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Sample records for cdznte detectors behavior

  1. Noise in CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, P. N.; Amman, M.; Lee J. S.; Manfredi, P. F.

    2000-10-10

    Noise in CdZnTe devices with different electrode configurations was investigated. Measurements on devices with guard-ring electrode structures showed that surface leakage current does not produce any significant noise. The parallel white noise component of the devices appeared to be generated by the bulk current alone, even though the surface current was substantially higher. This implies that reducing the surface leakage current of a CdZnTe detector may not necessarily result in a significant improvement in noise performance. The noise generated by the bulk current is also observed to be below full shot noise. This partial suppression of shot noise may be the result of Coulomb interaction between carriers or carrier trapping. Devices with coplanar strip electrodes were observed to produce a 1/f noise term at the preamplifier output. Higher levels of this 1/f noise were observed with decreasing gap widths between electrodes. The level of this 1/f noise appeared to be independent of bias voltage and leakage current but was substantially reduced after certain surface treatments.

  2. ATMOSPHERIC EFFECTS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF CDZNTE SINGLE CRYSTAL DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Duff, M.; Teague, L.

    2010-05-12

    The production of high-quality ternary single-crystal materials for radiation detectors has progressed over the past 15 years. One of the more common materials being studied is CdZnTe (CZT), which can be grown using several methods to produce detector-grade materials. The work presented herein examines the effects of environmental conditions including temperature and humidity on detector performance [full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)] using the single pixel with guard detector configuration. The effects of electrical probe placement, reproducibility, and aging are also presented.

  3. READOUT SYSTEM FOR ARRAYS OF FRISCH-RING CDZNTE DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI, Y.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; DE GERONIMO, G.; O'CONNOR, P.; JAMES, R.B.; KARGAR, A.; HARRISON, M.J.; MCGREGOR, D.S.

    2006-10-29

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution for identifying isotopes, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. We will fabricate and test at Brookhaven National Laboratory an integrated module of a 64-element array of 6 x 6 x 12 mm{sup 3} Frisch-ring detectors, coupled with a readout electronics system. It supports 64 readout channels, and includes front-end electronics, signal processing circuit, USB interface and high-voltage power supply. The data-acquisition software is used to process the data stream, which includes amplitude and timing information for each detected event. This paper describes the design and assembly of the detector modules, readout electronics, and a conceptual prototype system. Some test results are also reported.

  4. Infrared LED Enhanced Spectroscopic CdZnTe Detector Working under High Fluxes of X-rays.

    PubMed

    Pekárek, Jakub; Dědič, Václav; Franc, Jan; Belas, Eduard; Rejhon, Martin; Moravec, Pavel; Touš, Jan; Voltr, Josef

    2016-09-27

    This paper describes an application of infrared light-induced de-polarization applied on a polarized CdZnTe detector working under high radiation fluxes. We newly demonstrate the influence of a high flux of X-rays and simultaneous 1200-nm LED illumination on the spectroscopic properties of a CdZnTe detector. CdZnTe detectors operating under high radiation fluxes usually suffer from the polarization effect, which occurs due to a screening of the internal electric field by a positive space charge caused by photogenerated holes trapped at a deep level. Polarization results in the degradation of detector charge collection efficiency. We studied the spectroscopic behavior of CdZnTe under various X-ray fluxes ranging between 5 × 10 5 and 8 × 10 6 photons per mm 2 per second. It was observed that polarization occurs at an X-ray flux higher than 3 × 10 6 mm - 2 ·s - 1 . Using simultaneous illumination of the detector by a de-polarizing LED at 1200 nm, it was possible to recover X-ray spectra originally deformed by the polarization effect.

  5. Infrared LED Enhanced Spectroscopic CdZnTe Detector Working under High Fluxes of X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Pekárek, Jakub; Dědič, Václav; Franc, Jan; Belas, Eduard; Rejhon, Martin; Moravec, Pavel; Touš, Jan; Voltr, Josef

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an application of infrared light-induced de-polarization applied on a polarized CdZnTe detector working under high radiation fluxes. We newly demonstrate the influence of a high flux of X-rays and simultaneous 1200-nm LED illumination on the spectroscopic properties of a CdZnTe detector. CdZnTe detectors operating under high radiation fluxes usually suffer from the polarization effect, which occurs due to a screening of the internal electric field by a positive space charge caused by photogenerated holes trapped at a deep level. Polarization results in the degradation of detector charge collection efficiency. We studied the spectroscopic behavior of CdZnTe under various X-ray fluxes ranging between 5×105 and 8×106 photons per mm2 per second. It was observed that polarization occurs at an X-ray flux higher than 3×106 mm−2·s−1. Using simultaneous illumination of the detector by a de-polarizing LED at 1200 nm, it was possible to recover X-ray spectra originally deformed by the polarization effect. PMID:27690024

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF DETECTOR GRADE CDZNTE MATERIAL FROM REDLEN TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M

    2008-07-09

    CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. This large band gap material shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. Historically, the performance of CZT has typically been adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity) and secondary phases (SP). The synthesis of CZT material has improved greatly with the primary performance limitation being attributed to mainly SP. In this presentation, we describe the extensive characterization of detector grade material that has been treated with post growth annealing to remove the SPs. Some of the analytical methods used in this study included polarized, cross polarized and transmission IR imaging, I-V curves measurements, synchrotron X-ray topography and electron microscopy.

  7. Development of CdZnTe radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey; Camarda, Giuseppe; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; Yang, Ge; Gul, Rubi; Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph B.

    2011-08-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a very attractive material for room-temperature semiconductor detectors because of its wide band-gap and high atomic number. Despite these advantages, CZT still presents some material limitations and poor hole mobility. In the past decade most of the efforts developing CZT detectors focused on designing different electrode configurations, mainly to minimize the deleterious effect due to the poor hole mobility. A few different electrode geometries were designed and fabricated, such as pixelated anodes and Frisch-grid detectors developed at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). However, crystal defects in CZT materials still limit the yield of detector-grade crystals, and, in general, dominate the detector's performance. In the past few years, our group's research extended to characterizing the CZT materials at the micro-scale, and to correlating crystal defects with the detector's performance. We built a set of unique tools for this purpose, including infrared (IR) transmission microscopy, X-ray micro-scale mapping using synchrotron light source, X-ray transmission- and reflection- topography, current deep level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS), and photoluminescence measurements. Our most recent work on CZT detectors was directed towards detailing various crystal defects, studying the internal electrical field, and delineating the effects of thermal annealing on improving the material properties. In this paper, we report our most recent results.

  8. Nuclear reactor pulse calibration using a CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kyle A; Geuther, Jeffrey A; Neihart, James L; Riedel, Todd A; Rojeski, Ronald A; Saddler, Jeffrey L; Schmidt, Aaron J; McGregor, Douglas S

    2012-07-01

    A CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector was used to calibrate nuclear reactor pulses. The standard configuration of the Pockels cell has collimated light passing through an optically transparent CdZnTe crystal located between crossed polarizers. The transmitted light was focused onto an IR sensitive photodiode. Calibrations of reactor pulses were performed using the CdZnTe Pockels cell by measuring the change in the photodiode current, repeated 10 times for each set of reactor pulses, set between 1.00 and 2.50 dollars in 0.50 increments of reactivity.

  9. Characterization of a large CdZnTe detector with a coplanar quad-grid design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theinert, R.

    2017-02-01

    The COBRA collaboration aims to search for neutrinoless double beta-decays of several isotopes using CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. To improve the sensitivity on the half-lifes of such decays, a large (2 × 2 × 1.5)cm3 CdZnTe detector for applications in gamma-ray spectroscopy and low-background operation is investigated. The electric properties as well as the spectroscopic performance of the detector, such as energy response and resolution, are characterized. In addition, several measurements are conducted to investigate the operational stability. Furthermore, the possibility to identify multiple-scattered gamma-rays with the new anode design is studied.

  10. Ruggedization of CdZnTe detectors and detector assemblies for radiation detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P. H.; Gomolchuk, P.; Chen, H.; Beitz, D.; Grosser, A. W.

    2015-06-01

    This paper described improvements in the ruggedization of CdZnTe detectors and detector assemblies for use in radiation detection applications. Research included experimenting with various conductive and underfill adhesive material systems suitable for CZT substrates. A detector design with encapsulation patterning was developed to protect detector surfaces and to control spacing between CZT anode and PCB carrier. Robustness of bare detectors was evaluated through temperature cycling and metallization shear testing. Attachment processes using well-chosen adhesives and PCB carrier materials were optimized to improve reliability of detector assemblies, resulted in Improved Attachment Detector Assembly. These detector assemblies were subjected to aggressive temperature cycling, and varying levels of drop/shock and vibration, in accordance with modified JEDEC, ANSI and FedEx testing standards, to assess their ruggedness. Further enhanced detector assembly ruggedization methods were investigated involving adhesive conformal coating, potting and dam filling on detector assemblies, which resulted in the Enhanced Ruggedization Detector Assembly. Large numbers of CZT detectors and detector assemblies with 5 mm and 15 mm thick, over 200 in total, were tested. Their performance was evaluated by exposure to various radioactive sources using comprehensive predefined detector specifications and testing protocols. Detector assemblies from improved attachment and enhanced ruggedization showed stable performances during the harsh environmental condition tests. In conclusion, significant progress has been made in improving the reliability and enhancing the ruggedness of CZT detector assemblies for radiation detection applications deployed in operational environments.

  11. A highly pixelated CdZnTe detector based on Topmetal-II- sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Shu-Guang; Fan, Yan; Sun, Xiang-Ming; Huang, Guang-Ming; Pei, Hua; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Jun; Yang, Ping; Wang, Dong

    2017-04-01

    Topmetal-II- is a low noise CMOS pixel direct charge sensor with a pitch of 83 μm. CdZnTe is an excellent semiconductor material for radiation detection. The combination of CdZnTe and the sensor makes it possible to build a detector with high spatial resolution. In our experiments, an epoxy adhesive is used as the conductive medium to connect the sensor and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe). The diffusion coefficient and charge efficiency of electrons are measured at a low bias voltage of -2 V, and the image of a single alpha particle is clear with a reasonable spatial resolution. A detector with such a structure has the potential to be applied in X-ray imaging systems with further improvements of the sensor. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375073, 11305072, U1232206)

  12. Preliminary results obtained from novel CdZnTe pad detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tuemer, T.O.; Joyce, D.C.; Yin, S.; Willson, P.D.; Parnham, K.B.; Glick, B.

    1996-06-01

    CdZnTe pad detectors with a novel geometry and approximately 1 mm{sup 2} pad sizes are being developed. These detectors have been specially designed for high energy resolution up to 300 keV energies. The contacts are produced through a unique technique developed by eV Products to achieve high reliability low resistance coupling to the substrate. A ceramic carrier is developed for low capacitance coupling of the detectors to NOVA`s FEENA chip. The detectors have been tested using the ultra low noise single and 3-channel amplifiers developed by eV Products. The CdZnTe detectors are tested for dark current. The charge energy resolutions and collection times are also measured using natural radiation sources. The measured detector parameters and the test results are showing that linear pad arrays can have good uniformity and excellent application potential for imaging x-rays and gamma-rays.

  13. Hard x-ray response of pixellated CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbene, L.; Caccia, S.; Bertuccio, G.

    2009-06-15

    In recent years, the development of cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for x-ray and gamma ray spectrometry has grown rapidly. The good room temperature performance and the high spatial resolution of pixellated CdZnTe detectors make them very attractive in space-borne x-ray astronomy, mainly as focal plane detectors for the new generation of hard x-ray focusing telescopes. In this work, we investigated on the spectroscopic performance of two pixellated CdZnTe detectors coupled with a custom low noise and low power readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The detectors (10x10x1 and 10x10x2 mm{sup 3} single crystals) have an anode layout based on an array of 256 pixels with a geometric pitch of 0.5 mm. The ASIC, fabricated in 0.8 mum BiCMOS technology, is equipped with eight independent channels (preamplifier and shaper) and characterized by low power consumption (0.5 mW/channel) and low noise (150-500 electrons rms). The spectroscopic results point out the good energy resolution of both detectors at room temperature [5.8% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 59.5 keV for the 1 mm thick detector; 5.5% FWHM at 59.5 keV for the 2 mm thick detector) and low tailing in the measured spectra, confirming the single charge carrier sensing properties of the CdZnTe detectors equipped with a pixellated anode layout. Temperature measurements show optimum performance of the system (detector and electronics) at T=10 deg.C and performance degradation at lower temperatures. The detectors and the ASIC were developed by our collaboration as two small focal plane detector prototypes for hard x-ray multilayer telescopes operating in the 20-70 keV energy range.

  14. Hard x-ray response of pixellated CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbene, L.; Del Sordo, S.; Caroli, E.; Gerardi, G.; Raso, G.; Caccia, S.; Bertuccio, G.

    2009-06-01

    In recent years, the development of cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for x-ray and gamma ray spectrometry has grown rapidly. The good room temperature performance and the high spatial resolution of pixellated CdZnTe detectors make them very attractive in space-borne x-ray astronomy, mainly as focal plane detectors for the new generation of hard x-ray focusing telescopes. In this work, we investigated on the spectroscopic performance of two pixellated CdZnTe detectors coupled with a custom low noise and low power readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The detectors (10×10×1 and 10×10×2 mm3 single crystals) have an anode layout based on an array of 256 pixels with a geometric pitch of 0.5 mm. The ASIC, fabricated in 0.8 μm BiCMOS technology, is equipped with eight independent channels (preamplifier and shaper) and characterized by low power consumption (0.5 mW/channel) and low noise (150-500 electrons rms). The spectroscopic results point out the good energy resolution of both detectors at room temperature [5.8% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 59.5 keV for the 1 mm thick detector; 5.5% FWHM at 59.5 keV for the 2 mm thick detector) and low tailing in the measured spectra, confirming the single charge carrier sensing properties of the CdZnTe detectors equipped with a pixellated anode layout. Temperature measurements show optimum performance of the system (detector and electronics) at T =10 °C and performance degradation at lower temperatures. The detectors and the ASIC were developed by our collaboration as two small focal plane detector prototypes for hard x-ray multilayer telescopes operating in the 20-70 keV energy range.

  15. Arrays of Encapsulated CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C. E.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Prettyman, T. H.; Reedy, R. C.; Smith, M. K.; Sweet, M. R.

    2000-01-01

    Recent results from encapsulated multi-element CdZnTe room-temperature semiconductor gamma-ray detectors are presented. Our multi-element-array design is a good low-mass and low-power candidate for elemental mapping on future planetary missions.

  16. Arrays of Encapsulated CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C. E.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Prettyman, T. H.; Reedy, R. C.; Smith, M. K.; Sweet, M. R.

    2000-01-01

    Recent results from encapsulated multi-element CdZnTe room-temperature semiconductor gamma-ray detectors are presented. Our multi-element-array design is a good low-mass and low-power candidate for elemental mapping on future planetary missions.

  17. Investigation of the peak shape parameter of CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, I.; Arlt, R.

    2001-02-01

    There is a need to define the magnitude of the asymmetry of the peak shapes (the tailing fraction) of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors. Since this tailing parameter determines to a large extent, the performance of peak fitting programs used to extract the peak areas from gamma spectra taken for the verification of nuclear material, a well-defined knowledge of this parameter is an important factor in such programs. The magnitude of the asymmetry of this tailing fraction was investigated for different models of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors. The gamma peak analysis program PkCheck (R. Gunnink, R. Arlt, Proceedings of 11th International Workshop on room temperature Semiconductor X- and gamma-ray detectors and associated electronics, 11-15 October 1999, Vienna, Austria, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 485 (2001) 196, This issue) was used to determine the tailing fraction as a function of detector type, high voltage and other operational parameters. Although there are considerable individual differences between different detector units of the same model, a general trend towards the growing of the tailing fraction with increasing detector volume was clearly observed. The lowest fractions are observed for electrically cooled planar pin CdTe detectors operated with a charge loss corrector, followed by small size hemispheric CdZnTe detectors.

  18. The Effect of Twin Boundaries on the Spectroscopic Performance of CdZnTe Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, C. M.; Roth, D.; Babu, S.; Tueller, Jack; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most single grains in cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) grown by the high-pressure Bridgman (HPB) technique contain multiple twin boundaries. As a consequence, twin boundaries are one of the most common macroscopic material defects found in large area (400 to 700 sq mm) CdZnTe specimens obtained from HPB ingots. Due to the prevalence of twin boundaries, understanding their effect on detector performance is key to the material selection process. Twin boundaries in several 2 mm thick large area specimens were first, documented using infrared transmission imaging. These specimens were then fabricated into either 2 mm pixel or planar detectors in order to examine the effect of the twin boundaries on detector performance. Preliminary results show that twin boundaries, which are decorated with tellurium inclusions, produce a reduction in detector efficiency and a degradation in resolution. The extent of the degradation appears to be a function of the density of tellurium inclusions.

  19. Accumulative dose response of CdZnTe detectors to 14.1 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang; Han, He-tong; Li, Gang; Lu, Yi

    2017-03-01

    The accumulative dose response of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors to 14.1 MeV neutrons is discussed experimentally in this paper. The Cockcroft-Walton Accelerator is used to obtain a steady neutron beam of 14.1 MeV neutrons. A pulsed X-ray source is used to test the response parameters of the neutron-exposed CZT detectors under the pulse mode. The irradiation time (hours) is shorter relative to the time scales (years) where annealing effects occur. Time and linearity response is analyzed to evaluate the maximum dose rate of the CZT detectors and the pulse shape. The result shows that the experimental CZT detectors maintain stable response behaviors, while the maximum dose rate and the total accumulative dose are less than 106 neutrons/(cm2·s) and 1010 neutrons/cm2, respectively.

  20. Surface Passivation of CdZnTe Detector by Hydrogen Peroxide Solution Etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, M.; Chen, H.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Burger, A.; James, R. B.

    1998-01-01

    The spectral resolution of room temperature nuclear radiation detectors such as CdZnTe is usually limited by the presence of conducting surface species that increase the surface leakage current. Studies have shown that the leakage current can be reduced by proper surface preparation. In this study, we try to optimize the performance of CdZnTe detector by etching the detector with hydrogen peroxide solution as function of concentration and etching time. The passivation effect that hydrogen peroxide introduces have been investigated by current-voltage (I-V) measurement on both parallel strips and metal-semiconductor-metal configurations. The improvements on the spectral response of Fe-55 and 241Am due to hydrogen peroxide treatment are presented and discussed.

  1. De-polarization of a CdZnTe radiation detector by pulsed infrared light

    SciTech Connect

    Dědič, V. Franc, J.; Rejhon, M.; Grill, R.; Zázvorka, J.; Sellin, P. J.

    2015-07-20

    This work is focused on a detailed study of pulsed mode infrared light induced depolarization of CdZnTe detectors operating at high photon fluxes. This depolarizing effect is a result of the decrease of positive space charge that is caused by the trapping of photogenerated holes at a deep level. The reduction in positive space charge is due to the optical transition of electrons from a valence band to the deep level due to additional infrared illumination. In this paper, we present the results of pulse mode infrared depolarization, by which it is possible to keep the detector in the depolarized state during its operation. The demonstrated mechanism represents a promising way to increase the charge collection efficiency of CdZnTe X-ray detectors operating at high photon fluxes.

  2. Surface Passivation of CdZnTe Detector by Hydrogen Peroxide Solution Etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, M.; Chen, H.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Burger, A.; James, R. B.

    1998-01-01

    The spectral resolution of room temperature nuclear radiation detectors such as CdZnTe is usually limited by the presence of conducting surface species that increase the surface leakage current. Studies have shown that the leakage current can be reduced by proper surface preparation. In this study, we try to optimize the performance of CdZnTe detector by etching the detector with hydrogen peroxide solution as function of concentration and etching time. The passivation effect that hydrogen peroxide introduces have been investigated by current-voltage (I-V) measurement on both parallel strips and metal-semiconductor-metal configurations. The improvements on the spectral response of Fe-55 and 241Am due to hydrogen peroxide treatment are presented and discussed.

  3. Computational modelling of pixelated CdZnTe detectors for x- and γ- ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myronakis, M. E.; Zvelebil, M.; Darambara, D. G.

    2012-03-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are currently used in medical imaging systems employing γ-ray photons. As new imaging techniques such as photon-counting and energy-weighted x-ray imaging are gaining research interest, CdZnTe is seen under a new light for potential use in computed tomography, tomosynthesis and other x-ray imaging applications. However, being relatively expensive, CdZnTe could be favoured by advanced computational modelling to assist in detector and imaging system optimisation. In this work, pixelated CdZnTe detectors are computationally modelled using an integrated framework that combines the Finite Element and Monte Carlo numerical methods to obtain realistic detector models.Various detector thickness and pixel sizes are designed and their performance is investigated in terms of charge induction efficiency, detection efficiency and energy resolution. Detection efficiency and energy resolution are assessed for monoenegergetic photon beams within the energy range used in medical x-ray imaging applications such as mammography and computed tomography. Some of the capabilities of the framework are demonstrated. Small pixel sizes, below 100μm are prone to charge transport effects such as diffusion, especially in larger thickness ( > 0.5 mm) and may have limited use in pixelated geometries. Detection efficiency is affected by fluorescence and photon escape as thickness and pixel size decrease. Energy resolution is affected by beam geometry and can vary from ~ 3% to 11% depending on the beam width. The framework provides a generic platform and a powerful tool that can be used in the design and optimisation of semiconductor detectors made from any semiconductor material, imaging systems and signal correction techniques.

  4. Characterization of a large CdZnTe coplanar quad-grid semiconductor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, J.; Gehre, D.; Gößling, C.; Hagner, C.; Heidrich, N.; Klingenberg, R.; Kröninger, K.; Nitsch, C.; Oldorf, C.; Quante, T.; Rajek, S.; Rebber, H.; Rohatsch, K.; Tebrügge, J.; Temminghoff, R.; Theinert, R.; Timm, J.; Wonsak, B.; Zatschler, S.; Zuber, K.

    2016-01-01

    The COBRA collaboration aims to search for neutrinoless double beta-decay of 116Cd. A demonstrator setup with 64 CdZnTe semiconductor detectors, each with a volume of 1 cm3, is currently being operated at the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy. This paper reports on the characterization of a large 2 × 2 × 1.5cm3 CdZnTe detector with a new coplanar-grid design for applications in γ-ray spectroscopy and low-background operation. Several studies of electric properties as well as of the spectrometric performance, like energy response and resolution, are conducted. Furthermore, measurements including investigating the operational stability and a possibility to identify multiple-scattered photons are presented.

  5. CdZnTe position-sensitive drift detectors with thicknesses up to 5 cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Chen, E.; Cheng, S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Gallagher, R.; Dedic, V.; De Geronimo, G.; Ocampo Giraldo, L.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; MacKenzie, J. M.; Sellin, P.; Taherion, S.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; El-hanany, U.; James, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the feasibility of long-drift-time CdZnTe (CZT) gamma-ray detectors, fabricated from CZT material produced by Redlen Technologies. CZT crystals with cross-section areas of 5 × 5 mm2 and 6 × 6 mm2 and thicknesses of 20-, 30-, 40-, and 50-mm were configured as 3D position-sensitive drift detectors and were read out using a front-end ASIC. By correcting the electron charge losses caused by defects in the crystals, we demonstrated high performance for relatively thick detectors fabricated from unselected CZT material.

  6. CdZnTe Image Detectors for Hard-X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. M. Hubert; Cook, Walter R.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Lin, Jiao Y. Y.; Mao, Peter H.; Schindler, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    Arrays of CdZnTe photodetectors and associated electronic circuitry have been built and tested in a continuing effort to develop focal-plane image sensor systems for hard-x-ray telescopes. Each array contains 24 by 44 pixels at a pitch of 498 m. The detector designs are optimized to obtain low power demand with high spectral resolution in the photon- energy range of 5 to 100 keV. More precisely, each detector array is a hybrid of a CdZnTe photodetector array and an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) containing an array of amplifiers in the same pixel pattern as that of the detectors. The array is fabricated on a single crystal of CdZnTe having dimensions of 23.6 by 12.9 by 2 mm. The detector-array cathode is a monolithic platinum contact. On the anode plane, the contact metal is patterned into the aforementioned pixel array, surrounded by a guard ring that is 1 mm wide on three sides and is 0.1 mm wide on the fourth side so that two such detector arrays can be placed side-by-side to form a roughly square sensor area with minimal dead area between them. Figure 1 shows two anode patterns. One pattern features larger pixel anode contacts, with a 30-m gap between them. The other pattern features smaller pixel anode contacts plus a contact for a shaping electrode in the form of a grid that separates all the pixels. In operation, the grid is held at a potential intermediate between the cathode and anode potentials to steer electric charges toward the anode in order to reduce the loss of charges in the inter-anode gaps. The CdZnTe photodetector array is mechanically and electrically connected to the ASIC (see Figure 2), either by use of indium bump bonds or by use of conductive epoxy bumps on the CdZnTe array joined to gold bumps on the ASIC. Hence, the output of each pixel detector is fed to its own amplifier chain.

  7. Hard x-ray response of a CdZnTe ring-drift detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, A.; den Hartog, R.; Quarati, F.; Gostilo, V.; Kondratjev, V.; Loupilov, A.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Wigmore, J. K.; Webb, A.; Welter, E.

