was reduced. Our data provide evidence that Sm proteins function as suppressors of tumour cell growth and may have major implications as cancer therapeutics.

  4. Mechanism of p27 Unfolding for CDK2 Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Rath, Soumya Lipsa; Senapati, Sanjib

    2016-05-23

    Cell-cycle regulatory protein, CDK2 is active when bound to its complementary partner protein, CyclinA or E. Recent discovery of the Kip/Cip family of proteins has indicated that the activity of CDK2 is also regulated by a member protein, p27. Although, the mechanism of CDK2 inhibition by p27 binding is known from crystal structure, little is known about the mechanism of CDK2 reactivation. Here, we execute classical and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of unphosphorylated- and phosphorylated-p27 bound CDK2/CyclinA to unravel the CDK2 reactivation mechanism at molecular-to-atomic detail. Results suggest that the phosphorylation of p27 Y88 residue (pY88-p27) first disrupts the p27/CDK2 hybrid β-sheet and subsequently ejects the p27 310 helix from CDK2 catalytic cleft. The unbinding of p27 from CDK2/CyclinA complex, thus, follows a two-step unfolding mechanism, where the 310 helix ejection constitutes the rate-limiting step. Interestingly, the unfolding of p27 leaves CDK2/CyclinA in an active state, where the prerequisite CDK2-CyclinA interfacial contacts were regained and ATP achieved its native position for smooth transfer of phosphate. Our findings match very well with NMR chemical shift data that indicated the flip-out of p27 310 helix from CDK2 pocket and kinetic experiments that exhibited significant kinase activity of CDK2 when saturated with pY88-p27.

  5. Mechanism of p27 Unfolding for CDK2 Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Soumya Lipsa; Senapati, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cycle regulatory protein, CDK2 is active when bound to its complementary partner protein, CyclinA or E. Recent discovery of the Kip/Cip family of proteins has indicated that the activity of CDK2 is also regulated by a member protein, p27. Although, the mechanism of CDK2 inhibition by p27 binding is known from crystal structure, little is known about the mechanism of CDK2 reactivation. Here, we execute classical and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of unphosphorylated- and phosphorylated-p27 bound CDK2/CyclinA to unravel the CDK2 reactivation mechanism at molecular-to-atomic detail. Results suggest that the phosphorylation of p27 Y88 residue (pY88-p27) first disrupts the p27/CDK2 hybrid β-sheet and subsequently ejects the p27 310 helix from CDK2 catalytic cleft. The unbinding of p27 from CDK2/CyclinA complex, thus, follows a two-step unfolding mechanism, where the 310 helix ejection constitutes the rate-limiting step. Interestingly, the unfolding of p27 leaves CDK2/CyclinA in an active state, where the prerequisite CDK2-CyclinA interfacial contacts were regained and ATP achieved its native position for smooth transfer of phosphate. Our findings match very well with NMR chemical shift data that indicated the flip-out of p27 310 helix from CDK2 pocket and kinetic experiments that exhibited significant kinase activity of CDK2 when saturated with pY88-p27. PMID:27211815

  6. Novel tumor growth inhibition mechanism by cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 involves anti-angiogenesis modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zolochevska, Olga; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of expressing the cell cycle regulator protein cdk2-associating protein1 (cdk2ap1) in inhibiting growth of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Expression of cdk2ap1 correlated with reduction in several SCC malignant cell phenotypes, including reduced angiogenesis. We observed several alterations in gene expression consistent with classical functions of cdk2ap1, including upregulation of cell cycle inhibitory genes, and an upregulation in expression of genes belonging to both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic cascades. Interestingly, we also uncovered a profile of gene expression and activation of signaling pathways that may suggest new tumor-suppressive functions for cdk2ap1 through downregulation of invasion/metastasis and modulation of antiangiogenesis by upregulation of the TGFβ signaling pathway. Blocking of the TGFβ1 pathway resulted in inhibition of the cdk2ap1 antiangiogenesis phenotype. In combination, these data support the role of cdk2ap1 as a tumor suppressor gene that can regulate SCC tumor growth in a cell autonomous manner through decreases in invasiveness and a non cell-autonomous manner through decreases in angiogenesis phenotypes, and these are novel phenotypes induced by cdk2ap1. PMID:20541561

  7. TOK-1, a novel p21Cip1-binding protein that cooperatively enhances p21-dependent inhibitory activity toward CDK2 kinase.

    PubMed

    Ono, T; Kitaura, H; Ugai, H; Murata, T; Yokoyama, K K; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    2000-10-06

    A p21(Cip1/Waf1/Sdi1) is known to act as a negative cell-cycle regulator by inhibiting kinase activity of a variety of cyclin-dependent kinases. In addition to binding of the cyclin-dependent kinase to the N-terminal region of p21, p21 is also bound at its C-terminal region by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), SET/TAF1, and calmodulin, indicating the versatile function of p21. In this study, we cloned cDNA encoding a novel protein named TOK-1 as a p21 C-terminal-binding protein by a two-hybrid system. Two splicing isoforms of TOK-1, TOK-1alpha and TOK-1beta, comprising 322 and 314 amino acids, respectively, were co-localized with p21 in nuclei and showed a similar expression profile to that of p21 in human tissues. TOK-1alpha, but not TOK-1beta, directly bound to the C-terminal proximal region of p21, and both were expressed at the G(1)/S boundary of the cell cycle. TOK-1alpha also preferentially bound to an active form of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) via p21, and these made a ternary complex in human cells. Furthermore, the results of three different types of experiments showed that TOK-1alpha enhanced the inhibitory activity of p21 toward histone H1 kinase activity of CDK2. TOK-1alpha is thus thought to be a new type of CDK2 modulator.

  8. Regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 Thr-160 phosphorylation and activity by mitogen-activated protein kinase in late G1 phase.

    PubMed Central

    Chiariello, M; Gomez, E; Gutkind, J S

    2000-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, p42(MAPK) and p44(MAPK), are central components of growth-promoting signalling pathways. However, how stimulation of MAP kinases culminates in cell-cycle progression is still poorly understood. Here we show that mitogenic stimulation of NIH 3T3 cells causes a sustained activation of MAP kinases, which lasts until cells begin progressing through the G(1)/S boundary. Furthermore, we observed that disruption of the MAP-kinase pathway with a selective MEK (MAP kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase) inhibitor, PD98059, prevents the activation of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 and DNA synthesis, even when added during late G(1) phase, once the known mechanisms by which MAP kinase controls G(1) progression, accumulation of G(1) cyclins and degradation of Cdk inhibitors have already taken place. Moreover, we provide evidence indicating that MAP kinases control Cdk2 Thr-160 activating phosphorylation and function, possibly by regulating the activity of a Cdk-activating kinase, thus promoting the re-initiation of DNA synthesis. These findings suggest the existence of a novel mechanism whereby signal-transducing pathways converging on MAP kinases can affect the cell-cycle machinery and, ultimately, participate in cell-growth control. PMID:10903150

  9. A new human p34 protein kinase, CDK2, identified by complementation of a cdc28 mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a homolog of Xenopus Eg1.

    PubMed

    Elledge, S J; Spottswood, M R

    1991-09-01

    The onset of S-phase and M-phase in both Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the function of the cdc2/CDC28 gene product, p34, a serine-threonine protein kinase. A human homolog, p34cdc2, was identified by functional complementation of the S.pombe cdc2 mutation (Lee and Nurse, 1987). Using a human cDNA expression library to search for suppressors of cdc28 mutations in S. cerevisiae, we have identified a second functional p34 homolog, CDK2 cell division kinase). This gene is expressed as a 2.1 kb transcript encoding a polypeptide of 298 amino acids. This protein retains nearly all of the amino acids highly conserved among previously identified p34 homologs from other species, but is considerably divergent from all previous p34cdc2 homologs, approximately 65% identity. This gene encodes the human homolog of the Xenopus Eg1 gene, sharing 89% amino acid identity, and defines a second sub-family of CDC2 homologs. A second chromosomal mutation which arose spontaneously was required to allow complementation of the cdc28-4 mutation by CDK2. This mutation blocked the ability of this strain to mate. These results suggest that the machinery controlling the human cell cycle is more complex than that for fission and budding yeast.

  10. Double edge: CDK2AP1 in cell-cycle regulation and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Wong, D T W; Kim, J J; Khalid, O; Sun, H H; Kim, Y

    2012-03-01

    Cancer research has been devoted toward an understanding of the molecular regulation and functional significance of cell-cycle regulators in the pathogenesis and development of cancers. Cyclin-dependent Kinase 2-associated Protein 1 (CDK2AP1) is one such cell-cycle regulator, originally identified as a growth suppressor and a prognostic marker for human oral/head and neck cancers. Functional importance and the molecular mechanism of CDK2AP1-mediated cell-cycle regulation have been documented over the years. Recent progress has shown that CDK2AP1 is a competency factor in embryonic stem cell differentiation. Deletion of CDK2AP1 leads to early embryonic lethality, potentially through altered differentiation capability of embryonic stem cells. More intriguingly, CDK2AP1 exerts its effect on stem cell maintenance/differentiation through epigenetic regulation. Cancer cells and stem cells share common cellular characteristics, most prominently in maintaining high proliferative potential through an unconventional cell-cycle regulatory mechanism. Cross-talk between cellular processes and molecular signaling pathways is frequent in any biological system. Currently, it remains largely elusive how cell-cycle regulation is mechanistically linked to epigenetic control. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying CDK2AP1-mediated cell-cycle regulation and epigenetic control will set an example for establishing a novel and effective molecular link between these two important regulatory mechanisms.

  11. A computational study of the protein-ligand interactions in CDK2 inhibitors: using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics interaction energy as a predictor of the biological activity.

    PubMed

    Alzate-Morales, Jans H; Contreras, Renato; Soriano, Alejandro; Tuñon, Iñaki; Silla, Estanislao

    2007-01-15

    We report a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study to determine the protein-ligand interaction energy between CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and five inhibitors with the N(2)-substituted 6-cyclohexyl-methoxy-purine scaffold. The computational results in this work show that the QM/MM interaction energy is strongly correlated to the biological activity and can be used as a predictor, at least within a family of substrates. A detailed analysis of the protein-ligand structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations shows specific interactions within the active site that, in some cases, have not been reported before to our knowledge. The computed interaction energy gauges the strength of protein-ligand interactions. Finally, energy decomposition and multiple regression analyses were performed to check the contribution of the electrostatic and van der Waals energies to the total interaction energy and to show the capabilities of the computational model to identify new potent inhibitors.

  12. p12CDK2-AP1 interacts with CD82 to regulate the proliferation and survival of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chai, Juan; Ju, Jun; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Shen, Zhi-Yuan; Liang, Liang; Yang, Xiang-Ming; Ma, Chao; Ni, Qian-Wei; Sun, Mo-Yi

    2016-08-01

    p12 cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2)-associating protein 1 (p12CDK2-AP1) has been demonstrated to negatively regulate the activity of CDK2. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We aimed to determine the potential binding proteins of p12CDK2-AP1 and to elucidate the role of p12CDK2-AP1 in the regulation of the proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, and in vivo growth of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. The protein-protein interaction was predicted using computational decision templates. The predicted p12CDK2‑AP1 interacting proteins were overexpressed in human oral squamous cell carcinoma OSCC-15 cells, and the protein binding was examined using co-precipitation (Co-IP). Cell proliferation and invasion were determined via MTT assay and Transwell system, respectively. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining followed by flow cytometric analysis. The in vivo growth of OSCC-15 cells was examined in nude mouse tumor xenografts. We found that overexpression of either p12CDK2-AP1 or CD82 significantly suppressed the proliferation and invasion but promoted the apoptosis of OSCC-15 cells (P<0.05). Importantly, combined overexpression of p12CDK2-AP1 and CD82 showed synergistic antitumor activity compared with the overexpression of a single protein alone (P<0.05). Additionally, the simultaneous overexpression of p12CDK2-AP1 and CD82 significantly suppressed the in vivo tumor growth of OSCC-15 cells in nude mice compared with the negative control (P<0.05). Our findings indicate that p12CDK2-AP1 interacts with CD82 to play a functional role in suppressing the in vitro and in vivo growth of OSCC-15 cells.

  13. The amino terminus of Cdk2 binds p21.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, N K; Borao, F J; Dardashti, O; Cohen, H D; Germino, F J

    1996-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor known as p21, which is transcriptionally regulated by p53, can induce G1 arrest when overexpressed and inhibit the kinase activity of a wide variety of cyclin-Cdk complexes. Previous studies have demonstrated that a portion of the conserved region of p21 (amino acids 46-78), which is homologous to similar regions in the related Cdk inhibitors p27 and p57, can bind to Cdk2, and that this region is essential for kinase inhibition. However, the site(s) on Cdk2 that are involved in p21 binding have not been identified. We therefore created mutant Cdk2 molecules with various N-terminal and C-terminal deletions and tested each for their ability to bind to p21 by the yeast two-hybrid and the double-tagging assays. None of the deletion mutants tested bound to p21 by either assay. We next tested whether p21 could bind to Cdk7, a component of the cyclin-activating kinase complex. By both the double-tagging and yeast two-hybrid assays, p21 failed to bind to this protein, consistent with previous reports. However, hybrid molecules consisting of the amino-terminal half of Cdk2 and the carboxy-terminal half of Cdk7 (Cdk2/Cdk7) could bind to p21 by both assays, whereas the Cdk7/Cdk2 hybrids could not. Furthermore, the yeast Cdc28 protein, which is 65% identical with Cdk2, failed to bind to p21 by both the yeast two-hybrid and double-tagging assays. Cdk2/Cdc28 hybrids but not Cdc28/Cdk2 hybrids could bind to p21. These results suggest that the amino-terminal half of Cdk2 is important for p21 binding, consistent with the recently published crystal-lographic data. Our data also suggest that the three-dimensional structure of Cdk2 is likely altered by creating deletion mutants from either the amino- or carboxy-terminal end of the protein. Finally, we have mutated the Cdc28/Cdk2 hybrid protein and isolated several mutants, which are able to bind to p21. This approach may be useful for identifying residues in Cdk2 and Cdc28 that affect their

  14. LMW-E/CDK2 Deregulates Acinar Morphogenesis, Induces Tumorigenesis, and Associates with the Activated b-Raf-ERK1/2-mTOR Pathway in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Duong, MyLinh T.; Akli, Said; Wei, Caimiao; Wingate, Hannah F.; Liu, Wenbin; Lu, Yiling; Yi, Min; Mills, Gordon B.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2012-01-01

    Elastase-mediated cleavage of cyclin E generates low molecular weight cyclin E (LMW-E) isoforms exhibiting enhanced CDK2associated kinase activity and resistance to inhibition by CDK inhibitors p21 and p27. Approximately 27% of breast cancers express high LMW-E protein levels, which significantly correlates with poor survival. The objective of this study was to identify the signaling pathway(s) deregulated by LMW-E expression in breast cancer patients and to identify pharmaceutical agents to effectively target this pathway. Ectopic LMW-E expression in nontumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) was sufficient to generate xenografts with greater tumorigenic potential than full-length cyclin E, and the tumorigenicity was augmented by in vivo passaging. However, cyclin E mutants unable to interact with CDK2 protected hMECs from tumor development. When hMECs were cultured on Matrigel, LMW-E mediated aberrant acinar morphogenesis, including enlargement of acinar structures and formation of multi-acinar complexes, as denoted by reduced BIM and elevated Ki67 expression. Similarly, inducible expression of LMW-E in transgenic mice generated hyper-proliferative terminal end buds resulting in enhanced mammary tumor development. Reverse-phase protein array assay of 276 breast tumor patient samples and cells cultured on monolayer and in three-dimensional Matrigel demonstrated that, in terms of protein expression profile, hMECs cultured in Matrigel more closely resembled patient tissues than did cells cultured on monolayer. Additionally, the b-Raf-ERK1/2-mTOR pathway was activated in LMW-E–expressing patient samples, and activation of this pathway was associated with poor disease-specific survival. Combination treatment using roscovitine (CDK inhibitor) plus either rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor) or sorafenib (a pan kinase inhibitor targeting b-Raf) effectively prevented aberrant acinar formation in LMW-E–expressing cells by inducing G1/S cell cycle arrest. LMW

  15. Hexachlorobenzene alters cell cycle by regulating p27-cyclin E-CDK2 and c-Src-p27 protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Ventura, C; Núñez, M; Gaido, V; Pontillo, C; Miret, N; Randi, A; Cocca, C

    2017-03-15

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is an organochlorine pollutant widely distributed in the environment around the entire world. Previous reports from our group and others have demonstrated that this compound is as an endocrine disruptor. We have also reported that HCB presents a co-carcinogenic effect in N-Nitroso-N-methyl-urea-induced mammary tumours in rats. In this work, we studied the effects of HCB on cell cycle progression and cell cycle regulating protein expression in the estrogen-sensitive breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Here, we show that HCB alters cell cycle in a concentration-dependent way. The lowest assessed concentration (0.005μM) promotes the cell cycle progression, enhances cyclin D1 expression, and reduces the nuclear localization of p27 accompanied by an increased interaction between p27 and c-Src kinase. On the other hand, 5μM HCB delays the cell cycle progression and promotes the formation of the cyclin E-CDK2-p27 protein complex. Our results show that HCB stimulates cell proliferation through cell cycle modulation and c-Src involvement in MCF-7 cells. Here, we report for the first time that differential mechanisms of action of HCB on mammary cell cycle progression are triggered at different concentrations of this pollutant.

  16. Cyclin A/CDK2 binds directly to E2F-1 and inhibits the DNA-binding activity of E2F-1/DP-1 by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Sheppard, K A; Peng, C Y; Yee, A S; Piwnica-Worms, H

    1994-12-01

    E2F-1, a member of the E2F transcription factor family, contributes to the regulation of the G1-to-S phase transition in higher eukaryotic cells. E2F-1 forms a heterodimer with DP-1 and binds to several cell cycle regulatory proteins, including the retinoblastoma family (RB, p107, p130) and cyclin A/CDK2 complexes. We have analyzed E2F-1 phosphorylation and its interaction with cyclin A/CDK2 complexes both in vivo and in vitro. In vitro, E2F-1 formed a stable complex with cyclin A/CDK2 but not with either subunit alone. DP-1 did not interact with cyclin A, CDK2, or the cyclin A/CDK2 complex. While the complex of cyclin A/CDK2 was required for stable complex formation with E2F-1, the kinase-active form of CDK2 was not required. However, E2F-1 was phosphorylated by cyclin A/CDK2 in vitro and was phosphorylated in vivo in HeLa cells. Two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping studies demonstrated an overlap in the phosphopeptides derived from E2F-1 labeled in vitro and in vivo, indicating that cyclin A/CDK2 may be responsible for the majority of E2F-1 phosphorylation in vivo. Furthermore, an active DNA-binding complex could be reconstituted from purified E2F-1/DP-1 and cyclin A/CDK2. Binding studies conducted both in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that the cyclin A/CDK2-binding region resided within the N-terminal 124 amino acids of E2F-1. Because the stable association of E2F-1 with cyclin A/CDK2 in vitro and in vivo did not require a DP-1- or RB-binding domain and because the interactions could be reconstituted from purified components in vitro, we conclude that the interactions between cyclin A/CDK2 and E2F-1 are direct. Finally, we report that the DNA-binding activity of the E2F-1/DP-1 complex is inhibited following phosphorylation by cyclin A/CDK2.

  17. The structure of cyclin E1/CDK2: implications for CDK2 activation and CDK2-independent roles.

    PubMed

    Honda, Reiko; Lowe, Edward D; Dubinina, Elena; Skamnaki, Vicky; Cook, Atlanta; Brown, Nick R; Johnson, Louise N

    2005-02-09

    Cyclin E, an activator of phospho-CDK2 (pCDK2), is important for cell cycle progression in metazoans and is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells. It is essential for entry to the cell cycle from G0 quiescent phase, for the assembly of prereplication complexes and for endoreduplication in megakaryotes and giant trophoblast cells. We report the crystal structure of pCDK2 in complex with a truncated cyclin E1 (residues 81-363) at 2.25 A resolution. The N-terminal cyclin box fold of cyclin E1 is similar to that of cyclin A and promotes identical changes in pCDK2 that lead to kinase activation. The C-terminal cyclin box fold shows significant differences from cyclin A. It makes additional interactions with pCDK2, especially in the region of the activation segment, and contributes to CDK2-independent binding sites of cyclin E. Kinetic analysis with model peptide substrates show a 1.6-fold increase in kcat for pCDK2/cyclin E1 (81-363) over kcat of pCDK2/cyclin E (full length) and pCDK2/cyclin A. The structural and kinetic results indicate no inherent substrate discrimination between pCDK2/cyclin E and pCDK2/cyclin A with model substrates.

  18. c-Jun induces apoptosis of starved BM2 monoblasts by activating cyclin A-CDK2

    SciTech Connect

    Vanhara, Petr; Bryja, Vitezslav; Horvath, Viktor; Kozubik, Alois; Hampl, Ales; Smarda, Jan . E-mail: smarda@sci.muni.cz

    2007-02-02

    c-Jun is one of the major components of the activating protein-1 (AP-1), the transcription factor that participates in regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, we explored functional interactions of the c-Jun protein with several regulators of the G1/S transition in serum-deprived v-myb-transformed chicken monoblasts BM2. We show that the c-Jun protein induces expression of cyclin A, thus up-regulating activity of cyclin A-associated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), and causing massive programmed cell death of starved BM2cJUN cells. Specific inhibition of CDK2 suppresses frequency of apoptosis of BM2cJUN cells. We conclude that up-regulation of cyclin A expression and CDK2 activity can represent important link between the c-Jun protein, cell cycle machinery, and programmed cell death pathway in leukemic cells.

  19. Identification of a p130 domain mediating interactions with cyclin A/cdk 2 and cyclin E/cdk 2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Lacy, S; Whyte, P

    1997-05-22

    P130 shares structural and functional homology with pRb and p107. One property common to p107 and p130, but not to pRb, is the ability to stably interact with cyclin A/cdk2 and cyclin E/cdk2 complexes in vitro and in vivo. Using GST-p130 fusion proteins representing various regions of p130, baculovirus-produced cyclin A/cdk2 and cyclin E/cdk2 complexes were found to interact with residues within a part of p130 known as the spacer region. Cyclin E was able to bind the p130 spacer region in the presence or absence of cdk2 whereas cyclin A binding was dependent upon the presence of cdk2. The smallest p130 fusion protein sufficient to interact with cyclin A/cdk2 or cyclin E/cdk2 complexes contained p130 amino acids 652-698 and deletion of p130 amino acids 680-682 abolished binding to both of the cyclin/cdk2 complexes. When overexpressed in C33A cells, a p130 mutant containing a deletion of amino acids 620-697 was unable to form complexes with either cyclin A or cyclin E. This p130 mutant was at least as active as wild type p130 in suppressing the growth of G418 resistant colonies when overexpressed in C33A or SAOS-2 cells.

  20. CDK2 activation in mouse epidermis induces keratinocyte proliferation but does not affect skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; De Siervi, Adriana; Conti, Claudio J; Senderowicz, Adrian M; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2008-08-01

    It has been widely assumed that elevated CDK2 kinase activity plays a contributory role in tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that mice overexpressing CDK4 under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK4 mice) develop epidermal hyperplasia and increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. In this model, CDK4 overexpression results in increased CDK2 activity associated with the noncatalytic function of CDK4, sequestration of p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Furthermore, we have shown that ablation of Cdk2 reduces Ras-Cdk4 tumorigenesis, suggesting that increased CDK2 activity plays an important role in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated two transgenic mouse models of elevated CDK2 kinase activity, K5Cdk2 and K5Cdk4(D158N) mice. The D158N mutation blocks CDK4 kinase activity without interfering with its binding capability. CDK2 activation via overexpression of CDK4(D158N), but not of CDK2, resulted in epidermal hyperplasia. We observed elevated levels of p21(Cip1) in K5Cdk2, but not in K5Cdk4(D158N), epidermis, suggesting that CDK2 overexpression elicits a p21(Cip1) response to maintain keratinocyte homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that neither CDK2 overexpression nor the indirect activation of CDK2 enhanced skin tumor development. Thus, although the indirect activation of CDK2 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte hyperproliferation, activation of CDK2 alone does not induce malignant progression in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis.

  1. Histone H1 Phosphorylation by Cdk2 Selectively Modulates Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Transcription through Chromatin Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Rabindra N.; Banks, Geoffrey C.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Lee, Huay-Leng; Archer, Trevor K.

    2001-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter by ligand-bound glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is transient. Previously, we demonstrated that prolonged hormone exposure results in displacement of the transcription factor nuclear factor 1 (NF1) and the basal transcription complex from the promoter, the dephosphorylation of histone H1, and the establishment of a repressive chromatin structure. We have explored the mechanistic link between histone H1 dephosphorylation and silencing of the MMTV promoter by describing the putative kinase responsible for H1 phosphorylation. Both in vitro kinase assays and in vivo protein expression studies suggest that in hormone-treated cells the ability of cdk2 to phosphorylate histone H1 is decreased and the cdk2 inhibitory p21 protein level is increased. To address the role of cdk2 and histone H1 dephosphorylation in the silencing of the MMTV promoter, we used potent cdk2 inhibitors, Roscovitine and CVT-313, to generate an MMTV promoter which is associated predominantly with the dephosphorylated form of histone H1. Both Roscovitine and CVT-313 block phosphorylation of histone H1 and, under these conditions, the GR is unable to remodel chromatin, recruit transcription factors to the promoter, or stimulate MMTV mRNA accumulation. These results suggest a model where cdk2-directed histone H1 phosphorylation is a necessary condition to permit GR-mediated chromatin remodeling and activation of the MMTV promoter in vivo. PMID:11463824

  2. Briefly bound to activate: How the transient binding of a second catalytic Magnesium alters the structure and dynamics of the CDK2 protein kinase active site during catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhao Qin; Jacobsen, Douglas M.; Young, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    We have determined high resolution crystal structures of a CDK2/CyclinA transition-state complex bound to ADP, substrate peptide and MgF3−. Compared to previous structures of active CDK2, the catalytic subunit of the kinase adopts a more closed conformation around the active site and now allows observation of a second Mg2+ ion in the active site. Coupled with a strong [Mg2+] effect on in vitro kinase activity, the structures suggest that the transient binding of the second Mg2+ ion is necessary to achieve maximum rate-enhancement of the chemical reaction and Mg2+ concentration could represent an important regulator of CDK2 activity in vivo. Molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the simultaneous binding of substrate peptide, ATP and two Mg2+ ions is able to induce a more rigid and closed organization of the active site that functions to orient the phosphates, stabilize the buildup of negative charge, and shield the subsequently activated γ-phosphate from solvent. PMID:21565702

  3. Modulating the interaction between CDK2 and cyclin A with a quinoline-based inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongqi; Shipps, Gerald W; Zhao, Lianyun; Siddiqui, M Arshad; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Curran, Patrick J; Duca, Jose S; Hruza, Alan W; Fischmann, Thierry O; Madison, Vincent S; Zhang, Rumin; McNemar, Charles W; Mayhood, Todd W; Syto, Rosalinda; Annis, Allen; Kirschmeier, Paul; Lees, Emma M; Parry, David A; Windsor, William T

    2014-01-01

    A new class of quinoline-based kinase inhibitors has been discovered that both disrupt cyclin dependent 2 (CDK2) interaction with its cyclin A subunit and act as ATP competitive inhibitors. The key strategy for discovering this class of protein-protein disrupter compounds was to screen the monomer CDK2 in an affinity-selection/mass spectrometry-based technique and to perform secondary assays that identified compounds that bound only to the inactive CDK2 monomer and not the active CDK2/cyclin A heterodimer. Through a series of chemical modifications the affinity (Kd) of the original hit improved from 1 to 0.005μM.

  4. Expression of NPAT, a novel substrate of cyclin E–CDK2, promotes S-phase entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiyong; Dynlacht, Brian; Imai, Takashi; Hori, Tada-aki; Harlow, Ed

    1998-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms by which CDKs regulate cell cycle progression, it is necessary to identify and characterize the physiological substrates of these kinases. We have developed a screening method to identify novel CDK substrates. One of the cDNAs identified in the screen is identical to the recently isolated NPAT gene. Here we show that NPAT associates with cyclin E–CDK2 in vivo and can be phosphorylated by this CDK. The protein level of NPAT peaks at the G1/S boundary. Overexpression of NPAT accelerates S-phase entry, and this effect is enhanced by coexpression of cyclin E–CDK2. These results suggest that NPAT is a substrate of cyclin E–CDK2 and plays a role in S-phase entry. PMID:9472014

  5. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of cyclin E and CDK2 from Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Fu, M J; Qiu, L H

    2016-09-16

    Reduced reproductive performance of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) has caused economic losses and hampered the fishing industry. Detailed investigation of the molecular mechanism by which the cell cycle is regulated in this organism is needed to understand the development and maturation of ovaries and oocytes, with a view to improving reproductive capacity. Cell cycle progression is mainly determined by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and cyclin complexes, the cyclin E/CDK2 complex playing a key role in G1/S transition. However, knowledge of the interplay between cyclin E and CDK2 in invertebrates remains limited. In this study, full-length P. monodon cyclin E (Pmcyclin E) and CDK2 (PmCDK2) sequences were cloned. The open reading frame of Pmcyclin E was 1263 bp in length and encoded a 47.9-kDa protein, while that of PmCDK2 was 921 bp, encoding a protein of 34.9 kDa. Recombinant cyclin E and CDK2 proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by Ni-chelating affinity chromatography. In addition, a pull-down assay was performed to identify any interaction between Pmcyclin E and PmCDK2. This research provides a basis for the study of the functional mechanisms of the cyclin E/CDK2 complex in shrimp, further enriching our knowledge of invertebrate cell cycle regulation.

  6. Differences in substrate specificity between Cdk2-cyclin A and Cdk2-cyclin E in vitro.

    PubMed

    Higashi, H; Suzuki-Takahashi, I; Taya, Y; Segawa, K; Nishimura, S; Kitagawa, M

    1995-11-13

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), when bound to either cyclin A or cyclin E, recognizes the Ser/Thr-Pro-X-basic amino acid (motif A) as a phosphorylation site. In this study, we designed several peptides based on motif A and examined the substrate specificity of Cdk2-cyclin A and Cdk2-cyclin E using these peptides. Peptides containing a proline residue in the sequence Pro-X-Thr-Pro-X-basic amino acid (motif B) had higher affinity for both Cdk2 complexes than peptides containing motif A. Furthermore, differences in substrate affinity between the two Cdk2 complexes were caused by a proline residue adjacent to or three positions before the threonine residue. Similarly, the presence of different basic amino acids in motif B also had different effects on affinity for each complex. We demonstrate the possibility that the substrate specificity of Cdk2 bound to cyclin might be regulated by the species of cyclin.

  7. HBx-dependent cell cycle deregulation involves interaction with cyclin E/A-cdk2 complex and destabilization of p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Atish; Janbandhu, Vaibhao C; Kumar, Vijay

    2007-01-01

    The HBx (X protein of hepatitis B virus) is a promiscuous transactivator implicated to play a key role in hepatocellular carcinoma. However, HBx-regulated molecular events leading to deregulation of cell cycle or establishment of a permissive environment for hepatocarcinogenesis are not fully understood. Our cell culture-based studies suggested that HBx had a profound effect on cell cycle progression even in the absence of serum. HBx presence led to an early and sustained level of cyclin-cdk2 complex during the cell cycle combined with increased protein kinase activity of cdk2 heralding an early proliferative signal. The increased cdk2 activity also led to an early proteasomal degradation of p27(Kip1) that could be reversed by HBx-specific RNA interference and blocked by a chemical inhibitor of cdk2 or the T187A mutant of p27. Further, our co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro binding studies with recombinant proteins suggested a direct interaction between HBx and the cyclin E/A-cdk2 complex. Interference with different signalling cascades known to be activated by HBx suggested a constitutive requirement of Src kinases for the association of HBx with these complexes. Notably, the HBx mutant that did not interact with cyclin E/A failed to destabilize p27(Kip1) or deregulate the cell cycle. Thus HBx appears to deregulate the cell cycle by interacting with the key cell cycle regulators independent of its well-established role in transactivation.

  8. A variant form of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) in a malignantly transformed rat thyroid (FRTL-Tc) cell line.

    PubMed

    Kotani, S; Endo, T; Kitagawa, M; Higashi, H; Onaya, T

    1995-02-16

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) controls the transition from the G1 to the S phase in the mammalian cell cycle. We found by immunoblotting that anti-Cdk2 antibodies recognize three Cdk2 proteins (of 33, 34 and 39 kDa) in FRTL-5 and FRTL-Tc cells (malignantly transformed FRTL cells). Although 33 kDa protein is a phosphorylated form of 34 kDa protein previously reported, the nature of 39 kDa protein is unknown. In order to determine the nature of this protein, we screened a FRTL-5 cDNA library. Two cDNA clones of the rat homologue (rat Cdk2-alpha and -beta) of human Cdk2 were isolated. The open reading frame of rat Cdk2-alpha cDNA encoded a protein with 428 amino acids and has a high degree of conservation with human Cdk2. The calculated molecular weight of Cdk2-alpha protein is 33892 Da. The rat Cdk2-beta cDNA was identical to Cdk2-alpha cDNA except that it had extra 144 bp; this coincided with insertion of 48 amino acids into Cdk2-alpha protein between Met 196 and Val 197. The calculated molecular weight of Cdk2-beta protein is 39087 Da. Northern blot analysis indicated that the sizes of rat Cdk2-alpha and -beta mRNAs are approximately 2.5 kb and 3.0 kb, respectively. Partial proteolytic mapping showed that Cdk2-beta gene product is 39 kDa Cdk2 in the immunoblotting. We also found that Cdk2-beta protein binds to cyclin A and suc1 proteins. During G1-S phase in FRTL-Tc cells, Cdk2-alpha protein level is constant, but is gradually phosphorylated. In contrast, the level of Cdk2-beta protein increases through the S phase and decreases at the early G2 phase. These results suggest that a variant form of Cdk2 protein might be required for entry into the S phase of the cell cycle in FRTL-Tc cells.

  9. Cyclin A2 and CDK2 as Novel Targets of Aspirin and Salicylic acid: a Potential Role in Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Dachineni, Rakesh; Ai, Guoqiang; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Sadhu, Satya S.; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2015-01-01

    Data emerging from the past 10 years have consolidated the rationale for investigating the use of aspirin as a chemopreventive agent; however, the mechanisms leading to its anti-cancer effects are still being elucidated. We hypothesized that aspirin’s chemopreventive actions may involve cell cycle regulation through modulation of the levels or activity of cyclin A2/cyclin dependent kinase-2 (CDK2). In this study, HT-29 and other diverse panel of cancer cells were used to demonstrate that both aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decreased cyclin A2 (CCNA2) and CDK2 protein and mRNA levels. The down regulatory effect of either drugs on cyclin A2 levels was prevented by pretreatment with lactacystin, an inhibitor of proteasomes, suggesting the involvement of 26S proteasomes. In-vitro kinase assays showed that lysates from cells treated with salicylic acid had lower levels of CDK2 activity. Importantly, three independent experiments revealed that salicylic acid directly binds to CDK2. Firstly, inclusion of salicylic acid in naïve cell lysates, or in recombinant CDK2 preparations, increased the ability of the anti-CDK2 antibody to immunoprecipitate CDK2, suggesting that salicylic acid may directly bind and alter its conformation. Secondly, in 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate (ANS)-CDK2 fluorescence assays, pre-incubation of CDK2 with salicylic acid, dose-dependently quenched the fluorescence due to ANS. Thirdly, computational analysis using molecular docking studies identified Asp145 and Lys33 as the potential sites of salicylic acid interactions with CDK2. These results demonstrate that aspirin and salicylic acid down-regulate cyclin A2/CDK2 proteins in multiple cancer cell lines, suggesting a novel target and mechanism of action in chemoprevention. Implications Biochemical and structural studies indicate that the anti-proliferative actions of aspirin are mediated through cyclin A2/CDK2. PMID:26685215

  10. A screen for modifiers of cyclin E function in Drosophila melanogaster identifies Cdk2 mutations, revealing the insignificance of putative phosphorylation sites in Cdk2.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, M E; Elend, M; Heidmann, D; Herr, A; Marzodko, S; Herzig, A; Lehner, C F

    2000-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, cyclin E is thought to control the progression from G1 into S phase of the cell cycle by associating as a regulatory subunit with cdk2. To identify genes interacting with cyclin E, we have screened in Drosophila melanogaster for mutations that act as dominant modifiers of an eye phenotype caused by a Sevenless-CycE transgene that directs ectopic Cyclin E expression in postmitotic cells of eye imaginal disc and causes a rough eye phenotype in adult flies. The majority of the EMS-induced mutations that we have identified fall into four complementation groups corresponding to the genes split ends, dacapo, dE2F1, and Cdk2(Cdc2c). The Cdk2 mutations in combination with mutant Cdk2 transgenes have allowed us to address the regulatory significance of potential phosphorylation sites in Cdk2 (Thr 18 and Tyr 19). The corresponding sites in the closely related Cdk1 (Thr 14 and Tyr 15) are of crucial importance for regulation of the G2/M transition by myt1 and wee1 kinases and cdc25 phosphatases. In contrast, our results demonstrate that the equivalent sites in Cdk2 play no essential role. PMID:10790398

  11. Antimitogenic effect of green tea (-)-epigallocatechin gallate on 3T3-L1 preadipocytes depends on the ERK and Cdk2 pathways.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pei-Fang; Wu, Bo-Tsung; Chen, Hui-Chian; Chen, Yen-Hang; Chen, Chia-Lin; Wu, Ming-Hua; Liu, Hsien-Chun; Lee, Meng-Jung; Kao, Yung-Hsi

    2005-05-01

    Green tea catechins, especially (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), have been proposed as a chemopreventative for obesity, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. However, relatively little is known about the mechanism of the action of EGCG on fat cell function. This study was designed to investigate the pathways of EGCG's modulation of the mitogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Preadipocyte proliferation as indicated by an increased number of cells and greater incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was inhibited by EGCG in dose-, time-, and growth phase-dependent manners. Also, EGCG dose and time dependently decreased levels of phospho-ERK1/2, Cdk2, and cyclin D(1) proteins, reduced Cdk2 activity, and increased levels of G(0)/G(1) growth arrest, p21(waf/cip), and p27(kip1), but not p18(ink), proteins and their associations to Cdk2. However, neither MEK1, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, phospho-p38, JNK, nor phospho-JNK was changed. Increased phospho-ERK1/2 content and Cdk2 activity, respectively, via the transfection of MEK1 and Cdk2 cDNA into preadipocytes prevented EGCG from reducing cell numbers. These data demonstrate the ERK- and Cdk2-dependent antimitogenic effects of EGCG. Moreover, EGCG was more effective than epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin in changing the mitogenic signals. The signal of EGCG in reducing growth of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes differed from that of 3T3 fibroblasts. Results of this study may relate to the mechanism by which EGCG modulates body weight.

  12. Cell cycle–regulated phosphorylation of p220NPAT by cyclin E/Cdk2 in Cajal bodies promotes histone gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tianlin; Van Tine, Brian A.; Wei, Yue; Garrett, Michelle D.; Nelson, David; Adams, Peter D.; Wang, Jin; Qin, Jun; Chow, Louise T.; Harper, J. Wade

    2000-01-01

    Cyclin E/Cdk2 acts at the G1/S-phase transition to promote the E2F transcriptional program and the initiation of DNA synthesis. To explore further how cyclin E/Cdk2 controls S-phase events, we examined the subcellular localization of the cyclin E/Cdk2 interacting protein p220NPAT and its regulation by phosphorylation. p220 is localized to discrete nuclear foci. Diploid fibroblasts in Go and G1 contain two p220 foci, whereas S- and G2-phase cells contain primarily four p220 foci. Cells in metaphase and telophase have no detectable focus. p220 foci contain cyclin E and are coincident with Cajal bodies (CBs), subnuclear organelles that associate with histone gene clusters on chromosomes 1 and 6. Interestingly, p220 foci associate with chromosome 6 throughout the cell cycle and with chromosome 1 during S phase. Five cyclin E/Cdk2 phosphorylation sites in p220 were identified. Phospho-specific antibodies against two of these sites react with p220 within CBs in a cell cycle–specific manner. The timing of p220 phosphorylation correlates with the appearance of cyclin E in CBs at the G1/S boundary, and this phosphorylation is maintained until prophase. Expression of p220 activates transcription of the histone H2B promoter. Importantly, mutation of Cdk2 phosphorylation sites to alanine abrogates the ability of p220 to activate the histone H2B promoter. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that p220NPAT links cyclical cyclin E/Cdk2 kinase activity to replication-dependent histone gene transcription. PMID:10995387

  13. Microarray expression analysis of MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cells after inhibition of CDK2.

    PubMed

    Song, H; Wu, F; Li, S; Wang, Z; Liu, X; Cui, Y; Lin, C

    2017-03-03

    The study was aimed to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of CDK2 inhibition in neuroblastoma by bioinformatics analysis. Gene expression profile GSE16480 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from IMR32 between each time point and average expression of all time points. Gene significance was calculated using dSVDsig algorithm of dnet package. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was built. Then, integrated with gene significance, a core PPI network was detected by dNetPipeline algorithm in dnet package. Finally, pathway enrichment analysis was performed for genes in network. Total 1524 DEGs were identified. CCNA2 (cyclin A2), EXO1 (exonuclease 1), RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), TOP2A (topoisomerase (DNA) II alpha) and CDK1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1) were selected as DEGs with higher connectivity after PPI network analysis. In the network, CCNA2, CDK1, BUB1B (BUB1 mitotic checkpoint serine/threonine kinase B) and CCNB1 (cyclin B1) were involved in cell cycle pathway. Additionally, CCNB1, CDK1, CCNE2 (Cyclin E2), and RRM2B (ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2B) were involved in p53 signaling pathway. Cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway were closely associated with neuroblastoma after CDK2 inhibition. The DEGs, such as CCNA2, CCNB1, CDK1 and RRM2B may be the potential targets for neuroblastoma.

  14. CDK2 Regulates HIV-1 Transcription by Phosphorylation of CDK9 on Serine 90

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV-1 transcription is activated by the viral Tat protein that recruits host positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb) containing CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. P-TEFb in the cells exists as a lower molecular weight CDK9/cyclin T1 dimer and a high molecular weight complex of 7SK RNA, CDK9/cyclin T1, HEXIM1 dimer and several additional proteins. Our previous studies implicated CDK2 in HIV-1 transcription regulation. We also found that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators leads to the inhibition of CDK9 activity, suggesting a functional link between CDK2 and CDK9. Here, we investigate whether CDK2 phosphorylates CDK9 and regulates its activity. Results The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CDK2 inhibited CDK9 kinase activity and reduced CDK9 phosphorylation. Stable shRNA-mediated CDK2 knockdown inhibited HIV-1 transcription, but also increased the overall level of 7SK RNA. CDK9 contains a motif (90SPYNR94) that is consensus CDK2 phosphorylation site. CDK9 was phosphorylated on Ser90 by CDK2 in vitro. In cultured cells, CDK9 phosphorylation was reduced when Ser90 was mutated to an Ala. Phosphorylation of CDK9 on Ser90 was also detected with phospho-specific antibodies and it was reduced after the knockdown of CDK2. CDK9 expression decreased in the large complex for the CDK9-S90A mutant and was correlated with a reduced activity and an inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. In contrast, the CDK9-S90D mutant showed a slight decrease in CDK9 expression in both the large and small complexes but induced Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcription. Molecular modeling showed that Ser 90 of CDK9 is located on a flexible loop exposed to solvent, suggesting its availability for phosphorylation. Conclusion Our data indicate that CDK2 phosphorylates CDK9 on Ser 90 and thereby contributes to HIV-1 transcription. The phosphorylation of Ser90 by CDK2 represents a novel mechanism of HIV-1 regulated transcription and provides a new strategy for activation of latent HIV-1

  15. Phosphorylation of CDK2 on threonine 160 influences silencing of sex chromosome during male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Liu, Wenjing; Zhao, Weidong; Song, Gendi; Wang, Guishuan; Wang, Xiaorong; Sun, Fei

    2014-06-01

    In mammalian meiosis, the X and Y chromosomes are largely unsynapsed and transcriptionally silenced during the pachytene stage of meiotic prophase (meiotic sex chromosome inactivation), forming a specialized nuclear territory called sex or XY body. An increasing number of proteins and noncoding RNAs were found to localize to the sex body and take part in influencing expression of sex chromosome genes. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2 (-/-)) spermatocytes show incomplete sex chromosome pairing. Here, we further showed that phosphorylation of CDK2 isoform 1 (p-CDK2(39) [39 kDa]) on threonine 160 localizes to the sites of asynapsis and the sex body, interacting with phosphorylated gamma-H2AX. Meanwhile, p-CDK2(39) is frequently mislocalized throughout the sex body, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation is disrupted in PWK×C57BL/6J hybrid mice. Furthermore, pachytene spermatocytes treated with mevastatin (an inhibitor of p-CDK2) showed overexpression of sex chromosome-linked genes. Our results highlight an important role for p-CDK2(39) in influencing silencing of the sex chromosomes during male meiosis by interacting with gamma-H2AX.

  16. Zbtb7 suppresses the expression of CDK2 and E2F4 in liver cancer cells: implications for the role of Zbtb7 in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuefeng; Zu, Xuyu; Tang, Jing; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Feng; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-06-01

    Zbtb7, a member of the POK protein family, is involved in tumorigenesis and cellular differentiation by acting as a crucial transcription factor, but its role in cell cycle modulation remains uncharacterized. In the present study, CDK2 and E2F4, two cell cycle regulators, are shown to be downregulated at the mRNA and protein levels by Zbtb7 in HepG2 and QGY7703 cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that the activities of CDK2 and E2F4 promoters were suppressed by the modulation of Zbtb7 levels and that Zbtb7 represses promoter activities through a mechanism involving direct binding of Zbtb7 to the promoters. Furthermore, it was identified that the site at -259 to -252 within the CDK2 promoter is responsible for Zbtb7-induced repression of the promoter activity. It was found that siRNA‑induced knockdown of Zbtb7 resulted in the suppression of cell cycle progression in HepG2 and QGY7703 cells. Collectively, these data indicate that CDK2 and E2F4 are the downstream targets of Zbtb7, and Zbtb7 may be a cell cycle modulator by regulating the expression of cell cycle-associated genes in liver cancer cells.

  17. SUMOylation of Rb enhances its binding with CDK2 and phosphorylation at early G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fengxi; Qian, Jiang; Yue, Han; Li, Xiaofeng; Xue, Kang

    2016-07-02

    Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) is a prototypical tumor suppressor that is vital to the negative regulation of the cell cycle and tumor progression. Hypo-phosphorylated Rb is associated with G0/G1 arrest by suppressing E2F transcription factor activity, whereas Rb hyper-phosphorylation allows E2F release and cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S phase. However, the factors that regulate cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK)-dependent hyper-phosphorylation of Rb during the cell cycle remain obscure. In this study, we show that throughout the cell cycle, Rb is specifically small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)ylated at early G1 phase. SUMOylation of Rb stimulates its phosphorylation level by recruiting a SUMO-interaction motif (SIM)-containing kinase CDK2, leading to Rb hyper-phosphorylation and E2F-1 release. In contrast, a SUMO-deficient Rb mutant results in reduced SUMOylation and phosphorylation, weakened CDK2 binding, and attenuated E2F-1 sequestration. Furthermore, we reveal that Rb SUMOylation is required for cell proliferation. Therefore, our study describes a novel mechanism that regulates Rb phosphorylation during cell cycle progression.

  18. The cloning of the cdk2 transcript and the localization of its expression during gametogenesis in the freshwater giant prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Liu, Ping; Li, Zhen; Chen, Ying; Qiu, Gao-Feng

    2013-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) are key regulators of the cell cycle. In mammals, cdk2 plays an essential role in the meiosis of spermatocytes and oocytes. To investigate the role of cdk2 kinase during gametogenesis in crustaceans, we cloned a complete cDNA sequence of cdk2 from the freshwater giant prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, and examined its localization and expression in the developing gonads. The prawn cdk2 cDNA is 1,745 bp in length and encodes a putative protein of 305 amino acids. The deduced protein contains a conserved cyclin binding motif PSTAIRE and shares high homology with reported cdk2 kinases of other species. RT-PCR analysis showed a wide distribution of the cdk2 mRNA in all tested organs including the testis, ovary, heart, muscles, hepatopancreas and gills, and the highest level of expression in the ovary and testis. Localization by in situ hybridization of cdk2 mRNA in the ovary showed high expression in the ooplasm of previtellogenic and the nuclei of late vitellogenic oocytes. In testicular sections, cdk2 transcript is low in spermatogonia, high in spermatocytes, but reduced in spermatids and sperm. The high expression of the cdk2 transcripts in meiotic spermatocytes and oocytes indicated that the cdk2 gene has the conservative function in the germ cells meiosis during gametogenesis.

  19. Phosphorylation of HIV-1 Tat by CDK2 in HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatyana; Berro, Reem; Jerebtsova, Marina; Jackson, Angela; Charles, Sharroya; Klase, Zachary; Southerland, William; Gordeuk, Victor R; Kashanchi, Fatah; Nekhai, Sergei

    2006-01-01

    Background Transcription of HIV-1 genes is activated by HIV-1 Tat protein, which induces phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal domain (CTD) by CDK9/cyclin T1. Earlier we showed that CDK2/cyclin E phosphorylates HIV-1 Tat in vitro. We also showed that CDK2 induces HIV-1 transcription in vitro and that inhibition of CDK2 expression by RNA interference inhibits HIV-1 transcription and viral replication in cultured cells. In the present study, we analyzed whether Tat is phosphorylated in cultured cells by CDK2 and whether Tat phosphorylation has a regulatory effect on HIV-1 transcription. Results We analyzed HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2 in vitro and identified Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat as potential phosphorylation sites. Tat was phosphorylated in HeLa cells infected with Tat-expressing adenovirus and metabolically labeled with 32P. CDK2-specific siRNA reduced the amount and the activity of cellular CDK2 and significantly decreased phosphorylation of Tat. Tat co-migrated with CDK2 on glycerol gradient and co-immunoprecipitated with CDK2 from the cellular extracts. Tat was phosphorylated on serine residues in vivo, and mutations of Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat reduced Tat phosphorylation in vivo. Mutation of Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat reduced HIV-1 transcription in transiently transfected cells. The mutations of Tat also inhibited HIV-1 viral replication and Tat phosphorylation in the context of the integrated HIV-1 provirus. Analysis of physiological importance of the S16QP(K/R)19 and S46YGR49 sequences of Tat showed that Ser16 and Ser46 and R49 residues are highly conserved whereas mutation of the (K/R)19 residue correlated with non-progression of HIV-1 disease. Conclusion Our results indicate for the first time that Tat is phosphorylated in vivo; Tat phosphorylation is likely to be mediated by CDK2; and phosphorylation of Tat is important for HIV-1 transcription. PMID:17083724

  20. Identification of cyclin A/Cdk2 phosphorylation sites in B-Myb.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, O; Horstmann, S; Toprak, K; Klempnauer, K H; Ferrari, S

    1999-03-01

    B-myb is a highly conserved member of the myb proto-oncogene family that encodes a ubiquitously expressed 110-kDa sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. Transactivation of Myb-inducible promoters by B-Myb is repressed by a regulatory domain located at the C-terminus of the protein. Cyclin A/Cdk2-mediated phosphorylation apparently releases the negative constraint and triggers B-Myb transactivation potential. Two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide analysis indicated that the majority of the sites phosphorylated in vivo are targeted in vitro by cyclin A/Cdk2. Six sites in B-Myb fulfil the requirements for recognition by Cdk2. Using point mutation of the phosphorylation sites to nonphosphorylatable amino acids, we show that five of these sites are targets for Cdk2 in vivo. Mutation of one of these residues (T524) to alanine diminished the ability of B-Myb to promote transcription of a reporter gene, suggesting that phosphorylation of B-Myb at this site is important for the regulation of its activity by cyclin A/Cdk2.

  1. The differential catalytic activity of alternatively spliced cdk2 alpha and cdk2 beta in the G1/S transition and early S phase.

    PubMed

    Kwon, T K; Buchholz, M A; Jun, D Y; Kim, Y H; Nordin, A A

    1998-01-10

    Progression through the G1/S transition of the cell cycle is regulated by cyclin E/cdk2 and cyclin A/cdk2 complexes. We demonstrate that there are two forms of murine cdk2 (cdk2 alpha and beta). Cdk2 alpha consist of 298 amino acids, while cdk2 beta contains a 48-amino-acid insert between Met (196) and Val (197) of cdk2 alpha. Cdk2 beta results from differential splicing of the primary RNA transcript of the cdk2 gene. Although human cdk2 genomic DNA contained the sequence of the insert for the beta form, cdk2 beta was not detected by either Western blot or RT-PCR in human T-cells or several other human cell lines. Cdk2 beta expression in murine cells was similar to that of the phosphorylated, catalytically active form of cdk2 alpha. Cdk2 alpha and cdk2 beta have very similar binding activity to cyclin E and to the cdk inhibitor p27Kip1. The alternatively spliced cdk2 beta possesses catalytic activity in vivo and in vitro. The differential catalytic activity of these two forms of cdk2 suggests that cdk2 alpha and cdk2 beta may perform different functions at or near the G1/S transition and early S phase.

  2. Inhibition of cyclin A/Cdk2 phosphorylation impairs B-Myb transactivation function without affecting interactions with DNA or the CBP coactivator.

    PubMed

    Bessa, M; Saville, M K; Watson, R J

    2001-06-07

    Expression of the B-Myb transcription factor is directed by an E2F-dependent transcriptional mechanism to late G1 and S phases of the cell cycle, where its transactivation properties are enhanced post-translationally by cyclin A/Cdk2-mediated phosphorylation. Other experiments have shown that removal of the B-Myb C-terminus constitutively activates both transactivation and DNA-binding activities, suggesting that autoregulation by this inhibitory domain is counteracted by phosphorylation. We report here on further experiments to examine this hypothesis. The importance of this modification was first emphasized by showing that co-transfected dominant-negative Cdk2 (Cdk2DN) substantially reduced B-Myb transactivation activity. We then attempted to map the autoregulatory domain by analysing a series of progressively deleted C-terminal B-Myb mutants. Removal of just 29 C-terminal aa increased transactivation appreciably, however, maximal activity required removal of 143 amino acids (as in B-Myb + 561). Enhanced B-Myb + 561 function correlated with the acquisition of DNA binding activity to a single Myb binding site (MBS) oligonucleotide as determined by bandshift assays, however, further assays showed that even wt B-Myb could bind a DNA fragment containing three MBS. Although transactivation by B-Myb was severely dependent on hyperphosphorylation, neither inhibiting this activity by co-transfecting Cdk2DN nor augmenting it with cyclin A resulted in significant effects on DNA-binding. We also found that B-Myb could synergize with the CBP coactivator and that this cooperativity was cyclin A/Cdk2-dependent. Despite this, the physical association between these proteins was not influenced by the B-Myb phosphorylation status. We discuss these findings in relation to the autoregulation of B-Myb by the C-terminal domain.

  3. The cyclin E/Cdk2 substrate p220(NPAT) is required for S-phase entry, histone gene expression, and Cajal body maintenance in human somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Wei, Yue; Nalepa, Grzegorz; Harper, J Wade

    2003-12-01

    Cyclin E/Cdk2, a central regulator of the G1/S transition, coordinates multiple cell cycle events, including DNA replication, centrosome duplication, and activation of the E2F transcriptional program. Recent studies suggest a role for cyclin E/Cdk2 in activation of histone transcription during S phase via the Cajal body-associated protein p220NPAT, and in addition, p220 can promote S-phase entry independently of histone transcriptional activation when overexpressed. Here we have examined the requirement for p220 in histone transcription, cell cycle progression, and Cajal body function through analysis of human somatic HCT116 cells engineered to contain a conditional p220 allele. p220 is required for proliferation of HCT116 cells, as assessed after expression of Cre recombinase in p220(flox/-) cells. This defect was due to an inability of these cells to transit from G0/G1 into S phase, and cell cycle arrest occurred in the presence of elevated Cdk2 kinase activity. Expression of human papillomavirus E7, but not E6, eliminated cell cycle arrest in response to p220 depletion. Optimal expression of all four core histone genes required p220, as did optimal transcription of a histone H4 promoter-luciferase construct. Basal histone H4 expression in G0/G1, although p220 dependent, occurs in the absence of detectable phosphorylation of p220 on Cdk2 sites. Cells lacking p220 displayed defects in the localization of the Cajal body component p80coilin as cells progressed from G0 to S phase in response to mitogenic signals. These finding indicate that p220 is an essential downstream component of the cyclin E/Cdk2 signaling pathway and functions to coordinate multiple elements of the G1/S transition.

  4. Essential role of the Cdk2 activator RingoA in meiotic telomere tethering to the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Mikolcevic, Petra; Isoda, Michitaka; Shibuya, Hiroki; del Barco Barrantes, Ivan; Igea, Ana; Suja, José A.; Shackleton, Sue; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Nebreda, Angel R.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play key roles in cell cycle regulation. Genetic analysis in mice has revealed an essential role for Cdk2 in meiosis, which renders Cdk2 knockout (KO) mice sterile. Here we show that mice deficient in RingoA, an atypical activator of Cdk1 and Cdk2 that has no amino acid sequence homology to cyclins, are sterile and display meiotic defects virtually identical to those observed in Cdk2 KO mice including non-homologous chromosome pairing, unrepaired double-strand breaks, undetectable sex-body and pachytene arrest. Interestingly, RingoA is required for Cdk2 targeting to telomeres and RingoA KO spermatocytes display severely affected telomere tethering as well as impaired distribution of Sun1, a protein essential for the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope. Our results identify RingoA as an important activator of Cdk2 at meiotic telomeres, and provide genetic evidence for a physiological function of mammalian Cdk2 that is not dependent on cyclins. PMID:27025256

  5. Identification of cdk2 binding sites on the p27Kip1 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kwon, T K; Nordin, A A

    1998-02-12

    A cdk2 binding domain on p27Kip1 located within the sequence of amino acids 53-85 was further characterized by generating a series of point mutations within amino acid residues 62-75. Two regions, FDF (residues 62-64) and GXY (residues 72 and 74), were identified within the beta hairpin region of p27Kip1. Mutations within these regions essentially completely inhibited the binding to in vitro translated cdk2 and cdk2/cyclin E complexes formed in vitro or in vivo. The p27Kip1 GST-fusion protein of the point mutation that replaces phenylalanine at residue 64 to alanine (F64A) showed approximately twofold less inhibition of cdk2 kinase activity. The cellular response to the introduction of the F64A mutant form of p27Kip1 was compared to that of p27Kip1 wild type by transfecting HeLa cells with constructs of full length sense and antisense coding sequences. Overexpression of the F64A mutant form of p27Kip1 bound significantly lower levels of cdk2 as compared to wild type and did not affect the cdk2 related kinase activity of the transfected HeLa cells. Overexpression of wild type p27Kip1 resulted in a reduction of the level of cdk2 kinase activity and effectively suppressed the growth of the transfected HeLa cells.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Classical Multidimensional Scaling Unveil New Metastable States in the Conformational Landscape of CDK2

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Pasquale; Rastelli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases are key regulatory nodes in cellular networks and their function has been shown to be intimately coupled with their structural flexibility. However, understanding the key structural mechanisms of large conformational transitions remains a difficult task. CDK2 is a crucial regulator of cell cycle. Its activity is finely tuned by Cyclin E/A and the catalytic segment phosphorylation, whereas its deregulation occurs in many types of cancer. ATP competitive inhibitors have failed to be approved for clinical use due to toxicity issues raised by a lack of selectivity. However, in the last few years type III allosteric inhibitors have emerged as an alternative strategy to selectively modulate CDK2 activity. In this study we have investigated the conformational variability of CDK2. A low dimensional conformational landscape of CDK2 was modeled using classical multidimensional scaling on a set of 255 crystal structures. Microsecond-scale plain and accelerated MD simulations were used to populate this landscape by using an out-of-sample extension of multidimensional scaling. CDK2 was simulated in the apo-form and in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonic acid (ANS). The apo-CDK2 landscape analysis showed a conformational equilibrium between an Src-like inactive conformation and an active-like form. These two states are separated by different metastable states that share hybrid structural features with both forms of the kinase. In contrast, the CDK2/ANS complex landscape is compatible with a conformational selection picture where the binding of ANS in proximity of the αC helix causes a population shift toward the inactive conformation. Interestingly, the new metastable states could enlarge the pool of candidate structures for the development of selective allosteric CDK2 inhibitors. The method here presented should not be limited to the CDK2 case but could be used to systematically unmask similar mechanisms throughout the human

  7. Cdk2 plays a critical role in hepatocyte cell cycle progression and survival in the setting of cyclin D1 expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hanse, Eric A; Nelsen, Christopher J; Goggin, Melissa M; Anttila, Chelsea K; Mullany, Lisa K; Berthet, Cyril; Kaldis, Philipp; Crary, Gretchen S; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2009-09-01

    Cdk2 was once believed to play an essential role in cell cycle progression, but cdk2(-/-) mice have minimal phenotypic abnormalities. In this study, we examined the role of cdk2 in hepatocyte proliferation, centrosome duplication and survival. Cdk2(-/-) hepatocytes underwent mitosis and had normal centrosome content after mitogen stimulation. Unlike wild-type cells, cdk2(-/-) liver cells failed to undergo centrosome overduplication in response to ectopic cyclin D1 expression. After mitogen stimulation in culture or partial hepatectomy in vivo, cdk2(-/-) hepatocytes demonstrated diminished proliferation. Cyclin D1 is a key mediator of cell cycle progression in hepatocytes, and transient expression of this protein is sufficient to promote robust proliferation of these cells in vivo. In cdk2(-/-) mice and animals treated with the cdk2 inhibitor seliciclib, cyclin D1 failed to induce hepatocyte cell cycle progression. Surprisingly, cdk2 ablation or inhibition led to massive hepatocyte and animal death following cyclin D1 transfection. In a transgenic model of chronic hepatic cyclin D1 expression, seliciclib induced hepatocyte injury and animal death, suggesting that cdk2 is required for survival of cyclin D1-expressing cells even in the absence of substantial proliferation. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate that cdk2 plays a role in liver regeneration. Furthermore, it is essential for centrosome overduplication, proliferation and survival of hepatocytes that aberrantly express cyclin D1 in vivo. These studies suggest that cdk2 may warrant further investigation as a target for therapy of liver tumors with constitutive cyclin D1 expression.