    2007-09-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of a special type of CdZnTe detector of hard x and γ rays—a ring-drift detector. The device consists of a double ring electrode structure surrounding a central point anode with a guard plane surrounding the outer anode ring. The detector can be operated in two distinctively different modes of charge collection—pseudohemispherical and pseudodrift. We study the detector response profiles obtained by scanning the focused x-ray beam over the whole detector area, specifically the variations in count rate, peak position, and energy resolution for x rays from 10 to 100 keV. In addition, at 662 keV the energy resolution was shown to be 4.8 keV, more than a factor of 2 better than for CdZnTe coplanar grid detectors. To interpret the experimental data, we derive an analytical expression for the spatial distribution of the electric field inside the detector and neglecting carrier diffusion, and identify carrier collection patterns for both modes of operation within the drift model approximation. We show that this model provides a good understanding of measured profiles.

  8. Hard x-ray response of a CdZnTe ring-drift detector

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, A.; Hartog, R. den; Quarati, F.; Gostilo, V.; Kondratjev, V.; Loupilov, A.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Wigmore, J. K.; Webb, A.; Welter, E.

    2007-09-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of a special type of CdZnTe detector of hard x and {gamma} rays--A-drift detector. The device consists of a double ring electrode structure surrounding a central point anode with a guard plane surrounding the outer anode ring. The detector can be operated in two distinctively different modes of charge collection--pseudohemispherical and pseudodrift. We study the detector response profiles obtained by scanning the focused x-ray beam over the whole detector area, specifically the variations in count rate, peak position, and energy resolution for x rays from 10 to 100 keV. In addition, at 662 keV the energy resolution was shown to be 4.8 keV, more than a factor of 2 better than for CdZnTe coplanar grid detectors. To interpret the experimental data, we derive an analytical expression for the spatial distribution of the electric field inside the detector and neglecting carrier diffusion, and identify carrier collection patterns for both modes of operation within the drift model approximation. We show that this model provides a good understanding of measured profiles.

  9. Growth of CdZnTe Crystals for Radiation Detector Applications by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Cadmium Zinc Telluride (Cd(sub 1-x)Zn(sub x)Te) growth techniques are needed for the production of large-scale arrays of gamma and x-ray astronomy. The research objective is to develop crystal growth recipes and techniques to obtain large, high quality CdZnTe single crystal with reduced defects, such as charge trapping, twinning, and tellurium precipitates, which degrade the performance of CdZnTe and, at the same time, to increase the yield of usable material from the CdZnTe ingot. A low gravity material experiment, "Crystal Growth of Ternary Compound Semiconductors in Low Gravity Environment", will be performed in the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) on International Space Station (ISS). One section of the flight experiment is the melt growth of CdZnTe ternary compounds. This talk will focus on the ground-based studies on the growth of Cd(sub 0.80)Zn(sub 0.20)Te crystals for radiation detector applications by directional solidification. In this investigation, we have improved the properties that are most critical for the detector applications (electrical properties and crystalline quality): a) Electrical resistivity: use high purity starting materials (with reproducible impurity levels) and controlled Cd over pressure during growth to reproducibly balance the impurity levels and Cd vacancy concentration b) Crystalline quality: use ultra-clean growth ampoule (no wetting after growth), optimized thermal profile and ampoule design, as well as a technique for supercool reduction to growth large single crystal with high crystalline quality

  10. Time-Encoded Thermal Neutron Imaging Using Large-Volume Pixelated CdZnTe Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven T.

    CdZnTe detectors are commonly used for room-temperature gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging in a variety of applications including nuclear security, nuclear medicine, and space science. The material's long-established sensitivity to thermal neutrons, however, is less utilized. Generally speaking, the performance of neutron detectors based on the Cd capture reaction is limited by the physical nature of the reaction itself. Multiple gamma rays are emitted promptly following each capture event, which consists of one realization of many possible combinations of gamma-ray lines. Although the gamma-ray cascade can reduce photopeak efficiency in conventional devices, this work demonstrates that pixelated CdZnTe can recover losses by reading out each gamma-ray interaction separately. Including coincident events, the measured 558-keV photopeak efficiency for a 3 x 3 array of 2 cm x 2 cm by 1.5 cm pixelated CdZnTe detectors was about 10%, i.e., ten 558 keV photopeak events per 100 incident thermal neutrons. This was in good agreement with its calculated value. Initial measurements also show that neutron-gamma discrimination beyond simple energy windowing is possible when incorporating the 3-D interaction locations of gamma rays provided by the pixelated readout. In this work, we developed and successfully demonstrated a proof-of-principle time-encoding system for thermal neutron imaging using pixelated CdZnTe. Time encoding was chosen because it is not limited by the detector's position resolution or spatial extent. These issues are exacerbated by Cd capture due to the dispersal of cascade gamma rays throughout the device. The system was first tested using a MURA-based, W-metal mask with both Co-57 and U-metal gamma-ray sources. About 0.3° angular resolution within a 22° field of view was achieved for gamma rays, and good image uniformity was observed for objects of moderate spatial extent. A MURA-based thermal neutron mask was then constructed using 1-mm-thick BN tiles

  11. CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMARDA,G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; KOHMAN, K.T.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-05-04

    One important mission of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration is to develop reliable gamma-ray detectors to meet the widespread needs of users for effective techniques to detect and identify special nuclear- and radioactive-materials. Accordingly, the Nonproliferation and National Security Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked to evaluate existing technology and to develop improved room-temperature detectors based on semiconductors, such as CdZnTe (CZT). Our research covers two important areas: Improving the quality of CZT material, and exploring new CZT-based gamma-ray detectors. In this paper, we report on our recent findings from the material characterization and tests of actual CZT devices fabricated in our laboratory and from materials/detectors supplied by different commercial vendors. In particular, we emphasize the critical role of secondary phases in the current CZT material and issues in fabricating the CZT detectors, both of which affect their performance.

  12. Preliminary Performance of CdZnTe Imaging Detector Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B.; Sharma, D. P.; Meisner, J.; Gostilo, V.; Ivanov, V.; Loupilov, A.; Sokolov, A.; Sipila, H.

    1999-01-01

    The promise of good energy and spatial resolution coupled with high efficiency and near-room-temperature operation has fuelled a large International effort to develop Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) for the hard-x-ray region. We present here preliminary results from our development of small-pixel imaging arrays fabricated on 5x5x1-mm and 5x5x2-mm spectroscopy and discriminator-grade material. Each array has 16 (4x4) 0.65-mm gold readout pads on a 0.75-mm pitch, with each pad connected to a discrete preamplifier via a pulse-welded gold wire. Each array is mounted on a 3-stage Peltier cooler and housed in an ion-pump-evacuated housing which also contains a hybrid micro-assembly for the 16 channels of electronics. We have investigated the energy resolution and approximate photopeak efficiency for each pixel at several energies and have used an ultra-fine beam x-ray generator to probe the performance at the pixel boundaries. Both arrays gave similar results, and at an optimum temperature of -20 C we achieved between 2 and 3% FWHM energy resolution at 60 keV and around 15% at 5.9 keV. We found that all the charge was contained within 1 pixel until very close to the pixels edge, where it would start to be shared with its neighbor. Even between pixels, all the charge would be appropriately shared with no apparently loss of efficiency or resolution. Full details of these measurements will be presented, together with their implications for future imaging-spectroscopy applications.

  13. Preliminary Performance of CdZnTe Imaging Detector Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B.; Sharma, D. P.; Meisner, J.; Gostilo, V.; Ivanov, V.; Loupilov, A.; Sokolov, A.; Sipila, H.

    1999-01-01

    The promise of good energy and spatial resolution coupled with high efficiency and near-room-temperature operation has fuelled a large International effort to develop Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) for the hard-x-ray region. We present here preliminary results from our development of small-pixel imaging arrays fabricated on 5x5x1-mm and 5x5x2-mm spectroscopy and discriminator-grade material. Each array has 16 (4x4) 0.65-mm gold readout pads on a 0.75-mm pitch, with each pad connected to a discrete preamplifier via a pulse-welded gold wire. Each array is mounted on a 3-stage Peltier cooler and housed in an ion-pump-evacuated housing which also contains a hybrid micro-assembly for the 16 channels of electronics. We have investigated the energy resolution and approximate photopeak efficiency for each pixel at several energies and have used an ultra-fine beam x-ray generator to probe the performance at the pixel boundaries. Both arrays gave similar results, and at an optimum temperature of -20 C we achieved between 2 and 3% FWHM energy resolution at 60 keV and around 15% at 5.9 keV. We found that all the charge was contained within 1 pixel until very close to the pixels edge, where it would start to be shared with its neighbor. Even between pixels, all the charge would be appropriately shared with no apparently loss of efficiency or resolution. Full details of these measurements will be presented, together with their implications for future imaging-spectroscopy applications.

  14. Influence of infrared illumination on the characteristics of CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.; Dorogov, P.; Loutchanski, A.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared (IR) radiation of proper wavelength deep penetrating inside the CdZnTe detector may interact with trapping centers and has a significant influence on the trapping-detrapping processes of charge carriers from traps, thereby influencing charge collection efficiency in the detector. We studied the effect of infrared (IR) illumination on the characteristics of planar and quasi-hemispherical CdZnTe detectors. These results show that the near bandgap IR illumination significantly affects the detectors characteristics. By selecting a wavelength and intensity of illumination, detectors spectrometric characteristics can be significantly improved. Improvement of spectrometric characteristics is due to better uniformity of charge collection on the detector volume, as evidenced by the improvement in the total absorption peak symmetry and shape of the output pulses. The degree of improvement is different for various detectors depending on the characteristics of source material used for detector fabrication and theirs dimensions. For example, a detector of sizes 10 x 10 x 5 mm{sup 3} with an initial energy resolution (FWHM) of 20.6 keV at 662 keV under IR illumination was improved up to 9.1 keV, but a detector of sizes 5 x 5 x 2.5 mm{sup 3} with an initial energy resolution (FWHM) of 7.1 keV can be improved up to 4.8 keV. The IR illumination with a properly chosen intensity improves spectrometric characteristic in a wide range of energies without any losses of registration effectiveness. IR Illumination was practically performed using conventional GaAlAs IR LEDs with different peak wavelengths of emitted radiation. (authors)

  15. A CdZnTe slot-scanned detector for digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Mainprize, James G; Ford, Nancy L; Yin, Shi; Gordon, Eli E; Hamilton, William J; Tümer, Tümay O; Yaffe, Martin J

    2002-12-01

    A new high-resolution detector has been developed for use in a slot-scanned digital mammography system. The detector is a hybrid device that consists of a CCD operating in time-delay integration mode that is bonded to a 150-microm-thick CdZnTe photoconductor array. The CCD was designed with a detector element pitch of 50 microm. Two devices were evaluated with differing crystalline quality. Incomplete charge collection was a source of reduction in DQE. This occurs in both devices due to characteristically low mobility-lifetime products for CdZnTe, with the greatest losses demonstrated by the multicrystalline sample. The mobility-lifetime products for the multicrystalline device were found to be 2.4 x 10(-4) and 4.0 x 10(-7) cm2/V for electrons and holes, respectively. The device constructed with higher quality single crystal CdZnTe demonstrated mobility-lifetime products of 1.0 x 10(-4) and 4.4 x 10(-6) cm2/V for electrons and holes. The MTF and DQE for the device were measured at several exposures and results were compared to predictions from a linear systems model of signal and noise propagation. The MTF at a spatial frequency of 10 mm(-1) exceeded 0.18 and 0.56 along the scan and slot directions, respectively. Scanning motion and CCD design limited the resolution along the scan direction. For an x-ray beam from a tungsten target tube with 40 microm molybdenum filtration operated at 26 kV, the single crystal device demonstrated a DQE(0) of 0.70 +/- 0.02 at 7.1 x 10(-6) C/kg (27 mR) exposure to the detector, despite its relatively poor charge collection efficiency.

  16. Results from a Prototype Multi-Element CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detector for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C. E.; Browne, M. C.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Prettyman, T. H.; Reedy, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    We present high energy results for a 2 x 2 x 2 array of eight 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm coplanar grid CdZnTe detectors. We conclude that such an array can provide a room-temperature detector with good resolution and efficiency for planetary missions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Results from a Prototype Multi-Element CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detector for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C. E.; Browne, M. C.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Prettyman, T. H.; Reedy, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    We present high energy results for a 2 x 2 x 2 array of eight 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm coplanar grid CdZnTe detectors. We conclude that such an array can provide a room-temperature detector with good resolution and efficiency for planetary missions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. New developments in CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for X and γ-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verger, L.; Bonnefoy, J. P.; Glasser, F.; Ouvrier-Buffet, P.

    1997-06-01

    There has been considerable recent progress in II-VI semiconductor material and in methods for improving performance of the associated radiation detectors. New high resistivity CdZnTe material, new contact technologies, new detector structures, new electronic correction methods have opened the field of nuclear and x-ray imaging for industrial and medical applications. The purpose of this paper is to review new developments in several of these fields. In addition, we will present some recent results at LETI concerning first the CdTe 2-D imaging system (20 × 30 mm2 with 400 × 600 pixels) for dental radiology and second the CdZnTe fast pulse correction method applied to a 5 × 5 × 5 mm3 CdZnTe detector (energy resolution = 5% for detection efficiency of 85% at 122 keV) for medical imaging.

  19. Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Based on High-Efficiency Frisch-Ring Cdznte Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Y.; Bolotnikov, A; Camarda, G; Hossain, A; James, R; DeGeronimo, G; Fried, J; O'Connor, P; Kargar, A; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated both good energy resolution, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency in detecting gamma rays, highlighting the strong potential of CdZnTe materials for such applications. We are designing a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8 times 8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so greatly improving detection efficiency. By using the front-end application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy-resolution. It includes a signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuits, a high-voltage module, and a universal serial bus (USB) interface. In this paper, we detail the system's structure and report the results of our tests with it.

  20. HAND-HELD GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER BASED ON HIGH-EFFICIENCY FRISCH-RING CdZnTe DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI,Y.

    2007-05-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution, el% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. This technique facilitates the application of CdZnTe materials for high efficiency gamma-ray detection. A hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8x8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so that detection efficiency is significantly improved. By using the front-end ASICs developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy resolution. The spectrometer includes signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuit, high-voltage module, and USB interface. In this paper, we introduce the details of the system structure and report our test results with it.

  1. Investigation of the limitations of the highly pixilated CdZnTe detector for PET applications

    PubMed Central

    Komarov, Sergey; Yin, Yongzhi; Wu, Heyu; Wen, Jie; Krawczynski, Henric; Meng, Ling-Jian; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of a high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) insert device based on the CdZnTe detector with 350 μm anode pixel pitch to be integrated into a conventional animal PET scanner to improve its image resolution. In this paper, we have used a simplified version of the multi pixel CdZnTe planar detector, 5 mm thick with 9 anode pixels only. This simplified 9 anode pixel structure makes it possible to carry out experiments without a complete application-specific integrated circuits readout system that is still under development. Special attention was paid to the double pixel (or charge sharing) detections. The following characteristics were obtained in experiment: energy resolution full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) is 7% for single pixel and 9% for double pixel photoelectric detections of 511 keV gammas; timing resolution (FWHM) from the anode signals is 30 ns for single pixel and 35 ns for double pixel detections (for photoelectric interactions only the corresponding values are 20 and 25 ns); position resolution is 350 μm in x,y-plane and ~0.4 mm in depth-of-interaction. The experimental measurements were accompanied by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to find a limitation imposed by spatial charge distribution. Results from MC simulations suggest the limitation of the intrinsic spatial resolution of the CdZnTe detector for 511 keV photoelectric interactions is 170 μm. The interpixel interpolation cannot recover the resolution beyond the limit mentioned above for photoelectric interactions. However, it is possible to achieve higher spatial resolution using interpolation for Compton scattered events. Energy and timing resolution of the proposed 350 μm anode pixel pitch detector is no better than 0.6% FWHM at 511 keV, and 2 ns FWHM, respectively. These MC results should be used as a guide to understand the performance limits of the pixelated CdZnTe detector due to the underlying detection processes, with the understanding of

  2. Progress in the Development of CdZnTe Unipolar Detectors for Different Anode Geometries and Data Corrections

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiushi; Zhang, Congzhe; Lu, Yanye; Yang, Kun; Ren, Qiushi

    2013-01-01

    CdZnTe detectors have been under development for the past two decades, providing good stopping power for gamma rays, lightweight camera heads and improved energy resolution. However, the performance of this type of detector is limited primarily by incomplete charge collection problems resulting from charge carriers trapping. This paper is a review of the progress in the development of CdZnTe unipolar detectors with some data correction techniques for improving performance of the detectors. We will first briefly review the relevant theories. Thereafter, two aspects of the techniques for overcoming the hole trapping issue are summarized, including irradiation direction configuration and pulse shape correction methods. CdZnTe detectors of different geometries are discussed in detail, covering the principal of the electrode geometry design, the design and performance characteristics, some detector prototypes development and special correction techniques to improve the energy resolution. Finally, the state of art development of 3-D position sensing and Compton imaging technique are also discussed. Spectroscopic performance of CdZnTe semiconductor detector will be greatly improved even to approach the statistical limit on energy resolution with the combination of some of these techniques. PMID:23429509

  3. High voltage optimization in CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadalla, S. A.; Al-Grafi, M.; Iniewski, K.

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this paper is to investigate, experimentally and theoretical, the optimum operating bias, in cadmium zinc telluride Cd 0.9Zn0.1Te (CZT) crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THM), required to achieve maximum energy resolution. It was found that 5 mm thick detectors that have low electron trapping, (μτ)e≥1×10-2 cm2/V, operates efficiently at relatively low applied bias, 200 V; while detectors with high electron trapping, (μτ)e≤5×10-3 cm2/V, required relative high voltage: as high as 1000 V for 5 mm thick detectors. Similarly 10 mm thick detectors can be operated at as low as 500 V. Moreover, both charge collection efficiency (CCE) and energy resolution(ER) were found to follow the same trend.

  4. Mini Compton Camera Based on an Array of Virtual Frisch-Grid CdZnTe Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonho; Bolotnikov, Aleksey; Lee, Taewoong; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; Gul, Rubi; Hossain, Anwar; Utpal, Roy; Yang, Ge; James, Ralph

    2016-02-15

    In this study, we constructed a mini Compton camera based on an array of CdZnTe detectors and assessed its spectral and imaging properties. The entire array consisted of 6×6 Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors, each with a size of 6×6 ×15 mm3. Since it is easier and more practical to grow small CdZnTe crystals rather than large monolithic ones, constructing a mosaic array of parallelepiped crystals can be an effective way to build a more efficient, large-volume detector. With the fully operational CdZnTe array, we measured the energy spectra for 133Ba -, 137Cs -, 60Co-radiation sources; we also located these sources using a Compton imaging approach. Although the Compton camera was small enough to hand-carry, its intrinsic efficiency was several orders higher than those generated in previous researches using spatially separated arrays, because our camera measured the interactions inside the CZT detector array, wherein the detector elements were positioned very close to each other. Lastly, the performance of our camera was compared with that based on a pixelated detector.

  5. Mini Compton Camera Based on an Array of Virtual Frisch-Grid CdZnTe Detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Wonho; Bolotnikov, Aleksey; Lee, Taewoong; ...

    2016-02-15

    In this study, we constructed a mini Compton camera based on an array of CdZnTe detectors and assessed its spectral and imaging properties. The entire array consisted of 6×6 Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors, each with a size of 6×6 ×15 mm3. Since it is easier and more practical to grow small CdZnTe crystals rather than large monolithic ones, constructing a mosaic array of parallelepiped crystals can be an effective way to build a more efficient, large-volume detector. With the fully operational CdZnTe array, we measured the energy spectra for 133Ba -, 137Cs -, 60Co-radiation sources; we also located these sources usingmore » a Compton imaging approach. Although the Compton camera was small enough to hand-carry, its intrinsic efficiency was several orders higher than those generated in previous researches using spatially separated arrays, because our camera measured the interactions inside the CZT detector array, wherein the detector elements were positioned very close to each other. Lastly, the performance of our camera was compared with that based on a pixelated detector.« less

  6. Analysis of Surface Chemistry and Detector Performance of Chemically Process CdZnTe crystals

    SciTech Connect

    HOSSAIN, A.; Yang, G.; Sutton, J.; Zergaw, T.; Babalola, O. S.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda. ZG. S.; Gul, R.; Roy, U. N., and James, R. B.

    2015-10-05

    The goal is to produce non-conductive smooth surfaces for fabricating low-noise and high-efficiency CdZnTe devices for gamma spectroscopy. Sample preparation and results are discussed. The researachers demonstrated various bulk defects (e.g., dislocations and sub-grain boundaries) and surface defects, and examined their effects on the performance of detectors. A comparison study was made between two chemical etchants to produce non-conductive smooth surfaces. A mixture of bromine and hydrogen peroxide proved more effective than conventional bromine etchant. Both energy resolution and detection efficiency of CZT planar detectors were noticeably increased after processing the detector crystals using improved chemical etchant and processing methods.

  7. Charge sharing in common-grid pixelated CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Cheon; Anderson, Stephen E.; Kaye, Willy; Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Yuefeng; Kaye, Sonal Joshi; He, Zhong

    2011-10-01

    The charge sharing effect in pixelated CdZnTe (CZT) detectors with a common anode steering grid has been studied. The impact on energy resolution of weighting potential cross-talk and ballistic deficit due to cathode signal shaping has been investigated. A detailed system modeling package considering charge induction, electronic noise, pulse shaping, and ASIC triggering procedures has been developed to study the characteristics of common-grid CZT detectors coupled to the VAS_UM/TAT4 ASIC. Besides an actual common-grid CZT detector coupled to VAS_UM/TAT4 ASIC, a prototype digital read-out system has been developed to better understand the nature of the charge sharing effect.

  8. New room temperature high resolution solid-state detector (CdZnTe) for hard x rays and gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Amyelizabeth C.; Desai, Upendra D.

    1993-01-01

    The new CdZnTe high 'Z' material represents a significant improvement in detectors for high energy photons. With the thicknesses available, photons up to 100 keV can be efficiently detected. This material has a wide band gap of 1.5 - 2.2 eV which allows it to operate at room temperature while providing high spectral resolution. Results of resolution evaluations are presented. This detector can be used for high resolution spectral measurements of photons in x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, offering a significant reduction in the weight, power, and volume of the detector system compared to more conventional detector types such as scintillation counters. In addition, the detector will have the simplicity and reliability of solid-state construction. The CdZnTe detector, as a new development, has not yet been evaluated in space. The Get Away Special program can provide this opportunity.

  9. Impact of sub-pixelation within CdZnTe detectors for x-ray diffraction imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabary, J.; Paulus, C.; Montémont, G.; Verger, L.

    2017-05-01

    X-ray diffraction is known to be an effective technique for illicit materials detection in baggage screening, as it can reveal molecular structural information of any solid substances but also of liquids, aerosols and gels. Some X-ray diffraction systems using 2D pixelated spectrometric detectors, such as CdZnTe detectors, are then able to perform 3D baggage scanning in time compatible with bag throughput constraints of airports. However, X-ray diffraction systems designed for baggage screening generally suffer from poor photon count statistics and bad spatial resolution, because of the tight collimations and the small scattering angle. To improve these factors, techniques of sub-pixelation can be implemented in CdZnTe detectors. Indeed, sub-pixelation enables to open the collimation without angular resolution degradation and also to segment the inspected volume in several sub-volumes, inducing a better spatial resolution in the X-ray beam direction. In this paper, we present some experiments demonstrating the interest of sub-pixelation within CdZnTe detectors for X-ray diffraction imaging systems. In particular, an experimental demonstration is presented with a 2D XRD image of a realistic baggage performed with only one single pixel from our own CdZnTe based imager.

  10. 3-D Spatial Resolution of 350 μm Pitch Pixelated CdZnTe Detectors for Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yongzhi; Chen, Ximeng; Wu, Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Garson, Alfred; Li, Qiang; Guo, Qingzhen; Krawczynski, Henric; Meng, Ling-Jian; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    We are currently investigating the feasibility of using highly pixelated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for sub-500 μm resolution PET imaging applications. A 20 mm × 20 mm × 5 mm CdZnTe substrate was fabricated with 350 μm pitch pixels (250 μm anode pixels with 100 μm gap) and coplanar cathode. Charge sharing among the pixels of a 350 μm pitch detector was studied using collimated 122 keV and 511 keV gamma ray sources. For a 350 μm pitch CdZnTe detector, scatter plots of the charge signal of two neighboring pixels clearly show more charge sharing when the collimated beam hits the gap between adjacent pixels. Using collimated Co-57 and Ge-68 sources, we measured the count profiles and estimated the intrinsic spatial resolution of 350 μm pitch detector biased at −1000 V. Depth of interaction was analyzed based on two methods, i.e., cathode/anode ratio and electron drift time, in both 122 keV and 511 keV measurements. For single-pixel photopeak events, a linear correlation between cathode/anode ratio and electron drift time was shown, which would be useful for estimating the DOI information and preserving image resolution in CdZnTe PET imaging applications. PMID:28250476

  11. Preliminary results from a novel CdZnTe linear pad detector array x-ray imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, J.; Tuemer, T.O.; Petrini, B.M.; Kravis, S.D.; Yin, S.; Parnham, K.B.; Glick, B.; Willson, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    The excellent energy-resolution and short charge collection time, especially the possibility of room temperature operation, make CdZnTe semiconductor detectors an excellent candidate for x-ray imaging and spectroscopic application in nuclear physics. Because of these characteristics, CdZnTe pad detectors with a novel geometry and approximately 1 mm{sup 2} pad area have been developed. These pad type linear arrays are new and important for many scanning type applications using a wide energy range from about 10 to 300 keV energies. A prototype x-ray imaging system has been developed consisting of a state-of-the-art pad type linear array of CdZnTe detectors manufactured by eV Products and low noise readout electronics developed by NOVA R and D, Inc. A series of measurements on the temperature dependence of the performance of CdZnTe linear pad detector arrays has been performed at NOVA R and D, Inc. The changes in dark (leakage) current against temperature have been studied. High resolution x-ray spectra has been obtained using {sup 57}Co source at different temperatures. A low noise front-end electronics ASIC chip for reading out the detector array was developed that can achieve fast data acquisition with dual energy imaging capability. Several prototype CdZnTe pad detector arrays are placed next to each other to form an approximately 30 cm long linear array. This array is used to make preliminary dual energy scanned images of complex objects using a 90 kV x-ray generator. Some of the images will be presented. The results show that the system is excellent for applications in industrial and medical imaging.

  12. Evaluation of CdZnTe as neutron detector around medical accelerators.

    PubMed

    Martín-Martín, A; Iñiguez, M P; Luke, P N; Barquero, R; Lorente, A; Morchón, J; Gallego, E; Quincoces, G; Martí-Climent, J M

    2009-02-01

    The operation of electron linear accelerators (LINACs) and cyclotrons can produce a mixed gamma-neutron field composed of energetic neutrons coming directly from the source and scattered lower energy neutrons. The thermal neutron detection properties of a non-moderated coplanar-grid CdZnTe (CZT) gamma-ray detector close to an 18 MV electron LINAC and an 18 MeV proton cyclotron producing the radioisotope (18)F for positron emission tomography are investigated. The two accelerators are operated at conditions producing similar thermal neutron fluence rates of the order of 10(4) cm(-2) s(-1) at the measurement locations. The counting efficiency of the CZT detector using the prompt 558 keV photopeak following (113)Cd thermal neutron capture is evaluated and a good neutron detection performance is found at the two installations.

  13. Characterization of detector grade CdZnTe material from Redlen Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, Martine C.; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael; Buliga, Vladimir; Bradley, John P.; Dai, Zurong R.; Teslich, Nick; Black, David R.; Awadalla, Salah A.; Mackenzie, Jason; Chen, Henry

    2008-10-24

    CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. This large band gap material shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. Historically, the performance of CZT has typically been adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity) and secondary phases (SP). The synthesis of CZT material has improved greatly with the primary performance limitation being attributed to mainly SP. In this presentation, we describe the extensive characterization of detector grade material that has been treated with post growth annealing to remove the SPs. Some of the analytical methods used in this study included polarized, cross polarized and transmission IR imaging, I-V curves measurements, synchrotron X-ray topography and electron microscopy.

  14. Charge-sensitive front-end electronics with operational amplifiers for CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Födisch, P.; Berthel, M.; Lange, B.; Kirschke, T.; Enghardt, W.; Kaever, P.

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe, CZT) radiation detectors are suitable for a variety of applications, due to their high spatial resolution and spectroscopic energy performance at room temperature. However, state-of-the-art detector systems require high-performance readout electronics. Though an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is an adequate solution for the readout, requirements of high dynamic range and high throughput are not available in any commercial circuit. Consequently, the present study develops the analog front-end electronics with operational amplifiers for an 8×8 pixelated CZT detector. For this purpose, we modeled an electrical equivalent circuit of the CZT detector with the associated charge-sensitive amplifier (CSA). Based on a detailed network analysis, the circuit design is completed by numerical values for various features such as ballistic deficit, charge-to-voltage gain, rise time, and noise level. A verification of the performance is carried out by synthetic detector signals and a pixel detector. The experimental results with the pixel detector assembly and a 22Na radioactive source emphasize the depth dependence of the measured energy. After pulse processing with depth correction based on the fit of the weighting potential, the energy resolution is 2.2% (FWHM) for the 511 keV photopeak.

  15. Influence of infrared stimulation on spectroscopy characteristics of co-planar grid CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fjodorov, V.; Ivanov, V.; Loutchanski, A.

    2015-07-01

    It was previously found that illumination with monochromatic infrared (IR) light with wavelengths close to the absorption edge of the CdZnTe exert significant positive influence on the spectrometric characteristics of quasi-hemispherical CdZnTe detectors at room temperature. In this paper, preliminary results of IR stimulation on the spectrometric characteristics of coplanar-grid CdZnTe detectors as well as results of further studies of planar and quasi-hemispherical detectors are presented. Coplanar-grid detectors of 10 mm x 10 mm x 10 mm from Redlen Technologies and commercial available IR LEDs with different wavelengths of 800-1000 nm were used in the experiments. Influence of intensity and direction of IR illumination on the detector's characteristics was studied. Analysis of signals shapes from the preamplifiers outputs at registration of alpha particles showed that IR illumination leads to a change in the shapes of these signals. This may indicate changes in electric fields distributions. An improvement in energy resolution at gamma-energy of 662 keV was observed with quasi-hemispherical and co-planar detectors at the certain levels of IR illumination intensity. The most noticeable effect of IR stimulation was observed with quasi-hemispherical detectors. It is due with optimization of charge collection conditions in the quasi-hemispherical detectors under IT stimulation. (authors)

  16. Properties of CdZnTe detectors in the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Goro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Shin; Tashiro, Makoto; Suzuki, Masaya; Okada, Yu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Parsons, Ann M.; Tueller, Jack; Krimm, Hans; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Cummings, Jay; Markwardt, Craig; Hullinger, Derek D.; Gehrels, Neil A.; Fenimore, Edward E.; Palmer, David; Dean, Anthony J.; Willis, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The properties of 32k CdZnTe detectors have been studied in the pre-flight calibration of Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on-board the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer (scheduled for launch in January 2004). After corrections of the linearity and the gain, the energy resolution of summed spectrum is 7.0 keV (FWHM) at 122~keV. In order to construct response matrices for the BAT instrument, we extracted mobility-lifetime (μτ) products for electrons and holes in the CdZnTe. Based on a new method applied to 57Co spectra taken at different bias voltages, μτ for electrons ranges from 5.0x10-4 to 1.0x10-2cm2V-1, while μτ for holes ranges from 1.0x10-5 to 1.7x10-4cm2V-1. We show that the distortion of the spectrum and the peak efficiency of the BAT instrument are well reproduced by the μτ database constructed in the calibration.

  17. Control of electric field in CdZnTe radiation detectors by above-bandgap light

    SciTech Connect

    Franc, J.; Dědič, V.; Rejhon, M.; Zázvorka, J.; Praus, P.; Touš, J.; Sellin, P. J.

    2015-04-28

    We have studied the possibility of above bandgap light induced depolarization of CdZnTe planar radiation detector operating under high flux of X-rays by Pockels effect measurements. In this contribution, we show a similar influence of X-rays at 80 kVp and LED with a wavelength of 910 nm irradiating the cathode on polarization of the detector due to an accumulation of a positive space charge of trapped photo-generated holes. We have observed the depolarization of the detector under simultaneous cathode-site illumination with excitation LED at 910 nm and depolarization above bandgap LED at 640 nm caused by trapping of drifting photo-generated electrons. Although the detector current is quite high during this depolarization, we have observed that it decreases relatively fast to its initial value after switching off the depolarizing light. In order to get detailed information about physical processes present during polarization and depolarization and, moreover, about associated deep levels, we have performed the Pockels effect infrared spectral scanning measurements of the detector without illumination and under illumination in polarized and optically depolarized states.

  18. Analytical model for event reconstruction in coplanar grid CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, Matthew; Durst, Jürgen; Göpfert, Thomas; Wester, Thomas; Zuber, Kai

    2013-04-01

    Coplanar-grid (CPG) particle detectors were designed for materials such as CdZnTe (CZT) in which charge carriers of only one sign have acceptable transport properties. The presence of two independent anode signals allows for a reconstruction of deposited energy based on the difference between the two signals, and a reconstruction of the interaction depth based on the ratio of the amplitudes of the sum and difference of the signals. Energy resolution is greatly improved by modifying the difference signal with an empirically determined weighting factor to correct for the effects of electron trapping. This paper introduces a modified interaction depth reconstruction formula which corrects for electron trapping utilizing the same weighting factor used for energy reconstruction. The improvement of this depth reconstruction over simpler formulas is demonstrated. Further corrections due to the contribution of hole transport to the signals are discussed.

  19. Experimental study of double-{beta} decay modes using a CdZnTe detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J. V.; Goessling, C.; Koettig, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Rajek, S.; Schulz, O.; Janutta, B.; Zuber, K.; Junker, M.; Reeve, C.; Wilson, J. R.

    2009-08-15

    An array of sixteen 1 cm{sup 3} CdZnTe semiconductor detectors was operated at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS) to further investigate the feasibility of double-{beta} decay searches with such devices. As one of the double-{beta} decay experiments with the highest granularity the 4x4 array accumulated an overall exposure of 18 kg days. The setup and performance of the array is described. Half-life limits for various double-{beta} decay modes of Cd, Zn, and Te isotopes are obtained. No signal has been found, but several limits beyond 10{sup 20} years have been performed. They are an order of magnitude better than those obtained with this technology before and comparable to most other experimental approaches for the isotopes under investigation. An improved limit for the {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of {sup 120}Te is given.

  20. Application of CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detector for Imaging Corrosion under Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, J.; Yahya, R.

    2007-05-09

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) on the external wall of steel pipes is a common problem in many types of industrial plants. This is mainly due to the presence of moisture or water in the insulation materials. This type of corrosion can cause failures in areas that are not normally of a primary concern to an inspection program. The failures are often the result of localised corrosion and not general wasting over a large area. These failures can tee catastrophic in nature or at least have an adverse economic effect in terms of downtime and repairs. There are a number of techniques used today for CUI investigations. The main ones are profile radiography, pulse eddy current, ultrasonic spot readings and insulation removal. A new system now available is portable Pipe-CUI-Profiler. The nucleonic system is based on dual-beam gamma-ray absorption technique using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) semiconductor detectors. The Pipe-CUI-Profiler is designed to inspect pipes of internal diameter 50, 65, 80, 90, 100, 125 and 150 mm. Pipeline of these sizes with aluminium or thin steel sheathing, containing fibreglass or calcium silicate insulation to thickness of 25, 40 and 50 mm can be inspected. The system has proven to be a safe, fast and effective method of inspecting pipe in industrial plant operations. This paper describes the application of gamma-ray techniques and CdZnTe semiconductor detectors in the development of Pipe-CUI-Profiler for non-destructive imaging of corrosion under insulation of steel pipes. Some results of actual pipe testing in large-scale industrial plant will be presented.

  1. Time of flight experimental studies of CdZnTe radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, J. C.; Yao, H. W.; James, R. B.; Hermon, H.; Greaves, M.

    2000-06-01

    A time of flight technique was used to study the carrier trapping time, τ, and mobility, μ, in CdZnTe (CZT) and CdTe radiation detectors. Carriers were generated near the surface of the detector by a nitrogen-pumped pulsed dye laser with wavelength ˜500 nm. Signals from generated electrons or holes were measured by a fast oscilloscope and analyzed to determine the trapping time and mobility of carriers. Electron mobility was observed to change with temperature from 1200 cm2/Vs to 2400 cm2/Vs between 293 K and 138 K, respectively. Electron mobilities were observed between 900 cm2/Vs and 1350 cm2/Vs at room temperature for various CZT detectors. Electron mobilities in various CdTe detectors at room temperature were observed between 740 cm2/Vs and 1260 cm2/Vs. Average electron mobility was calculated to be 1120 cm2/Vs and 945 cm2/Vs for CZT and CdTe, respectively. Hole mobilities in both CZT and CdTe were found to vary between 27 cm2/Vs and 66 cm2/Vs. Electron trapping times in CZT at room temperature varied from 1.60 µs to 4.18 µs with an average value of about 2.5 µs. Electron trapping time in CdTe at room temperature varied between 1.7 µs and 4.15 µs with an average value of about 3.1 µs.

  2. Detector Performance of Ammonium-Sulfide-Passivated CdZnTe and CdMnTe Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.H.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Marchini, L.; Yang, G.; Hossain, A.; Cui, Y.; Xu, L.; and James, R.B.

    2010-08-01

    Dark currents, including those in the surface and bulk, are the leading source of electronic noise in X-ray and gamma detectors, and are responsible for degrading a detector's energy resolution. The detector material itself determines the bulk leakage current; however, the surface leakage current is controllable by depositing appropriate passivation layers. In previous research, we demonstrated the effectiveness of surface passivation in CZT (CdZnTe) and CMT (CdMnTe) materials using ammonium sulfide and ammonium fluoride. In this research, we measured the effect of such passivation on the surface states of these materials, and on the performances of detectors made from them.

  3. Characterization of detector-grade CdZnTe crystals grown by traveling heater method (THM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadalla, S. A.; Mackenzie, J.; Chen, H.; Redden, B.; Bindley, G.; Duff, M. C.; Burger, A.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.; Bradley, J. P.; Dai, Z. R.; Teslich, N.; Black, D. R.

    2010-02-01

    This work focuses on the 3. Resultsanddiscussioncharacterization of 10×10×10 mm 3 THM-grown CdZnTe detector-grade crystals that have been post-growth annealed to remove the secondary phases (SPs). All three detectors showed an average energy resolution of ˜1.63% for a small guarded pixel with 3.5 mm diameter, measured using 137Cs—662 keV with an average peak-to-Compton ratio of 2.7. The characterization showed vestiges of SPs and micro-twins present in some of the crystals indicating that the SPs prior to annealing were large and had size in the range of 100-500 μm. The various detectable structural features, such as micron twins, strains and sub-micron level of Te inclusions seemed to have little or no influence in the radiation spectrometer performance of the detectors; this is possibly because they are either having low density or electrically inactive.

  4. CdZnTe position-sensitive drift detectors with thicknesses up to 5 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A. E. Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.; Chen, E.; MacKenzie, J. M.; Taherion, S.; El-hanany, U.; Cheng, S.; Gallagher, R.; Dedic, V.; Ocampo Giraldo, L.; Sellin, P.

    2016-02-29

    We investigated the feasibility of long-drift-time CdZnTe (CZT) gamma-ray detectors, fabricated from CZT material produced by Redlen Technologies. CZT crystals with cross-section areas of 5 × 5 mm{sup 2} and 6 × 6 mm{sup 2} and thicknesses of 20-, 30-, 40-, and 50-mm were configured as 3D position-sensitive drift detectors and were read out using a front-end ASIC. By correcting the electron charge losses caused by defects in the crystals, we demonstrated high performance for relatively thick detectors fabricated from unselected CZT material.

  5. Evaluation of ZnO:Al as a contact material to CdZnTe for radiation detector applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Utpal N.; Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Cui, Yonggang; Gul, Rubi; Hossain, Anwar; Yang, Ge; James, Ralph B.; Pradhan, Aswini K.; Mundle, Rajeh

    2016-09-01

    Aluminum (Al) doped ZnO with very high Al concentration acts as metal regarding its electrical conductivity. ZnO offers many advantages over the commonly-known metals being used today as electrode materials for nuclear detector fabrication. Often, the common metals show poor adhesion to CdZnTe or CdTe surfaces and have a tendency to peel off. In addition, there is a large mismatch of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between the metals and underlying CdZnTe, which is one of the reasons for mechanical degradation of the contact. In contrast ZnO has a close match of the CTE with CdZnTe and possesses 8-20 times higher hardness than the commonly-used metals. In this presentation, we will explore and discuss the properties of CdZnTe detectors with ZnO:Al contacts.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF PD IMPURITIES AND TWIN BOUNDARY DEFECTS IN DETECTOR GRADE CDZNTE CRYSTALS

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M.

    2011-06-22

    Synthetic CdZnTe or ''CZT'' crystals are highly suitable for {gamma}-spectrometers operating at the room temperature. Secondary phases (SP) in CZT are known to inhibit detector performance, particularly when they are present in large numbers or dimensions. These SP may exist as voids or composites of non-cubic phase metallic Te layers with bodies of polycrystalline and amorphous CZT material and voids. Defects associated with crystal twining may also influence detector performance in CZT. Using transmission electron microscopy, we identify two types of defects that are on the nano scale. The first defect consists of 40 nm diameter metallic Pd/Te bodies on the grain boundaries of Te-rich composites. Although the nano-Pd/Te bodies around these composites may be unique to the growth source of this CZT material, noble metal impurities like these may contribute to SP formation in CZT. The second defect type consists of atom-scale grain boundary dislocations. Specifically, these involve inclined ''finite-sized'' planar defects or interfaces between layers of atoms that are associated with twins. Finite-sized twins may be responsible for the subtle but observable striations that can be seen with optical birefringence imaging and synchrotron X-ray topographic imaging.

  7. Cumulative effects of Te precipitates in CdZnTe radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Carini, G. A.; Cui, Y.; Li, L.; James, R. B.

    2007-02-01

    High-quality radiation detector-grade CdZnTe material is free from large-scale defects, such as grain boundaries, twins, and large Te or Cd inclusions (>50 μm), although it usually contains high concentrations of uniformly distributed Te inclusions and precipitates, typically of ˜20-μm-diameter size or smaller. We address the effects of the small-size Te precipitates on charge collection in CZT detectors, the significance of which is not yet well characterized. The strong correlation that we earlier found between the high-resolution X-ray maps and IR images proved that even small Te precipitates can trap substantial fractions of charge from the electron cloud. In this work, we modeled the transport of an electron cloud across idealized CZT devices containing Te precipitates to demonstrate that their cumulative effect can explain the degradation of energy resolution and the detection efficiency losses observed in actual CZT devices. Due to lack of experimental data on how the Te precipitates interact with an electron cloud, we developed a simplified (phenomenological) model based on the geometrical aspects of the problem. Despite its simplicity, the model correctly reproduced many experimental facts and gave quantitative predictions on the extent to which the presence of Te precipitates and inclusions can be tolerated. The broadening of the electron cloud due to repulsion and diffusion is at the core of the problem, making even low concentrations of small precipitates important in the device's performance.

  8. Progress in the Development of CdTe and CdZnTe Semiconductor Radiation Detectors for Astrophysical and Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sordo, Stefano Del; Abbene, Leonardo; Caroli, Ezio; Mancini, Anna Maria; Zappettini, Andrea; Ubertini, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) wide band gap semiconductors have attracted increasing interest as X-ray and gamma ray detectors. Among the traditional high performance spectrometers based on silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge), CdTe and CdZnTe detectors show high detection efficiency and good room temperature performance and are well suited for the development of compact and reliable detection systems. In this paper, we review the current status of research in the development of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors by a comprehensive survey on the material properties, the device characteristics, the different techniques for improving the overall detector performance and some major applications. Astrophysical and medical applications are discussed, pointing out the ongoing Italian research activities on the development of these detectors. PMID:22412323

  9. Progress in the Development of CdTe and CdZnTe Semiconductor Radiation Detectors for Astrophysical and Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    Sordo, Stefano Del; Abbene, Leonardo; Caroli, Ezio; Mancini, Anna Maria; Zappettini, Andrea; Ubertini, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) wide band gap semiconductors have attracted increasing interest as X-ray and gamma ray detectors. Among the traditional high performance spectrometers based on silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge), CdTe and CdZnTe detectors show high detection efficiency and good room temperature performance and are well suited for the development of compact and reliable detection systems. In this paper, we review the current status of research in the development of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors by a comprehensive survey on the material properties, the device characteristics, the different techniques for improving the overall detector performance and some major applications. Astrophysical and medical applications are discussed, pointing out the ongoing Italian research activities on the development of these detectors.

  10. Signal modeling of charge sharing effect in simple pixelated CdZnTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Cheon; Kaye, William R.; He, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    In order to study the energy resolution degradation in 3D position-sensitive pixelated CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, a detailed detector system modeling package has been developed and used to analyze the detector performance. A 20 × 20 × 15 mm3 CZT crystal with an 11 × 11 simple-pixel anode array and a 1.72 mm pixel pitch was modeled. The VAS UM/TAT4 Application Specific Integrated Circuitry (ASIC) was used for signal read-out. Components of the simulation package include gamma-ray interactions with the CZT crystal, charge induction, electronic noise, pulse shaping, and ASIC triggering procedures. The charge induction model considers charge drift, trapping, diffusion, and sharing between pixels. This system model is used to determine the effects of electron cloud sharing, weighting potential non-uniformity, and weighting potential cross-talk which produce non-uniform signal responses for different gamma-ray interaction positions and ultimately degrade energy resolution. The effect of the decreased weighting potential underneath the gap between pixels on the total pulse amplitude of events has been studied. The transient signals induced by electron clouds collected near the gap between pixels may generate false signals, and the measured amplitude can be even greater than the photopeak. As the number of pixels that collect charge increases, the probability of side-neighbor events due to charge sharing significantly increases. If side-neighbor events are not corrected appropriately, the energy resolution of pixelated CZT detectors in multiple-pixel events degrades rapidly.

  11. Effects of Te inclusions on charge-carrier transport properties in CdZnTe radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yaxu; Rong, Caicai; Xu, Yadong; Shen, Hao; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Ning; Lv, Haoyan; Li, Xinyi; Wei, Dengke; Jie, Wanqi

    2015-01-01

    The influence of tellurium (Te) inclusions on the charge collection efficiency in cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) detectors has been investigated using ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique. Combining the analysis of infrared transmittance image, most of the low charge collection areas in the IBIC images prove the existence of Te inclusions. To further clarify the role of Te inclusions on charge transport properties, bias dependent local IBIC scan was performed on Te inclusion related regions from 20 V to 500 V. The result shows that charge collection efficiencies in Te inclusion degraded regions experience fast ascent under low biases and slow descent at high applied biases, which deviates from Hecht rule. This behavior is attributed to the competitive influence of two mechanisms under different biases, namely charge carrier trapping due to uniformly distributed point defects and Te inclusion induced transient charge loss. A modified Hecht equation is further proposed to explain the effects of high-density localized defects, say Te inclusions, on the charge collection efficiency.

  12. Use of high-granularity position sensing to correct response non-uniformities of CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A. E. Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Mahler, G.; Maritato, M.; Marshall, M.; Roy, U.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.; Lee, K.; Petryk, M.

    2014-06-30

    CdZnTe (CZT) is a promising medium for room-temperature gamma-ray detectors. However, the low production yield of acceptable quality crystals hampers the use of CZT detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Significant efforts have been directed towards improving quality of CZT crystals to make them generally available for radiation detectors. Another way to address this problem is to implement detector designs that would allow for more accurate and predictable correction of the charge loss associated with crystal defects. In this work, we demonstrate that high-granularity position-sensitive detectors can significantly improve the performance of CZT detectors fabricated from CZT crystals with wider acceptance boundaries, leading to an increase of their availability and expected decrease in cost.

  13. Influence of the thickness of a crystal on the electrical characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sklyarchuk, V.; Fochuk, p.; Rarenko, I.; Zakharuk, Z.; Sklyarchuk, O. F.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; James, R. B.

    2015-08-01

    We studied the electrical characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te detectors with rectifying contacts and varying thicknesses, and established that their geometrical dimensions affect the measured electrical properties. We found that the maximum value of the operating-bias voltage and the electric field in the detector for acceptable values of the dark current can be achieved when the crystal has an optimum thickness. This finding is due to the combined effect of generation-recombination in the space-charge region and space-charge limited currents (SCLC).

  14. Point Defects in Pb-, Bi-, and In-Doped CdZnTe Detectors: Deep-Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, R.; Keeter, K.; Rodriguez, R.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Hossain, A.; Camarda, G. S.; Kim, K. H.; Yang, G.; Cui, Y.; Carcelen, V.; Franc, J.; Li, Z.; James, R. B.

    2012-03-01

    We studied, by current deep-level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS), point defects induced in CdZnTe detectors by three dopants: Pb, Bi, and In. Pb-doped CdZnTe detectors have a new acceptor trap at around 0.48 eV. The absence of a VCd trap suggests that all Cd vacancies are compensated by Pb interstitials after they form a deep-acceptor complex [[PbCd]+-V{Cd/2-}]-. Bi-doped CdZnTe detectors had two distinct traps: a shallow trap at around 36 meV and a deep donor trap at around 0.82 eV. In detectors doped with In, we noted three well-known traps: two acceptor levels at around 0.18 eV (A-centers) and 0.31 eV (VCd), and a deep trap at around 1.1 eV.