  8. Molecular simulation studies on the binding selectivity of 2-anilino-4-(thiazol-5-yl)-pyrimidines in complexes with CDK2 and CDK7.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Tahir Ali; Qian, Hai-Yan; Pan, You-Lu; Chen, Jian-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) was regarded as a potentially therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Since the CDK family includes couples of high homology members, designing CDK2-selective inhibitors would provide valuable opportunities for the development of anticancer drugs with optimal efficacy. In this study, three thiazo-5-yl-pyrimidines as CDK2 inhibitors with different selectivity over cyclin dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) were examined to study the selectivity mechanism using a combined approach of computational techniques of flexible docking, EasyMIFs, molecular electrostatic potential (MESP), natural bond orbital (NBO), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and binding free energy calculations. Molecular simulations elicited new chemical insights into steric and electronic complementarities of these molecules to the binding sites of CDK2 and CDK7. The computed binding free energies were consistent with the ranking of their experimental binding affinities on CDK2 and CDK7. We also conducted in silico mutations of three key amino acids (CDK2: Gln85, Lys89, Asp145) to examine their impact on ligand binding with MD simulations and binding free energy calculations. The results indicated that these residues exhibited a strong tendency to mediate ligand-protein interactions through the H-bond and vdW interaction with CDK2-selective inhibitor. The present work may provide a better structural understanding of the molecular mechanism of CDK2 selective inhibition. The new computational insights presented in this study are expected to be valuable for the guidelines and development of new potent CDK2 inhibitors.

  9. Differential regulation of CDP/Cux p110 by cyclin A/Cdk2 and cyclin A/Cdk1.

    PubMed

    Santaguida, Marianne; Nepveu, Alain

    2005-09-23

    Previous experiments with peptide fusion proteins suggested that cyclin A/Cdk1 and Cdk2 might exhibit similar yet distinct phosphorylation specificities. Using a physiological substrate, CDP/Cux, our study confirms this notion. Proteolytic processing of CDP/Cux by cathepsin L generates the CDP/Cux p110 isoform at the beginning of S phase. CDP/Cux p110 makes stable interactions with DNA during S phase but is inhibited in G2 following the phosphorylation of serine 1237 by cyclin A/Cdk1. In this study, we propose that differential phosphorylation by cyclin A/Cdk1 and cyclin A/Cdk2 enables CDP/Cux p110 to exert its function as a transcriptional regulator specifically during S phase. We found that like cyclin A/Cdk1, cyclin A/Cdk2 interacted efficiently with recombinant CDP/Cux proteins that contain the Cut homeodomain and an adjacent cyclin-binding motif (Cy). In contrast to cyclin A/Cdk1, however, cyclin A/Cdk2 did not efficiently phosphorylate CDP/Cux p110 on serine 1237 and did not inhibit its DNA binding activity in vitro. Accordingly, co-expression with cyclin A/Cdk2 in cells did not inhibit the DNA binding and transcriptional activities of CDP/Cux p110. To confirm that the sequence surrounding serine 1237 was responsible for the differential regulation by Cdk1 and Cdk2, we replaced 4 amino acids flanking the phosphorylation site to mimic a known Cdk2 phosphorylation site present in the Cdc6 protein. Both cyclin A/Cdk2 and Cdk1 efficiently phosphorylated the CDP/Cux(Cdc6) mutant and inhibited its DNA binding activity. Altogether our results help explain why the DNA binding activity of CDP/Cux p110 is maximal during S phase and decreases in G2 phase.

  10. Easy Identification of Residues Involved on Structural Differences Between Nonphosphorylated and Phosphorylated CDK2Cyclin A Complexes Using Two-Dimensional Networks.

    PubMed

    Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio

    2014-02-01

    The structures of proteins in Protein Data Bank (PDB) contain a lot of information that can be revealed through the use of tools to facilitate their organization and analysis. The increase in available structural data of nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated CDK2cyclin A (npCDK2cycA and pCDK2cycA) complexes has enabled a more realistic description of the fine structural details of the interface residues of these proteins. This work reports the application of two-dimensional network representations (TDNRs) to the structures deposited in PDB to distinguish the differences in the surface between both complexes due to phosphorylation. As a result, a detailed map of the hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions between the T-loop residues of CDK2 and the residues of cycA that are different among nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated complexes were described. In addition, we found some interesting subtle differences in the CDK2cycA interface between nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated complexes due to residues that are not located at the T-loop of CDK2. We noted that some HB interactions in CDK2cycA complex are reinforced when the CDK2 is phosphorylated.

  11. Amygdalin blocks bladder cancer cell growth in vitro by diminishing cyclin A and cdk2.

    PubMed

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Reiter, Michael; Tsaur, Igor; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug.

  12. Amygdalin Blocks Bladder Cancer Cell Growth In Vitro by Diminishing Cyclin A and cdk2

    PubMed Central

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Reiter, Michael; Tsaur, Igor; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25–10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug. PMID:25136960

  13. Structural studies of p21Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1 in the free and Cdk2-bound state: conformational disorder mediates binding diversity.

    PubMed

    Kriwacki, R W; Hengst, L; Tennant, L; Reed, S I; Wright, P E

    1996-10-15

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1, important for p53-dependent cell cycle control, mediates G1/S arrest through inhibition of Cdks and possibly through inhibition of DNA replication. Cdk inhibition requires a sequence of approximately 60 amino acids within the p21 NH2 terminus. We show, using proteolytic mapping, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, that p21 and NH2-terminal fragments that are active as Cdk inhibitors lack stable secondary or tertiary structure in the free solution state. In sharp contrast to the disordered free state, however, the p21 NH2 terminus adopts an ordered stable conformation when bound to Cdk2, as shown directly by NMR spectroscopy. We have, thus, identified a striking disorder-order transition for p21 upon binding to one of its biological targets, Cdk2. This structural transition has profound implications in light of the ability of p21 to bind and inhibit a diverse family of cyclin-Cdk complexes, including cyclin A-Cdk2, cyclin E-Cdk2, and cyclin D-Cdk4. Our findings suggest that the flexibility, or disorder, of free p21 is associated with binding diversity and offer insights into the role for structural disorder in mediating binding specificity in biological systems. Further, these observations challenge the generally accepted view of proteins that stable secondary and tertiary structure are prerequisites for biological activity and suggest that a broader view of protein structure should be considered in the context of structure-activity relationships.

  14. Prolonged induction of p21Cip1/WAF1/CDK2/PCNA complex by epidermal growth factor receptor activation mediates ligand-induced A431 cell growth inhibition

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Proliferation of some cultured human tumor cell lines bearing high numbers of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors is paradoxically inhibited by EGF in nanomolar concentrations. In the present study, we have investigated the biochemical mechanism of growth inhibition in A431 human squamous carcinoma cells exposed to exogenous EGF. In parallel, we studied a selected subpopulation, A431-F, which is resistant to EGF-mediated growth inhibition. We observed a marked reduction in cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) activity when A431 and A431-F cells were cultured with 20 nM EGF for 4 h. After further continuous exposure of A431 cells to EGF, the CDK2 activity remained at a low level and was accompanied by persistent G1 arrest. In contrast, the early reduced CDK2 activity and G1 accumulation in A431-F cells was only transient. We found that, at early time points (4-8 h), EGF induces p21Cip1/WAF1 mRNA and protein expression in both EGF-sensitive A431 cells and EGF-resistant A431-F cells. But only in A431 cells, was p21Cip1/WAF1 expression sustained at a significantly increased level for up to 5 d after addition of EGF. Induction of p21Cip1/WAF1 by EGF could be inhibited by a specific EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin AG1478, suggesting that p21Cip1/WAF1 induction was a consequence of receptor tyrosine kinase activation by EGF. We also demonstrated that the increased p21Cip1/WAF1 was associated with both CDK2 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Taken together, our results demonstrate that p21Cip1/WAF1 is an important mediator of EGF-induced G1 arrest and growth inhibition in A431 cells. PMID:7559780

  15. Acute reduction of an origin recognition complex (ORC) subunit in human cells reveals a requirement of ORC for Cdk2 activation.

    PubMed

    Machida, Yuichi J; Teer, Jamie K; Dutta, Anindya

    2005-07-29

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) is involved in formation of prereplicative complexes (pre-RCs) on replication origins in the G1 phase. At the G1/S transition, elevated cyclin E-CDK2 activity triggers 1DNA replication to enter S phase. The CDK cycle works as an engine that drives progression of cell cycle events by successive activation of different types of cyclin-CDK. However, how the CDK cycle is coordinated with replication initiation remains elusive. Here we report that acute depletion of ORC2 by RNA interference (RNAi) arrests cells with low cyclin E-CDK2 activity. This result suggests that loss of a replication initiation protein prevents progression of the CDK cycle in G1. p27 and p21 proteins accumulate following ORC2 RNAi and are required for the CDK2 inhibition. Restoration of CDK activity by co-depletion of p27 and p21 allows many ORC2-depleted cells to enter S phase and go on to mitosis. However, in some cells the release of the CDK2 block caused catastrophic events like apoptosis. Therefore, the CDK2 inhibition observed following ORC2 RNAi seems to protect cells from premature S phase entry and crisis in DNA replication. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of ORC2 in CDK2 activation, a linkage that could be important for maintaining genomic stability.

  16. Interferon regulatory factor-1 together with reactive oxygen species promotes the acceleration of cell cycle progression by up-regulating the cyclin E and CDK2 genes during high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Liu, Long; Chen, Chao; Chi, Ya-Li; Yang, Xiang-Qun; Xu, Yan; Li, Xiao-Tong; Guo, Shi-Lei; Xiong, Shao-Hu; Shen, Man-Ru; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Chuan-Sen; Hu, Kai-Meng

    2013-10-14

    The high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the development of diabetic vascular diseases. In a previous study, we confirmed that Interferon regulatory factor-1 (Irf-1) is a positive regulator of the high glucose-induced proliferation of VSMCs. However, the mechanisms remain to be determined. The levels of cyclin/CDK expression in two cell models involving Irf-1 knockdown and overexpression were quantified to explore the relationship between Irf-1 and its downstream effectors under normal or high glucose conditions. Subsequently, cells were treated with high glucose/NAC, normal glucose/H₂O₂, high glucose/U0126 or normal glucose/H₂O₂/U0126 during an incubation period. Then proliferation, cyclin/CDK expression and cell cycle distribution assays were performed to determine whether ROS/Erk1/2 signaling pathway was involved in the Irf-1-induced regulation of VSMC growth under high glucose conditions. We found that Irf-1 overexpression led to down-regulation of cyclin D1/CDK4 and inhibited cell cycle progression in VSMCs under normal glucose conditions. In high glucose conditions, Irf-1 overexpression led to an up-regulation of cyclin E/CDK2 and an acceleration of cell cycle progression, whereas silencing of Irf-1 suppressed the expression of both proteins and inhibited the cell cycle during the high glucose-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with antioxidants prevented the Irf-1 overexpression-induced proliferation of VSMCs, the up-regulation of cyclin E/CDK2 and the acceleration of cell cycle progression in high glucose conditions. In contrast, under normal glucose conditions, H₂O₂ stimulation and Irf-1 overexpression induced cell proliferation, up-regulated cyclin E/CDK2 expression and promoted cell cycle acceleration. In addition, overexpression of Irf-1 promoted the activation of Erk1/2 and when VSMCs overexpressing Irf-1 were treated with U0126, the specific Erk1/2 inhibitor

  17. Characterization of p21Cip1/Waf1 peptide domains required for cyclin E/Cdk2 and PCNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, I T; Akamatsu, M; Smith, M L; Lung, F D; Duba, D; Roller, P P; Fornace, A J; O'Connor, P M

    1996-02-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1 is responsible for the p53-dependent growth arrest of cells in G1 phase following DNA damage. In the present study we investigated regions of p21 involved in inhibition of the G1/S phase cyclin-dependent kinase, cyclin E/Cdk2, as well as regions of p21 important for binding to this kinase and recombinant PCNA. To perform these studies we synthesized a series of overlapping peptides spanning the entire p21 sequence and used them in in vitro assays with cyclin E/Cdk2-immune complexes and with recombinant p21 and PCNA proteins. One amino-terminal p21 peptide spanning amino acids 15-40, antagonized p21 binding and inhibition of cyclin E/Cdk2 kinase. Antagonism of p21 binding was, however, lost in a similar peptide lacking amino acids 15-20, or in a peptide in which cysteine-18 was substituted for a serine. These results suggest that this peptide region is important for p21 interaction with cyclin E/Cdk2. A second peptide (amino acids 58-77) also antagonized p21-activity, but this peptide did not affect the ability of p21 to interact with cyclin E/Cdk2. A region of p21 larger than 26 amino acids is presumably required for Cdk-inhibition because none of the peptides we tested inhibited cyclin E/Cdk2. We also found that a peptide spanning amino acids 21-45 bound recombinant p21 in ELISA assays, and additional studies revealed a requirement for amino acids 26 through 45 for this interaction. A p21 peptide spanning amino acids 139-164 was found to bind PCNA in a filter binding assay and this peptide suppressed recombinant p21-PCNA interaction. Conformational analysis revealed that peptides spanning amino acids 21-45 and 139-164 tended towards an alpha-helical conformation in trifluoroethanol buffer, indicating that these regions are probably in a coiled conformation in the native protein. Taken together, our results provide an insight into domains of p21 that are involved in cyclin E/Cdk2 and PCNA interaction. Our results

  18. Induction of p21WAF1/CIP1 and Inhibition of Cdk2 Mediated by the Tumor Suppressor p16INK4a

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Jayashree; Dai, Charlotte Y.; Somasundaram, Kumaravel; El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Herlyn, Meenhard; Enders, Greg H.

    1999-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p16INK4a inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6. This activates the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and, through incompletely understood events, arrests the cell division cycle. To permit biochemical analysis of the arrest, we generated U2-OS osteogenic sarcoma cell clones in which p16 transcription could be induced. In these clones, binding of p16 to cdk4 and cdk6 abrogated binding of cyclin D1, p27KIP1, and p21WAF1/CIP1. Concomitantly, the total cellular level of p21 increased severalfold via a posttranscriptional mechanism. Most cyclin E-cdk2 complexes associated with p21 and became inactive, expression of cyclin A was curtailed, and DNA synthesis was strongly inhibited. Induction of p21 alone, in a sibling clone, to the level observed during p16 induction substantially reproduced these effects. Overexpression of either cyclin E or A prevented p16 from mediating arrest. We then extended these studies to HCT 116 colorectal carcinoma cells and a p21-null clone derived by homologous recombination. In the parental cells, p16 expression also augmented total cellular and cdk2-bound p21. Moreover, p16 strongly inhibited DNA synthesis in the parental cells but not in the p21-null derivative. These findings indicate that p21-mediated inhibition of cdk2 contributes to the cell cycle arrest imposed by p16 and is a potential point of cooperation between the p16/pRB and p14ARF/p53 tumor suppressor pathways. PMID:10207115

  19. Evaluating the Significance of CDK2-PELP1 Axis in Tumorigenesis and Hormone Therapy Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Evaluating the Significance of CDK2 -PELP1 Axis in Tumorigenesis and Hormone Therapy Resistance PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Binoj Nair...conspicuous of which is the upregulation of Cyclin E and A, along with activation of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2 ( CDK2 ) ((6-10). Activation of CDK2 in...SRC-1 (17), SRC3 (AIB1) (18-20), NCOR1 (21) and PELP1 (22). The major focus of this proposal will be on PELP1 (Proline, glutamic Acid and Leucine

  20. Cyclin A/Cdk2 regulates Cdh1 and claspin during late S/G2 phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Vanessa; Wang, Weili; Harrington, Brittney; Lee, Won Jae; Beamish, Heather; Chia, Kee Ming; Pinder, Alex; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Pavey, Sandra; Gabrielli, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Whereas many components regulating the progression from S phase through G2 phase into mitosis have been identified, the mechanism by which these components control this critical cell cycle progression is still not fully elucidated. Cyclin A/Cdk2 has been shown to regulate the timing of Cyclin B/Cdk1 activation and progression into mitosis although the mechanism by which this occurs is only poorly understood. Here we show that depletion of Cyclin A or inhibition of Cdk2 during late S/early G2 phase maintains the G2 phase arrest by reducing Cdh1 transcript and protein levels, thereby stabilizing Claspin and maintaining elevated levels of activated Chk1 which contributes to the G2 phase observed. Interestingly, the Cyclin A/Cdk2 regulated APC/C(Cdh1) activity is selective for only a subset of Cdh1 targets including Claspin. Thus, a normal role for Cyclin A/Cdk2 during early G2 phase is to increase the level of Cdh1 which destabilises Claspin which in turn down regulates Chk1 activation to allow progression into mitosis. This mechanism links S phase exit with G2 phase transit into mitosis, provides a novel insight into the roles of Cyclin A/Cdk2 in G2 phase progression, and identifies a novel role for APC/C(Cdh1) in late S/G2 phase cell cycle progression.

  1. NPAT links cyclin E-Cdk2 to the regulation of replication-dependent histone gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Kennedy, B K; Lawrence, B D; Barbie, D A; Matera, A G; Fletcher, J A; Harlow, E

    2000-09-15

    In eukaryotic cells, histone gene expression is one of the major events that mark entry into S phase. While this process is tightly linked to cell cycle position, how it is regulated by the cell cycle machinery is not known. Here we show that NPAT, a substrate of the cyclin E-Cdk2 complex, is associated with human replication-dependent histone gene clusters on both chromosomes 1 and 6 in S phase. We demonstrate that NPAT activates histone gene transcription and that this activation is dependent on the promoter elements (SSCSs) previously proposed to mediate cell cycle-dependent transcription. Cyclin E is also associated with the histone gene loci, and cyclin E-Cdk2 stimulates the NPAT-mediated activation of histone gene transcription. Thus, our results both show that NPAT is involved in a key S phase event and provide a link between the cell cycle machinery and activation of histone gene transcription.

  2. Cdk2-dependent phosphorylation of Id2 modulates activity of E2A-related transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Hara, E; Hall, M; Peters, G

    1997-01-01

    The helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein Id2 is thought to affect the balance between cell growth and differentiation by negatively regulating the function of basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. Id2 acts by forming heterodimers that are unable to bind to specific (E-box) DNA sequences. Here we show that this activity can be overcome by phosphorylation of a serine residue within a consensus target site for cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). In vitro, Id2 can be phosphorylated by either cyclin E-Cdk2 or cyclin A-Cdk2 but not by cyclin D-dependent kinases. Analogous phosphorylation occurs in serum-stimulated human diploid fibroblasts at a time in late G1 consistent with the appearance of active cyclin E-Cdk2. The phosphorylation of Id2 in these cells correlates with the restoration of a distinct E-box-dependent DNA-binding complex, suggesting that the levels of this complex are modulated by both the abundance and phosphorylation status of Id2. These data provide a link between cyclin-dependent kinases and bHLH transcription factors that may be critical for the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:9029153

  3. CK1δ activity is modulated by CDK2/E- and CDK5/p35-mediated phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ianes, Chiara; Xu, Pengfei; Werz, Natalie; Meng, Zhigang; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Bischof, Joachim; Knippschild, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    CK1 protein kinases form a family of serine/threonine kinases which are highly conserved through different species and ubiquitously expressed. CK1 family members can phosphorylate numerous substrates thereby regulating different biological processes including membrane trafficking, cell cycle regulation, circadian rhythm, apoptosis, and signal transduction. Deregulation of CK1 activity and/or expression contributes to the development of neurological diseases and cancer. Therefore, CK1 became an interesting target for drug development and it is relevant to further understand the mechanisms of its regulation. In the present study, Cyclin-dependent kinase 2/Cyclin E (CDK2/E) and Cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p35 (CDK5/p35) were identified as cellular kinases able to modulate CK1δ activity through site-specific phosphorylation of its C-terminal domain. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CK1δ with CDK2/E or CDK5/p35 reduces CK1δ activity in vitro, indicating a functional impact of the interaction between CK1δ and CDK/cyclin complexes. Interestingly, inhibition of Cyclin-dependent kinases by Dinaciclib increases CK1δ activity in pancreatic cancer cells. In summary, these results suggest that CK1δ activity can be modulated by the interplay between CK1δ and CDK2/E or CDK5/p35. These findings extend our knowledge about CK1δ regulation and may be of use for future development of CK1-related therapeutic strategies in the treatment of neurological diseases or cancer.

  4. Cdk2 loss accelerates precursor differentiation and remyelination in the adult central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Caillava, Céline; Vandenbosch, Renaud; Jablonska, Beata; Deboux, Cyrille; Spigoni, Giulia; Gallo, Vittorio; Malgrange, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    The specific functions of intrinsic regulators of oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) division are poorly understood. Type 2 cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk2) controls cell cycle progression of OPCs, but whether it acts during myelination and repair of demyelinating lesions remains unexplored. Here, we took advantage of a viable Cdk2−/− mutant mouse to investigate the function of this cell cycle regulator in OPC proliferation and differentiation in normal and pathological conditions. During central nervous system (CNS) development, Cdk2 loss does not affect OPC cell cycle, oligodendrocyte cell numbers, or myelination. However, in response to CNS demyelination, it clearly alters adult OPC renewal, cell cycle exit, and differentiation. Importantly, Cdk2 loss accelerates CNS remyelination of demyelinated axons. Thus, Cdk2 is dispensable for myelination but is important for adult OPC renewal, and could be one of the underlying mechanisms that drive adult progenitors to differentiate and thus regenerate myelin. PMID:21502361

  5. Loss of p12CDK2-AP1 Expression in Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Disrupted Transforming Growth Factor-β-Smad Signaling Pathway1

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Shintani, Satoru; Kim, Yong; Wong, David T

    2006-01-01

    Abstract We examined correlations between TGF-β1, TβR-I and TβR-II, p12CDK2-AP1, p21WAF1, p27KIP1, Smad2, and p-Smad2 in 125 cases of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to test the hypothesis that resistance to TGF-β1-induced growth suppression is due to the disruption of its signaling pathway as a consequence of reduced or lost p12CDK2-AP1. Immunoreactivity for TβR-II decreased in OSCC with increasing disease aggressiveness; however, no differences were observed for TβR-I and TGF-β1. The expression of TβR-II significantly correlated with p12CDK2-AP1 and p27KIP1 (P < .001 and P < .01, respectively). Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between TβR-II expression and p-Smad2 (P < .001). The in vivo correlation of the levels of TβR-II, p12CDK2-AP1, and p27KIP1 was confirmed in normal and OSCC cell lines. Additionally, in vitro analysis of TGF-β1-treated cells showed that TGF-β1 treatment of normal keratinocytes suppressed cell growth with upregulation of p-Smad2, p12CDK2-AP1, and p21WAF1 expression, whereas there was no effect on OSCC cell lines. These results provide evidence of a link between a disrupted TGF-β-Smad signaling pathway and loss of induction of cell cycle-inhibitory proteins, especially p12CDK2-AP1 in OSCC, which may lead to the resistance of TGF-β1 growth-inhibitory effect on OSCC. PMID:17217620

  6. Unmasking the redundancy between Cdk1 and Cdk2 at G2 phase in human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    L'Italien, Lawrence; Tanudji, Marcel; Russell, Loren; Schebye, Xiao Min

    2006-05-01

    A series of studies published in 2003 has challenged the essentiality of Cdk2. A recently published work indicates that cyclin E-Cdk1 compensates for Cdk2's function at G1/S transition in Cdk2(-/-) Mefs. In this study, we uncovered a redundant mechanism between Cdk1 and Cdk2 at G2 in multiple cancer cell lines. When either Cdk2 or Cdk1 is ablated using RNAi, there were complex shifts of cyclin A towards its reciprocal partner, i.e., when Cdk2 is ablated, cyclin A redistributes to Cdk1; when Cdk1 is ablated, cyclin A forms more abundant complexes with Cdk2. Further, cyclin B redistributes to Cdk2 upon Cdk1 knockdown. These redistributions bring about increased kinase activities of corresponding complexes. Elimination of the compensatory mechanism by knockdown of both Cdk1 and Cdk2 using RNAi reveals phenotypes at G2 phase. The results suggest that the redistributed complexes contribute to the cyclin B-Cdk1 activation when either Cdk1 or Cdk2 alone is ablated and this redundancy masks Cdk2's role when Cdk2 is singly ablated. It is also worth noting that the predominant G2 arrest described here, unlike those Cdk1-Cdk2 double ablated Mefs, raises a question of whether different Cdk activities are required for G1/S or G2/M progression in normal vs. cancer cells.

  7. Molecular cloning, sequence characterization and tissue transcription profile analyses of two novel genes: LCK and CDK2 from the Black-boned sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongman; Chen, Shanna; Xi, Dongmei; He, Yiduo; Liu, Qin; Mao, Huaming; Deng, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    The complete coding sequences of two sheep genes--LCK and CDK2--were amplified using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method based on three sheep EST sequences whose translated amino acids contain the domain PTKc_Lck_BIk and S_TKc domain, respectively. The sequence analyses of these two genes revealed that the sheep LCK gene encodes a protein of 509 amino acids which has high homology with the lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) of eight species: bovine (99%), human (96%), dog (96%), Aotus nancymaae (95%), mouse (94%), rat (91%), horse (91%) and chicken (81%). The sheep CDK2 gene encodes a protein of 298 amino acids which has high homology with the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) of ten species: bovine (100%), goat (100%), rat (99%), mouse (99%), Chinese hamster (99%), dog (98%), golden hamster (98%), human (98%), horse (98%) and rhesus monkey (98%). The tissue transcription profile analyses indicated that that the Black-boned sheep LCK and CDK2 genes are generally but differentially expressed in the detected tissues including in tissues including spleen, muscle, skin, kidney, lung, liver and heart. These data serve as a foundation for further insight into these two genes.

  8. An in silico exploration of the interaction mechanism of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine type CDK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Gao, Weimin; Li, Feng; Wang, Jinghui; Zhang, Jingxiao; Yang, Yinfeng; Zhang, Shuwei; Yang, Ling

    2013-09-01

    CDK2, which interacts with cyclin A and cyclin E, is an important member of the CDK family. Having been proved to be associated with many diseases for its vital role in cell cycle, CDK2 is a promising target of anti-cancer drugs dealing with cell cycle disorders. In the present work, a total of 111 pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines (PHTPPs) as CDK2/cyclin A inhibitors were studied to conduct three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity (3D-QSAR) analyses. The optimal comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) model shows that Q(2) = 0.516, Rncv(2) = 0.912, Rpre(2) = 0.914, Rm(2) = 0.843, SEP = 0.812, SEE = 0.347 with 10 components using steric, hydrophobic and H-bond donor field descriptors, indicating its effective internal and external predictive capacity. The contour maps further indicate that (1) bulky substituents in R1 are beneficial while H-bond donor groups at this position are detrimental; (2) hydrophobic contributions in the R2 area are favorable; (3) large and hydrophilic groups are well tolerated at the R3 position (a close H-bond donor moiety is favorable while a distal H-bond donor moiety in this area is disfavored); (4) bulky and hydrophobic features in the R4 region are beneficial for the biological activities and (5) the 7-N-aryl substitution is crucial to boost the inhibitory activities of the PHTPP inhibitors. Finally, docking and MD simulations demostrate that PHTPP derivatives are stabilized in a 'flying bat' conformation mainly through the H-bond interactions and hydrophobic contacts. Comparative studies indicate that PHTPP derivatives fit well within the ATP binding cleft in CDK2, with the core heterocyclic ring overlapping significantly with the adenine group of ATP despite a small deflection. In comparison to numerous other inhibitors binding to the ATP pocket, PHTPP analogues follow the binding fashion of purine inhibitors of this kinase. It is anticipated that the binding mechanism and structural features of PHTPP inhibitors

  9. WHSC1L1 drives cell cycle progression through transcriptional regulation of CDC6 and CDK2 in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Saloura, Vassiliki; Vougiouklakis, Theodore; Zewde, Makda; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Park, Jae-Hyun; Gao, Guimin; Karrison, Theodore; Lingen, Mark; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    Wolf-Hisrchhorn Syndrome Candidate 1-Like 1 (WHSC1L1) is a protein lysine methyltransferase that is recurrently amplified (8p11.23) in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). In this study, we investigated the oncogenic role of WHSC1L1 in SCCHN. Using immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays of patients with locoregionally advanced SCCHN, we found that WHSC1L1 is significantly overexpressed in patients with SCCHN, and is associated with poor grade and heavy smoking history. Knockdown of WHSC1L1 expression resulted in significant growth suppression and reduction of H3K36 dimethylation (H3K36me2) in SCCHN cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that WHSC1L1 and H3K36me2 are enriched in the gene bodies of the cell cycle-related genes CDC6 and CDK2, implying that WHSC1L1 directly regulates the transcription of these genes. According to the importance of CDC6 and CDK2 for G1 to S transition, WHSC1L1 knockdown induced strong G0/G1 arrest which was rescued by introduction of wild-type WHSC1L1 but not by that of enzyme-inactive WHSC1L1. Our results imply that WHSC1L1 and its product H3K36me2 are essential for the transition from G1 to S phase in SCCHN cells and that WHSC1L1 could serve as a rational target for anticancer drug development for patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:27285764

  10. Cdk1, but not Cdk2, is the sole Cdk that is essential and sufficient to drive resumption of meiosis in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Deepak; Zheng, Wenjing; Shen, Yan; Gorre, Nagaraju; Ning, Yao; Halet, Guillaume; Kaldis, Philipp; Liu, Kui

    2012-06-01

    Mammalian oocytes are arrested at the prophase of meiosis I during fetal or postnatal development, and the meiosis is resumed by the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone. The in vivo functional roles of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) during the resumption of meiosis in mammalian oocytes are largely unknown. Previous studies have shown that deletions of Cdk3, Cdk4 or Cdk6 in mice result in viable animals with normal oocyte maturation, indicating that these Cdks are not essential for the meiotic maturation of oocytes. In addition, conventional knockout of Cdk1 and Cdk2 leads to embryonic lethality and postnatal follicular depletion, respectively, making it impossible to study the functions of Cdk1 and Cdk2 in oocyte meiosis. In this study, we generated conditional knockout mice with oocyte-specific deletions of Cdk1 and Cdk2. We showed that the lack of Cdk1, but not of Cdk2, leads to female infertility due to a failure of the resumption of meiosis in the oocyte. Re-introduction of Cdk1 mRNA into Cdk1-null oocytes largely resumed meiosis. Thus, Cdk1 is the sole Cdk that is essential and sufficient to drive resumption of meiosis in mouse oocytes. We also found that Cdk1 maintains the phosphorylation status of protein phosphatase 1 and lamin A/C in oocytes in order for meiosis resumption to occur.

  11. CDK2 and mTOR are direct molecular targets of isoangustone A in the suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eunjung; Son, Joe Eun; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yeong A; Liu, Kangdong; Kim, Jiyoung; Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2013-10-01

    Licorice extract which is used as a natural sweetener has been shown to possess inhibitory effects against prostate cancer, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Here, we report a compound, isoangustone A (IAA) in licorice that potently suppresses the growth of aggressive prostate cancer and sought to clarify its mechanism of action. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on the growth of PTEN-deleted human prostate cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Administration of IAA significantly attenuated the growth of prostate cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. These effects were found to be attributable to inhibition of the G1/S phase cell cycle transition and the accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. The elevated p27{sup kip1} expression levels were concurrent with the decrease of its phosphorylation at threonine 187 through suppression of CDK2 kinase activity and the reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473 by diminishing the kinase activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Further analysis using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitated cell lysates determined that IAA exerts suppressive effects against CDK2 and mTOR kinase activity by direct binding with both proteins. These findings suggested that the licorice compound IAA is a potent molecular inhibitor of CDK2 and mTOR, with strong implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, licorice-derived extracts with high IAA content warrant further clinical investigation for nutritional sources for prostate cancer patients. - Highlights: • Isoangustone A suppresses growth of PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. • Administration of isoangustone A inhibits tumor growth in mice. • Treatment of isoangustone A induces cell cycle arrest and accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. • Isoangustone A inhibits CDK2 and mTOR activity. • Isoangustone A directly binds with CDK2 and mTOR complex in prostate cancer cells.

  12. G{sub 1} arrest and down-regulation of cyclin E/cyclin-dependent kinase 2 by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine are dependent on the retinoblastoma protein in the bladder carcinoma cell line 5637

    SciTech Connect

    Schnier, J.B.; Nishi, K.; Goodrich, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    The protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine has been shown to induce G{sub 1} phase arrest in normal cells but not in most transformed cells. Staurosporine did not induce G{sub 1} phase arrest in the bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 that lacks a functional retinoblastoma protein (pRB{sup {minus}}). However, when infected with a pRB-expressing retrovirus, these cells, now pRB{sup +} and pRB{sup {minus}} cells, cyclin D1-associated kinase activities were reduced on staurosporine treatment. In contrast, cylin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 and cyclin E/CDK2 activities were inhibited only in pRB{sup +} cells. Staurosporine treatment did not cause reductions in the protein levels of CDK4, cyclin D1, CDK2, or cyclin E. The CDK inhibitor proteins p21{sup (Wafl/Cipl)} and p27{sup (Kipl}) levels increased in staurosporine-treated cells. Immunoprecipitation of CDK2, cyclin E, and p21 form staurosporine-treated pRB{sup +} cells revealed a 2.5- to 3-fold higher ratio of p21 bound to CDK2 compared with staurosporine-treated pRB cells. In pRB{sup +} cells, p21 was preferentially associated with Thr160 phosphorylated active CDK2. In pRB{sup {minus}} cells, however, p21 was bound preferentially to the unphosphorylated, inactive form of CDK2 even though the phosphorylated form was abundant. This is the first evidence suggesting that G{sub 1} arrest by 4 nM staurosporine is dependent on a functional pRB protein. Cell cycle arrest at the pRB-dependent checkpoint may prevent activation of cyclin E/CDK2 by stabilizing its interaction with inhibitor proteins p21 and p27. 47 refs.

  13. Phenyl-1-Pyridin-2yl-Ethanone-Based Iron Chelators Increase IκB-α Expression, Modulate CDK2 and CDK9 Activities, and Inhibit HIV-1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Namita; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Breuer, Denitra; Niu, Xiaomei; Lin, Xionghao; Xu, Min; Gavrilenko, Konstantin; Kashanchi, Fatah; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription is activated by the Tat protein, which recruits CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. CDK9 is phosphorylated by CDK2, which facilitates formation of the high-molecular-weight positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex. We previously showed that chelation of intracellular iron inhibits CDK2 and CDK9 activities and suppresses HIV-1 transcription, but the mechanism of the inhibition was not understood. In the present study, we tested a set of novel iron chelators for the ability to inhibit HIV-1 transcription and elucidated their mechanism of action. Novel phenyl-1-pyridin-2yl-ethanone (PPY)-based iron chelators were synthesized and examined for their effects on cellular iron, HIV-1 inhibition, and cytotoxicity. Activities of CDK2 and CDK9, expression of CDK9-dependent and CDK2-inhibitory mRNAs, NF-κB expression, and HIV-1- and NF-κB-dependent transcription were determined. PPY-based iron chelators significantly inhibited HIV-1, with minimal cytotoxicity, in cultured and primary cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 subtype B, but they had less of an effect on HIV-1 subtype C. Iron chelators upregulated the expression of IκB-α, with increased accumulation of cytoplasmic NF-κB. The iron chelators inhibited CDK2 activity and reduced the amount of CDK9/cyclin T1 in the large P-TEFb complex. Iron chelators reduced HIV-1 Gag and Env mRNA synthesis but had no effect on HIV-1 reverse transcription. In addition, iron chelators moderately inhibited basal HIV-1 transcription, equally affecting HIV-1 and Sp1- or NF-κB-driven transcription. By virtue of their involvement in targeting several key steps in HIV-1 transcription, these novel iron chelators have the potential for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25155598

  14. Androgen Suppresses the Proliferation of Androgen Receptor-Positive Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells via Inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shih Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yu; Fukuchi, Junichi; Hiipakka, Richard A.; Chung, Chi-Jung; Chan, Tzu-Min; Liao, Shutsung; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR) and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27Kip1; and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27Kip1 and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2. PMID:25271736

  15. Chloroquine alleviates etoposide-induced centrosome amplification by inhibiting CDK2 in adrenocortical tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T-Y; Syu, J-S; Lin, T-C; Cheng, H-l; Lu, F-l; Wang, C-Y

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor drug etoposide (ETO) is widely used in treating several cancers, including adrenocortical tumor (ACT). However, when used at sublethal doses, tumor cells still survive and are more susceptible to the recurring tumor due to centrosome amplification. Here, we checked the effect of sublethal dose of ETO in ACT cells. Sublethal dose of ETO treatment did not induce cell death but arrested the ACT cells in G2/M phase. This resulted in centrosome amplification and aberrant mitotic spindle formation leading to genomic instability and cellular senescence. Under such conditions, Chk2, cyclin A/CDK2 and ERK1/2 were aberrantly activated. Pharmacological inactivation of Chk2, CDK2 or ERK1/2 or depletion of CDK2 or Chk2 inhibited the centrosome amplification in ETO-treated ACT cells. In addition, autophagy was activated by ETO and was required for ACT cell survival. Chloroquine, the autophagy inhibitor, reduced ACT cell growth and inhibited ETO-induced centrosome amplification. Chloroquine alleviated CDK2 and ERK, but not Chk2, activation and thus inhibited centrosome amplification in either ETO- or hydroxyurea-treated ACT cells. In addition, chloroquine also inhibited centrosome amplification in osteosarcoma U2OS cell lines when treated with ETO or hydroxyurea. In summary, we have demonstrated that chloroquine inhibited ACT cell growth and alleviated DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification by inhibiting CDK2 and ERK activity, thus preventing genomic instability and recurrence of ACT. PMID:26690546

  16. In silico study of porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids as CDK2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Arba, Muhammad; Ihsan, Sunandar; Ramadhan, La Ode Ahmad Nur; Tjahjono, Daryono Hadi

    2017-04-01

    Cyclin-Dependent Kinases (CDKs) are known to play crucial roles in controlling cell cycle progression of eukaryotic cell and inhibition of their activity has long been considered as potential strategy in anti-cancer drug research. In the present work, a series of porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids bearing meso-substituents, i.e. either pyridine or pyrazole rings were designed and computationally evaluated for their Cyclin Dependent Kinase-2 (CDK2) inhibitory activity using molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation. The molecular docking simulation revealed that all six porphyrin hybrids were able to bind to ATP-binding site of CDK2 and interacted with key residues constituted the active cavity of CDK2, while molecular dynamics simulation indicated that all porphyrins bound to CDK2 were stable for 6ns. The binding free energies predicted by MM-PBSA method showed that most compounds exhibited higher affinity than that of native ligand (4-anilinoquinazoline, DTQ) and the affinity of mono-H2PyP-AQ was about three times better than that of DTQ, indicating its potential to be advanced as a new CDK2 inhibitor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cyclin E Uses Cdc6 as a Chromatin-Associated Receptor Required for DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Furstenthal, Laura; Kaiser, Brett K.; Swanson, Craig; Jackson, Peter K.

    2001-01-01

    Using an in vitro chromatin assembly assay in Xenopus egg extract, we show that cyclin E binds specifically and saturably to chromatin in three phases. In the first phase, the origin recognition complex and Cdc6 prereplication proteins, but not the minichromosome maintenance complex, are necessary and biochemically sufficient for ATP-dependent binding of cyclin E–Cdk2 to DNA. We find that cyclin E binds the NH2-terminal region of Cdc6 containing Cy–Arg-X-Leu (RXL) motifs. Cyclin E proteins with mutated substrate selection (Met-Arg-Ala-Ile-Leu; MRAIL) motifs fail to bind Cdc6, fail to compete with endogenous cyclin E–Cdk2 for chromatin binding, and fail to rescue replication in cyclin E–depleted extracts. Cdc6 proteins with mutations in the three consensus RXL motifs are quantitatively deficient for cyclin E binding and for rescuing replication in Cdc6-depleted extracts. Thus, the cyclin E–Cdc6 interaction that localizes the Cdk2 complex to chromatin is important for DNA replication. During the second phase, cyclin E–Cdk2 accumulates on chromatin, dependent on polymerase activity. In the third phase, cyclin E is phosphorylated, and the cyclin E–Cdk2 complex is displaced from chromatin in mitosis. In vitro, mitogen-activated protein kinase and especially cyclin B–Cdc2, but not the polo-like kinase 1, remove cyclin E–Cdk2 from chromatin. Rebinding of hyperphosphorylated cyclin E–Cdk2 to interphase chromatin requires dephosphorylation, and the Cdk kinase–directed Cdc14 phosphatase is sufficient for this dephosphorylation in vitro. These three phases of cyclin E association with chromatin may facilitate the diverse activities of cyclin E–Cdk2 in initiating replication, blocking rereplication, and allowing resetting of origins after mitosis. PMID:11257126

  18. TNFα Signaling Regulates Cystic Epithelial Cell Proliferation through Akt/mTOR and ERK/MAPK/Cdk2 Mediated Id2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Julie X.; Fan, Lucy X.; Li, Xiaoyan; Calvet, James P.; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is present in cyst fluid and promotes cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). However, the cross-talk between TNFα and PKD associated signaling pathways remains elusive. In this study, we found that stimulation of renal epithelial cells with TNFα or RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand), a member of the TNFα cytokine family, activated either the PI3K pathway, leading to AKT and mTOR mediated the increase of Id2 protein, or MAPK and Cdk2 to induce Id2 nuclear translocation. The effects of TNFα/RANKL on increasing Id2 protein and its nuclear translocation caused significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of the Cdk inhibitor p21, allowing increased cell proliferation. TNFα levels increase in cystic kidneys in response to macrophage infiltration and thus might contribute to cyst growth and enlargement during the progression of disease. As such, this study elucidates a novel mechanism for TNFα signaling in regulating cystic renal epithelial cell proliferation in ADPKD. PMID:26110849

  19. Regulation of estrogen receptor transcriptional enhancement by the cyclin A/Cdk2 complex.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, J M; Rogatsky, I; Garabedian, M J

    1997-09-16

    We have found that ectopic expression of cyclin A increases hormone-dependent and hormone-independent transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor in vivo in a number of cell lines, including HeLa cells, U-2 OS osteosarcoma cells and Hs 578Bst breast epithelial cells. This effect can be further enhanced in HeLa cells by the concurrent expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase activator, cyclin H, and cdk7, and abolished by expression of the cdk inhibitor, p27(KIP1), or by the expression of a dominant negative catalytically inactive cdk2 mutant. ER is phosphorylated between amino acids 82 and 121 in vitro by the cyclin A/cdk2 complex and incorporation of phosphate into ER is stimulated by ectopic expression of cyclin A in vivo. Together, these results strongly suggest a direct role for the cyclin A/cdk2 complex in phosphorylating ER and regulating its transcriptional activity.

  20. A centrosomal localization signal in cyclin E required for Cdk2-independent S phase entry.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yutaka; Maller, James L

    2004-10-29

    Excess cyclin E-Cdk2 accelerates entry into S phase of the cell cycle and promotes polyploidy, which may contribute to genomic instability in cancer cells. We identified 20 amino acids in cyclin E as a centrosomal localization signal (CLS) essential for both centrosomal targeting and promoting DNA synthesis. Expressed wild-type, but not mutant, CLS peptides localized on the centrosome, prevented endogenous cyclin E and cyclin A from localizing to the centrosome, and inhibited DNA synthesis. Ectopic cyclin E localized to the centrosome and accelerated S phase entry even with mutations that abolish Cdk2 binding, but not with a mutation in the CLS. These results suggest that cyclin E has a modular centrosomal-targeting domain essential for promoting S phase entry in a Cdk2-independent manner.

  1. A novel approach to the discovery of small molecule ligands of CDK2

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Mathew P.; Alam, Riazul; Betzi, Stephane; Ingles, Donna J.; Zhu, Jin-Yi

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to identify novel small molecule ligands of CDK2 with potential as allosteric inhibitors, we devised a robust and cost-effective fluorescence-based high-throughput screening assay. The assay is based on the specific interaction of CDK2 with the extrinsic fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), which binds to a large allosteric pocket adjacent to the ATP site. Hit compounds which displace ANS directly or indirectly from CDK2 are readily classified as ATP site binders or allosteric ligands through the use of staurosporine, which blocks the ATP site without displacing ANS. Pilot screening of 1,453 compounds led to the discovery of 12 compounds with displacement activities (EC50 values) ranging from 6 to 44 μM, all of which were classified as ATP site-directed ligands. Four new Type I inhibitor scaffolds were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. While this small compound library contained only ATP-site directed ligands, the application of this assay to large compound libraries has the potential to reveal previously unrecognized chemical scaffolds suitable for structure-based design of CDK2 inhibitors with new mechanisms of action. PMID:22893598

  2. Identification of New Substrates for Breast Tumor Specific LMW Cyclin E/CDK2 Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Cyclin E/CDK2 phosphorylation of Hbo1 does not affect the HAT activity of Hbo1 CDK1 phosphorylates Hbo1 at T85/T88 to create a docking site for polo ...values first subtracted from a water control and then normalized to the positive control, which used HeLa nuclear extract as a source of HAT

  3. Specific overexpression of cyclin E·CDK2 in early preinvasive and primary breast tumors in female ACI rats induced by estrogen.

    PubMed

    Weroha, S John; Lingle, Wilma L; Hong, Yan; Li, Sara Antonia; Li, Jonathan J

    2010-02-01

    Overexpressed Aurora A, amplified centrosomes, and aneuploidy are salient features of estrogen-induced mammary preinvasive lesions and tumors in female August--Copenhagen Irish (ACI) rats. Intimately involved in these events are cyclins and their associated cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) partners. Cyclin E1·CDK2 overexpression plays an important dual role in late G1/S phase of the cell cycle in cancer cells. It increases DNA replication providing growth advantage to cancer cells and facilitates aberrant centrosome duplication, generating chromosomal instability and aneuploidy leading to tumor development. Presented herein, a 24.0- and 45.0-fold elevation in cyclin E1 and CDK2 was found in 17β-estradiol (E(2))-induced ACI rat mammary tumors (MTs), respectively. Cyclin E·CDK2 positive staining was confined to the large round cells found within focal dysplasias, ductal carcinomas in situ, and invasive MTs. Co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase activity of these tumors revealed that these cell cycle entities are functional. When mammary tissue derived from untreated normal, E(2)-induced hyperplasia and primary tumors were normalized to cyclin E1 levels, low molecular weight (LMW) cyclin E1 forms (33- and 45-kDa) were detected in all of these tissue groups. Moreover, increasing concentrations of protease inhibitor in tissue lysates resulted in a marked reduction of LMW forms, indicating that the presence of cyclin E1 LMW forms can be markedly reduced. Significant increases in cyclin E1 mRNA (2.1-fold) were detected in primary ACI rat E(2)-induced breast tumors, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed a 20% amplification of the cyclin E1 gene (CCNE1). Collectively, these results support the involvement of cyclin E1·CDK2 in centrosome overduplication during each stage of E(2)-induced mammary tumorigenesis.

  4. AMPKα1 deletion in fibroblasts promotes tumorigenesis in athymic nude mice by p52-mediated elevation of erythropoietin and CDK2

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ye; Lu, Qiulun; Zou, Ming-Hui; Song, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor development. Accumulating evidence suggests that adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an energy sensor and redox modulator, is associated with cancer development. However, the effect of AMPK on tumor development is controversial, and whether AMPK affects tumor angiogenesis has not been resolved. We show that deletion of AMPKα1, but not AMPKα2, upregulates non-canonical nuclear factor kappa B2 (NF-κB2)/p52-mediated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), which is responsible for the anchorage-independent cell growth of immortalized mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). Co-culture with AMPKα1 knockout MEFs (or their conditioned medium) enhances the migration and network formation of human microvascular endothelial cells, which is dependent on p52-upregulated erythropoietin (Epo). AMPKα1 deletion stimulates cellular proliferation of allograft MEFs, angiogenesis, and tumor development in athymic nu/nu mice, which is partly ameliorated by antibody-mediated Epo neutralization. Therefore, the AMPKα1-p52-Epo pathway may be involved in stromal fibroblast-mediated angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. PMID:27449088

  5. Cdk2 deficiency decreases ras/CDK4-dependent malignant progression, but not myc-induced tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Kim, Yongbaek; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2007-10-15

    We have previously shown that forced expression of CDK4 in mouse skin (K5CDK4 mice) results in increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development in a chemical carcinogenesis protocol. This protocol induces skin papilloma development, causing a selection of cells bearing activating Ha-ras mutations. We have also shown that myc-induced epidermal proliferation and oral tumorigenesis (K5Myc mice) depends on CDK4 expression. Biochemical analysis of K5CDK4 and K5Myc epidermis as well as skin tumors showed that keratinocyte proliferation is mediated by CDK4 sequestration of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and activation of CDK2. Here, we studied the role of CDK2 in epithelial tumorigenesis. In normal skin, loss of CDK2 rescues CDK4-induced, but not myc-induced epidermal hyperproliferation. Ablation of CDK2 in K5CDK4 mice results in decreased incidences and multiplicity of skin tumors as well as malignant progression to SCC. Histopathologic analysis showed that K5CDK4 tumors are drastically more aggressive than K5CDK4/CDK2-/- tumors. On the other hand, we show that CDK2 is dispensable for myc-induced tumorigenesis. In contrast to our previous report of K5Myc/CDK4-/-, K5Myc/CDK2-/- mice developed oral tumors with the same frequency as K5Myc mice. Overall, we have established that ras-induced tumors are more susceptible to CDK2 ablation than myc-induced tumors, suggesting that the efficacy of targeting CDK2 in tumor development and malignant progression is dependent on the oncogenic pathway involved.

  6. Identification of New Substrates for Breast Tumor-Specific LMW Cyclin E/CDk2 Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    induced breast cancer and that CDK2 inhibitor (such as roscovitine ) also delays mammary tumor formation (Akli et al., 2011). The hypothesis is that...in the presence of 32P-γ-ATP and with or without roscovitine . The samples were separated by SDS-PAGE and exposed to x-ray films. (E) Schematic of...phosphorylate Hbo1 at relatively similar levels, and addition of roscovitine efficiently inhibited the Hbo1 phosphorylation signal (Figure 2C). Similar

  7. Multiple CDK inhibitor dinaciclib suppresses neuroblastoma growth via inhibiting CDK2 and CDK9 activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenghu; Wang, Zhenyu; Pang, Jonathan C.; Yu, Yang; Bieerkehazhi, Shayahati; Lu, Jiaxiong; Hu, Ting; Zhao, Yanling; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Hong; Yi, Joanna S.; Liu, Shangfeng; Yang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, is responsible for approximately 15% of cancer-related mortality in children. Aberrant activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) has been shown to contribute to tumor cell progression in many cancers including NB. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors of CDKs comprise a strategic option in cancer therapy. Here we show that a novel multiple-CDK inhibitor, dinaciclib (SCH727965, MK-7965), exhibits potent anti-proliferative effects on a panel of NB cell lines by blocking the activity of CDK2 and CDK9. Dinaciclib also significantly sensitized NB cell lines to the treatment of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin (Dox) and etoposide (VP-16). Furthermore, dinaciclib revealed in vivo antitumor efficacy in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model of two NB cell lines and blocked tumor development in the TH-MYCN transgenic NB mouse model. Taken together, this study suggests that CDK2 and CDK9 are potential therapeutic targets in NB and that abrogating CDK2 and CDK9 activity by small molecules like dinaciclib is a promising strategy and a treatment option for NB patients. PMID:27378523

  8. CDK2 Phosphorylation on Threonine39 by AKT and Its Implication on Cyclin Binding, Cellular Localization, and Cell Cycle Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a ...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT...AKT. We will also determine the effect of AKT phosphorylation on Cdk2 by constructing a phosphomimetic mutant of Cdk2 and determining if this has an

  9. Explicit treatment of active-site waters enhances quantum mechanical/implicit solvent scoring: Inhibition of CDK2 by new pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Hylsová, Michaela; Carbain, Benoit; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Musilová, Lenka; Haldar, Susanta; Köprülüoğlu, Cemal; Ajani, Haresh; Brahmkshatriya, Pathik S; Jorda, Radek; Kryštof, Vladimír; Hobza, Pavel; Echalier, Aude; Paruch, Kamil; Lepšík, Martin

    2017-01-27

    We present comprehensive testing of solvent representation in quantum mechanics (QM)-based scoring of protein-ligand affinities. To this aim, we prepared 21 new inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) with the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core, whose activities spanned three orders of magnitude. The crystal structure of a potent inhibitor bound to the active CDK2/cyclin A complex revealed that the biphenyl substituent at position 5 of the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine scaffold was located in a previously unexplored pocket and that six water molecules resided in the active site. Using molecular dynamics, protein-ligand interactions and active-site water H-bond networks as well as thermodynamics were probed. Thereafter, all the inhibitors were scored by the QM approach utilizing the COSMO implicit solvent model. Such a standard treatment failed to produce a correlation with the experiment (R(2) = 0.49). However, the addition of the active-site waters resulted in significant improvement (R(2) = 0.68). The activities of the compounds could thus be interpreted by taking into account their specific noncovalent interactions with CDK2 and the active-site waters. In summary, using a combination of several experimental and theoretical approaches we demonstrate that the inclusion of explicit solvent effects enhance QM/COSMO scoring to produce a reliable structure-activity relationship with physical insights. More generally, this approach is envisioned to contribute to increased accuracy of the computational design of novel inhibitors.

  10. Robustness of CDK2 in Triggering Cellular Senescence based on Probability of DNA-damaged Cells Passing G1/S Checkpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hong; Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Kulasiri, Don

    2011-06-01

    Recent experiments have shown that cellular senescence, a mechanism employed by cells for thwarting cell proliferation, plays an important role in protecting cells against cancer; therefore, a deeper understanding of cellular senescence can lead to effective cancer treatment. Inhibition of CDK2 is thought to be the critical trigger for cellular senescence. In this study, we first implement a mathematical model of G1/S transition involving the DNA-damage pathway and show that cellular senescence can be achieved by lowering CDK2. The robustness of CDK2 in triggering cellular senescence is determined from the probability (β) of DNA-damaged cells passing G1/S checkpoint for normal CDK2 and CDK2-deficient situations based on different thresholds of the peak time of two important biomarkers, CycE and E2F. The comparison of the values of β under the normal CDK2 and lower CDK2 levels reveals that reducing CDK2 levels can decrease the percentage of damaged cells passing G1/S checkpoint; more importantly, 50% reduction of CDK2 achieves 65% reduction in the percentage of damaged cells passing the G1/S checkpoint. These results point out that the developed model can highlight the possibility of lowering the bar for cellular senescence by reducing CDK2 levels. The results of investigation of β for the different thresholds of the peak times of other biomarkers show that β is insensitive to these perturbations of the peak time indicating that CDK2 activity is robust in lowering the senescence bar for low and high levels of DNA-damage. Furthermore, a mathematical formulation of robustness indicates that the robustness of CDK2-triggered senescence increases with decreasing levels of CDK2, and is slightly greater for low-level DNA damage condition.

  11. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of p48 Ebp1 by CDK2 is required for tumorigenic function of p48.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyo Rim; Kim, Chung Kwon; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2015-11-01

    The long isoform of ErbB3 binding protein 1 (Ebp1), p48, strongly promotes tumorigenesis of glioblastoma, accelerating cell proliferation and transformation, while the short isoform, p42, which lacks the N-terminal 54 amino acids, inhibits tumor growth. However, it is unclear if the N-terminal domain of p48 regulates the oncogenic function of p48. Here, we show that p48, but not p42, interacts with cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) through its N-terminal domain, resulting in the specific phosphorylation of serine 34 of p48. Overexpression of wild-type p48 greatly enhanced tumor cell growth, whereas phospho-ablated mutant S34A of p48, which is mutated at the CDK2 phosphorylation site, antagonizes cell proliferation and transformation. Moreover, phospho-ablated mutant S34A abrogated the ability of p48 to accelerate tumor cell growth in a mouse engraft model. Thus, our findings indicate that p48Ebp1 acts as an oncoprotein through selective interaction and/or modification of the N-terminal domain that does not exist in its short isoform p42.

  12. Expression of cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 suppresses tumor cell phenotype by non-cell autonomous mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zolochevska, Olga; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of expressing the cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 in epithelial or stromal cell compartments to reduce SCC growth in vitro and in vivo. Cell autonomous and/or non-cell autonomous expression of cdk2ap1 reduced tumor growth and invasion and altered cell cycle, adhesion, invasion, angiogenesis, and apoptotic gene expression, as assessed by several in vitro phenotype assays, quantitative real time PCR, and in vivo molecular imaging using a novel three-way xenograft animal model. Our findings suggest that the interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts that promote abnormal growth can be minimized by expressing cdk2ap1, supporting a novel concept by which tumor/growth suppressor genes can impact tumorigenesis phenotypes from non-cell autonomous interactions within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:19515604

  13. CDK2 differentially controls normal cell senescence and cancer cell proliferation upon exposure to reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Chae Young; Lee, Seung-Min; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} differently adjusted senescence and proliferation in normal and cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently decreased PCNA levels in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently increased CDK2 activity in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup Cip1} is likely dispensable when H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces senescence in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggestively, CDK2 and PCNA play critical roles in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell fate decision. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species modulate cell fate in a context-dependent manner. Sublethal doses of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreased the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in normal cells (including primary human dermal fibroblasts and IMR-90 cells) without affecting cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, leading to cell cycle arrest and subsequent senescence. In contrast, exposure of cancer cells (such as HeLa and MCF7 cells) to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased CDK2 activity with no accompanying change in the PCNA level, leading to cell proliferation. A CDK2 inhibitor, CVT-313, prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cancer cell proliferation. These results support the notion that the cyclin/CDK2/p21{sup Cip1}/PCNA complex plays an important role as a regulator of cell fate decisions.

  14. Are progenitor cells pre-programmed for sequential cell cycles not requiring cyclins D and E and activation of Cdk2?

    PubMed

    Xie, D-X; Yao, J; Zhang, P; Li, X-L; Feng, Y-D; Wu, J-H; Tao, D-D; Hu, J-B; Gong, J-P

    2008-04-01

    Based on studies of unicellular organisms or cultured mammalian cells, the generally accepted model of cell-cycle regulation has been developed in which sequential (scheduled) expression of cyclins D, E, A and B and activation of Cdk2 and Cdk1 takes place. It is assumed that the same model is applicable both in vivo and in vitro. In the present study, we compared proliferating marrow cells freshly isolated from healthy individuals with proliferating lymphocytes in cultures. We demonstrate that during progression of freshly collected human bone marrow cells through G(1), S and G(2)/M, only Cdk1 combined with cyclins A and B(1) was distinctly present and active, and its activity gradually increased. In contrast, in vitro growing mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes had perfectly scheduled sequential expression of all four cyclins and Cdk1 and Cdk2 activities. Our findings demonstrate that the pattern of cyclin expression and Cdk activity in bone marrow in vivo is distinctly different from the one observed for normal cells in vitro. Because proliferating bone marrow cells are predominantly expanding populations of committed progenitors, it is likely that during the expansion phase their cell-cycle progression is pre-programmed, being driven solely by Cdk1 combined either with cyclin A or with cyclin B(1). Expansion of progenitor cells thus may not require the early steps of cell-cycle regulation, associated with triggering progression by availability of growth factors and mitogens.

  15. Transferable scoring function based on semiempirical quantum mechanical PM6-DH2 method: CDK2 with 15 structurally diverse inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobeš, Petr; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Řezáč, Jan; Otyepka, Michal; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-03-01

    A semiempirical quantum mechanical PM6-DH2 method accurately covering the dispersion interaction and H-bonding was used to score fifteen structurally diverse CDK2 inhibitors. The geometries of all the complexes were taken from the X-ray structures and were reoptimised by the PM6-DH2 method in continuum water. The total scoring function was constructed as an estimate of the binding free energy, i.e., as a sum of the interaction enthalpy, interaction entropy and the corrections for the inhibitor desolvation and deformation energies. The applied scoring function contains a clear thermodynamical terms and does not involve any adjustable empirical parameter. The best correlations with the experimental inhibition constants (ln K i) were found for bare interaction enthalpy ( r 2 = 0.87) and interaction enthalpy corrected for ligand desolvation and deformation energies ( r 2 = 0.77); when the entropic term was considered, however, the correlation becomes worse but still acceptable ( r 2 = 0.52). The resulting correlation based on the PM6-DH2 scoring function is better than previously published function based on various docking/scoring, SAR studies or advanced QM/MM approach, however, the robustness is limited by number of available experimental data used in the correlation. Since a very similar correlation between the experimental and theoretical results was found also for a different system of the HIV-1 protease, the suggested scoring function based on the PM6-DH2 method seems to be applicable in drug design, even if diverse protein-ligand complexes have to be ranked.

  16. In Silico Identification and In Vitro and In Vivo Validation of Anti-Psychotic Drug Fluspirilene as a Potential CDK2 Inhibitor and a Candidate Anti-Cancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Lu, Di; Wong, Man-Hon; Lin, Marie Chia-mi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Surgical resection and conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy ultimately fail due to tumor recurrence and HCC’s resistance. The development of novel therapies against HCC is thus urgently required. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) pathways are important and well-established targets for cancer treatment. In particular, CDK2 is a key factor regulating the cell cycle G1 to S transition and a hallmark for cancers. In this study, we utilized our free and open-source protein-ligand docking software, idock, prospectively to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 FDA-approved small molecule drugs using a repurposing strategy and an ensemble docking methodology. Sorted by average idock score, nine compounds were purchased and tested in vitro. Among them, the anti-psychotic drug fluspirilene exhibited the highest anti-proliferative effect in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Huh7 cells. We demonstrated for the first time that fluspirilene treatment significantly increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase, and decreased the expressions of CDK2, cyclin E and Rb, as well as the phosphorylations of CDK2 on Thr160 and Rb on Ser795. We also examined the anti-cancer effect of fluspirilene in vivo in BALB/C nude mice subcutaneously xenografted with human hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7 cells. Our results showed that oral fluspirilene treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth. Fluspirilene (15 mg/kg) exhibited strong anti-tumor activity, comparable to that of the leading cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (10 mg/kg). Moreover, the cocktail treatment with fluspirilene and 5-fluorouracil exhibited the highest therapeutic effect. These results suggested for the first time that fluspirilene is a potential CDK2 inhibitor and a candidate anti-cancer drug for the treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma. In view of the fact that fluspirilene has a long history of safe human

  17. Molecular modeling studies to characterize N-phenylpyrimidin-2-amine selectivity for CDK2 and CDK4 through 3D-QSAR and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Tahir Ali; Chen, Jiong-Jiong; Qian, Hai-Yan; Pan, You-Lu; Chen, Jian-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    CDK2 is a promising target for the development of anti-cancer agents. It is not an easy task to design CDK2-selective inhibitors which do not exhibit activity for other CDK family members, particularly CDK4, due to a high degree of structural homology among CDK family members. In this study, 4-substituted N-phenylpyrimidin-2-amine derivatives as CDK2 inhibitors were examined to understand the selectivity mechanism against CDK4 using a combined approach of 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, MESP, MD simulations, and binding free energy calculations. 3D-QSAR models were developed to propose structural determinants for CDK2 and CDK4 inhibition. High q(2) and r(2) values for CoMFA and CoMSIA models based on both internal and external validations suggested that the generated 3D-QSAR models may exhibit good capability to predict bioactivities of inhibitors against CDK2 or CDK4. Electrostatic potentials on the molecular surface have been discussed in detail for determining the binding affinity of studied inhibitors by combining molecular docking with MESP and Mulliken charge analyses. Binding free energy calculations suggested that the residues Gln85, Asp86, and Lys89 of CDK2 would play a critical role in selective CDK2 inhibition. The electrostatic interactions of an inhibitor with Glu144 and Asn145 of CDK4 may predominately drive CDK4 inhibition. These findings may provide a better structural understanding of the mechanism of CDK2 selective inhibition. The results obtained in the current study may provide valuable guidelines for developing novel potent and selective CDK2 inhibitors.

  18. Inhibition of Cdk2 activity decreases Aurora-A kinase centrosomal localization and prevents centrosome amplification in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Leontovich, Alexey A; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Veroux, Massimiliano; Tallarita, Tiziano; Billadeau, Daniel; McCubrey, James; Ingle, James; Galanis, Evanthia; D'Assoro, Antonino B

    2013-05-01

    Centrosome amplification plays a key role in the origin of chromosomal instability (CIN) during cancer development and progression. In this study, MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines harboring abrogated p53 function (vMCF-7DNp53) were employed to investigate the relationship between induction of genotoxic stress, activation of cyclin-A/Cdk2 and Aurora-A oncogenic signalings and development of centrosome amplification. Introduction of genotoxic stress in the vMCF-7DNp53 cell line by treatment with hydroxyurea (HU) induced centrosome amplification that was mechanistically linked to Aurora-A kinase activity. In cells carrying defective p53, the development of centrosome amplification also occurred following treatment with another DNA damaging agent, methotrexate. Importantly, we demonstrated that Aurora-A kinase-induced centrosome amplification was mediated by Cdk2 kinase since molecular inhibition of Cdk2 activity by SU9516 suppressed Aurora-A centrosomal localization and consequent centrosome amplification. In addition, we employed vMCF-7DRaf-1 cells that display high levels of endogenous cyclin-A and demonstrated that molecular targeting of Aurora-A by Alisertib reduces cyclin-A expression. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a novel positive feed-back loop between cyclin-A/Cdk2 and Aurora-A pathways in the development of centrosome amplification in breast cancer cells. They also provide the translational rationale for targeting 'druggable cell cycle regulators' as an innovative therapeutic strategy to inhibit centrosome amplification and CIN in breast tumors resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Halolamina pelagica CDK2 Isolated from Natural Salterns from Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sonam; Abrol, Shrutica; Yadav, Ajar Nath; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Halolamina pelagica strain CDK2, a halophilic archaeon (growth range 1.36 to 5.12 M NaCl), was isolated from rhizosphere of wild grasses of hypersaline soil of the Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, India. Its draft genome contains 2,972,542 bp and 3,485 coding sequences, depicting genes for halophilic serine proteases and trehalose synthesis. PMID:28183764

  20. Structural basis for specificity and potency of a flavonoid inhibitor of human CDK2, a cell cycle kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Filgueira de Azevedo, W. Jr.; Mueller-Dieckmann, H.J.; Schulze-Gahmen, U.

    1996-04-02

    The central role of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) in cell cycle regulation makes them a promising target for studying inhibitory molecules that can modify the degree of cell proliferation. The discovery of specific inhibitors of CDKs such as polyhydroxylated flavones has opened the way to investigation and design of antimitotic compounds. A novel flavone, (-)-cis-5,7-dihydroxyphenyl-8-[4-(3-hydroxy-1-methyl)piperidinyl]-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride hemihydrate (L868276), is a potent inhibitor of CDKs. A chlorinated form, flavopiridol, is currently in phase I clinical trials as a drug against breast tumors. We determined the crystal structure of a complex between CDK2 and L868276 at 2.33-{Angstrom} resolution and refined to an R{sub factor} of 20.3%. The aromatic portion of the inhibitor binds to the adenine-binding pocket of CDK2, and the position of the phenyl group of the inhibitor enables the inhibitor to make contacts with the enzyme not observed in the ATP complex structure. The analysis of the position of this phenyl ring not only explains the great differences of kinase inhibition among the flavonoid inhibitors but also explains the specificity of L868276 to inhibit CDK2 and CDC2. 36 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Nuclear Import of Cdk/Cyclin Complexes: Identification of Distinct Mechanisms for Import of Cdk2/Cyclin E and Cdc2/Cyclin B1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jonathan D.; Yang, Jing; Truant, Ray; Kornbluth, Sally

    1999-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of nuclear proteins is required for both DNA replication and entry into mitosis. Consequently, most cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)/cyclin complexes are localized to the nucleus when active. Although our understanding of nuclear transport processes has been greatly enhanced by the recent identification of nuclear targeting sequences and soluble nuclear import factors with which they interact, the mechanisms used to target Cdk/cyclin complexes to the nucleus remain obscure; this is in part because these proteins lack obvious nuclear localization sequences. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms responsible for Cdk/cyclin transport, we examined nuclear import of fluorescent Cdk2/cyclin E and Cdc2/cyclin B1 complexes in digitonin-permeabilized mammalian cells and also examined potential physical interactions between these Cdks, cyclins, and soluble import factors. We found that the nuclear import machinery recognizes these Cdk/cyclin complexes through direct interactions with the cyclin component. Surprisingly, cyclins E and B1 are imported into nuclei via distinct mechanisms. Cyclin E behaves like a classical basic nuclear localization sequence–containing protein, binding to the α adaptor subunit of the importin-α/β heterodimer. In contrast, cyclin B1 is imported via a direct interaction with a site in the NH2 terminus of importin-β that is distinct from that used to bind importin-α. PMID:9922449

  2. Microtubules, Tubulins and Associated Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raxworthy, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews much of what is known about microtubules, which are biopolymers consisting predominantly of subunits of the globular protein, tubulin. Describes the functions of microtubules, their structure and assembly, microtube associated proteins, and microtubule-disrupting agents. (TW)

  3. Microtubules, Tubulins and Associated Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raxworthy, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews much of what is known about microtubules, which are biopolymers consisting predominantly of subunits of the globular protein, tubulin. Describes the functions of microtubules, their structure and assembly, microtube associated proteins, and microtubule-disrupting agents. (TW)

  4. Proteolysis of Xenopus Cip-type CDK inhibitor, p16Xic2, is regulated by PCNA binding and CDK2 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell division is positively regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) partnered with cyclins and negatively regulated by CDK inhibitors. In the frog, Xenopus laevis, three types of CDK inhibitors have been described: p27Xic1 (Xic1) which shares sequence homology with both p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 from mammals, p16Xic2 (Xic2) which shares sequence homology with p21Cip1, and p17Xic3 (Xic3) which shares sequence homology with p27Kip1. While past studies have demonstrated that during DNA polymerase switching, Xic1 is targeted for protein turnover dependent upon DNA, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), and the ubiquitin ligase CRL4Cdt2, little is known about the processes that regulate Xic2 or Xic3. Methods We used the Xenopus interphase egg extract as a model system to examine the regulation of Xic2 by proteolysis and phosphorylation. Results Our studies indicated that following primer synthesis during the initiation of DNA replication, Xic2 is targeted for DNA- and PCNA-dependent ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and that Cdt2 can promote Xic2 turnover. Additionally, during interphase, Xic2 is phosphorylated by CDK2 at Ser-98 and Ser-131 in a DNA-independent manner, inhibiting Xic2 turnover. In the presence of double-stranded DNA ends, Xic2 is also phosphorylated at Ser-78 and Ser-81 by a caffeine-sensitive kinase, but this phosphorylation does not alter Xic2 turnover. Conversely, in the presence or absence of DNA, Xic3 was stable in the Xenopus interphase egg extract and did not exhibit a shift indicative of phosphorylation. Conclusions During interphase, Xic2 is targeted for DNA- and PCNA-dependent proteolysis that is negatively regulated by CDK2 phosphorylation. During a response to DNA damage, Xic2 may be alternatively regulated by phosphorylation by a caffeine-sensitive kinase. Our studies suggest that the three types of Xenopus CDK inhibitors, Xic1, Xic2, and Xic3 appear to be uniquely regulated which may reflect their specialized roles during cell

  5. Phosphorylation of EZH2 at T416 by CDK2 contributes to the malignancy of triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng-Chieh; LaBaff, Adam; Wei, Yongkun; Nie, Lei; Xia, Weiya; Huo, Longfei; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Jennifer L; Liu, Dongping; Lang, Jingyu; Du, Yi; Lien, Huang-Chun; Li, Long-Yuan; Deng, Rong; Chan, Li-Chuan; Yao, Jun; Kleer, Celina G; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which is closely related to basal-like breast cancer, is a highly aggressive subtype of breast cancer that initially responds to chemotherapy but eventually develops resistance. This presents a major clinical challenge as there are currently no effective targeted therapies available due to its lack of HER2 and estrogen receptor expression. Here, we show that cyclin E and the enhancer of zeste 2 (EZH2) are closely co-expressed in TNBC patients, and cyclin E/CDK2 phosphorylates EZH2 at T416 (pT416-EZH2) in vivo. Phosphorylation of EZH2 at T416 enhances the ability of EZH2 to promote TNBC cell migration/invasion, tumorsphere formation, and in vivo tumor growth. In addition, high pT416-EZH2 correlates with poorer survival in TNBC patients. These findings suggest that pT416 has the potential to serve as a therapeutic biomarker for the aggressive forms of breast cancer and provide a rationale for the use of CDK2 inhibitors to treat TNBC. PMID:26279746

  6. The proline-histidine-rich CDK2/CDK4 interaction region of C/EBPalpha is dispensable for C/EBPalpha-mediated growth regulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Porse, Bo Torben; Pedersen, Thomas Askov; Hasemann, Marie Sigurd; Schuster, Mikkel Bruhn; Kirstetter, Peggy; Luedde, Tom; Damgaard, Inge; Kurz, Elke; Schjerling, Charlotte Karlskov; Nerlov, Claus

    2006-02-01

    The C/EBPalpha transcription factor regulates growth and differentiation of several tissues during embryonic development. Several hypotheses as to how C/EBPalpha inhibits cellular growth in vivo have been derived, mainly from studies of tissue culture cells. In fetal liver it has been proposed that a short, centrally located, 15-amino-acid proline-histidine-rich region (PHR) of C/EBPalpha is responsible for the growth-inhibitory function of the protein through its ability to interact with CDK2 and CDK4, thereby inhibiting their activities. Homozygous Cebpa(DeltaPHR/DeltaPHR) (DeltaPHR) mice, carrying a modified cebpa allele lacking amino acids 180 to 194, were born at the Mendelian ratio, reached adulthood, and displayed no apparent adverse phenotypes. When fetal livers from the DeltaPHR mice were analyzed for their expression of cell cycle markers, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 kinase activity, and global gene expression, we failed to detect any cell cycle or developmental differences between the DeltaPHR mice and their control littermates. These in vivo data demonstrate that any C/EBPalpha-mediated growth repression via the PHR as well as the basic region is dispensable for proper embryonic development of, and cell cycle control in, the liver. Surprisingly, control experiments performed in C/EBPalpha null fetal livers yielded similar results.

  7. Bufalin induces G0/G1 phase arrest through inhibiting the levels of cyclin D, cyclin E, CDK2 and CDK4, and triggers apoptosis via mitochondrial signaling pathway in T24 human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Wen; Yang, Jai-Sing; Pai, Shu-Jen; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chang, Shu-Jen; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Fan, Ming-Jen; Chiou, Shang-Ming; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Yeh, Chin-Chung; Chen, Po-Yuan; Tsuzuki, Minoru; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-04-01

    Most of the chemotherapy treatments for bladder cancer aim to kill the cancer cells, but a high recurrence rate after medical treatments is still occurred. Bufalin from the skin and parotid venom glands of toad has been shown to induce apoptotic cell death in many types of cancer cell lines. However, there is no report addressing that bufalin induced cell death in human bladder cancer cells. The purpose of this study was investigated the mechanisms of bufalin-induced apoptosis in a human bladder cancer cell line (T24). We demonstrated the effects of bufalin on the cell growth and apoptosis in T24 cells by using DAPI/TUNEL double staining, a PI exclusion and flow cytometric analysis. The effects of bufalin on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the level of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and DNA content including sub-G1 (apoptosis) in T24 cells were also determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of G(0)/G(1) phase-regulated and apoptosis-associated protein levels in bufalin-treated T24 cells. The results indicated that bufalin significantly decreased the percentage of viability, induced the G(0)/G(1) phase arrest and triggered apoptosis in T24 cells. The down-regulation of the protein levels for cyclin D, CDK4, cyclin E, CDK2, phospho-Rb, phospho-AKT and Bcl-2 with the simultaneous up-regulation of the cytochrome c, Apaf-1, AIF, caspase-3, -7 and -9 and Bax protein expressions and caspase activities were observed in T24 cells after bufalin treatment. Based on our results, bufalin induces apoptotic cell death in T24 cells through suppressing AKT activity and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein as well as inducing pro-apoptotic Bax protein. The levels of caspase-3, -7 and -9 are also mediated apoptosis in bufalin-treated T24 cells. Therefore, bufalin might be used as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of human bladder cancer in the future.

  8. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated protein induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human hepatocellular carcinoma by activating the p53–Fbxw7 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haihe; Yang, Zhanchun; Liu, Chunbo; Huang, Shishun; Wang, Hongzhi; Chen, Yingli; Chen, Guofu

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. • RITA can significantly inhibit the in vitro growth of SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. • RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC. - Abstract: Aberrant Notch signaling is observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and has been associated with the modulation of cell growth. However, the role of Notch signaling in HCC and its underlying mechanism remain elusive. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated (RITA) mediates the nuclear export of RBP-J to tubulin fibers and downregulates Notch-mediated transcription. In this study, we found that RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. These changes led to growth inhibition and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. Our findings indicate that RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC.

  9. Human carbon catabolite repressor protein (CCR4)-associative factor 1: cloning, expression and characterization of its interaction with the B-cell translocation protein BTG1.

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, J A; Adams-Burton, C; Pedicord, D L; Sukovich, D A; Benfield, P A; Corjay, M H; Stoltenborg, J K; Dicker, I B

    1998-01-01

    The human BTG1 protein is thought to be a potential tumour suppressor because its overexpression inhibits NIH 3T3 cell proliferation. However, little is known about how BTG1 exerts its anti-proliferative activity. In this study, we used the yeast 'two-hybrid' system to screen for interacting protein partners and identified human carbon catabolite repressor protein (CCR4)-associative factor 1 (hCAF-1), a homologue of mouse CAF-1 (mCAF-1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yCAF-1/POP2. In vitro the hCAF-1/BTG1 complex formation was dependent on the phosphorylation of a putative p34cdc2 kinase site on BTG1 (Ser-159). In yeast, the Ala-159 mutant did not interact with hCAF-1. In addition, phosphorylation of Ser-159 in vitro showed specificity for the cell cycle kinases p34CDK2/cyclin E and p34CDK2/cyclin A, but not for p34CDK4/cyclin D1 or p34cdc2/cyclin B. Cell synchrony experiments with primary cultures of rat aortic smooth-muscle cells (RSMCs) demonstrated that message and protein levels of rat CAF-1 (rCAF-1) were up-regulated under conditions of cell contact, as previously reported for BTG1 [Wilcox, Scott, Subramanian, Ross, Adams-Burton, Stoltenborg and Corjay (1995) Circulation 92, I34-I35]. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis showed that rCAF-1 localizes to the nucleus of contact-inhibited RSMCs, where it was physically associated with BTG1, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation with anti-hCAF-1 antisera. Overexpression of hCAF-1 in NIH 3T3 and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells was itself anti-proliferative with colony formation reduced by 67% and 90% respectively. Taken together, these results indicate that formation of the hCAF-1/BTG1 complex is driven by phosphorylation at BTG1 (Ser-159) and implicates this complex in the signalling events of cell division that lead to changes in cellular proliferation associated with cell-cell contact. PMID:9820826

  10. Phosphorylation of Skp2 regulated by CDK2 and Cdc14B protects it from degradation by APCCdh1 in G1 phase

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Geneviève; Coulombe, Philippe; Tanguay, Pierre-Luc; Boutonnet, Christel; Meloche, Sylvain

    2008-01-01

    The p27Kip1 ubiquitin ligase receptor Skp2 is often overexpressed in human tumours and displays oncogenic properties. The activity of SCFSkp2 is regulated by the APCCdh1, which targets Skp2 for degradation. Here we show that Skp2 phosphorylation on Ser64/Ser72 positively regulates its function in vivo. Phosphorylation of Ser64, and to a lesser extent Ser72, stabilizes Skp2 by interfering with its association with Cdh1, without affecting intrinsic ligase activity. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2-mediated phosphorylation of Skp2 on Ser64 allows its expression in mid-G1 phase, even in the presence of active APCCdh1. Reciprocally, dephosphorylation of Skp2 by the mitotic phosphatase Cdc14B at the M → G1 transition promotes its degradation by APCCdh1. Importantly, lowering the levels of Cdc14B accelerates cell cycle progression from mitosis to S phase in an Skp2-dependent manner, demonstrating epistatic relationship of Cdc14B and Skp2 in the regulation of G1 length. Thus, our results reveal that reversible phosphorylation plays a key role in the timing of Skp2 expression in the cell cycle. PMID:18239684

  11. Epistructural Tension Promotes Protein Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    2012-05-01

    Epistructural tension is the reversible work per unit area required to span the aqueous interface of a soluble protein structure. The parameter accounts for the free-energy cost of imperfect hydration, involving water molecules with a shortage of hydrogen-bonding partnerships relative to bulk levels. The binding hot spots along protein-protein interfaces are identified with residues that contribute significantly to the epistructural tension in the free subunits. Upon association, such residues either displace or become deprived of low-coordination vicinal water molecules.

  12. MAD1 and p27KIP1 Cooperate To Promote Terminal Differentiation of Granulocytes and To Inhibit Myc Expression and Cyclin E-CDK2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Grant A.; Foley, Kevin P.; Fero, Matthew L.; Walkley, Carl R.; Deans, Andrew J.; Roberts, James M.; Eisenman, Robert N.

    2002-01-01

    To understand how cellular differentiation is coupled to withdrawal from the cell cycle, we have focused on two negative regulators of the cell cycle, the MYC antagonist MAD1 and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1. Generation of Mad1/p27KIP1 double-null mice revealed a number of synthetic effects between the null alleles of Mad1 and p27KIP1, including embryonic lethality, increased proliferation, and impaired differentiation of granulocyte precursors. Furthermore, with granulocyte cell lines derived from the Mad1/p27KIP1 double-null mice, we observed constitutive Myc expression and cyclin E-CDK2 kinase activity as well as impaired differentiation following treatment with an inducer of differentiation. By contrast, similar treatment of granulocytes from Mad1 or p27KIP1 single-null mice resulted in differentiation accompanied by downregulation of both Myc expression and cyclin E-CDK2 kinase activity. In the double-null granulocytic cells, addition of a CDK2 inhibitor in the presence of differentiation inducer was sufficient to restore differentiation and reduce Myc levels. We conclude that Mad1 and p27KIP1 operate, at least in part, by distinct mechanisms to downregulate CDK2 activity and Myc expression in order to promote cell cycle exit during differentiation. PMID:11940659

  13. An analysis of ATP binding with kinase catalytic subunit by molecular dynamics simulation of the CDK2 active kinase crystal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretov, D. A.; Kholmurodov, Kh. T.; Koltovaya, N. A.

    2007-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to analyze changes in the functionally significant structural elements of the crystal lattices of pT160-CDK2/cyclin and A/ATP-Mg2+/substrate complexes of the native (CDK2-G16) and mutant (CDK2-S16) active kinases at physiological temperatures (300 K). The structural rearrangement of ATP caused by changes in the kinase catalytic domain was studied. ATP was fixed by the ionic and H-bond interactions of several residues, including Lys33, Asp145, and side-chain amides of the G loop between β1 and β2. The binding of the kinases to complexes with cyclin and the phosphorylation of T160 in the active complex of the CDK2 kinase result in the ATP orientation more convenient for the transfer of the phosphate group to the substrate. An analysis of interatomic distances in the ATP active site region and Asp145, Asn132, Lys33 catalytic sites participating in the orientation of ATP phosphates revealed that the Asp 145 amino acid residue was situated noticeably closer to the ATP molecule in the native complex than in its mutant counterpart. The same is true of the arrangement of the Lys33 residue with respect to ATP.

  14. Differential Regulation of Progesterone Receptor-Mediated Transcription by CDK2 and DNA-PK.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Lindsey S; Bolt, Michael J; Grimm, Sandra L; Edwards, Dean P; Mancini, Michael A; Weigel, Nancy L

    2016-02-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) function is altered by cell signaling, but the mechanisms of kinase-specific regulation are not well defined. To examine the role of cell signaling in the regulation of PR transcriptional activity, we have utilized a previously developed mammalian-based estrogen-response element promoter array cell model and automated cell imaging and analysis platform to visualize and quantify effects of specific kinases on different mechanistic steps of PR-mediated target gene activation. For these studies, we generated stable estrogen-response element array cell lines expressing inducible chimeric PR that contains a swap of the estrogen receptor-α DNA-binding domain for the DNA-binding domain of PR. We have focused on 2 kinases important for steroid receptor activity: cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and DNA-dependent protein kinase. Treatment with either a Cdk1/2 inhibitor (NU6102) or a DNA-dependent protein kinase inhibitor (NU7441) decreased hormone-mediated chromatin decondensation and transcriptional activity. Further, we observed a quantitative reduction in the hormone-mediated recruitment of select coregulator proteins with NU6102 that is not observed with NU7441. In parallel, we determined the effect of kinase inhibition on hormone-mediated induction of primary and mature transcripts of endogenous genes in T47D breast cancer cells. Treatment with NU6102 was much more effective than NU7441, in inhibiting induction of PR target genes that exhibit a rapid increase in primary transcript expression in response to hormone. Taken together, these results indicate that the 2 kinases regulate PR transcriptional activity by distinct mechanisms.

  15. Understanding and modulating cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor specificity: molecular modeling and biochemical evaluation of pyrazolopyrimidinones as CDK2/cyclin A and CDK4/cyclin D1 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Karen A.; Markwalder, Jay A.; Seitz, Steven P.; Chang, Chong-Hwan; Cox, Sarah; Boisclair, Michael D.; Brizuela, Leonardo; Brenner, Stephen L.; Stouten, Pieter F. W.

    2005-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. The cyclins, their activating agents, and endogenous CDK inhibitors are frequently mutated in human cancers, making CDKs interesting targets for cancer chemotherapy. Our aim is the discovery of selective CDK4/cyclin D1 inhibitors. An ATP-competitive pyrazolopyrimidinone CDK inhibitor was identified by HTS and docked into a CDK4 homology model. The resulting binding model was consistent with available SAR and was validated by a subsequent CDK2/inhibitor crystal structure. An iterative cycle of chemistry and modeling led to a 70-fold improvement in potency. Small substituent changes resulted in large CDK4/CDK2 selectivity changes. The modeling revealed that selectivity is largely due to hydrogen-bonded interactions with only two kinase residues. This demonstrates that small differences between enzymes can efficiently be exploited in the design of selective inhibitors.

  16. ONIOM study of the nonbonding interaction of the 2PU inhibitor with the CDK2 and CDK4 cyclin-dependant kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aixiao; Maurel, François; Delamar, Michel; Wang, Baoshan

    We discuss in this article, the applicability of hybrid techniques [especially the our-own N-layered integrated molecular orbital and molecular mechanics (ONIOM) method] to weak chemical interactions in large systems, such as the interaction of cyclin-dependant kinases, CDK4, and CDK2, with a specific ligand (2PU) showing selectivity for CDK4. Our results show that the energies from the ONIOM calculations perfectly match our former molecular dynamics results, both for determining the amino acids which have strongest interactions with the ligand and for explaining the selectivity of 2PU towards CDK4, as compared with CDK2. We show that the ONIOM method is a good candidate for studying such interactions in large systems, even though there are still some technical and theoretical problems to solve. The calculation details will be presented together with the methodology we devised for using the ONIOM approach in such a context.

  17. Cyclin E/Cdk2, P/CAF, and E1A regulate the transactivation of the c-myc promoter by FOXM1

    SciTech Connect

    Wierstra, Inken Alves, Juergen

    2008-03-28

    FOXM1c transactivates the c-myc promoter by binding directly to its TATA-boxes. The present study demonstrates that the transactivation of the c-myc promoter by FOXM1c is enhanced by the key proliferation signal cyclin E/Cdk2, but repressed by P/CAF and the adenoviral oncoprotein E1A. Furthermore, FOXM1c interacts with the coactivator and histone acetyltransferase P/CAF. This study shows that, on the c-myc-P1 TATA-box, FOXM1c does not function simply as normal transcription factor just binding to an unusual site. Moreover, the inhibitory N-terminus of FOXM1c does not inhibit its transrepression domain or its EDA. Others reported that a cyclin/Cdk-binding LXL-motif of the splice variant FoxM1b is required for its interaction with Cdk2, Cdk1, and p27, its phosphorylation by Cdk1 and its activation by Cdc25B. In contrast, we now demonstrate that this LXL-motif is not required for the activation of FOXM1c by cyclin D1/Cdk4, cyclin E/Cdk and cyclin A/Cdk2 or for the repression of FOXM1c by p27.

  18. Briefly Bound to Activate: Transient Binding of a Second Catalytic Magnesium Activates the Structure and Dynamics of CDK2 Kinase for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Zhao Qin; Jacobsen, Douglas M.; Young, Matthew A.

    2014-10-02

    We have determined high-resolution crystal structures of a CDK2/Cyclin A transition state complex bound to ADP, substrate peptide, and MgF{sub 3}{sup -}. Compared to previous structures of active CDK2, the catalytic subunit of the kinase adopts a more closed conformation around the active site and now allows observation of a second Mg{sup 2+} ion in the active site. Coupled with a strong [Mg{sup 2+}] effect on in vitro kinase activity, the structures suggest that the transient binding of the second Mg{sup 2+} ion is necessary to achieve maximum rate enhancement of the chemical reaction, and Mg{sup 2+} concentration could represent an important regulator of CDK2 activity in vivo. Molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the simultaneous binding of substrate peptide, ATP, and two Mg{sup 2+} ions is able to induce a more rigid and closed organization of the active site that functions to orient the phosphates, stabilize the buildup of negative charge, and shield the subsequently activated {gamma}-phosphate from solvent.

  19. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, George; Dudkin, Sergii; Borkin, Dmitry; Ni, Wendi; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2015-04-29

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes.

  20. Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    2008-05-28

    The Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities (BEPro3) is a software tool for estimating probabilities of protein-protein association between bait and prey protein pairs using data from multiple-bait, multiple-replicate, protein LC-MS/MS affinity isolation experiments. BEPro3 is public domain software, has been tested on Windows XP and version 10.4 or newer of the Mac OS 10.4, and is freely available. A user guide, example dataset with analysis and additional documentation are included with the BEPro3 download.

  1. DEC1 regulates breast cancer cell proliferation by stabilizing cyclin E protein and delays the progression of cell cycle S phase

    PubMed Central

    Bi, H; Li, S; Qu, X; Wang, M; Bai, X; Xu, Z; Ao, X; Jia, Z; Jiang, X; Yang, Y; Wu, H

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer that is accompanied by a high level of cyclin E expression usually exhibits poor prognosis and clinical outcome. Several factors are known to regulate the level of cyclin E during the cell cycle progression. The transcription factor DEC1 (also known as STRA13 and SHARP2) plays an important role in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Nevertheless, the mechanism of its role in cell proliferation is poorly understood. In this study, using the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, we showed that DEC1 could inhibit the cell cycle progression of breast cancer cells independently of its transcriptional activity. The cell cycle-dependent timing of DEC1 overexpression could affect the progression of the cell cycle through regulating the level of cyclin E protein. DEC1 stabilized cyclin E at the protein level by interacting with cyclin E. Overexpression of DEC1 repressed the interaction between cyclin E and its E3 ligase Fbw7α, consequently reducing the level of polyunbiquitinated cyclin E and increased the accumulation of non-ubiquitinated cyclin E. Furthermore, DEC1 also promoted the nuclear accumulation of Cdk2 and the formation of cyclin E/Cdk2 complex, as well as upregulating the activity of the cyclin E/Cdk2 complex, which inhibited the subsequent association of cyclin A with Cdk2. This had the effect of prolonging the S phase and suppressing the growth of breast cancers in a mouse xenograft model. These events probably constitute the essential steps in DEC1-regulated cell proliferation, thus opening up the possibility of a protein-based molecular strategy for eliminating cancer cells that manifest a high-level expression of cyclin E. PMID:26402517

  2. Mammalian E-type cyclins control chromosome pairing, telomere stability and CDK2 localization in male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Martinerie, Laetitia; Manterola, Marcia; Chung, Sanny S W; Panigrahi, Sunil K; Weisbach, Melissa; Vasileva, Ana; Geng, Yan; Sicinski, Peter; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2014-02-01

    Loss of function of cyclin E1 or E2, important regulators of the mitotic cell cycle, yields viable mice, but E2-deficient males display reduced fertility. To elucidate the role of E-type cyclins during spermatogenesis, we characterized their expression patterns and produced additional deletions of Ccne1 and Ccne2 alleles in the germline, revealing unexpected meiotic functions. While Ccne2 mRNA and protein are abundantly expressed in spermatocytes, Ccne1 mRNA is present but its protein is detected only at low levels. However, abundant levels of cyclin E1 protein are detected in spermatocytes deficient in cyclin E2 protein. Additional depletion of E-type cyclins in the germline resulted in increasingly enhanced spermatogenic abnormalities and corresponding decreased fertility and loss of germ cells by apoptosis. Profound meiotic defects were observed in spermatocytes, including abnormal pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, heterologous chromosome associations, unrepaired double-strand DNA breaks, disruptions in telomeric structure and defects in cyclin-dependent-kinase 2 localization. These results highlight a new role for E-type cyclins as important regulators of male meiosis.

  3. Mammalian E-type Cyclins Control Chromosome Pairing, Telomere Stability and CDK2 Localization in Male Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sanny S. W.; Panigrahi, Sunil K.; Weisbach, Melissa; Vasileva, Ana; Geng, Yan; Sicinski, Peter; Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of function of cyclin E1 or E2, important regulators of the mitotic cell cycle, yields viable mice, but E2-deficient males display reduced fertility. To elucidate the role of E-type cyclins during spermatogenesis, we characterized their expression patterns and produced additional deletions of Ccne1 and Ccne2 alleles in the germline, revealing unexpected meiotic functions. While Ccne2 mRNA and protein are abundantly expressed in spermatocytes, Ccne1 mRNA is present but its protein is detected only at low levels. However, abundant levels of cyclin E1 protein are detected in spermatocytes deficient in cyclin E2 protein. Additional depletion of E-type cyclins in the germline resulted in increasingly enhanced spermatogenic abnormalities and corresponding decreased fertility and loss of germ cells by apoptosis. Profound meiotic defects were observed in spermatocytes, including abnormal pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, heterologous chromosome associations, unrepaired double-strand DNA breaks, disruptions in telomeric structure and defects in cyclin-dependent-kinase 2 localization. These results highlight a new role for E-type cyclins as important regulators of male meiosis. PMID:24586195

  4. Putting one step before the other: distinct activation pathways for Cdk1 and Cdk2 bring order to the mammalian cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Karl A; Fisher, Robert P

    2010-02-15

    Eukaryotic cell division is controlled by the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Cdk1 and Cdk2, which function at different stages of the mammalian cell cycle, both require cyclin-binding and phosphorylation of the activation (T-) loop for full activity, but differ with respect to the order in which the two steps occur in vivo. To form stable complexes with either of its partners-cyclins A and B-Cdk1 must be phosphorylated on its T-loop, but that phosphorylation in turn depends on the presence of cyclin. Cdk2 can follow a kinetically distinct path to activation in which T-loop phosphorylation precedes cyclin-binding, and thereby out-compete the more abundant Cdk1 for limiting amounts of cyclin A. Mathematical modeling suggests this could be a principal basis for the temporal ordering of CDK activation during S phase, which may dictate the sequence in which replication origins fire. Still to be determined are how: (1) the activation machinery discriminates between closely related CDKs, and (2) coordination of the cell cycle is affected when this mechanism of pathway insulation breaks down.

  5. Phenethyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression and the levels of protein associated with cell cycle regulation in human glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Chang, Shu-Jen; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain malignancy. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a member of the isothiocyanate family, can induce apoptosis in many human cancer cells. Our previous study disclosed that PEITC induces apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway, dysfunction of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathway in human brain glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) 8401 cells. To the best of our knowledge, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the genetic levels of GBM 8401 cells in vitro. PEITC may induce G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest through affecting the proteins such as cdk2, cyclin E, and p21 in GBM 8401 cells. Many genes associated with cell-cycle regulation of GBM 8401 cells were changed after PEITC treatment: 48 genes were upregulated and 118 were downregulated. The cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), Budding uninhibited by benzimidazole 1 homolog beta (BUB1B), and cyclin B1 were downregulated, and clusterin was upregulated in GBM 8401 cells treated with PEITC. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of PEITC on the genetic levels and potential biomarkers for glioblastoma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 176-187, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Chk1 is activated at the midblastula transition in Xenopus laevis embryos independently of DNA content and the cyclin E/Cdk2 developmental timer.

    PubMed

    Adjerid, Nassiba; Wroble, Brian N; Sible, Jill C

    2008-04-15

    Cell cycle checkpoints that are engaged in response to damaged and unreplicated DNA may serve additional, constitutive functions. In the developing Xenopus laevis embryo, the checkpoint kinase Chk1 is transiently activated at the midblastula transition (MBT), a period of extensive cell cycle remodeling including the acquisition of cell cycle checkpoints. The timing of many cell cycle remodeling events at the MBT, such as the lengthening of cell cycles, depends upon a critical nucleocytoplasmic (N/C) ratio. However, other events, including the degradation of maternal cyclin E, do not depend upon the N/C ratio, and are regulated by an autonomous developmental timer. To better understand what regulates Chk1 activation at the MBT, embryos were treated with aphidicolin, at different developmental times and for different lengths of time, to reduce the DNA content at the MBT. Chk1 was activated at the MBT in these embryos establishing that Chk1 activation occurs independently of the N/C ratio. Cdc25A is normally phosphorylated by Chk1 at the MBT and then degraded. The degradation of Cdc25A demonstrated partial dependence on DNA content, suggesting that factors other than Chk1 regulate its degradation. When the cyclin E developmental timer was disrupted with the Cdk2 inhibitor delta34-Xic1, Chk1 was still activated at the MBT, indicating that activation of Chk1 at the MBT was not directly linked to the cyclin E timer. Conversely, unreplicated or damaged DNA, delayed the degradation of cyclin E at the MBT, indicating that the cyclin E/Cdk2 timer is sensitive to engagement of cell cycle checkpoints.

  7. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein–Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, George; Dudkin, Sergii; Borkin, Dmitry; Ni, Wendi; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2014-11-25

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here in this paper, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes.

  8. Lin-28 Homologue A (LIN28A) Promotes Cell Cycle Progression via Regulation of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2), Cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Cell Division Cycle 25 Homolog A (CDC25A) Expression in Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L.; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1–17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent). PMID:22467868

  9. Lin-28 homologue A (LIN28A) promotes cell cycle progression via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and cell division cycle 25 homolog A (CDC25A) expression in cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-05-18

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1-17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent).

  10. Evolution of organelle-associated protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raines, Elaine W

    2009-02-15

    Identification of the protein constituents of cell organelles forms the basis for studies to define the roles of specific proteins in organelle structure and functions. Over the past decade, the use of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has dissected various organelles and allowed the association of many novel proteins with particular organelles. This review chronicles the evolution of organelle proteomics technology, and discusses how many limitations, such as organelle heterogeneity and purity, can be avoided with recently developed quantitative profiling approaches. Although many challenges remain, quantitative profiling of organelles holds the promise to begin to address the complex and dynamic shuttling of proteins among organelles that will be critical for application of this advanced technology to disease-based changes in organelle function.

  11. Phasins, Multifaceted Polyhydroxyalkanoate Granule-Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mezzina, Mariela P.

    2016-01-01

    Phasins are the major polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granule-associated proteins. They promote bacterial growth and PHA synthesis and affect the number, size, and distribution of the granules. These proteins can be classified in 4 families with distinctive characteristics. Low-resolution structural studies and in silico predictions were performed in order to elucidate the structure of different phasins. Most of these proteins share some common structural features, such as a preponderant α-helix composition, the presence of disordered regions that provide flexibility to the protein, and coiled-coil interacting regions that form oligomerization domains. Due to their amphiphilic nature, these proteins play an important structural function, forming an interphase between the hydrophobic content of PHA granules and the hydrophilic cytoplasm content. Phasins have been observed to affect both PHA accumulation and utilization. Apart from their role as granule structural proteins, phasins have a remarkable variety of additional functions. Different phasins have been determined to (i) activate PHA depolymerization, (ii) increase the expression and activity of PHA synthases, (iii) participate in PHA granule segregation, and (iv) have both in vivo and in vitro chaperone activities. These properties suggest that phasins might play an active role in PHA-related stress protection and fitness enhancement. Due to their granule binding capacity and structural flexibility, several biotechnological applications have been developed using different phasins, increasing the interest in the study of these remarkable proteins. PMID:27287326

  12. Tracking membrane protein association in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Reffay, Myriam; Gambin, Yann; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Phan, Gilles; Taulier, Nicolas; Ducruix, Arnaud; Hodges, Robert S; Urbach, Wladimir

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue.We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well.After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 A, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the bilayers. We extract a

  13. Multifunctional Microtubule-Associated Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Krtková, Jana; Benáková, Martina; Schwarzerová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are involved in key processes in plant cells, including cell division, growth and development. MT-interacting proteins modulate MT dynamics and organization, mediating functional and structural interaction of MTs with other cell structures. In addition to conventional microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) in plants, there are many other MT-binding proteins whose primary function is not related to the regulation of MTs. This review focuses on enzymes, chaperones, or proteins primarily involved in other processes that also bind to MTs. The MT-binding activity of these multifunctional MAPs is often performed only under specific environmental or physiological conditions, or they bind to MTs only as components of a larger MT-binding protein complex. The involvement of multifunctional MAPs in these interactions may underlie physiological and morphogenetic events, e.g., under specific environmental or developmental conditions. Uncovering MT-binding activity of these proteins, although challenging, may contribute to understanding of the novel functions of the MT cytoskeleton in plant biological processes. PMID:27148302

  14. Hydrophobic folding units at protein-protein interfaces: implications to protein folding and to protein-protein association.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Nussinov, R.

    1997-01-01

    A hydrophobic folding unit cutting algorithm, originally developed for dissecting single-chain proteins, has been applied to a dataset of dissimilar two-chain protein-protein interfaces. Rather than consider each individual chain separately, the two-chain complex has been treated as a single chain. The two-chain parsing results presented in this work show hydrophobicity to be a critical attribute of two-state versus three-state protein-protein complexes. The hydrophobic folding units at the interfaces of two-state complexes suggest that the cooperative nature of the two-chain protein folding is the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, similar to its being the driving force in a single-chain folding. In analogy to the protein-folding process, the two-chain, two-state model complex may correspond to the formation of compact, hydrophobic nuclei. On the other hand, the three-state model complex involves binding of already folded monomers, similar to the association of the hydrophobic folding units within a single chain. The similarity between folding entities in protein cores and in two-state protein-protein interfaces, despite the absence of some chain connectivities in the latter, indicates that chain linkage does not necessarily affect the native conformation. This further substantiates the notion that tertiary, non-local interactions play a critical role in protein folding. These compact, hydrophobic, two-chain folding units, derived from structurally dissimilar protein-protein interfaces, provide a rich set of data useful in investigations of the role played by chain connectivity and by tertiary interactions in studies of binding and of folding. Since they are composed of non-contiguous pieces of protein backbones, they may also aid in defining folding nuclei. PMID:9232644

  15. Sneddon syndrome associated with Protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Refah; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Tombul, Temel

    2012-01-01

    Sneddon syndrome (SS) is rare, arterio-occlusive disorder characterized by generalized livedo racemosa of the skin and various central nervous symptoms due to occlusion of medium-sized arteries of unknown. Seizure, cognitive impairment, hypertension, and history of repetitive miscarriages are the other symptoms seen in this disease. Livedo racemosa involves persisting irreversible skin lesions red or blue in color with irregular margins. Usually, SS occurs in women of childbearing age. Protein S deficiency is an inherited or acquired disorder associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We present a 33-year-old woman with SS with diffuse livedo racemosa, recurrent cerebrovascular diseases, migraine-type headache, sinus vein thrombosis, and protein S deficiency. Protein S deficiency and with Sneddon syndrome rarely encountered in the literature.

  16. Activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Meikrantz, W; Gisselbrecht, S; Tam, S W; Schlegel, R

    1994-01-01

    Apoptosis was induced in S-phase-arrested HeLa cells by staurosporine, caffeine, 6-dimethylaminopurine, and okadaic acid, agents that activate M-phase-promoting factor and induce premature mitosis in similarly treated hamster cell lines. Addition of these agents to asynchronously growing HeLa cells or to cells arrested in early G1 phase with lovastatin had little or no effect. S-phase arrest also promoted tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis, eliminating the normal requirement for simultaneous cycloheximide treatment. For all of the apoptosis-inducing agents tested, the appearance of condensed chromatin was accompanied by 2- to 7-fold increases in cyclin A-associated histone H1 kinase activity, levels approximating the mitotic value. Where examined, both Cdc2 and Cdk2, the catalytic subunits known to associate with cyclin A, were activated. Stable overexpression of bcl-2 suppressed the apoptosis-inducing activity of all agents tested and reduced the amount of Cdc2 and Cdk2 in the nucleus, suggesting a possible mechanism by which bcl-2 inhibits the chromatin condensation characteristic of apoptosis. These findings suggest that at least one of the biochemical steps required for mitosis, activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases, is also an important event during apoptosis. Images PMID:8170983

  17. Ribosome-associated protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Brandman, Onn; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis by the ribosome can fail for numerous reasons including faulty mRNA, insufficient availability of charged tRNAs and genetic errors. All organisms have evolved mechanisms to recognize stalled ribosomes and initiate pathways for recycling, quality control and stress signaling. Here we review the discovery and molecular dissection of the eukaryotic ribosome-associated quality-control pathway for degradation of nascent polypeptides arising from interrupted translation. PMID:26733220

  18. CDK2 and PKA mediated-sequential phosphorylation is critical for p19INK4d function in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Marazita, Mariela C; Ogara, M Florencia; Sonzogni, Silvina V; Martí, Marcelo; Dusetti, Nelson J; Pignataro, Omar P; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2012-01-01

    DNA damage triggers a phosphorylation-based signaling cascade known as the DNA damage response. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK4/6 inhibitors, has been reported to participate in the DNA damage response promoting DNA repair and cell survival. Here, we provide mechanistic insight into the activation mechanism of p19INK4d linked to the response to DNA damage. Results showed that p19INK4d becomes phosphorylated following UV radiation, β-amyloid peptide and cisplatin treatments. ATM-Chk2/ATR-Chk1 signaling pathways were found to be differentially involved in p19INK4d phosphorylation depending on the type of DNA damage. Two sequential phosphorylation events at serine 76 and threonine 141 were identified using p19INK4d single-point mutants in metabolic labeling assays with (32)P-orthophosphate. CDK2 and PKA were found to participate in p19INK4d phosphorylation process and that they would mediate serine 76 and threonine 141 modifications respectively. Nuclear translocation of p19INK4d induced by DNA damage was shown to be dependent on serine 76 phosphorylation. Most importantly, both phosphorylation sites were found to be crucial for p19INK4d function in DNA repair and cell survival. In contrast, serine 76 and threonine 141 were dispensable for CDK4/6 inhibition highlighting the independence of p19INK4d functions, in agreement with our previous findings. These results constitute the first description of the activation mechanism of p19INK4d in response to genotoxic stress and demonstrate the functional relevance of this activation following DNA damage.

  19. Molecular modeling studies of 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-h] quinazoline derivatives as potent CDK2/Cyclin a inhibitors using 3D-QSAR and docking.

    PubMed

    Ai, Yong; Wang, Shao-Teng; Sun, Ping-Hua; Song, Fa-Jun

    2010-09-28

    CDK2/cyclin A has appeared as an attractive drug targets over the years with diverse therapeutic potentials. A computational strategy based on comparative molecular fields analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) followed by molecular docking studies were performed on a series of 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-h]quinazoline derivatives as potent CDK2/cyclin A inhibitors. The CoMFA and CoMSIA models, using 38 molecules in the training set, gave r(2) (cv) values of 0.747 and 0.518 and r(2) values of 0.970 and 0.934, respectively. 3D contour maps generated by the CoMFA and CoMSIA models were used to identify the key structural requirements responsible for the biological activity. Molecular docking was applied to explore the binding mode between the ligands and the receptor. The information obtained from molecular modeling studies may be helpful to design novel inhibitors of CDK2/cyclin A with desired activity.

  20. Molecular Modeling Studies of 4,5-Dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-h] quinazoline Derivatives as Potent CDK2/Cyclin A Inhibitors Using 3D-QSAR and Docking

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Yong; Wang, Shao-Teng; Sun, Ping-Hua; Song, Fa-Jun

    2010-01-01

    CDK2/cyclin A has appeared as an attractive drug targets over the years with diverse therapeutic potentials. A computational strategy based on comparative molecular fields analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) followed by molecular docking studies were performed on a series of 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-h]quinazoline derivatives as potent CDK2/cyclin A inhibitors. The CoMFA and CoMSIA models, using 38 molecules in the training set, gave r2cv values of 0.747 and 0.518 and r2 values of 0.970 and 0.934, respectively. 3D contour maps generated by the CoMFA and CoMSIA models were used to identify the key structural requirements responsible for the biological activity. Molecular docking was applied to explore the binding mode between the ligands and the receptor. The information obtained from molecular modeling studies may be helpful to design novel inhibitors of CDK2/cyclin A with desired activity. PMID:21152296

  1. Microtubule-associated proteins from Antarctic fishes.

    PubMed

    Detrich, H W; Neighbors, B W; Sloboda, R D; Williams, R C

    1990-01-01

    Microtubules and presumptive microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) were isolated from the brain tissues of four Antarctic fishes (Notothenia gibberifrons, N. coriiceps neglecta, Chaenocephalus aceratus, and a Chionodraco sp.) by means of a taxol-dependent, microtubule-affinity procedure (cf. Vallee: Journal of Cell Biology 92:435-442, 1982). MAPs from these fishes were similar to each other in electrophoretic pattern. Prominent in each preparation were proteins in the molecular weight ranges 410,000-430,000, 220,000-280,000, 140,000-155,000, 85,000-95,000, 40,000-45,000, and 32,000-34,000. The surfaces of MAP-rich microtubules were decorated by numerous filamentous projections. Exposure to elevated ionic strength released the MAPs from the microtubules and also removed the filamentous projections. Addition of fish MAPs to subcritical concentrations of fish tubulins at 0-5 degrees C induced the assembly of microtubules. Both the rate and the extent of this assembly increased with increasing concentrations of the MAPs. Sedimentation revealed that approximately six proteins, with apparent molecular weights between 60,000 and 300,000, became incorporated into the microtubule polymer. Bovine MAPs promoted microtubule formation by fish tubulin at 2-5 degrees C, and proteins corresponding to MAPs 1 and 2 co-sedimented with the polymer. MAPs from C. aceratus also enhanced the polymerization of bovine tubulin at 33 degrees C, but the microtubules depolymerized at 0 degrees C. We conclude that MAPs are part of the microtubules of Antarctic fishes, that these proteins promote microtubule assembly in much the same way as mammalian MAPs, and that they do not possess special capacities to promote microtubule assembly at low temperatures or to prevent cold-induced microtubule depolymerization.

  2. Protein-Associated Lipid of Bacillus stearothermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Card, George L.; Szuba, Joan C.; Shimizu, Marilyn

    1979-01-01

    The composition and patterns of metabolism of phospholipids isolated as part of a lipid-depleted membrane fragment (LDM fragment) and associated with the membrane adenosine triphosphatase complex have been compared with those of the bulk membrane phospholipid. The bulk lipid was extracted from washed membranes with sodium cholate. The LDM fragments, which contained a portion of the electron transport system and the membrane adenosine triphosphatase complex, were purified by chromatography with Sepharose 6B. The LDM fragment preparations contained 0.10 ± 0.02 μmol of lipid phosphorus per mg of protein, compared with 0.54 ± 0.05 μmol of lipid phosphorus per mg of protein for washed membranes. The phospholipid associated with the LDM fragments consisted of 78 ± 4% cardiolipin, 7 ± 1% phosphatidylglycerol, and 15 ± 3% phosphatidylethanolamine. Changes in the total membrane lipid composition (produced by culture conditions) did not alter the phospholipid composition of the LDM fragments. The adenosine triphosphate complex was separated from the other components of the LDM fragments by suspension of the fragments in 1% Triton X-100 and precipitation with antibody specific for the F1 component of the adenosine triphosphatase complex. The phospholipid isolated with the adenosine triphosphatase complex consisted of 86% cardiolipin, 8% phosphatidylglycerol, and 6% phosphatidylethanolamine. In pulse-chase experiments with 32P and [2-3H]glycerol, the labeling patterns of the phosphatididylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine associated with the LDM fragments were different from those of the bulk membrane phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. It was concluded that at least a portion of the phospholipid isolated with the LDM fragments was part of a native lipid-protein complex. PMID:159285

  3. Overexpression of Cyclin A Inhibits Augmentation of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Transduction by the Adenovirus E4orf6 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Grifman, Mirta; Chen, Nancie N.; Gao, Guang-ping; Cathomen, Toni; Wilson, James M.; Weitzman, Matthew D.

    1999-01-01

    The 34-kDa product of adenovirus E4 region open reading frame 6 (E4orf6) dramatically enhances transduction by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors (rAAV). This is achieved by promoting the conversion of incoming single-stranded viral genomes into transcriptionally competent duplex molecules. The molecular mechanism for enhancing second-strand synthesis is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed the cellular consequences of E4orf6 expression and the requirements for efficient rAAV transduction mediated by E4orf6. Expression of E4orf6 in 293 cells led to an inhibition of cell cycle progression and an accumulation of cells in S phase. This was preceded by specific degradation of cyclin A and p53, while the levels of other proteins involved in cell cycle control remained unchanged. In addition, the kinase activity of cdc2 was inhibited. We further showed that p53 expression is not necessary or inhibitory for augmentation of rAAV transduction by E4orf6. However, overexpression of cyclin A inhibited E4orf6-mediated enhancement of rAAV transduction. A cyclin A mutant incapable of recruiting protein substrates for cdk2 was unable to inhibit E4orf6-mediated augmentation. In addition, we created an E4orf6 mutant that is selectively defective in rAAV augmentation of transduction. Based on these findings, we suggest that cyclin A degradation represents a viral mechanism to disrupt cell cycle progression, resulting in enhanced viral transduction. Understanding the cellular pathways used during transduction will increase the utility of rAAV vectors in a wide range of gene therapy applications. PMID:10559315

  4. Characterization of microtubule-associated protein 1-associated protein kinases from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Watanabe, M; Nakamura, A

    1996-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 1 preparation, MAP1A and 1B, obtained from rat brain microtubules was associated with protein kinases that were insensitive to cAMP, cGMP, calcium, calcium/calmodulin and calcium/phosphatidylserine. The fractionation of highly purified MAP1 by phosphocellulose chromatography revealed that protein kinase activity to phosphorylate phosvitin was separated into three major peaks (MAP1 kinases A, B and C). MAP1 was recovered in the MAP1 kinase A fraction and phosphorylated by the contained kinase. MAP1 kinase A is a novel protein kinase that is remarkably activated by poly-L-lysine and poly-L-arginine, but very insensitive to heparin among the kinases. Photoaffinity labeling using [alpha-32P]8-azido ATP indicated that the 65 kDa polypeptide is identified as an ATP-binding protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the highly purified MAP1 and MAP1 kinase A fractions. MAP1 kinases B and C may be identified as casein kinase I- and II-like kinases. The present results show that MAP1 is associated with at least three kinases and provide an insight for understanding thoroughly the MAP1-mediated microtubule functions.

  5. A Novel High-Throughput 3D Screening System for EMT Inhibitors: A Pilot Screening Discovered the EMT Inhibitory Activity of CDK2 Inhibitor SU9516

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Takanori; Rahman, M. Mamunur; Sakamoto, Ruriko; Masuda, Norio; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Calderwood, Stuart K.; Kozaki, Ken-ichi; Itoh, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial pathological event in cancer, particularly in tumor cell budding and metastasis. Therefore, control of EMT can represent a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer. Here, we introduce an innovative three-dimensional (3D) high-throughput screening (HTS) system that leads to an identification of EMT inhibitors. For the establishment of the novel 3D-HTS system, we chose NanoCulture Plates (NCP) that provided a gel-free micro-patterned scaffold for cells and were independent of other spheroid formation systems using soft-agar. In the NCP-based 3D cell culture system, A549 lung cancer cells migrated, gathered, and then formed multiple spheroids within 7 days. Live cell imaging experiments showed that an established EMT-inducer TGF-β promoted peripheral cells around the core of spheroids to acquire mesenchymal spindle shapes, loss of intercellular adhesion, and migration from the spheroids. Along with such morphological change, EMT-related gene expression signatures were altered, particularly alteration of mRNA levels of ECAD/CDH1, NCAD/CDH2, VIM and ZEB1/TCF8. These EMT-related phenotypic changes were blocked by SB431542, a TGF-βreceptor I (TGFβR1) inhibitor. Inside of the spheroids were highly hypoxic; in contrast, spheroid-derived peripheral migrating cells were normoxic, revealed by visualization and quantification using Hypoxia Probe. Thus, TGF-β-triggered EMT caused spheroid hypoplasia and loss of hypoxia. Spheroid EMT inhibitory (SEMTIN) activity of SB431542 was calculated from fluorescence intensities of the Hypoxia Probe, and then was utilized in a drug screening of EMT-inhibitory small molecule compounds. In a pilot screening, 9 of 1,330 compounds were above the thresholds of the SEMTIN activity and cell viability. Finally, two compounds SB-525334 and SU9516 showed SEMTIN activities in a dose dependent manner. SB-525334 was a known TGFβR1 inhibitor. SU9516 was a cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) inhibitor

  6. A Novel High-Throughput 3D Screening System for EMT Inhibitors: A Pilot Screening Discovered the EMT Inhibitory Activity of CDK2 Inhibitor SU9516.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kazuya; Eguchi, Takanori; Rahman, M Mamunur; Sakamoto, Ruriko; Masuda, Norio; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Calderwood, Stuart K; Kozaki, Ken-Ichi; Itoh, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial pathological event in cancer, particularly in tumor cell budding and metastasis. Therefore, control of EMT can represent a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer. Here, we introduce an innovative three-dimensional (3D) high-throughput screening (HTS) system that leads to an identification of EMT inhibitors. For the establishment of the novel 3D-HTS system, we chose NanoCulture Plates (NCP) that provided a gel-free micro-patterned scaffold for cells and were independent of other spheroid formation systems using soft-agar. In the NCP-based 3D cell culture system, A549 lung cancer cells migrated, gathered, and then formed multiple spheroids within 7 days. Live cell imaging experiments showed that an established EMT-inducer TGF-β promoted peripheral cells around the core of spheroids to acquire mesenchymal spindle shapes, loss of intercellular adhesion, and migration from the spheroids. Along with such morphological change, EMT-related gene expression signatures were altered, particularly alteration of mRNA levels of ECAD/CDH1, NCAD/CDH2, VIM and ZEB1/TCF8. These EMT-related phenotypic changes were blocked by SB431542, a TGF-βreceptor I (TGFβR1) inhibitor. Inside of the spheroids were highly hypoxic; in contrast, spheroid-derived peripheral migrating cells were normoxic, revealed by visualization and quantification using Hypoxia Probe. Thus, TGF-β-triggered EMT caused spheroid hypoplasia and loss of hypoxia. Spheroid EMT inhibitory (SEMTIN) activity of SB431542 was calculated from fluorescence intensities of the Hypoxia Probe, and then was utilized in a drug screening of EMT-inhibitory small molecule compounds. In a pilot screening, 9 of 1,330 compounds were above the thresholds of the SEMTIN activity and cell viability. Finally, two compounds SB-525334 and SU9516 showed SEMTIN activities in a dose dependent manner. SB-525334 was a known TGFβR1 inhibitor. SU9516 was a cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) inhibitor

  7. Structure prediction of magnetosome-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nudelman, Hila; Zarivach, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are Gram-negative bacteria that can navigate along geomagnetic fields. This ability is a result of a unique intracellular organelle, the magnetosome. These organelles are composed of membrane-enclosed magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) crystals ordered into chains along the cell. Magnetosome formation, assembly, and magnetic nano-crystal biomineralization are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins (MAPs). Most MAP-encoding genes are located in a conserved genomic region – the magnetosome island (MAI). The MAI appears to be conserved in all MTB that were analyzed so far, although the MAI size and organization differs between species. It was shown that MAI deletion leads to a non-magnetic phenotype, further highlighting its important role in magnetosome formation. Today, about 28 proteins are known to be involved in magnetosome formation, but the structures and functions of most MAPs are unknown. To reveal the structure–function relationship of MAPs we used bioinformatics tools in order to build homology models as a way to understand their possible role in magnetosome formation. Here we present a predicted 3D structural models’ overview for all known Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 MAPs. PMID:24523717

  8. Associations between individual cow factors and milk-protein production.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, J M; Martin, S W; Lissemore, K D; Leslie, K E; Gibson, J P; Scott, H M; Kelton, D F

    1998-02-06

    Associations between stage of lactation, cow characteristics, and protein production were evaluated using data from a 2-year period on 75 Ontario, 5 Alberta, and 3 Nova Scotia dairy farms. Individual-cow protein production was defined by 305-day protein yield and by the estimated breeding value for protein yield. Lactation curves for average daily protein yield were computed by parity, breed, and season of calving. Mean protein yield was highest in early lactation. However, there was no pronounced peak in daily protein yield. Parity was positively associated with 305-day protein yield and negatively associated with the estimated breeding values for protein yield. First-calf heifers had lower protein yields in early lactation and a slower rate of decline in protein yield in late lactation, as compared to later parity cows. Holstein cows had higher unadjusted protein yields and lower protein yields after adjusting for milk yield than other breeds. Holstein cows had significantly higher protein yields early in lactation compared to other breeds, but the rate of decline in protein production in late lactation was also greater. Season was associated with 305-day protein yield; the highest protein yields occurred in cows calving in the fall and winter months, but these cows had the greatest rate of decline in protein production in late lactation.