  15. Development of CDZNTE Detectors for Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.

    1999-01-01

    Under this grant the UC Berkeley PI, K. Hurley, joined a Goddard-led effort to develop large area, multi-pixel Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe, or CZT) detectors for gamma-ray astronomy. His task was to advise the project of new developments in the area of cosmic gamma-ray bursts, in order to focus the detector development effort on the construction of an instrument which could be deployed on a spacecraft to localize and measure the energy spectra of bursts with good angular and energy resolution, respectively. UC Berkeley had no hardware role in this proposal. The result of this effort was the production, at Goddard, of five CZT prototype modules. A proposal was written for SWIFT, a MIDEX mission to study cosmic gamma-ray bursts. One experiment aboard SWIFT is the Burst Arcminute Telescope (BAT), which consists of a 5200 sq cm hard X-ray detector and a coded mask. The detector comprises 256 CZT modules, each containing 128 4 x 4 x 2 mm CZT detectors. Each detector is read out using an ASIC. The angular resolution achieved with this mask/array combination is 22 arcminutes, and a strong gamma-ray burst can be localized to an accuracy of 4 arcminutes in under 10 seconds. The energy resolution is typically 5 keV FWHM at 60 keV, and the energy range is 10 - 150 keV. The BAT views 2 steradians, and its sensitivity is such that the instrument can detect 350 gamma-ray burst/year, localizing 320 of them to better than 4 arcminute accuracy. The BAT concept therefore met the science goals for gamma-ray bursts. The UCB effort in the SWIFT proposal included the scientific objectives for gamma-ray bursts, and the assembly of a team of optical and radio observers who would use the BAT data to perform rapid multi-wavelength searches for the counterparts to bursts. This proposal was submitted to NASA and peer-reviewed. In January 1999 it was one of five such proposals selected for a Phase A study. This study was completed in June, and SWIFT was formally presented to NASA in

  16. Development of CDZNTE Detectors for Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.

    1999-01-01

    Under this grant the UC Berkeley PI, K. Hurley, joined a Goddard-led effort to develop large area, multi-pixel Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe, or CZT) detectors for gamma-ray astronomy. His task was to advise the project of new developments in the area of cosmic gamma-ray bursts, in order to focus the detector development effort on the construction of an instrument which could be deployed on a spacecraft to localize and measure the energy spectra of bursts with good angular and energy resolution, respectively. UC Berkeley had no hardware role in this proposal. The result of this effort was the production, at Goddard, of five CZT prototype modules. A proposal was written for SWIFT, a MIDEX mission to study cosmic gamma-ray bursts. One experiment aboard SWIFT is the Burst Arcminute Telescope (BAT), which consists of a 5200 sq cm hard X-ray detector and a coded mask. The detector comprises 256 CZT modules, each containing 128 4 x 4 x 2 mm CZT detectors. Each detector is read out using an ASIC. The angular resolution achieved with this mask/array combination is 22 arcminutes, and a strong gamma-ray burst can be localized to an accuracy of 4 arcminutes in under 10 seconds. The energy resolution is typically 5 keV FWHM at 60 keV, and the energy range is 10 - 150 keV. The BAT views 2 steradians, and its sensitivity is such that the instrument can detect 350 gamma-ray burst/year, localizing 320 of them to better than 4 arcminute accuracy. The BAT concept therefore met the science goals for gamma-ray bursts. The UCB effort in the SWIFT proposal included the scientific objectives for gamma-ray bursts, and the assembly of a team of optical and radio observers who would use the BAT data to perform rapid multi-wavelength searches for the counterparts to bursts. This proposal was submitted to NASA and peer-reviewed. In January 1999 it was one of five such proposals selected for a Phase A study. This study was completed in June, and SWIFT was formally presented to NASA in

  17. An effect of the networks of the subgrain boundaries on spectral responses of thick CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A.; Butcher, J.; Camarda, G.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S.; Fochuk, P.; Gul,R.; Hamade, M.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Kopach,O.; Petryk, M.; Raghothamachar, B.; Yang, G.; and James, R.B.

    2011-08-12

    CdZnTe (CZT) crystals used for nuclear-radiation detectors often contain high concentrations of subgrain boundaries and networks of poligonized dislocations that can significantly degrade the performance of semiconductor devices. These defects exist in all commercial CZT materials, regardless of their growth techniques and their vendor. We describe our new results from examining such detectors using IR transmission microscopy and white X-ray beam diffraction topography. We emphasize the roles on the devices performances of networks of subgrain boundaries with low dislocation densities, such as poligonized dislocations and mosaic structures. Specifically, we evaluated their effects on the gamma-ray responses of thick, >10 mm, CZT detectors. Our findings set the lower limit on the energy resolution of CZT detectors containing dense networks of subgrain boundaries, and walls of dislocations.

  18. Electronics System for the GammaTracker Handheld CdZnTe Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Myjak, Mitchell J.; Morris, Scott J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; McCann, Jason M.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Rohrer, John S.; Burghard, Brion J.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2007-12-31

    We are currently developing a handheld radioisotope identifier containing eighteen position-sensitive CdZnTe crystals. In addition to isotope identification, the device performs basic Compton imaging to determine the location of suspected sources. This paper gives an overview of the electronics system we have designed for this instrument. We use specialized application-specific integrated circuits to preprocess the outputs of each CdZnTe crystal. A low-power microprocessor running Windows CE drives the user interface and implements the isotope identification and directionality computations. Finally, we use a field-programmable gate array to perform the computationally intensive imaging tasks in real time.

  19. Novel ZnO:Al contacts to CdZnTe for X- and gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, U. N.; Mundle, R. M.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Pradhan, A. K.; James, R. B.

    2016-05-01

    CdZnTe (CZT) has made a significant impact as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors due to its potential impact in applications related to nonproliferation, homeland security, medical imaging, and gamma-ray telescopes. In all such applications, common metals, such as gold, platinum and indium, have been used as electrodes for fabricating the detectors. Because of the large mismatch in the thermal-expansion coefficient between the metal contacts and CZT, the contacts can undergo stress and mechanical degradation, which is the main cause for device instability over the long term. Here, we report for the first time on our use of Al-doped ZnO as the preferred electrode for such detectors. The material was selected because of its better contact properties compared to those of the metals commonly used today. Comparisons were conducted for the detector properties using different contacts, and improvements in the performances of ZnO:Al-coated detectors are described in this paper. These studies show that Al:ZnO contacts to CZT radiation detectors offer the potential of becoming a transformative replacement for the common metallic contacts due to the dramatic improvements in the performance of detectors and improved long-term stability.

  20. Novel ZnO:Al contacts to CdZnTe for X- and gamma-ray detectors

    PubMed Central

    Roy, U. N.; Mundle, R. M.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Pradhan, A. K.; James, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    CdZnTe (CZT) has made a significant impact as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors due to its potential impact in applications related to nonproliferation, homeland security, medical imaging, and gamma-ray telescopes. In all such applications, common metals, such as gold, platinum and indium, have been used as electrodes for fabricating the detectors. Because of the large mismatch in the thermal-expansion coefficient between the metal contacts and CZT, the contacts can undergo stress and mechanical degradation, which is the main cause for device instability over the long term. Here, we report for the first time on our use of Al-doped ZnO as the preferred electrode for such detectors. The material was selected because of its better contact properties compared to those of the metals commonly used today. Comparisons were conducted for the detector properties using different contacts, and improvements in the performances of ZnO:Al-coated detectors are described in this paper. These studies show that Al:ZnO contacts to CZT radiation detectors offer the potential of becoming a transformative replacement for the common metallic contacts due to the dramatic improvements in the performance of detectors and improved long-term stability. PMID:27216387

  1. New developments in clinical applications of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber, C.

    1996-10-01

    This review about the medical applications of CdTe and CdZnTe is an update on the 1992 paper [1]. This new paper is legitimized by the recent progress which has been made in this field. First of all, the usefulness of a new material, i.e. CdZnTe, has been demonstrated. While the two materials are still being improved, it seems as yet too early to debate which of CdTe:Cl or CdZnTe will be the best choice. Historical applications span over the past 18 years, involving devices like miniature probes for per-operative scintigraphy or the monitoring of physiological functions and, closer to us, appliances dedicated to bone densitometry, and have been expanding as such devices have become commercially available, for many years now. Newly available microelectronic circuitry allows 2D-arrays to be built for digital quantitative X-ray (chest, dental …) and for high-resolution gamma cameras. The clinical demand is very high, especially in the field of nuclear medicine. Although there already exist clinical demonstrators, the future of such CdTe applications depends on further reduction in material and device mounting costs. New perspectives concern XCT applications, but the data resulting from research work are kept for restricted use within industrial R&D laboratories.

  2. A semi-analytic approximation of charge induction in monolithic pixelated CdZnTe radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, Derek S.

    2010-03-01

    A semi-analytic approximation to the weighting potential within monolithic pixelated CdZnTe radiation detectors is presented. The approximation is based on solving the multi-dimensional Laplace equation that results upon replacing rectangular pixels with equal-area circular pixels. Further, we utilize the simplicity of the resulting approximate weighting potential to extend the well-known Hecht equation, describing charge induction in a parallel plate detector, to that approximating the multi-dimensional charge induction within a pixelated detector. These newly found expressions for the weighting potential and charge induction in a pixelated detector are compared throughout to full 3D electrostatic and monte carlo simulations using eV DSIM ( eV Microelectronics Device SIMulator). The semi-analytic expressions derived in this paper can be evaluated quickly, and can therefore be used to efficiently reduce the size and dimensionality of the parameter space on which a detailed 3D numerical analysis is needed for pixelated detector design in a wide range of applications.

  3. Analysis of Te and TeO2 on CdZnTe Nuclear Detectors Treated with Hydrogen Bromide and Ammonium-Based Solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Drabo, Mebougna L.; Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Okwechime, Ifechukwude O.; ...

    2017-04-30

    Surface defects caused during cutting and polishing in the fabrication of cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) nuclear detectors limit their spectral performance. Chemical treatments are often used to remove surface damages and defects. In this paper, we present the analysis of Te and TeO2 species on the surfaces of CdZnTe nuclear detectors treated with hydrogen bromide and ammonium-based solutions. The CdZnTe wafers were chemo-mechanically polished in a mixture of hydrogen bromide in hydrogen peroxide and ethylene glycol, followed by a chemical passivation in a mixture of ammonium fluoride and hydrogen peroxide solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed significant conversion of Te tomore » TeO2, thus producing a more chemically stable surface. The resistivity of the CdZnTe samples is in the order of 1010 ohms-cm. The current for a given applied voltage increased following the passivation and decreased after a 3-hour period. Results from spectral response measurements showed that the 59.5-keV gamma-peak of Am-241 was stable under the same channel for the surface treatment processes.« less

  4. Performance comparison of small-pixel CdZnTe radiation detectors with gold contacts formed by sputter and electroless deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, S. J.; Baker, M. A.; Duarte, D. D.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Sellin, P. J.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.

    2017-06-01

    Recent improvements in the growth of wide-bandgap semiconductors, such as cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT), has enabled spectroscopic X/γ-ray imaging detectors to be developed. These detectors have applications covering homeland security, industrial analysis, space science and medical imaging. At the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) a promising range of spectroscopic, position sensitive, small-pixel Cd(Zn)Te detectors have been developed. The challenge now is to improve the quality of metal contacts on CdZnTe in order to meet the demanding energy and spatial resolution requirements of these applications. The choice of metal deposition method and fabrication process are of fundamental importance. Presented is a comparison of two CdZnTe detectors with contacts formed by sputter and electroless deposition. The detectors were fabricated with a 74 × 74 array of 200 μm pixels on a 250 μm pitch and bump-bonded to the HEXITEC ASIC. The X/γ-ray emissions from an 241Am source were measured to form energy spectra for comparison. It was found that the detector with contacts formed by electroless deposition produced the best uniformity and energy resolution; the best pixel produced a FWHM of 560 eV at 59.54 keV and 50% of pixels produced a FWHM better than 1.7 keV . This compared with a FWHM of 1.5 keV for the best pixel and 50% of pixels better than 4.4 keV for the detector with sputtered contacts.

  5. Use of Sub-bandgap Illumination to Improve Radiation Detector Resolution of CdZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, Martine C.; Washington, Aaron L.; Teague, Lucile C.; Wright, Jonathan S.; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael; Buliga, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    The performance of Cd1- x Zn x Te (CZT) materials for room-temperature gamma/x-ray radiation detection continues to improve in terms of material quality and detector design. In our prior publications, we investigated the use of multiple wavelengths of light (in the visible and infrared) to target charge carriers at various trap energies and physical positions throughout crystals. Light exposure significantly alters the charge mobility and improves carrier collection at the anode contact. This study presents an investigation of material performance as a radiation detector during such illumination. The decrease in charge trapping and increase in charge collection due to a higher probability of free electron release from traps contributed to an increase in the resolution-based performance of the detector through controlled illumination. We investigated the performance improvement of CZT crystals with previously known levels of intrinsic defects and secondary phases, at various voltages, light-emitting diode (LED) light wavelengths, and shaping times. Although our setup was clearly not optimized for radiation detector performance, it demonstrated substantial resolution improvements (based on full-width at half-maximum using 662-keV gamma rays from 137Cs upon illumination with 950-nm light) of 16% to 38% in comparison with unilluminated CZT under similar conditions. This manuscript includes discussion of the electrooptic behavior and its effect on performance. Additional testing and fabrication of a detector that incorporates such LED light optimization could lead to improved performance with existing detector-grade materials.

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF ELECTROSTATIC SHIELDING AND ELECTRONIC SUBTRACTION TO CORRECT FOR THE HOLE TRAPPING IN CDZNTE SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    BOLOTNIKOV,A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; HOSSAIN, A.; CUI, Y.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-08-26

    CdZnTe (CZT) is a very promising material for nuclear-radiation detectors. CZT detectors operate at ambient temperatures and offer high detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution, placing them ahead of high-purity Ge for those applications where cryogenic cooling is problematic. The progress achieved in CZT detectors over the past decade is founded on the developments of robust detector designs and readout electronics, both of which helped to overcome the effects of carrier trapping. Because the holes have low mobility, only electrons can be used to generate signals in thick CZT detectors, so one must account for the variation of the output signal versus the locations of the interaction points. To obtain high spectral resolution, the detector's design should provide a means to eliminate this dependence throughout the entire volume of the device. In reality, the sensitive volume of any ionization detector invariably has two regions. In the first, adjacent to the collecting electrode, the amplitude of the output signal rapidly increases almost to its maximum as the interaction point is located farther from the anode; in the rest of the volume, the output signal remains nearly constant. Thus, the quality of CZT detector designs can be characterized based on the magnitude of the signals variations in the drift region and the ratio between the volumes of the driR and induction regions. The former determines the ''geometrical'' width of the photopeak i.e., the line width that affects the total energy resolution and is attributed to the device's geometry when all other factors are neglected. The latter determines the photopeak efficiency and the area under the continuum in the pulse-height spectra. In this work, we describe our findings from systematizing different designs of CZT detectors and evaluating their performance based on these two criteria.

  7. Detection of electron and hole traps in CdZnTe radiation detectors by thermoelectric emission spectroscopy and thermally stimulated conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    E. Y. Lee; B. A. Brunett; R. W. Olsen; J. M. Van Scyoc III; H. Hermon; R. B. James

    1998-06-18

    The electrical properties of CdZnTe radiation detectors are largely determined by electron and hole traps in this material. The traps, in addition to degrading the detector performance, can function as dopants and determine the resistivity of the material. Thermoelectric emission spectroscopy and thermally stimulated conductivity are used to detect these traps in a commercially available spectrometer-grade CdZnTe detector, and the electrical resistivity is measured as a function of temperature. A deep electron trap having an energy of 695 meV and cross section of 8 x 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2} is detected and three hole traps having energies of 70 {+-} 20 meV, 105 {+-} 30 meV and 694 {+-} 162 meV are detected. A simple model based on these traps explains quantitatively all the data, including the electrical properties at room temperature and also their temperature dependence.

  8. Design and performances of a low-noise and radiation-hardened readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Gan; Tingcun, Wei; Wu, Gao; Yongcai, Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the design and performances of a low-noise and radiation-hardened front-end readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) dedicated to CdZnTe detectors for a hard X-ray imager in space applications. The readout channel is comprised of a charge sensitive amplifier, a CR-RC shaping amplifier, an analog output buffer, a fast shaper, and a discriminator. An 8-channel prototype ASIC is designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35-μm mixed-signal CMOS technology, the die size of the prototype chip is 2.2 × 2.2 mm2. The input energy range is from 5 to 350 keV. For this 8-channel prototype ASIC, the measured electrical characteristics are as follows: the overall gain of the readout channel is 210 V/pC, the linearity error is less than 2%, the crosstalk is less than 0.36%, The equivalent noise charge of a typical channel is 52.9 e- at zero farad plus 8.2 e- per picofarad, and the power consumption is less than 2.4 mW/channel. Through the measurement together with a CdZnTe detector, the energy resolution is 5.9% at the 59.5-keV line under the irradiation of the radioactive source 241Am. The radiation effect experiments show that the proposed ASIC can resist the total ionization dose (TID) irradiation of higher than 200 krad(Si). Project supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project (No. 2011YQ040082), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475136, 11575144, 61176094), and the Shaanxi Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2015JM1016).

  9. High-Efficiency CdZnTe Position-Sensitive VFG Gamma-Ray Detectors for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; James, Ralph B.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Vernon, E.; Camarda, G. S.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Indusi, J.; Boyer, Brian

    2015-09-30

    The goal of this project is to incorporate a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) detector (with 1% or better resolution) into a bench-top prototype for isotope identification and related safeguards applications. The bench-top system is based on a 2x2 array of 6x6x20 mm3 position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid (VFG) CZT detectors. The key features of the array are that it allows for the use of average-grade CZT material with a moderate content of defects, and yet it provides high energy resolution, 1% FWHM at 662 keV, large effective area, and low-power consumption. The development of this type of 3D detector and new instruments incorporating them is motivated by the high cost and low availability of large, > 1 cm3, CZT crystals suitable for making multi-pixel detectors with acceptable energy resolution and efficiency.

  10. Energy dispersive CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for spectral clinical CT and NDT applications.

    PubMed

    Barber, W C; Wessel, J C; Nygard, E; Iwanczyk, J S

    2015-06-01

    We are developing room temperature compound semiconductor detectors for applications in energy-resolved high-flux single x-ray photon-counting spectral computed tomography (CT), including functional imaging with nanoparticle contrast agents for medical applications and non destructive testing (NDT) for security applications. Energy-resolved photon-counting can provide reduced patient dose through optimal energy weighting for a particular imaging task in CT, functional contrast enhancement through spectroscopic imaging of metal nanoparticles in CT, and compositional analysis through multiple basis function material decomposition in CT and NDT. These applications produce high input count rates from an x-ray generator delivered to the detector. Therefore, in order to achieve energy-resolved single photon counting in these applications, a high output count rate (OCR) for an energy-dispersive detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) compound semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel provided the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions, and at a sufficiently high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). We have developed high-flux energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray imaging array sensors using pixellated CdTe and CdZnTe semiconductors optimized for clinical CT and security NDT. We have also fabricated high

  11. Energy dispersive CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for spectral clinical CT and NDT applications

    PubMed Central

    Barber, W. C.; Wessel, J. C.; Nygard, E.; Iwanczyk, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    We are developing room temperature compound semiconductor detectors for applications in energy-resolved high-flux single x-ray photon-counting spectral computed tomography (CT), including functional imaging with nanoparticle contrast agents for medical applications and non destructive testing (NDT) for security applications. Energy-resolved photon-counting can provide reduced patient dose through optimal energy weighting for a particular imaging task in CT, functional contrast enhancement through spectroscopic imaging of metal nanoparticles in CT, and compositional analysis through multiple basis function material decomposition in CT and NDT. These applications produce high input count rates from an x-ray generator delivered to the detector. Therefore, in order to achieve energy-resolved single photon counting in these applications, a high output count rate (OCR) for an energy-dispersive detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) compound semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel provided the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions, and at a sufficiently high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). We have developed high-flux energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray imaging array sensors using pixellated CdTe and CdZnTe semiconductors optimized for clinical CT and security NDT. We have also fabricated high

  12. Energy dispersive CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for spectral clinical CT and NDT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, W. C.; Wessel, J. C.; Nygard, E.; Iwanczyk, J. S.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing room temperature compound semiconductor detectors for applications in energy-resolved high-flux single x-ray photon-counting spectral computed tomography (CT), including functional imaging with nanoparticle contrast agents for medical applications and non-destructive testing (NDT) for security applications. Energy-resolved photon-counting can provide reduced patient dose through optimal energy weighting for a particular imaging task in CT, functional contrast enhancement through spectroscopic imaging of metal nanoparticles in CT, and compositional analysis through multiple basis function material decomposition in CT and NDT. These applications produce high input count rates from an x-ray generator delivered to the detector. Therefore, in order to achieve energy-resolved single photon counting in these applications, a high output count rate (OCR) for an energy-dispersive detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) compound semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel provided the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions, and at a sufficiently high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). We have developed high-flux energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray imaging array sensors using pixellated CdTe and CdZnTe semiconductors optimized for clinical CT and security NDT. We have also fabricated high

  13. Experimental study of {sup 113}Cd {beta} decay using CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Goessling, C.; Kiel, H.; Muenstermann, D.; Oehl, S.; Junker, M.; Zuber, K.

    2005-12-15

    A search for the fourfold forbidden {beta} decay of {sup 113}Cd has been performed with CdZnTe semiconductors. With 0.86 kg {center_dot} d of statistics a half-life for the decay of T{sub 1/2}=[8.2{+-}0.2(stat.){sub -1.0}{sup +0.2}(sys.)]x10{sup 15} yr has been obtained. This is in good agreement with published values. A comparison of the spectral shape with the one given on the Table of Isotopes Web page shows a severe deviation.

  14. Effects of chemo-mechanical polishing on CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Egarievwe, Stephen E.; Hossain, Anwar; Okwechime, Ifechukwude O.; ...

    2015-06-23

    Here, mechanically polishing cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) wafers for x-ray and gamma-ray detectors often is inadequate in removing surface defects caused by cutting them from the ingots. Fabrication-induced defects, such as surface roughness, dangling bonds, and nonstoichiometric surfaces, often are reduced through polishing and etching the surface. In our earlier studies of mechanical polishing with alumina powder, etching with hydrogen bromide in hydrogen peroxide solution, and chemomechanical polishing with bromine–methanol–ethylene glycol solution, we found that the chemomechanical polishing process produced the least surface leakage current. In this research, we focused on using two chemicals to chemomechanically polish CdZnTe wafers aftermore » mechanical polishing, viz. bromine–methanol–ethylene glycol (BME) solution, and hydrogen bromide (HBr) in a hydrogen peroxide and ethylene–glycol solution. We used x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), current–voltage (I–V) measurements, and Am-241 spectral response measurements to characterize and compare the effects of each solution. The results show that the HBr-based solution produced lower leakage current than the BME solution. Results from using the same chemomechanical polishing solution on two samples confirmed that the surface treatment affects the measured bulk current (a combination of bulk and surface currents). XPS results indicate that the tellurium oxide to tellurium peak ratios for the mechanical polishing process were reduced significantly by chemomechanical polishing using the BME solution (78.9% for Te 3d5/2O2 and 76.7% for Te 3d3/2O2) compared with the HBr-based solution (27.6% for Te 3d5/2O2 and 35.8% for Te 3d3/2O2). Spectral response measurements showed that the 59.5-keV peak of Am-241 remained under the same channel number for all three CdZnTe samples. While the BME-based solution gave a better performance of 7.15% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) compared with 7.59% FWHM

  15. Effects of chemo-mechanical polishing on CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Egarievwe, Stephen E.; Hossain, Anwar; Okwechime, Ifechukwude O.; Gul, Rubi; James, Ralph B.

    2015-06-23

    Here, mechanically polishing cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) wafers for x-ray and gamma-ray detectors often is inadequate in removing surface defects caused by cutting them from the ingots. Fabrication-induced defects, such as surface roughness, dangling bonds, and nonstoichiometric surfaces, often are reduced through polishing and etching the surface. In our earlier studies of mechanical polishing with alumina powder, etching with hydrogen bromide in hydrogen peroxide solution, and chemomechanical polishing with bromine–methanol–ethylene glycol solution, we found that the chemomechanical polishing process produced the least surface leakage current. In this research, we focused on using two chemicals to chemomechanically polish CdZnTe wafers after mechanical polishing, viz. bromine–methanol–ethylene glycol (BME) solution, and hydrogen bromide (HBr) in a hydrogen peroxide and ethylene–glycol solution. We used x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), current–voltage (I–V) measurements, and Am-241 spectral response measurements to characterize and compare the effects of each solution. The results show that the HBr-based solution produced lower leakage current than the BME solution. Results from using the same chemomechanical polishing solution on two samples confirmed that the surface treatment affects the measured bulk current (a combination of bulk and surface currents). XPS results indicate that the tellurium oxide to tellurium peak ratios for the mechanical polishing process were reduced significantly by chemomechanical polishing using the BME solution (78.9% for Te 3d5/2O2 and 76.7% for Te 3d3/2O2) compared with the HBr-based solution (27.6% for Te 3d5/2O2 and 35.8% for Te 3d3/2O2). Spectral response measurements showed that the 59.5-keV peak of Am-241 remained under the same channel number for all three CdZnTe samples. While the BME-based solution gave a better

  16. Effects of Chemomechanical Polishing on CdZnTe X-ray and Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Hossain, Anwar; Okwechime, Ifechukwude O.; Gul, Rubi; James, Ralph B.

    2015-09-01

    Mechanically polishing cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) wafers for x-ray and gamma-ray detectors often is inadequate in removing surface defects caused by cutting them from the ingots. Fabrication-induced defects, such as surface roughness, dangling bonds, and nonstoichiometric surfaces, often are reduced through polishing and etching the surface. In our earlier studies of mechanical polishing with alumina powder, etching with hydrogen bromide in hydrogen peroxide solution, and chemomechanical polishing with bromine-methanol-ethylene glycol solution, we found that the chemomechanical polishing process produced the least surface leakage current. In this research, we focused on using two chemicals to chemomechanically polish CdZnTe wafers after mechanical polishing, viz. bromine-methanol-ethylene glycol (BME) solution, and hydrogen bromide (HBr) in a hydrogen peroxide and ethylene-glycol solution. We used x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), current-voltage ( I- V) measurements, and Am-241 spectral response measurements to characterize and compare the effects of each solution. The results show that the HBr-based solution produced lower leakage current than the BME solution. Results from using the same chemomechanical polishing solution on two samples confirmed that the surface treatment affects the measured bulk current (a combination of bulk and surface currents). XPS results indicate that the tellurium oxide to tellurium peak ratios for the mechanical polishing process were reduced significantly by chemomechanical polishing using the BME solution (78.9% for Te 3 d 5/2O2 and 76.7% for Te 3 d 3/2O2) compared with the HBr-based solution (27.6% for Te 3 d 5/2O2 and 35.8% for Te 3 d 3/2O2). Spectral response measurements showed that the 59.5-keV peak of Am-241 remained under the same channel number for all three CdZnTe samples. While the BME-based solution gave a better performance of 7.15% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) compared with 7.59% FWHM for the HBr

  17. Internal electric-field-lines distribution in CdZnTe detectors measured using X-ray mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.E.; , .; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Yao, H.W.; James, R.B.