  9. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Phosphorylates S/T-P Sites in the Hepadnavirus Core Protein C-Terminal Domain and Is Incorporated into Viral Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Ludgate, Laurie; Ning, Xiaojun; Nguyen, David H.; Adams, Christina; Mentzer, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is important for viral RNA packaging, reverse transcription, and subcellular localization. Hepadnavirus capsids also package a cellular kinase. The identity of the host kinase that phosphorylates the core CTD or gets packaged remains to be resolved. In particular, both the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core CTDs harbor several conserved serine/threonine-proline (S/T-P) sites whose phosphorylation state is known to regulate CTD functions. We report here that the endogenous kinase in the HBV capsids was blocked by chemical inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), in particular, CDK2 inhibitors. The kinase phosphorylated the HBV CTD at the serine-proline (S-P) sites. Furthermore, we were able to detect CDK2 in purified HBV capsids by immunoblotting. Purified CDK2 phosphorylated the S/T-P sites of the HBV and DHBV CTD in vitro. Inhibitors of CDKs, of CDK2 in particular, decreased both HBV and DHBV CTD phosphorylation in vivo. Moreover, CDK2 inhibitors blocked DHBV CTD phosphorylation, specifically at the S/T-P sites, in a mammalian cell lysate. These results indicate that cellular CDK2 phosphorylates the functionally critical S/T-P sites of the hepadnavirus core CTD and is incorporated into viral capsids. PMID:22951823

  10. Golgi linked protein glycosylation and associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Ungar, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    One of the Golgi's main functions is the glycosylation of secreted proteins. A large variety of glycan chains can be synthesized in the Golgi, and it is increasingly clear that these are critical in basic cellular functions as well as the development of multicellular organisms. The structurally best-documented glycans are N-glycans, yet these are also the most enigmatic in their function. In contrast, O-glycan function is far better understood, but here the structures and biosynthetic pathways are very incomplete. The critical importance of glycans is highlighted by the broad spectrum of diseases they are associated with, such as a number of inherited diseases, but also cancers or diabetes. The molecular clues to these, however, are only just being elucidated. Although some glycan structures are known to be involved in signaling or adhesion to the extracellular matrix, for most the functions are not yet known. This review aims at summarizing current knowledge as much as to point out critical areas key for future progress.

  11. TTRAP is a novel PML nuclear bodies-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Guanlan; Pan Yukun; Wang Bingyin; Huang Lu; Tian Ling; Xue Jinglun; Chen Jinzhong Jia, William

    2008-10-24

    PML nuclear body (PML NB) is an important macromolecular nuclear structure that is involved in many essential aspects of cellular function. Tens of proteins have been found in PML NBs, and promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) has been proven to be essential for the formation of this structure. Here, we showed that TRAF and TNF receptor-associated protein (TTRAP) was a novel PML NBs-associated protein. TTRAP colocalized with three important PML NBs-associated proteins, PML, DAXX and Sp100 in the typical fashion of PML NBs. By yeast mating assay, TTRAP was identified to interact with these PML NBs-associated proteins. The transcription and expression of TTRAP could be induced by IFN-{gamma}, representing another common feature of PML NBs-associated proteins. These results would not only be important for understanding PML NBs but also be helpful in studying the TTRAP function in the future.

  12. HIV-associated thromboembolic phenomenon due to protein C deficiency.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Anmol; Shah, Ira

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals are at a high risk of developing arterial and venous thromboembolism. Opportunistic infections, protease inhibitors, low CD4 count, antiphospholipid antibodies, protein S, and protein C deficiencies are some important risk factors associated with it. However, thromboembolic phenomenon due to protein C deficiency has been rarely reported. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with facial palsy due to middle cerebral artery infarct because of HIV infection and associated protein C deficiency.

  13. Downregulation of telomerase activity by diclofenac and curcumin is associated with cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Rana, Chandan; Piplani, Honit; Vaish, Vivek; Nehru, Bimla; Sanyal, S N

    2015-08-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation is the hallmark of cancer, and cancer cells have typically acquired damage to genes that directly regulate their cell cycles. The synthesis of DNA onto the end of chromosome during the replicative phase of cell cycle by telomerase may be necessary for unlimited proliferation of cells. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme is considered as a universal therapeutic target of cancer because of its preferential expression in cancer cells and its presence in 90 % of tumors. We studied the regulation of telomerase and telomerase reverse transcriptase catalytic subunit (TERT) by diclofenac and curcumin, alone and also in combination, in 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride-induced colorectal cancer in rats. The relationship of telomerase activity with tumors suppressor proteins (p51, Rb, p21), cell cycle machinery, and apoptosis was also studied. Telomerase is highly expressed in DMH group and its high activity is associated with increased TERT expression. However, telomerase is absent or is present at lower levels in normal tissue. CDK4, CDK2, cyclin D1, and cyclin E are highly expressed in DMH as assessed by RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence analysis. Diclofenac and curcumin overcome these carcinogenic effects by downregulating telomerase activity, diminishing the expression of TERT, CDK4, CDK2, cyclin D1, and cyclin E. The anticarcinogenic effects shown after the inhibition of telomerase activity by diclofenac and curcumin may be associated with upregulation of tumor suppressor proteins p51, Rb, and p21, whose activation induces the cells cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  14. Desmoglein-2 is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer tissues and its knockdown suppresses NSCLC growth by regulation of p27 and CDK2.

    PubMed

    Cai, Feng; Zhu, Qingqing; Miao, Yingying; Shen, Simei; Su, Xin; Shi, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Desmoglein-2 (Dsg2) is a cell adhesion protein of the cadherin superfamily. Altered Dsg2 expression is associated with tumorigenesis. This study determined Dsg2 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue specimens for association with clinicopathological and survival data and then assessed the effect of Dsg2 knockdown on regulation of NSCLC cell malignant behaviors in vitro and in nude mouse xenografts. qRT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect Dsg2 expression in 28 paired NSCLC and normal tissue samples. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect Dsg2 expression in 70 cases of paraffin-embedded NSCLC tissues. NSCLC A549, H1703, and H1299 cells were cultured with Dsg2 knockdown performed using Dsg2 siRNA. Cell viability, cell cycle, apoptosis, and colony formation were assessed. siRNA-transfected A549 cells were also used to generate tumor xenografts in nude mice. Both Dsg2 mRNA and protein were highly expressed in NSCLC tissues and associated with NSCLC size, but not with overall survival of patients. Moreover, knockdown of Dsg2 expression reduced NSCLC cell proliferation and arrested them at the G1 phase of the cell cycle, but did not significantly affect NSCLC cell apoptosis. Dsg2 knockdown downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 expression and upregulated p27 expression. Nude mouse xenograft assays showed that Dsg2 knockdown inhibited NSCLC xenograft growth in vivo. This study revealed the importance of Dsg2 in suppression of NSCLC development and progression. Further studies will explore whether restoration of Dsg2 expression is a novel strategy in control of NSCLC.

  15. Cloning and mapping of Np95 gene which encodes a novel nuclear protein associated with cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, A; Matsuda, Y; Takemoto, Y; Hashimoto, Y; Kubo, E; Araki, R; Fukumura, R; Mita, K; Tatsumi, K; Muto, M

    1998-12-01

    We previously obtained a monoclonal antibody (Th-10a mAb) that recognizes a single 95-kDa mouse nuclear protein (NP95). Immunostaining analyses revealed that the NP95 was specifically stained in the S phase of normal mouse thymocytes. In contrast, mouse T cell lymphoma cells exhibited a constantly high level of NP95 accumulation irrespective of cell stages during the cell cycle. In the present study, we isolated the cDNA encoding the NP95 from a lambdagt-11 cDNA expression library, using the Th-10a mAb. Sequencing of the whole 3.5-kb cDNA revealed that NP95 is a novel nuclear protein with an open reading frame (ORF) consisting of 782 amino acids. The ORF contains a zinc finger motif, a potential ATP/GTP binding site, a putative cyclin A/E-cdk2 phosphorylation site, and the retinoblastoma protein (RB)-binding motif "IXCXE". The chromosomal location of Np95 gene was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Np95 gene locates on mouse Chromosome (Chr) 17DE1.1. and rat Chr 9q11.2-q12.1. Np95 was strongly expressed in the testis, spleen, thymus, and lung tissues, but not in the brain, liver, or skeletal muscles. These results collectively implicate this novel nuclear protein in cell cycle progression and/or DNA replication.

  16. Determination of reversible protein equilibrium association coefficients using light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The characterization in solution of reversible protein associations as well as associations between proteins and small molecules is essential in many areas of science. Understanding cellular function or developing and formulating pharmaceuticals or other biologically active materials often requires quantitation of such associations. Most pharmaceuticals have functionality due solely to association with molecules within the body, and the discovery and accurate characterization of these associations is a key element for pharmaceutical development. Unfortunately, most methods used to measure associations of proteins require either immobilizing the protein on a surface (e.g. surface plasmon resonance), which potentially alters the protein characteristics, or require considerable time and effort and large quantities of sample (e.g. analytical ultracentrifugation, isothermal titration calorimetry). Light scattering based measurements of reversible association coefficients require much less sample and may be performed much more rapidly than other free solution techniques. In this talk I describe how static and dynamic light scattering may each independently be used to measure equilibrium association coefficients between proteins in free solution, and may also be used to observe and quantitate the association of small molecules with them. I present background theory for both static and dynamic light scattering measurements of equilibrium associations, and examples of measurements made of both model systems and of systems with commercial relevance in the pharmaceutical industry.

  17. Dynein light chain association sequences can facilitate nuclear protein import.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Gregory W; Roth, Daniela Martino; DeJesus, Michelle A; Leyton, Denisse L; Filmer, Richard P; Pouton, Colin W; Jans, David A

    2007-08-01

    Nuclear localization sequence (NLS)-dependent nuclear protein import is not conventionally held to require interaction with microtubules (MTs) or components of the MT motor, dynein. Here we report for the first time the role of sequences conferring association with dynein light chains (DLCs) in NLS-dependent nuclear accumulation of the rabies virus P-protein. We find that P-protein nuclear accumulation is significantly enhanced by its dynein light chain association sequence (DLC-AS), dependent on MT integrity and association with DLCs, and that P-protein-DLC complexes can associate with MT cytoskeletal structures. We also find that P-protein DLC-AS, as well as analogous sequences from other proteins, acts as an independent module that can confer enhancement of nuclear accumulation to proteins carrying the P-protein NLS, as well as several heterologous NLSs. Photobleaching experiments in live cells demonstrate that the MT-dependent enhancement of NLS-mediated nuclear accumulation by the P-protein DLC-AS involves an increased rate of nuclear import. This is the first report of DLC-AS enhancement of NLS function, identifying a novel mechanism regulating nuclear transport with relevance to viral and cellular protein biology. Importantly, this data indicates that DLC-ASs represent versatile modules to enhance nuclear delivery with potential therapeutic application.

  18. Neurodegenerative diseases and widespread aggregation are associated with supersaturated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ciryam, Prajwal; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Morimoto, Richard I.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Summary The maintenance of protein solubility is a fundamental aspect of protein homeostasis, as aggregation is associated with cytotoxicity and a variety of human diseases. Numerous proteins unrelated in sequence and structure, however, can misfold and aggregate, and widespread aggregation can occur in living systems under stress or ageing. A crucial question in this context is why only certain proteins aggregate in vivo while others do not. We identify here the proteins most vulnerable to aggregation as those whose cellular concentrations are high relative to their solubilities. These supersaturated proteins represent a metastable sub-proteome involved in pathological aggregation during stress and ageing, and are overrepresented in biochemical processes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Consequently, such cellular processes become dysfunctional when the ability to keep intrinsically supersaturated proteins soluble is compromised. Thus, the simultaneous analysis of abundance and solubility can rationalize the diverse cellular pathologies linked to neurodegenerative diseases and aging. PMID:24183671

  19. Reverse Nearest Neighbor Search on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network to Infer Protein-Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Suratanee, Apichat; Plaimas, Kitiporn

    2017-01-01

    The associations between proteins and diseases are crucial information for investigating pathological mechanisms. However, the number of known and reliable protein-disease associations is quite small. In this study, an analysis framework to infer associations between proteins and diseases was developed based on a large data set of a human protein-protein interaction network integrating an effective network search, namely, the reverse k-nearest neighbor (RkNN) search. The RkNN search was used to identify an impact of a protein on other proteins. Then, associations between proteins and diseases were inferred statistically. The method using the RkNN search yielded a much higher precision than a random selection, standard nearest neighbor search, or when applying the method to a random protein-protein interaction network. All protein-disease pair candidates were verified by a literature search. Supporting evidence for 596 pairs was identified. In addition, cluster analysis of these candidates revealed 10 promising groups of diseases to be further investigated experimentally. This method can be used to identify novel associations to better understand complex relationships between proteins and diseases. PMID:28757797

  20. Reverse Nearest Neighbor Search on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network to Infer Protein-Disease Associations.

    PubMed

    Suratanee, Apichat; Plaimas, Kitiporn

    2017-01-01

    The associations between proteins and diseases are crucial information for investigating pathological mechanisms. However, the number of known and reliable protein-disease associations is quite small. In this study, an analysis framework to infer associations between proteins and diseases was developed based on a large data set of a human protein-protein interaction network integrating an effective network search, namely, the reverse k-nearest neighbor (RkNN) search. The RkNN search was used to identify an impact of a protein on other proteins. Then, associations between proteins and diseases were inferred statistically. The method using the RkNN search yielded a much higher precision than a random selection, standard nearest neighbor search, or when applying the method to a random protein-protein interaction network. All protein-disease pair candidates were verified by a literature search. Supporting evidence for 596 pairs was identified. In addition, cluster analysis of these candidates revealed 10 promising groups of diseases to be further investigated experimentally. This method can be used to identify novel associations to better understand complex relationships between proteins and diseases.

  1. Integrated protein function prediction by mining function associations, sequences, and protein-protein and gene-gene interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-15

    Protein function prediction is an important and challenging problem in bioinformatics and computational biology. Functionally relevant biological information such as protein sequences, gene expression, and protein-protein interactions has been used mostly separately for protein function prediction. One of the major challenges is how to effectively integrate multiple sources of both traditional and new information such as spatial gene-gene interaction networks generated from chromosomal conformation data together to improve protein function prediction. In this work, we developed three different probabilistic scores (MIS, SEQ, and NET score) to combine protein sequence, function associations, and protein-protein interaction and spatial gene-gene interaction networks for protein function prediction. The MIS score is mainly generated from homologous proteins found by PSI-BLAST search, and also association rules between Gene Ontology terms, which are learned by mining the Swiss-Prot database. The SEQ score is generated from protein sequences. The NET score is generated from protein-protein interaction and spatial gene-gene interaction networks. These three scores were combined in a new Statistical Multiple Integrative Scoring System (SMISS) to predict protein function. We tested SMISS on the data set of 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA). The method performed substantially better than three base-line methods and an advanced method based on protein profile-sequence comparison, profile-profile comparison, and domain co-occurrence networks according to the maximum F-measure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Mechanism of Action of Unique Small Molecules that Inhibit the Pim Protein Kinase Blocking Prostate Cancer Cell Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    ligase for this protein when activated by Cdh1 (25, 26). Phosphorylation of Skp2 by CDK2 (27) and Akt1 (28, 29) on Ser64 and Ser72 protects it from...from Escherichia coli using a Calbiochemnickel-nitrilotriacetic acid column. GST andGST- Skp2 proteins were purified from E. coli using glutathione...purified from insect cells (39) andmixedwith in vitro-translated 35S-labeled p27 that had previously been incubatedwith cyclin E/ Cdk2 alongwithmeth

  3. Predicting protein function by frequent functional association pattern mining in protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Rae; Zhang, Aidong

    2010-01-01

    Predicting protein function from protein interaction networks has been challenging because of the complexity of functional relationships among proteins. Most previous function prediction methods depend on the neighborhood of or the connected paths to known proteins. However, their accuracy has been limited due to the functional inconsistency of interacting proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for function prediction by identifying frequent patterns of functional associations in a protein interaction network. A set of functions that a protein performs is assigned into the corresponding node as a label. A functional association pattern is then represented as a labeled subgraph. Our frequent labeled subgraph mining algorithm efficiently searches the functional association patterns that occur frequently in the network. It iteratively increases the size of frequent patterns by one node at a time by selective joining, and simplifies the network by a priori pruning. Using the yeast protein interaction network, our algorithm found more than 1400 frequent functional association patterns. The function prediction is performed by matching the subgraph, including the unknown protein, with the frequent patterns analogous to it. By leave-one-out cross validation, we show that our approach has better performance than previous link-based methods in terms of prediction accuracy. The frequent functional association patterns generated in this study might become the foundations of advanced analysis for functional behaviors of proteins in a system level.

  4. Predicting Protein-protein Association Rates using Coarse-grained Simulation and Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Wu, Yinghao

    2017-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions dominate all major biological processes in living cells. We have developed a new Monte Carlo-based simulation algorithm to study the kinetic process of protein association. We tested our method on a previously used large benchmark set of 49 protein complexes. The predicted rate was overestimated in the benchmark test compared to the experimental results for a group of protein complexes. We hypothesized that this resulted from molecular flexibility at the interface regions of the interacting proteins. After applying a machine learning algorithm with input variables that accounted for both the conformational flexibility and the energetic factor of binding, we successfully identified most of the protein complexes with overestimated association rates and improved our final prediction by using a cross-validation test. This method was then applied to a new independent test set and resulted in a similar prediction accuracy to that obtained using the training set. It has been thought that diffusion-limited protein association is dominated by long-range interactions. Our results provide strong evidence that the conformational flexibility also plays an important role in regulating protein association. Our studies provide new insights into the mechanism of protein association and offer a computationally efficient tool for predicting its rate.

  5. CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors and their Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Allyn C.; Blume, Lawrence C.; Dalton, George D.

    2011-01-01

    CB1 receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) abundant in neurons, in which they modulate neurotransmission. The CB1 receptor influence on memory and learning is well recognized, and disease states associated with CB1 receptors are observed in addiction disorders, motor dysfunction, schizophrenia, and in bipolar, depression, and anxiety disorders. Beyond the brain, CB1 receptors also function in liver and adipose tissues, vascular as well as cardiac tissue, reproductive tissues and bone. Signal transduction by CB1 receptors occurs through interaction with Gi/o proteins to inhibit adenylyl cyclase, activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), inhibit voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, activate K+ currents (Kir), and influence Nitric Oxide (NO) signaling. CB1 receptors are observed in internal organelles as well as plasma membrane. β-Arrestins, adaptor protein AP-3, and G-protein receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP1) modulate cellular trafficking. Cannabinoid Receptor Interacting Protein 1a (CRIP1a) is an accessory protein whose function has not been delineated. Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase (FAN) regulates ceramide signaling. Such diversity in cellular signaling and modulation by interacting proteins suggests that agonists and allosteric modulators could be developed to specifically regulate unique, cell type-specific responses. PMID:20166926

  6. Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK), a novel membrane-associated, ankyrin repeat-containing protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Haider, K; Ponda, M; Cariappa, A; Rowitch, D; Pillai, S

    2001-06-15

    A novel murine membrane-associated protein kinase, PKK (protein kinase C-associated kinase), was cloned on the basis of its physical association with protein kinase Cbeta (PKCbeta). The regulated expression of PKK in mouse embryos is consistent with a role for this kinase in early embryogenesis. The human homolog of PKK has over 90% identity to its murine counterpart, has been localized to chromosome 21q22.3, and is identical to the PKCdelta-interacting kinase, DIK (Bahr, C., Rohwer, A., Stempka, L., Rincke, G., Marks, F., and Gschwendt, M. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 36350-36357). PKK comprises an N-terminal kinase domain and a C-terminal region containing 11 ankyrin repeats. PKK exhibits protein kinase activity in vitro and associates with cellular membranes. PKK exists in three discernible forms at steady state: an underphosphorylated form of 100 kDa; a soluble, cytosolic, phosphorylated form of 110 kDa; and a phosphorylated, detergent-insoluble form of 112 kDa. PKK is initially synthesized as an underphosphorylated soluble 100-kDa protein that is quantitatively converted to a detergent-soluble 110-kDa form. This conversion requires an active catalytic domain. Although PKK physically associates with PKCbeta, it does not phosphorylate this PKC isoform. However, PKK itself may be phosphorylated by PKCbeta. PKK represents a developmentally regulated protein kinase that can associate with membranes. The functional significance of its association with PKCbeta remains to be ascertained.

  7. Identification of proteins associated with amyloidosis by polarity index method.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Uversky, Vladimir N; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas; Leopold-Sordo, Marili; Madero-Arteaga, Alejandro; Morales-Reyes, Alicia; Tavera-Sierra, Lourdes; González-Bernal, Jesus A; Arias-Estrada, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    There is a natural protein form, insoluble and resistant to proteolysis, adopted by many proteins independently of their amino acid sequences via specific misfolding-aggregation process. This dynamic process occurs in parallel with or as an alternative to physiologic folding, generating toxic protein aggregates that are deposited and accumulated in various organs and tissues. These proteinaceous deposits typically represent bundles of β-sheet-enriched fibrillar species known as the amyloid fibrils that are responsible for serious pathological conditions, including but not limited to neurodegenerative diseases, grouped under the term amyloidoses. The proteins that might adopt this fibrillar conformation are some globular proteins and natively unfolded (or intrinsically disordered) proteins. Our work shows that intrinsically disordered and intrinsically ordered proteins can be reliably identified, discriminated, and differentiated by analyzing their polarity profiles generated using a computational tool known as the polarity index method (Polanco & Samaniego, 2009; Polanco et al., 2012; 2013; 2013a; 2014; 2014a; 2014b; 2014c; 2014d). We also show that proteins expressed in neurons can be differentiated from proteins in these two groups based on their polarity profiles, and also that this computational tool can be used to identify proteins associated with amyloidoses. The efficiency of the proposed method is high (i.e. 70%) as evidenced by the analysis of peptides and proteins in the APD2 database (2012), AVPpred database (2013), and CPPsite database (2013), the set of selective antibacterial peptides from del Rio et al. (2001), the sets of natively unfolded and natively folded proteins from Oldfield et al. (2005), the set of human revised proteins expressed in neurons, and non-human revised proteins expressed in neurons, from the Uniprot database (2014), and also the set of amyloidogenic proteins from the AmyPDB database (2014).

  8. ERCC6L, a DNA helicase, is involved in cell proliferation and associated with survival and progress in breast and kidney cancers.

    PubMed

    Pu, Shao-Yan; Yu, Qin; Wu, Huan; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Qiong; He, Yong-Han; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2017-06-27

    By analyzing 4987 cancer transcriptomes from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identified that excision repair cross-complementation group 6 like (ERCC6L), a newly discovered DNA helicase, is highly expressed in 12 solid cancers. However, its role and mechanism in tumorigenesis are largely unknown. In this study, we found that ERCC6L silencing by small interring RNA (siRNA) or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) significantly inhibited the proliferation of breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) and kidney cancer cells (786-0). Furthermore, ERCC6L silencing induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase without affecting apoptosis. We then performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis after ERCC6L silencing and identified that RAB31 was markedly downregulated at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Its downstream protein, phosphorylated MAPK and CDK2 were also inhibited by ERCC6L silencing. The xenograft experiment showed that silencing of ERCC6L strikingly inhibited tumor growth from the 7th day after xenograft in nude mice. In addition, higher ERCC6L expression was found to be significantly associated with worse clinical survival in breast and kidney cancers. In conclusion, our results suggest that ERCC6L may stimulates cancer cell proliferation by promoting cell cycle through a way of RAB31-MAPK-CDK2, and it could be a potential biomarker for cancer prognosis and target for cancer treatment.

  9. ERCC6L, a DNA helicase, is involved in cell proliferation and associated with survival and progress in breast and kidney cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huan; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Qiong; He, Yong-Han; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2017-01-01

    By analyzing 4987 cancer transcriptomes from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identified that excision repair cross-complementation group 6 like (ERCC6L), a newly discovered DNA helicase, is highly expressed in 12 solid cancers. However, its role and mechanism in tumorigenesis are largely unknown. In this study, we found that ERCC6L silencing by small interring RNA (siRNA) or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) significantly inhibited the proliferation of breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) and kidney cancer cells (786-0). Furthermore, ERCC6L silencing induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase without affecting apoptosis. We then performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis after ERCC6L silencing and identified that RAB31 was markedly downregulated at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Its downstream protein, phosphorylated MAPK and CDK2 were also inhibited by ERCC6L silencing. The xenograft experiment showed that silencing of ERCC6L strikingly inhibited tumor growth from the 7th day after xenograft in nude mice. In addition, higher ERCC6L expression was found to be significantly associated with worse clinical survival in breast and kidney cancers. In conclusion, our results suggest that ERCC6L may stimulates cancer cell proliferation by promoting cell cycle through a way of RAB31-MAPK-CDK2, and it could be a potential biomarker for cancer prognosis and target for cancer treatment. PMID:28178669

  10. Protein function prediction using guilty by association from interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Damiano; Giollo, Manuel; Ferrari, Carlo; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2015-12-01

    Protein function prediction from sequence using the Gene Ontology (GO) classification is useful in many biological problems. It has recently attracted increasing interest, thanks in part to the Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA) challenge. In this paper, we introduce Guilty by Association on STRING (GAS), a tool to predict protein function exploiting protein-protein interaction networks without sequence similarity. The assumption is that whenever a protein interacts with other proteins, it is part of the same biological process and located in the same cellular compartment. GAS retrieves interaction partners of a query protein from the STRING database and measures enrichment of the associated functional annotations to generate a sorted list of putative functions. A performance evaluation based on CAFA metrics and a fair comparison with optimized BLAST similarity searches is provided. The consensus of GAS and BLAST is shown to improve overall performance. The PPI approach is shown to outperform similarity searches for biological process and cellular compartment GO predictions. Moreover, an analysis of the best practices to exploit protein-protein interaction networks is also provided.

  11. RAIN: RNA–protein Association and Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Junge, Alexander; Refsgaard, Jan C.; Garde, Christian; Pan, Xiaoyong; Santos, Alberto; Alkan, Ferhat; Anthon, Christian; von Mering, Christian; Workman, Christopher T.; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Gorodkin, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Protein association networks can be inferred from a range of resources including experimental data, literature mining and computational predictions. These types of evidence are emerging for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) as well. However, integration of ncRNAs into protein association networks is challenging due to data heterogeneity. Here, we present a database of ncRNA–RNA and ncRNA–protein interactions and its integration with the STRING database of protein–protein interactions. These ncRNA associations cover four organisms and have been established from curated examples, experimental data, interaction predictions and automatic literature mining. RAIN uses an integrative scoring scheme to assign a confidence score to each interaction. We demonstrate that RAIN outperforms the underlying microRNA-target predictions in inferring ncRNA interactions. RAIN can be operated through an easily accessible web interface and all interaction data can be downloaded. Database URL: http://rth.dk/resources/rain PMID:28077569

  12. The association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Rudd, C E; Finberg, R W

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are nonmembrane spanning cell surface proteins that have been demonstrated to be signal transduction molecules. Because these proteins do not extend into the cytoplasm, the mechanism by which cross-linking of these molecules leads to intracellular signal transduction events is obscure. Previous analysis has indicated that these proteins are associated with src family member tyrosine kinases; however, the role this interaction plays in the generation of intracellular signals is not clear. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins are associated with alpha subunits of heterotrimeric GTP binding proteins (G proteins) in both human and murine lymphocytes. When the GPI-anchored proteins CD59, CD48, and Thy-1 were immunoprecipitated from various cell lines or freshly isolated lymphocytes, all were found to be associated with a 41-kDa phosphoprotein that we have identified, by using specific antisera, as a mixture of tyrosine phosphorylated G protein alpha subunits: a small amount of Gialpha1, and substantial amounts of Gialpha2 and Gialpha3. GTP binding assays performed with immunoprecipitations of CD59 indicated that there was GTP-binding activity associated with this molecule. Thus, we have shown by both immunochemical and functional criteria that GPI-anchored proteins are physically associated with G proteins. These experiments suggest a potential role of G proteins in the transduction of signals generated by GPI-anchored molecules expressed on lymphocytes of both mouse and human. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8650218

  13. A New Protein-Protein Interaction Sensor Based on Tripartite Split-GFP Association

    PubMed Central

    Cabantous, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Hau B.; Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Koraïchi, Faten; Chaudhary, Anu; Ganguly, Kumkum; Lockard, Meghan A.; Favre, Gilles; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring protein-protein interactions in living cells is key to unraveling their roles in numerous cellular processes and various diseases. Previously described split-GFP based sensors suffer from poor folding and/or self-assembly background fluorescence. Here, we have engineered a micro-tagging system to monitor protein-protein interactions in vivo and in vitro. The assay is based on tripartite association between two twenty amino-acids long GFP tags, GFP10 and GFP11, fused to interacting protein partners, and the complementary GFP1-9 detector. When proteins interact, GFP10 and GFP11 self-associate with GFP1-9 to reconstitute a functional GFP. Using coiled-coils and FRB/FKBP12 model systems we characterize the sensor in vitro and in Escherichia coli. We extend the studies to mammalian cells and examine the FK-506 inhibition of the rapamycin-induced association of FRB/FKBP12. The small size of these tags and their minimal effect on fusion protein behavior and solubility should enable new experiments for monitoring protein-protein association by fluorescence. PMID:24092409

  14. A new protein-protein interaction sensor based on tripartite split-GFP association.

    PubMed

    Cabantous, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Hau B; Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Koraïchi, Faten; Chaudhary, Anu; Ganguly, Kumkum; Lockard, Meghan A; Favre, Gilles; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2013-10-04

    Monitoring protein-protein interactions in living cells is key to unraveling their roles in numerous cellular processes and various diseases. Previously described split-GFP based sensors suffer from poor folding and/or self-assembly background fluorescence. Here, we have engineered a micro-tagging system to monitor protein-protein interactions in vivo and in vitro. The assay is based on tripartite association between two twenty amino-acids long GFP tags, GFP10 and GFP11, fused to interacting protein partners, and the complementary GFP1-9 detector. When proteins interact, GFP10 and GFP11 self-associate with GFP1-9 to reconstitute a functional GFP. Using coiled-coils and FRB/FKBP12 model systems we characterize the sensor in vitro and in Escherichia coli. We extend the studies to mammalian cells and examine the FK-506 inhibition of the rapamycin-induced association of FRB/FKBP12. The small size of these tags and their minimal effect on fusion protein behavior and solubility should enable new experiments for monitoring protein-protein association by fluorescence.

  15. Engineering nanoparticle-protein associations for protein crystal nucleation and nanoparticle arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Denise N.

    Engineering the nanoparticle - protein association offers a new way to form protein crystals as well as new approaches for arrangement of nanoparticles. Central to this control is the nanoparticle surface. By conjugating polymers on the surface with controlled molecular weights many properties of the nanoparticle can be changed including its size, stability in buffers and the association of proteins with its surface. Large molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings allow for weak associations between proteins and nanoparticles. These interactions can lead to changes in how proteins crystallize. In particular, they decrease the time to nucleation and expand the range of conditions over which protein crystals form. Interestingly, when PEG chain lengths are too short then protein association is minimized and these effects are not observed. One important feature of protein crystals nucleated with nanoparticles is that the nanoparticles are incorporated into the crystals. What results are nanoparticles placed at well-defined distances in composite protein-nanoparticle crystals. Crystals on the size scale of 10 - 100 micrometers exhibit optical absorbance, fluorescence and super paramagnetic behavior derivative from the incorporated nanomaterials. The arrangement of nanoparticles into three dimensional arrays also gives rise to new and interesting physical and chemical properties, such as fluorescence enhancement and varied magnetic response. In addition, anisotropic nanomaterials aligned throughout the composite crystal have polarization dependent optical properties.

  16. Prioritizing disease candidate proteins in cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks based on "guilt by association" analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wan; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming; Li, Weiguo; Qu, Xiaoli; Liang, Binhua; Gao, Qianping; Feng, Chenchen; Jia, Xu; Lv, Yana; Zhang, Siya; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    The cardiomyopathies are a group of heart muscle diseases which can be inherited (familial). Identifying potential disease-related proteins is important to understand mechanisms of cardiomyopathies. Experimental identification of cardiomyophthies is costly and labour-intensive. In contrast, bioinformatics approach has a competitive advantage over experimental method. Based on "guilt by association" analysis, we prioritized candidate proteins involving in human cardiomyopathies. We first built weighted human cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks for three subtypes of cardiomyopathies using the known disease proteins from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man as seeds. We then developed a method in prioritizing disease candidate proteins to rank candidate proteins in the network based on "guilt by association" analysis. It was found that most candidate proteins with high scores shared disease-related pathways with disease seed proteins. These top ranked candidate proteins were related with the corresponding disease subtypes, and were potential disease-related proteins. Cross-validation and comparison with other methods indicated that our approach could be used for the identification of potentially novel disease proteins, which may provide insights into cardiomyopathy-related mechanisms in a more comprehensive and integrated way.

  17. Identification of nuclear structural protein alterations associated with seminomas.

    PubMed

    Leman, Eddy S; Magheli, Ahmed; Yong, Koh Meng Aw; Netto, George; Hinz, Stefan; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2009-12-15

    Currently, there are no specific markers available for the early detection and for monitoring testicular cancer. Based upon an approach that targets nuclear structure, we have identified a set of proteins that are specific for seminomas, which may then have clinical utility for the disease. Utilizing samples obtained from men with no evidence of testicular cancer (n = 5) as well as those with seminomas (n = 6), nuclear matrix proteins were extracted and separated using a high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis gel system. The proteins were identified by mass spectrometry analysis. These analyses revealed seven nuclear matrix proteins associated with the normal testes, which did not appear in the seminomas. In the seminomas, four nuclear matrix proteins were identified to be associated with the disease that were absent in the normal testes. Mass spectrometric and immunoblot analyses of these proteins revealed that one of the proteins identified in the normal testes appears to be StAR-related lipid transfer protein 7 (StARD7). In the non-seminoma tissues, one of the identified proteins appears to be cell division protein kinase 10 (CDK10). Both StarD7 and CDK10 could potentially be involved in cell differentiation and growth, and thus may serve as potential targets for therapy of prognostication of seminomas. This is the first study to examine the role of nuclear structural proteins as potential biomarkers in testicular cancer. We are currently examining the roles of some of the identified proteins as potential biomarkers for the disease. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Nanoparticles-cell association predicted by protein corona fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchetti, S.; Digiacomo, L.; Pozzi, D.; Peruzzi, G.; Micarelli, E.; Mahmoudi, M.; Caracciolo, G.

    2016-06-01

    In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface chemistry (unmodified and PEGylated) to investigate the relationships between NP physicochemical properties (nanoparticle size, aggregation state and surface charge), protein corona fingerprints (PCFs), and NP-cell association. We found out that none of the NPs' physicochemical properties alone was exclusively able to account for association with human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). For the entire library of NPs, a total of 436 distinct serum proteins were detected. We developed a predictive-validation modeling that provides a means of assessing the relative significance of the identified corona proteins. Interestingly, a minor fraction of the HC, which consists of only 8 PCFs were identified as main promoters of NP association with HeLa cells. Remarkably, identified PCFs have several receptors with high level of expression on the plasma membrane of HeLa cells.In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface

  19. Few serum proteins mediate APOE’s association with dementia

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The latent variable “δ” (for “dementia”) appears to be uniquely responsible for the dementing aspects of cognitive impairment. Age, depression, gender and the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele are independently associated with δ. In this analysis, we explore serum proteins as potential mediators of APOE’s specific association with δ in a large, ethnically diverse longitudinal cohort, the Texas Alzheimer’s Research and Care Consortium (TARCC). APOE was associated only with C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Adiponectin (APN) and Amphiregulin (AREG), although the latter two’s associations did not survive Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. All three proteins were associated with δ and had weak potential mediation effects on APOE’s association with that construct. Our findings suggest that APOE’s association with cognitive performance is specific to δ and partially mediated by serum inflammatory proteins. The majority of APOE’s significant unadjusted effect on δ is unexplained. It may instead arise from direct central nervous system effects, possibly on native intelligence. If so, then APOE may exert a life-long influence over δ and therefore all-cause dementia risk. PMID:28291794

  20. Quantitative Protein Localization Signatures Reveal an Association between Spatial and Functional Divergences of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  1. Quantitative protein localization signatures reveal an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins.

    PubMed

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  2. Screening serum hepatocellular carcinoma-associated proteins by SELDI-based protein spectrum analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie-Feng; Liu, Yin-Kun; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Kang, Xiao-Nan; Huang, Cheng; He, Yi-Feng; Tang, Zhao-You; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To find out potential serum hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-associated proteins with low molecular weight and low abundance by SELDI-based serum protein spectra analysis, that will have much application in the diagnosis or differentiated diagnosis of HCC, as well as giving a better understanding of the mechanism of hepato-carcinogenesis. METHODS: Total serum samples were collected with informed consent from 81 HCC patients with HBV(+)/cirrhosis(+), 36 cirrhosis patients and 43 chronic hepatitis B patients. Serum protein fingerprint profiles were first generated by selected WCX2 protein chip capture integrating with SELDI-TOF-MS, then normalized and aligned by Ciphergen SELDI Software 3.1.1 with Biomarker Wizard. Comparative analysis of the intensity of corresponding protein fingerprint peaks in normalized protein spectra, some protein peaks with significant difference between HCC and cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis B were found. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-eight serum protein peaks between 2000 and 30 000Da were identified under the condition of signal-to-noise > 5 and minimum threshold for cluster > 20%. Eighty-seven of these proteins were showed significant differences in intensity between HCC and cirrhosis (P < 0.05). Of the above differential proteins, 45 proteins had changes greater than two-fold, including 15 upregulated proteins and 30 downregulated proteins in HCC serum. Between HCC and chronic hepatitis B, 9 of 52 differential proteins (P < 0.05) had intensities of more than two-fold, including 2 upregulated proteins and 7 downregulated proteins in HCC serum. Between cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B, 28 of 79 significant differential proteins (P < 0.05) changes greater than two-fold in intensity, including 17 upregulated proteins and 11 downregulated proteins in cirrhosis serum. For the analysis of these leading differential proteins in subtraction difference mode among three diseases, the five common downregulated proteins in HCC serum (M/Z 2870

  3. Screening serum hepatocellular carcinoma-associated proteins by SELDI-based protein spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie-Feng; Liu, Yin-Kun; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Kang, Xiao-Nan; Huang, Cheng; He, Yi-Feng; Tang, Zhao-You; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2008-02-28

    To find out potential serum hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-associated proteins with low molecular weight and low abundance by SELDI-based serum protein spectra analysis, that will have much application in the diagnosis or differentiated diagnosis of HCC, as well as giving a better understanding of the mechanism of hepato-carcinogenesis. Total serum samples were collected with informed consent from 81 HCC patients with HBV(+)/cirrhosis(+), 36 cirrhosis patients and 43 chronic hepatitis B patients. Serum protein fingerprint profiles were first generated by selected WCX2 protein chip capture integrating with SELDI-TOF-MS, then normalized and aligned by Ciphergen SELDI Software 3.1.1 with Biomarker Wizard. Comparative analysis of the intensity of corresponding protein fingerprint peaks in normalized protein spectra, some protein peaks with significant difference between HCC and cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis B were found. One hundred and twenty-eight serum protein peaks between 2000 and 30000 Da were identified under the condition of signal-to-noise > 5 and minimum threshold for cluster > 20%. Eighty-seven of these proteins were showed significant differences in intensity between HCC and cirrhosis (P < 0.05). Of the above differential proteins, 45 proteins had changes greater than two-fold, including 15 upregulated proteins and 30 downregulated proteins in HCC serum. Between HCC and chronic hepatitis B, 9 of 52 differential proteins (P < 0.05) had intensities of more than two-fold, including 2 upregulated proteins and 7 downregulated proteins in HCC serum. Between cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B, 28 of 79 significant differential proteins (P < 0.05) changes greater than two-fold in intensity, including 17 upregulated proteins and 11 downregulated proteins in cirrhosis serum. For the analysis of these leading differential proteins in subtraction difference mode among three diseases, the five common downregulated proteins in HCC serum (M/Z 2870, 3941, 2688, 3165, 5483

  4. Ghrelin augments murine T-cell proliferation by activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Patel, Kalpesh; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lustig, Ana; Kim, Jie Wan; Mattson, Mark P.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Thymic atrophy occurs during normal aging, and is accelerated by exposure to chronic stressors that elevate glucocorticoid levelsand impair the naïve T cell output. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin was recently shown to attenuate age-associated thymic atrophy. Here, we report that ghrelin enhances the proliferation of murine CD4+ primary T cells and a CD4+ T-cell line. Ghrelin induced activation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways, via upstream activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and protein kinase C, to enhance T-cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin induced expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and retinoblastoma phosphorylation. Finally, ghrelin activated the above-mentioned signaling pathways and stimulated thymocyte proliferation in young and older mice in vivo. PMID:25447526

  5. Association of Ebola Virus Matrix Protein VP40 with Microtubules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    dynein has been reported for African swine fever virus protein 54 (1) as well as VP26 of herpes simplex virus (12), and binding to members of the plus...associated motor pro- teins for movement of viral particles to the site of budding has been proposed for African swine fever virus and vaccinia virus (22...Fernandez-Zapatero, L. Soto, C. Canto, I. Rodriguez-Crespo, L. Dixon, and J. M. Escribano. 2001. African swine fever virus protein p54 interacts with

  6. A cellular protein that associates with the transforming protein of Rous sarcoma virus is also a heat-shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, H; Levinson, W; Bishop, J M

    1981-01-01

    A single viral protein (pp60src) mediates neoplastic transformation of cells infected with Rous sarcoma virus. Immunoprecipitation of pp60src has revealed two cellular proteins (Mr 50,000 and 89,000) that appear to associate with pp60src in a specific manner. Neither of the cellular proteins has been well characterized, but it is thought that both may participate in the function of pp60src. Treatment of avian cells with unphysiological temperature or certain chemical agents amplifies the production of several proteins in the manner of the "heat shock" response earlier described for Drosophila. We report here that one of these proteins, with a molecular weight of 89,000 is identical to the 89-kilodalton protein found associated with pp60src. The 89-kilodalton protein is a major constituent of both uninfected and infected cells, even in the absence of inducing agents, but only a small fraction of this protein appears to associate with pp60src in cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus. The complex containing pp60src and the 89-kilodalton protein can be precipitated by an immune reaction involving pp60src alone. The complexed form of the 89-kilodalton protein did not react directly with antibodies but regained its reactivity subsequent to release from the complex. We conclude that the 89-kilodalton protein is bound to pp60src in a relatively stable complex. We suggest that the 89-kilodalton protein may have overlapping roles in viral oncogenesis and the heat shock response, and that evidence on the function of the protein in either setting may illuminate its function in the other. In addition, it may prove profitable to search for other overlaps between the cellular response to heat shock and the neoplastic transformation of cells by pp60src. Images PMID:6262754

  7. Proteins associated with RNase E in a multicomponent ribonucleolytic complex.

    PubMed Central

    Miczak, A; Kaberdin, V R; Wei, C L; Lin-Chao, S

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli endoribonuclease RNase E is essential for RNA processing and degradation. Earlier work provided evidence that RNase E exists intracellularly as part of a multicomponent complex and that one of the components of this complex is a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, polynucleotide phosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.8). To isolate and identify other components of the RNase E complex, FLAG-epitope-tagged RNase E (FLAG-Rne) fusion protein was purified on a monoclonal antibody-conjugated agarose column. The FLAG-Rne fusion protein, eluted by competition with the synthetic FLAG peptide, was found to be associated with other proteins. N-terminal sequencing of these proteins revealed the presence in the RNase E complex not only of polynucleotide phosphorylase but also of DnaK, RNA helicase, and enolase (EC 4.2.1.11). Another protein associated only with epitope-tagged temperature-sensitive (Rne-3071) mutant RNase E but not with the wild-type enzyme is GroEL. The FLAG-Rne complex has RNase E activity in vivo and in vitro. The relative amount of proteins associated with wild-type and Rne-3071 expressed at an elevated temperature differed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8632981

  8. Surfactant-associated proteins: structure, function and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Ketko, Anastasia K; Donn, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy is now the standard of care for infants with respiratory distress syndrome. As the understanding of surfactant structure and function has evolved, surfactant-associated proteins are now understood to be essential components of pulmonary surfactant. Their structural and functional diversity detail the complexity of their contributions to normal pulmonary physiology, and deficiency states result in significant pathology. Engineering synthetic surfactant protein constructs has been a major research focus for replacement therapies. This review highlights what is known about surfactant proteins and how this knowledge is pivotal for future advancements in treating respiratory distress syndrome as well as other pulmonary diseases characterized by surfactant deficiency or inactivation.

  9. Septin-Associated Protein Kinases in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Adam M.; Finnigan, Gregory C.; Roelants, Françoise M.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Septins are a family of eukaryotic GTP-binding proteins that associate into linear rods, which, in turn, polymerize end-on-end into filaments, and further assemble into other, more elaborate super-structures at discrete subcellular locations. Hence, septin-based ensembles are considered elements of the cytoskeleton. One function of these structures that has been well-documented in studies conducted in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is to serve as a scaffold that recruits regulatory proteins, which dictate the spatial and temporal control of certain aspects of the cell division cycle. In particular, septin-associated protein kinases couple cell cycle progression with cellular morphogenesis. Thus, septin-containing structures serve as signaling platforms that integrate a multitude of signals and coordinate key downstream networks required for cell cycle passage. This review summarizes what we currently understand about how the action of septin-associated protein kinases and their substrates control information flow to drive the cell cycle into and out of mitosis, to regulate bud growth, and especially to direct timely and efficient execution of cytokinesis and cell abscission. Thus, septin structures represent a regulatory node at the intersection of many signaling pathways. In addition, and importantly, the activities of certain septin-associated protein kinases also regulate the state of organization of the septins themselves, creating a complex feedback loop. PMID:27847804

  10. Protein-Based Three-Dimensional Memories and Associative Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birge, Robert

    2008-03-01

    The field of bioelectronics has benefited from the fact that nature has often solved problems of a similar nature to those which must be solved to create molecular electronic or photonic devices that operate with efficiency and reliability. Retinal proteins show great promise in bioelectronic devices because they operate with high efficiency (˜0.65%), high cyclicity (>10^7), operate over an extended wavelength range (360 -- 630 nm) and can convert light into changes in voltage, pH, absorption or refractive index. This talk will focus on a retinal protein called bacteriorhodopsin, the proton pump of the organism Halobacterium salinarum. Two memories based on this protein will be described. The first is an optical three-dimensional memory. This memory stores information using volume elements (voxels), and provides as much as a thousand-fold improvement in effective capacity over current technology. A unique branching reaction of a variant of bacteriorhodopsin is used to turn each protein into an optically addressed latched AND gate. Although three working prototypes have been developed, a number of cost/performance and architectural issues must be resolved prior to commercialization. The major issue is that the native protein provides a very inefficient branching reaction. Genetic engineering has improved performance by nearly 500-fold, but a further order of magnitude improvement is needed. Protein-based holographic associative memories will also be discussed. The human brain stores and retrieves information via association, and human intelligence is intimately connected to the nature and enormous capacity of this associative search and retrieval process. To a first order approximation, creativity can be viewed as the association of two seemingly disparate concepts to form a totally new construct. Thus, artificial intelligence requires large scale associative memories. Current computer hardware does not provide an optimal environment for creating artificial

  11. Protein complexes associated with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Rajeev; Verma, Subhash C.; Robertson, Erle S. . E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2007-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the major biological cofactor contributing to development of Kaposi's sarcoma. KSHV establishes a latent infection in human B cells expressing the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), a critical factor in the regulation of viral latency. LANA is known to modulate viral and cellular gene expression. We report here on some initial proteomic studies to identify cellular proteins associated with the amino and carboxy-terminal domains of LANA. The results of these studies show an association of known cellular proteins which support LANA functions and have identified additional LANA-associated proteins. These results provide new evidence for complexes involving LANA with a number of previously unreported functional classes of proteins including DNA polymerase, RNA helicase and cell cycle control proteins. The results also indicate that the amino terminus of LANA can interact with its carboxy-terminal domain. This interaction is potentially important for facilitating associations with other cell cycle regulatory proteins which include CENP-F identified in association with both the amino and carboxy-termini. These novel associations add to the diversity of LANA functions in relation to the maintenance of latency and subsequent transformation of KSHV infected cells.

  12. Mechanisms of Protein-Ligand Association and Its Modulation by Protein Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Held, Martin; Metzner, Philipp; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Noé, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Protein-ligand interactions are essential for nearly all biological processes, and yet the biophysical mechanism that enables potential binding partners to associate before specific binding occurs remains poorly understood. Fundamental questions include which factors influence the formation of protein-ligand encounter complexes, and whether designated association pathways exist. To address these questions, we developed a computational approach to systematically analyze the complete ensemble of association pathways. Here, we use this approach to study the binding of a phosphate ion to the Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein. Various mutants of the protein are considered, and their effects on binding free-energy profiles, association rates, and association pathway distributions are quantified. The results reveal the existence of two anion attractors, i.e., regions that initially attract negatively charged particles and allow them to be efficiently screened for phosphate, which is subsequently specifically bound. Point mutations that affect the charge on these attractors modulate their attraction strength and speed up association to a factor of 10 of the diffusion limit, and thus change the association pathways of the phosphate ligand. It is demonstrated that a phosphate that prebinds to such an attractor neutralizes its attraction effect to the environment, making the simultaneous association of a second phosphate ion unlikely. This study suggests ways in which structural properties can be used to tune molecular association kinetics so as to optimize the efficiency of binding, and highlights the importance of kinetic properties. PMID:21281585

  13. Phospholipid transfer protein in human plasma associates with proteins linked to immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Marian C; Vaisar, Tomás; Han, Xianlin; Heinecke, Jay W; Albers, John J

    2010-08-31

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), which associates with apolipoprotein A-I (the major HDL protein), plays a key role in lipoprotein remodeling. Because its level in plasma increases during acute inflammation, it may also play previously unsuspected roles in the innate immune system. To gain further insight into its potential physiological functions, we isolated complexes containing PLTP from plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography and determined their composition. Shotgun proteomics revealed that only 6 of the 24 proteins detected in the complexes were apolipoproteins. The most abundant proteins were clusterin (apoJ), PLTP itself, coagulation factors, complement factors, and apoA-I. Remarkably, 20 of the 24 proteins had known protein-protein interactions. Biochemical studies confirmed two previously established interactions and identified five new ones between PLTP and proteins. Moreover, clusterin, apoA-I, and apoE preserved the lipid-transfer activity of recombinant PLTP in the absence of lipid, indicating that these interactions may have functional significance. Unexpectedly, lipids accounted for only 3% of the mass of the PLTP complexes. Collectively, our observations indicate that PLTP in human plasma resides on lipid-poor complexes dominated by clusterin and proteins implicated in host defense and inflammation. They further suggest that protein-protein interactions drive the formation of PLTP complexes in plasma.

  14. Association of the protein D and protein E forms of rat CRISP1 with epididymal sperm.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth P; Ensrud-Bowlin, Kathy M; Piehl, Laura B; Parent, Karlye R; Bernhardt, Miranda L; Hamilton, David W

    2008-12-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory protein 1 (CRISP1) is a secretory glycoprotein produced by the rat epididymal epithelium in two forms, referred to as proteins D and E. CRISP1 has been implicated in sperm-egg fusion and has been shown to suppress capacitation in rat sperm. Several studies have suggested that CRISP1 associates transiently with the sperm surface, whereas others have shown that at least a portion of CRISP1 persists on the surface. In the present study, we demonstrate that protein D associates transiently with the sperm surface in a concentration-dependent manner, exhibiting saturable binding to both caput and cauda sperm in a concentration range that is consistent with its capacitation-inhibiting activity. In contrast, protein E persists on the sperm surface after all exogenous protein D has been dissociated. Comparison of caput and cauda sperm reveal that protein E becomes bound to the sperm in the cauda epididymidis. We show that protein E associates with caput sperm, which do not normally have it on their surfaces, in vitro in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. These studies demonstrate that most CRISP1 interacts with sperm transiently, possibly with a specific receptor on the sperm surface, consistent with its action in suppressing capacitation during epididymal storage of sperm. These studies also confirm a tightly bound population of protein E that could act in the female tract.

  15. Immunogenicity of self tumor associated proteins is enhanced through protein truncation

    PubMed Central

    Kottke, Tim; Shim, Kevin G; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Zaidi, Shane; Maria Diaz, Rosa; Pulido, Jose; Thompson, Jill; Rajani, Karishma R; Evgin, Laura; Ilett, Elizabeth; Pandha, Hardev; Harrington, Kevin; Selby, Peter; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We showed previously that therapy with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) expressing tumor-associated proteins eradicates established tumors. We show here that when cellular cDNA were cloned into VSV which retained their own poly-A signal, viral species emerged in culture which had deleted the cellular poly-A signal and also contained a truncated form of the protein coding sequence. Typically, the truncation occurred such that a Tyrosine-encoding codon was converted into a STOP codon. We believe that the truncation of tumor-associated proteins expressed from VSV in this way occurred to preserve the ability of the virus to replicate efficiently. Truncated cDNA expressed from VSV were significantly more effective than full length cDNA in treating established tumors. Moreover, tumor therapy with truncated cDNA was completely abolished by depletion of CD4+ T cells, whereas therapy with full length cDNA was CD8+ T cell dependent. These data show that the type/potency of antitumor immune responses against self-tumor-associated proteins can be manipulated in vivo through the nature of the self protein (full length or truncated). Therefore, in addition to generation of neoantigens through sequence mutation, immunological tolerance against self-tumor-associated proteins can be broken through manipulation of protein integrity, allowing for rational design of better self-immunogens for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27933315

  16. Cancer associated proteins in blood plasma: Determining normal variation.

    PubMed

    Stenemo, Markus; Teleman, Johan; Sjöström, Martin; Grubb, Gabriel; Malmström, Erik; Malmström, Johan; Niméus, Emma

    2016-07-01

    Protein biomarkers have the potential to improve diagnosis, stratification of patients into treatment cohorts, follow disease progression and treatment response. One distinct group of potential biomarkers comprises proteins which have been linked to cancer, known as cancer associated proteins (CAPs). We determined the normal variation of 86 CAPs in 72 individual plasma samples collected from ten individuals using SRM mass spectrometry. Samples were collected weekly during 5 weeks from ten volunteers and over one day at nine fixed time points from three volunteers. We determined the degree of the normal variation depending on interpersonal variation, variation due to time of day, and variation over weeks and observed that the variation dependent on the time of day appeared to be the most important. Subdivision of the proteins resulted in two predominant protein groups containing 21 proteins with relatively high variation in all three factors (day, week and individual), and 22 proteins with relatively low variation in all factors. We present a strategy for prioritizing biomarker candidates for future studies based on stratification over their normal variation and have made all data publicly available. Our findings can be used to improve selection of biomarker candidates in future studies and to determine which proteins are most suitable depending on study design.

  17. A multidimensional proteomic approach to identify hypertrophy-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Merry L; Goshorn, Danielle K; Comte-Walters, Susana; Hendrick, Jennifer W; Hapke, Elizabeth; Zile, Michael R; Schey, Kevin

    2006-04-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a leading cause of congestive heart failure. The exact mechanisms that control cardiac growth and regulate the transition to failure are not fully understood, in part due to the lack of a complete inventory of proteins associated with LVH. We investigated the proteomic basis of LVH using the transverse aortic constriction model of pressure overload in mice coupled with a multidimensional approach to identify known and novel proteins that may be relevant to the development and maintenance of LVH. We identified 123 proteins that were differentially expressed during LVH, including LIM proteins, thioredoxin, myoglobin, fatty acid binding protein 3, the abnormal spindle-like microcephaly protein (ASPM), and cytoskeletal proteins such as actin and myosin. In addition, proteins with unknown functions were identified, providing new directions for future research in this area. We also discuss common pitfalls and strategies to overcome the limitations of current proteomic technologies. Together, the multidimensional approach provides insight into the proteomic changes that occur in the LV during hypertrophy.

  18. Identification of urinary proteins potentially associated with diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Marikanty, R. K.; Gupta, M. K.; Cherukuvada, S. V. B.; Kompella, S. S. S; Prayaga, A. K.; Konda, S.; Polisetty, R. V.; Idris, M. M.; Rao, P. V.; Chandak, G. R.; Dakshinamurty, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease. Although several parameters are used to evaluate renal damage, in many instances, there is no pathological change until damage is already advanced. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a novel tool to identify newer diagnostic markers. To identify urinary proteins associated with renal complications in diabetes, we collected urine samples from 10 type 2 diabetes patients each with normoalbuminuria, micro- and macro-albuminuria and compared their urinary proteome with that of 10 healthy individuals. Urinary proteins were concentrated, depleted of albumin and five other abundant plasma proteins and in-gel trypsin digested after prefractionation on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The peptides were analyzed using a nanoflow reverse phase liquid chromatography system coupled to linear trap quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. We identified large number of proteins in each group, of which many were exclusively present in individual patient groups. A total of 53 proteins were common in all patients but were absent in the controls. The majority of the proteins were functionally binding, biologically involved in metabolic processes, and showed enrichment of alternative complement and blood coagulation pathways. In addition to identifying reported proteins such as α2-HS-glycoprotein and Vitamin D binding protein, we detected novel proteins such as CD59, extracellular matrix protein 1 (ECM1), factor H, and myoglobin in the urine of macroalbuminuria patients. ECM1 and factor H are known to influence mesangial cell proliferation, and CD59 causes microvascular damage by influencing membrane attack complex deposition, suggestive their biological relevance to DN. Thus, we have developed a proteome database where various proteins exclusively present in the patients may be further investigated for their role as stage-specific markers and possible therapeutic targets. PMID

  19. Identification of urinary proteins potentially associated with diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Marikanty, R K; Gupta, M K; Cherukuvada, S V B; Kompella, S S S; Prayaga, A K; Konda, S; Polisetty, R V; Idris, M M; Rao, P V; Chandak, G R; Dakshinamurty, K V

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease. Although several parameters are used to evaluate renal damage, in many instances, there is no pathological change until damage is already advanced. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a novel tool to identify newer diagnostic markers. To identify urinary proteins associated with renal complications in diabetes, we collected urine samples from 10 type 2 diabetes patients each with normoalbuminuria, micro- and macro-albuminuria and compared their urinary proteome with that of 10 healthy individuals. Urinary proteins were concentrated, depleted of albumin and five other abundant plasma proteins and in-gel trypsin digested after prefractionation on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The peptides were analyzed using a nanoflow reverse phase liquid chromatography system coupled to linear trap quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. We identified large number of proteins in each group, of which many were exclusively present in individual patient groups. A total of 53 proteins were common in all patients but were absent in the controls. The majority of the proteins were functionally binding, biologically involved in metabolic processes, and showed enrichment of alternative complement and blood coagulation pathways. In addition to identifying reported proteins such as α2-HS-glycoprotein and Vitamin D binding protein, we detected novel proteins such as CD59, extracellular matrix protein 1 (ECM1), factor H, and myoglobin in the urine of macroalbuminuria patients. ECM1 and factor H are known to influence mesangial cell proliferation, and CD59 causes microvascular damage by influencing membrane attack complex deposition, suggestive their biological relevance to DN. Thus, we have developed a proteome database where various proteins exclusively present in the patients may be further investigated for their role as stage-specific markers and possible therapeutic targets.

  20. The master role of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor in melanocyte and melanoma biology.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Akinori; Fisher, David E

    2017-03-06

    Certain transcription factors have vital roles in lineage development, including specification of cell types and control of differentiation. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a key transcription factor for melanocyte development and differentiation. MITF regulates expression of numerous pigmentation genes to promote melanocyte differentiation, as well as fundamental genes for maintaining cell homeostasis, including genes encoding proteins involved in apoptosis (eg, BCL2) and the cell cycle (eg, CDK2). Loss-of-function mutations of MITF cause Waardenburg syndrome type IIA, whose phenotypes include depigmentation due to melanocyte loss, whereas amplification or specific mutation of MITF can be an oncogenic event that is seen in a subset of familial or sporadic melanomas. In this article, we review basic features of MITF biological function and highlight key unresolved questions regarding this remarkable transcription factor.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 6 March 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.9.

  1. Ribosomal protein S6 associates with alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 and mediates expression from alphavirus messages.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stephanie A; Berglund, Peter; Beard, Clayton W; Johnston, Robert E

    2006-08-01

    Although alphaviruses dramatically alter cellular function within hours of infection, interactions between alphaviruses and specific host cellular proteins are poorly understood. Although the alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) is an essential component of the viral replication complex, it also has critical auxiliary functions that determine the outcome of infection in the host. To gain a better understanding of nsP2 function, we sought to identify cellular proteins with which Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2 interacted. We demonstrate here that nsP2 associates with ribosomal protein S6 (RpS6) and that nsP2 is present in the ribosome-containing fractions of a polysome gradient, suggesting that nsP2 associates with RpS6 in the context of the whole ribosome. This result was noteworthy, since viral replicase proteins have seldom been described in direct association with components of the ribosome. The association of RpS6 with nsP2 was detected throughout the course of infection, and neither the synthesis of the viral structural proteins nor the presence of the other nonstructural proteins was required for RpS6 interaction with nsP2. nsP1 also was associated with RpS6, but other nonstructural proteins were not. RpS6 phosphorylation was dramatically diminished within hours after infection with alphaviruses. Furthermore, a reduction in the level of RpS6 protein expression led to diminished expression from alphavirus subgenomic messages, whereas no dramatic diminution in cellular translation was observed. Taken together, these data suggest that alphaviruses alter the ribosome during infection and that this alteration may contribute to differential translation of host and viral messages.

  2. Cyclin A-dependent phosphorylation of the ETS-related protein, MEF, restricts its activity to the G1 phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Y; Boccuni, P; Mao, S; Zhang, J; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Tempst, P; Kiyokawa, H; Nimer, S D

    2001-11-02

    MEF, a recently identified member of the E74 family of ETS-related transcription factors, is a strong transcriptional activator of cytokine gene expression. Using a green fluorescent protein gene reporter plasmid regulated by an MEF-responsive promoter, we determined that the transcriptional activity of MEF is largely restricted to the G1 phase of the cell cycle. MEF-dependent transcription was suppressed by the expression of cyclin A but not by cyclin D or cyclin E. This effect was due to the kinase activity generated by cyclin A expression, as co-expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 or p27, or a dominant negative form of CDK2 (DNK2), abrogated the reduction of MEF transcriptional activity by cyclin A. Cyclin A-CDK2 phosphorylated MEF protein in vitro more efficiently than cyclin D-CDK4 or cyclin E-CDK2, and phosphorylation of MEF by cyclin A-CDK2 reduced its ability to bind DNA. We determined one site of phosphorylation by cyclin A-CDK2 at the C terminus of MEF, using mass-spectrometry; mutation of three serine or threonine residues in this region significantly reduced phosphorylation of MEF by cyclin A and reduced cyclin A-mediated suppression of its transactivating activity. These amino acid substitutions also reduced the restriction of MEF activity to G1. Phosphorylation of MEF by the cyclin A-CDK2 complex controls its transcriptional activity during the cell cycle, establishing a novel link between the ETS family of proteins and the cell cycle machinery.

  3. Bacterial protein signals are associated with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Juste, Catherine; Kreil, David P; Beauvallet, Christian; Guillot, Alain; Vaca, Sebastian; Carapito, Christine; Mondot, Stanislas; Sykacek, Peter; Sokol, Harry; Blon, Florence; Lepercq, Pascale; Levenez, Florence; Valot, Benoît; Carré, Wilfrid; Loux, Valentin; Pons, Nicolas; David, Olivier; Schaeffer, Brigitte; Lepage, Patricia; Martin, Patrice; Monnet, Véronique; Seksik, Philippe; Beaugerie, Laurent; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Doré, Joël

    2014-01-01

    Objective No Crohn’s disease (CD) molecular maker has advanced to clinical use, and independent lines of evidence support a central role of the gut microbial community in CD. Here we explore the feasibility of extracting bacterial protein signals relevant to CD, by interrogating myriads of intestinal bacterial proteomes from a small number of patients and healthy controls. Design We first developed and validated a workflow—including extraction of microbial communities, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and LC-MS/MS—to discover protein signals from CD-associated gut microbial communities. Then we used selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to confirm a set of candidates. In parallel, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing for an integrated analysis of gut ecosystem structure and functions. Results Our 2D-DIGE-based discovery approach revealed an imbalance of intestinal bacterial functions in CD. Many proteins, largely derived from Bacteroides species, were over-represented, while under-represented proteins were mostly from Firmicutes and some Prevotella members. Most overabundant proteins could be confirmed using SRM. They correspond to functions allowing opportunistic pathogens to colonise the mucus layers, breach the host barriers and invade the mucosae, which could still be aggravated by decreased host-derived pancreatic zymogen granule membrane protein GP2 in CD patients. Moreover, although the abundance of most protein groups reflected that of related bacterial populations, we found a specific independent regulation of bacteria-derived cell envelope proteins. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that quantifiable bacterial protein signals are associated with CD, which can have a profound impact on future molecular diagnosis. PMID:24436141

  4. Bacterial protein signals are associated with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Juste, Catherine; Kreil, David P; Beauvallet, Christian; Guillot, Alain; Vaca, Sebastian; Carapito, Christine; Mondot, Stanislas; Sykacek, Peter; Sokol, Harry; Blon, Florence; Lepercq, Pascale; Levenez, Florence; Valot, Benoît; Carré, Wilfrid; Loux, Valentin; Pons, Nicolas; David, Olivier; Schaeffer, Brigitte; Lepage, Patricia; Martin, Patrice; Monnet, Véronique; Seksik, Philippe; Beaugerie, Laurent; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Doré, Joël

    2014-10-01

    No Crohn's disease (CD) molecular maker has advanced to clinical use, and independent lines of evidence support a central role of the gut microbial community in CD. Here we explore the feasibility of extracting bacterial protein signals relevant to CD, by interrogating myriads of intestinal bacterial proteomes from a small number of patients and healthy controls. We first developed and validated a workflow-including extraction of microbial communities, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and LC-MS/MS-to discover protein signals from CD-associated gut microbial communities. Then we used selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to confirm a set of candidates. In parallel, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing for an integrated analysis of gut ecosystem structure and functions. Our 2D-DIGE-based discovery approach revealed an imbalance of intestinal bacterial functions in CD. Many proteins, largely derived from Bacteroides species, were over-represented, while under-represented proteins were mostly from Firmicutes and some Prevotella members. Most overabundant proteins could be confirmed using SRM. They correspond to functions allowing opportunistic pathogens to colonise the mucus layers, breach the host barriers and invade the mucosae, which could still be aggravated by decreased host-derived pancreatic zymogen granule membrane protein GP2 in CD patients. Moreover, although the abundance of most protein groups reflected that of related bacterial populations, we found a specific independent regulation of bacteria-derived cell envelope proteins. This study provides the first evidence that quantifiable bacterial protein signals are associated with CD, which can have a profound impact on future molecular diagnosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Protein-driven inference of miRNA–disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Mørk, Søren; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Palleja Caro, Albert; Gorodkin, Jan; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a highly abundant class of non-coding RNA genes involved in cellular regulation and thus also diseases. Despite miRNAs being important disease factors, miRNA–disease associations remain low in number and of variable reliability. Furthermore, existing databases and prediction methods do not explicitly facilitate forming hypotheses about the possible molecular causes of the association, thereby making the path to experimental follow-up longer. Results: Here we present miRPD in which miRNA–Protein–Disease associations are explicitly inferred. Besides linking miRNAs to diseases, it directly suggests the underlying proteins involved, which can be used to form hypotheses that can be experimentally tested. The inference of miRNAs and diseases is made by coupling known and predicted miRNA–protein associations with protein–disease associations text mined from the literature. We present scoring schemes that allow us to rank miRNA–disease associations inferred from both curated and predicted miRNA targets by reliability and thereby to create high- and medium-confidence sets of associations. Analyzing these, we find statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in pathways related to cancer and type I diabetes mellitus, suggesting either a literature bias or a genuine biological trend. We show by example how the associations can be used to extract proteins for disease hypothesis. Availability and implementation: All datasets, software and a searchable Web site are available at http://mirpd.jensenlab.org. Contact: lars.juhl.jensen@cpr.ku.dk or gorodkin@rth.dk PMID:24273243

  6. Analysis of the proteins associated with platelet detergent resistant membranes.

    PubMed

    Szklanna, Paulina B; Foy, Martina; Wynne, Kieran; Byrne, Dwayne; Maguire, Patricia B

    2016-09-01

    Proteomic studies have facilitated the identification of proteins associated with the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fraction in a variety of cell types. Here, we have undertaken label-free quantitative (LFQ) proteomic profiling of the proteins associated with detergent-resistant plasma and internal membranes from resting and activated platelets. One hundred forty-one proteins were identified and raw data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002554. The proteins identified include a myriad of important platelet signaling and trafficking proteins including Rap1b, Src, SNAP-23, syntaxin-11, and members of the previously unattributed Ragulator complex. Mean LFQ intensities calculated across three technical replicates for the three biological donors revealed that several important platelet signaling proteins altered their detergent solubility upon activation, including GPIbα, GPIbβ, Src, and 14-3-3ζ. Altered detergent solubility for GPIbα, following activation using a variety of platelet agonists, was confirmed by immunoblotting and further coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that GPIbα forms a complex with 14-3-3ζ that shifts into DRMs following activation. Taken together, proteomic profiling of platelet DRMs allowed greater insight in the complex biology of both DRMs and platelets and will be a useful subproteome to study platelet-related disease. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002554 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002554). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Jupiter, a new Drosophila protein associated with microtubules.

    PubMed

    Karpova, Nina; Bobinnec, Yves; Fouix, Sylvaine; Huitorel, Philippe; Debec, Alain

    2006-05-01

    In this study we describe a novel Drosophila protein Jupiter, which shares properties with several structural microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) including TAU, MAP2, MAP4. Jupiter is a soluble unfolded molecule with the high net positive charge, rich in Glycine. It possesses two degenerated repeats around the sequence PPGG, separated by a Serine-rich region. Jupiter associates with microtubules in vitro and, fused with the green fluorescent protein (GFP), is an excellent marker to follow microtubule dynamics in vivo. In a jupiter transgenic Drosophila strain generated by the "protein-trap" technique, Jupiter:GFP fusion protein localizes to the microtubule network through the cell cycle at the different stages of development. We found particularly high Jupiter:GFP concentrations in the young embryo, larval nervous system, precursors of eye photoreceptors and adult ovary. Moreover, from jupiter:gfp embryos we have established two permanent cell lines presenting strongly fluorescent microtubules during the whole cell cycle. In these cells, the distribution of the Jupiter:GFP fusion protein reproduces microtubule behavior upon treatment by the drugs colchicine and taxol. The jupiter cell lines and fly strain should be of wide interest for biologists interested in in vivo analysis of microtubule dynamics.

  8. Virulent strain associated outer membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Skare, J T; Shang, E S; Foley, D M; Blanco, D R; Champion, C I; Mirzabekov, T; Sokolov, Y; Kagan, B L; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated and purified outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Borrelia burgdorferi strain B31 based on methods developed for isolation of Treponema pallidum OMV. Purified OMV exhibited distinct porin activities with conductances of 0.6 and 12.6 nano-Siemen and had no detectable beta-NADH oxidase activity indicating their outer membrane origin and their lack of inner membrane contamination, respectively. Hydrophobic proteins were identified by phase partitioning with Triton X-114. Most of these hydrophobic membrane proteins were not acylated, suggesting that they are outer membrane-spanning proteins. Identification of palmitate-labeled lipoproteins revealed that several were enriched in the OMV, several were enriched in the protoplasmic cylinder inner membrane fraction, and others were found exclusively associated with the inner membrane. The protein composition of OMV changed significantly with successive in vitro cultivation of strain B31. Using antiserum with specificity for virulent strain B31, we identified OMV antigens on the surface of the spirochete and identified proteins whose presence in OMV could be correlated with virulence and protective immunity in the rabbit Lyme disease model. These virulent strain associated outer membrane-spanning proteins may provide new insight into the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Images PMID:7593626

  9. Thermodynamics of folding and association of lattice-model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellmer, Troy; Bratko, Dusan; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey

    2005-05-01

    Closely related to the "protein folding problem" is the issue of protein misfolding and aggregation. Protein aggregation has been associated with the pathologies of nearly 20 human diseases and presents serious difficulties during the manufacture of pharmaceutical proteins. Computational studies of multiprotein systems have recently emerged as a powerful complement to experimental efforts aimed at understanding the mechanisms of protein aggregation. We describe the thermodynamics of systems containing two lattice-model 64-mers. A parallel tempering algorithm abates problems associated with glassy systems and the weighted histogram analysis method improves statistical quality. The presence of a second chain has a substantial effect on single-chain conformational preferences. The melting temperature is substantially reduced, and the increase in the population of unfolded states is correlated with an increase in interactions between chains. The transition from two native chains to a non-native aggregate is entropically favorable. Non-native aggregates receive ˜25% of their stabilizing energy from intraprotein contacts not found in the lowest-energy structure. Contact maps show that for non-native dimers, nearly 50% of the most probable interprotein contacts involve pairs of residues that form native contacts, suggesting that a domain-swapping mechanism is involved in self-association.

  10. Encounter complexes and dimensionality reduction in protein–protein association

    PubMed Central

    Kozakov, Dima; Li, Keyong; Hall, David R; Beglov, Dmitri; Zheng, Jiefu; Vakili, Pirooz; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch; Clore, G Marius; Vajda, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    An outstanding challenge has been to understand the mechanism whereby proteins associate. We report here the results of exhaustively sampling the conformational space in protein–protein association using a physics-based energy function. The agreement between experimental intermolecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) data and the PRE profiles calculated from the docked structures shows that the method captures both specific and non-specific encounter complexes. To explore the energy landscape in the vicinity of the native structure, the nonlinear manifold describing the relative orientation of two solid bodies is projected onto a Euclidean space in which the shape of low energy regions is studied by principal component analysis. Results show that the energy surface is canyon-like, with a smooth funnel within a two dimensional subspace capturing over 75% of the total motion. Thus, proteins tend to associate along preferred pathways, similar to sliding of a protein along DNA in the process of protein-DNA recognition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01370.001 PMID:24714491

  11. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Low Concentrations of Protein Z

    PubMed Central

    Erez, Offer; Hoppensteadt, Debra; Romero, Roberto; Espinoza, Jimmy; Goncalves, Luis; Nien, Jyh Kae; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Fareed, Jawed; Gotsch, Francesca; Pineles, Beth; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn

    2008-01-01

    Objective Protein Z, a vitamin K-dependent plasma protein, has an important role in the regulation of the coagulation cascade. Protein Z deficiency has been associated with unexplained pregnancy loss and adverse pregnancy outcome in patients with thrombophilia. This study was conducted to determine if preeclampsia (PE), small-for-gestational age (SGA) and fetal demise are associated with changes in maternal plasma concentrations of protein Z. Study Design This cross-sectional study included normal pregnant women (N=71), patients with PE (N=130), patients who delivered a SGA neonate (N=58), and patients with fetal demise (N=58). Maternal plasma protein Z concentrations were measured by a sensitive and specific immunoassay. Protein Z deficiency was defined as maternal plasma concentrations ≤5th percentile of the normal pregnancy group (≤1.59μg/mL). Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Results 1) Patients with preeclampsia had a lower median plasma concentration of protein Z than normal pregnant women (PE: median: 1.6 μg/mL, range: 0.2-3.3 μg/mLl vs. normal pregnancy: median: 2.4 μg/mL, range: 1.1-3.4 μg/mLl; p<0.01); 2) Patients with SGA (median: 2.3 μg/mL, range: 0.2-3.8 μg/mL) and fetal demise (median: 2.6 μg/mL, range: 0.2-4.3 μg/mL) did not have significant different median protein Z concentrations from normal pregnant women (p>0.05); and 3) Women in the PE and fetal demise groups had significantly higher rate of protein Z deficiency than those with normal pregnancy outcome. Conclusion 1) PE, but neither SGA nor fetal demise, is associated with significantly lower maternal median plasma concentration of protein Z concentrations than normal pregnancy; and 2) a high rate of protein Z deficiency was observed in patients with PE and fetal demise. PMID:17701666

  12. An updated nomenclature for keratin-associated proteins (KAPs).

    PubMed

    Gong, Hua; Zhou, Huitong; McKenzie, Grant W; Yu, Zhidong; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M; Plowman, Jeffrey E; Wright, Mathew W; Arora, Reena; Bawden, C Simon; Chen, Yulin; Li, Jinquan; Hickford, Jonathan G H

    2012-01-01

    Most protein in hair and wool is of two broad types: keratin intermediate filament-forming proteins (commonly known as keratins) and keratin-associated proteins (KAPs). Keratin nomenclature was reviewed in 2006, but the KAP nomenclature has not been revised since 1993. Recently there has been an increase in the number of KAP genes (KRTAPs) identified in humans and other species, and increasingly reports of variation in these genes. We therefore propose that an updated naming system is needed to accommodate the complexity of the KAPs. It is proposed that the system is founded in the previous nomenclature, but with the abbreviation sp-KAPm-nL*x for KAP proteins and sp-KRTAPm-n(p/L)*x for KAP genes. In this system "sp" is a unique letter-based code for different species as described by the protein knowledge-based UniProt. "m" is a number identifying the gene or protein family, "n" is a constituent member of that family, "p" signifies a pseudogene if present, "L" if present signifies "like" and refers to a temporary "place-holder" until the family is confirmed and "x" signifies a genetic variant or allele. We support the use of non-italicised text for the proteins and italicised text for the genes. This nomenclature is not that different to the existing system, but it includes species information and also describes genetic variation if identified, and hence is more informative. For example, GenBank sequence JN091630 would historically have been named KRTAP7-1 for the gene and KAP7-1 for the protein, but with the proposed nomenclature would be SHEEP-KRTAP7-1*A and SHEEP-KAP7-1*A for the gene and protein respectively. This nomenclature will facilitate more efficient storage and retrieval of data and define a common language for the KAP proteins and genes from all mammalian species.

  13. Loss of protein association causes cardiolipin degradation in Barth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Phoon, Colin K.L.; Berno, Bob; D’Souza, Kenneth; Hoedt, Esthelle; Zhang, Guoan; Neubert, Thomas A.; Epand, Richard M.; Ren, Mindong; Schlame, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cardiolipin is a specific mitochondrial phospholipid that has a high affinity for proteins and that stabilizes the assembly of supercomplexes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. We found that sequestration of cardiolipin in protein complexes is critical to protect it from degradation. The turnover of cardiolipin is slower by almost an order of magnitude than the turnover of other phospholipids. However, in Barth syndrome, cardiolipin is rapidly degraded via the intermediate monolyso-cardiolipin. Treatments that induce supercomplex assembly decrease the turnover of cardiolipin and the concentration of monolyso-cardiolipin whereas dissociation of supercomplexes has the opposite effect. Our data suggest that cardiolipin is uniquely protected from normal lipid turnover by its association with proteins, but in Barth syndrome, where this association is compromised, cardiolipin becomes unstable, which causes the accumulation of monolyso-cardiolipin. PMID:27348092

  14. Crystallization of cyclase-associated protein from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Andreas; Hess, Sonja; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2002-10-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved two-domain protein that helps to activate the catalytic activity of adenylyl cyclase in the cyclase-bound state through interaction with Ras, which binds to the cyclase in a different region. With its other domain, CAP can bind monomeric actin and therefore also carries a cytoskeletal function. The protein is thus involved in Ras/cAMP-dependent signal transduction and most likely serves as an adapter protein translocating the adenylyl cyclase complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.2, b = 75.1, c = 162.9 A, have been obtained from Dictyostelium discoideum CAP carrying a C-terminal His tag. A complete native data set extending to 2.2 A resolution was collected from a single crystal using an in-house X-ray system. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of CAP.

  15. Enzymes Associated with Protein Bodies Isolated from Ungerminated Barley Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Ory, Robert L.; Henningsen, Knud W.

    1969-01-01

    Protein bodies were isolated intact from dormant barley seeds, Hordeum vulgare, var. Kenia, by a combination of buffer extractions and centrifugations over a sucrose gradient. Examination of the protein bodies pellet in the electron microscope shows 2 types of protein bodies in a wide variation of sizes. The majority of them stain evenly with osmium, are contained within a single membrane, and have no other structural components. The other type, mostly the larger particles, has a fine structure of orderly dark and light-stained layers attached to the protein bodies. Two acid hydrolases are associated with these particles: acid phosphatase activity, specific for sodium phytate but inactive on β-glycerol phosphate, glucose 1-phosphate, fructose 1,6-diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate; and acid protease activity. Images PMID:5397495

  16. Enzymes associated with protein bodies isolated from ungerminated barley seeds.

    PubMed

    Ory, R L; Henningsen, K W

    1969-11-01

    Protein bodies were isolated intact from dormant barley seeds, Hordeum vulgare, var. Kenia, by a combination of buffer extractions and centrifugations over a sucrose gradient. Examination of the protein bodies pellet in the electron microscope shows 2 types of protein bodies in a wide variation of sizes. The majority of them stain evenly with osmium, are contained within a single membrane, and have no other structural components. The other type, mostly the larger particles, has a fine structure of orderly dark and light-stained layers attached to the protein bodies. Two acid hydrolases are associated with these particles: acid phosphatase activity, specific for sodium phytate but inactive on beta-glycerol phosphate, glucose 1-phosphate, fructose 1,6-diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate; and acid protease activity.

  17. RNA immunoprecipitation for determining RNA-protein associations in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Chris; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2006-08-01

    Similar to chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) can be used to detect the association of individual proteins with specific nucleic acid regions, in this case on RNA. Live cells are treated with formaldehyde to generate protein-RNA cross-links between molecules that are in close proximity in vivo. RNA sequences that cross-link with a given protein are isolated by immunoprecipitation of the protein, and reversal of the formaldehyde cross-linking permits recovery and quantitative analysis of the immunoprecipitated RNA by reverse transcription PCR. The basics of RIP are very similar to those of ChIP, but with some important caveats. This unit describes the RIP procedure for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although the corresponding steps for metazoan cells have not yet been worked out, it is likely that the yeast procedure can easily be adapted for use in other organisms.

  18. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  19. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphisms are associated with coronary artery calcification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is a key regulator of vascular calcification. Genetic variation at the MGP locus could modulate the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). We examined the cross-sectional association between MGP SNPs [rs1800802 (T-138C), rs1800801 (G-7A),and rs4236 (Ala102Thr)...

  20. ODV-associated proteins of the Pieris rapae granulovirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Bao-Qin; Xu, Hai-Jun; Cui, Ying-Jun; Xu, Yi-Peng; Zhang, Min-Juan; Han, Yeon Soo; Lee, Yong Seok; Bao, Yan-Yuan; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2011-06-03

    Alphabaculovirus (lepidopteran-specific nucleopolyhedroviruses, NPV) and Betabaculovirus (granuloviruses, GV) are two main genera of the family Baculoviridae. The virion proteomes of Alphabaculovirus have been well studied; however, the Betabaculovirus virion compositions remain unclear. Pieris rapae granulovirus (PrGV) can kill larvae of P. rapae, a worldwide and important pest of mustard family crops. In this study, the occlusion-derived virus (ODV)-associated proteins of PrGV were identified using three mass spectrometry (MS) approaches. The MS analyses demonstrated that 47 proteins were present in PrGV-ODV. Of the 47 PrGV-ODV proteins, 33 have homologues identified previously in other baculovirus ODV/BVs, whereas 14 (P10, Pr21, Pr29, Pr35, Pr42, Pr54, P45/48, Pr83, Pr84, Pr89, Pr92, Pr111, Pr114 and FGF3) were newly identified ODV proteins. Seven of the 14 newly identified ODV proteins are specific to Betabaculovirus, including Pr35, Pr42, Pr54, Pr83, Pr84, Pr111 and Pr114. Furthermore, the data derived from these MS approaches were validated by immunoblotting analysis using antisera prepared from 11 randomly selected recombinant PrGV-ODV proteins (including 5 Betabaculovirus-unique proteins). Comparison analyses revealed the similar and different compositions between Betabaculovirus and Alphabaculovirus virions, which deepen our understanding of the baculovirus virion structure and provide helpful information on Betabaculovirus--host interaction studies.

  1. Effects of polyamines on prostatic chromatin- and non-histone-protein-associated protein kinase reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, K; Wilson, M J; Goueli, S A; Williams-Ashman, H G

    1978-01-01

    Studies are presented on the influence of polyamines on prostatic chromatin- and non-histone-protein-associated protein kinase reactions involving both exogenous and endogenous substrates. The activities toward the model acidic protein substrate, dephosphophosvitin, were maximal at 160--200mM-NaCl (or -KCl or -NH4Cl). Under these conditions, spermidine and spermine added in concentrations up to 2mM were essentially without effect. However, without addition of NaCl to the medium, marked stimulation of these reactions was elicited by these polyamines at 1--2mM concentrations. The stimulatory effects were not due to non-specific changes in the ionic strength or to substitution of spermine for Mg2+, as maximal stimulation by 1 mM-spermine was observed only at optimal (2--4mM) Mg2+ concentrations. Qualitatively similar effects of polyamines were observed with enzyme preparations from the prostates of castrated rats, and with chromatin and non-histone-protein preparations from other tissues besides ventral prostate. When phosphorylation of endogenous non-histone proteins of the chromatin was measured, spermine stimulated both the initial rates and the final extent of transphosphorylation, even in the presence of optimal concentration of NaCl. By contrast, spermine or spermidine had no effect on the chromatin- and non-histone-protein-associated protein kinase reactions determined with lysine-rich histones as substrates. Chemically NN-dimethylated dephosphophosvitin was a less active substrate for the chromatin-associated protein kinase, but its phosphorylation was more markedly stimulated by spermine in comparison with unmodified dephosphophosvitin. These observations hint that the polyamine stimulations of the various protein kinase reactions may be due to effects on the conformations of the non-histone protein substrates rather than on the kinases themselves. PMID:747650

  2. Lipid nanotechnologies for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Grushin, Kirill; Dalm, Daniela; Miller, Jaimy

    2014-11-01

    We present a methodology of lipid nanotubes (LNT) and nanodisks technologies optimized in our laboratory for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins at close to physiological conditions. The application of these lipid nanotechnologies for structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is fundamental for understanding and modulating their function. The LNTs in our studies are single bilayer galactosylceramide based nanotubes of ∼20 nm inner diameter and a few microns in length, that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. The lipid nanodisks (NDs) are self-assembled discoid lipid bilayers of ∼10 nm diameter, which are stabilized in aqueous solutions by a belt of amphipathic helical scaffold proteins. By combining LNT and ND technologies, we can examine structurally how the membrane curvature and lipid composition modulates the function of the membrane-associated proteins. As proof of principle, we have engineered these lipid nanotechnologies to mimic the activated platelet's phosphtaidylserine rich membrane and have successfully assembled functional membrane-bound coagulation factor VIII in vitro for structure determination by cryo-EM. The macromolecular organization of the proteins bound to ND and LNT are further defined by fitting the known atomic structures within the calculated three-dimensional maps. The combination of LNT and ND technologies offers a means to control the design and assembly of a wide range of functional membrane-associated proteins and complexes for structural studies by cryo-EM. The presented results confirm the suitability of the developed methodology for studying the functional structure of membrane-associated proteins, such as the coagulation factors, at a close to physiological environment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Comparative effects of cryosolvents on tubulin association, thermal stability, and binding of microtubule-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Pajot-Augy, E

    1993-06-01

    Organic cryosolvents essential for cryopreservation of living cells have a colligative effect on water properties, but also affect cellular structures such as the membrane, actin, or tubulin cytoskeleton. The effects of cryosolvents on actin and its binding proteins are starting to be well investigated. In parallel, tubulin assembly characteristics were investigated comparatively, with 0-30% 1,2-propanediol, dimethyl sulfoxide, or glycerol, and with or without microtubule-associated proteins, at 37 or 4 degrees C. Tubulin association was monitored by spectrometry and sedimentation, providing the concentration in free protein, cold-depolymerizable microtubules, and cold-resistant associations. At 37 degrees C, 1,2-propanediol and dimethyl sulfoxide induce a similar association level and cold stability of the assemblies. Glycerol yields a lower level of tubulin association. Cold stability of the assemblies requires the presence of solvent, the amount of which is modulated by microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs): 15% 1,2-propanediol or dimethyl sulfoxide, decreasing down to 10% with MAPs, or 10% glycerol with MAPs only. At 4 degrees C, some cold-stable association is promoted by 1,2-propanediol or dimethyl sulfoxide above 10-15%, in the presence or absence of MAPs, but not with glycerol. In addition, protein content of the various fractions obtained with MAPs and 30% solvent was examined by densitometry of electrophoresis gels. Cold-labile associations obtained at 37 degrees C with 1,2-propanediol or dimethyl sulfoxide are lacking in tubulin and enriched in tau proteins relative to control or glycerol. Associations formed at 37 degrees C and stable to subsequent cold treatment, or at 4 degrees C, regardless of the solvent, present a large tubulin content, as well as few tau proteins and high-molecular-weight MAPs.

  4. Chicken Egg Shell Membrane Associated Proteins and Peptides.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Sarbjeet; Liyanage, Rohana; Kannan, Lakshmi; Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Lay, Jack O; Rath, Narayan C

    2015-11-11

    Egg shells are poultry industry byproducts with potential for use in various biological and agricultural applications. We have been interested in the membranes underlying the calcareous shell as a feed supplement, which showed potential to improve immunity and performance of post hatch poultry. Therefore, to determine their protein and peptide profiles, we extracted the egg shell membranes (ESM) from fresh unfertilized eggs with methanol and guanidine hydrochloride (GdHCl) to obtain soluble proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. The methanol extract was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), high-performance reverse phase liquid chromatographic separation (HPLC), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to determine its peptide and protein profiles. The GdHCl extract was subjected to ESI-HPLC-MS/MS following trypsin digestion of reduced/alkylated proteins. Nine proteins from the methanol extract and >275 proteins from the GdHCl extract were tentatively identified. The results suggested the presence of several abundant proteins from egg whites, such as ovoalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme as well as many others associated with antimicrobial, biomechanical, cytoskeletal organizational, cell signaling, and enzyme activities. Collagens, keratin, agrin, and laminin were some of the structural proteins present in the ESM. The methanol-soluble fraction contained several clusterin peptides and defensins, particularly, two isoforms of gallin. The ratios of the two isoforms of gallin differed between the membranes obtained from brown and white eggs. The high abundance of several antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and other bioactive proteins in the ESM along with its potential to entrap various microbes and antigens may make it a suitable vehicle for oral immunization of post hatch poultry and improve their disease resistance.

  5. Balanced Protein–Water Interactions Improve Properties of Disordered Proteins and Non-Specific Protein Association

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Some frequently encountered deficiencies in all-atom molecular simulations, such as nonspecific protein–protein interactions being too strong, and unfolded or disordered states being too collapsed, suggest that proteins are insufficiently well solvated in simulations using current state-of-the-art force fields. To address these issues, we make the simplest possible change, by modifying the short-range protein–water pair interactions, and leaving all the water–water and protein–protein parameters unchanged. We find that a modest strengthening of protein–water interactions is sufficient to recover the correct dimensions of intrinsically disordered or unfolded proteins, as determined by direct comparison with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data. The modification also results in more realistic protein-protein affinities, and average solvation free energies of model compounds which are more consistent with experiment. Most importantly, we show that this scaling is small enough not to affect adversely the stability of the folded state, with only a modest effect on the stability of model peptides forming α-helix and β-sheet structures. The proposed adjustment opens the way to more accurate atomistic simulations of proteins, particularly for intrinsically disordered proteins, protein–protein association, and crowded cellular environments. PMID:25400522

  6. Gene Ontology Function prediction in Mollicutes using Protein-Protein Association Networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many complex systems can be represented and analysed as networks. The recent availability of large-scale datasets, has made it possible to elucidate some of the organisational principles and rules that govern their function, robustness and evolution. However, one of the main limitations in using protein-protein interactions for function prediction is the availability of interaction data, especially for Mollicutes. If we could harness predicted interactions, such as those from a Protein-Protein Association Networks (PPAN), combining several protein-protein network function-inference methods with semantic similarity calculations, the use of protein-protein interactions for functional inference in this species would become more potentially useful. Results In this work we show that using PPAN data combined with other approximations, such as functional module detection, orthology exploitation methods and Gene Ontology (GO)-based information measures helps to predict protein function in Mycoplasma genitalium. Conclusions To our knowledge, the proposed method is the first that combines functional module detection among species, exploiting an orthology procedure and using information theory-based GO semantic similarity in PPAN of the Mycoplasma species. The results of an evaluation show a higher recall than previously reported methods that focused on only one organism network. PMID:21486441

  7. Purification of recombinant nacre-associated mineralization protein AP7 fused with maltose-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Hsun-Hui; Mou, Yun; Chi, Peter; Chan, Jerry Chun Chung; Luo, Shih-Chi

    2014-08-01

    Formation of biominerals often involves specific proteins that modulate the process of matrix assembly, nucleation, and crystal growth. AP7 is an aragonite-associated protein of 7 kDa and is intrinsically disordered. The structural disorder of AP7 makes it very difficult to express in Escherchiacoli. In this work, we report the first successful expression and purification of recombinant AP7 using the maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion approach. We obtain a high-yield production of recombinant MBP-AP7 protein inE. coli (∼60 mg/L). We also establish an efficient protocol to remove the MBP fusion protein by Factor Xa, followed by purification using size-exclusion chromatography. Characterization of the recombinant AP7 protein has been carried out using MALDI-TOF, peptide mass fingerprinting, and circular dichroism (CD). The mass data confirm that the purified recombinant protein is AP7. The CD data suggest that the recombinant AP7 protein exists as partially disordered structure at neutral pH. The calcium carbonate precipitation assay shows that both MBP-AP7 and AP7 exhibit morphological modification on calcite crystallites. The co-precipitation of MBP-tagged AP7 derivatives and calcium carbonate generate different types of AP7 composite calcite and vaterite crystals. This system should be helpful to establish a model for understanding the structure/function relationship between the protein and inorganic mineral interaction.

  8. MAMP (microbe-associated molecular pattern)-induced changes in plasma membrane-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Uhlíková, Hana; Solanský, Martin; Hrdinová, Vendula; Šedo, Ondrej; Kašparovský, Tomáš; Hejátko, Jan; Lochman, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Plant plasma membrane associated proteins play significant roles in Microbe-Associated Molecular Pattern (MAMP) mediated defence responses including signal transduction, membrane transport or energetic metabolism. To elucidate the dynamics of proteins associated with plasma membrane in response to cryptogein, a well-known MAMP of defence reaction secreted by the oomycete Phytophthora cryptogea, 2D-Blue Native/SDS gel electrophoresis of plasma membrane fractions was employed. This approach revealed 21 up- or down-regulated protein spots of which 15 were successfully identified as proteins related to transport through plasma membrane, vesicle trafficking, and metabolic enzymes including cytosolic NADP-malic enzyme and glutamine synthetase. Observed changes in proteins were also confirmed on transcriptional level by qRT-PCR analysis. In addition, a significantly decreased accumulation of transcripts observed after employment of a mutant variant of cryptogein Leu41Phe, exhibiting a conspicuous defect in induction of resistance, sustains the contribution of identified proteins in cryptogein-triggered cellular responses. Our data provide further evidence for dynamic MAMP-induced changes in plasma membrane associated proteins.

  9. Root carbon and protein metabolism associated with heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bingru; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Xu, Jichen

    2012-05-01

    Extensive past efforts have been taken toward understanding heat tolerance mechanisms of the aboveground organs. Root systems play critical roles in whole-plant adaptation to heat stress, but are less studied. This review discusses recent research results revealing some critical physiological and metabolic factors underlying root thermotolerance, with a focus on temperate perennial grass species. Comparative analysis of differential root responses to supraoptimal temperatures by a heat-adapted temperate C3 species, Agrostis scabra, which can survive high soil temperatures up to 45 °C in geothermal areas in Yellow Stone National Park, and a heat-sensitive cogeneric species, Agrostis stolonifera, suggested that efficient carbon and protein metabolism is critical for root thermotolerance. Superior root thermotolerance in a perennial grass was associated with a greater capacity to control respiratory costs through respiratory acclimation, lowering carbon investment in maintenance for protein turnover, and efficiently partitioning carbon into different metabolic pools and alternative respiration pathways. Proteomic analysis demonstrated that root thermotolerance was associated with an increased maintenance of stability and less degradation of proteins, particularly those important for metabolism and energy production. In addition, thermotolerant roots are better able to maintain growth and activity during heat stress by activating stress defence proteins such as those participating in antioxidant defence (i.e. superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase) and chaperoning protection (i.e. heat shock protein).

  10. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein–Protein Interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Lund, George; Dudkin, Sergii; Borkin, Dmitry; ...

    2014-11-25

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here in this paper, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation ofmore » CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes.« less

  11. HLA-H and associated proteins in patients with hemochromatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, E.; West, C.; Gelbart, T.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 845A(C282Y) mutation in the HLA-H gene accounts for most cases of hereditary hemochromatosis in patients who are of European origin. Some lack this mutation, however, and it is not present in Asian patients. Thus, other mutations either in HLA-H or associated proteins may be present in such patients. HLA-H associates with beta-2-microglobulin. Calreticulin associates with class 1 HLA proteins and appears to be identical with mobilferrin, a putative iron transport protein. These two proteins are therefore candidates for mutations in patients with hemochromatosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have sequenced the coding region and parts of introns of the HLA-H gene, the beta-2-microglobulin gene, and the calreticulin (mobilferrin) gene of 10, 7, and 5 hemochromatosis patients, respectively, selecting those who were not homozygous for the 845A(C282Y) mutation. The number of chromosomes at risk studied were 18 for HLA-H, 14 for beta-2-microglobulin and 10 for calreticulin. RESULTS: We detected 3 new intronic polymorphisms in the HLA-H gene, each a point mutation. Some differences from published sequences of beta-2-microglobulin and calreticulin were documented, but these were uniformly present in all samples. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of additional mutations in the HLA-H gene is remarkable, and we speculate that the C282Y mutation may be a gain-of-function change. PMID:9234244

  12. Effect of association with adenylyl cyclase-associated protein on the interaction of yeast adenylyl cyclase with Ras protein.

    PubMed

    Shima, F; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Tamada, M; Okada, T; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1997-03-01

    Posttranslational modification of Ras protein has been shown to be critical for interaction with its effector molecules, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase. However, the mechanism of its action was unknown. In this study, we used a reconstituted system with purified adenylyl cyclase and Ras proteins carrying various degrees of the modification to show that the posttranslational modification, especially the farnesylation step, is responsible for 5- to 10-fold increase in Ras-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase activity even though it has no significant effect on their binding affinity. The stimulatory effect of farnesylation is found to depend on the association of adenylyl cyclase with 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP), which was known to be required for proper in vivo response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras protein, by comparing the levels of Ras-dependent activation of purified adenylyl cyclase with and without bound CAP. The region of CAP required for this effect is mapped to its N-terminal segment of 168 amino acid residues, which coincides with the region required for the in vivo effect. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect is successfully reconstituted by in vitro association of CAP with the purified adenylyl cyclase molecule lacking the bound CAP. These results indicate that the association of adenylyl cyclase with CAP is responsible for the stimulatory effect of posttranslational modification of Ras on its activity and that this may be the mechanism underlying its requirement for the proper in vivo cyclic AMP response.

  13. Regulation of human endometrial stromal proliferation and differentiation by C/EBPβ involves cyclin E-cdk2 and STAT3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Taylor, Robert N; Bagchi, Indrani C; Bagchi, Milan K

    2012-12-01

    During each menstrual cycle, the human uterus undergoes a unique transformation, known as decidualization, which involves endometrial stromal proliferation and differentiation. During this process, the stromal cells are transformed into decidual cells, which produce factors that prepare the uterus for potential embryo implantation. We previously identified the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)β as a regulator of endometrial stromal proliferation and differentiation in mice. In this study, we addressed the role of C/EBPβ in human endometrial decidualization. Using small interfering RNA targeted to C/EBPβ mRNA, we demonstrated that C/EBPβ controls the proliferation of primary human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) by regulating the expression of several key cell cycle-regulatory factors during the G(1)-S phase transition. Additionally, loss of C/EBPβ expression blocked the differentiation of HESCs in response to estrogen, progesterone, and cyclic AMP. Gene expression profiling of normal and C/EBPβ-deficient HESCs revealed that the receptor for the cytokine IL-11 and its downstream signal transducer signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) are targets of regulation by C/EBPβ. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that C/EBPβ controls the expression of STAT3 gene by directly interacting with a distinct regulatory sequence in its 5'-flanking region. Attenuation of STAT3 mRNA expression in HESCs resulted in markedly reduced differentiation of these cells, indicating an important role for STAT3 in decidualization. Gene expression profiling, using STAT3-deficient HESCs, showed an extensive overlap of pathways downstream of STAT3 and C/EBPβ during stromal cell differentiation. Collectively, these findings revealed a novel functional link between C/EBPβ and STAT3 that is a critical regulator of endometrial differentiation in women.

  14. Iroquois homeobox transcription factor (Irx5) promotes G1/S-phase transition in vascular smooth muscle cells by CDK2-dependent activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi; Bacanamwo, Methode

    2016-01-01

    The Iroquois homeobox (Irx5) gene is essential in embryonic development and cardiac electrophysiology. Although recent studies have reported that IRX5 protein is involved in regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, little is known about the role of IRX5 in the adult vasculature. Here we report novel observations on the role of IRX5 in adult vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) during proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Comparative studies using primary human endothelial cells, VSMCs, and intact carotid arteries to determine relative expression of Irx5 in the peripheral vasculature demonstrate significantly higher expression in VSMCs. Sprague-Dawley rat carotid arteries were subjected to balloon catherization, and the presence of IRX5 was examined by immunohistochemistry after 2 wk. Results indicate markedly elevated IRX5 signal at 14 days compared with uninjured controls. Total RNA was isolated from injured and uninjured arteries, and Irx5 expression was measured by RT-PCR. Results demonstrate a significant increase in Irx5 expression at 3–14 days postinjury compared with controls. Irx5 genetic gain- and loss-of-function studies using thymidine and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation assays resulted in modulation of DNA synthesis in primary rat aortic VSMCs. Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27kip1), E2F transcription factor 1 (E2f1), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) expression in Irx5-transduced VSMCs compared with controls. Subsequently, apoptosis was observed and confirmed by morphological observation, caspase-3 cleavage, and enzymatic activation compared with control conditions. Taken together, these results indicate that Irx5 plays an important role in VSMC G1/S-phase cell cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis. PMID:27170637

  15. Transcriptional robustness and protein interactions are associated in yeast.

    PubMed

    Bekaert, Michaël; Conant, Gavin C

    2011-05-05

    Robustness to insults, both external and internal, is a characteristic feature of life. One level of biological organization for which noise and robustness have been extensively studied is gene expression. Cells have a variety of mechanisms for buffering noise in gene expression, but it is not completely clear what rules govern whether or not a given gene uses such tools to maintain appropriate expression. Here, we show a general association between the degree to which yeast cells have evolved mechanisms to buffer changes in gene expression and whether they possess protein-protein interactions. We argue that this effect bears an affinity to epistasis, because yeast appears to have evolved regulatory mechanisms such that distant changes in gene copy number for a protein-protein interaction partner gene can alter a gene's expression. This association is not unexpected given recent work linking epistasis and the deleterious effects of changes in gene dosage (i.e., the dosage balance hypothesis). Using gene expression data from artificial aneuploid strains of bakers' yeast, we found that genes coding for proteins that physically interact with other proteins show less expression variation in response to aneuploidy than do other genes. This effect is even more pronounced for genes whose products interact with proteins encoded on aneuploid chromosomes. We further found that genes targeted by transcription factors encoded on aneuploid chromosomes were more likely to change in expression after aneuploidy. We suggest that these observations can be best understood as resulting from the higher fitness cost of misexpression in epistatic genes and a commensurate greater regulatory control of them.

  16. Attractive protein-polymer interactions markedly alter the effect of macromolecular crowding on protein association equilibria.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ming; Li, Hong-Tao; Chen, Jie; Minton, Allen P; Liang, Yi

    2010-08-04

    The dependence of the fluorescence of catalase upon the concentration of added superoxide dismutase (SOD) indicates that SOD binds to saturable sites on catalase. The affinity of SOD for these sites varies with temperature, and with the concentration of each of three nominally inert polymeric additives--dextran 70, Ficoll 70, and polyethylene glycol 2000. At room temperature (25.0 degrees C) and higher, the addition of high concentrations of polymer is found to significantly enhance the affinity of SOD for catalase, but with decreasing temperature the enhancing effect of polymer addition diminishes, and at 8.0 degrees C, addition of polymer has little or no effect on the affinity of SOD for catalase. The results presented here provide the first experimental evidence for the existence of competition between a repulsive excluded volume interaction between protein and polymer, which tends to enhance association of dilute protein, and an attractive interaction between protein and polymer, which tends to inhibit protein association. The net effect of high concentrations of polymer upon protein associations depends upon the relative strength of these two types of interactions at the temperature of measurement, and may vary significantly between different proteins and/or polymers.

  17. The functional domain grouping of microtubule associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Charlotte M; Wakefield, James G

    2008-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs), which play crucial roles in normal cell function, are regulated by MT associated proteins (MAPs). Using a combinatorial approach that includes biochemistry, proteomics and bioinformatics, we have recently identified 270 putative MAPs from Drosophila embryos and characterized some of those required for correct progression through mitosis. Here we identify functional groups of these MAPs using a reciprocal hits sequence alignment technique and assign InterPro functional domains to 28 previously uncharacterized proteins. This approach gives insight into the potential functions of MAPs and how their roles may affect MTs. PMID:19704789

  18. Heat Shock Proteins in Association with Heat Tolerance in Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhan, Chenyang; Huang, Bingru

    2011-01-01

    The grass family Poaceae includes annual species cultivated as major grain crops and perennial species cultivated as forage or turf grasses. Heat stress is a primary factor limiting growth and productivity of cool-season grass species and is becoming a more significant problem in the context of global warming. Plants have developed various mechanisms in heat-stress adaptation, including changes in protein metabolism such as the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs). This paper summarizes the structure and function of major HSPs, recent research progress on the association of HSPs with grass tolerance to heat stress, and incorporation of HSPs in heat-tolerant grass breeding. PMID:22084689

  19. p95vav associates with the nuclear protein Ku-70.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, F; Dargemont, C; Pozo, F; Reeves, W H; Camonis, J; Gisselbrecht, S; Fischer, S

    1996-01-01

    The proto-oncogene vav is expressed solely in hematopoietic cells and plays an important role in cell signaling, although little is known about the proteins involved in these pathways. To gain further information, the Src homology 2 (SH2) and 3 (SH3) domains of Vav were used to screen a lymphoid cell cDNA library by the yeast two-hybrid system. Among the positive clones, we detected a nuclear protein, Ku-70, which is the DNA-binding element of the DNA-dependent protein kinase. In Jurkat and UT7 cells, Vav is partially localized in the nuclei, as judged from immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy studies. By using glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins derived from Ku-70 and coimmunoprecipitation experiments with lysates prepared from human thymocytes and Jurkat and UT7 cells, we show that Vav associates with Ku-70. The interaction of Vav with Ku-70 requires only the 150-residue carboxy-terminal portion of Ku-70, which binds to the 25 carboxy-terminal residues of the carboxy SH3 domain of Vav. A proline-to-leucine mutation in the carboxy SH3 of Vav that blocks interaction with proline-rich sequences does not modify the binding of Ku-70, which lacks this motif. Therefore, the interaction of Vav with Ku-70 may be a novel form of protein-protein interaction. The potential role of Vav/Ku-70 complexes is discussed. PMID:8524317

  20. A novel family of plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Vidya; Poulet, Axel; Détourné, Gwénaëlle; Tatout, Christophe; Vanrobays, Emmanuel; Evans, David E; Graumann, Katja

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the characterisation of a new family of higher plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins (NEAPs) that interact with other proteins of the nuclear envelope. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the family consists of three genes expressed ubiquitously (AtNEAP1-3) and a pseudogene (AtNEAP4). NEAPs consist of extensive coiled-coil domains, followed by a nuclear localisation signal and a C-terminal predicted transmembrane domain. Domain deletion mutants confirm the presence of a functional nuclear localisation signal and transmembrane domain. AtNEAP proteins localise to the nuclear periphery as part of stable protein complexes, are able to form homo- and heteromers, and interact with the SUN domain proteins AtSUN1 and AtSUN2, involved in the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. An A. thaliana cDNA library screen identified a putative transcription factor called AtbZIP18 as a novel interactor of AtNEAP1, which suggest a connection between NEAP and chromatin. An Atneap1 Atneap3 double-knockout mutant showed reduced root growth, and altered nuclear morphology and chromatin structure. Thus AtNEAPs are suggested as inner nuclear membrane-anchored coiled-coil proteins with roles in maintaining nuclear morphology and chromatin structure.

  1. Characterization of associated proteins and phospholipids in natural rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Sansatsadeekul, Jitlada; Sakdapipanich, Jitladda; Rojruthai, Porntip

    2011-06-01

    Non-rubber components present in natural rubber (NR) latex, such as proteins and phospholipids, are presumed to be distributed in the serum fraction as well as surrounding the rubber particle surface. The phospholipid-protein layers covering the rubber particle surface are especially interesting due to their ability to enhance the colloidal stability of NR latex. In this study, we have characterized the components surrounding the NR particle surface and investigated their role in the colloidal stability of NR particles. Proteins from the cream fraction were proteolytically removed from the NR latex and compare to those from the serum fractions using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealing that both fractions contained similar proteins in certain molecular weights such as 14.5, 25 and 27 kDa. Phospholipids removed from latex by treatment with NaOH were analyzed using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and several major signals were assignable to -(CH(2))(n)-, -CH(2)OP, -CH(2)OC═O and -OCH(2)CH(2)NH-. These signals are important evidence that indicates phospholipids associate with the rubber chain. The colloidal behavior of rubber lattices before and after removal of protein-lipid membrane was evaluated by zeta potential analysis and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The lowest zeta potential value of NR particles was observed at pH 10, consequently leading to the highest stability of rubber particles. Additionally, SEM micrographs clearly displayed a gray ring near the particle surface corresponding to the protein-lipid membrane layer.

  2. Herp enhances ER-associated protein degradation by recruiting ubiquilins

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Yeon; Kim, Eunmin; Yoon, Sungjoo Kim; Yoon, Jong-Bok

    2008-05-02

    ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) is a protein quality control system of ER, which eliminates misfolded proteins by proteasome-dependent degradation and ensures export of only properly folded proteins from ER. Herp, an ER membrane protein upregulated by ER stress, is implicated in regulation of ERAD. In the present study, we show that Herp interacts with members of the ubiquilin family, which function as a shuttle factor to deliver ubiquitinated substrates to the proteasome for degradation. Knockdown of ubiquilin expression by small interfering RNA stabilized the ERAD substrate CD3{delta}, whereas it did not alter or increased degradation of non-ERAD substrates tested. CD3{delta} was stabilized by overexpressed Herp mutants which were capable of binding to ubiquilins but were impaired in ER membrane targeting by deletion of the transmembrane domain. Our data suggest that Herp binding to ubiquilin proteins plays an important role in the ERAD pathway and that ubiquilins are specifically involved in degradation of only a subset of ubiquitinated targets, including Herp-dependent ERAD substrates.

  3. Protein requirements for sister telomere association in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Canudas, Silvia; Houghtaling, Benjamin R; Kim, Ju Youn; Dynek, Jasmin N; Chang, William G; Smith, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies in human cells indicate that sister telomeres have distinct requirements for their separation at mitosis. In cells depleted for tankyrase 1, a telomeric poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, sister chromatid arms and centromeres separate normally, but telomeres remain associated and cells arrest in mitosis. Here, we use biochemical and genetic approaches to identify proteins that might mediate the persistent association at sister telomeres. We use immunoprecipitation analysis to show that the telomeric proteins, TRF1 (an acceptor of PARsylation by tankyrase 1) and TIN2 (a TRF1 binding partner) each bind to the SA1 ortholog of the cohesin Scc3 subunit. Sucrose gradient sedimentation shows that TRF1 cosediments with the SA1–cohesin complex. Depletion of the SA1 cohesin subunit or the telomeric proteins (TRF1 and TIN2) restores the normal resolution of sister telomeres in mitosis in tankyrase 1-depleted cells. Moreover, depletion of TRF1 and TIN2 or SA1 abrogates the requirement for tankyrase 1 in mitotic progression. Our studies indicate that sister telomere association in human cells is mediated by a novel association between a cohesin subunit and components of telomeric chromatin. PMID:17962804

  4. Repeat-containing protein effectors of plant-associated organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Hamiaux, Cyril; Templeton, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-associated organisms, including microbes, nematodes, and insects, deliver effector proteins into the apoplast, vascular tissue, or cell cytoplasm of their prospective hosts. These effectors function to promote colonization, typically by altering host physiology or by modulating host immune responses. The same effectors however, can also trigger host immunity in the presence of cognate host immune receptor proteins, and thus prevent colonization. To circumvent effector-triggered immunity, or to further enhance host colonization, plant-associated organisms often rely on adaptive effector evolution. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that several effectors of plant-associated organisms are repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) that carry tandem or non-tandem arrays of an amino acid sequence or structural motif. In this review, we highlight the diverse roles that these repeat domains play in RCP effector function. We also draw attention to the potential role of these repeat domains in adaptive evolution with regards to RCP effector function and the evasion of effector-triggered immunity. The aim of this review is to increase the profile of RCP effectors from plant-associated organisms. PMID:26557126

  5. Adeno-associated virus rep protein synthesis during productive infection

    SciTech Connect

    Redemann, B.E.; Mendelson, E.; Carter, B.J.

    1989-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep proteins mediate viral DNA replication and can regulate expression from AAV genes. The authors studied the kinetics of synthesis of the four Rep proteins, Rep78, Rep68, Rep52, and Rep40, during infection of human 293 or KB cells with AAV and helper adenovirus by in vivo labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting analyses. Rep78 and Rep52 were readily detected concomitantly with detection of viral monomer duplex DNA replicating about 10 to 12 h after infection, and Rep68 and Rep40 were detected 2 h later. Rep78 and Rep52 were more abundant than Rep68 and Rep40 owing to a higher synthesis rate throughout the infectious cycle. In some experiments, very low levels of Rep78 could be detected as early as 4 h after infection. The synthesis rates of Rep proteins were maximal between 14 and 24 h and then decreased later after infection. Isotopic pulse-chase experiments showed that each of the Rep proteins was synthesized independently and was stable for at least 15 h. A slower-migrating, modified form of Rep78 was identified late after infection. AAV capsid protein synthesis was detected at 10 to 12 h after infection and also exhibited synthesis kinetics similar to those of the Rep proteins. AAV DNA replication showed at least two clearly defined stages. Bulk duplex replicating DNA accumulation began around 10 to 12 h and reached a maximum level at about 20 h when Rep and capsid protein synthesis was maximal. Progeny single-stranded DNA accumulation began about 12 to 13 h, but most of this DNA accumulated after 24 h when Rep and capsid protein synthesis had decreased.

  6. Differences in protein-protein association networks for lung adenocarcinoma: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Anisha; Sikdar, Sinjini; Gill, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Various methods to determine the connectivity scores between groups of proteins associated with lung adenocarcinoma are examined. Proteins act together to perform a wide range of functions within biological processes. Hence, identification of key proteins and their interactions within protein networks can provide invaluable information on disease mechanisms. Differential network analysis provides a means of identifying differences in the interactions among proteins between two networks. We use connectivity scores based on the method of partial least squares to quantify the strength of the interactions between each pair of proteins. These scores are then used to perform permutation-based statistical tests. This examines if there are significant differences between the network connectivity scores for individual proteins or classes of proteins. The expression data from a study on lung adenocarcinoma is used in this study. Connectivity scores are computed for a group of 109 subjects who were in the complete remission and as well as for a group of 51 subjects whose cancer had progressed. The distributions of the connectivity scores are similar for the two networks yet subtle but statistically significant differences have been identified and their impact discussed. PMID:25489174

  7. Identification of major proteins associated with Dictyostelium discoideum endocytic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Adessi, C; Chapel, A; Vinçon, M; Rabilloud, T; Klein, G; Satre, M; Garin, J

    1995-10-01

    Magnetic isolation of endocytic vesicles from Dictyostelium discoideum was accomplished after feeding the amoebae with iron oxide particles. Proteins associated with the endocytic vesicles were resolved by SDS-PAGE and digested 'in-gel' with endoproteinase Lys-C or Asp-N to generate peptides for amino acid sequencing. This strategy allowed the identification of the major protein constituents of the vesicles: namely, the A, B, D, E and 110 kDa subunits of a vacuolar type H(+)-ATPase, actin, a Rab 7-like GTPase, a p34 protein corresponding to a new cysteine proteinase and the 25 kDa product of a recently sequenced D. discoideum open reading frame.

  8. Phase I and Pharmacologic Study of SNS-032, a Potent and Selective Cdk2, 7, and 9 Inhibitor, in Patients With Advanced Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wei-Gang; Chen, Rong; Plunkett, William; Siegel, David; Sinha, Rajni; Harvey, R. Donald; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Popplewell, Leslie; Coutre, Steven; Fox, Judith A.; Mahadocon, Kristi; Chen, Tianling; Kegley, Peggy; Hoch, Ute; Wierda, William G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose SNS-032 is a highly selective and potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) 2, 7, and 9, with in vitro growth inhibitory effects and ability to induce apoptosis in malignant B cells. A phase I dose-escalation study of SNS-032 was conducted to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics, biomarkers of mechanism-based pharmacodynamic (PD) activity, and clinical efficacy. Patients and Methods Parallel cohorts of previously treated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) received SNS-032 as a loading dose followed by 6-hour infusion weekly for 3 weeks of each 4-week course. Results There were 19 patients with CLL and 18 with MM treated. Tumor lysis syndrome was the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) for CLL, the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) was 75 mg/m2, and the most frequent grade 3 to 4 toxicity was myelosuppression. One patient with CLL had more than 50% reduction in measurable disease without improvement in hematologic parameters. Another patient with low tumor burden had stable disease for four courses. For patients with MM, no DLT was observed and MTD was not identified at up to 75 mg/m2, owing to early study closure. Two patients with MM had stable disease and one had normalization of spleen size with treatment. Biomarker analyses demonstrated mechanism-based PD activity with inhibition of Cdk7 and Cdk9, decreases in Mcl-1 and XIAP expression level, and associated CLL cell apoptosis. Conclusion SNS-032 demonstrated mechanism-based target modulation and limited clinical activity in heavily pretreated patients with CLL and MM. Further single-agent, PD-based, dose and schedule modification is warranted to maximize clinical efficacy. PMID:20479412

  9. Identification of protein-protein interactions of the occlusion-derived virus-associated proteins of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ke; Wu, Minzhi; Deng, Fei; Song, Jingjiao; Dong, Chunsheng; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify protein-protein interactions among the components of the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV), a group II alphabaculovirus in the family Baculoviridae. To achieve this, 39 selected genes of potential ODV structural proteins were cloned and expressed in the Gal4 yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. The direct-cross Y2H assays identified 22 interactions comprising 13 binary interactions [HA9-ODV-EC43, ODV-E56-38K, ODV-E56-PIF3, LEF3-helicase, LEF3-alkaline nuclease (AN), GP41-38K, GP41-HA90, 38K-PIF3, 38K-PIF2, VP80-HA100, ODV-E66-PIF3, ODV-E66-PIF2 and PIF3-PIF2] and nine self-associations (IE1, HA44, LEF3, HA66, GP41, CG30, 38K, PIF3 and P24). Five of these interactions - LEF3-helicase and LEF3-AN, and the self-associations of IE1, LEF3 and 38K - have been reported previously in Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus. As HA44 and HA100 were two newly identified ODV proteins of group II viruses, their interactions were further confirmed. The self-association of HA44 was verified with a His pull-down assay and the interaction of VP80-HA100 was confirmed by a co-immunoprecipitation assay. A summary of the protein-protein interactions of baculoviruses reported so far, comprising 68 interactions with 45 viral proteins and five host proteins, is presented, which will facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of baculovirus infection.

  10. Ric-8 Proteins Are Molecular Chaperones That Direct Nascent G Protein α Subunit Membrane Association

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, Meital; Pinter, Mary E.; Wright, Forrest A.; Chan, PuiYee; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Tall, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    Ric-8A (resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8A) and Ric-8B are guanine nucleotide exchange factors that enhance different heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein (G protein) signaling pathways by unknown mechanisms. Because transgenic disruption of Ric-8A or Ric-8B in mice caused early embryonic lethality, we derived viable Ric-8A– or Ric-8B–deleted embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from blastocysts of these mice. We observed pleiotropic G protein signaling defects in Ric-8A−/− ES cells, which resulted from reduced steady-state amounts of Gαi, Gαq, and Gα13 proteins to <5% of those of wild-type cells. The amounts of Gαs and total Gβ protein were partially reduced in Ric-8A−/− cells compared to those in wild-type cells, and only the amount of Gαs was reduced substantially in Ric-8B−/− cells. The abundances of mRNAs encoding the G protein α subunits were largely unchanged by loss of Ric-8A or Ric-8B. The plasma membrane residence of G proteins persisted in the absence of Ric-8 but was markedly reduced compared to that in wild-type cells. Endogenous Gαi and Gαq were efficiently translated in Ric-8A−/− cells but integrated into endomembranes poorly; however, the reduced amounts of G protein α subunits that reached the membrane still bound to nascent Gβγ. Finally, Gαi, Gαq, and Gβ1 proteins exhibited accelerated rates of degradation in Ric-8A−/− cells compared to those in wild-type cells. Together, these data suggest that Ric-8 proteins are molecular chaperones required for the initial association of nascent Gα subunits with cellular membranes. PMID:22114146

  11. Why are proteins with glutamine- and asparagine-rich regions associated with protein misfolding diseases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor

    2005-12-01

    The possibility that vibrational excited states (VESs) are the drivers of protein folding and function (the VES hypothesis) is explored to explain the reason why Gln- and Asn-rich proteins are associated with degenerative diseases. The Davydov/Scott model is extended to describe energy transfer from the water solution to the protein and vice versa. Computer simulations show that, on average, Gln and Asn residues lead to an initial larger absorption of energy from the environment to the protein, something that can explain the greater structural instability of prions. The sporadic, inherited and infectious character of prion diseases is discussed in the light of the VES hypothesis. An alternative treatment for prion diseases is suggested.