    2009-10-19

    The ideal operation of CdZnTe devices entails having a uniformly distributed internal electric field. Such uniformity especially is critical for thick long-drift-length detectors, such as large-volume CPG and 3-D multi-pixel devices. Using a high-spatial resolution X-ray mapping technique, we investigated the distribution of the electric field in real devices. Our measurements demonstrate that in thin detectors, <5 mm, the electric field-lines tend to bend away from the side surfaces (i.e., a focusing effect). In thick detectors, >1 cm, with a large aspect ratio (thickness-to-width ratio), we observed two effects: the electric field lines bending away from or towards the side surfaces, which we called, respectively, the focusing field-line distribution and the defocusing field-line distribution. In addition to these large-scale variations, the field-line distributions were locally perturbed by the presence of extended defects and residual strains existing inside the crystals. We present our data clearly demonstrating the non-uniformity of the internal electric field.

  18. Al-doped ZnO contact to CdZnTe for x- and gamma-ray detector applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, U. N.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.; Mundle, R. M.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2016-06-13

    The poor adhesion of common metals to CdZnTe (CZT)/CdTe surfaces has been a long-standing challenge for radiation detector applications. In this present work, we explored the use of an alternative electrode, viz., Al-doped ZnO (AZO) as a replacement to common metallic contacts. ZnO offers several advantages over the latter, such as having a higher hardness, a close match of the coefficients of thermal expansion for CZT and ZnO, and better adhesion to the surface of CZT due to the contact layer being an oxide. The AZO/CZT contact was investigated via high spatial-resolution X-ray response mapping for a planar detector at the micron level. The durability of the device was investigated by acquiring I–V measurements over an 18-month period, and good long-term stability was observed. We have demonstrated that the AZO/CZT/AZO virtual-Frisch-grid device performs fairly well, with comparable or better characteristics than that for the same detector fabricated with gold contacts.

  19. The electrical properties and defect levels of Al doped CdZnTe crystal for detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ruihua; Jie, Wanqi; Zha, Gangqiang; Liu, Weihua; Xu, Yadong; Fu, Li; Wang, Tao

    2009-07-01

    CdZnTe (CZT) is one of the most promising materials for room-temperature X-ray and Gamma-ray detectors. The electrical properties of CZT crystal decide the performance of CZT detector to a large degree. For high quality CZT crystal using as detector, both high resistivity and high carrier transport properties are necessary. In this paper, the electrical properties and defect levels of Al-doped CZT (CZT:Al) crystal were discussed. Utilizing the thermally stimulated current (TSC) spectroscope measurement, the defect levels in CZT:Al crystal and their level-model were determined and inferred. The carrier transport properties of the CZT:Al were charactered with the carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) products determined by the peak channel of241Am alpha particle 5.48 MeV spectrum as a function of the bias voltage. Fitted by the single carrier Hecht equation, the μτ for the electron was evaluated to be 4.6×10-4 cm2Â.V-1.

  20. Al-doped ZnO contact to CdZnTe for x- and gamma-ray detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, U. N.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Mundle, R. M.; Pradhan, A. K.; James, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    The poor adhesion of common metals to CdZnTe (CZT)/CdTe surfaces has been a long-standing challenge for radiation detector applications. In this present work, we explored the use of an alternative electrode, viz., Al-doped ZnO (AZO) as a replacement to common metallic contacts. ZnO offers several advantages over the latter, such as having a higher hardness, a close match of the coefficients of thermal expansion for CZT and ZnO, and better adhesion to the surface of CZT due to the contact layer being an oxide. The AZO/CZT contact was investigated via high spatial-resolution X-ray response mapping for a planar detector at the micron level. The durability of the device was investigated by acquiring I-V measurements over an 18-month period, and good long-term stability was observed. We have demonstrated that the AZO/CZT/AZO virtual-Frisch-grid device performs fairly well, with comparable or better characteristics than that for the same detector fabricated with gold contacts.

  1. Development of a Spectral Model Based on Charge Transport for the Swift/BAT 32K CdZnTe Detector Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Goro; Parsons, Ann; Hillinger, Derek; Suzuki, Masaya; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tashiro, Makoto; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Okada, Yuu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Shin

    2005-01-01

    The properties of 32K CdZnTe (4 x 4 sq mm large, 2 mm thick) detectors have been studied in the pre-flight calibration of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on-board the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer (scheduled for launch in November 2004). In order to understand the energy response of the BAT CdZnTe array, we first quantify the mobility-lifetime (mu tau) products of carriers in individual CdZnTe detectors, which produce a position dependency in the charge induction efficiency and results in a low energy tail in the energy spectrum. Based on a new method utilizing (57)Co spectra obtained at different bias voltages, the mu tau for electrons ranges from 5.0 x 10(exp -4) to 1.0 x 10(exp -2) sq cm/V while the mu tau for holes ranges from 1.3 x 10(exp -5 to 1.8 x 10(exp -4) sq cm/V. We find that this wide distribution of mu tau products explains the large diversity in spectral shapes between CdZnTe detectors well. We also find that the variation of mu tau products can be attributed to the difference of crystal ingots or manufacturing harness. We utilize the 32K sets of extracted mu tau products to develop a spectral model of the detector. In combination with Monte Carlo simulations, we can construct a spectral model for any photon energy or any incident angle.

  2. Hard X- and γ-ray measurements with a large volume coplanar grid CdZnTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alan; Buslaps, T.; Gostilo, V.; Graafsma, H.; Hijmering, R.; Kozorezov, A.; Loupilov, A.; Lumb, D.; Welter, E.

    2006-07-01

    The recent introduction of coplanar grid techniques has led to resurgence in interest in developing large volume compound semiconductor detectors that have a reasonable γ-ray response but also good spectroscopic resolution. We report the results of a series of hard X- and γ-ray measurements on a large 15×15 mm 2, 10 mm thick CdZnTe coplanar grid detector. The measurements were carried out at the HASYLAB and ESRF synchrotron radiation facilities using highly monochromatic pencil beams across the energy range 20-800 keV. Additional full-area measurements were carried out using radioactive sources. All measurements were carried out at room temperature. The measured energy resolution under full-area illumination was 8 and 12 keV FWHM at 59.95 and 662 keV, respectively. Under pencil beam illumination, the measured resolutions were essentially the same. The detector energy response function was found to be linear over the energy range 20-1400 keV with an average rms nonlinearity of 1.4%, consistent with statistics. The spatial uniformity of the detector was evaluated at 30, 60 and 180 keV by raster scanning a 20×20 μm 2 monoenergetic X-ray beam across the active area. Apart from a few localized areas, the detector response was found to uniform at the few percent level, consistent with statistics. At 180 keV, the nonuniformity in the energy response due to the grids was estimated to be at the 0.7% level.

  3. Using the TOF method to measure the electron lifetime in long-drift CdZnTe detectors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Chen, Eric; Cui, Yonggang; Gul, Rubi; Dedic, Václav; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Fried, Jack; Hossain, Anwar; MacKenzie, Jason M.; Sellin, Paul; Taherion, Saeid; Vernon, Emerson; Yang, Ge; El-hanany, Uri; James, Ralph B.

    2016-09-01

    The traditional method for electron lifetime measurements of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors relies on using the Hecht equation. The procedure involves measuring the dependence of the detector response on the applied bias and applying the Hecht equation to evaluate the mu-tau product, which in turn can be converted into the carrier lifetime if the mobility is known. Despite general acceptance of this technique, which is very convenient for comparative testing of different CZT materials, the assumption of a constant electric field inside a detector is unjustified. In the Hecht equation, this assumption means that the drift time would be a linear function of the drift distance. This condition is rarely fulfilled in practice at low applied biases where the Hecht equation is most sensitive to the mu-tau product. As a result, researchers usually take measurements at relatively high biases, which work well in the case of the low mu-tau material, <10-3 cm2/V, but give significantly underestimated values for the case of high mu-tau crystals. In this work, we applied the time-of-flight (TOF) technique to measure the electron lifetimes in long-drift-length (3 cm) standard-grade CZT detectors produced by Redlen Technologies. The TOF-based techniques are traditionally used for monitoring the electronegative impurity concentrations in noble gas detectors by measuring the electron lifetimes. We found the electron mu-tau product of tested crystals is in the range 0.1-0.2 cm2/V, which is an order of the magnitude higher than any value previously reported for CZT material. In this work, we reported the measurement procedure and the results. We will also discuss the applicability criteria of the Hecht equation for measuring the electron lifetime in high mu-tau product CZT.

  4. Topographic Evaluation of the Effect of Passivation in Improving the Performance of CdZnTe Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, A.; Dowdy, A.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Roy, U. N.; Tappero, R.; Tong, X.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2014-08-01

    Surface passivation reportedly is an effective technique for controlling surface leakage current and its related electronic noise. Several chemical agents have been effectively used for passivating cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) surfaces; however, the long-term stability and the adverse effect on the metal contacts remain questionable. In this study, we reviewed two popular passivating agents, viz. hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and a mixture of ammonium fluoride and hydrogen peroxide (NH4F + H2O2). Our aim was to identify an ideal one that can effectively and permanently lower surface leakage currents without adversely affecting the metal contacts. We characterized their topographic features and their long-term effectiveness in terms of detector performance, and compared the results to understand their nature. We determined which chemical species were formed, and recorded the peaks of elemental Cd and Te via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micron-scale spatial resolution x-ray fluorescence ( μ-XRF). We describe in detail the formation of new chemical species and the material nonuniformity of differently treated surfaces. Their effectiveness was assessed from experimental findings of their electrical properties and the spectral response. Our results imply that both passivating agents lowered the surface leakage current, and improved the detection efficiency of the CZT detectors, but their effectiveness was unstable over time.

  5. Preliminary test results of a new high-energy-resolution silicon and CdZnTe pixel detectors for application to x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, V. V.; Hamilton, William J.; Hurley, Kevin; Maeding, Dale G.; Ogelman, Hakki; Paulos, Robert J.; Puetter, Richard C.; Tumer, Tumay O.; Zweerink, Jeffrey

    1999-10-01

    New, high spatial resolution CdZnTe (CZT) and silicon (Si) pixel detectors are highly suitable for x-ray astronomy. These detectors are planned for use in wide field of view, imaging x-ray, and low energy gamma-ray all-sky monitor (AXGAM) in a future space mission. The high stopping power of CZT detectors combined with low-noise front-end readout makes possible an order of magnitude improvement in spatial and energy resolution in x-ray detection. The AXGAM instrument will be built in the form of a fine coded aperture placed over two-dimensional, high spatial resolution and low energy threshold CZT pixel detector array. The preliminary result of CZT and silicon pixel detector test with low-noise readout electronics system are presented. These detectors may also be used with or without modification for medical and industrial imaging.

  6. Design and Measurement of a Low-Noise 64-Channels Front-End Readout ASIC for CdZnTe Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Bo; Wei, Tingcun; Gao, Wu; Liu, Hui; Hu, Yann

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors, as one of the principal detectors for the next-generation X-ray and γ-ray imagers, have high energy resolution and supporting electrode patterning in the radiation environment at room-temperature. In the present, a number of internationally renowned research institutions and universities are actively using these detector systems to carry out researches of energy spectrum analysis, medical imaging, materials characterization, high-energy physics, nuclear plant monitoring, and astrophysics. As the most important part of the readout system for the CdZnTe detector, the front-end readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) would have an important impact on the performances of the whole detector system. In order to ensure the small signal to noise ratio (SNR) and sufficient range of the output signal, it is necessary to design a front-end readout ASIC with very low noise and very high dynamic range. In addition, radiation hardness should be considered when the detectors are utilized in the space applications and high energy physics experiments. In this paper, we present measurements and performances of a novel multi-channel radiation-hardness low-noise front-end readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors. The readout circuits in each channel consist of charge sensitive amplifier, leakage current compensation circuit (LCC), CR-RC shaper, S-K filter, inverse proportional amplifier, peak detect and hold circuit (PDH), discriminator and trigger logic, time sequence control circuit and driving buffer. All of 64 readout channels' outputs enter corresponding inputs of a 64 channel multiplexer. The output of the mux goes directly out of the chip via the output buffer. The 64-channel readout ASIC is implemented using the TSMC 0.35 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology. The die size of the prototype chip is 2.7 mm x 8 mm. At room temperature, the equivalent noise level of a typical channel reaches 66 e{sup -} (rms) at zero farad for a power

  7. Development of new CdZnTe detectors for room-temperature high-flux radiation measurements.

    PubMed

    Abbene, Leonardo; Gerardi, Gaetano; Raso, Giuseppe; Principato, Fabio; Zambelli, Nicola; Benassi, Giacomo; Bettelli, Manuele; Zappettini, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Recently, CdZnTe (CZT) detectors have been widely proposed and developed for room-temperature X-ray spectroscopy even at high fluxes, and great efforts have been made on both the device and the crystal growth technologies. In this work, the performance of new travelling-heater-method (THM)-grown CZT detectors, recently developed at IMEM-CNR Parma, Italy, is presented. Thick planar detectors (3 mm thick) with gold electroless contacts were realised, with a planar cathode covering the detector surface (4.1 mm × 4.1 mm) and a central anode (2 mm × 2 mm) surrounded by a guard-ring electrode. The detectors, characterized by low leakage currents at room temperature (4.7 nA cm(-2) at 1000 V cm(-1)), allow good room-temperature operation even at high bias voltages (>7000 V cm(-1)). At low rates (200 counts s(-1)), the detectors exhibit an energy resolution around 4% FWHM at 59.5 keV ((241)Am source) up to 2200 V, by using commercial front-end electronics (A250F/NF charge-sensitive preamplifier, Amptek, USA; nominal equivalent noise charge of 100 electrons RMS). At high rates (1 Mcounts s(-1)), the detectors, coupled to a custom-designed digital pulse processing electronics developed at DiFC of University of Palermo (Italy), show low spectroscopic degradations: energy resolution values of 8% and 9.7% FWHM at 59.5 keV ((241)Am source) were measured, with throughputs of 0.4% and 60% at 1 Mcounts s(-1), respectively. An energy resolution of 7.7% FWHM at 122.1 keV ((57)Co source) with a throughput of 50% was obtained at 550 kcounts s(-1) (energy resolution of 3.2% at low rate). These activities are in the framework of an Italian research project on the development of energy-resolved photon-counting systems for high-flux energy-resolved X-ray imaging.

  8. Multiple-Scale Analysis of Charge Transport in Semiconductor Radiation Detectors: Application to Semi-Insulating CdZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, Derek S.; Szeles, Csaba

    2009-01-01

    The transport, trapping, and subsequent detrapping of charge in single crystals of semi-insulating cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) has been analyzed using multiple-scale perturbation techniques. This method has the advantage of not only treating impulse charge generation typical in spectroscopic analysis, but also a large class of continuous generation sources more relevant to high-flux x-ray imaging applications. We first demonstrate that the multiple-scale solutions obtained for small-current transients induced by an impulse generation of charge are consistent with well-known exact solutions. Further, we use the multiple-scale solutions to derive an analytic generalization of the Hecht equation that incorporates detrapping over times much longer than the carrier transit time (i.e., delayed signal components). The method is then applied to a continuous charge generation source that approximates that of an x-ray source. The space-time solutions obtained are relevant to detector design in high-flux x-ray imaging applications. Throughout this work the multiple-scale solutions are compared with exact solutions as well as full numerical solutions of the fundamental charge conservation equations.

  9. A 12-bit 1 MS/s SAR-ADC for multi-channel CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Liu; Tingcun, Wei; Bo, Li; Panjie, Guo; Yongcai, Hu

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a low power, area-efficient and radiation-hardened 12-bit 1 MS/s successive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for multi-channel CdZnTe (CZT) detector applications. In order to improve the SAR-ADC's accuracy, a novel comparator is proposed in which the offset voltage is self-calibrated and also a new architecture for the unit capacitor array is proposed to reduce the capacitance mismatches in the charge-redistribution DAC. The ability to radiation-harden the SAR-ADC is enhanced through circuit and layout design technologies. The prototype chip was fabricated using a TSMC 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS process. At a 3.3/5 V power supply and a sampling rate of 1 MS/s, the proposed SAR-ADC achieves a peak signal to noise and distortion ratio (SINAD) of 67.64 dB and consumes only 10 mW power. The core of the prototype chip occupies an active area of 1180 × 1080 μm2. Project supported by the Special-Funded Program on National Key Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development (No. 2011YQ040082).

  10. Optimal configuration of a low-dose breast-specific gamma camera based on semiconductor CdZnTe pixelated detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genocchi, B.; Pickford Scienti, O.; Darambara, DG

    2017-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequent tumours in women. During the ‘90s, the introduction of screening programmes allowed the detection of cancer before the palpable stage, reducing its mortality up to 50%. About 50% of the women aged between 30 and 50 years present dense breast parenchyma. This percentage decreases to 30% for women between 50 to 80 years. In these women, mammography has a sensitivity of around 30%, and small tumours are covered by the dense parenchyma and missed in the mammogram. Interestingly, breast-specific gamma-cameras based on semiconductor CdZnTe detectors have shown to be of great interest to early diagnosis. Infact, due to the high energy, spatial resolution, and high sensitivity of CdZnTe, molecular breast imaging has been shown to have a sensitivity of about 90% independently of the breast parenchyma. The aim of this work is to determine the optimal combination of the detector pixel size, hole shape, and collimator material in a low dose dual head breast specific gamma camera based on a CdZnTe pixelated detector at 140 keV, in order to achieve high count rate, and the best possible image spatial resolution. The optimal combination has been studied by modeling the system using the Monte Carlo code GATE. Six different pixel sizes from 0.85 mm to 1.6 mm, two hole shapes, hexagonal and square, and two different collimator materials, lead and tungsten were considered. It was demonstrated that the camera achieved higher count rates, and better signal-to-noise ratio when equipped with square hole, and large pixels (> 1.3 mm). In these configurations, the spatial resolution was worse than using small pixel sizes (< 1.3 mm), but remained under 3.6 mm in all cases.

  11. Defect Measurements of CdZnTe Detectors Using I-DLTS, TCT, I-V and Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gul,R.

    2008-08-11

    In this work we measured the crystal defect levels and tested the performance of CdZnTe detectors by diverse methodologies, viz., Current Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (I-DLTS), Transient Current Technique (TCT), Current and Capacitance versus Voltage measurements (I-V and C-V), and gamma-ray spectroscopy. Two important characteristics of I-DLTS technique for advancing this research are (1) it is applicable for high-resistivity materials (>10{sup 6} {Omega}-cm), and, (2) the minimum temperature for measurements can be as low as 10 K. Such low-temperature capability is excellent for obtaining measurements at shallow levels. We acquired CdZnTe crystals grown by different techniques from two different vendors and characterized them for point defects and their response to photons. I-DLTS studies encompassed measuring the parameters of the defects, such as the energy levels in the band gap, the carrier capture cross-sections and their densities. The current induced by the laser-generated carriers and the charge collected (or number of electrons collected) were obtained using TCT that also provides the transport properties, such as the carrier life time and mobility of the detectors under study. The detector's electrical characteristics were explored, and its performance tested using I-V, C-V and gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  12. Defect measurements of CdZnTe detectors using I-DLTS, TCT, I-V, C-V and γ-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, R.; Li, Z.; Rodriguez, R.; Keeter, K.; Bolotnikov, A.; James, R.

    2008-08-01

    In this work we measured the crystal defect levels and tested the performance of CdZnTe detectors by diverse methodologies, viz., Current Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (I-DLTS), Transient Current Technique (TCT), Current and Capacitance versus Voltage measurements (I-V and C-V), and gamma-ray spectroscopy. Two important characteristics of I-DLTS technique for advancing this research are (1) it is applicable for high-resistivity materials (>106 Ω-cm), and, (2) the minimum temperature for measurements can be as low as 10 K. Such low-temperature capability is excellent for obtaining measurements at shallow levels. We acquired CdZnTe crystals grown by different techniques from two different vendors and characterized them for point defects and their response to photons. I-DLTS studies encompassed measuring the parameters of the defects, such as the energy levels in the band gap, the carrier capture cross-sections and their densities. The current induced by the laser-generated carriers and the charge collected (or number of electrons collected) were obtained using TCT that also provides the transport properties, such as the carrier life time and mobility of the detectors under study. The detector's electrical characteristics were explored, and its performance tested using I-V, C-V and gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  13. CdZnTe γ detector for deep inelastic neutron scattering on the VESUVIO spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, C.; D'Angelo, A.; Gorini, G.; Imberti, S.; Pietropaolo, A.; Rhodes, N. J.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Senesi, R.; Tardocchi, M.

    In this paper it is shown that solid-state cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) is a promising photon detector for neutron spectroscopy in a wide energy interval, ranging from thermal ( 25 meV) to epithermal ( 70 eV) neutron energies. In the present study two CZT detectors were tested as part of the inverse-geometry neutron spectrometer VESUVIO operating at the ISIS pulsed neutron source. The response of the CZT detector to photon emission from radiative neutron capture in 238U was determined by biparametric measurements of neutron time of flight and photon energy. The scattering response function F(y) from a Pb sample has been derived using both CZT and conventional 6Li-glass scintillator detectors. The former showed both an improved signal to background ratio and higher efficiency as compared to 6Li glass, allowing us to measure F(y) up to the fourth 238U absorption energy (Er=66.02 eV). Due to the small size of CZT detectors, their use is envisaged in arrays, with high spatial resolution, for neutron-scattering studies at high energy (ω>1 eV) and low wavevector (q <10 Å-1) transfers.

  14. Evaluation of the mobility-lifetime product in CdTe and CdZnTe detectors by the transient-current technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uxa, Štěpán; Grill, Roman; Belas, Eduard

    2013-09-01

    New methods for evaluation of mobility-lifetime product (μτ) in polarized planar CdTe and CdZnTe detectors are presented. We combined the transient-current technique measurements with the measurements of the charge-collection efficiency and developed two iterative procedures for calculating μτ and mobility, μ, both taking into account the actual profile of the electric field in a detector. Their applicability is demonstrated on both the simulated and existing experimental data. The cases in which these methods are preferred to the common procedures based on the Hecht equation are widely discussed. We demonstrate that neglecting the detector's polarization can lead to underestimation of real μτ, thus negatively affecting the interpretation of particular measurements.

  15. A low-noise 64-channel front-end readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors aimed to hard X-ray imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, B.; Wei, T.; Gao, W.; Liu, H.; Hu, Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we report on the recent development of a 64-channel low-noise front-end readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors aimed to hard X-ray imaging systems. The readout channel is comprised of a charge sensitive amplifier, a leakage current compensation circuit, a CR-RC shaper, two S-K filters, an inverse proportional amplifier, a peak-detect-and-hold circuit, a discriminator and trigger logic, a time sequence control circuit and a driving buffer. The readout ASIC is implemented in TSMC 0.35 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology, the die size of the prototype chip is 2.7 mm×8.0 mm. The overall gain of the readout channel is 200 mV/fC, the power consumption is less than 8 mW/channel, the linearity error is less than 1%, the inconsistency among the channels is less than 2.86%, and the equivalent noise charge of a typical channel is 66 e- at zero farad plus 14 e- per picofarad. By connecting this readout ASIC to an 8×8 pixel CdZnTe detector, we obtained an energy spectrum, the energy resolution of which is 4.5% at the 59.5 keV line of 241Am source.

  16. Primary study on the contact degradation mechanism of CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Wenbin; Wei, Jin; Qi, Zhang; Wanwan, Li; Jiahua, Min; Jianyong, Teng; Yongbiao, Qian

    2004-07-01

    The metal-CdZnTe (CZT) interface plays a vital role in determining the contact characteristics, which is often the dominant factor influencing detector performance. The effects of the degradation of the interfacial layer between the metal contact layer and CZT surface on the mechanical and electrical properties have been investigated in this paper. The interfacial thermal stresses were simulated using 3-D finite element method (FEM). The results indicate that the maximum thermal stress is concentrated on the midst of the electrode and the magnitude of the stress produced by the different electrode materials in order is Al>Au>Pt>In. The adhesion forces between the metal contact layer and CZT surface were measured by using a Dage PC2400 Micro tester with the shear-off-method. The inter-diffusion between the metal contact layer and CZT was identified using the Anger depth profiles. The experimental results indicate that the electroless Au electrode on p-type high resistivity CZT is of smaller interfacial adhesion strength, but of better ohmicity than the sputtered Au. In addition, the aging effects on the contact characteristics of the detector were also examined.

  17. Material-specific imaging system using energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction and spatially resolved CdZnTe detectors with potential application in breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbes, Damien; Tabary, Joachim; Paulus, Caroline; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Verger, Loïck

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a coherent X-ray-scattering imaging technique using a multipixel energy-dispersive system. Without any translation, the technique produces specific 1D image from data recorded by a single CdZnTe detector pixel using subpixelation techniques. The method is described in detail, illustrated by a simulation and then experimentally validated. As the main considered application of our study is breast imaging, this validation involves 2D imaging of a phantom made of plastics mimicking breast tissues. The results obtained show that our system can specifically image the phantom using a single detector pixel. For the moment, in vivo breast imaging applications remain difficult, as the dose delivered by the system is too high, but some adjustments are considered for further work.

  18. CdTe and CdZnTe detectors in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber, C.

    2000-07-01

    Nuclear medicine diagnostic applications are growing in search for more disease specific or more physiologically relevant imaging. The data are obtained non-invasively from large field γ cameras or from miniaturised probes. As far as single photon emitters are concerned, often labelled with 99mTc (140 keV, γ), nuclear instrumentation deals with poor counting statistics due to the method of spatial localisation and low contrast to noise due to scatter in the body. Since the 1960s attempts have been made to replace the NaI scintillator by semiconductor detectors with better spectrometric characteristics to improve contrast and quantitative measurements. They allow direct conversion of energy and thus more compact sensors. Room-temperature semiconductor detectors such as cadmium tellure and cadmium zinc tellure have favourable physical characteristics for medical applications which have been investigated in the 1980s. During one decade, they have been used in miniaturised probes such as for inter-operative surgery guidance which is today in a fast growing phase. This material suffers from charge transport problems which has slowed down imaging applications. Owing to a considerable research work on material, contacts and dedicated electronics small field of view compact pixellated γ cameras have been prototyped and one already marketed. Although extended clinical evaluation has to be conducted and long-term reliability assesed, the available data already confirm the expected gain in image contrast. Medical interest for dedicated imaging systems is greater than it was in the 1980s when the first mobile γ cameras were marketed. The future of CdTe or CdZnTe-based imager for routine use now relies at first on industrial costs.

  19. Final Report: A CdZnTe detector for MRI-compatible SPECT Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Ling-Jian

    2012-12-27

    The key objective of this project is to develop the enabling technology for future MRI-compatible nuclear (e.g. SPECT) imaging system, and to demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous MR and SPECT imaging studies of the same object. During the past three years, we have developed (a) a MRI-compatible ultrahigh resolution gamma ray detector and associated readout electronics, (b) a theoretical approach for modeling the effect of strong magnetic field on SPECT image quality, and (c) a maximum-likelihood (ML) based reconstruction routine with correction for the MR-induced distortion. With this support, we have also constructed a four-head MR-compatible SPECT system and tested the system inside a 3-T clinical MR-scanner located on UI campus. The experimental results obtained with this system have clearly demonstrated that sub-500um spatial resolution can be achieved with a SPECT system operated inside a 3-T MRI scanner. During the past three years, we have accomplished most of the major objectives outlined in the original proposal. These research efforts have laid out a solid foundation the development of future MR-compatible SPECT systems for both pre-clinical and clinical imaging applications.

  20. Dynamics of native oxide growth on CdTe and CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detectors

    PubMed Central

    Zázvorka, Jakub; Franc, Jan; Beran, Lukáš; Moravec, Pavel; Pekárek, Jakub; Veis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We studied the growth of the surface oxide layer on four different CdTe and CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detector-grade samples using spectroscopic ellipsometry. We observed gradual oxidization of CdTe and CdZnTe after chemical etching in bromine solutions. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we found that the oxide consists only of oxygen bound to tellurium. We applied a refined theoretical model of the surface layer to evaluate the spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. In this way we studied the dynamics and growth rate of the oxide layer within a month after chemical etching of the samples. We observed two phases in the evolution of the oxide layer on all studied samples. A rapid growth was visible within five days after the chemical treatment followed by semi-saturation and a decrease in the growth rate after the first week. After one month all the samples showed an oxide layer about 3 nm thick. The oxide thickness was correlated with leakage current degradation with time after surface preparation. PMID:27933118

  1. Linearity enhancement design of a 16-channel low-noise front-end readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Huiming; Wei, Tingcun; Wang, Jia

    2017-03-01

    A 16-channel front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with linearity enhancement design for cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors is presented in this paper. The resistors in the slow shaper are realized using a high-Z circuit to obtain constant resistance value instead of using only a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistor, thus the shaping time of the slow shaper can be kept constant for different amounts of input energies. As a result, the linearity of conversion gain is improved significantly. The ASIC was designed and fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a die size of 2.60 mm×3.53 mm. The tested results show that a typical channel provides an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 109.7e-+16.3e-/pF with a power consumption of 4 mW and achieves a conversion gain of 87 mV/fC with a nonlinearity of <0.4%. The linearity of conversion gain is improved by at least 86.6% as compared with the traditional approaches using the same front-end readout architecture and manufacture process. Moreover, the inconsistency among channels is <0.3%. An energy resolution of 2.975 keV (FWHM) for gamma rays of 59.5 keV was measured by connecting the ASIC to a 5 mm×5 mm ×2 mm CdZnTe detector at room temperature. The front-end readout ASIC presented in this paper achieves an outstanding linearity performance without compromising the noise, power consumption, and chip size performances.

  2. Performance simulation of an x-ray detector for spectral CT with combined Si and Cd[Zn]Te detection layers.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Christoph; Engel, Klaus-Jürgen; Wiegert, Jens

    2010-12-21

    The most obvious problem in obtaining spectral information with energy-resolving photon counting detectors in clinical computed tomography (CT) is the huge x-ray flux present in conventional CT systems. At high tube voltages (e.g. 140 kVp), despite the beam shaper, this flux can be close to 10⁹ Mcps mm⁻² in the direct beam or in regions behind the object, which are close to the direct beam. Without accepting the drawbacks of truncated reconstruction, i.e. estimating missing direct-beam projection data, a photon-counting energy-resolving detector has to be able to deal with such high count rates. Sub-structuring pixels into sub-pixels is not enough to reduce the count rate per pixel to values that today's direct converting Cd[Zn]Te material can cope with (≤ 10 Mcps in an optimistic view). Below 300 µm pixel pitch, x-ray cross-talk (Compton scatter and K-escape) and the effect of charge diffusion between pixels are problematic. By organising the detector in several different layers, the count rate can be further reduced. However this alone does not limit the count rates to the required level, since the high stopping power of the material becomes a disadvantage in the layered approach: a simple absorption calculation for 300 µm pixel pitch shows that the required layer thickness of below 10 Mcps/pixel for the top layers in the direct beam is significantly below 100 µm. In a horizontal multi-layer detector, such thin layers are very difficult to manufacture due to the brittleness of Cd[Zn]Te. In a vertical configuration (also called edge-on illumination (Ludqvist et al 2001 IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 48 1530-6, Roessl et al 2008 IEEE NSS-MIC-RTSD 2008, Conf. Rec. Talk NM2-3)), bonding of the readout electronics (with pixel pitches below 100 µm) is not straightforward although it has already been done successfully (Pellegrini et al 2004 IEEE NSS MIC 2004 pp 2104-9). Obviously, for the top detector layers, materials with lower stopping power would be advantageous

  3. Use of high-granularity CdZnTe pixelated detectors to correct response non-uniformities caused by defects in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Eger, J.; Emerick, A.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Roy, U.; Salwen, C.; Soldner, S.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2015-09-06

    Following our successful demonstration of the position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, we investigated the feasibility of using high-granularity position sensing to correct response non-uniformities caused by the crystal defects in CdZnTe (CZT) pixelated detectors. The development of high-granularity detectors able to correct response non-uniformities on a scale comparable to the size of electron clouds opens the opportunity of using unselected off-the-shelf CZT material, whilst still assuring high spectral resolution for the majority of the detectors fabricated from an ingot. Here, we present the results from testing 3D position-sensitive 15×15×10 mm3 pixelated detectors, fabricated with conventional pixel patterns with progressively smaller pixel sizes: 1.4, 0.8, and 0.5 mm. We employed the readout system based on the H3D front-end multi-channel ASIC developed by BNL's Instrumentation Division in collaboration with the University of Michigan. We use the sharing of electron clouds among several adjacent pixels to measure locations of interaction points with sub-pixel resolution. By using the detectors with small-pixel sizes and a high probability of the charge-sharing events, we were able to improve their spectral resolutions in comparison to the baseline levels, measured for the 1.4-mm pixel size detectors with small fractions of charge-sharing events. These results demonstrate that further enhancement of the performance of CZT pixelated detectors and reduction of costs are possible by using high spatial-resolution position information of interaction points to correct the small-scale response non-uniformities caused by crystal defects present in most devices.

  4. Use of high-granularity CdZnTe pixelated detectors to correct response non-uniformities caused by defects in crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; ...

    2015-09-06

    Following our successful demonstration of the position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, we investigated the feasibility of using high-granularity position sensing to correct response non-uniformities caused by the crystal defects in CdZnTe (CZT) pixelated detectors. The development of high-granularity detectors able to correct response non-uniformities on a scale comparable to the size of electron clouds opens the opportunity of using unselected off-the-shelf CZT material, whilst still assuring high spectral resolution for the majority of the detectors fabricated from an ingot. Here, we present the results from testing 3D position-sensitive 15×15×10 mm3 pixelated detectors, fabricated with conventional pixel patterns with progressively smaller pixelmore » sizes: 1.4, 0.8, and 0.5 mm. We employed the readout system based on the H3D front-end multi-channel ASIC developed by BNL's Instrumentation Division in collaboration with the University of Michigan. We use the sharing of electron clouds among several adjacent pixels to measure locations of interaction points with sub-pixel resolution. By using the detectors with small-pixel sizes and a high probability of the charge-sharing events, we were able to improve their spectral resolutions in comparison to the baseline levels, measured for the 1.4-mm pixel size detectors with small fractions of charge-sharing events. These results demonstrate that further enhancement of the performance of CZT pixelated detectors and reduction of costs are possible by using high spatial-resolution position information of interaction points to correct the small-scale response non-uniformities caused by crystal defects present in most devices.« less

  5. Use of high-granularity CdZnTe pixelated detectors to correct response non-uniformities caused by defects in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Eger, J.; Emerick, A.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Roy, U.; Salwen, C.; Soldner, S.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    Following our successful demonstration of the position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, we investigated the feasibility of using high-granularity position sensing to correct response non-uniformities caused by the crystal defects in CdZnTe (CZT) pixelated detectors. The development of high-granularity detectors able to correct response non-uniformities on a scale comparable to the size of electron clouds opens the opportunity of using unselected off-the-shelf CZT material, whilst still assuring high spectral resolution for the majority of the detectors fabricated from an ingot. Here, we present the results from testing 3D position-sensitive 15×15×10 mm3 pixelated detectors, fabricated with conventional pixel patterns with progressively smaller pixel sizes: 1.4, 0.8, and 0.5 mm. We employed the readout system based on the H3D front-end multi-channel ASIC developed by BNL's Instrumentation Division in collaboration with the University of Michigan. We use the sharing of electron clouds among several adjacent pixels to measure locations of interaction points with sub-pixel resolution. By using the detectors with small-pixel sizes and a high probability of the charge-sharing events, we were able to improve their spectral resolutions in comparison to the baseline levels, measured for the 1.4-mm pixel size detectors with small fractions of charge-sharing events. These results demonstrate that further enhancement of the performance of CZT pixelated detectors and reduction of costs are possible by using high spatial-resolution position information of interaction points to correct the small-scale response non-uniformities caused by crystal defects present in most devices.

  6. Drift time variations in CdZnTe detectors measured with alpha-particles: Their correlation with the detector’s responses

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov A. E.; Butcher, J.; Hamade, M.; Petryk, M.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Yang, G.; and James, R.

    2012-05-14

    Homogeneity of properties related to material crystallinity is a critical parameter for achieving high-performance CdZnTe (CZT) radiation detectors. Unfortunately, this requirement is not always satisfied in today's commercial CZT material due to high concentrations of extended defects, in particular subgrain boundaries, which are believed to be part of the causes hampering the energy resolution and efficiency of CZT detectors. In the past, the effects of subgrain boundaries have been studied in Si, Ge and other semiconductors. It was demonstrated that subgrain boundaries tend to accumulate secondary phases and impurities causing inhomogeneous distributions of trapping centers. It was also demonstrated that subgrain boundaries result in local perturbations of the electric field, which affect the carrier transport and other properties of semiconductor devices. The subgrain boundaries in CZT material likely behave in a similar way, which makes them responsible for variations in the electron drift time and carrier trapping in CZT detectors. In this work, we employed the transient current technique to measure variations in the electron drift time and related the variations to the device performances and subgrain boundaries, whose presence in the crystals were confirmed with white beam X-ray diffraction topography and infrared transmission microscopy.

  7. Assessment of a new ZnO:Al contact to CdZnTe for X- and gamma-ray detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, U. N.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Mundle, R. M.; Pradhan, A. K.; James, R. B.

    2017-09-01

    The large mismatch of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between the metal contact and CdZnTe exerts thermal stress at the metal/CZT interface, which causes mechanical degradation of the contact in addition to the poor adhesion of the metallic thin film to CZT. To form a reliable and stable interface, the contact material should have better adhesion and a close match of the coefficients of thermal expansion with CZT/CdTe. Here, we report on our investigations of a novel non-metallic contact layer for use in radiation detector applications. The proposed ZnO:Al contact layer offers better adhesion due to the oxide interface, higher hardness and better matching of the CTE with CZT. It has high prospects for a reliable and stable device structure that can serve as a replacement to the common metallic electrodes used today. We evaluated AZO contacts to CZT and extracted the electronic characteristics, such as resistivity and mobility-lifetime product of electrons, and compared the results of the same characterization measurements for CZT with gold contacts. The present observations showed that the characteristics of CZT detectors with AZO contacts are nearly identical to the same detectors with gold contacts.

  8. Use of the drift-time method to measure the electron lifetime in long-drift-length CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Chen, E.; Gul, R.; Dedic, V.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; MacKenzie, J. M.; Ocampo, L.; Sellin, P.; Taherion, S.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; El-Hanany, U.; James, R. B.

    2016-09-01

    The traditional method for electron lifetime measurements of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors relies on using the Hecht equation. The procedure involves measuring the dependence of the detector response on the applied bias to evaluate the μτ product, which in turn can be converted into the carrier lifetime. Despite general acceptance of this technique, which is very convenient for comparative testing of different CZT materials, the assumption of a constant electric field inside a detector is unjustified. In the Hecht equation, this assumption means that the drift time would be a linear function of the distance. This condition is not fulfilled in practice at low applied biases, where the Hecht equation is most sensitive to the μτ product. As a result, researchers usually take measurements at relatively high biases, which work well in the case of the low μτ-product material, <10-3 cm2/V, but give significantly underestimated values for the case of high μτ-product crystals. In this work, we applied the drift-time method to measure the electron lifetimes in long-drift-length (4 cm) standard-grade CZT detectors produced by the Redlen Technologies. We found that the electron μτ product of tested crystals is in the range 0.1-0.2 cm2/V, which is an order of the magnitude higher than any value previously reported for a CZT material. In comparison, using the Hecht equation fitting, we obtained μτ = 2.3 × 10-2 cm2/V for a 2-mm thin planar detector fabricated from the same CZT material.

  9. X-ray response of CdZnTe detectors grown by the vertical Bridgman technique: Energy, temperature and high flux effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbene, L.; Gerardi, G.; Turturici, A. A.; Raso, G.; Benassi, G.; Bettelli, M.; Zambelli, N.; Zappettini, A.; Principato, F.

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, CdZnTe (CZT) is one of the key materials for the development of room temperature X-ray and gamma ray detectors and great efforts have been made on both the device and the crystal growth technologies. In this work, we present the results of spectroscopic investigations on new boron oxide encapsulated vertical Bridgman (B-VB) grown CZT detectors, recently developed at IMEM-CNR Parma, Italy. Several detectors, with the same electrode layout (gold electroless contacts) and different thicknesses (1 and 2.5 mm), were realized: the cathode is a planar electrode covering the detector surface (4.1×4.1 mm2), while the anode is a central electrode (2×2 mm2) surrounded by a guard-ring electrode. The detectors are characterized by electron mobility-lifetime product (μeτe) values ranging between 0.6 and 1·10-3 cm2/V and by low leakage currents at room temperature and at high bias voltages (38 nA/cm2 at 10000 V/cm). The spectroscopic response of the detectors to monochromatic X-ray and gamma ray sources (109Cd, 241Am and 57Co), at different temperatures and fluxes (up to 1 Mcps), was measured taking into account the mitigation of the effects of incomplete charge collection, pile-up and high flux radiation induced polarization phenomena. A custom-designed digital readout electronics, developed at DiFC of University of Palermo (Italy), able to perform a fine pulse shape and height analysis even at high fluxes, was used. At low rates (200 cps) and at room temperature (T=25 °C), the detectors exhibit an energy resolution FWHM around 4% at 59.5 keV, for comparison an energy resolution of 3% was measured with Al/CdTe/Pt detectors by using the same electronics (A250F/NF charge sensitive preamplifier, Amptek, USA; nominal ENC of 100 electrons RMS). At high rates (750 kcps), energy resolution values of 7% and 9% were measured, with throughputs of 2% and 60% respectively. No radiation polarization phenomena were observed at room temperature up to 1 Mcps (241Am source, 60 ke

  10. Compensation and trapping in CdZnTe radiation detectors studied by thermoelectric emission spectroscopy, thermally stimulated conductivity, and current-voltage measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph B. James

    2000-01-07

    In today's commercially available counter-select-grade CdZnTe crystals for radiation detector applications, the thermal ionization energies of the traps and their types, whether electron or hole traps, were measured. The measurements were successfully done using thermoelectric emission spectroscopy (TEES) and thermally stimulated conductivity (TSC). For reliability, the electrical contacts to the sample were found to be very important and, instead of Au Schottky contacts, In Ohmic contacts had to be used. For the filling of the traps, photoexcitation was done at zero bias, at 20K and at wavelengths which gave the maximum bulk photoexcitation for the sample. Between the temperature range from 20 to 400 K, the TSC current was found to be on the order of {approximately} 10,000 times or even larger than the TEES current, in agreement with theory, but only TEES could resolve the trap type and was sensitive to the deep traps. Large concentration of hole traps at 0.1 and 0.6 eV were observed and smaller contraction of electron traps at 0.4 eV was seen. These deep traps cause compensation in the material and also cause trapping that degrades the radiation detection measurement.

  11. Hard X- and γ-ray measurements with a 3×3×2 mm 3 CdZnTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alan; Buslaps, T.; Erd, C.; Graafsma, H.; Lumb, D.; Welter, E.

    2006-07-01

    We report the results of a series of X- and γ-ray measurements on a 3×3 mm, 2 mm thick CdZnTe detector carried out at the HASYLAB and ESRF synchrotron radiation facilities. The detector energy response function was found to be linear over the energy range 10-100 keV with an average rms non-linearity of 0.6%, consistent with statistics. Under full area illumination, the FWHM energy resolution was 270 eV at 5.9 keV and rises to 930 eV at 59.54 keV. Under pencil beam illumination, the measured energy resolution at 10 keV was 310 eV FWHM and rises to ˜1000 eV at 100 keV. At 60 keV the resolution was found to be ˜30% lower than that measured under uniform illumination, indicating a degree of non-uniform crystallinity and stoichiometry in the bulk. For energies <50 keV, the measured energy-loss spectra show symmetric photopeaks, becoming increasing tailed at higher energies due to hole trapping. Using risetime discrimination (RTD) to filter out events due to holes, it was found that the shape of the photopeaks could be substantially improved at high energies, albeit at the expense of photopeak efficiency. In fact, the relative number of counts in photopeak, dropped from ˜90% at 10 keV to ˜15% at 100 keV. The results show that a combination of low-noise front-end architecture and RTD leads to very good performances below, say, 100 keV, but above this energy, other techniques (e.g., bi-parametric corrections or single carrier sensing techniques) need to be employed if spectrometric performance is to be maintained.

  12. Long-Term Stable Surface Treatments on CdTe and CdZnTe Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekarek, Jakub; Belas, Eduard; Zazvorka, Jakub

    2016-12-01

    The spectral resolution and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) room-temperature x-ray and gamma-ray detectors are often limited by high surface leakage current due to conducting surface species created during detector fabrication. Surface treatments play a major role in reduction of this surface leakage current. The effect of various types of surface etching and passivation on the leakage current and thereby the spectral energy resolution, CCE, and internal electric field profile of CdTe/CZT detectors has been studied. The main aim of this work is preparation of long-term stable detectors with strongly reduced leakage current. The time stability of the current-voltage characteristic and spectral resolution was investigated during 21 days and 1 year, respectively, after performing surface treatments. Our results suggest that the optimal detector preparation method is chemomechanical polishing in bromine-ethylene glycol solution followed by chemical etching in bromine-methanol solution then surface passivation in potassium hydroxide or ammonium fluoride (NH4F/H2O2). Detectors prepared using this optimal treatment exhibited low leakage current, high spectral resolution, and long-term stability compared with those subjected to other surface preparation methods.

  13. Long-Term Stable Surface Treatments on CdTe and CdZnTe Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekarek, Jakub; Belas, Eduard; Zazvorka, Jakub

    2017-04-01

    The spectral resolution and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) room-temperature x-ray and gamma-ray detectors are often limited by high surface leakage current due to conducting surface species created during detector fabrication. Surface treatments play a major role in reduction of this surface leakage current. The effect of various types of surface etching and passivation on the leakage current and thereby the spectral energy resolution, CCE, and internal electric field profile of CdTe/CZT detectors has been studied. The main aim of this work is preparation of long-term stable detectors with strongly reduced leakage current. The time stability of the current-voltage characteristic and spectral resolution was investigated during 21 days and 1 year, respectively, after performing surface treatments. Our results suggest that the optimal detector preparation method is chemomechanical polishing in bromine-ethylene glycol solution followed by chemical etching in bromine-methanol solution then surface passivation in potassium hydroxide or ammonium fluoride (NH4F/H2O2). Detectors prepared using this optimal treatment exhibited low leakage current, high spectral resolution, and long-term stability compared with those subjected to other surface preparation methods.

  14. Post-Growth Annealing of Bridgman-grown CdZnTe and CdMnTe Crystals for Room-temperature Nuclear Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Yang, Ge; Egarievwe, Alexander; Okwechime, Ifechukwude O.; Gray, Justin; Hales, Zaveon M.; Hossain, Anwar; Camarda, Guiseppe S.; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; James, Ralph B.

    2015-02-11

    Bridgman-grown cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) and cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe or CMT) crystals often have Te inclusions that limit their performances as X-ray- and gamma-ray-detectors. We present here the results of post-growth thermal annealing aimed at reducing and eliminating Te inclusions in them. In a 2D analysis, we observed that the sizes of the Te inclusions declined to 92% during a 60-h annealing of CZT at 510 °C under Cd vapor. Further, tellurium inclusions were eliminated completely in CMT samples annealed at 570 °C in Cd vapor for 26 h, whilst their electrical resistivity fell by an order of 102. During the temperature-gradient annealing of CMT at 730 °C and an 18 °C/cm temperature gradient for 18 h in a vacuum of 10-5 mbar, we observed the diffusion of Te from the sample, causing a reduction in size of the Te inclusions. For CZT samples annealed at 700 °C in a 10 °C/cm temperature gradient, we observed the migration of Te inclusions from a low-temperature region to a high one at 0.022 μm/s. During the temperature-gradient annealing of CZT in a vacuum of 10-5 mbar at 570 °C and 30 °C/cm for 18 h, some Te inclusions moved toward the high-temperature side of the wafer, while other inclusions of the same size, i.e., 10 µm in diameter, remained in the same position. These results show that the migration, diffusion, and reaction of Te with Cd in the matrix of CZT- and CMT-wafers are complex phenomena that depend on certain conditions.

  15. Post-Growth Annealing of Bridgman-grown CdZnTe and CdMnTe Crystals for Room-temperature Nuclear Radiation Detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Yang, Ge; Egarievwe, Alexander; ...

    2015-02-11

    Bridgman-grown cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) and cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe or CMT) crystals often have Te inclusions that limit their performances as X-ray- and gamma-ray-detectors. We present here the results of post-growth thermal annealing aimed at reducing and eliminating Te inclusions in them. In a 2D analysis, we observed that the sizes of the Te inclusions declined to 92% during a 60-h annealing of CZT at 510 °C under Cd vapor. Further, tellurium inclusions were eliminated completely in CMT samples annealed at 570 °C in Cd vapor for 26 h, whilst their electrical resistivity fell by an ordermore » of 102. During the temperature-gradient annealing of CMT at 730 °C and an 18 °C/cm temperature gradient for 18 h in a vacuum of 10-5 mbar, we observed the diffusion of Te from the sample, causing a reduction in size of the Te inclusions. For CZT samples annealed at 700 °C in a 10 °C/cm temperature gradient, we observed the migration of Te inclusions from a low-temperature region to a high one at 0.022 μm/s. During the temperature-gradient annealing of CZT in a vacuum of 10-5 mbar at 570 °C and 30 °C/cm for 18 h, some Te inclusions moved toward the high-temperature side of the wafer, while other inclusions of the same size, i.e., 10 µm in diameter, remained in the same position. These results show that the migration, diffusion, and reaction of Te with Cd in the matrix of CZT- and CMT-wafers are complex phenomena that depend on certain conditions.« less

  16. Characterization of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for gamma-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verger, L.; Boitel, M.; Gentet, M. C.; Hamelin, R.; Mestais, C.; Mongellaz, F.; Rustique, J.; Sanchez, G.