  12. BIMOLECULAR FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION ANALYSIS OF INDUCIBLE PROTEIN INTERACTIONS: EFFECTS OF FACTORS AFFECTING PROTEIN FOLDING ON FLUORESCENT PROTEIN FRAGMENT ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Robida, Aaron M; Kerppola, Tom K

    2009-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis enables visualization of the subcellular locations of protein interactions in living cells. We investigated the temporal resolution and the quantitative accuracy of BiFC analysis using fragments of different fluorescent proteins. We determined the kinetics of BiFC complex formation in response to the rapamycin-inducible interaction between the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) and the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB). Fragments of YFP fused to FKBP and FRB produced detectable BiFC complex fluorescence 10 minutes after rapamycin addition and a ten-fold increase in the mean fluorescence intensity in 8 hours. The N-terminal fragment of the Venus fluorescent protein fused to FKBP produced constitutive BiFC complexes with several C-terminal fragments fused to FRB. A chimeric N-terminal fragment containing residues from Venus and YFP produced either constitutive or inducible BiFC complexes depending on the temperature at which the cells were cultured. The concentrations of inducers required for half-maximal induction of BiFC complex formation by all fluorescent protein fragments tested were consistent with the affinities of the inducers for unmodified FKBP and FRB. Treatment of the FK506 inhibitor of FKBP-FRB interaction prevented the formation of BiFC complexes by FKBP and FRB fusions, but did not disrupt existing BiFC complexes. Proteins synthesized prior to rapamycin addition formed BiFC complexes with the same efficiency as newly synthesized proteins. Inhibitors of protein synthesis attenuated BiFC complex formation independent of their effects on fusion protein synthesis. The kinetics at which they inhibited BiFC complex formation suggest that they prevented association of the fluorescent protein fragments, but not the slow maturation of BiFC complex fluorescence. Agents that induce the unfolded protein response also reduced formation of BiFC complexes. The effects of these agents were suppressed by cellular

  13. Modeling associated protein-DNA pattern discovery with unified scores.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tak-Ming; Lo, Leung-Yau; Sze-To, Ho-Yin; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Xiao, Xinshu; Wong, Man-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding protein-DNA interactions, specifically transcription factor (TF) and transcription factor binding site (TFBS) bindings, is crucial in deciphering gene regulation. The recent associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery combines one-sided motif discovery on both the TF and the TFBS sides. Using sequences only, it identifies the short protein-DNA binding cores available only in high-resolution 3D structures. The discovered patterns lead to promising subtype and disease analysis applications. While the related studies use either association rule mining or existing TFBS annotations, none has proposed any formal unified (both-sided) model to prioritize the top verifiable associated patterns. We propose the unified scores and develop an effective pipeline for associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery. Our stringent instance-level evaluations show that the patterns with the top unified scores match with the binding cores in 3D structures considerably better than the previous works, where up to 90 percent of the top 20 scored patterns are verified. We also introduce extended verification from literature surveys, where the high unified scores correspond to even higher verification percentage. The top scored patterns are confirmed to match the known WRKY binding cores with no available 3D structures and agree well with the top binding affinities of in vivo experiments.

  14. Dephosphorylation of human cyclin-dependent kinases by protein phosphatase type 2C alpha and beta 2 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, A; Kaldis, P; Solomon, M J

    2000-11-03

    We previously reported that the activating phosphorylation on cyclin-dependent kinases in yeast (Cdc28p) and in humans (Cdk2) is removed by type 2C protein phosphatases. In this study, we characterize this PP2C-like activity in HeLa cell extract and determine that it is due to PP2C beta 2, a novel PP2C beta isoform, and to PP2C alpha. PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 co-purified with Mg(2+)-dependent Cdk2/Cdk6 phosphatase activity in DEAE-Sepharose, Superdex-200, and Mono Q chromatographies. Moreover, purified recombinant PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 proteins efficiently dephosphorylated monomeric Cdk2/Cdk6 in vitro. The dephosphorylation of Cdk2 and Cdk6 by PP2C isoforms was inhibited by the binding of cyclins. We found that the PP2C-like activity in HeLa cell extract, partially purified HeLa PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 isoforms, and the recombinant PP2Cs exhibited a comparable substrate preference for a phosphothreonine containing substrate, consistent with the conservation of threonine residues at the site of activating phosphorylation in CDKs.

  15. A novel nucleoid-associated protein specific to the actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Swiercz, Julia P.; Nanji, Tamiza; Gloyd, Melanie; Guarné, Alba; Elliot, Marie A.

    2013-01-01

    Effective chromosome organization is central to the functioning of any cell. In bacteria, this organization is achieved through the concerted activity of multiple nucleoid-associated proteins. These proteins are not, however, universally conserved, and different groups of bacteria have distinct subsets that contribute to chromosome architecture. Here, we describe the characterization of a novel actinobacterial-specific protein in Streptomyces coelicolor. We show that sIHF (SCO1480) associates with the nucleoid and makes important contributions to chromosome condensation and chromosome segregation during Streptomyces sporulation. It also affects antibiotic production, suggesting an additional role in gene regulation. In vitro, sIHF binds DNA in a length-dependent but sequence-independent manner, without any obvious structural preferences. It does, however, impact the activity of topoisomerase, significantly altering DNA topology. The sIHF–DNA co-crystal structure reveals sIHF to be composed of two domains: a long N-terminal helix and a C-terminal helix-two turns-helix domain with two separate DNA interaction sites, suggesting a potential role in bridging DNA molecules. PMID:23427309

  16. Characterization of the human GARP (Golgi associated retrograde protein) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liewen, Heike; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Oliveira, Vasco; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Luo Guorong; Wadle, Andreas; Jung, Martin; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Stenner-Liewen, Frank . E-mail: stenlie@t-online.de

    2005-05-15

    The Golgi associated retrograde protein complex (GARP) or Vps fifty-three (VFT) complex is part of cellular inter-compartmental transport systems. Here we report the identification of the VFT tethering factor complex and its interactions in mammalian cells. Subcellular fractionation shows that human Vps proteins are found in the smooth membrane/Golgi fraction but not in the cytosol. Immunostaining of human Vps proteins displays a vesicular distribution most concentrated at the perinuclear envelope. Co-staining experiments with endosomal markers imply an endosomal origin of these vesicles. Significant accumulation of VFT complex positive endosomes is found in the vicinity of the Trans Golgi Network area. This is in accordance with a putative role in Golgi associated transport processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, GARP is the main effector of the small GTPase Ypt6p and interacts with the SNARE Tlg1p to facilitate membrane fusion. Accordingly, the human homologue of Ypt6p, Rab6, specifically binds hVps52. In human cells, the 'orphan' SNARE Syntaxin 10 is the genuine binding partner of GARP mediated by hVps52. This reveals a previously unknown function of human Syntaxin 10 in membrane docking and fusion events at the Golgi. Taken together, GARP shows significant conservation between various species but diversification and specialization result in important differences in human cells.

  17. Structural and functional characterization of synapse-associated protein-97

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei

    Synapse-associated protein-97 (SAP97) as a scaffold protein plays an important role in regulating neural signal transmission in the central nervous system by coupling with activated membrane receptors, ion channels, and downstream signaling proteins. SAP97 consists of six functional domains: L27, PDZ1, PDZ2, PDZ3, SH3, and GK. Each of these domains mediates the interactions of SAP97 with other proteins. Understanding the molecular mechanism of these interactions in neural signal transmission is a goal of this study. Here high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy are employed towards the goal of the structural and functional characterization of SAP97; specifically, we (a) characterize the binding of the PDZ domains of SAP97 with the C-terminus of NR2B, and determine the structure of the PDZ1-NR2B; (b) characterize the binding of the PDZ domains with the C-terminus of stargazin and multiple mutants, and identify the perturbed amino acids in PDZ2 upon the binding of stargazin; (c) characterize the binding specificity carried by the beta2/beta3 loop of the PDZ3 domain. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism for the binding specificities of the PDZ domains of SAP97, thereby furthering the development of drugs that target these domains to treat neurological diseases.

  18. Hydroxocobalamin association during cell culture results in pink therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Kenneth M; Gillespie, Ronald; Lewis, Nathan; Fujimori, Kiyoshi; McCoy, Rebecca; Bach, Julia; Connell-Crowley, Lisa; Eakin, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    Process control of protein therapeutic manufacturing is central to ensuring the product is both safe and efficacious for patients. In this work, we investigate the cause of pink color variability in development lots of monoclonal antibody (mAb) and Fc-fusion proteins. Results show pink-colored product generated during manufacturing is due to association of hydroxocobalamin (OH-Cbl), a form of vitamin B12. OH-Cbl is not part of the product manufacturing process; however we found cyanocobalamin (CN-Cbl) in cell culture media converts to OH-Cbl in the presence of light. OH-Cbl can be released from mAb and Fc-fusion proteins by conversion with potassium cyanide to CN-Cbl, which does not bind. By exploiting the differential binding of CN-Cbl and OH-Cbl, we developed a rapid and specific assay to accurately measure B12 levels in purified protein. Analysis of multiple products and lots using this technique gives insight into color variability during manufacturing. PMID:23924851

  19. Identification of extensin protein associated with sugar beet pectin.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Alberto; Fishman, Marshall L; Fortis, Laurie L; Cooke, Peter H; Hotchkiss, Arland T

    2009-11-25

    Several studies have suggested that the emulsification properties associated with pectin obtained from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) are due to the presence of a protein-pectin complex. Nevertheless, the identity of the protein has remained elusive. Pectin, extracted from sugar beet pulp by microwave-assisted extraction, and a commercial sample were both subjected to protease digestion with trypsin. The resulting peptides were separated from the pectin solution by ultrafiltration using a 3 kDa molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) membrane and analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization with tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The partial sequences derived from the mass spectrometry analyses of the resulting tryptic peptides are found to be highly consistent with extensin protein matched from the B. vulgaris Genetic Index database and also correspond to previously reported extensin peptides found in sugar beet cell suspension cultures. Further attempts were made to disassociate the protein from pectin using 1 M NaCl and a 100 kDa MWCO membrane; however, no peptides were observed following trypsin digestion of the permeate solution. This evidence suggests the existence of a complex between the pectin and extensin that is not due to ionic interactions. Trypsin digestion of commercial sugar beet pectin also produced the peptide profile observed with the microwave-assisted extracted pectin sample. Atomic force microscopy established that the number of rod-like elements decreased following protease treatment compared to the untreated sample.

  20. Initiation of protein association in tofu formation by metal ions.

    PubMed

    Arii, Yasuhiro; Takenaka, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium and calcium ions are important factors in making tofu. However, the molecular role of these ions remains unclear in tofu formation. We have previously shown that magnesium chloride concentration-dependent produced silken tofu-like (SP) and regular tofu-like (RP) precipitates, but was an inconsequential factor for the retention of tofu. We investigated in this present study, the effect of various metal chlorides on the metal chloride concentration-dependent changes in tofu formation. These changes occurred in a similar manner to that of the magnesium ion, in which SP formation was followed by RP formation. It is interesting that the midpoint concentration for the formation of SP and RP represented a good correlation with the stability constant of EDTA. This correlation demonstrated the possibility that metal ions would interact with the carboxyl groups of soy proteins. We consider from these results that metal ions were the initiators of protein association in tofu formation.

  1. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liang; Huang, Jianbin; Ma, Zhixin; Zhang, Jing; Zou, Yapeng; Gao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html.

  2. STRING: a database of predicted functional associations between proteins.

    PubMed

    von Mering, Christian; Huynen, Martijn; Jaeggi, Daniel; Schmidt, Steffen; Bork, Peer; Snel, Berend

    2003-01-01

    Functional links between proteins can often be inferred from genomic associations between the genes that encode them: groups of genes that are required for the same function tend to show similar species coverage, are often located in close proximity on the genome (in prokaryotes), and tend to be involved in gene-fusion events. The database STRING is a precomputed global resource for the exploration and analysis of these associations. Since the three types of evidence differ conceptually, and the number of predicted interactions is very large, it is essential to be able to assess and compare the significance of individual predictions. Thus, STRING contains a unique scoring-framework based on benchmarks of the different types of associations against a common reference set, integrated in a single confidence score per prediction. The graphical representation of the network of inferred, weighted protein interactions provides a high-level view of functional linkage, facilitating the analysis of modularity in biological processes. STRING is updated continuously, and currently contains 261 033 orthologs in 89 fully sequenced genomes. The database predicts functional interactions at an expected level of accuracy of at least 80% for more than half of the genes; it is online at http://www.bork.embl-heidelberg.de/STRING/.

  3. Functional aspects of membrane association of reggie/flotillin proteins.

    PubMed

    Banning, Antje; Tomasovic, Ana; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2011-12-01

    Flotillin-2 and flotillin-1, also called reggie-1 and reggie-2, are ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved proteins. Originally, they were described as neuronal regeneration proteins, but they appear to function in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as membrane receptor signaling, endocytosis, phagocytosis and cell adhesion. The molecular details of the function of flotillins in these processes have only been partially clarified. Flotillins are associated with cholesterol and sphingolipid enriched membrane microdomains known as rafts, and some findings even suggest that they define their own kind of a microdomain. The mechanism of the membrane association of flotillins appears to rely mainly on acylation (myristoylation and/or palmitoylation), localizing flotillins onto the cytosolic side of the membranes, whereas no transmembrane domains are present. In addition, flotillins show a strong tendency to form homo- and hetero-oligomers with each other. In this review, we will summarize the recent findings on the function of flotillins and discuss the mechanisms that might regulate their function, such as membrane association, oligomerization and phosphorylation.

  4. Iron-Associated Outer Membrane Proteins of Magnetic Bacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-16

    AD-A210 088 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Form Approved WrMN PAGE0MB No ()704-0188 la RPORTSECQ!TY -AssF.(L; i RES’C it MA %CS ()NA 14 J 1 ILL 2a SECURITY...NUMBERS 800N. uicy t.PROGRAM PROiECT rASK P T’O ~80NQunyS.EiLEVE T NO NO NO jACCES ON NO Arlington, VA 22217-5000 61153N IRR 4106 4413-009 1 1 TITLE...include Security Classification) (u) Iron Associated Outer Membrane Proteins of Magnetic Bacteria 12 PERSONAL AuTHOR(S) Blakemore, Richard Peter 1 3a

  5. Protein aggregates are associated with replicative aging without compromising protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Saarikangas, Juha; Barral, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of cellular lineages is facilitated by asymmetric segregation of fate determinants between dividing cells. In budding yeast, various aging factors segregate to the aging (mother)-lineage, with poorly understood consequences. In this study, we show that yeast mother cells form a protein aggregate during early replicative aging that is maintained as a single, asymmetrically inherited deposit over the remaining lifespan. Surprisingly, deposit formation was not associated with stress or general decline in proteostasis. Rather, the deposit-containing cells displayed enhanced degradation of cytosolic proteasome substrates and unimpaired clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates. Deposit formation was dependent on Hsp42, which collected non-random client proteins of the Hsp104/Hsp70-refolding machinery, including the prion Sup35. Importantly, loss of Hsp42 resulted in symmetric inheritance of its constituents and prolonged the lifespan of the mother cell. Together, these data suggest that protein aggregation is an early aging-associated differentiation event in yeast, having a two-faceted role in organismal fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06197.001 PMID:26544680

  6. Fragile X mental retardation protein interactions with the microtubule associated protein 1B RNA.

    PubMed

    Menon, Lakshmi; Mader, Samantha Ann; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2008-08-01

    Fragile X mental retardation syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation, is caused by the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP has been shown to use its arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) box to bind to a subset of RNA targets that form a G quadruplex structure. We performed a detailed analysis of the interactions between the FMRP RGG box and the microtubule associated protein 1B (MAP1B) mRNA, a relevant in vivo FMRP target. We show that MAP1B RNA forms an intramolecular G quadruplex structure, which is bound with high affinity and specificity by the FMRP RGG box. We determined that hydrophobic interactions are important in the FMRP RGG box-MAP1B RNA association, with minor contributions from electrostatic interactions. Our findings that at low protein:RNA ratios the RNA G quadruplex structure is slightly stabilized, whereas at high ratios is unfolded, suggest a mechanism by which the FMRP concentration variation in response to a neurotransmitter stimulation event could act as a regulatory switch for the protein function, from translation repressor to translation activator.

  7. Simultaneous time-lamination imaging of protein association using a split fluorescent timer protein.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Ayari; Hattori, Mitsuru; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2015-03-17

    Studies of temporal behaviors of protein association in living cells are crucially important for elucidating the fundamental roles and the mechanism of interactive coordination for cell activities. We developed a method for investigating the temporal alternation of a particular protein assembly using monomeric fluorescent proteins, fluorescent timers (FTs), of which the fluorescent color changes from blue to red over time. We identified a dissection site of the FTs, which allows complementation of the split FT fragments. The split fragments of each FT variant recovered their fluorescence and maintained inherent rates of the color changes upon the reassembly of the fragments in vitro. We applied this method to visualize the aggregation process of α-synuclein in living cells. The size of the aggregates with the temporal information was analyzed from ratio values of the blue and red fluorescence of the reconstituted FTs, from which the aggregation rates were evaluated. This method using the split FT fragments enables tracing and visualizing temporal alternations of various protein associations by single fluorescence measurements at a given time point.

  8. Computing Protein-Protein Association Affinity with Hybrid Steered Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Roberto A; Yu, Lili; Chen, Liao Y

    2015-09-08

    Computing protein-protein association affinities is one of the fundamental challenges in computational biophysics/biochemistry. The overwhelming amount of statistics in the phase space of very high dimensions cannot be sufficiently sampled even with today's high-performance computing power. In this article, we extend a potential of mean force (PMF)-based approach, the hybrid steered molecular dynamics (hSMD) approach we developed for ligand-protein binding, to protein-protein association problems. For a protein complex consisting of two protomers, P1 and P2, we choose m (≥3) segments of P1 whose m centers of mass are to be steered in a chosen direction and n (≥3) segments of P2 whose n centers of mass are to be steered in the opposite direction. The coordinates of these m + n centers constitute a phase space of 3(m + n) dimensions (3(m + n)D). All other degrees of freedom of the proteins, ligands, solvents, and solutes are freely subject to the stochastic dynamics of the all-atom model system. Conducting SMD along a line in this phase space, we obtain the 3(m + n)D PMF difference between two chosen states: one single state in the associated state ensemble and one single state in the dissociated state ensemble. This PMF difference is the first of four contributors to the protein-protein association energy. The second contributor is the 3(m + n - 1)D partial partition in the associated state accounting for the rotations and fluctuations of the (m + n - 1) centers while fixing one of the m + n centers of the P1-P2 complex. The two other contributors are the 3(m - 1)D partial partition of P1 and the 3(n - 1)D partial partition of P2 accounting for the rotations and fluctuations of their m - 1 or n - 1 centers while fixing one of the m/n centers of P1/P2 in the dissociated state. Each of these three partial partitions can be factored exactly into a 6D partial partition in multiplication with a remaining factor accounting for the small fluctuations while fixing three

  9. A matrix protein silences transposons and repeats through interaction with retinoblastoma-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifeng; Wang, Yizhong; Stroud, Hume; Gu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Bo; Gan, Eng-Seng; Ng, Kian-Hong; Jacobsen, Steven E; He, Yuehui; Ito, Toshiro

    2013-02-18

    Epigenetic regulation helps to maintain genomic integrity by suppressing transposable elements (TEs) and also controls key developmental processes, such as flowering time. To prevent TEs from causing rearrangements and mutations, TE and TE-like repetitive DNA sequences are usually methylated, whereas histones are hypoacetylated and methylated on specific residues (e.g., H3 lysine 9 dimethylation [H3K9me2]). TEs and repeats can also attenuate gene expression. However, how various histone modifiers are recruited to target loci is not well understood. Here we show that knockdown of the nuclear matrix protein with AT-hook DNA binding motifs TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENT SILENCING VIA AT-HOOK (TEK) in Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta results in robust activation of various TEs, the TE-like repeat-containing floral repressor genes FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FWA. This derepression is associated with chromatin conformational changes, increased histone acetylation, reduced H3K9me2, and even TE transposition. TEK directly binds to an FLC-repressive regulatory region and the silencing repeats of FWA and associates with Arabidopsis homologs of the Retinoblastoma-associated protein 46/48, FVE and MSI5, which mediate histone deacetylation. We propose that the nuclear matrix protein TEK acts in the maintenance of genome integrity by silencing TE and repeat-containing genes.

  10. The evolution and diversification of plant microtubule-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, John

    2013-07-01

    Plant evolution is marked by major advances in structural characteristics that facilitated the highly successful colonization of dry land. Underlying these advances is the evolution of genes encoding specialized proteins that form novel microtubular arrays of the cytoskeleton. This review investigates the evolution of plant families of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) through the recently sequenced genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Selaginella moellendorffii, Physcomitrella patens, Volvox carteri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The families of MAPs examined are AIR9, CLASP, CRIPT, MAP18, MOR1, TON, EB1, AtMAP70, SPR2, SPR1, WVD2 and MAP65 families (abbreviations are defined in the footnote to Table 1). Conjectures are made regarding the evolution of MAPs in plants in relation to the evolution of multicellularity, oriented cell division and vasculature. Angiosperms in particular have high numbers of proteins that are involved in promotion of helical growth or its suppression, and novel plant microtubular structures may have acted as a catalyst for the development of novel plant MAPs. Comparisons of plant MAP gene families with those of animals show that animals may have more flexibility in the structure of their microtubule cytoskeletons than plants, but with both plants and animals possessing many MAP splice variants. © 2013 The Author The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase sigma is associated with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Muise, Aleixo M; Walters, Thomas; Wine, Eytan; Griffiths, Anne M; Turner, Dan; Duerr, Richard H; Regueiro, Miguel D; Ngan, Bo-Yee; Xu, Wei; Sherman, Philip M; Silverberg, Mark S; Rotin, Daniela

    2007-07-17

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a relatively common chronic debilitating intestinal illness, is composed of two broadly defined groups, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Although several susceptibility genes for CD have been recently described, susceptibility genes exclusive for UC have not been forthcoming. Here, we show that receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase sigma (PTPRS-encoding PTPsigma) knockout mice spontaneously develop mild colitis that becomes severe when challenged with two known inducers of colitis. We also demonstrate that E-cadherin and beta-catenin, two important adherens junction proteins involved in maintenance of barrier defense in the colon, act as colonic substrates for PTPsigma. Furthermore, we show that three SNPs (rs886936, rs17130, and rs8100586) that flank exon 8 in the human PTPRS gene are associated with UC. The presence of these SNPs is associated with novel splicing that removes the third immunoglobulin-like domain (exon 9) from the extracellular portion of PTPsigma, possibly altering dimerization or ligand recognition. We propose that polymorphisms in the human PTPRS gene lead to ulcerative colitis.

  12. Measuring residue associations in protein structures. Possible implications for protein folding.

    PubMed

    Karlin, S; Zuker, M; Brocchieri, L

    1994-06-03

    We propose a number of distance measures between residues in protein structures based on average, minimum and maximum distances of all atom (backbone and side-chain) coordinates or with respect to side-chain atom coordinates only. The d1-distance (D1-distance) refers to the average distance between side-chain (backbone and side-chain) atoms of a residue pair in a given structure. The dm-distance (Dm-distance) refers to the minimum distance between side-chain atoms (non-trivial minimum distance between all atoms of a residue pair). For each distance measure, averaging and normalizing over representative protein structures, association values and closeness orderings for all amino acid types are determined. The expected associations of side-chain interactions between oppositely charged residues, among hydrophobic residues and of cysteine with cysteine are confirmed. Several surprising associations are observed relative to (1) the aromatic residues tyrosine and tryptophan, but not phenylalanine; (2) multiple histidine residues; (3) asymmetries of arginine versus lysine, aspartate versus glutamate, alanine versus glycine, and asparagine versus glutamine; (4) absence of correlations of alpha-carbon distances with side-chain distances. The all atoms D1-distance attractions are dominated by steric relationships, with glycine and alanine significantly close to all amino acids, whereas large residues are under-associated with all residue types. In contrast, for the closeness ordering corresponding to the minimum side-chain dm-distance, glycine and alanine are among the least associated. However, in the d1-distance alanine is significantly close to all hydrophobic residues with the exception of tryptophan. The dm-distance preferences display a pervasive attraction for tyrosine by almost all residue types, the prominence of tyrosine and tryptophan in cation-aromatic interactions, and the versatility of histidine in functionality. The principal findings suggest a new

  13. Germ cell mitogenic activity is associated with nerve growth factor-like protein(s).

    PubMed

    Onoda, M; Pflug, B; Djakiew, D

    1991-12-01

    from pheochromocytoma cells (PC-12), a functional bioassay for NGF-like activity, was stimulated by addition of RSP and PSP to the culture media of the PC-12 cells. These results demonstrate mitogenic activity in germ cell proteins (RSP and PSP) and identify a NGF-like protein(s) which is associated with most of this activity.

  14. Conservation of Oxidative Protein Stabilization in an Insect Homologue of Parkinsonism-Associated Protein DJ-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiusheng; Prahlad, Janani; Wilson, Mark A.

    2012-08-21

    DJ-1 is a conserved, disease-associated protein that protects against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in multiple organisms. Human DJ-1 contains a functionally essential cysteine residue (Cys106) whose oxidation is important for regulating protein function by an unknown mechanism. This residue is well-conserved in other DJ-1 homologues, including two (DJ-1{alpha} and DJ-1{beta}) in Drosophila melanogaster. Because D. melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying DJ-1 function, we have determined the crystal structure and impact of cysteine oxidation on Drosophila DJ-1{beta}. The structure of D. melanogaster DJ-1{beta} is similar to that of human DJ-1, although two important residues in the human protein, Met26 and His126, are not conserved in DJ-1{beta}. His126 in human DJ-1 is substituted with a tyrosine in DJ-1{beta}, and this residue is not able to compose a putative catalytic dyad with Cys106 that was proposed to be important in the human protein. The reactive cysteine in DJ-1 is oxidized readily to the cysteine-sulfinic acid in both flies and humans, and this may regulate the cytoprotective function of the protein. We show that the oxidation of this conserved cysteine residue to its sulfinate form (Cys-SO{sub 2{sup -}}) results in considerable thermal stabilization of both Drosophila DJ-1{beta} and human DJ-1. Therefore, protein stabilization is one potential mechanism by which cysteine oxidation may regulate DJ-1 function in vivo. More generally, most close DJ-1 homologues are likely stabilized by cysteine-sulfinic acid formation but destabilized by further oxidation, suggesting that they are biphasically regulated by oxidative modification.

  15. Molecular Analysis of the Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm-Associated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Goh, H. M. Sharon; Beatson, Scott A.; Totsika, Makrina; Moriel, Danilo G.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Szubert, Jan; Runnegar, Naomi; Sidjabat, Hanna E.; Paterson, David L.; Nimmo, Graeme R.; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a multidrug-resistant pathogen associated with hospital outbreaks of infection across the globe, particularly in the intensive care unit. The ability of A. baumannii to survive in the hospital environment for long periods is linked to antibiotic resistance and its capacity to form biofilms. Here we studied the prevalence, expression, and function of the A. baumannii biofilm-associated protein (Bap) in 24 carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii ST92 strains isolated from a single institution over a 10-year period. The bap gene was highly prevalent, with 22/24 strains being positive for bap by PCR. Partial sequencing of bap was performed on the index case strain MS1968 and revealed it to be a large and highly repetitive gene approximately 16 kb in size. Phylogenetic analysis employing a 1,948-amino-acid region corresponding to the C terminus of Bap showed that BapMS1968 clusters with Bap sequences from clonal complex 2 (CC2) strains ACICU, TCDC-AB0715, and 1656-2 and is distinct from Bap in CC1 strains. By using overlapping PCR, the bapMS1968 gene was cloned, and its expression in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain resulted in increased biofilm formation. A Bap-specific antibody was generated, and Western blot analysis showed that the majority of A. baumannii strains expressed an ∼200-kDa Bap protein. Further analysis of three Bap-positive A. baumannii strains demonstrated that Bap is expressed at the cell surface and is associated with biofilm formation. Finally, biofilm formation by these Bap-positive strains could be inhibited by affinity-purified Bap antibodies, demonstrating the direct contribution of Bap to biofilm growth by A. baumannii clinical isolates. PMID:23956398

  16. Association of C-reactive protein with mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosebud O.; Geda, Yonas E.; Knopman, David S.; Christianson, Teresa J.H.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammation is suggested to play a role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, and may also be involved in the pathogenesis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This study examined the association of inflammatory markers in serum or plasma with prevalent MCI and MCI subtypes in a population-based sample. Methods Olmsted County, MN, residents aged 70–89 years on October 1, 2004, were evaluated using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. Information ascertained for each participant was reviewed by an expert panel of neuropsychologists, physicians, and nurses, and a diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI, or dementia was made by consensus. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα), and adiponectin were measured at baseline. Results Among 313 subjects with MCI and 1,570 cognitively normal subjects, a CRP level in the upper quartile (> 3.3 mg/L) was significantly associated with MCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00–2.01) and with non-amnestic MCI (na-MCI; OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.12–3.78) after adjusting for age, sex, and years of education. However, there was no association with amnestic MCI (a-MCI; OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.81–1.82). No association was observed with the other inflammatory markers. Conclusions Plasma CRP is associated with prevalent MCI and with na-MCI in elderly, non-demented persons in the population-based setting. These findings suggest an involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of MCI. PMID:19751919

  17. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A: spotlight on kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Kalousová, Marta; Tesař, Vladimír; Muravská, Alexandra; Zima, Tomáš

    2012-03-24

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) is a biomarker routinely used in screening for Down syndrome in the first trimester of pregnancy. It is also present in very small amounts in men and non-pregnant women. PAPP-A is a key regulator of local insulin-like growth factor (IGF) bioavailability - IGFs are essential for normal body size during fetal development, but they are associated with aging and age-related diseases. Measurement of circulating PAPP-A can provide valuable information not only in pregnant women (chromosomal anomalies and adverse pregnancy outcomes) but also in patients with coronary artery disease (contribution to diagnosis, prognostic value) and in patients with kidney diseases. PAPP-A is associated with renal function and proteinuria, is increased mainly in dialysis patients and decreases after kidney transplantation. It is an independent mortality predictor of hemodialysis patients and indicator of adverse outcome of transplanted patients. PAPP-A levels can be influenced by various chemicals and drugs, among them mainly heparin. Various assays for PAPP-A exist and the type of assay used in a study should be considered. This article reviews the data summarizing basic information about PAPP-A with a particular focus on the significance of PAPP-A in renal diseases.

  18. Discovery of Chromatin-Associated Proteins via Sequence-Specific Capture and Mass Spectrometric Protein Identification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Darling, Julia; Guillen-Ahlers, Hector; Shortreed, Michael R; Scalf, Mark; Frey, Brian L; Kendziorski, Christina; Olivier, Michael; Gasch, Audrey P; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-08-01

    DNA-protein interactions play critical roles in the control of genome expression and other fundamental processes. An essential element in understanding how these systems function is to identify their molecular components. We present here a novel strategy, Hybridization Capture of Chromatin Associated Proteins for Proteomics (HyCCAPP), to identify proteins that are interacting with any given region of the genome. This technology identifies and quantifies the proteins that are specifically interacting with a genomic region of interest by sequence-specific hybridization capture of the target region from in vivo cross-linked chromatin, followed by mass spectrometric identification and quantification of associated proteins. We demonstrate the utility of HyCCAPP by identifying proteins associated with three multicopy and one single-copy loci in yeast. In each case, a locus-specific pattern of target-associated proteins was revealed. The binding of previously unknown proteins was confirmed by ChIP in 11 of 17 cases. The identification of many previously known proteins at each locus provides strong support for the ability of HyCCAPP to correctly identify DNA-associated proteins in a sequence-specific manner, while the discovery of previously unknown proteins provides new biological insights into transcriptional and regulatory processes at the target locus.

  19. Discovery of Chromatin-Associated Proteins via Sequence-Specific Capture and Mass Spectrometric Protein Identification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    DNA–protein interactions play critical roles in the control of genome expression and other fundamental processes. An essential element in understanding how these systems function is to identify their molecular components. We present here a novel strategy, Hybridization Capture of Chromatin Associated Proteins for Proteomics (HyCCAPP), to identify proteins that are interacting with any given region of the genome. This technology identifies and quantifies the proteins that are specifically interacting with a genomic region of interest by sequence-specific hybridization capture of the target region from in vivo cross-linked chromatin, followed by mass spectrometric identification and quantification of associated proteins. We demonstrate the utility of HyCCAPP by identifying proteins associated with three multicopy and one single-copy loci in yeast. In each case, a locus-specific pattern of target-associated proteins was revealed. The binding of previously unknown proteins was confirmed by ChIP in 11 of 17 cases. The identification of many previously known proteins at each locus provides strong support for the ability of HyCCAPP to correctly identify DNA-associated proteins in a sequence-specific manner, while the discovery of previously unknown proteins provides new biological insights into transcriptional and regulatory processes at the target locus. PMID:24999558

  20. Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein functions as a structural microtubule-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Jamie; Boutant, Emmanuel; Seemanpillai, Mark; Groner, Anna; Sambade, Adrian; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2006-09-01

    The cell-to-cell spread of Tobacco mosaic virus infection depends on virus-encoded movement protein (MP), which is believed to form a ribonucleoprotein complex with viral RNA (vRNA) and to participate in the intercellular spread of infectious particles through plasmodesmata. Previous studies in our laboratory have provided evidence that the vRNA movement process is correlated with the ability of the MP to interact with microtubules, although the exact role of this interaction during infection is not known. Here, we have used a variety of in vivo and in vitro assays to determine that the MP functions as a genuine microtubule-associated protein that binds microtubules directly and modulates microtubule stability. We demonstrate that, unlike MP in whole-cell extract, microtubule-associated MP is not ubiquitinated, which strongly argues against the hypothesis that microtubules target the MP for degradation. In addition, we found that MP interferes with kinesin motor activity in vitro, suggesting that microtubule-associated MP may interfere with kinesin-driven transport processes during infection.

  1. Tobacco Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Functions as a Structural Microtubule-Associated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Jamie; Boutant, Emmanuel; Seemanpillai, Mark; Sambade, Adrian; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The cell-to-cell spread of Tobacco mosaic virus infection depends on virus-encoded movement protein (MP), which is believed to form a ribonucleoprotein complex with viral RNA (vRNA) and to participate in the intercellular spread of infectious particles through plasmodesmata. Previous studies in our laboratory have provided evidence that the vRNA movement process is correlated with the ability of the MP to interact with microtubules, although the exact role of this interaction during infection is not known. Here, we have used a variety of in vivo and in vitro assays to determine that the MP functions as a genuine microtubule-associated protein that binds microtubules directly and modulates microtubule stability. We demonstrate that, unlike MP in whole-cell extract, microtubule-associated MP is not ubiquitinated, which strongly argues against the hypothesis that microtubules target the MP for degradation. In addition, we found that MP interferes with kinesin motor activity in vitro, suggesting that microtubule-associated MP may interfere with kinesin-driven transport processes during infection. PMID:16912284

  2. Genetic analysis of a Drosophila microtubule-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The 205-kD microtubule-associated protein (205K MAP) is one of the principal MAPs in Drosophila. 205K MAP is similar to the HeLa 210K/MAP4 family of MAPs since it shares the following biochemical properties: it is present in several isoforms, has a molecular mass of approximately 200 kD, and is thermostable. Furthermore, immuno-crossreactivity has been observed between mouse MAP4, HeLa 210K, and Drosophila 205K MAP. Currently, there is little information concerning the biological function of this group of nonmotor MAPs. We have used a classical genetic approach to try to identify the role of the 205K MAP in Drosophila by isolating mutations in the 205K MAP gene. An F2 lethal screen was used to acquire deficiencies of 100EF, the chromosomal location of the 205K MAP gene. Drosophila bearing a homozygous deficiency for the 205K MAP region are fully viable and show no obvious phenotype. A recently developed polymerase chain reaction screen was also used to recover five P-element insertions upstream from the 205K MAP gene. Western blot analysis has shown that these insertions result in hypomorphic mutations of the 205K MAP gene. As was seen with animals that have no 205K MAP, these mutations appear to have no phenotype. These data unambiguously demonstrate that the 205K MAP gene is inessential for development. These results also suggest that there may exist protein(s) with redundant function that can substitute for 205K MAP. PMID:1309812

  3. Modulation of cell growth by the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A.

    PubMed

    Arima, N; Kao, C Y; Licht, T; Padmanabhan, R; Sasaguri, Y; Padmanabhan, R

    2001-04-20

    Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein, NS5A, is a phosphoprotein produced from the processing of the viral polyprotein precursor. NS5A associates with several cellular proteins in mammalian cells, and the biological consequences of this interaction are currently unknown. To this end, five stable NS5A-expressing murine and human cell lines were established. Tetracycline-regulated NIH3T3 cells and rat liver epithelial cells as well as the constitutive, NS5A-expressing, human Chang liver, HeLa, and NIH3T3 cells all exhibited cell growth retardation compared with the control cells. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry indicated that the NS5A-expressing human epitheloid tumor cells had a reduced S phase and an increase in the G(2)/M phase, which could be explained by a p53-dependent induction of p21(Waf1/Cip1) protein and mRNA levels. NS5A interacts with Cdk1 in vivo and in vitro, and a significant portion of the p21(Waf1/Cip1) was found to be in a complex with Cdk2 in the NS5A-expressing human hepatic cell line. Cdk1 and cyclin B1 proteins were also reduced in human Chang liver cells consistent with the increase in G(2)/M phase. Our results suggest that the NS5A protein causes growth inhibition and cell cycle perturbations by targeting the Cdk1/2-cyclin complexes.

  4. Atomistic Simulation of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Associated Cellulosomal Protein Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Crowley, Michael F; Smith, Jeremy C

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations have been performed to obtain an atomic-level understanding of lignocellulose structure and the assembly of its associated cellulosomal protein complexes. First, a CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived and validated by performing a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal of a lignin fragment molecule and comparing simulation-derived structural features with experimental results. Together with the existing force field for polysaccharides, this work provides the basis for full simulations of lignocellulose. Second, the underlying molecular mechanism governing the assembly of various cellulosomal modules is investigated by performing a novel free-energy calculation of the cohesin-dockerin dissociation. Our calculation indicates a free-energy barrier of ~17 kcal/mol and further reveals a stepwise dissociation pathway involving both the central -sheet interface and its adjacent solvent-exposed loop/turn regions clustered at both ends of the -barrel structure.

  5. Altered cell-matrix associated ADAM proteins in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gerst, J L; Raina, A K; Pirim, I; McShea, A; Harris, P L; Siedlak, S L; Takeda, A; Petersen, R B; Smith, M A

    2000-03-01

    Alterations in cell-matrix 'contact' are often related to a disruption of cell cycle regulation and, as such, occur variously in neoplasia. Given the recent findings showing cell cycle alterations in Alzheimer disease, we undertook a study of ADAM-1 and 2 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease), developmentally-regulated, integrin-binding, membrane-bound metalloproteases. Our results show that whereas ADAM-1 and 2 are found in susceptible hippocampal neurons in Alzheimer disease, these proteins were not generally increased in similar neuronal populations in younger or age-matched controls except in association with age-related neurofibrillary alterations. This increase in both ADAM-1 and 2 in cases of Alzheimer disease was verified by immunoblot analysis (P < 0.05). An ADAM-induced loss of matrix integration would effectively "reset" the mitotic clock and thereby stimulate re-entry into the cell cycle in neurons in Alzheimer disease. Furthermore, given the importance of integrins in maintaining short-term memory, alterations in ADAM proteins or their proteolytic activity could also play a proximal role in the clinico-pathological manifestations of Alzheimer disease. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Computer Molecular Dynamics Studies on Protein Structures (Visual Pigment Rhodopsin and Cyclin-Dependent Kinases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo T.

    2007-05-01

    Based on the computer molecular dynamics (MD) calculations we have simulated for the visual pigment rhodopsin and cyclin-dependent kinase proteins the dynamical and structural properties at reliable physiological temperatures and conditions. MD simulations are carried out on the rhodopsin protein to investigate the conformational changes of the protein in relation to the inclusion of the 11-cis chromophore retinal into consideration. It was demonstrated that the adaptation of the chromophore retinal in the opsin site causes a considerable influence on its protein binding pocket, as well as on conformations of the cytoplasmic part, but the extracelluar part of the protein shows a comparably small changes. On the basis of the simulaton results we discuss some molecular mechanisms for the rhodopsin protein function as a G-protein-coupled receptor in the dark state, i.e. for the chromophore retinal as a ligand-agonist stabilizaing the inactive conformation. The central role that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) play in the timing of cell division and repair and the high incidence of genetic alteration of CDKs or deregulation of CDK inhibitors in a number of cancers make CDC28 of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae very attractive model for studies of mechanisms of CDK regulation. The crystal structure of the human CDK2 has served as a model for the catalytic core of other CDKs, including CDC28. Nanoseconds long molecular dynamics trajectories of the CDK2/ATP complex were analyzed. The MD simulations of substitution CDK2-G16S in conserved G-loop shows an important of this amino acid and a conformational change of CDK2 structure resulting in the moving of the G-loop away from ATP and a new rearrangement of amino acids in the T-loop.

  7. Nanoscopic dynamics of bicontinous microemulsions: effect of membrane associated protein

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, V. K.; Hayes, Douglas G.; Urban, Volker S.; ...

    2017-06-12

    Bicontinous microemulsions (BμE) generally consist of nanodomains formed by surfactant in a mixture of water and oil at nearly equal proportions and are potential candidates for the solubilization and purification of membrane proteins. In this paper, we present the first time report of nanoscopic dynamics of surfactant monolayers within BμEs formed by the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) measured on the nanosecond to picosecond time scale using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). BμEs investigated herein consisted of middle phases isolated from Winsor-III microemulsion systems that were formed by mixing aqueous and oil solutions under optimal conditions. QENS data indicates thatmore » surfactants undergo two distinct motions, namely (i) lateral motion along the surface of the oil nanodomains and (ii) localized internal motion. Lateral motion can be described using a continuous diffusion model, from which the lateral diffusion coefficient is obtained. Internal motion of surfactant is described using a model which assumes that a fraction of the surfactants’ hydrogens undergoes localized translational diffusion that could be considered confined within a spherical volume. The effect of cytochrome c, an archetypal membrane-associated protein known to strongly partition near the surfactant head groups in BμEs (a trend supported by small-angle X-ray scattering [SAXS] analysis), on the dynamics of BμE has also been investigated. QENS results demonstrated that cytochrome c significantly hindered both the lateral and the internal motions of surfactant. The lateral motion was more strongly affected: a reduction of the lateral diffusion coefficient by 33% was measured. This change is mainly attributable to the strong association of cytochrome c with oppositely charged SDS. In contrast, analysis of SAXS data suggested that thermal fluctuations (for a longer length and slower time scale compared to QENS) were increased upon incorporation of cytochrome

  8. Protein phosphorylation cascades associated with methamphetamine-induced glial activation.

    PubMed

    Hebert, M A; O'Callaghan, J P

    2000-09-01

    Reactive gliosis is the most prominent response to diverse forms of central nervous system (CNS) injury. The signaling events that mediate this characteristic response to neural injury are under intense investigation. Several studies have demonstrated the activation of phosphoproteins within the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Janus kinase (JAK) pathways following neural insult. These signaling pathways may be involved or responsible for the glial response following injury, by virtue of their ability to phosphorylate and dynamically regulate the activity of various transcription factors. This study sought to delineate, in vivo, the relative contribution of MAPK- and JAK-signaling components to reactive gliosis as measured by induction of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), following chemical-induced neural damage. At time points (6, 24, and 48 h) following methamphetamine (METH, 10 mg/kg x 4, s.c.) administration, female C57BL/6J mice were sacrificed by focused microwave irradiation, a technique that preserves steady-state phosphorylation. Striatal (target) and nontarget (hippocampus) homogenates were assayed for METH-induced changes in markers of dopamine (DA) neuron integrity as well as differences in the levels of activated phosphoproteins. GFAP upregulation occurred as early as 6 h, reaching a threefold induction 48 h following METH exposure. Neurotoxicant-induced reductions in striatal levels of DA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) paralleled the temporal profile of GFAP induction. Blots of striatal homogenates, probed with phosphorylation-state specific antibodies, demonstrated significant changes in activated forms of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2), c-jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK), MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK1/2), 70-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p70 S6), cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). MAPK-related phosphoproteins exhibited an

  9. Transient phosphorylation of tumor associated microtubule associated protein (TMAP)/cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2) at Thr-596 during early phases of mitosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Choi, Yong-Bock; Lee, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Kwon, Hye-Rim; Seong, Yeon-Sun; Kim, Heung Tae; Park, Joobae; Bae, Chang-Dae; Hong, Kyeong-Man

    2008-08-31

    Tumor associated microtubule associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2) is a mitotic spindle-associated protein whose expression is cell cycle-regulated and also frequently deregulated in cancer cells. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against TMAP/CKAP2 were produced: B-1-13 and D-12-3. Interestingly, the reactivity of mAb D-12-3 to TMAP/CKAP2 was markedly decreased specifically in mitotic cell lysate. The epitope mapping study showed that mAb D-12-3 recognizes the amino acid sequence between 569 and 625 and that phosphorylation at T596 completely abolishes the reactivity of the antibody, suggesting that the differential reactivity originates from the phosphorylation status at T596. Immunofluorescence staining showed that mAb D-12-3 fails to detect TMAP/CKAP2 in mitotic cells between prophase and metaphase, but the staining becomes evident again in anaphase, suggesting that phosphorylation at T596 occurs transiently during early phases of mitosis. These results suggest that the cellular functions of TMAP/CKAP2 might be regulated by timely phosphorylation and dephosphorylation during the course of mitosis.

  10. Cdk1-cyclin B1-mediated phosphorylation of tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein/cytoskeleton-associated protein 2 in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Hyo-Sil; Seong, Yeon-Sun; Hong, Kyeong-Man; Bae, Chang-Dae; Park, Joobae

    2009-06-12

    During mitosis, establishment of structurally and functionally sound bipolar spindles is necessary for maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation. Tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton-associated protein 2 (CKAP2), is a mitotic spindle-associated protein whose level is frequently up-regulated in various malignancies. Previous reports have suggested that TMAP is a potential regulator of mitotic spindle assembly and dynamics and that it is required for chromosome segregation to occur properly. So far, there have been no reports on how its mitosis-related functions are regulated. Here, we report that TMAP is hyper-phosphorylated at the C terminus specifically during mitosis. At least four different residues (Thr-578, Thr-596, Thr-622, and Ser-627) were responsible for the mitosis-specific phosphorylation of TMAP. Among these, Thr-622 was specifically phosphorylated by Cdk1-cyclin B1 both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, compared with the wild type, a phosphorylation-deficient mutant form of TMAP, in which Thr-622 had been replaced with an alanine (T622A), induced a significant increase in the frequency of metaphase cells with abnormal bipolar spindles, which often displayed disorganized, asymmetrical, or narrow and elongated morphologies. Formation of these abnormal bipolar spindles subsequently resulted in misalignment of metaphase chromosomes and ultimately caused a delay in the entry into anaphase. Moreover, such defects resulting from the T622A mutation were associated with a decrease in the rate of protein turnover at spindle microtubules. These findings suggest that Cdk1-cyclin B1-mediated phosphorylation of TMAP is important for and contributes to proper regulation of microtubule dynamics and establishment of functional bipolar spindles during mitosis.

  11. Weighted-ensemble Brownian dynamics simulations for protein association reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, G A; Kim, S

    1996-01-01

    A new method, weighted-ensemble Brownian dynamics, is proposed for the simulation of protein-association reactions and other events whose frequencies of outcomes are constricted by free energy barriers. The method features a weighted ensemble of trajectories in configuration space with energy levels dictating the proper correspondence between "particles" and probability. Instead of waiting a very long time for an unlikely event to occur, the probability packets are split, and small packets of probability are allowed to diffuse almost immediately into regions of configuration space that are less likely to be sampled. The method has been applied to the Northrup and Erickson (1992) model of docking-type diffusion-limited reactions and yields reaction rate constants in agreement with those obtained by direct Brownian simulation, but at a fraction of the CPU time (10(-4) to 10(-3), depending on the model). Because the method is essentially a variant of standard Brownian dynamics algorithms, it is anticipated that weighted-ensemble Brownian dynamics, in conjunction with biophysical force models, can be applied to a large class of association reactions of interest to the biophysics community. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:8770190

  12. Heavy path mining of protein-protein associations in the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinran; Korkmaz, Turgay; Lilburn, Timothy G; Cai, Hong; Gu, Jianying; Wang, Yufeng

    2015-07-15

    Annotating and understanding the function of proteins and other elements in a genome can be difficult in the absence of a well-studied and evolutionarily close relative. The causative agent of malaria, one of the oldest and most deadly global infectious diseases, is a good example of this problem. The burden of malaria is huge and there is a pressing need for new, more effective antimalarial strategies. However, techniques such as homology-dependent annotation transfer are severely impaired in this parasite because there are no well-understood close relatives. To circumvent this approach we developed a network-based method that uses a heavy path network-mining algorithm. We uncovered the protein-protein associations that are implicated in important cellular processes including genome integrity, DNA repair, transcriptional regulation, invasion, and pathogenesis, thus demonstrating the utility of this method. The URL of the source code for super-sequence mining method is http://www.cs.utsa.edu/~korkmaz/research/heavy-path-mining/.

  13. Huntingtin-Associated Protein 1 Interacts with Breakpoint Cluster Region Protein to Regulate Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pai-Tsang; Chen, Chien-Ho; Hsu, I-Uen; Salim, Shaima’a Ahmad; Kao, Shu-Huei; Cheng, Chao-Wen; Lai, Chang-Hao; Lee, Cheng-Fan; Lin, Yung-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in microtubule-dependent trafficking and certain signaling pathways in neuronal cells represent critical pathogenesis in neurodegenerative diseases. Huntingtin (Htt)-associated protein-1 (Hap1) is a brain-enriched protein and plays a key role in the trafficking of neuronal surviving and differentiating cargos. Lack of Hap1 reduces signaling through tropomyosin-related kinases including extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), resulting in inhibition of neurite outgrowth, hypothalamic dysfunction and postnatal lethality in mice. To examine how Hap1 is involved in microtubule-dependent trafficking and neuronal differentiation, we performed a proteomic analysis using taxol-precipitated microtubules from Hap1-null and wild-type mouse brains. Breakpoint cluster region protein (Bcr), a Rho GTPase regulator, was identified as a Hap1-interacting partner. Bcr was co-immunoprecipitated with Hap1 from transfected neuro-2a cells and co-localized with Hap1A isoform more in the differentiated than in the nondifferentiated cells. The Bcr downstream effectors, namely ERK and p38, were significantly less activated in Hap1-null than in wild-type mouse hypothalamus. In conclusion, Hap1 interacts with Bcr on microtubules to regulate neuronal differentiation. PMID:25671650

  14. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi.

    PubMed

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D; Meade, Bryan R; Dowdy, Steven F

    2015-04-20

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms.

  15. Promyelocytic leukemia protein enhances apoptosis of gastric cancer cells through Yes-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhipeng; Chen, Jiamin; Shao, Liming; Ma, Wangqian; Xu, Dingting

    2015-09-01

    It has been shown that Yes-associated protein (YAP) acts as a transcriptional co-activator to regulate p73-dependent apoptosis in response to DNA damage in some cell types, and promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is involved in the regulation loop through stabilization of YAP through sumoylation. Although YAP has been shown to be significantly upregulated in gastric cancer, whether the YAP/PML/p73 regulation loop also functions in gastric cancer is unknown. Here, we show significantly higher levels of YAP and significantly lower levels of PML in the gastric cancer specimen. Overexpression of YAP in gastric cancer cells significantly increased cell growth, but did not affect apoptosis. However, overexpression of PML in gastric cancer cells significantly increased cell apoptosis, resulting in decreases in cell growth, which seemed to require the presence of YAP. The effect of PML on apoptosis appeared to be conducted through p73-mediated modulation of apoptosis-associated genes, Bcl-2, Bak, and caspase9. Thus, our study suggests the presence of a YAP/PML/p73 regulatory loop in gastric cancer, and highlights PML as a promising tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through YAP-coordinated cancer cell apoptosis.

  16. Revealing the potential pathogenesis of glioma by utilizing a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiran; Li, Gang; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the potential mechanism of glioma through bioinformatic approaches. The gene expression profile (GSE4290) of glioma tumor and non-tumor samples was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 180 samples were available, including 23 non-tumor and 157 tumor samples. Then the raw data were preprocessed using robust multiarray analysis, and 8,890 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by using t-test (false discovery rate < 0.0005). Furthermore, 16 known glioma related genes were abstracted from Genetic Association Database. After mapping 8,890 DEGs and 16 known glioma related genes to Human Protein Reference Database, a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network (GAPN) was constructed. In addition, 51 sub-networks in GAPN were screened out through Molecular Complex Detection (score ≥ 1), and sub-network 1 was found to have the closest interaction (score = 3). What' more, for the top 10 sub-networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis (p value < 0.05) was performed, and DEGs involved in sub-network 1 and 2, such as BRMS1L and CCNA1, were predicted to regulate cell growth, cell cycle, and DNA replication via interacting with known glioma related genes. Finally, the overlaps of DEGs and human essential, housekeeping, tissue-specific genes were calculated (p value = 1.0, 1.0, and 0.00014, respectively) and visualized by Venn Diagram package in R. About 61% of human tissue-specific genes were DEGs as well. This research shed new light on the pathogenesis of glioma based on DEGs and GAPN, and our findings might provide potential targets for clinical glioma treatment.

  17. Establishing an osteosarcoma associated protein-protein interaction network to explore the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to establish an osteosarcoma (OS) associated protein-protein interaction network and explore the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Methods The gene expression profile GSE9508 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, including five samples of non-malignant bone (the control), seven samples for non-metastatic patients (six of which were analyzed in duplicate), and 11 samples for metastatic patients (10 of which were analyzed in duplicate). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between osteosarcoma and control samples were identified by packages in R with the threshold of |logFC (fold change)| > 1 and false discovery rate < 0.05. Osprey software was used to construct the interaction network of DEGs, and genes at protein-protein interaction (PPI) nodes with high degrees were identified. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and WebGestalt software were then used to perform functional annotation and pathway enrichment analyses for PPI networks, in which P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Compared to the control samples, the expressions of 42 and 341 genes were altered in non-metastatic OS and metastatic OS samples, respectively. A total of 15 significantly enriched functions were obtained with Gene Ontology analysis (P < 0.05). The DEGs were classified and significantly enriched in three pathways, including the tricarboxylic acid cycle, lysosome and axon guidance. Genes such as HRAS, IDH3A, ATP6ap1, ATP6V0D2, SEMA3F and SEMA3A were involved in the enriched pathways. Conclusions The hub genes from metastatic OS samples are not only bio-markers of OS, but also help to improve therapies for OS. PMID:24330838

  18. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 gene polymorphisms and antisocial personality disorder: association with temperament and psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Basoglu, Cengiz; Oner, Ozgur; Ates, Alpay; Algul, Ayhan; Bez, Yasin; Cetin, Mesut; Herken, Hasan; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Munir, Kerim M

    2011-06-01

    The molecular genetic of personality disorders has been investigated in several studies; however, the association of antisocial behaviours with synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25) gene polymorphisms has not. This association is of interest as SNAP25 gene polymorphism has been associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and personality. We compared the distribution of DdeI and MnII polymorphisms in 91 young male offenders and in 38 sex-matched healthy control subjects. We also investigated the association of SNAP25 gene polymorphisms with severity of psychopathy and with temperament traits: novelty seeking, harm avoidance, and reward dependence. The MnII T/T and DdeI T/T genotypes were more frequently present in male subjects with antisocial personality disorder (APD) than in sex-matched healthy control subjects. The association was stronger when the frequency of both DdeI and MnII T/T were taken into account. In the APD group, the genotype was not significantly associated with the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised scores, measuring the severity of psychopathy. However, the APD subjects with the MnII T/T genotype had higher novelty seeking scores; whereas, subjects with the DdeI T/T genotype had lower reward dependence scores. Again, the association between genotype and novelty seeking was stronger when both DdeI and MnII genotypes were taken into account. DdeI and MnII T/T genotypes may be a risk factor for antisocial behaviours. The association of the SNAP25 DdeI T/T and MnII T/T genotypes with lower reward dependence and higher novelty seeking suggested that SNAP25 genotype might influence other personality disorders, as well.

  19. Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25 Gene Polymorphisms and Antisocial Personality Disorder: Association With Temperament and Psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Basoglu, Cengiz; Oner, Ozgur; Ates, Alpay; Algul, Ayhan; Bez, Yasin; Cetin, Mesut; Herken, Hasan; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Munir, Kerim M

    2011-01-01

    Objective The molecular genetic of personality disorders has been investigated in several studies; however, the association of antisocial behaviours with synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25) gene polymorphisms has not. This association is of interest as SNAP25 gene polymorphism has been associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and personality. Methods We compared the distribution of DdeI and MnlI polymorphisms in 91 young male offenders and in 38 sex-matched healthy control subjects. We also investigated the association of SNAP25 gene polymorphisms with severity of psychopathy and with temperament traits: novelty seeking, harm avoidance, and reward dependence. Results The MnlI T/T and DdeI T/T genotypes were more frequently present in male subjects with antisocial personality disorder (APD) than in sex-matched healthy control subjects. The association was stronger when the frequency of both DdeI and MnlI T/T were taken into account. In the APD group, the genotype was not significantly associated with the Psychopathy Checklist–Revised scores, measuring the severity of psychopathy. However, the APD subjects with the MnlI T/T genotype had higher novelty seeking scores; whereas, subjects with the DdeI T/T genotype had lower reward dependence scores. Again, the association between genotype and novelty seeking was stronger when both DdeI and MnlI genotypes were taken into account. Conclusion DdeI and MnlI T/T genotypes may be a risk factor for antisocial behaviours. The association of the SNAP25 DdeI T/T and MnlI T/T genotypes with lower reward dependence and higher novelty seeking suggested that SNAP25 genotype might influence other personality disorders, as well. PMID:21756448

  20. G1 cell cycle arrest due to the inhibition of erbB family receptor tyrosine kinases does not require the retinoblastoma protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, Andrea J. . E-mail: Andrea.Gonzales@pfizer.com; Fry, David W.

    2005-02-01

    The erbB receptor family (EGFr, erbB-2, erbB-3, and erbB-4) consists of transmembrane glycoproteins that transduce extracellular signals to the nucleus when activated. erbB family members are widely expressed in epithelial, mesenchymal, and neuronal cells and contribute to the proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival of these cell types. The present study evaluates the effects of erbB family signaling on cell cycle progression and the role that pRB plays in regulating this process. ErbB family RTK activity was inhibited by PD 158780 in the breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. PD 158780 (0.5 {mu}M) inhibited EGF-stimulated and heregulin-stimulated autophosphorylation and caused a G1 cell cycle arrest within 24 h, which correlated with hypophosporylation of pRB. MCF10A cells lacking functional pRB retained the ability to arrest in G1 when treated with PD 158780. Both cell lines showed induction of p27{sup KIP1} protein when treated with PD 158780 and increased association of p27{sup KIP1} with cyclin E-CDK2. Furthermore, CDK2 kinase activity was dramatically inhibited with drug treatment. Changes in other pRB family members were noted with drug treatment, namely a decrease in p107 and an increase in p130. These findings show that the G1 arrest induced through inhibition of erbB family RTK activity does not require functional pRB.

  1. Locating overlapping dense subgraphs in gene (protein) association networks and predicting novel protein functional groups among these subgraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Gergely; Derenyi, Imre; Farkas, Illes J.; Vicsek, Tamas

    2006-03-01

    Most tasks in a cell are performed not by individual proteins, but by functional groups of proteins (either physically interacting with each other or associated in other ways). In gene (protein) association networks these groups show up as sets of densely connected nodes. In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, known physically interacting groups of proteins (called protein complexes) strongly overlap: the total number of proteins contained by these complexes by far underestimates the sum of their sizes (2750 vs. 8932). Thus, most functional groups of proteins, both physically interacting and other, are likely to share many of their members with other groups. However, current algorithms searching for dense groups of nodes in networks usually exclude overlaps. With the aim to discover both novel functions of individual proteins and novel protein functional groups we combine in protein association networks (i) a search for overlapping dense subgraphs based on the Clique Percolation Method (CPM) (Palla, G., et.al. Nature 435, 814-818 (2005), http://angel.elte.hu/clustering), which explicitly allows for overlaps among the groups, and (ii) a verification and characterization of the identified groups of nodes (proteins) with the help of standard annotation databases listing known functions.

  2. Staphylococcus saprophyticus surface-associated protein (Ssp) is associated with lifespan reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Florian; Mohner, Amelie; Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören G

    2013-10-01

    Staphylococcal lipases have been proposed as pathogenicity factors. In Staphylococcus saprophyticus the surface-associated protein (Ssp) has been previously characterized as a cell wall-associated true lipase. A S. saprophyticus Δssp::ermB mutant has been described as less virulent in an in vivo model of urinary tract infection compared with its wild-type. This is the first report showing that S. saprophyticus induced a lifespan reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans similar to that of S. aureus RN4220. In two S. saprophyticus Δssp::ermB mutants lifespan reduction in C. elegans was partly abolished. In order to attribute virulence to the lipase activity itself and distinguish this phenomenon from the presence of the Ssp-protein, the conserved active site of the lipase was modified by site-directed ligase-independent mutagenesis and lipase activity-deficient mutants were constructed. These results indicate that the Ssp is associated with pathogenicity in C. elegans and one could speculate that the lipase activity itself is responsible for this virulence.

  3. Therapeutic intervention based on protein prenylation and associated modifications

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, Michael H; Brunsveld, Lucas; Hrycyna, Christine A; Michaelis, Susan; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Waldmann, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, a specific set of proteins are modified by C-terminal attachment of 15-carbon farnesyl groups or 20-carbon geranylgeranyl groups that function both as anchors for fixing proteins to membranes and as molecular handles for facilitating binding of these lipidated proteins to other proteins. Additional modification of these prenylated proteins includes C-terminal proteolysis and methylation, and attachment of a 16-carbon palmitoyl group; these modifications augment membrane anchoring and alter the dynamics of movement of proteins between different cellular membrane compartments. The enzymes in the protein prenylation pathway have been isolated and characterized. Blocking protein prenylation is proving to be therapeutically useful for the treatment of certain cancers, infection by protozoan parasites and the rare genetic disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. PMID:16983387

  4. Immunoprecipitation of Plasma Membrane Receptor-Like Kinases for Identification of Phosphorylation Sites and Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are difficult to study for numerous reasons. The surface of membrane proteins is relatively hydrophobic and sometimes very unstable, additionally requiring detergents for their extraction from the membrane. This leads to challenges at all levels, including expression, solubilization, purification, identification of associated proteins, and the identification of post-translational modifications. However, recent advances in immunoprecipitation technology allow to isolate membrane proteins efficiently, facilitating the study of protein-protein interactions, the identification of novel associated proteins, and to identify post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Here, we describe an optimized immunoprecipitation protocol for plant plasma membrane receptor-like kinases.

  5. The ETS protein MEF is regulated by phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis via the protein-ubiquitin ligase SCFSkp2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Hedvat, Cyrus V; Mao, Shifeng; Zhu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Jinjuan; Nguyen, Hoang; Koff, Andrew; Nimer, Stephen D

    2006-04-01

    MEF is an ETS-related transcription factor with strong transcriptional activating activity that affects hematopoietic stem cell behavior and is required for normal NK cell and NK T-cell development. The MEF (also known as ELF4) gene is repressed by several leukemia-associated fusion transcription factor proteins (PML-retinoic acid receptor alpha and AML1-ETO), but it is also activated by retroviral insertion in several cancer models. We have previously shown that cyclin A-dependent phosphorylation of MEF largely restricts its activity to the G(1) phase of the cell cycle; we now show that MEF is a short-lived protein whose expression level also peaks during late G(1) phase. Mutagenesis studies show that the rapid turnover of MEF in S phase is dependent on the specific phosphorylation of threonine 643 and serine 648 at the C terminus of MEF by cdk2 and on the Skp1/Cul1/F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex SCF(Skp2), which targets MEF for ubiquitination and proteolysis. Overexpression of MEF drives cells through the G(1)/S transition, thereby promoting cell proliferation. The tight regulation of MEF levels during the cell cycle contributes to its effects on regulating cell cycle entry and cell proliferation.

  6. Cellular proteins that associate with the middle and small T antigens of polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Pallas, D C; Cherington, V; Morgan, W; DeAnda, J; Kaplan, D; Schaffhausen, B; Roberts, T M

    1988-11-01

    We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze in more detail the cellular proteins which associate with the middle and small tumor antigens (MT and ST, respectively) of polyomavirus. Proteins with molecular masses of 27, 29, 36, 51, 61, 63, and 85 kilodaltons (kDa) that specifically coimmunoprecipitated with MT were identified on these gels. The 36-, 51-, 61-, 63-, and 85-kDa proteins are probably the same as the proteins of similar sizes previously reported by a number of groups, whereas the 27- and 29-kDa proteins represent proteins that are heretofore undescribed. The 27- and 29-kDa proteins were abundant cellular proteins, whereas the others were minor cellular constituents. The association of each of these proteins with MT was sensitive to one or more mutations in MT that rendered it transformation defective. The association of the 85-kDa protein was the most sensitive indicator of the transformation competence of MT mutants. In addition, the 85-kDa protein was the only associated protein whose association with MT changed consistently in parallel with MT-associated phosphatidylinositol kinase activity. Furthermore, the fraction of the 85-kDa protein which was found associated with the MT complex contained 15 to 20% of its phosphate content on tyrosine. The 36- and 63-kDa proteins complexed with both polyomavirus MT and ST and comigrated on two-dimensional gels with two simian virus 40 ST-associated proteins originally described by Rundell and coworkers (K. Rundell, E. O. Major, and M. Lampert, J. Virol. 37:1090-1093, 1981). None of the other MT-associated proteins associated significantly with ST.

  7. Constitutively active K-cyclin/cdk6 kinase in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Van Dross, Rukiyah; Yao, Shan; Asad, Shaheena; Westlake, Grant; Mays, Deborah J; Barquero, Laura; Duell, Stephanie; Pietenpol, Jennifer A; Browning, Philip J

    2005-05-04

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated human herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes K-cyclin, a homologue of D-type cellular cyclins, which binds cyclin-dependent kinases to phosphorylate various substrates. K-cyclin/cdk phosphorylates a subset of substrates normally targeted by cyclins D, E, and A. We used cells naturally infected with KSHV to further characterize the biochemical features of K-cyclin. We used immunoprecipitation with K-cyclin antibodies to examine the association of K-cyclin with cdk2, cdk6, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1 proteins in BC3 cells. We separated populations of BC3 cells enriched in cells in G1, S, or G2/M phases by elutriation and measured K-cyclin protein and the kinase activity of K-cyclin/cdk6 complexes. The half-life of K-cyclin and cyclin D2 proteins was determined by blocking protein synthesis with cycloheximide and measuring proteins in cell lysates by western blot analysis. We fused the entire K-cyclin sequence to the carboxyl-terminal sequence of cellular cyclin D that contains the PEST degradation sequence to produce K-cyclin/D2 and transfected K-cyclin/D2 into K-cyclin-negative cells to investigate the effect of the PEST sequence on K-cyclin's stability. Viral K-cyclin interacted with cyclin-dependent kinases cdk2, cdk4, and cdk6 and with the cyclin/cdk inhibitory proteins p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 in BC3 cell lysates. Unlike D-type cyclins, whose expression is cell cycle dependent, the level of K-cyclin was stable throughout the cell cycle, and the kinase associated with the K-cyclin/cdk6 complex was constitutively active. The half-life of K-cyclin (6.9 hours) was much longer than that of cellular cyclin D2 (0.6 hour) and that of K-cyclin/D2 (0.5 hour), probably because K-cyclin lacks the PEST degradation sequence present in D-type cyclins. The constitutive activation of K-cyclin/cdk complexes in KSHV-infected cells appears to result from the extended half-life of K-cyclin and may explain its role in Kaposi sarcoma.

  8. Uncoupling protein 2 gene polymorphisms are associated with obesity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) gene polymorphisms have been reported as genetic risk factors for obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We examined the association of commonly observed UCP2 G(−866)A (rs659366) and Ala55Val (C > T) (rs660339) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with obesity, high fasting plasma glucose, and serum lipids in a Balinese population. Methods A total of 603 participants (278 urban and 325 rural subjects) were recruited from Bali Island, Indonesia. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and total cholesterol (TC) were measured. Obesity was determined based on WHO classifications for adult Asians. Participants were genotyped for G(−866)A and Ala55Val polymorphisms of the UCP2 gene. Results Obesity prevalence was higher in urban subjects (51%) as compared to rural subjects (23%). The genotype, minor allele (MAF), and heterozygosity frequencies were similar between urban and rural subjects for both SNPs. All genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. A combined analysis of genotypes and environment revealed that the urban subjects carrying the A/A genotype of the G(−866)A SNP have higher BMI than the rural subjects with the same genotype. Since the two SNPs showed strong linkage disequilibrium (D’ = 0.946, r2 = 0.657), a haplotype analysis was performed. We found that the AT haplotype was associated with high BMI only when the urban environment was taken into account. Conclusions We have demonstrated the importance of environmental settings in studying the influence of the common UCP2 gene polymorphisms in the development of obesity in a Balinese population. PMID:22533685

  9. Fontan-associated protein-losing enteropathy and plastic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Stringer, Kathleen A; Donohue, Janet E; Yu, Sunkyung; Shaver, Ashley; Caruthers, Regine L; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Fifer, Carlen; Goldberg, Caren; Russell, Mark W

    2015-04-01

    To characterize the medical history, disease progression, and treatment of current-era patients with the rare diseases Fontan-associated protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) and plastic bronchitis. A novel survey that queried demographics, medical details, and treatment information was piloted and placed online via a Facebook portal, allowing social media to power the study. Participation regardless of PLE or plastic bronchitis diagnosis was allowed. Case control analyses compared patients with PLE and plastic bronchitis with uncomplicated control patients receiving the Fontan procedure. The survey was completed by 671 subjects, including 76 with PLE, 46 with plastic bronchitis, and 7 with both. Median PLE diagnosis was 2.5 years post-Fontan. Hospitalization for PLE occurred in 71% with 41% hospitalized ≥ 3 times. Therapy varied significantly. Patients with PLE more commonly had hypoplastic left ventricle (62% vs 44% control; OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.43-5.53), chylothorax (66% vs 41%; OR 2.96, CI 1.65-5.31), and cardiothoracic surgery in addition to staged palliation (17% vs 5%; OR 4.27, CI 1.63-11.20). Median plastic bronchitis diagnosis was 2 years post-Fontan. Hospitalization for plastic bronchitis occurred in 91% with 61% hospitalized ≥ 3 times. Therapy was very diverse. Patients with plastic bronchitis more commonly had chylothorax at any surgery (72% vs 51%; OR 2.47, CI 1.20-5.08) and seasonal allergies (52% vs 36%; OR 1.98, CI 1.01-3.89). Patient-specific factors are associated with diagnoses of PLE or plastic bronchitis. Treatment strategies are diverse without clear patterns. These results provide a foundation upon which to design future therapeutic studies and identify a clear need for forming consensus approaches to treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mapping of domains on HIV envelope protein mediating association with calnexin and protein-disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Papandréou, Marie-Jeanne; Barbouche, Rym; Guieu, Régis; Rivera, Santiago; Fantini, Jacques; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Jones, Ian M; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2010-04-30

    The cell catalysts calnexin (CNX) and protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) cooperate in establishing the disulfide bonding of the HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Following HIV binding to lymphocytes, cell-surface PDI also reduces Env to induce the fusogenic conformation. We sought to define the contact points between Env and these catalysts to illustrate their potential as therapeutic targets. In lysates of Env-expressing cells, 15% of the gp160 precursor, but not gp120, coprecipitated with CNX, whereas only 0.25% of gp160 and gp120 coprecipitated with PDI. Under in vitro conditions, which mimic the Env/PDI interaction during virus/cell contact, PDI readily associated with Env. The domains of Env interacting in cellulo with CNX or in vitro with PDI were then determined using anti-Env antibodies whose binding site was occluded by CNX or PDI. Antibodies against domains V1/V2, C2, and the C terminus of V3 did not bind CNX-associated Env, whereas those against C1, V1/V2, and the CD4-binding domain did not react with PDI-associated Env. In addition, a mixture of the latter antibodies interfered with PDI-mediated Env reduction. Thus, Env interacts with intracellular CNX and extracellular PDI via discrete, largely nonoverlapping, regions. The sites of interaction explain the mode of action of compounds that target these two catalysts and may enable the design of further new competitive agents.

  11. Complete protein-protein association kinetics in atomic detail revealed by molecular dynamics simulations and Markov modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, Nuria; Doerr, Stefan; de Fabritiis, Gianni; Noé, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Protein-protein association is fundamental to many life processes. However, a microscopic model describing the structures and kinetics during association and dissociation is lacking on account of the long lifetimes of associated states, which have prevented efficient sampling by direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here we demonstrate protein-protein association and dissociation in atomistic resolution for the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar by combining adaptive high-throughput MD simulations and hidden Markov modelling. The model reveals experimentally consistent intermediate structures, energetics and kinetics on timescales from microseconds to hours. A variety of flexibly attached intermediates and misbound states funnel down to a transition state and a native basin consisting of the loosely bound near-native state and the tightly bound crystallographic state. These results offer a deeper level of insight into macromolecular recognition and our approach opens the door for understanding and manipulating a wide range of macromolecular association processes.

  12. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in atherosclerosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    AYYAPPAN, JANEESH PLAKKAL; PAUL, ANTONI; GOO, YOUNG-HWA

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of atherosclerotic plaques in arterial walls leads to major cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Macrophages/foam cells are central components of atherosclerotic plaques, which populate the arterial wall in order to remove harmful modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, resulting in the accumulation of lipids, mostly LDL-derived cholesterol ester, in cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). At present, LDs are recognized as dynamic organelles that govern cellular metabolic processes. LDs consist of an inner core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and free cholesterol, and contain LD-associated proteins (LDAPs) that regulate LD functions. Foam cells are characterized by an aberrant accumulation of cytosolic LDs, and are considered a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions through all stages of development. Previous studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying foam cell formation, aiming to discover therapeutic strategies that target foam cells and intervene against atherosclerosis. It is well established that LDAPs have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases caused by dysfunction of lipid metabolism, and several studies have linked LDAPs to the development of atherosclerosis. In this review, several foam cell-targeting pathways have been described, with an emphasis on the role of LDAPs in cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. In addition, the potential of LDAPs as therapeutic targets to prevent the progression and/or facilitate the regression of the disease has been discussed. PMID:27082419

  13. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in atherosclerosis (Review).

    PubMed

    Plakkal Ayyappan, Janeesh; Paul, Antoni; Goo, Young-Hwa

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of atherosclerotic plaques in arterial walls leads to major cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Macrophages/foam cells are central components of atherosclerotic plaques, which populate the arterial wall in order to remove harmful modified low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, resulting in the accumulation of lipids, mostly LDL‑derived cholesterol ester, in cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). At present, LDs are recognized as dynamic organelles that govern cellular metabolic processes. LDs consist of an inner core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and free cholesterol, and contain LD‑associated proteins (LDAPs) that regulate LD functions. Foam cells are characterized by an aberrant accumulation of cytosolic LDs, and are considered a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions through all stages of development. Previous studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying foam cell formation, aiming to discover therapeutic strategies that target foam cells and intervene against atherosclerosis. It is well established that LDAPs have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases caused by dysfunction of lipid metabolism, and several studies have linked LDAPs to the development of atherosclerosis. In this review, several foam cell‑targeting pathways have been described, with an emphasis on the role of LDAPs in cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. In addition, the potential of LDAPs as therapeutic targets to prevent the progression and/or facilitate the regression of the disease has been discussed.

  14. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Syam; Hagberg, Henrik; Krishnamurthy, Rajanikant; Thornton, Claire; Mallard, Carina

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk) family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1. PMID:23880846

  15. Death associated protein kinases: molecular structure and brain injury.

    PubMed

    Nair, Syam; Hagberg, Henrik; Krishnamurthy, Rajanikant; Thornton, Claire; Mallard, Carina

    2013-07-04

    Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk) family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  16. JNK phosphorylates Yes-associated protein (YAP) to regulate apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, V; Gudmundsdottir, K; Luong, P; Leung, K-Y; Knebel, A; Basu, S

    2010-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) regulates DNA damage and chemosensitivity, as well as functioning as a pro-growth, cell size regulator. For both of its roles, regulation by phosphorylation is crucial. We undertook an in vitro screen to identify novel YAP kinases to discover new signaling pathways to better understand YAP's function. We identified JNK1 and JNK2 as robust YAP kinases, as well as mapped multiple sites of phosphorylation. Using inhibitors and siRNA, we showed that JNK specifically phosphorylates endogenous YAP in a number of cell types. We show that YAP protects keratinocytes from UV irradiation but promotes UV-induced apoptosis in a squamous cell carcinoma. We defined the mechanism for this dual role to be YAP's ability to bind and stabilize the pro-proliferative ΔNp63α isoform in a JNK-dependent manner. Our report indicates that an evaluation of the expression of the different isoforms of p63 and p73 is crucial in determining YAP's function. PMID:21364637

  17. Protein Mediated Oxidative Stress in Patients with Diabetes and its Associated Neuropathy: Correlation with Protein Carbonylation and Disease Activity Markers

    PubMed Central

    Almogbel, Ebtehal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Free radicals have been implicated as Diabetes Mellitus (DM) contributors in type 2 DM and its associated Diabetes Mellitus Neuropathy (DMN). However, the potential for protein mediated oxidative stress to contribute disease pathogenesis remains largely unexplored. Aim To investigate the status and contribution of protein mediated oxidative stress in patients with DM or DMN and to explore whether oxidative protein modification has a role in DM progression to DM associated neuropathy. Materials and Methods Sera from 42 DM and 37 DMN patients with varying levels of disease activities biomarkers (HbA1C, patients’ age or disease duration) and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated for serum levels of protein mediated oxidative stress. Results Serum analysis showed significantly higher levels of protein carbonyl contents in both DM and DMN patients compared with healthy controls. Importantly, not only was there an increased number of subjects positive for protein carbonylation, but also the levels of protein carbonyl contents were significantly higher among DM and DMN patients, whose HbA1C were ≥8.8 as compared with patients with lower HbA1C (HbA1C<8.8). Similar pattern of protein carbonyls formation was also observed with patients’ ages or with patient’s disease durations, suggesting a possible relationship between protein oxidation and disease progression. Furthermore, sera from DMN patients had higher levels of protein carbonylation compared with non-neuropathic DM patients’ sera, suggesting an involvement of protein oxidation in the progression of diabetes to diabetes neuropathy. Conclusion These findings support an association between protein oxidation and DM or DMN progression. The stronger response observed in patients with higher HbA1C or patients’ ages or disease durations suggests, that protein mediated oxidative stress may be useful in evaluating the progression of DM and its associated DMN and in elucidating the

  18. Fusions involving protein kinase C and membrane-associated proteins in benign fibrous histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Płaszczyca, Anna; Nilsson, Jenny; Magnusson, Linda; Brosjö, Otte; Larsson, Olle; Vult von Steyern, Fredrik; Domanski, Henryk A; Lilljebjörn, Henrik; Fioretos, Thoas; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Mandahl, Nils; Nord, Karolin H; Mertens, Fredrik

    2014-08-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) is a mesenchymal tumor that most often occurs in the skin (so-called dermatofibroma), but may also appear in soft tissues (so-called deep BFH) and in the skeleton (so-called non-ossifying fibroma). The origin of BFH is unknown, and it has been questioned whether it is a true neoplasm. Chromosome banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, RNA sequencing, RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to search for recurrent somatic mutations in a series of BFH. BFHs were found to harbor recurrent fusions of genes encoding membrane-associated proteins (podoplanin, CD63 and LAMTOR1) with genes encoding protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms PRKCB and PRKCD. PKCs are serine-threonine kinases that through their many phosphorylation targets are implicated in a variety of cellular processes, as well as tumor development. When inactive, the amino-terminal, regulatory domain of PKCs suppresses the activity of their catalytic domain. Upon activation, which requires several steps, they typically translocate to cell membranes, where they interact with different signaling pathways. The detected PDPN-PRKCB, CD63-PRKCD and LAMTOR1-PRKCD gene fusions are all predicted to result in chimeric proteins consisting of the membrane-binding part of PDPN, CD63 or LAMTOR1 and the entire catalytic domain of the PKC. This novel pathogenetic mechanism should result in constitutive kinase activity at an ectopic location. The results show that BFH indeed is a true neoplasm, and that distorted PKC activity is essential for tumorigenesis. The findings also provide means to differentiate BFH from other skin and soft tissue tumors. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Rare cancers.

  19. CAP2, cyclase-associated protein 2, is a dual compartment protein.

    PubMed

    Peche, V; Shekar, S; Leichter, M; Korte, H; Schröder, R; Schleicher, M; Holak, T A; Clemen, C S; Ramanath-Y, B; Pfitzer, G; Karakesisoglou, I; Noegel, A A

    2007-10-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins with roles in regulating the actin cytoskeleton and in signal transduction. Mammals have two CAP genes encoding the related CAP1 and CAP2. We studied the distribution and subcellular localization of CAP1 and CAP2 using specific antibodies. CAP1 shows a broad tissue distribution, whereas CAP2 is significantly expressed only in brain, heart and skeletal muscle, and skin. CAP2 is found in the nucleus in undifferentiated myoblasts and at the M-line of differentiated myotubes. In PAM212, a mouse keratinocyte cell line, CAP2 is enriched in the nucleus, and sparse in the cytosol. By contrast, CAP1 localizes to the cytoplasm in PAM212 cells. In human skin, CAP2 is present in all living layers of the epidermis localizing to the nuclei and the cell periphery. In in vitro studies, a C-terminal fragment of CAP2 interacts with actin, indicating that CAP2 has the capacity to bind to actin.

  20. Methionine-rich repeat proteins: a family of membrane-associated proteins which contain unusual repeat regions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jamie L; Evans, Nicholas A; Ahmed, Tanweer; Wrigley, Jonathan D J; Khan, Shukria; Wright, Charles; Keen, Jeffrey N; Holzenburg, Andreas; Findlay, John B C

    2005-03-01

    We report the protein isolation, cloning and characterization of members of an unusual protein family, which comprise the most abundant proteins present in the squid eye. The proteins in this family have a range of molecular weights from 32 to 36 kDa. Electron microscopy and detergent solubilization demonstrate that these proteins are tightly associated with membrane structures where they may form tetramers. Despite this, these proteins have no stretches of hydrophobic residues that could form typical transmembrane domains. They share an unusual protein sequence rich in methionine, and contain multiple repeating motifs. We have therefore named these proteins Methionine-Rich Repeat Proteins (MRRPs). The use of structure prediction algorithms suggest very little recognized secondary structure elements. At the time of cloning no sequence or structural homologues have been found in any database. We have isolated three closely related cDNA clones from the MRRP family. Coupled in vitro transcription/translation of the MRRP clones shows that they encode proteins with molecular masses similar to components of native MRRPs. Immunoblot analysis of these proteins reveals that they are also present in squid brain, optic lobe, and heart, and also indicate that MRRP-like protein motifs may also exist in mammalian tissues. We propose that MRRPs define a family of important proteins that have an unusual mode of attachment or insertion into cell membranes and are found in evolutionarily diverse organisms.

  1. Extracellular matrix-associated proteins form an integral and dynamic system during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Sun, Jin; Ding, Wei; Lin, Jinshui; Tian, Renmao; Lu, Liang; Liu, Xiaofen; Shen, Xihui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Though the essential role of extracellular matrix in biofilm development has been extensively documented, the function of matrix-associated proteins is elusive. Determining the dynamics of matrix-associated proteins would be a useful way to reveal their functions in biofilm development. Therefore, we applied iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to evaluate matrix-associated proteins isolated from different phases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 biofilms. Among the identified 389 proteins, 54 changed their abundance significantly. The increased abundance of stress resistance and nutrient metabolism-related proteins over the period of biofilm development was consistent with the hypothesis that biofilm matrix forms micro-environments in which cells are optimally organized to resist stress and use available nutrients. Secreted proteins, including novel putative effectors of the type III secretion system were identified, suggesting that the dynamics of pathogenesis-related proteins in the matrix are associated with biofilm development. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the abundance changes of matrix-associated proteins and their expression. Further analysis revealed complex interactions among these modulated proteins, and the mutation of selected proteins attenuated biofilm development. Collectively, this work presents the first dynamic picture of matrix-associated proteins during biofilm development, and provides evidences that the matrix-associated proteins may form an integral and well regulated system that contributes to stress resistance, nutrient acquisition, pathogenesis and the stability of the biofilm. PMID:26029669

  2. Association between serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A and bicarbonate in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Bicik, Zerrin; Coskun, Abdurrahman; Serteser, Mustafa; Bulur, Atilla; Mese, Meral; Unsal, Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Acidosis is associated with protein-energy malnutrition, inflammation, and bone disease, and low bicarbonate levels have been implicated in higher mortality rates in chronic kidney disease. Recently, the concentration of serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) has become accepted as a prognostic marker in hemodialysis patients. This study determined the relationship between PAPP-A and bicarbonate levels in these patients. The study enrolled 65 hemodialysis patients (41 males, 24 females) and 26 control subjects (11 males, 15 females). Serum PAPP-A, intact parathormone (iPTH), calcium, phosphorus (P), and bicarbonate levels were measured. Correlations between PAPP-A and bicarbonate, iPTH, calcium, and phosphorus were evaluated. Median PAPP-A levels were significantly higher in hemodialysis patients [15.1 (<0.03-158.8) ng/ml] than in control subjects [6.6 (<0.03-16.4) ng/ml] (P < 0.05). There were statistically significant correlations between serum PAPP-A and bicarbonate, iPTH, and P in hemodialysis patients but not in control subjects. Elevation of serum PAPP-A has been found in hemodialysis patients and its significant correlation with bicarbonate suggests that it may be a prognostic factor. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The extracellular-regulated protein kinase 5 (ERK5) promotes cell proliferation through the down-regulation of inhibitors of cyclin dependent protein kinases (CDKs).

    PubMed

    Perez-Madrigal, Diana; Finegan, Katherine G; Paramo, Blanca; Tournier, Cathy

    2012-12-01

    Activation of the extracellular-regulated protein kinase 5 (ERK5) has been associated with mitogenic signal transduction. However, conflicting findings have challenged the idea that ERK5 is a critical regulator of cell proliferation. We have addressed this issue by testing the effect of the conditional loss of ERK5 in primary fibroblasts. We have discovered that ERK5 suppressed the expression of the cyclin dependent protein kinase (CDKs) inhibitors, p21 and p27, by decreasing mRNA and protein stability, respectively. As a result, low level CDK2 activity detected in ERK5-deficient cells correlated with a defect in G1 to S phase transition of the cell cycle. Similarly, we found that the malignant MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line was dependent on ERK5 to proliferate. We propose that ERK5 blocks p21 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells via a mechanism that implicates c-Myc-dependent transcriptional regulation of the miR-17-92 cluster. Together with evidence that cancer patients with poor prognosis display a high level of expression of components of the ERK5 signaling pathway, these findings support the hypothesis that ERK5 can be a potential target for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis.

  5. Novel intracellular proteins associated with cellular vitamin D action.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Giana; Wood, Richard J; Mayer, Jean

    2002-07-01

    Work with vitamin D-resistant New World primates has revealed novel cellular proteins involved in vitamin D action. An "intracellular vitamin D-binding protein" functions to bind vitamin D metabolites in the cell and enhances vitamin D action. By contrast, a "vitamin D response element-binding protein" inhibits vitamin D receptor binding to the DNA and is responsible for vitamin D resistance in New World primates.

  6. HIV Genome-Wide Protein Associations: a Review of 30 Years of Research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The HIV genome encodes a small number of viral proteins (i.e., 16), invariably establishing cooperative associations among HIV proteins and between HIV and host proteins, to invade host cells and hijack their internal machineries. As a known example, the HIV envelope glycoprotein GP120 is closely associated with GP41 for viral entry. From a genome-wide perspective, a hypothesis can be worked out to determine whether 16 HIV proteins could develop 120 possible pairwise associations either by physical interactions or by functional associations mediated via HIV or host molecules. Here, we present the first systematic review of experimental evidence on HIV genome-wide protein associations using a large body of publications accumulated over the past 3 decades. Of 120 possible pairwise associations between 16 HIV proteins, at least 34 physical interactions and 17 functional associations have been identified. To achieve efficient viral replication and infection, HIV protein associations play essential roles (e.g., cleavage, inhibition, and activation) during the HIV life cycle. In either a dispensable or an indispensable manner, each HIV protein collaborates with another viral protein to accomplish specific activities that precisely take place at the proper stages of the HIV life cycle. In addition, HIV genome-wide protein associations have an impact on anti-HIV inhibitors due to the extensive cross talk between drug-inhibited proteins and other HIV proteins. Overall, this study presents for the first time a comprehensive overview of HIV genome-wide protein associations, highlighting meticulous collaborations between all viral proteins during the HIV life cycle. PMID:27357278

  7. HIV Genome-Wide Protein Associations: a Review of 30 Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangdi; De Clercq, Erik

    2016-09-01

    The HIV genome encodes a small number of viral proteins (i.e., 16), invariably establishing cooperative associations among HIV proteins and between HIV and host proteins, to invade host cells and hijack their internal machineries. As a known example, the HIV envelope glycoprotein GP120 is closely associated with GP41 for viral entry. From a genome-wide perspective, a hypothesis can be worked out to determine whether 16 HIV proteins could develop 120 possible pairwise associations either by physical interactions or by functional associations mediated via HIV or host molecules. Here, we present the first systematic review of experimental evidence on HIV genome-wide protein associations using a large body of publications accumulated over the past 3 decades. Of 120 possible pairwise associations between 16 HIV proteins, at least 34 physical interactions and 17 functional associations have been identified. To achieve efficient viral replication and infection, HIV protein associations play essential roles (e.g., cleavage, inhibition, and activation) during the HIV life cycle. In either a dispensable or an indispensable manner, each HIV protein collaborates with another viral protein to accomplish specific activities that precisely take place at the proper stages of the HIV life cycle. In addition, HIV genome-wide protein associations have an impact on anti-HIV inhibitors due to the extensive cross talk between drug-inhibited proteins and other HIV proteins. Overall, this study presents for the first time a comprehensive overview of HIV genome-wide protein associations, highlighting meticulous collaborations between all viral proteins during the HIV life cycle.

  8. Protein Z variants associated with protein Z plasma levels and with risk of idiopathic recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaikh, Fatima S; Sater, Mai S; Finan, Ramzi R; Racoubian, Eddie; Abu-Hijleh, Tala M; Mustafa, Fekria E; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2013-09-01

    Protein Z (PZ) deficiency due to anti-PZ autoantibodies and/or mutations in PZgene was linked with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including idiopathic recurrent miscarriage (IRM). We investigated the association of rs3024718, rs3024719, rs3024731, rs3024778, rs3024772, and rs3024735 (G79A) PZ variants and changes in PZ levels in 287 women with IRM, and 308 control women. Of the 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analyzed, higher minor allele frequency of rs3024735 (G79A) and rs3024731 were seen in IRM cases than in control women. Significantly higher frequencies of rs3024735/G79A G/A and A/A (P< .001), rs3024719 G/A (P= .009), and rs3024731 A/A (P = .012), but not rs3024718 (P= .12), rs3024778 (P = .76), or rs3024772 (P= .27) genotype carriers were seen between IRM cases versus control women, respectively, and was linked with reduced PZ levels. Six-locus (rs3024718/rs3024719/rs3024778/rs3024731/rs3024735/rs3024772) PZhaplotypes analysis demonstrated increased frequency of GAGAAG and AGGTAG and reduced frequency of AGGTGC haplotypes in IRM cases, thereby conferring disease susceptibility and protective nature to these haplotypes, respectively. These results demonstrate that specific PZSNPs and haplotypes are significantly associated with IRM.

  9. Proteomics analysis revealed changes in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins associated with oil mist exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Shan; Chen, Pang-Wei; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Su, Shu-Hui; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2006-04-01

    Exposure to oil mist has been associated with a variety of acute and chronic respiratory effects. Using proteomics approaches to investigate exposure-associated proteins may provide useful information to understand the mechanisms of associated respiratory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins associated with oil mist exposure using nano-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The results revealed that 29 proteins exhibited significant changes after exposure. These proteins included surfactant-associated proteins (SP-A and SP-D), inflammatory proteins (complement component 3, immunoglobulins, lysozyme, etc.), growth factors (e.g., transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha)), calcium-binding proteins (calcyclin, calgranulin A, calreticulin, and calvasculin), and other proteins (e.g., cathepsin D, saposin, and intestinal trefoil factor). To further evaluate changes in protein levels, a simple quantitative strategy was developed in this study. A large decrease in protein levels of SP-A and SP-D (0.24- and 0.38-fold, respectively) following exposure was observed. In contrast, protein levels of TGF-alpha and calcium-binding proteins were significantly increased (4.46- and 1.4-1.8-fold, respectively). Due to the diverse functions of these proteins, the results might contribute to understand the mechanisms involved in lung disorders induced by oil mist exposure.

  10. Characterization of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Bae, Chang-Dae; Park, Joobae

    2009-11-30

    Tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2), has been recently shown to be involved in the assembly and maintenance of mitotic spindle and also plays an essential role in maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. We have previously reported that TMAP is phosphorylated at multiple residues specifically during mitosis, and characterized the mechanism and functional importance of phosphorylation at one of the mitosis-specific phosphorylation residues (i.e., Thr-622). However, the phosphorylation events at the remaining mitotic phosphorylation sites of TMAP have not been fully characterized in detail. Here, we report on generation and characterization of phosphorylated Thr-578- and phosphorylated Thr-596-specific antibodies. Using the antibodies, we show that phosphorylation of TMAP at Thr-578 and Thr-596 indeed occurs specifically during mitosis. Immunofluorescent staining using the antibodies shows that these residues become phosphorylated starting at prophase and then become rapidly dephosphorylated soon after initiation of anaphase. Subtle differences in the kinetics of phosphorylation between Thr-578 and Thr-596 imply that they may be under different mechanisms of phosphorylation during mitosis. Unlike the phosphorylation-deficient mutant form for Thr-622, the mutant in which both Thr-578 and Thr-596 had been mutated to alanines did not induce significant delay in progression of mitosis. These results show that the majority of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of TMAP is limited to pre-anaphase stages and suggest that the multiple phosphorylation may not act in concert but serve diverse functions.

  11. Characterization of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hyun-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2), has been recently shown to be involved in the assembly and maintenance of mitotic spindle and also plays an essential role in maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. We have previously reported that TMAP is phosphorylated at multiple residues specifically during mitosis, and characterized the mechanism and functional importance of phosphorylation at one of the mitosis-specific phosphorylation residues (i.e., Thr-622). However, the phosphorylation events at the remaining mitotic phosphorylation sites of TMAP have not been fully characterized in detail. Here, we report on generation and characterization of phosphorylated Thr-578- and phosphorylated Thr-596-specific antibodies. Using the antibodies, we show that phosphorylation of TMAP at Thr-578 and Thr-596 indeed occurs specifically during mitosis. Immunofluorescent staining using the antibodies shows that these residues become phosphorylated starting at prophase and then become rapidly dephosphorylated soon after initiation of anaphase. Subtle differences in the kinetics of phosphorylation between Thr-578 and Thr-596 imply that they may be under different mechanisms of phosphorylation during mitosis. Unlike the phosphorylation-deficient mutant form for Thr-622, the mutant in which both Thr-578 and Thr-596 had been mutated to alanines did not induce significant delay in progression of mitosis. These results show that the majority of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of TMAP is limited to pre-anaphase stages and suggest that the multiple phosphorylation may not act in concert but serve diverse functions. PMID:19641375

  12. Cerebral infarction associated with protein C deficiency following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, B G; Saving, K L; McCallister, J A; Warkentin, P I; McConnell, J R; Roberts, W M; Coccia, P F; Haire, W D

    1991-10-01

    Hypercoagulable states associated with deficiencies in circulating anticoagulant protein C occur after chemotherapy for a variety of malignant diseases. Protein C deficiency also occurs following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and may be responsible for a variety of transplantation-associated complications. We report the case of a child who suffered a stroke associated with low protein C antigen and activity occurring 11 months after allogeneic BMT. Protein C levels recovered spontaneously by 18 months after BMT. We speculate that the protein C deficiency and and resultant hypercoagulable state led to the stroke, and the deficiency of this anticoagulant was a sequela of the transplant.

  13. Third-Party Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Indicates Constitutive Association of Membrane Proteins: Application to Class A G-Protein-Coupled Receptors and G-Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Lan, Tien-Hung; Barik, Arnab; Lambert, Nevin A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Many of the molecules that mediate G-protein signaling are thought to constitutively associate with each other in variably stable signaling complexes. Much of the evidence for signaling complexes has come from Förster resonance energy transfer and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) studies. However, detection of constitutive protein association with these methods is hampered by nonspecific energy transfer that occurs when donor and acceptor molecules are in close proximity by chance. We show that chemically-induced recruitment of local third-party BRET donors or acceptors reliably separates nonspecific and specific BRET. We use this method to reexamine the constitutive association of class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with other GPCRs and with heterotrimeric G-proteins. We find that β2 adrenoreceptors constitutively associate with each other and with several other class A GPCRs. In contrast, GPCRs and G-proteins are unlikely to exist in stable constitutive preassembled complexes. PMID:20483349

  14. Evidence for direct association of Vpr and matrix protein p17 within the HIV-1 virion.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Yoshimoto, J; Isaka, Y; Miki, S; Suyama, A; Adachi, A; Hayami, M; Fujiwara, T; Yoshie, O

    1996-06-01

    Vpr is one of the auxiliary proteins of HIV-1 and is selectively incorporated into the virion by a process involving the C-terminal p6 portion of the Gag precursor Pr55. Vpr and the matrix protein p17 are the components of the viral preintegration complex and appear to play important roles in the nuclear transport of proviral DNA in nondividing cells. In the present study, we have demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments that Vpr associates with matrix protein p17 but not with capsid protein p24 within the HIV-1 virion. Experiments employing the yeast two-hybrid GAL4 assay for protein-protein interactions also demonstrated a direct association between Vpr and the C-terminal region of matrix protein p17. Association of Vpr and the matrix protein p17 within the mature virion is consistent with their collaborative role in the nuclear transportation of the viral preintegration complex in nondividing cells such as macrophages.

  15. Proteomic analysis and identification of cell surface-associated proteins of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Jayaramaiah, Usharani; Singh, Neetu; Thankappan, Sabarinath; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara

    2016-06-01

    Blackleg is a highly fatal disease of cattle and sheep, caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a Gram positive, anaerobic, spore forming bacteria. Cell surface-associated proteins play a major role in inducing the protective immunity. However, the identity of a majority of cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei is not known. In the present investigation, we have used SDS-PAGE, 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting followed by mass spectrometry to identify cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei. Among the identified proteins, which have shown to offer protective antigencity in other bacteria, Enolase, Chaperonin, Ribosomal protein L10, Glycosyl Hydrolase and Flavoprotein were characterized by sequencing and their overexpression in Escherichia coli. In conclusion, cell surface-associated proteins were identified using proteomic approach and the genes for the immunoreactive proteins were expressed, which may prove to be potential diagnostic or vaccine candidates.

  16. Roles of the Polymerase-Associated Protein Genes in Newcastle Disease Virus Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-hui; Cheng, Jin-long; Xue, Jia; Jin, Ji-hui; Song, Yang; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Guo-zhong

    2017-01-01

    The virulence of Newcastle disease virus varies greatly and is determined by multiple genetic factors. In this study, we systematically evaluated the roles of the polymerase-associated (NP, P and L) protein genes in genotype VII NDV virulence after confirming the envelope-associated (F and HN) proteins contributed greatly to NDV virulence. The results revealed that the polymerase-associated protein genes individually had certain effect on virulence, while transfer of these three genes in combination significantly affected the chimeric virus virulence, especially when the L gene was involved. These results indicated that the L protein was a major contributor to NDV virulence when combined with the homologous NP and P proteins. We also investigated viral RNA synthesis using NDV minigenome systems to assess the interaction between the NP, P, and L proteins, which showed that the activity of the polymerase-associated proteins were directly related to viral RNA transcription and replication. PMID:28220114

  17. Overexpression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 is associated with metastasis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Min; Song, Xiaolian; Zhang, Guoliang; Peng, Aimei; Li, Xuan; Li, Ming; Liu, Yang; Wang, Changhui

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancer ranks first in both prevalence and mortality rates among all types of cancer. Metastasis is the main cause of treatment failure. Biomarkers are critical to early diagnosis and prediction and monitoring of progressive lesions. Several biomarkers have been identified for lung cancer but none have been routinely used clinically. The present study assessed the diagnostic and prognostic value of cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) for lung cancer. CAP1 mRNA abundance and protein content were determined by real-time PCR and western blot analysis and/or immunostaining in biopsy specimens (24 neoplastic and 6 non-neoplastic) freshly collected at surgical lung resection, in 82 pathologically banked lung cancer specimens and in cultured non-invasive (95-C) and invasive (95-D) lung cancer cells. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to correlate immunoreactive CAP1 signal with cancer type and stage. In vitro cell migration was performed to determine the effect of RNA interference-mediated CAP1 gene silencing on invasiveness of 95-D cells. These analyses collectively demonstrated that: i) both CAP1 mRNA abundance and protein content were significantly higher in neoplastic compared to non-neoplastic specimens and in metastatic compared to non-metastatic specimens but not different between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma; ii) immunoreactive CAP1 signal was significantly stronger in metastatic specimens and 95-D cells compared to non-metastatic specimens and 95-C cells; and iii) RNA interference-mediated CAP1 gene silencing adequately attenuated the invasive capacity of 95-D cells in vitro. These findings suggest that overexpression of CAP1 in lung cancer cells, particularly at the metastatic stage, may have significant clinical implications as a diagnostic/prognostic factor for lung cancer.

  18. Proteome analysis of microtubule-associated proteins and their interacting partners from mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Kozielski, Frank; Riaz, Tahira; DeBonis, Salvatore; Koehler, Christian J; Kroening, Mario; Panse, Isabel; Strozynski, Margarita; Donaldson, Ian M; Thiede, Bernd

    2011-07-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential for a variety of cellular processes. MTs are finely regulated by distinct classes of MT-associated proteins (MAPs), which themselves bind to and are regulated by a large number of additional proteins. We have carried out proteome analyses of tubulin-rich and tubulin-depleted MAPs and their interacting partners isolated from bovine brain. In total, 573 proteins were identified giving us unprecedented access to brain-specific MT-associated proteins from mammalian brain. Most of the standard MAPs were identified and at least 500 proteins have been reported as being associated with MTs. We identified protein complexes with a large number of subunits such as brain-specific motor/adaptor/cargo complexes for kinesins, dynein, and dynactin, and proteins of an RNA-transporting granule. About 25% of the identified proteins were also found in the synaptic vesicle proteome. Analysis of the MS/MS data revealed many posttranslational modifications, amino acid changes, and alternative splice variants, particularly in tau, a key protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Bioinformatic analysis of known protein-protein interactions of the identified proteins indicated that the number of MAPs and their associated proteins is larger than previously anticipated and that our database will be a useful resource to identify novel binding partners.

  19. Association of protein S p.Pro667Pro dimorphism with plasma protein S levels in normal individuals and patients with inherited protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Castaman, G; Biguzzi, E; Razzari, C; Tosetto, A; Fontana, G; Asti, D; Brancaccio, V; Castori, D; Lane, D A; Faioni, E M

    2007-01-01

    A dimorphism in PROS1 gene (c.A2,001G, p.Pro667Pro) has been associated with significantly reduced levels of both free and total protein S in carriers of the GG genotype. It is not known how the GG genotype could influence PS levels in normals, whether it could influence the levels of protein S in carriers of mutations in PROS1 gene and whether this genotype acts as an isolated or additive risk factor for venous thrombosis. With this as background, we evaluated the association of p.Pro667Pro dimorphism with free and total protein S centrally measured in a panel of 119 normal controls, 222 individuals with low protein S and 137 individuals with normal PS levels belonging to 76 families with protein S deficiency enrolled in the ProSIT study. Transient expression of recombinant wild type protein S and p.Pro667Pro protein S was performed to evaluate the role of the A to G transition at position 2001 in vitro. The p.Pro667Pro polymorphism was also expressed together with a p.Glu67Ala variant to assess a possible influence on protein S levels in protein S deficient subjects. Free and total protein S levels were significantly lower in normal women. In normal women only was the GG genotype associated with significantly lower free protein S levels in comparison to AA and AG genotypes (P=0.032). No significant influence of GG genotype was observed in patients, either with known mutations or with low protein S levels. These data were confirmed by in vitro transient expression, showing no difference in secretion levels of the p.Pro667Pro variant (even in association with the p.Glu67Ala mutation), compared to the wild type protein S. The genotype in itself was neither a significant risk factor for venous thrombosis nor a risk modifier in patients with known mutations.

  20. EP4 Receptor–Associated Protein in Macrophages Ameliorates Colitis and Colitis-Associated Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Masato; Yasui, Mika; Komekado, Hideyuki; Higuchi, Sei; Fujikawa, Risako; Nakanishi, Yuki; Fukuda, Akihisa; Kawada, Kenji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Kita, Toru; Libby, Peter; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Yokode, Masayuki; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 plays important roles in the maintenance of colonic homeostasis. The recently identified prostaglandin E receptor (EP) 4–associated protein (EPRAP) is essential for an anti-inflammatory function of EP4 signaling in macrophages in vitro. To investigate the in vivo roles of EPRAP, we examined the effects of EPRAP on colitis and colitis-associated tumorigenesis. In mice, EPRAP deficiency exacerbated colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) treatment. Wild-type (WT) or EPRAP-deficient recipients transplanted with EPRAP-deficient bone marrow developed more severe DSS-induced colitis than WT or EPRAP-deficient recipients of WT bone marrow. In the context of colitis-associated tumorigenesis, both systemic EPRAP null mutation and EPRAP-deficiency in the bone marrow enhanced intestinal polyp formation induced by azoxymethane (AOM)/DSS treatment. Administration of an EP4-selective agonist, ONO-AE1-329, ameliorated DSS-induced colitis in WT, but not in EPRAP-deficient mice. EPRAP deficiency increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of p105, MEK, and ERK, resulting in activation of stromal macrophages in DSS-induced colitis. Macrophages of DSS-treated EPRAP-deficient mice exhibited a marked increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, relative to WT mice. By contrast, forced expression of EPRAP in macrophages ameliorated DSS-induced colitis and AOM/DSS-induced intestinal polyp formation. These data suggest that EPRAP in macrophages functions crucially in suppressing colonic inflammation. Consistently, EPRAP-positive macrophages were also accumulated in the colonic stroma of ulcerative colitis patients. Thus, EPRAP may be a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory bowel disease and associated intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:26439841

  1. Expression of Yes-associated protein modulates Survivin expression in primary liver malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F; Lam-Himlin, Dora M; Klein, Alison P; Nayar, Suresh K; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies, the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing, and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice after genetic manipulation of Yes-associated protein, a transcription coactivator. Here, we comprehensively documented Yes-associated protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression is significantly increased in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. We found that increased Yes-associated protein levels in hepatocellular carcinoma are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification and transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. We found that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress Yes-associated protein in the liver, we found that Survivin messenger RNA expression depends upon Yes-associated protein levels. Our findings suggested that Yes-associated protein contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    PubMed

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    Many processes, cell motility being an example, require cells to remodel the actin cytoskeleton in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton involves the rapid disassembly and reassembly of actin filaments, a phenomenon regulated by the action of particular actin-binding proteins. In recent years, an interest in studying actin regulation in unicellular organisms has arisen. Parasitic protozoan are among these organisms and studies of the cytoskeleton functions of these protozoan are relevant related to either cell biology or pathogenicity. To discuss recent data in this field, a symposium concerning "Actin and actin-binding proteins in protists" was held on May 8-11 in Paris, France, during the XXXV meeting of the French Society of Protistology. As a brief summary of the symposium we report here findings concerning the in vitro actin dynamic assembly, as well as the characterization of several actin-binding proteins from the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis and Plasmodium knowlesi. In addition, localization of actin in non-pathogen protists such as Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii is also presented. The data show that some actin-binding proteins facilitate organization of filaments into higher order structures as pseudopods, while others have regulatory functions, indicating very particular roles for actin-binding proteins. One of the proteins discussed during the symposium, the actin depolymerizing factor ADF, was shown to enhance the treadmilling rate of actin filaments. In vitro, ADF binds to the ADP-bound forms of G-actin and F-actin, thereby participating in and changing the rate of actin assembly. Biochemical approaches allowed the identification of a protein complex formed by HSP/C70-cap32-34 which might also be involved in depolymerization of F-actin in P. knowlesi. Molecular and cellular approaches were used to identify proteins such as ABP-120 and myosin

  3. ASSOCIATIONS OF PROTEIN INTAKE AND PROTEIN SOURCE WITH BONE MINERAL DENSITY AND FRACTURE RISK: A POPULATION-BASED COHORT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    LANGSETMO, L.; BARR, S.I.; BERGER, C.; KREIGER, N.; RAHME, E.; ADACHI, J.D.; PAPAIOANNOU, A.; KAISER, S. M; PRIOR, J.C.; HANLEY, D.A.; KOVACS, C.S.; JOSSE, R.G.; GOLTZMAN, D.

    2016-01-01

    High dietary protein has been hypothesized to cause lower bone mineral density (BMD) and greater fracture risk. Previous results are conflicting and few studies have assessed potential differences related to differing protein sources. Objective To determine associations between total protein intake, and protein intake by source (dairy, non-dairy animal, plant) with BMD, BMD change, and incident osteoporotic fracture. Design/Setting Prospective cohort study (Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study). Participants/Measures Protein intake was assessed as percent of total energy intake (TEI) at Year 2 (1997–99) using a food frequency questionnaire (N=6510). Participants were contacted annually to ascertain incident fracture. Total hip and lumbar spine BMD was measured at baseline and Year 5. Analyses were stratified by group (men 25–49 y, men 50+ y, premenopausal women 25–49 y, and postmenopausal women 50+ y) and adjusted for major confounders. Fracture analyses were limited to those 50+ y. Results Intakes of dairy protein (with adjustment for BMI) were positively associated with total hip BMD among men and women aged 50+ y, and in men aged 25–49. Among adults aged 50+ y, those with protein intakes of <12% TEI (women) and <11% TEI (men) had increased fracture risk compared to those with intakes of 15% TEI. Fracture risk did not significantly change as intake increased above 15% TEI, and was not significantly associated with protein source. Conclusions In contrast to hypothesized risk of high protein, we found that for adults 50+ y, low protein intake (below 15% TEI) may lead to increased fracture risk. Source of protein was a determinant of BMD, but not fracture risk. PMID:26412291

  4. Identification and Validation of PTEN Complex, Associated Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    Rosalia construct was transcribed and translated using a wheat germ lysate transcription/translation system to generate an unphosphorylated protein...efficient using the wheat germ lysate transcription/translation, system the new antisera immunoprecipitated the protein as well as the C54 Ab, especially...pSGL-PTEN was in vitro translated in a Rabbit reticolocyte lysate system (A) or in a wheat germ system (B) in the presence of radioactively labeled

  5. Methyl-accepting protein associated with bacterial sensory phodopsin I

    SciTech Connect

    Spudich, E.N.; Hasselbacher, C.A. ); Spudich, J.L. )

    1988-09-01

    In vivo radiolabeling of Halaobacterium halobium phototaxis mutants and revertants with L-(methyl-{sup 3}H) methionine implicated seven methyl-accepting protein bands with apparent molecular masses from 65 to 150 kilodaltons (kDa) in adaptation of the organism to chemo and photo stimuli, and one of these (94 kDa) was specifically implicated in photoaxis. The lability of the radiolabeled bands to mild base treatment indicated the the methyl linkages are carboxylmethylesters, as is the case in the eubacterial chemotaxis receptor-transducers. The 94-kDa protein was present in increased amounts in an overproducer of the apoprotein of sensory rhodopsin I, one of two retinal-containing photoaxis receptors in H. halobium. It was absent in a strain the contained sensory rhodopsin II and that lacked sensory rhodopsin I and was also absent in a mutant that lacked both photoreceptors. Based in the role of methyl-accepting proteins in chemotaxis in other bacteria, we suggest that the 94-kDa protein is the signal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. By ({sup 3}H)retinal labeling studies, we previously identified a 25-kDa retinal-binding polypeptide that was derived from photochemically reactive sensory rhodopsin I. When H. halobium membranes containing sensory rhodopsin I were treated by a procedure that stably reduced ({sup 3}H) retinal onto the 25-kDa apoprotein, a 94-kDa protein was also found to be radiolabeled. Protease digestion confirmed that the 94-kDa retinal-labeled protein was the same as the methyl-accepting protein that was suggested above to be the siginal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. Possible models are that the 25- and 94-kDa proteins are tightly interacting components of the photosensory signaling machinery or that both are forms of sensory rhodopsin I.

  6. Methyl-accepting protein associated with bacterial sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, E N; Hasselbacher, C A; Spudich, J L

    1988-01-01

    In vivo radiolabeling of Halobacterium halobium phototaxis mutants and revertants with L-[methyl-3H] methionine implicated seven methyl-accepting protein bands with apparent molecular masses from 65 to 150 kilodaltons (kDa) in adaptation of the organism to chemo and photo stimuli, and one of these (94 kDa) was specifically implicated in phototaxis. The lability of the radiolabeled bands to mild base treatment indicated that the methyl linkages are carboxylmethylesters, as is the case in the eubacterial chemotaxis receptor-transducers. The 94-kDa protein was present in increased amounts in an overproducer of the apoprotein of sensory rhodopsin I, one of two retinal-containing phototaxis receptors in H. halobium. It was absent in a strain that contained sensory rhodopsin II and that lacked sensory rhodopsin I and was also absent in a mutant that lacked both photoreceptors. Based on the role of methyl-accepting proteins in chemotaxis in other bacteria, we suggest that the 94-kDa protein is the signal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. By [3H]retinal labeling studies, we previously identified a 25-kDa retinal-binding polypeptide that was derived from photochemically reactive sensory rhodopsin I. When H. halobium membranes containing sensory rhodopsin I were treated by a procedure that stably reduced [3H]retinal onto the 25-kDa apoprotein, a 94-kDa protein was also found to be radiolabeled. Protease digestion confirmed that the 94-kDa retinal-labeled protein was the same as the methyl-accepting protein that was suggested above to be the signal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. Possible models are that the 25- and 94-kDa proteins are tightly interacting components of the photosensory signaling machinery or that both are forms of sensory rhodopsin I. Images PMID:3410829

  7. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphism, but not concentrations, is associated with radiographic hand osteoarthritis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective. Factors associated with mineralization and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis (OA) are incompletely understood. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a mineralization inhibitor, have been associated clinically with conditions of abnormal calcification. We therefore evalua...

  8. Inference of domain-disease associations from domain-protein, protein-disease and disease-disease relationships.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wangshu; Coba, Marcelo P; Sun, Fengzhu

    2016-01-11

    Protein domains can be viewed as portable units of biological function that defines the functional properties of proteins. Therefore, if a protein is associated with a disease, protein domains might also be associated and define disease endophenotypes. However, knowledge about such domain-disease relationships is rarely available. Thus, identification of domains associated with human diseases would greatly improve our understanding of the mechanism of human complex diseases and further improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. Based on phenotypic similarities among diseases, we first group diseases into overlapping modules. We then develop a framework to infer associations between domains and diseases through known relationships between diseases and modules, domains and proteins, as well as proteins and disease modules. Different methods including Association, Maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), Domain-disease pair exclusion analysis (DPEA), Bayesian, and Parsimonious explanation (PE) approaches are developed to predict domain-disease associations. We demonstrate the effectiveness of all the five approaches via a series of validation experiments, and show the robustness of the MLE, Bayesian and PE approaches to the involved parameters. We also study the effects of disease modularization in inferring novel domain-disease associations. Through validation, the AUC (Area Under the operating characteristic Curve) scores for Bayesian, MLE, DPEA, PE, and Association approaches are 0.86, 0.84, 0.83, 0.83 and 0.79, respectively, indicating the usefulness of these approaches for predicting domain-disease relationships. Finally, we choose the Bayesian approach to infer domains associated with two common diseases, Crohn's disease and type 2 diabetes. The Bayesian approach has the best performance for the inference of domain-disease relationships. The predicted landscape between domains and diseases provides a more detailed view about the disease

  9. Cancer-associated mutations are preferentially distributed in protein kinase functional sites.

    PubMed

    Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Redfern, Oliver C; Orengo, Christine A; Valencia, Alfonso

    2009-12-01

    Protein kinases are a superfamily involved in many crucial cellular processes, including signal transmission and regulation of cell cycle. As a consequence of this role, kinases have been reported to be associated with many types of cancer and are considered as potential therapeutic targets. We analyzed the distribution of pathogenic somatic point mutations (drivers) in the protein kinase superfamily with respect to their location in the protein, such as in structural, evolutionary, and functionally relevant regions. We find these driver mutations are more clearly associated with key protein features than other somatic mutations (passengers) that have not been directly linked to tumor progression. This observation fits well with the expected implication of the alterations in protein kinase function in cancer pathogenicity. To explain the relevance of the detected association of cancer driver mutations at the molecular level in the human kinome, we compare these with genetically inherited mutations (SNPs). We find that the subset of nonsynonymous SNPs that are associated to disease, but sufficiently mild to the point of being widespread in the population, tend to avoid those key protein regions, where they could be more detrimental for protein function. This tendency contrasts with the one detected for cancer associated-driver-mutations, which seems to be more directly implicated in the alteration of protein function. The detailed analysis of protein kinase groups and a number of relevant examples, confirm the relation between cancer associated-driver-mutations and key regions for protein kinase structure and function.

  10. The subunit interfaces of weakly associated homodimeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sucharita; Pal, Arumay; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Janin, Joël

    2010-04-23

    We analyzed subunit interfaces in 315 homodimers with an X-ray structure in the Protein Data Bank, validated by checking the literature for data that indicate that the proteins are dimeric in solution and that, in the case of the "weak" dimers, the homodimer is in equilibrium with the monomer. The interfaces of the 42 weak dimers, which are smaller by a factor of 2.4 on average than in the remainder of the set, are comparable in size with antibody-antigen or protease-inhibitor interfaces. Nevertheless, they are more hydrophobic than in the average transient protein-protein complex and similar in amino acid composition to the other homodimer interfaces. The mean numbers of interface hydrogen bonds and hydration water molecules per unit area are also similar in homodimers and transient complexes. Parameters related to the atomic packing suggest that many of the weak dimer interfaces are loosely packed, and we suggest that this contributes to their low stability. To evaluate the evolutionary selection pressure on interface residues, we calculated the Shannon entropy of homologous amino acid sequences at 60% sequence identity. In 93% of the homodimers, the interface residues are better conserved than the residues on the protein surface. The weak dimers display the same high degree of interface conservation as other homodimers, but their homologs may be heterodimers as well as homodimers. Their interfaces may be good models in terms of their size, composition, and evolutionary conservation for the labile subunit contacts that allow protein assemblies to share and exchange components, allosteric proteins to undergo quaternary structure transitions, and molecular machines to operate in the cell.

  11. Associations between milk-protein production and reproduction, health, and culling.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, J M; Martin, S W; Lissemore, K D; Leslie, K E; Gibson, J P; Scott, H M; Kelton, D F

    1998-04-16

    Associations between protein production and individual-cow reproductive performance, health, and culling were investigated in a 2-year observational study involving a convenience sample of 75 Ontario, 5 Alberta, and 3 Nova Scotia dairy farms. Protein production was defined by 305-day lactation protein yields and by estimated breeding values for protein yield. After controlling for the level of milk production, herd, parity, breed, and season of calving, there were no significant associations between either measure of protein production and days open or days to first breeding. The only associations between protein production and disease were small positive associations between the estimated breeding value for protein yield and cystic ovaries and mean lactation somatic cell count. The risk of culling, after controlling for the level of milk production, was negatively associated with previous-lactation 305-day protein yield for parity three animals only. The estimated breeding value for protein yield had a small negative association with the overall risk of culling, although the associations were not significant for individual lactations.

  12. Proteomic analysis of Col11a1-associated protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Raquel J.; Mallory, Christopher; McDougal, Owen M.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2012-01-01

    Cartilage plays an essential role during skeletal development within the growth plate and in articular joint function. Interactions between the collagen fibrils and other extracellular matrix molecules maintain structural integrity of cartilage, orchestrate complex dynamic events during embryonic development, and help to regulate fibrillogenesis. To increase our understanding of these events, affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify proteins that interact with the collagen fibril surface via the amino terminal domain of collagen alpha 1(XI) a protein domain that is displayed at the surface of heterotypic collagen fibrils of cartilage. Proteins extracted from fetal bovine cartilage using homogenization in high ionic strength buffer were selected based on affinity for the amino terminal noncollagenous domain of collagen alpha 1(XI). Mass spectrometry was used to determine the amino acid sequence of tryptic fragments for protein identification. Extracellular matrix molecules and cellular proteins that were identified as interacting with the amino terminal domain of collagen alpha 1(XI) directly or indirectly, included proteoglycans, collagens, and matricellular molecules, some of which also play a role in fibrillogenesis, while others are known to function in the maintenance of tissue integrity. Characterization of these molecular interactions will provide a more thorough understanding of how the extracellular matrix molecules of cartilage interact and what role collagen XI plays in the process of fibrillogenesis and maintenance of tissue integrity. Such information will aid tissue engineering and cartilage regeneration efforts to treat cartilage tissue damage and degeneration. PMID:22038862

  13. Identification of Autophagosome-associated Proteins and Regulators by Quantitative Proteomic Analysis and Genetic Screens*

    PubMed Central

    Dengjel, Jörn; Høyer-Hansen, Maria; Nielsen, Maria O.; Eisenberg, Tobias; Harder, Lea M.; Schandorff, Søren; Farkas, Thomas; Kirkegaard, Thomas; Becker, Andrea C.; Schroeder, Sabrina; Vanselow, Katja; Lundberg, Emma; Nielsen, Mogens M.; Kristensen, Anders R.; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Madeo, Frank; Jäättelä, Marja; Andersen, Jens S.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the major intracellular catabolic pathways, but little is known about the composition of autophagosomes. To study the associated proteins, we isolated autophagosomes from human breast cancer cells using two different biochemical methods and three stimulus types: amino acid deprivation or rapamycin or concanamycin A treatment. The autophagosome-associated proteins were dependent on stimulus, but a core set of proteins was stimulus-independent. Remarkably, proteasomal proteins were abundant among the stimulus-independent common autophagosome-associated proteins, and the activation of autophagy significantly decreased the cellular proteasome level and activity supporting interplay between the two degradation pathways. A screen of yeast strains defective in the orthologs of the human genes encoding for a common set of autophagosome-associated proteins revealed several regulators of autophagy, including subunits of the retromer complex. The combined spatiotemporal proteomic and genetic data sets presented here provide a basis for further characterization of autophagosome biogenesis and cargo selection. PMID:22311637

  14. Detection of dysregulated protein-association networks by high-throughput proteomics predicts cancer vulnerabilities.