    2001-02-01

    CEA-LETI in association with Bicron and Crismatec has been developing solid-state gamma camera technology based on CZT. The project included gamma camera head systems development including front-end electronics with an integrated circuit (ASIC), material growth, and detector fabrication and characterization. One feature of the work is the use of linear correlation between the amplitude and the fast rise time of the signal - which corresponds to the electron transit time in the detector, a development that was reported previously and which allows more than 80% of the 122 keV γ-photons incident on HPBM material to be recovered in a ±6.5% 2D window. In the current work, we summarize other methods to improve CZT detector performance and compare them with the Bi-Parametric Spectrum (BPS) method. The BPS method can also be applied as a diagnositic. BPS curve shapes are shown to vary with electric field, and with electron transport properties, and the correction algorithims are seen to be robust over a range of values. In addition, the technique is found to improve detectors from a variety of sources including some with special electrode geometries. In all cases, the BPS method improves efficiency (>75%) without degrading energy resolution (± 6.5% 2D window) even for a monolithic detector. The method does not overcome bulk inhomogeneity nor noise which comes from low resistivity.

  17. Background Studies of a Position Sensitive CdZnTe X-ray Detector at Balloon Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavis, K.; Dowkontt, P.; Epstein, J.; Hink, P.; Matteson, J.; Duttweiler, F.; Huszar, G.; Leblanc, P.; Skelton, R.; Stephan, E.

    1999-04-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is a room temperature semiconductor detector well suited for high energy X-ray astronomy. As part of the High Energy X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HEXIS) development, we flew a position sensitive CZT detector on two balloon flights using seven shielding schemes to study the background properties of the CZT detector. Passive, active and hybrid passive-active shields were used on the cross-strip detector as well as on a standard planar CZT flown along side the cross-strip CZT for comparison. The cross-strip detector utilizes our recently developed, novel electrode configuration that improves interaction localization and depth of interaction (DOI) determination. During the flight, shield pulse heights were telemetered along with event data allowing us to conduct detailed studies of shield rejection effects. Preliminary results have been presented on the effectiveness of shielding and background reduction techniques that employ the DOI, as indicated by the ratio of cathode to anode pulse height (Slavis, et. al., SPIE Proc., 3445, 169, 1998, and Slavis, et. al., AAS #193, #66.05, 1999). Preliminary analysis indicates the 40-80 keV background is 4x10(-4) (cts)/(cm(2-s-keV)) for the cross-strip CZT without applying rejection techniques other than an active-shield energy deposition veto. We present here results incorporating more sophisticated background rejection techniques such as refinements to the preliminary DOI cut, multiple-site signatures and a more detailed investigation of the dependence of shield energy deposition on background rejection. We will also present upper limits on CZT activation. This is possible because the long duration at float in 1998 permitted cycling through the shield configurations for run times separated by at least 8 hours. Based on our preliminary analysis, we are confident that CZT detectors will be desirable for future low background, hard X-ray astronomy missions.

  18. Novel Surface Preparation and Contacts for CdZnTe Nuclear Radiation Detectors Using Patterned Films of Semiconductors and Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael; Conway, Adam; Payne, Steve

    2013-04-01

    The semiconductor Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has emerged as the material of choice for room temperature detection of X-rays and gamma-rays. The detectors will cover the energy range from 30 keV to several MeV, and will achieve excellent 662 keV energy resolution. The development of high resolution gamma ray detectors based on CZT is dependent on low electronic noise levels. One common source of noise is the surface leakage current, which limits the performance of advanced readout schemes such as the coplanar grid and pixelated architectures with steering grids. Excessive bulk leakage current can result from one of several surface effects: leaky native oxides, unsatisfied bonds, and surface damage. We propose to fabricate and test oriented [111] CZT crystals with thicknesses up to 1.5 cm with an innovative detection technique based on co-planar or other electron only transport designs using plasma processing, thin film sputtering, chemical passivation and wet etching techniques. Compared to conventional pixel detectors, the proposed contact configuration needs lower power consumption and a lower cost. The detector design can be used for building very low-cost handheld radiation detection devices.

  19. Signal formation on a serpentine delay-line electrode patterned on the CdZnTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geehyun; Karbowski, Joseph; Hammig, Mark D.

    2011-10-01

    Delay-line electrodes can simplify the readout hardware and reduce the power requirements of a nuclear radiation detector by replacing dozens or hundreds of readout circuits with only one or two time-sensitive readouts per detector face. The simplified means of lateral position-sensing with micrometer-range resolution was previously validated upon high-resistivity silicon, with the ultimate goal of mapping the recoil electrons from gamma-ray events, thereby increasing the angular resolution of gamma-cameras. However, the effect of the induced current on non-collecting legs of the meander pattern was not evaluated, a deficiency addressed in this paper, in which a Cd 0.9Zn 0.1Te (CZT) bulk crystal was used as the substrate. We present simulations of: (1) the electric field distribution, as calculated with MAXWELL ® 12.0, within the CZT detector with the delay-line electrode, (2) the charge carrier drift motion within the semiconductor, and (3) the propagation of the induced charge signal along the meandering electrode pattern. CZT detectors purchased from ORBOTECH were reprocessed for studying various metal-semiconductor contacts, and with optimized interfaces, the fabrication of the delay-line electrode was performed using photolithographic processes in the Lurie Nanofabrication Facility in the University of Michigan. Current-voltage ( I- V) characteristic curves were obtained for performance evaluation and compared with pre-processing data. Readout circuits were connected to the fabricated CZT detector to test the lateral position-sensing, and the overlay design used to balance the transmission line electrode is discussed.

  20. OPTIMIZATION OF VIRTUAL FRISCH-GRID CdZnTe DETECTOR DESIGNS FOR IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF GAMMA RAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    BOLOTNIKOV,A.E.; ABDUL-JABBAR, N.M.; BABALOLA, S.; CAMARDA, G.S.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; JACKSON, E.; JACKSON, H.; JAMES, J.R.; LURYI, A.L.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-08-21

    In the past, various virtual Frisch-grid designs have been proposed for cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and other compound semiconductor detectors. These include three-terminal, semi-spherical, CAPture, Frisch-ring, capacitive Frisch-grid and pixel devices (along with their modifications). Among them, the Frisch-grid design employing a non-contacting ring extended over the entire side surfaces of parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals is the most promising. The defect-free parallelepiped-shaped crystals with typical dimensions of 5x5{approx}12 mm3 are easy to produce and can be arranged into large arrays used for imaging and gamma-ray spectroscopy. In this paper, we report on further advances of the virtual Frisch-grid detector design for the parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals. Both the experimental testing and modeling results are described.

  1. Development of High Resolution Mirrors and Cd-Zn-Te Detectors for Hard X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Speegle, Chet O.; Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Engelhaupt, Darell; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and implementation of a high-resolution conical, grazing- incidence, hard X-ray (20-70 keV) telescope. When flown aboard stratospheric balloons, these mirrors are used to image cosmic sources such as supernovae, neutron stars, and quasars. The fabrication process involves generating super-polished mandrels, mirror shell electroforming, and mirror testing. The cylindrical mandrels consist of two conical segments; each segment is approximately 305 mm long. These mandrels are first, precision ground to within approx. 1.0 micron straightness along each conical segment and then lapped and polished to less than 0.5 micron straightness. Each mandrel segment is the super-polished to an average surface roughness of approx. 3.25 angstrom rms. By mirror shell replication, this combination of good figure and low surface roughness has enabled us to achieve 15 arcsec, confirmed by X-ray measurements in the Marshall Space Flight Center 102 meter test facility. To image the focused X-rays requires a focal plane detector with appropriate spatial resolution. For 15 arcsec optics of 6 meter focal length, this resolution must be around 200 microns. In addition, the detector must have a high efficiency, relatively high energy resolution, and low background. We are currently developing Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride fine-pixel detectors for this purpose. The detectors under study consist of a 16x16 pixel array with a pixel pitch of 300 microns and are 1 mm and 2 mm thick. At 60 keV, the measured energy resolution is around 2%.

  2. Development of High Resolution Mirrors and Cd-Zn-Te Detectors for Hard X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Speegle, Chet O.; Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Engelhaupt, Darell; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and implementation of a high-resolution conical, grazing- incidence, hard X-ray (20-70 keV) telescope. When flown aboard stratospheric balloons, these mirrors are used to image cosmic sources such as supernovae, neutron stars, and quasars. The fabrication process involves generating super-polished mandrels, mirror shell electroforming, and mirror testing. The cylindrical mandrels consist of two conical segments; each segment is approximately 305 mm long. These mandrels are first, precision ground to within approx. 1.0 micron straightness along each conical segment and then lapped and polished to less than 0.5 micron straightness. Each mandrel segment is the super-polished to an average surface roughness of approx. 3.25 angstrom rms. By mirror shell replication, this combination of good figure and low surface roughness has enabled us to achieve 15 arcsec, confirmed by X-ray measurements in the Marshall Space Flight Center 102 meter test facility. To image the focused X-rays requires a focal plane detector with appropriate spatial resolution. For 15 arcsec optics of 6 meter focal length, this resolution must be around 200 microns. In addition, the detector must have a high efficiency, relatively high energy resolution, and low background. We are currently developing Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride fine-pixel detectors for this purpose. The detectors under study consist of a 16x16 pixel array with a pixel pitch of 300 microns and are 1 mm and 2 mm thick. At 60 keV, the measured energy resolution is around 2%.

  3. Effect of electron transport properties on unipolar CdZnTe radiation detectors: LUND, SpectrumPlus, and Coplanar Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph B. James

    2000-01-07

    Device simulations of (1) the laterally-contacted-unipolar-nuclear detector (LUND), (2) the SpectrumPlus, (3) and the coplanar grid made of Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te (CZT) were performed for {sup 137}Cs irradiation by 662.15 keV gamma-rays. Realistic and controlled simulations of the gamma-ray interactions with the CZT material were done using the MCNP4B2 Monte Carlo program, and the detector responses were simulated using the Sandia three-dimensional multielectrode simulation program (SandTMSP). The simulations were done for the best and the worst expected carrier nobilities and lifetimes of currently commercially available CZT materials for radiation detector applications. For the simulated unipolar devices, the active device volumes were relatively large and the energy resolutions were fairly good, but these performance characteristics were found to be very sensitive to the materials properties. The internal electric fields, the weighting potentials, and the charge induced efficiency maps were calculated to give insights into the operation of these devices.

  4. Influence of accelerated crucible rotation on defect distribution and detector characteristics of melt grown CdZnTe (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Santosh; McCoy, Jedidiah; Lynn, Kelvin

    2016-09-01

    Non-stoichiometry related extended defects in CdTe/CZT, such as tellurium inclusions and precipitates are known to be detrimental bulk defects in detector grade cadmium zinc telluride. In our attempt to minimize the size of tellurium inclusions we have employed accelerated crucible rotation technique in modified vertical Bridgman growth configuration. Acceleration and deceleration rate as high as 900 rpm2 was successfully applied during superheated melt mixing and growth. By comparing growths with and without ACRT under otherwise identical growth conditions, it was observed that the average inclusion size reduced by more than 50 percent due to ACRT. Additionally, we will discuss the effect of forced melt convection on the axial zinc and dopant segregation profile. Electrical characterization, spectrometric performance and purity analysis of the grown crystals will be presented.

  5. An analysis of point defects induced by In, Al, Ni, and Sn dopants in Bridgman-grown CdZnTe detectors and their influence on trapping of charge carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; James, R. B.

    2017-03-01

    In this research, we studied point defects induced in Bridgman-grown CdZnTe detectors doped with Indium (In), Aluminium (Al), Nickel (Ni), and Tin (Sn). Point defects associated with different dopants were observed, and these defects were analyzed in detail for their contributions to electron/hole (e/h) trapping. We also explored the correlations between the nature and abundance of the point defects with their influence on the resistivity, electron mobility-lifetime (μτe) product, and electron trapping time. We used current-deep level transient spectroscopy to determine the energy, capture cross-section, and concentration of each trap. Furthermore, we used the data to determine the trapping and de-trapping times for the charge carriers. In In-doped CdZnTe detectors, uncompensated Cd vacancies (VCd-) were identified as a dominant trap. The VCd- were almost compensated in detectors doped with Al, Ni, and Sn, in addition to co-doping with In. Dominant traps related to the dopant were found at Ev + 0.36 eV and Ev + 1.1 eV, Ec + 76 meV and Ev + 0.61 eV, Ev + 36 meV and Ev + 0.86 eV, Ev + 0.52 eV and Ec + 0.83 eV in CZT:In, CZT:In + Al, CZT:In + Ni, and CZT:In + Sn, respectively. Results indicate that the addition of other dopants with In affects the type, nature, concentration (Nt), and capture cross-section (σ) and hence trapping (tt) and de-trapping (tdt) times. The dopant-induced traps, their corresponding concentrations, and charge capture cross-section play an important role in the performance of radiation detectors, especially for devices that rely solely on electron transport.

  6. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Ackley, K.; Camarda, G. S.; Cherches, C.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hodges, D.; Hossain, A.; Lee, W.; Mahler, G.; Maritato, M.; Petryk, M.; Roy, U.; Salwen, C.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2015-07-28

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe (CZT) detectors coupled to a front-end readout ASIC for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6x6x15 mm3 detectors grouped into 3x3 sub-arrays of 2x2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics. The further enhancement of the arrays’ performance and reduction of their cost are made possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.

  7. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras

    DOE PAGES

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Ackley, K.; Camarda, G. S.; ...

    2015-07-28

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe (CZT) detectors coupled to a front-end readout ASIC for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6x6x15 mm3 detectors grouped into 3x3 sub-arrays of 2x2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics.more » The further enhancement of the arrays’ performance and reduction of their cost are made possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.« less

  8. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras.

    PubMed

    Bolotnikov, A E; Ackley, K; Camarda, G S; Cherches, C; Cui, Y; De Geronimo, G; Fried, J; Hodges, D; Hossain, A; Lee, W; Mahler, G; Maritato, M; Petryk, M; Roy, U; Salwen, C; Vernon, E; Yang, G; James, R B

    2015-07-01

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors coupled to a front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6 × 6 × 15 mm(3) detectors grouped into 3 × 3 sub-arrays of 2 × 2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics. The further enhancement of the arrays' performance and reduction of their cost are possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.

  9. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A. E. Ackley, K.; Camarda, G. S.; Cherches, C.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Mahler, G.; Maritato, M.; Roy, U.; Salwen, C.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.; Hodges, D.; Lee, W.; Petryk, M.

    2015-07-15

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors coupled to a front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6 × 6 × 15 mm{sup 3} detectors grouped into 3 × 3 sub-arrays of 2 × 2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics. The further enhancement of the arrays’ performance and reduction of their cost are possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.

  10. ILLUMINATION RESPONSE OF CDZNTE

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Washington, A.; Duff, M.

    2011-08-02

    CdZnTe (CZT) semiconducting crystals are of interest for use as room temperature X- and {gamma}-ray spectrometers. Several studies have focused on understanding the various electronic properties of these materials, such as the surface and bulk resistivities and the distribution of the electric field within the crystal. Specifically of interest is how these properties are influenced by a variety of factors including structural heterogeneities, such as secondary phases (SPs) and line defects as well as environmental effects. Herein, we report the bulk current, surface current, electric field distribution and performance of a spectrometer-grade CZT crystal exposed to above band-gap energy illumination.

  11. Effect of chemical etching on the surface roughness of CdZnTe and CdMnTe gamma radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain,A.; Babalola, S.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Yang, G.; Guo, M.; Kochanowska, D.; Mycielski, A.; Burger, A.; James, R.B.

    2008-08-11

    Generally, mechanical polishing is performed to diminish the cutting damage followed by chemical etching to remove the remaining damage on crystal surfaces. In this paper, we detail the findings from our study of the effects of various chemical treatments on the roughness of crystal surfaces. We prepared several CdZnTe (CZT) and CdMnTe (CMT) crystals by mechanical polishing with 5 {micro}m and/or lower grits of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} abrasive papers including final polishing with 0.05-{micro}m particle size alumina powder and then etched them for different periods with a 2%, 5% Bromine-Methanol (B-M) solution, and also with an E-solution (HNO{sub 3}:H{sub 2}O:Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}). The material removal rate (etching rate) from the crystals was found to be 10 {micro}m, 30 {micro}m, and 15 {micro}m per minute, respectively. The roughness of the resulting surfaces was determined by the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to identify the most efficient surface processing method by combining mechanical and chemical polishing.

  12. CdZnTe Background Measurements at Balloon Altitudes with PoRTIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, L.; Gehrels, N.; Naya, J.; Stahle, C. M.; Tueller, J.; Teegarden, B.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the CdZnTe internal background at balloon altitudes are essential to determine which physical processes make the most important background contributions. We present results from CdZnTe background measurements made by PoRTIA, a small CdZnTe balloon instrument that was flown three times in three different shielding configurations. PoRTIA was passively shielded during its first flight from Palestine, Texas and actively shielded as a piggyback instrument on the GRIS balloon experiment during its second and third flights from Alice Springs, Australia, using the thick GRIS Nal anticoincidence shield. A significant CdZnTe background reduction was achieved during the third flight with PoRTIA placed completely inside the GRIS shield and blocking crystal, and thus completely surrounded by 15 cm of Nal. A unique balloon altitude background data set is provided by CdZnTe and Ge detectors simultaneously surrounded by the same thick anticoincidence shield; the presence of a single coxial Ge detector inside the shield next to PoRTIA allowed a measurement of the ambient neutron flux inside the shield throughout the flight. These neutrons interact with the detector material to produce isomeric states of the Cd, Zn and Te nuclei that radiatively decay; calculations are presented that indicate that these decays may explain most of the fully shielded CdZnTe background.

  13. Polycrystalline CdZnTe thick films for low energy x-ray: system evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Sunwoo; Park, Shin-Woong; Yi, Yun

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray response of polycrystalline-CdZnTe was measured by signal-to-noise (S/N) analysis. The CdZnTe material has optimal properties in a solid-state X-ray detector, and much research has focused on single crystal CdZnTe with a small-sized, silicon readout device. However, it would be difficult to apply CdTe or CdZnTe single crystal to large area, flat panel detectors, such as those used for radiography and mammography. As an alternative of single crystal CdZnTe, we have grown thick, polycrystalline CdZnTe films of high resistivity (>5 x 10(9) Ohm cm) using the thermal evaporation method on carbon substrate. A high signal-to-noise value has a direct impact on the performance of CdZnTe X-ray detectors. Important image parameters, such as dynamic range and detective quantum efficiency, rely on the signal and noise characteristics of the system. In this paper, we analyzed the properties of the X-ray detector and obtained images of the X-ray detector using the data acquisition system. The X-ray detector used the Cd1-xZnxTe (x=0.04), which used carbon substrate and gold as the electrode. The detector design is planar and 32 mm x 10 mm in size, and it has a 1.75mm x 1mm pixel electrode size and a detector thickness of 150 microm.

  14. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY BASED CHARACTERIZATION OF CDZNTE CRYSTALS

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M

    2006-09-28

    Synthetic CdZnTe or 'CZT' crystals can be used for the room temperature-based detection of {gamma}-radiation. Structural/morphological heterogeneities within CZT, such as twinning, inclusions, and polycrystallinity can affect detector performance. We used a synchrotron-based X-ray technique, specifically extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, to determine whether there are differences on a local structural level between intact CZT of high and low radiation detector performance. These studies were complemented by data on radiation detector performance and transmission IR imaging. The EXAFS studies revealed no detectable local structural differences between the two types of CZT materials.

  15. CdZnTe gamma ray spectrometer for orbital gamma ray spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T. H.; Feldman, W. C.; Fuller, K. R.; Storms, S. A.; Soldner, S. A.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Browne, M. C.; Moss, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    We present the design and analysis of a new gamma ray spectrometer for planetary science that uses an array of CdZnTe detectors to achieve the detection efficiency needed for orbital measurements. The use of CdZnTe will provide significantly improved pulse height resolution relative to scintillation-based detectors, with commensurate improvement in the accuracy of elemental abundances determined by gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. The spectrometer can be flown either on the instrument deck of the spacecraft or on a boom. For deck-mounted systems, a BGO anticoincidence shield is included in the design to suppress the response of the CdZnTe detector to gamma rays that originate in the spacecraft. The BGO shield also serves as a backup spectrometer, providing heritage from earlier planetary science missions and reducing the risk associated with the implementation of new technology.

  16. Te inclusion-induced electrical field perturbation in CdZnTe single crystals revealed by Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Li, Linglong; Xu, Yadong; Yang, Yaodong; Ren, Jie; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao; Xu, Lingyan; He, Yihui; Xi, Shouzhi

    2016-09-01

    To understand the effects of tellurium (Te) inclusions on the device performance of CdZnTe radiation detectors, the perturbation of the electrical field in and around Te inclusions was studied in CdZnTe single crystals via Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Te inclusions were proved to act as lower potential centers with respect to surrounding CdZnTe matrix. Based on the KPFM results, the energy band diagram at the Te/CdZnTe interface was established, and the bias-dependent effects of Te inclusion on carrier transportation is discussed.

  17. Upgrading FLIR NanoRaider with the next Generation of CdZnTe Detectors. Goal - Integrate VFG detectors into FLIR R200. Advanced Virtual Grid ASIC (AVG-ASIC).

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey; Cui, Yonggang; Vernon, Emerson; De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2016-06-01

    This document presents motivations, goals and the current status of this project; development (fabrication, performance) of position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors proposed for nanoRaider, an instrument commonly used by nuclear inspectors; ASIC developments for CZT detectors; and the electronics development for the detector prototype..

  18. A new approach in modeling the behavior of RPC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F. L.; Giardoni, M.; Passamonti, L.; Piccolo, D.; Pierluigi, D.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Buontempo, S.; Cimmino, A.; de Gruttola, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Baesso, P.; Belli, G.; Pagano, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Vicini, A.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Sharma, A.; Bhattacharyya, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of RPC detectors is highly sensitive to environmental variables. A novel approach is presented to model the behavior of RPC detectors in a variety of experimental conditions. The algorithm, based on Artificial Neural Networks, has been developed and tested on the CMS RPC gas gain monitoring system during commissioning.

  19. Purification of CdZnTe by electromigration

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Kim, Sangsu; Hong, Jinki; Lee, Jinseo; Hong, Taekwon; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; James, R. B.

    2015-04-14

    Electro-migration of ionized/electrically active impurities in CdZnTe (CZT) was successfully demonstrated at elevated temperature with an electric field of 20 V/mm. Copper, which exists in positively charged states, electro-migrated at a speed of 15 μm/h in an electric field of 20 V/mm. A notable variation in impurity concentration along the growth direction with the segregation tendency of the impurities was observed in an electro-migrated CZT boule. Notably, both Ga and Fe, which exist in positively charged states, exhibited the opposite distribution to that of their segregation tendency in Cd(Zn)Te. A CZT detector fabricated from the middle portion of the electro-migrated CZT boule showed an improved mobility-lifetime product of 0.91 × 10{sup −2} cm{sup 2}/V, compared with that of 1.4 × 10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/V, observed in an as-grown (non-electro-migrated) CZT detector. The optimum radiation detector material would have minimum concentration of deep traps required for compensation.

  20. Purification of CdZnTe by electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Kim, Sangsu; Hong, Jinki; Lee, Jinseo; Hong, Taekwon; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; James, R. B.

    2015-04-01

    Electro-migration of ionized/electrically active impurities in CdZnTe (CZT) was successfully demonstrated at elevated temperature with an electric field of 20 V/mm. Copper, which exists in positively charged states, electro-migrated at a speed of 15 μm/h in an electric field of 20 V/mm. A notable variation in impurity concentration along the growth direction with the segregation tendency of the impurities was observed in an electro-migrated CZT boule. Notably, both Ga and Fe, which exist in positively charged states, exhibited the opposite distribution to that of their segregation tendency in Cd(Zn)Te. A CZT detector fabricated from the middle portion of the electro-migrated CZT boule showed an improved mobility-lifetime product of 0.91 × 10-2 cm2/V, compared with that of 1.4 × 10-3 cm2/V, observed in an as-grown (non-electro-migrated) CZT detector. The optimum radiation detector material would have minimum concentration of deep traps required for compensation.

  1. Purification of CdZnTe by Electromigration

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, K.; Kim, Sangsu; Hong, Jinki; ...

    2015-04-14

    Electro-migration of ionized/electrically active impurities in CdZnTe (CZT) was successfully demonstrated at elevated temperature with an electric field of 20 V/mm. Copper, which exists in positively charged states, electro-migrated at a speed of 15 lm/h in an electric field of 20 V/mm. A notable variation in impurity concentration along the growth direction with the segregation tendency of the impurities was observed in an electro-migrated CZT boule. Notably, both Ga and Fe, which exist in positively charged states, exhibited the opposite distribution to that of their segregation tendency in Cd(Zn)Te. Furthermore, a CZT detector fabricated from the middle portion of themore » electromigrated CZT boule showed an improved mobility-lifetime product of 0.91 10-2 cm2 /V, compared to that of 1.4 10-3 cm2 /V, observed in an as-grown (non-electro-migrated) CZT detector. The optimum radiation detector material would have minimum concentration of deep traps required for compensation.« less

  2. Purification of CdZnTe by Electromigration

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Kim, Sangsu; Hong, Jinki; Lee, Jinseo; Hong, Taekwon; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; James, R. B.