    PubMed

    Lapek, John D; Greninger, Patricia; Morris, Robert; Amzallag, Arnaud; Pruteanu-Malinici, Iulian; Benes, Cyril H; Haas, Wilhelm

    2017-09-11

    The formation of protein complexes and the co-regulation of the cellular concentrations of proteins are essential mechanisms for cellular signaling and for maintaining homeostasis. Here we use isobaric-labeling multiplexed proteomics to analyze protein co-regulation and show that this allows the identification of protein-protein associations with high accuracy. We apply this 'interactome mapping by high-throughput quantitative proteome analysis' (IMAHP) method to a panel of 41 breast cancer cell lines and show that deviations of the observed protein co-regulations in specific cell lines from the consensus network affects cellular fitness. Furthermore, these aberrant interactions serve as biomarkers that predict the drug sensitivity of cell lines in screens across 195 drugs. We expect that IMAHP can be broadly used to gain insight into how changing landscapes of protein-protein associations affect the phenotype of biological systems.

  15. Associations between heat shock protein 70 genetic polymorphisms and calving traits in crossbred Brahman cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stressors such as heat, cold, toxins, and oxygen deprivation are known to induce heat shock proteins. Genetic polymorphisms associated with heat shock protein genes have been associated with decreased male and female fertility. Our objectives were to 1) confirm single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) ...

  16. Rearrangement of microtubule associated protein parallels the morphological transformation of neurons from dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Hernández, M A; Avila, J; Moya, F; Alberto, C

    1989-01-01

    In primary cultures of dorsal root ganglion cells from rat embryos, neurons undergo a morphological transformation from a bipolar to a differentiated pseudo-unipolar shape, resembling their developmental stages in vivo. Cells present in these cultures are characterized here by immunological criteria using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against microtubule associated proteins MAP1 and MAP2 and against tubulin. After development for seven days in culture, antibodies against microtubule associated proteins MAP1 brightly labeled cells with neuronal morphology and lightly stained cells with the shape of Schwann cells. In addition, an extended network of neuronal processes was labeled with this antibody. Anti-microtubule associated protein MAP2 stained only neurons and a more restricted network of neuronal processes. The compartmentalization of microtubule associated protein MAP2 during the maturation process was followed by double-labeling with antibodies to microtubule associated proteins MAP1 and MAP2. Initially, microtubule associated protein MAP2 was present in the cell body and the two processes of bipolar neurons. Subsequently, the labeling of both processes changed, depending on neuronal morphology. In neurons in which both processes were approaching one another, one of these neurites was stained predominantly with anti-microtubule associated protein MAP2. Finally, in pseudo, unipolar neurons, anti-microtubule associated protein MAP2 labeling was found in the cell body and excluded from the more distal processes.

  17. Inhibition of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) impairs mitochondrial fission and mitotic catastrophe after x-irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamori, Tohru; Ike, Satoshi; Bo, Tomoki; Sasagawa, Tomoya; Sakai, Yuri; Suzuki, Motofumi; Yamamoto, Kumiko; Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial dynamics is crucial for the maintenance of cellular quality control and function in response to various stresses. However, the role of mitochondrial dynamics in cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR) is still largely unknown. In this study, we provide evidence that IR triggers mitochondrial fission mediated by the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). We also show IR-induced mitotic catastrophe (MC), which is a type of cell death associated with defective mitosis, and aberrant centrosome amplification in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). These are attenuated by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Drp1. Whereas radiation-induced aberrant centrosome amplification and MC are suppressed by the inhibition of Plk1 and CDK2 in wild-type MEFs, the inhibition of these kinases is ineffective in Drp1-deficient MEFs. Furthermore, the cyclin B1 level after irradiation is significantly higher throughout the time course in Drp1-deficient MEFs than in wild-type MEFs, implying that Drp1 is involved in the regulation of cyclin B1 level. These findings strongly suggest that Drp1 plays an important role in determining the fate of cells after irradiation via the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:26466676

  18. Inhibition of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) impairs mitochondrial fission and mitotic catastrophe after x-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamamori, Tohru; Ike, Satoshi; Bo, Tomoki; Sasagawa, Tomoya; Sakai, Yuri; Suzuki, Motofumi; Yamamoto, Kumiko; Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-12-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial dynamics is crucial for the maintenance of cellular quality control and function in response to various stresses. However, the role of mitochondrial dynamics in cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR) is still largely unknown. In this study, we provide evidence that IR triggers mitochondrial fission mediated by the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). We also show IR-induced mitotic catastrophe (MC), which is a type of cell death associated with defective mitosis, and aberrant centrosome amplification in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). These are attenuated by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Drp1. Whereas radiation-induced aberrant centrosome amplification and MC are suppressed by the inhibition of Plk1 and CDK2 in wild-type MEFs, the inhibition of these kinases is ineffective in Drp1-deficient MEFs. Furthermore, the cyclin B1 level after irradiation is significantly higher throughout the time course in Drp1-deficient MEFs than in wild-type MEFs, implying that Drp1 is involved in the regulation of cyclin B1 level. These findings strongly suggest that Drp1 plays an important role in determining the fate of cells after irradiation via the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics.

  19. Association of adaptor protein TRIP8b with clathrin.

    PubMed

    Popova, Nadezhda V; Deyev, Igor E; Petrenko, Alexander G

    2011-09-01

    TPR-containing Rab8b-interacting protein (TRIP8b) is a brain-specific hydrophilic cytosolic protein that contains tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). Previous studies revealed interaction of this protein via its TPR-containing domain with Rab8b small GTPase, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated channel (HCN) channels and G protein-coupled receptor calcium-independent receptor of α-latrotoxin. We identified clathrin as a major component of eluates from the TRIP8b affinity matrix. In the present study, by in vitro-binding analysis we demonstrate a direct interaction between clathrin and TRIP8b. The clathrin-binding site was localized in the N-terminal (non-TPR containing) part of the TRIP8b molecule that contains two short motifs involved in the clathrin binding. In transfected HEK293 cells, co-expression of HCN1 with TRIP8b resulted in translocation of the channels from the cell surface to large intracellular puncta where both TRIP8b and clathrin were concentrated. These puncta co-localized partially with an early endosome marker and strongly overlapped with lysosome staining reagent. When HCN1 was co-expressed with a clathrin-non-binding mutant of TRIP8b, clathrin did not translocate to HCN1 and TRIP8b-containing puncta, suggesting that TRIP8b interacts with HCN and clathrin independently. We found TRIP8b present in the fraction of clathrin-coated vesicles purified from brain tissues. Stripping the clathrin coat proteins from the vesicles with Tris alkaline buffer resulted in concomitant release of TRIP8b. Our data suggest complex regulatory functions of TRIP8b in neuronal endocytosis through independent interaction with membrane proteins and components of the clathrin coat. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Heat shock proteins and their association with major pediatric malignancies.

    PubMed

    Skora, Dorota; Gorska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins belong to a group of molecular chaperones responsible for the regulation of many intracellular processes. HSPs play a pivotal role in the survival of cells under stressful conditions. Over-expression of these proteins have been found in both healthy and a great number of cancer cells. HSPs may be involved in numerous carcinogenic and chemoresistant processes. Due to that fact, they may be referred to as diagnostic biomarkers of oncogenesis and potential targets for anticancer drugs. Thus, we decided to review the involvement of major HSPs in the most malignant childhood cancers.

  1. Localized mRNA translation and protein association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2014-08-01

    Recent direct observations of localization of mRNAs and proteins both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells can be related to slowdown of diffusion of these species due to macromolecular crowding and their ability to aggregate and form immobile or slowly mobile complexes. Here, a generic kinetic model describing both these factors is presented and comprehensively analyzed. Although the model is non-linear, an accurate self-consistent analytical solution of the corresponding reaction-diffusion equation has been constructed, the types of localized protein distributions have been explicitly shown, and the predicted kinetic regimes of gene expression have been classified.

  2. Herpesvirus saimiri protein StpB associates with cellular Src.

    PubMed

    Hör, S; Ensser, A; Reiss, C; Ballmer-Hofer, K; Biesinger, B

    2001-02-01

    Subgroup B isolates of Herpesvirus saimiri are less efficient in T lymphocyte transformation when compared with subgroups A or C. Here it is shown that subgroup B strain SMHI encodes a protein, StpB, at a position equivalent to those of the ORFs for the saimiri transforming proteins (Stp) of subgroups A and C. StpB shares little similarity with StpA or StpC, but interacts with the SH2 domain of cellular Src, as does StpA. Thus, factors other than c-Src binding determine the efficiency of primary T cell transformation by Herpesvirus saimiri.

  3. Is there a biological cost of protein disorder? Analysis of cancer-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Pajkos, Mátyás; Mészáros, Bálint; Simon, István; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna

    2012-01-01

    As many diseases can be traced back to altered protein function, studying the effect of genetic variations at the level of proteins can provide a clue to understand how changes at the DNA level lead to various diseases. Cellular processes rely not only on proteins with well-defined structure but can also involve intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that exist as highly flexible ensembles of conformations. Disordered proteins are mostly involved in signaling and regulatory processes, and their functional repertoire largely complements that of globular proteins. However, it was also suggested that protein disorder entails an increased biological cost. This notion was supported by a set of individual IDPs involved in various diseases, especially in cancer, and the increased amount of disorder observed among disease-associated proteins. In this work, we tested if there is any biological risk associated with protein disorder at the level of single nucleotide mutations. Specifically, we analyzed the distribution of mutations within ordered and disordered segments. Our results demonstrated that while neutral polymorphisms were more likely to occur within disordered segments, cancer-associated mutations had a preference for ordered regions. Additionally, we proposed an alternative explanation for the association of protein disorder and the involvement in cancer with the consideration of functional annotations. Individual examples also suggested that although disordered segments are fundamental functional elements, their presence is not necessarily accompanied with an increased mutation rate in cancer. The presented study can help to understand how the different structural properties of proteins influence the consequences of genetic mutations.

  4. Discovery of circulating proteins associated to knee radiographic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lourido, Lucía; Ayoglu, Burcu; Fernández-Tajes, Juan; Oreiro, Natividad; Henjes, Frauke; Hellström, Cecilia; Schwenk, Jochen M; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Nilsson, Peter; Blanco, Francisco J

    2017-03-09

    Currently there are no sufficiently sensitive biomarkers able to reflect changes in joint remodelling during osteoarthritis (OA). In this work, we took an affinity proteomic approach to profile serum samples for proteins that could serve as indicators for the diagnosis of radiographic knee OA. Antibody suspension bead arrays were applied to analyze serum samples from patients with OA (n = 273), control subjects (n = 76) and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 244). For verification, a focused bead array was built and applied to an independent set of serum samples from patients with OA (n = 188), control individuals (n = 83) and RA (n = 168) patients. A linear regression analysis adjusting for sex, age and body mass index (BMI) revealed that three proteins were significantly elevated (P < 0.05) in serum from OA patients compared to controls: C3, ITIH1 and S100A6. A panel consisting of these three proteins had an area under the curve of 0.82 for the classification of OA and control samples. Moreover, C3 and ITIH1 levels were also found to be significantly elevated (P < 0.05) in OA patients compared to RA patients. Upon validation in additional study sets, the alterations of these three candidate serum biomarker proteins could support the diagnosis of radiographic knee OA.

  5. Plant Protein Intake and Dietary Diversity Are Independently Associated with Nutrient Adequacy in French Adults.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Clélia M; Egnell, Manon; Huneau, Jean-François; Mariotti, François

    2016-11-01

    Plant protein intake, which is favorably associated with the intake of many nutrients, is a marker of a healthy diet. However, the higher nutrient adequacy of diets rich in plant protein may also originate from overarching factors associated with more healthful dietary behaviors, such as a greater dietary diversity. Our main objective was to determine whether the relation between plant protein intake and nutrient adequacy could be explained, at least in part, by an association with overall dietary diversity. We used data from 1330 adults participating in the French Nutrition and Health Survey [Etude Nationale Nutrition Santé (ENNS); 2006-2007]. With the use of global, integrative approaches, we assessed nutrient adequacy [by using the probabilistic PANDiet (Probability of Adequate Nutrient Intake) scoring system] and overall dietary diversity (by using a 100-point score that accounts for the relative number of subgroups consumed in 7 food groups). Linear multivariate modeling was used for the analysis. We found a positive association between plant protein (but not total or animal protein) intake and dietary diversity (β = 0.08) and a strong positive association between dietary diversity and nutrient adequacy (β = 0.33). However, the association between plant protein intake and nutrient adequacy was not explained by dietary diversity (r = 0.38 and partial r = 0.36, P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, nutrient adequacy was positively associated with dietary diversity (β = 0.44) and plant (β = 0.37) and animal (β = 0.15) protein intakes. Associations persisted after adjustment for potential confounders (total energy, energy density, sex, body mass index, income, occupational status, educational level, region, season, and smoking status). Overall dietary diversity is greater in French adults who consume more plant protein. Both plant protein intake and dietary diversity are associated with the nutrient adequacy of the diet. But the plant protein

  6. Association of adaptor protein TRIP8b with clathrin

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Nadezhda V.; Deyev, Igor E.; Petrenko, Alexander G.

    2011-01-01

    TRIP8b is a brain-specific hydrophilic cytosolic protein that contains tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). Previous studies revealed interaction of this protein via its TPR-containing domain with Rab8b small GTPase, HCN channels and G protein-coupled receptor CIRL. We identified clathrin as a major component of eluates from the TRIP8b affinity matrix. In the present study, by in vitro binding analysis we demonstrate a direct interaction between clathrin and TRIP8b. The clathrin-binding site was localized in the N-terminal (non-TPR containing) part of the TRIP8b molecule that contains two short motifs involved in the clathrin binding. In transfected HEK293 cells, co-expression of HCN1 with TRIP8b resulted in translocation of the channels from the cell surface to large intracellular puncta where both TRIP8b and clathrin were concentrated. These puncta co-localized partially with an early endosome marker and strongly overlapped with lysosome staining reagent. When HCN1 was co-expressed with a clathrin-non-binding mutant of TRIP8b, clathrin did not translocate to HCN1 and TRIP8b-containing puncta, suggesting that TRIP8b interacts with HCN and clathrin independently. We found TRIP8b present in the fraction of clathrin-coated vesicles purified from brain tissues. Stripping the clathrin coat proteins from the vesicles with Tris alkaline buffer resulted in concomitant release of TRIP8b. Our data suggest complex regulatory functions of TRIP8b in neuronal endocytosis through independent interaction with membrane proteins and components of the clathrin coat. PMID:21749376

  7. The Bmi-1 polycomb protein antagonizes the (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate-dependent suppression of skin cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Adhikary, Gautam; Eckert, Richard L

    2010-03-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of gene expression that enhance cell survival. This regulation is achieved via action of two multiprotein PcG complexes--PRC2 (EED) and PRC1 [B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1)]. These complexes modulate gene expression by increasing histone methylation and reducing acetylation--leading to a closed chromatin conformation. Activity of these proteins is associated with increased cell proliferation and survival. We show increased expression of key PcG proteins in immortalized keratinocytes and skin cancer cell lines. We examine the role of two key PcG proteins, Bmi-1 and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), and the impact of the active agent in green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), on the function of these regulators. EGCG treatment of SCC-13 cells reduces Bmi-1 and Ezh2 level and this is associated with reduced cell survival. The reduction in survival is associated with a global reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, a hallmark of PRC2 complex action. This change in PcG protein expression is associated with reduced expression of key proteins that enhance progression through the cell cycle [cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin A and cyclin B1] and increased expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression (p21 and p27). Apoptosis is also enhanced, as evidenced by increased caspase 9, 8 and 3 cleavage and increased poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase cleavage. EGCG treatment also increases Bax and suppresses Bcl-xL expression. Vector-mediated enhanced Bmi-1 expression reverses these EGCG-dependent changes. These findings suggest that green tea polyphenols reduce skin tumor cell survival by influencing PcG-mediated epigenetic regulatory mechanisms.

  8. Computational Framework for Prediction of Peptide Sequences That May Mediate Multiple Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debasree; Patra, Piya; Ghosh, Abhirupa; Saha, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    A considerable proportion of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in the cell are estimated to be mediated by very short peptide segments that approximately conform to specific sequence patterns known as linear motifs (LMs), often present in the disordered regions in the eukaryotic proteins. These peptides have been found to interact with low affinity and are able bind to multiple interactors, thus playing an important role in the PPI networks involving date hubs. In this work, PPI data and de novo motif identification based method (MEME) were used to identify such peptides in three cancer-associated hub proteins—MYC, APC and MDM2. The peptides corresponding to the significant LMs identified for each hub protein were aligned, the overlapping regions across these peptides being termed as overlapping linear peptides (OLPs). These OLPs were thus predicted to be responsible for multiple PPIs of the corresponding hub proteins and a scoring system was developed to rank them. We predicted six OLPs in MYC and five OLPs in MDM2 that scored higher than OLP predictions from randomly generated protein sets. Two OLP sequences from the C-terminal of MYC were predicted to bind with FBXW7, component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex involved in proteasomal degradation of MYC. Similarly, we identified peptides in the C-terminal of MDM2 interacting with FKBP3, which has a specific role in auto-ubiquitinylation of MDM2. The peptide sequences predicted in MYC and MDM2 look promising for designing orthosteric inhibitors against possible disease-associated PPIs. Since these OLPs can interact with other proteins as well, these inhibitors should be specific to the targeted interactor to prevent undesired side-effects. This computational framework has been designed to predict and rank the peptide regions that may mediate multiple PPIs and can be applied to other disease-associated date hub proteins for prediction of novel therapeutic targets of small molecule PPI modulators. PMID

  9. Associations between pre-eclampsia and protein C and protein S levels among pregnant Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Okoye, Helen C; Eweputanna, Lisa I; Okpani, Anthony O U; Ejele, Oseikhuemen A

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate levels of protein C and free protein S among women with pre-eclampsia, and determine whether there is a relationship between deficiencies and pre-eclampsia. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a hospital in Nigeria from July 2013 to March 2014 among 90 pregnant women with pre-eclampsia (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg, proteinuria ≥300 mg in 24 hours) and 90 normotensive pregnant women (control group). Plasma levels of protein C and free protein S were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and protein C activity by a chromogenic method. Mean protein C antigen and activity levels did not differ between groups (P=0.639 and P=0.444, respectively). The incidence of protein C antigen and activity deficiency also did not differ (P=0.288 and P>0.99, respectively). The mean free protein S antigen level was higher among women with pre-eclampsia (54.48%±19.58%) than in the control group (47.23%±10.27%; P=0.004). No woman in the control group had protein S deficiency, as compared with 2 (2%) of the women with pre-eclampsia (P=0.497). No association was found between deficiencies of these proteins and pre-eclampsia. Deficiencies of protein C and free protein S are unlikely to be etiopathogenetic for pre-eclampsia; therefore, therapeutic intervention should focus on other potential pathogenetic pathways. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  10. Compartmentalization of Proteins in Epididymosomes Coordinates the Association of Epididymal Proteins with the Different Functional Structures of Bovine Spermatozoa1

    PubMed Central

    Girouard, Julie; Frenette, Gilles; Sullivan, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Epididymosomes are small membranous vesicles secreted by epithelial cells within the luminal compartment of the epididymis. In bovine, many proteins are associated with epididymosomes, and some of them, such as the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein P25b, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and aldose reductase (AKR1B1), are transferred to spermatozoa during the epididymal maturation process. P25b is associated with detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) domains of epididymal spermatozoa, whereas MIF and AKR1B1 are cytosolic proteins associated with detergent-soluble fractions. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DRM domains are also present in the epididymosomes and that P25b DRM-associated proteins in these vesicles are transferred to the DRMs of spermatozoa. The presence of DRMs in epididymosomes was confirmed by their insolubility in cold Triton X-100 and their low buoyant density in sucrose gradient. Furthermore, DRMs isolated from epididymosomes are characterized by the exclusive presence of ganglioside GM1 and by high levels of cholesterol and sphingomyelin. Biochemical analysis indicated that P25b is linked to DRM in epididymosomes, whereas MIF and AKR1B1 are completely excluded from these membrane domains. Proteolytic treatment of epididymosomes and immunoblotting studies showed that P25b is affected by trypsin or pronase proteolysis. In contrast, MIF and AKR1B1 are not degraded by proteases, suggesting that they are localized within epididymosomes. Interaction studies between epididymosomes and epididymal spermatozoa demonstrated that P25b is transferred from the DRM of epididymosomes to the DRM of the caput epididymal spermatozoa as a GPI-anchored protein. Together, these data suggest that specific localization and compartmentalization of proteins in the epididymosomes coordinate the association of epididymal proteins with the different functional structures of spermatozoa. PMID:19164173

  11. Elevated cyclin A associated kinase activity promotes sensitivity of metastatic human cancer cells to DNA antimetabolite drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Yin, Hailin; Panandikar, Ashwini; Gandhi, Varsha; Sen, Subrata

    2015-08-01

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle in successful systemic therapy of metastatic cancer. We analyzed the involvement of cell cycle regulatory proteins in eliciting response to N (phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA), an inhibitor of de novo pyrimidine synthesis, in two metastatic variants of human cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 isolated from lung (L-2) and brain (Br-1) in nude mouse, respectively. L-2 and Br-l cells markedly differed in their sensitivity to PALA. While both cell types displayed an initial S phase delay/arrest, Br-l cells proliferated but most L-2 cells underwent apoptosis. There was distinct elevation in cyclin A, and phosphorylated Rb proteins concomitant with decreased expression of bcl-2 protein in the PALA treated L-2 cells undergoing apoptosis. Markedly elevated cyclin A associated and cdk2 kinase activities together with increased E2F1-DNA binding were detected in these L-2 cells. Induced ectopic cyclin A expression sensitized Br-l cells to PALA by activating an apoptotic pathway. Our findings demonstrate that elevated expression of cyclin A and associated kinase can activate an apoptotic pathway in cells exposed to DNA antimetabolites. Abrogation of this pathway can lead to resistance against these drugs in metastatic variants of human carcinoma cells.

  12. Effect of the microtubule-associated protein tau on dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparacino, J.; Farías, M. G.; Lamberti, P. W.

    2014-02-01

    Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with nonmotile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al., Science 319, 1086 (2008), 10.1126/science.1152993] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduces experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

  13. Membrane Recruitment of the Non-receptor Protein GIV/Girdin (Gα-interacting, Vesicle-associated Protein/Girdin) Is Sufficient for Activating Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; Leyme, Anthony; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Marivin, Arthur; Broselid, Stefan; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-12-30

    GIV (aka Girdin) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates heterotrimeric G protein signaling downstream of RTKs and integrins, thereby serving as a platform for signaling cascade cross-talk. GIV is recruited to the cytoplasmic tail of receptors upon stimulation, but the mechanism of activation of its G protein regulatory function is not well understood. Here we used assays in humanized yeast models and G protein activity biosensors in mammalian cells to investigate the role of GIV subcellular compartmentalization in regulating its ability to promote G protein signaling. We found that in unstimulated cells GIV does not co-fractionate with its substrate G protein Gαi3 on cell membranes and that constitutive membrane anchoring of GIV in yeast cells or rapid membrane translocation in mammalian cells via chemically induced dimerization leads to robust G protein activation. We show that membrane recruitment of the GIV "Gα binding and activating" motif alone is sufficient for G protein activation and that it does not require phosphomodification. Furthermore, we engineered a synthetic protein to show that recruitment of the GIV "Gα binding and activating" motif to membranes via association with active RTKs, instead of via chemically induced dimerization, is also sufficient for G protein activation. These results reveal that recruitment of GIV to membranes in close proximity to its substrate G protein is a major mechanism responsible for the activation of its G protein regulatory function.

  14. A maize protein associated with the G-box binding complex has homology to brain regulatory proteins.

    PubMed Central

    de Vetten, N C; Lu, G; Feri, R J

    1992-01-01

    The G-box element is a moderately conserved component of the promoter of many inducible genes, including the alcohol dehydrogenase genes of Arabidopsis and maize. We used monoclonal antibodies generated against partially purified G-box binding factor (GBF) activity to characterize maize proteins that are part of the DNA binding complex. Antibodies interacted with partially purified maize GBF complexes to produce a slower migrating complex in the gel retardation assay. Immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that the protein recognized by the antibody is not a DNA binding protein in and of itself, but rather is associated with the DNA binding complex. These monoclonal antibodies were used to isolate cDNA clones encoding a protein that we have designated GF14. Maize GF14 contains a region resembling a leucine zipper and acidic carboxy and amino termini, of which the latter can form an amphipathic alpha-helix similar to known transcriptional activators such as VP16 and GAL4. Protein gel blot analysis of cell culture extract showed that a single, major protein of approximately 30 kD is recognized by anti-GF14; the protein is also present predominantly in the kernel and root. The deduced amino acid sequence of maize GF14 is more than 80% identical to Arabidopsis GF14 and Oenothera PHP-O, and is more than 60% identical to a class of mammalian brain proteins described as both protein kinase C inhibitors and activators of tyrosine and tryptophan hydroxylases. GF14 is found in a variety of monocotyledons and dicotyledons, gymnosperms, and yeast. This suggests a deep evolutionary conservation of a potential regulatory protein associated with a core sequence found in the promoter region of many genes. PMID:1446170

  15. Retinal proteins associated with redox regulation and protein folding play central roles in response to high glucose conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ssu-Han; Lee, Wen-Chi; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy typically causes poor vision and blindness. A previous study revealed that a high blood glucose concentration induces glycoxidation and weakens the retinal capillaries. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of high blood glucose induced diabetic retinopathy remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we cultured the retinal pigmented epithelial cell line ARPE-19 in mannitol-balanced 5.5, 25, and 100 mM glucose media and investigated protein level alterations. Proteomic analysis revealed significant changes in 137 protein features, of which 124 demonstrated changes in a glucose concentration dependent manner. Several proteins functionally associated with redox regulation, protein folding, or the cytoskeleton are affected by increased glucose concentrations. Additional analyses also revealed that cellular oxidative stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, was significantly increased after treatment with high glucose concentrations. However, the mitochondrial membrane potential and cell survival remained unchanged during treatment with high glucose concentrations. To summarize, in this study, we used a comprehensive retinal pigmented epithelial cell based proteomic approach for identifying changes in protein expression associated retinal markers induced by high glucose concentrations. Our results revealed that a high glucose condition can induce cellular oxidative stress and modulate the levels of proteins with functions in redox regulation, protein folding, and cytoskeleton regulation; however, cell viability and mitochondrial integrity are not significantly disturbed under these high glucose conditions.

  16. RNA: protein interactions associated with satellites of panicum mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Desvoyes, B; Scholthof, K B

    2000-11-17

    The interactions between satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) capsid protein (CP) and its 824 nucleotide (nt) single stranded RNA were investigated by gel mobility shift assay and Northwestern blot assay. SPMV CP has specificity for its RNA at high affinity, but little affinity for non-viral RNA. The SPMV CP also bound a 350 nt satellite RNA (satRNA) that, like SPMV, is dependent on panicum mosaic virus for its replication. SPMV CP has the novel property of encapsidating SPMV RNA and satRNA. Competition gel mobility shift assays performed with a non-viral RNA and unlabeled SPMV RNA and satRNA revealed that these RNA:protein interactions were in part sequence specific.

  17. Characterization of Antibody Specific for Disease Associated Prion Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Prion diseases are characterized by the presence of the abnormal scrapie isoform of prion protein...areas of Task 2. Our main research findings have been published recently (Zou W, Zheng J, Gray D, Gambetti P, Chen SG. Antibody to DNA detects scrapie ...chemiluminescence. (B) Immunocapture of PrP by OCD4 following incubation with nuclease and salmon DNA. 2 1 I Scrapie -infected hamster BH (2 pi each) was either

  18. Predicting Protein–protein Association Rates using Coarse-grained Simulation and Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Wu, Yinghao

    2017-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions dominate all major biological processes in living cells. We have developed a new Monte Carlo-based simulation algorithm to study the kinetic process of protein association. We tested our method on a previously used large benchmark set of 49 protein complexes. The predicted rate was overestimated in the benchmark test compared to the experimental results for a group of protein complexes. We hypothesized that this resulted from molecular flexibility at the interface regions of the interacting proteins. After applying a machine learning algorithm with input variables that accounted for both the conformational flexibility and the energetic factor of binding, we successfully identified most of the protein complexes with overestimated association rates and improved our final prediction by using a cross-validation test. This method was then applied to a new independent test set and resulted in a similar prediction accuracy to that obtained using the training set. It has been thought that diffusion-limited protein association is dominated by long-range interactions. Our results provide strong evidence that the conformational flexibility also plays an important role in regulating protein association. Our studies provide new insights into the mechanism of protein association and offer a computationally efficient tool for predicting its rate. PMID:28418043

  19. Cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins interact with Lynch-Syndrome associated mismatch repair protein MLH1.

    PubMed

    Brieger, Angela; Adryan, Boris; Wolpert, Fabian; Passmann, Sandra; Zeuzem, Stefan; Trojan, Jörg

    2010-09-01

    The involvement of MLH1 in several mismatch repair-independent cellular processes has been reported. In an attempt to gain further insight into the protein's cellular functions, we screened for novel interacting partners of MLH1 utilizing a bacterial two-hybrid system. Numerous unknown interacting proteins were identified, suggesting novel biological roles of MLH1. The network of MLH1 and its partner proteins involves a multitude of cellular processes. Integration of our data with the "General Repository for Interaction Datasets" highlighted that MLH1 exhibits relationships to three interacting pairs of proteins involved in cytoskeletal and filament organization: Thymosin beta 4 and Actin gamma, Cathepsin B and Annexin A2 as well as Spectrin alpha and Desmin. Coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization experiments validated the interaction of MLH1 with these proteins. Differential mRNA levels of many of the identified proteins, detected by microarray analysis comparing MLH1-deficient and -proficient cell lines, support the assumed interplay of MLH1 and the identified candidate proteins. By siRNA knock down of MLH1, we demonstrated the functional impact of MLH1-Actin interaction on filament organization and propose that dysregulation of MLH1 plays an essential role in cytoskeleton dynamics. Our data suggest novel roles of MLH1 in cellular organization and colorectal cancerogenesis.

  20. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation.

  1. Depletion of ribosomal protein S19 causes a reduction of rRNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Juli, Giada; Gismondi, Angelo; Monteleone, Valentina; Caldarola, Sara; Iadevaia, Valentina; Aspesi, Anna; Dianzani, Irma; Proud, Christopher G.; Loreni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis plays key roles in cell growth by providing increased capacity for protein synthesis. It requires coordinated production of ribosomal proteins (RP) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA), including the processing of the latter. Here, we show that, the depletion of RPS19 causes a reduction of rRNA synthesis in cell lines of both erythroid and non-erythroid origin. A similar effect is observed upon depletion of RPS6 or RPL11. The deficiency of RPS19 does not alter the stability of rRNA, but instead leads to an inhibition of RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) activity. In fact, results of nuclear run-on assays and ChIP experiments show that association of Pol I with the rRNA gene is reduced in RPS19-depleted cells. The phosphorylation of three known regulators of Pol I, CDK2, AKT and AMPK, is altered during ribosomal stress and could be involved in the observed downregulation. Finally, RNA from patients with Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA), shows, on average, a lower level of 47S precursor. This indicates that inhibition of rRNA synthesis could be one of the molecular alterations at the basis of DBA. PMID:27734913

  2. Reproducible quantification of cancer-associated proteins in body fluids using targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Hüttenhain, Ruth; Soste, Martin; Selevsek, Nathalie; Röst, Hannes; Sethi, Atul; Carapito, Christine; Farrah, Terry; Deutsch, Eric W; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Moritz, Robert L; Niméus-Malmström, Emma; Rinner, Oliver; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2012-07-11

    The rigorous testing of hypotheses on suitable sample cohorts is a major limitation in translational research. This is particularly the case for the validation of protein biomarkers; the lack of accurate, reproducible, and sensitive assays for most proteins has precluded the systematic assessment of hundreds of potential marker proteins described in the literature. Here, we describe a high-throughput method for the development and refinement of selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assays for human proteins. The method was applied to generate such assays for more than 1000 cancer-associated proteins, which are functionally related to candidate cancer driver mutations. We used the assays to determine the detectability of the target proteins in two clinically relevant samples: plasma and urine. One hundred eighty-two proteins were detected in depleted plasma, spanning five orders of magnitude in abundance and reaching below a concentration of 10 ng/ml. The narrower concentration range of proteins in urine allowed the detection of 408 proteins. Moreover, we demonstrate that these SRM assays allow reproducible quantification by monitoring 34 biomarker candidates across 83 patient plasma samples. Through public access to the entire assay library, researchers will be able to target their cancer-associated proteins of interest in any sample type using the detectability information in plasma and urine as a guide. The generated expandable reference map of SRM assays for cancer-associated proteins will be a valuable resource for accelerating and planning biomarker verification studies.

  3. Association of Plasmodium berghei proteins with the host erythrocyte membrane: binding to inside-out vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wiser, M F; Sartorelli, A C; Patton, C L

    1990-01-01

    Two acidic phosphoproteins of Plasmodium berghei origin, of 65 and 46 kDa, are associated with the plasma membrane of the host mouse erythrocyte. The 65-kDa protein partitions between a soluble and particulate phase upon host cell lysis, whereas the 46-kDa protein is localized exclusively in the particulate fraction. Both proteins bind to inside-out vesicles derived from erythrocyte ghosts and the conditions of the reassociation reaction indicate that the binding is specific and that the proteins interact only with the cytoplasmic face of the erythrocyte membrane. The 65-kDa protein appears to exist in two membrane-associated states; one loosely bound, which readily dissociates from the membrane, and a more tightly associated state, which does not dissociate under non-denaturing conditions. The 46-kDa protein is tightly bound to the host erythrocyte membrane and does not dissociate. Cross-linking studies suggest that both of these parasite proteins interact with the submembrane cytoskeleton of the erythrocyte, and that the 65-kDa protein also appears to interact simultaneously with the lipid bilayer and erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, direct interaction between the malarial proteins and distinct erythrocyte membrane proteins could not be demonstrated. In summary, these findings indicate that the acidic phosphoproteins of the malarial parasite interact with the cytoplasmic face of the erythrocyte membrane both in vivo and in vitro.

  4. Transmembrane Protein (Perfringolysin O) Association with Ordered Membrane Domains (Rafts) Depends Upon the Raft-Associating Properties of Protein-Bound Sterol

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Because transmembrane (TM) protein localization, or nonlocalization, in ordered membrane domains (rafts) is a key to understanding membrane domain function, it is important to define the origin of protein-raft interaction. One hypothesis is that a tight noncovalent attachment of TM proteins to lipids that have a strong affinity for ordered domains can be sufficient to induce raft-protein interaction. The sterol-binding protein perfringolysin O (PFO) was used to test this hypothesis. PFO binds both to sterols that tend to localize in ordered domains (e.g., cholesterol), and to those that do not (e.g., coprostanol), but it does not bind to epicholesterol, a raft-promoting 3α-OH sterol. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay in model membrane vesicles containing coexisting ordered and disordered lipid domains, both TM and non-TM forms of PFO were found to concentrate in ordered domains in vesicles containing high and low-Tm lipids plus cholesterol or 1:1 (mol/mol) cholesterol/epicholesterol, whereas they concentrate in disordered domains in vesicles containing high-Tm and low-Tm lipids plus 1:1 (mol/mol) coprostanol/epicholesterol. Combined with previous studies this behavior indicates that TM protein association with ordered domains is dependent upon both the association of the protein-bound sterol with ordered domains and hydrophobic match between TM segments and rafts. PMID:24359745

  5. Identification of proteins associated with RNA polymerase III using a modified tandem chromatin affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Thuy-Trinh; Saguez, Cyril; Conesa, Christine; Lefebvre, Olivier; Acker, Joël

    2015-02-01

    To identify the proteins associated with the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) machinery in exponentially growing yeast cells, we developed our own tandem chromatin affinity purification procedure (TChAP) after in vivo cross-link, allowing a reproducible and good recovery of the protein bait and its associated partners. In contrast to TFIIIA that could only be purified as a free protein, this protocol allows us to capture free Pol III together with Pol III bound on its target genes. Transcription factors, elongation factors, RNA-associated proteins and proteins involved in Pol III biogenesis were identified by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the presence of all the TFIIIB subunits found associated with Pol III together with the absence of TFIIIC and chromatin factors including histones suggest that DNA-bound Pol III purified using TChAP is mainly engaged in transcription reinitiation.

  6. Association equilibria for proteins interacted with crowders of short-range attraction in crowded environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jiachen; Song, Fan

    2017-01-01

    Based on a very simple coarse-grained colloidal model, here we implement an effective hard-sphere theory and numerical simulation to capture the general features of the association equilibria for globular proteins in crowded environment. We measure the activity coefficient, i.e., the deviation from ideal behavior of protein solution, and the crowding factor, i.e., the contribution of crowders to the association equilibria, for proteins in macromolecular crowding. The results show that the association balance in macromolecular crowding depends sensitively on the magnitude of protein-crowder attraction and the relative size of reactant to crowding agent. Since our coarse-grained model is irrelevant to the microscopic details of the molecules, it can be applied to the control of the association equilibria of many globular proteins such as bovine serum albumin, crystallin and lysozyme.

  7. M-Finder: Uncovering functionally associated proteins from interactome data integrated with GO annotations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a key role in understanding the mechanisms of cellular processes. The availability of interactome data has catalyzed the development of computational approaches to elucidate functional behaviors of proteins on a system level. Gene Ontology (GO) and its annotations are a significant resource for functional characterization of proteins. Because of wide coverage, GO data have often been adopted as a benchmark for protein function prediction on the genomic scale. Results We propose a computational approach, called M-Finder, for functional association pattern mining. This method employs semantic analytics to integrate the genome-wide PPIs with GO data. We also introduce an interactive web application tool that visualizes a functional association network linked to a protein specified by a user. The proposed approach comprises two major components. First, the PPIs that have been generated by high-throughput methods are weighted in terms of their functional consistency using GO and its annotations. We assess two advanced semantic similarity metrics which quantify the functional association level of each interacting protein pair. We demonstrate that these measures outperform the other existing methods by evaluating their agreement to other biological features, such as sequence similarity, the presence of common Pfam domains, and core PPIs. Second, the information flow-based algorithm is employed to discover a set of proteins functionally associated with the protein in a query and their links efficiently. This algorithm reconstructs a functional association network of the query protein. The output network size can be flexibly determined by parameters. Conclusions M-Finder provides a useful framework to investigate functional association patterns with any protein. This software will also allow users to perform further systematic analysis of a set of proteins for any specific function. It is available online at http

  8. Co-Association of Cytochrome f Catabolites and Plastid-Lipid-Associated Protein with Chloroplast Lipid Particles1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew D.; Licatalosi, Donny D.; Thompson, John E.

    2000-01-01

    Distinguishable populations of lipid particles isolated from chloroplasts of yellow wax bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Kinghorn Wax) leaves have been found to contain plastid-lipid-associated protein (J. Pozueta-Romero, F. Rafia, G. Houlné, C. Cheniclet, J.P. Carde, M.-L. Schantz, R. Schantz [1997] Plant Physiol 115: 1185–1194). One population is comprised of plastoglobuli obtained from sonicated chloroplasts by flotation centrifugation. Higher density lipid-protein particles isolated from chloroplast stroma by ultrafiltration constitute a second population. Inasmuch as the stromal lipid-protein particles contain plastid-lipid-associated protein, but are distinguishable from plastoglobuli in terms of their lipid and protein composition, they appear to be plastoglobuli-like particles. Of particular interest is the finding that plastoglobuli and the higher density lipid-protein particles both contain catabolites of the thylakoid protein, cytochrome f. These observations support the view that there are distinguishable populations of plastoglobuli-like particles in chloroplasts. They further suggest that the formation of these particles may allow removal of protein catabolites from the thylakoid membrane that are destined for degradation as part of normal thylakoid turnover. PMID:10982436

  9. Membrane-Associated RING-CH Proteins Associate with Bap31 and Target CD81 and CD44 to Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bartee, Eric; Eyster, Craig A.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Mansouri, Mandana; Donaldson, Julie G.; Früh, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) proteins represent a family of transmembrane ubiquitin ligases modulating intracellular trafficking and turnover of transmembrane protein targets. While homologous proteins encoded by gamma-2 herpesviruses and leporipoxviruses have been studied extensively, limited information is available regarding the physiological targets of cellular MARCH proteins. To identify host cell proteins targeted by the human MARCH-VIII ubiquitin ligase we used stable isotope labeling of amino-acids in cell culture (SILAC) to monitor MARCH-dependent changes in the membrane proteomes of human fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of Bap31, a chaperone that predominantly resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We demonstrate that Bap31 associates with the transmembrane domains of several MARCH proteins and controls intracellular transport of MARCH proteins. In addition, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of the hyaluronic acid-receptor CD44 and both MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV sequestered the tetraspanin CD81 in endo-lysosomal vesicles. Moreover, gene knockdown of MARCH-IV increased surface levels of endogenous CD81 suggesting a constitutive involvement of this family of ubiquitin ligases in the turnover of tetraspanins. Our data thus suggest a role of MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV in the regulated turnover of CD81 and CD44, two ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional proteins. PMID:21151997

  10. Membrane-Associated RING-CH proteins associate with Bap31 and target CD81 and CD44 to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Bartee, Eric; Eyster, Craig A; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Mansouri, Mandana; Donaldson, Julie G; Früh, Klaus

    2010-12-02

    Membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) proteins represent a family of transmembrane ubiquitin ligases modulating intracellular trafficking and turnover of transmembrane protein targets. While homologous proteins encoded by gamma-2 herpesviruses and leporipoxviruses have been studied extensively, limited information is available regarding the physiological targets of cellular MARCH proteins. To identify host cell proteins targeted by the human MARCH-VIII ubiquitin ligase we used stable isotope labeling of amino-acids in cell culture (SILAC) to monitor MARCH-dependent changes in the membrane proteomes of human fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of Bap31, a chaperone that predominantly resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We demonstrate that Bap31 associates with the transmembrane domains of several MARCH proteins and controls intracellular transport of MARCH proteins. In addition, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of the hyaluronic acid-receptor CD44 and both MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV sequestered the tetraspanin CD81 in endo-lysosomal vesicles. Moreover, gene knockdown of MARCH-IV increased surface levels of endogenous CD81 suggesting a constitutive involvement of this family of ubiquitin ligases in the turnover of tetraspanins. Our data thus suggest a role of MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV in the regulated turnover of CD81 and CD44, two ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional proteins.

  11. Analysis of low-density lipoprotein-associated proteins using the method of digitized native protein mapping.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ya; Chen, Jin; Wang, Ahui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shumin; Manabe, Takashi; Tan, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The method of digitized native protein mapping, combining nondenaturing micro 2DE, grid gel-cutting, and quantitative LC-MS/MS (in data-independent acquisition mode, or MS(E) ), was improved by using a new MS/MS mode, ion mobility separation enhanced-MS(E) (HDMS(E) ), and applied to analyze the area of human plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). An 18 mm × 4.8 mm rectangular area which included LDL on a nondenaturing micro 2D gel of human plasma was grid-cut into 72 square gel pieces and subjected to quantitative LC-MS/MS. Compared with MS(E) , HDMS(E) showed significantly higher performance, by assigning 50% more proteins and detecting each protein in more squares. A total of 253 proteins were assigned with LC-HDMS(E) and the quantity distribution of each was reconstructed as a native protein map. The maps showed that Apo B-100 was the most abundant protein in the grid-cut area, concentrated at pI ca. 5.4-6.1 and apparent mass ca. 1000 kDa, which corresponded to four gel pieces, squares 39-42. An Excel macro was prepared to search protein maps which showed protein quantity peaks localized within this concentrated region of Apo B-100. Twenty-two proteins out of the 252 matched this criterion, in which 19 proteins have been reported to be associated with LDL. This method only requires several microliters of a plasma sample and the principle of the protein separation is totally different from the commonly used ultracentrifugation. The results obtained by this method would provide new insights on the structure and function of LDL.

  12. Association of Nonribosomal Nucleolar Proteins in Ribonucleoprotein Complexes during Interphase and Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Piñol-Roma, Serafín

    1999-01-01

    rRNA precursors are bound throughout their length by specific proteins, as the pre-rRNAs emerge from the transcription machinery. The association of pre-rRNA with proteins as ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes persists during maturation of 18S, 5.8S, and 28S rRNA, and through assembly of ribosomal subunits in the nucleolus. Preribosomal RNP complexes contain, in addition to ribosomal proteins, an unknown number of nonribosomal nucleolar proteins, as well as small nucleolar RNA-ribonucleoproteins (sno-RNPs). This report describes the use of a specific, rapid, and mild immunopurification approach to isolate and analyze human RNP complexes that contain nonribosomal nucleolar proteins, as well as ribosomal proteins and rRNA. Complexes immunopurified with antibodies to nucleolin—a major nucleolar RNA-binding protein—contain several distinct specific polypeptides that include, in addition to nucleolin, the previously identified nucleolar proteins B23 and fibrillarin, proteins with electrophoretic mobilities characteristic of ribosomal proteins including ribosomal protein S6, and a number of additional unidentified proteins. The physical association of these proteins with one another is mediated largely by RNA, in that the complexes dissociate upon digestion with RNase. Complexes isolated from M-phase cells are similar in protein composition to those isolated from interphase cell nuclear extracts. Therefore, the predominant proteins that associate with nucleolin in interphase remain in RNP complexes during mitosis, despite the cessation of rRNA synthesis and processing in M-phase. In addition, precursor rRNA, as well as processed 18S and 28S rRNA and candidate rRNA processing intermediates, is found associated with the immunopurified complexes. The characteristics of the rRNP complexes described here, therefore, indicate that they represent bona fide precursors of mature cytoplasmic ribosomal subunits. PMID:9880328

  13. The ankyrin repeat containing SOCS box protein 5: a novel protein associated with arteriogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boengler, Kerstin; Pipp, Frederic; Fernandez, Borja; Richter, Alexandra; Schaper, Wolfgang; Deindl, Elisabeth

    2003-02-28

    Arteriogenesis, the growth of pre-existing collateral arteries, can be induced in rabbit by occlusion of the femoral artery. In order to identify and characterize genes differentially expressed during the early phase of arteriogenesis, cDNA of collateral arteries 24h after femoral ligation or sham operation was subjected to suppression subtractive hybridization. We identified the ankyrin repeat containing SOCS box protein 5 (asb5) and cloned the rabbit full-length cDNA. Asb5 was demonstrated to be a single-copy gene. We localized the asb5 protein in vivo in endothelial and smooth muscle cells of collateral arteries as well as in satellite cells. Asb5 was significantly upregulated in growing collateral arteries on mRNA and protein level. The infusion of doxorubicin in rabbit led to a significant decrease of the asb5 mRNA. In summary, our data show that asb5 is a novel protein implicated in the initiation of arteriogenesis.

  14. Membrane insertion and topology of the translocon-associated protein (TRAP) gamma subunit.

    PubMed

    Bañó-Polo, Manuel; Martínez-Garay, Carlos A; Grau, Brayan; Martínez-Gil, Luis; Mingarro, Ismael

    2017-05-01

    Translocon-associated protein (TRAP) complex is intimately associated with the ER translocon for the insertion or translocation of newly synthesised proteins in eukaryotic cells. The TRAP complex is comprised of three single-spanning and one multiple-spanning subunits. We have investigated the membrane insertion and topology of the multiple-spanning TRAP-γ subunit by glycosylation mapping and green fluorescent protein fusions both in vitro and in cell cultures. Results demonstrate that TRAP-γ has four transmembrane (TM) segments, an Nt/Ct cytosolic orientation and that the less hydrophobic TM segment inserts efficiently into the membrane only in the cellular context of full-length protein.

  15. Associations between milk protein concentration at various stages of lactation and reproductive performance in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Morton, J M; Auldist, M J; Douglas, M L; Macmillan, K L

    2016-12-01

    Milk protein concentration has been positively associated with a range of measures of reproductive performance in dairy cows. These beneficial associations are most likely due to factors affecting both milk protein concentration and reproductive performance possibly being mediated, in part, by energy balance during early lactation. However, it is likely that factors other than energy balance are also involved in these relationships. A retrospective single cohort study was conducted using subsets of data collected from 74 dairy herds with seasonal or split calving patterns. Associations between milk protein concentration at various stages of lactation and reproductive performance in Holstein dairy cows were assessed using random effects logistic regression and survival analysis with milk protein concentration during the cow's breeding period fitted as a time-varying covariate. The beneficial associations between milk protein concentration and each of the 4 selected indices for measuring reproductive performance were evident when milk protein concentration was derived for each 30-d period from calving up to 300d in milk. For the first 150d of lactation the adjusted odds ratios were highest from 31 to 60d and only slightly lower for all periods up to 150d of lactation. Estimated associations for 31 to 60d were stronger than for 0 to 30d. In addition, milk protein concentration during a cow's breeding period was positively associated with the subsequent daily hazard of conception, even after adjusting for milk protein concentration in the cow's first or second month of lactation. Milk protein concentrations from 0 to 30d of lactation were less closely correlated with concentrations measured at subsequent 30-d intervals; correlations were closer between other periods in lactation. These results indicate that the association between milk protein concentration and reproductive performance is partly due to factors other than the extent of negative energy balance in early

  16. Axoplasmic transport of microtubule-associated proteins in the rat sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Takenaka, T.; Inomata, K.

    1981-09-01

    /sup 32/P-ATP was injected into the L5 dorsal root ganglion and axoplasmic transport of the phosphorylate MA proteins 2, microtubule-associated proteins 2, was observed. After the injection of /sup 32/P-ATP, the nerve was dissected out at prescribed time intervals and sliced into 5-mm pieces. Each segment was electrophoresed on an SDS-polyacrylamide slab gel and subjected to autoradiography. A protein of 310,000 dalton was transported at a velocity of 6.6-10.6 mm/day in the axon with the electrophoretic mobility identical to that of MA proteins 2, one of the key components associated with the microtubules.

  17. Surfactant protein A2 mutations associated with pulmonary fibrosis lead to protein instability and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Wang, Yongyu; Gerard, Robert D; Mendelson, Carole R; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2010-07-16

    Rare heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2, SFTPA2) are associated with adult-onset pulmonary fibrosis and adenocarcinoma of the lung. We have previously shown that two recombinant SP-A2 mutant proteins (G231V and F198S) remain within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of A549 cells and are not secreted into the culture medium. The pathogenic mechanism of the mutant proteins is unknown. Here we analyze all common and rare variants of the surfactant protein A2, SP-A2, in both A549 cells and in primary type II alveolar epithelial cells. We show that, in contrast with all other SP-A2 variants, the mutant proteins are not secreted into the medium with wild-type SP-A isoforms, form fewer intracellular dimer and trimer oligomers, are partially insoluble in 0.5% Nonidet P-40 lysates of transfected A549 cells, and demonstrate greater protein instability in chymotrypsin proteolytic digestions. Both the G231V and F198S mutant SP-A2 proteins are destroyed via the ER-association degradation pathway. Expression of the mutant proteins increases the transcription of a BiP-reporter construct, expression of BiP protein, and production of an ER stress-induced XBP-1 spliced product. Human bronchoalveolar wash samples from individuals who are heterozygous for the G231V mutation have similar levels of total SP-A as normal family members, which suggests that the mechanism of disease does not involve an overt lack of secreted SP-A but instead involves an increase in ER stress of resident type II alveolar epithelial cells.

  18. Ligand induced galectin-3 protein self-association.

    PubMed

    Lepur, Adriana; Salomonsson, Emma; Nilsson, Ulf J; Leffler, Hakon

    2012-06-22

    Many functions of galectin-3 entail binding of its carbohydrate recognition site to glycans of a glycoprotein, resulting in cross-linking thought to be mediated by its N-terminal noncarbohydrate-binding domain. Here we studied interaction of galectin-3 with the model glycoprotein asialofetuin (ASF), using a fluorescence anisotropy assay to measure the concentration of free galectin carbohydrate recognition sites in solution. Surprisingly, in the presence of ASF, this remained low even at high galectin-3 concentrations, showing that many more galectin-3 molecules were engaged than expected due to the about nine known glycan-based binding sites per ASF molecule. This suggests that after ASF-induced nucleation, galectin-3 associates with itself by the carbohydrate recognition site binding to another galectin-3 molecule, possibly forming oligomers. We named this type-C self-association to distinguish it from the previously proposed models (type-N) where galectin-3 molecules bind to each other through the N-terminal domain, and all carbohydrate recognition sites are available for binding glycans. Both types of self-association can result in precipitates, as measured here by turbidimetry and dynamic light scattering. Type-C self-association and precipitation occurred even with a galectin-3 mutant (R186S) that bound poorly to ASF but required much higher concentration (∼50 μM) as compared with wild type (∼1 μM). ASF also induced weaker type-C self-association of galectin-3 lacking its N-terminal domains, but as expected, no precipitation. Neither a monovalent nor a divalent N-acetyl-D-lactosamine-containing glycan induced type-C self-association, even if the latter gave precipitates with high concentrations of galectin-3 (>∼50 μM) in agreement with published results and perhaps due to type-N self-association.

  19. Type VI secretion apparatus and phage tail-associated protein complexes share a common evolutionary origin

    SciTech Connect

    Leiman, Petr G.; Basler, Marek; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Sauder, J. Michael; Pukatzki, Stefan; Burley, Stephen K.; Almo, Steven C.; Mekalanos, John J.

    2009-04-22

    Protein secretion is a common property of pathogenic microbes. Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use at least 6 distinct extracellular protein secretion systems to export proteins through their multilayered cell envelope and in some cases into host cells. Among the most widespread is the newly recognized Type VI secretion system (T6SS) which is composed of 15--20 proteins whose biochemical functions are not well understood. Using crystallographic, biochemical, and bioinformatic analyses, we identified 3 T6SS components, which are homologous to bacteriophage tail proteins. These include the tail tube protein; the membrane-penetrating needle, situated at the distal end of the tube; and another protein associated with the needle and tube. We propose that T6SS is a multicomponent structure whose extracellular part resembles both structurally and functionally a bacteriophage tail, an efficient machine that translocates proteins and DNA across lipid membranes into cells.

  20. Proteomic Study of Retinal Proteins Associated with Transcorneal Electric Stimulation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanamoto, Takashi; Souchelnytskyi, Nazariy; Kurimoto, Takuji; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Sakaue, Hiroaki; Munemasa, Yasunari; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background. To investigate how transcorneal electric stimulation (TES) affects the retina, by identifying those proteins up- and downregulated by transcorneal electric stimulation (TES) in the retina of rats. Methods. Adult Wistar rats received TES on the left eyes at different electrical currents while the right eyes received no treatment and served as controls. After TES, the eye was enucleated and the retina was isolated. The retinas were analyzed by proteomics. Results. Proteomics showed that twenty-five proteins were upregulated by TES. The identified proteins included cellular signaling proteins, proteins associated with neuronal transmission, metabolic proteins, immunological factors, and structural proteins. Conclusions. TES induced changes in expression of various functional proteins in the retina. PMID:25821588

  1. Proteomic study of retinal proteins associated with transcorneal electric stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kanamoto, Takashi; Souchelnytskyi, Nazariy; Kurimoto, Takuji; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Sakaue, Hiroaki; Munemasa, Yasunari; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background. To investigate how transcorneal electric stimulation (TES) affects the retina, by identifying those proteins up- and downregulated by transcorneal electric stimulation (TES) in the retina of rats. Methods. Adult Wistar rats received TES on the left eyes at different electrical currents while the right eyes received no treatment and served as controls. After TES, the eye was enucleated and the retina was isolated. The retinas were analyzed by proteomics. Results. Proteomics showed that twenty-five proteins were upregulated by TES. The identified proteins included cellular signaling proteins, proteins associated with neuronal transmission, metabolic proteins, immunological factors, and structural proteins. Conclusions. TES induced changes in expression of various functional proteins in the retina.

  2. Homologs of the yeast Tvp38 vesicle-associated protein are conserved in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Rebecca; Schneider, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Vesicle transfer processes in eukaryotes depend on specific proteins, which mediate the selective packing of cargo molecules for subsequent release out of the cells after vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane. The protein Tvp38 is conserved in yeasts and higher eukaryotes and potentially involved in vesicle transfer processes at the Golgi membrane. Members of the so-called “SNARE-associated proteins of the Tvp38-family” have also been identified in prokaryotes and those belong to the DedA protein family. Tvp38/DedA proteins are also conserved in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. While only a single member of this family appears to be present in chloroplasts, cyanobacterial genomes typically encode multiple homologous proteins. Mainly based on our understanding of the DedA-homologous proteins of Escherichia coli, it appears likely that the function of these proteins in chloroplast and cyanobacteria involves stabilizing and organizing the structure of internal membrane systems. PMID:24312110

  3. Effects of a high protein diet on body weight and comorbidities associated with obesity.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Red meat intake has been frequently associated with the development of coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes but vegetable protein has been associated with protection from these diseases. Whether this is related to the protein per se or to the increased polyunsaturated fat or higher fibre levels associated with more vegetarian diets is not clear. High protein diets are associated with greater satiety and in some studies are associated with greater weight loss compared with high carbohydrate diets especially in an ad libitum design. These diets also lower plasma triglyceride and blood pressure and sometimes spare lean mass. There appear to be no harmful effects of high protein diets on bone density or renal function in weight loss studies.

  4. A Golgi-associated protein 4.1B variant is required for assimilation of proteins in the membrane.

    PubMed

    Kang, Qiaozhen; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Huizheng; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2009-04-15

    The archetypal membrane skeleton is that of the erythrocyte, consisting predominantly of spectrin, actin, ankyrin R and protein 4.1R. The presence in the Golgi of a membrane skeleton with a similar structure has been inferred, based on the identification of Golgi-associated spectrin and ankyrin. It has long been assumed that a Golgi-specific protein 4.1 must also exist, but it has not previously been found. We demonstrate here that a hitherto unknown form of protein 4.1, a 200 kDa 4.1B, is associated with the Golgi of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. This 4.1B variant behaves like a Golgi marker after treatment with Brefeldin A and during mitosis. Depletion of the protein in HBE cells by siRNA resulted in disruption of the Golgi structure and failure of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, ZO-1 and ZO-2 to migrate to the membrane. Thus, this newly identified Golgi-specific protein 4.1 appears to have an essential role in maintaining the structure of the Golgi and in assembly of a subset of membrane proteins.

  5. Distinct Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Fractions of Drosophila Heterochromatin Protein 1: Their Phosphorylation Levels and Associations with Origin Recognition Complex Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Da Wei; Fanti, Laura; Pak, Daniel T.S.; Botchan, Michael R.; Pimpinelli, Sergio; Kellum, Rebecca

    1998-01-01

    The distinct structural properties of heterochromatin accommodate a diverse group of vital chromosome functions, yet we have only rudimentary molecular details of its structure. A powerful tool in the analyses of its structure in Drosophila has been a group of mutations that reverse the repressive effect of heterochromatin on the expression of a gene placed next to it ectopically. Several genes from this group are known to encode proteins enriched in heterochromatin. The best characterized of these is the heterochromatin-associated protein, HP1. HP1 has no known DNA-binding activity, hence its incorporation into heterochromatin is likely to be dependent upon other proteins. To examine HP1 interacting proteins, we isolated three distinct oligomeric species of HP1 from the cytoplasm of early Drosophila embryos and analyzed their compositions. The two larger oligomers share two properties with the fraction of HP1 that is most tightly associated with the chromatin of interphase nuclei: an underphosphorylated HP1 isoform profile and an association with subunits of the origin recognition complex (ORC). We also found that HP1 localization into heterochromatin is disrupted in mutants for the ORC2 subunit. These findings support a role for the ORC-containing oligomers in localizing HP1 into Drosophila heterochromatin that is strikingly similar to the role of ORC in recruiting the Sir1 protein to silencing nucleation sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:9679132

  6. Identification of genes and proteins associated with anagen wool growth.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Liu, N; Liu, K; He, J; Yu, J; Bu, R; Cheng, M; De, W; Liu, J; Li, H

    2017-02-01

    Identifying genes of major effect for wool growth would offer strategies for improving the quality and increasing the yield of fine wool. In this study, we employed the Agilent Sheep Gene Expression Microarray and proteomic technology to investigate the gene expression patterns of body side skin (more wool growing) in Aohan fine wool sheep (a Chinese indigenous breed) in comparison with groin skin (no wool growing) at the anagen stage of the wool follicle. A microarray study revealed that 4772 probes were differentially expressed, including 2071 upregulated and 2701 downregulated probes, in the comparisons of body side skin vs. groin skin (S/G). The microarray results were verified by means of quantitative PCR. A total of 1099 probes were assigned to unique genes/transcripts. The number of distinct genes/transcripts (annotated) was 926, of which 352 were upregulated and 574 were downregulated. In S/G, 13 genes were upregulated by more than 10 fold, whereas 60 genes were downregulated by more than 10 fold. Further analysis revealed that the majority of the genes possibly related to the wool growth could be assigned to categories including regulation of cell division, intermediate filament, cytoskeletal part and growth factor activity. Several potential gene families may participate in hair growth regulation, including fibroblast growth factors, transforming growth factor-β, WNTs, insulin-like growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factors and so on. Proteomic analysis also revealed 196 differentially expressed protein points, of which 121 were identified as single protein points.

  7. Proteins