    2015-04-14

    Electro-migration of ionized/electrically active impurities in CdZnTe (CZT) was successfully demonstrated at elevated temperature with an electric field of 20 V/mm. Copper, which exists in positively charged states, electro-migrated at a speed of 15 lm/h in an electric field of 20 V/mm. A notable variation in impurity concentration along the growth direction with the segregation tendency of the impurities was observed in an electro-migrated CZT boule. Notably, both Ga and Fe, which exist in positively charged states, exhibited the opposite distribution to that of their segregation tendency in Cd(Zn)Te. Furthermore, a CZT detector fabricated from the middle portion of the electromigrated CZT boule showed an improved mobility-lifetime product of 0.91 10-2 cm2 /V, compared to that of 1.4 10-3 cm2 /V, observed in an as-grown (non-electro-migrated) CZT detector. The optimum radiation detector material would have minimum concentration of deep traps required for compensation.

  3. CdZnTe gamma ray spectrometer for orbital planetary missions

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, W. C.; Storms, S. A.; Fuller, K. R.; Moss, C. E.; Browne, M. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Ianakiev, K. D.; Prettyman, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of surface elemental composition is needed to understand the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. Gamma rays and neutrons produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with surface materials can be detected from orbit and analyzed to determine composition. Using gamma ray spectroscopy, major rock forming elements such as Fe, Ti, Al, Si, Mg, and Ca can be detected. The accuracy of elemental abundance is limited by the resolution of the spectrometer. For space missions, scintillators such as BGO and NaI(Tl) have been used for gamma ray spectroscopy. New planetary science missions are being planned to explore Mars, Mercury, the asteroid belt, and the outer planets. Significant improvements in the pulse height resolution relative to scintillation detectors can be made using CdZnTe, a new room temperature detector technology. For an orbiting instrument, a CdZnTe detector at least 16 cm{sup 3} in size is needed. A 4 x 4 array of 1-cm{sup 3} coplanar grid detectors can be manufactured that meets requirements for resolution and counting efficiency. The array will shielded from gamma rays produced in the spacecraft by a BGO detector. By improving pulse height resolution by a factor of three at low energy, the CdZnTe detector will be able to make accurate measurements of elements that are currently difficult to measure using scintillation technology. The BGO shield will provide adequate suppression of gamma rays originating in the spacecraft, enabling the gamma ray spectrometer to be mounted on the deck of a spacecraft. To test this concept, we are constructing a flight qualified, prototype CdZnTe detector array. The prototype consists of a 2 x 2 array of coplanar grid detectors. We will present the results of mechanical and electronic testing and radiation damage tests, and the performance of the array for gamma ray spectroscopy.

  4. Fast Neutron Detection using Pixelated CdZnTe Spectrometers

    DOE PAGES

    Streicher, Michael; Goodman, David; Zhu, Yuefeng; ...

    2017-05-29

    One important important signature of special nuclear materials (SNM) are fast neutrons. Fast neutrons have a low natural background rate and readily penetrate high atomic number materials which easily shield gamma-ray signatures. Thus, fast neutrons provide a complementary signal to gamma rays for detecting shielded SNM. Scattering kinematics dictate that a large nucleus (such as Cd or Te) will recoil with small kinetic energy after an elastic collision with a fast neutron. Charge carrier recombination and quenching further reduce the recorded energy deposited. Thus, the energy threshold of CdZnTe detectors must be very low in order to sense the smallmore » signals from these recoils. Here, the threshold was reduced to less than 5 keVee to demonstrate that the 5.9 keV x-ray line from 55Fe could be separated from electronic noise. Elastic scattering neutron interactions were observed as small energy depositions (less than 20 keVee) using digitally-sampled pulse waveforms from pixelated CdZnTe detectors. Characteristic gamma-ray lines from inelastic neutron scattering were also observed.« less

  5. ADVANCED READOUT ELECTRONICS FOR MULTIELEMENT CdZnTe SENSORS.

    SciTech Connect

    DE GERONIMO,G.; O CONNOR,P.; KANDASAMY,A.; GROSHOLZ,J.

    2002-07-08

    A generation of high performance front-end and read-out ASICs customized for highly segmented CdZnTe sensors is presented. The ASICs, developed in a multi-year effort at Brookhaven National Laboratory, are targeted to a wide range of applications including medical, safeguards/security, industrial, research, and spectroscopy. The front-end multichannel ASICs provide high accuracy low noise preamplification and filtering of signals, with versions for small and large area CdZnTe elements. They implement a high order unipolar or bipolar shaper, an innovative low noise continuous reset system with self-adapting capability to the wide range of detector leakage currents, a new system for stabilizing the output baseline and high output driving capability. The general-purpose versions include programmable gain and peaking time. The read-out multichannel ASICs provide fully data driven high accuracy amplitude and time measurements, multiplexing and time domain derandomization of the shaped pulses. They implement a fast arbitration scheme and an array of innovative two-phase offset-free rail-to-rail analog peak detectors for buffering and absorption of input rate fluctuations, thus greatly relaxing the rate requirement on the external ADC. Pulse amplitude, hit timing, pulse risetime, and channel address per processed pulse are available at the output in correspondence of an external readout request. Prototype chips have been fabricated in 0.5 and 0.35 {micro}m CMOS and tested. Design concepts and experimental results are discussed.

  6. Strong mechanical adhesion of gold electroless contacts on CdZnTe deposited by alcoholic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassi, G.; Nasi, L.; Bettelli, M.; Zambelli, N.; Calestani, D.; Zappettini, A.

    2017-02-01

    CdZnTe crystals are nowadays employed as X-ray detectors for a number of applications, such as medical imaging, security, and environmental monitoring. One of the main difficulties connected with CdZnTe-based detector processing is the poor contact adhesion that affect bonding procedures and device long term stability. We have shown that it is possible to obtain mechanically stable contacts by common electroless deposition using alcoholic solutions instead of water solutions. The contacts show blocking current-voltage characteristic that is required for obtaining spectroscopic detectors. Nanoscale-resolved chemical analysis indicated that the improved mechanical adhesion is due to a better control of the stoichiometry of the CdZnTe layer below the contact.

  7. SEMICONDUCTOR PHYSICS: Charge transport performance of high resistivity CdZnTe crystals doped with In/Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadong, Xu; Lingyan, Xu; Tao, Wang; Gangqiang, Zha; Li, Fu; Wanqi, Jie; P, Sellin

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the charge transport properties of as-grown high resistivity CdZnTe crystals doped with In/Al, the α particle spectroscopic response was measured using an un-collimated 241Am (5.48 MeV) radioactive source at room temperature. The electron mobility lifetime products (μτ)e of the CdZnTe crystals were predicted by fitting plots of photo-peak position versus electrical field strength using the single carrier Hecht equation. A TOF technique was employed to evaluate the electron mobility for CdZnTe crystals. The mobility was obtained by fitting the electron drift velocities as a function of the electrical field strengths, where the drift velocities were achieved by analyzing the rise-time distributions of the voltage pulses formed by a preamplifier. A fabricated CdZnTe planar detector based on a low In concentration doped CdZnTe crystal with (μτ)e = 2.3 × 10-3 cm2/V and μe = 1000 cm2/(V dot m s), respectively, exhibits an excellent γ-ray spectral resolution of 6.4% (FWHM = 3.8 keV) for an un-collimated 241Am @ 59.54 keV isotope.

  8. Low Temperature Photoluminescence Characterization of Orbitally Grown CdZnTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, Timothy M.; Larson, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    The II-VI ternary alloy CdZnTe is a technologically important material because of its use as a lattice matched substrate for HgCdTe based devices. The increasingly stringent requirements on performance that must be met by such large area infrared detectors also necessitates a higher quality substrate. Such substrate material is typically grown using the Bridgman technique. Due to the nature of bulk semiconductor growth, gravitationally dependent phenomena can adversely affect crystalline quality. The most direct way to alleviate this problem is by crystal growth in a reduced gravity environment. Since it requires hours, even days, to grow a high quality crystal, an orbiting space shuttle or space station provides a superb platform on which to conduct such research. For well over ten years NASA has been studying the effects of microgravity semiconductor crystal growth. This paper reports the results of photoluminescence characterization performed on an arbitrary grown CdZnTe bulk crystal.

  9. Solid state detectors in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Darambara, D G; Todd-Pokropek, A

    2002-03-01

    Since Nuclear Medicine diagnostic applications are growing fast, room temperature semiconductor detectors such CdTe and CdZnTe either in the form of single detectors or as segmented monolithic detectors have been investigated aiming to replace the NaI scintillator. These detectors have inherently better energy resolution that scintillators coupled to photodiodes or photomultiplier tubes leading to compact imaging systems with higher spatial resolution and enhanced contrast. Advantages and disadvantages of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors in imaging systems are discussed and efforts to develop semiconductor-based planar and tomographic cameras as well as nuclear probes are presented.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF SECONDARY PHASES AND OTHER DEFECTS IN CDZNTE

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M.

    2010-06-30

    Semiconducting CdZnTe or 'CZT' crystals are very suitable for use as a room temperature-based gamma radiation spectrometer. During the last decade, modifications in growth methods for CZT have significantly improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. For example, various structural heterogeneities within the CZT crystals, such as, pipes, voids, polycrystallinity, and secondary phases (SP) can have a negative impact on the detector performance. In this study, a CZT material was grown by the modified vertical Bridgman growth (MVB) method with zone leveled growth in the absence of excess Te in the melt. Numerous SP were imaged using transmission IR at a volume % of 0.002. Samples from this material were analyzed using various analytical techniques to evaluate its electrical properties, purity and detector performance as radiation spectrometers and to determine the morphology, dimension and elemental /structural composition of one of the SP in this material. This material was found to have a high resistivity and good radiation spectrometer performance. It had SPs that were rich in calcium (Ca), carbon (C) and oxygen (O) (possibly CaCO{sub 3}) or only C and O that were 5 {micro}m or less in diameter.

  11. Relationship between the cathodoluminescence emission and resistivity in In doped CdZnTe crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, J.; Carcelen, V.; Dieguez, E.; Hidalgo, P.; Piqueras, J.; Vijayan, N.; Sochinskii, N. V.; Perez, J. M.

    2009-08-15

    Cadmium zinc telluride, CdZnTe, bulk single crystals doped with 10{sup 19} at./cm{sup 3} of indium in the initial melt were grown by vertical Bridgman technique. The samples were investigated by energy dispersive spectroscopy, cathodoluminiscence (CL), and current-voltage behavior at room temperature. The results shows that Cd and Te vacancy concentration depend on the indium and zinc concentrations. CL measurements indicate a relationship between radiative centers associated to Cd and Te vacancies and resistivity values.

  12. Space charge oscillations in semiinsulating CdZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dědič, V.; Rejhon, M.; Franc, J.; Musiienko, A.; Grill, R.

    2017-09-01

    Our work focuses on a detailed analysis of non-trivial temporal evolution of the electric field measured by the Pockels effect in a CdZnTe planar sample after biasing. The electric field varies, and in a couple of seconds, it reaches a steady state. We have observed an undershoot of the electric field evolution close to the cathode which is a sign of a local oscillation of the space charge density. An advanced deep level analysis based on thermal emission results in a single hole trap with energy Ev + 0.87 eV responsible for complex electric field behavior. Moreover, we simulated an influence of a deep level concentration Nt on the local electric field oscillations: with a higher Nt the undershoots turn to the oscillations, while with a lower Nt, the undershoots turn to the monotonous temporal evolution of the electric field.

  13. Live-monitoring of Te inclusions laser-induced thermo-diffusion and annealing in CdZnTe crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zappettini, A.; Zambelli, N.; Benassi, G.; Calestani, D.; Pavesi, M.

    2014-06-23

    The presence of Te inclusions is one of the main factors limiting performances of CdZnTe crystals as X-ray detectors. We show that by means of infrared laser radiation it is possible to move and anneal tellurium inclusions exploiting a thermo-diffusion mechanism. The process is studied live during irradiation by means of an optical microscope equipment. Experimental conditions, and, in particular, energy laser fluence, for annealing inclusions of different dimensions are determined.

  14. Anomalous Thermal Behavior in Microcalorimeter Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Horansky, Robert D.; Beall, James A.; Irwin, Kent D.; Ullom, Joel N.

    2009-12-16

    Improving the resolution of gamma-ray detectors is important for many fields, including determinations of the Lamb shift in atoms with high atomic numbers, nuclear treaty verification, and environmental monitoring. High-purity germanium detectors are currently the tool of choice for precision gamma-ray spectroscopy. The resolution of these detectors is limited to about 500 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 100 keV by Fano statistics. In comparison, low-temperature microcalorimeters can provide over an order of magnitude improvement in photon resolution. For instance, a gamma-ray microcalorimeter has achieved 25 eV FWHM resolution at 103 keV. These calorimeters consist of two components, a bulk absorber to stop incident gamma rays and a thermometer made from a thin film electrically biased in the superconducting-to-normal phase transition, called a Transition Edge Sensor, or TES. The standard absorber is bulk, superconducting tin. While tin has historically been the best performing absorber, pulse decays in Sn devices are much slower than predicted. We have begun a systematic study of absorber behavior in order to assess and improve response times. This study leverages two capabilities: the ability to microfabricate highly uniform arrays of gamma-ray detectors and the ability to read out many detectors in a single cool-down using SQUID multiplexer circuits. Here, we present two experiments to identify the source of thermal time constants. The first involves varying properties of the Sn absorber including purity, vendor, and crystal grain size. The second examines the role of the other elements in the microcalorimeter assembly.

  15. Anomalous Thermal Behavior in Microcalorimeter Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horansky, Robert D.; Beall, James A.; Irwin, Kent D.; Ullom, Joel N.

    2009-12-01

    Improving the resolution of gamma-ray detectors is important for many fields, including determinations of the Lamb shift in atoms with high atomic numbers, nuclear treaty verification, and environmental monitoring. High-purity germanium detectors are currently the tool of choice for precision gamma-ray spectroscopy. The resolution of these detectors is limited to about 500 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 100 keV by Fano statistics. In comparison, low-temperature microcalorimeters can provide over an order of magnitude improvement in photon resolution. For instance, a gamma-ray microcalorimeter has achieved 25 eV FWHM resolution at 103 keV. These calorimeters consist of two components, a bulk absorber to stop incident gamma rays and a thermometer made from a thin film electrically biased in the superconducting-to-normal phase transition, called a Transition Edge Sensor, or TES. The standard absorber is bulk, superconducting tin. While tin has historically been the best performing absorber, pulse decays in Sn devices are much slower than predicted. We have begun a systematic study of absorber behavior in order to assess and improve response times. This study leverages two capabilities: the ability to microfabricate highly uniform arrays of gamma-ray detectors and the ability to read out many detectors in a single cool-down using SQUID multiplexer circuits. Here, we present two experiments to identify the source of thermal time constants. The first involves varying properties of the Sn absorber including purity, vendor, and crystal grain size. The second examines the role of the other elements in the microcalorimeter assembly.

  16. Study of asymmetries of Cd(Zn)Te devices investigated using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, and gamma ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Crocco, J.; Bensalah, H.; Zheng, Q.; Dieguez, E.; Corregidor, V.; Avles, E.; Castaldini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Cavalcoli, D.; Cavallini, A.; Vela, O.

    2012-10-01

    Despite these recent advancements in preparing the surface of Cd(Zn)Te devices for detector applications, large asymmetries in the electronic properties of planar Cd(Zn)Te detectors are common. Furthermore, for the development of patterned electrode geometries, selection of each electrode surface is crucial for minimizing dark current in the device. This investigation presented here has been carried out with three objectives. Each objective is oriented towards establishing reliable methods for the selection of the anode and cathode surfaces independent of the crystallographic orientation. The objectives of this study are (i) investigate how the asymmetry in I-V characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te devices may be associated with the TeO2 interfacial layer using Rutherford backscattering to study the structure at the Au-Cd(Zn)Te interface, (ii) develop an understanding of how the concentration of the active traps in Cd(Zn)Te varies with the external bias, and (iii) propose non-destructive methods for selection of the anode and cathode which are independent of crystallographic orientation. The spectroscopic methods employed in this investigation include Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, and surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, as well as gamma ray spectroscopy to demonstrate the influence on detector properties.

  17. Using a pulsed laser beam to investigate the feasibility of sub-pixel position resolution with time-correlated transient signals in 3D pixelated CdZnTe detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Giraldo, L. Ocampo; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; ...

    2017-04-20

    For this study, we evaluated the X-Y position resolution achievable in 3D pixelated detectors by processing the signal waveforms readout from neighboring pixels. In these measurements we used a focused light beam, down to 10 μm, generated by a ~1 mW pulsed laser (650 nm) to carry out raster scans over selected 3×3 pixel areas, while recording the charge signals from the 9 pixels and the cathode using two synchronized digital oscilloscopes.

  18. Using a pulsed laser beam to investigate the feasibility of sub-pixel position resolution with time-correlated transient signals in 3D pixelated CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldo, L. Ocampo; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cheng, S.; De Geronimo, G.; McGilloway, A.; Fried, J.; Hodges, D.; Hossain, A.; Ünlü, K.; Petryk, M.; Vidal, V.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2017-09-01

    We evaluated the X-Y position resolution achievable in 3D pixelated detectors by processing the signal waveforms readout from neighboring pixels. In these measurements we used a focused light beam, down to 10 μm, generated by a 1 mW pulsed laser (650 nm) to carry out raster scans over selected 3×3 pixel areas, while recording the charge signals from the 9 pixels and the cathode using two synchronized digital oscilloscopes.

  19. Gamma-Ray Detectors: From Homeland Security to the Cosmos (443rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey

    2008-12-03

    Many radiation detectors are first developed for homeland security or industrial applications. Scientists, however, are continuously realizing new roles that these detectors can play in high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments. On Wednesday, December 3, join presenter Aleksey Bolotnikov, a physicist in the Nonproliferation and National Security Department (NNSD) and a co-inventor of the cadmium-zinc-telluride Frisch-ring (CdZnTe) detector, for the 443rd Brookhaven Lecture, entitled Gamma-Ray Detectors: From Homeland Security to the Cosmos. In his lecture, Bolotnikov will highlight two primary radiation-detector technologies: CdZnTe detectors and fluid-Xeon (Xe) detectors.

  20. Effect of thickness on physical properties of electron beam vacuum evaporated CdZnTe thin films for tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chander, Subhash; Dhaka, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    The thickness and physical properties of electron beam vacuum evaporated CdZnTe thin films have been optimized in the present work. The films of thickness 300 nm and 400 nm were deposited on ITO coated glass substrates and subjected to different characterization tools like X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis spectrophotometer, source meter and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate the structural, optical, electrical and surface morphological properties respectively. The XRD results show that the as-deposited CdZnTe thin films have zinc blende cubic structure and polycrystalline in nature with preferred orientation (111). Different structural parameters are also evaluated and discussed. The optical study reveals that the optical transition is found to be direct and energy band gap is decreased for higher thickness. The transmittance is found to increase with thickness and red shift observed which is suitable for CdZnTe films as an absorber layer in tandem solar cells. The current-voltage characteristics of deposited films show linear behavior in both forward and reverse directions as well as the conductivity is increased for higher film thickness. The SEM studies show that the as-deposited CdZnTe thin films are found to be homogeneous, uniform, small circle-shaped grains and free from crystal defects. The experimental results confirm that the film thickness plays an important role to optimize the physical properties of CdZnTe thin films for tandem solar cell applications as an absorber layer.

  1. Analysis of Etched CdZnTe Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, J. D.; Bubulac, L. O.; Jaime-Vasquez, M.; Lennon, C. M.; Arias, J. M.; Smith, P. J.; Jacobs, R. N.; Markunas, J. K.; Almeida, L. A.; Stoltz, A.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Peterson, J.; Reddy, M.; Jones, K.; Johnson, S. M.; Lofgreen, D. D.

    2016-09-01

    State-of-the-art as-received (112)B CdZnTe substrates have been examined for surface impurity contamination and polishing residue. Two 4 cm × 4 cm and one 6 cm × 6 cm (112)B state-of-the-art as-received CdZnTe wafers were analyzed. A maximum surface impurity concentration of Al = 1.7 × 1015 atoms cm-2, Si = 3.7 × 1013 atoms cm-2, Cl = 3.12 × 1015 atoms cm-2, S = 1.7 × 1014 atoms cm-2, P = 1.1 × 1014 atoms cm-2, Fe = 1.0 × 1013 atoms cm-2, Br = 1.2 × 1014 atoms cm-2, and Cu = 4 × 1012 atoms cm-2 was observed on the as-received CdZnTe wafers. CdZnTe particulates and residual SiO2 polishing grit were observed on the surface of the as-received (112)B CdZnTe substrates. The polishing grit/CdZnTe particulate density on CdZnTe wafers was observed to vary across a 6 cm × 6 cm wafer from ˜4 × 107 cm-2 to 2.5 × 108 cm-2. The surface impurity and damage layer of the (112)B CdZnTe wafers dictate that a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) preparation etch is required. The contamination for one 4 cm × 4 cm and one 6 cm × 6 cm CdZnTe wafer after a standard MBE Br:methanol preparation etch procedure was also analyzed. A maximum surface impurity concentration of Al = 2.4 × 1015 atoms cm-2, Si = 4.0 × 1013 atoms cm-2, Cl = 7.5 × 1013 atoms cm-2, S = 4.4 × 1013 atoms cm-2, P = 9.8 × 1013 atoms cm-2, Fe = 1.0 × 1013 atoms cm-2, Br = 2.9 × 1014 atoms cm-2, and Cu = 5.2 × 1012 atoms cm-2 was observed on the MBE preparation-etched CdZnTe wafers. The MBE preparation-etched surface contamination consists of Cd(Zn)Te particles/flakes. No residual SiO2 polishing grit was observed on the (112)B surface.

  2. Development of a simplified simulation model for performance characterization of a pixellated CdZnTe multimodality imaging system.

    PubMed

    Guerra, P; Santos, A; Darambara, D G

    2008-02-21

    Current requirements of molecular imaging lead to the complete integration of complementary modalities in a single hybrid imaging system to correlate function and structure. Among the various existing detector technologies, which can be implemented to integrate nuclear modalities (PET and/or single-photon emission computed tomography with x-rays (CT) and most probably with MR, pixellated wide bandgap room temperature semiconductor detectors, such as CdZnTe and/or CdTe, are promising candidates. This paper deals with the development of a simplified simulation model for pixellated semiconductor radiation detectors, as a first step towards the performance characterization of a multimodality imaging system based on CdZnTe. In particular, this work presents a simple computational model, based on a 1D approximate solution of the Schockley-Ramo theorem, and its integration into the Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) platform in order to perform accurately and, therefore, improve the simulations of pixellated detectors in different configurations with a simultaneous cathode and anode pixel readout. The model presented here is successfully validated against an existing detailed finite element simulator, the multi-geometry simulation code, with respect to the charge induced at the anode, taking into consideration interpixel charge sharing and crosstalk, and to the detector charge induction efficiency. As a final point, the model provides estimated energy spectra and time resolution for (57)Co and (18)F sources obtained with the GATE code after the incorporation of the proposed model.

  3. Mechanisms of the passage of dark currents through Cd(Zn)Te semi-insulating crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklyarchuk, V.; Fochuk, P.; Rarenko, I.; Zakharuk, Z.; Sklyarchuk, O.; Nykoniuk, Ye.; Rybka, A.; Kutny, V.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; James, R. B.

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the passage of dark currents through semi-insulating crystals of Cd(Zn)Te with weak n-type conductivity that are used widely as detectors of ionizing radiation. The crystals were grown from a tellurium solution melt at 800 оС by the zone-melting method, in which a polycrystalline rod in a quartz ampoule was moved through a zone heater at a rate of 2 mm per day. The synthesis of the rod was carried out at ~1150 оС. We determined the important electro-physical parameters of this semiconductor, using techniques based on a parallel study of the temperature dependence of current-voltage characteristics in both the ohmic and the space-charge-limited current regions. We established in these crystals the relationship between the energy levels and the concentrations of deep-level impurity states, responsible for dark conductivity and their usefulness as detectors.

  4. Pixellated Cd(Zn)Te high-energy X-ray instrument

    PubMed Central

    Seller, P.; Bell, S.; Cernik, R.J.; Christodoulou, C.; Egan, C.K.; Gaskin, J.A.; Jacques, S.; Pani, S.; Ramsey, B.D.; Reid, C.; Sellin, P.J.; Scuffham, J.W.; Speller, R.D.; Wilson, M.D.; Veale, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pixellated high energy X-ray detector instrument to be used in a variety of imaging applications. The instrument consists of either a Cadmium Zinc Telluride or Cadmium Telluride (Cd(Zn)Te) detector bump-bonded to a large area ASIC and packaged with a high performance data acquisition system. The 80 by 80 pixels each of 250 μm by 250 μm give better than 1 keV FWHM energy resolution at 59.5 keV and 1.5 keV FWHM at 141 keV, at the same time providing a high speed imaging performance. This system uses a relatively simple wire-bonded interconnection scheme but this is being upgraded to allow multiple modules to be used with very small dead space. The readout system and the novel interconnect technology is described and how the system is performing in several target applications. PMID:22737179

  5. Pixellated Cd(Zn)Te high-energy X-ray instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seller, P.; Bell, S.; Cernik, R. J.; Christodoulou, C.; Egan, C. K.; Gaskin, J. A.; Jacques, S.; Pani, S.; Ramsey, B. D.; Reid, C.; Sellin, P. J.; Scuffham, J. W.; Speller, R. D.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a pixellated high energy X-ray detector instrument to be used in a variety of imaging applications. The instrument consists of either a Cadmium Zinc Telluride or Cadmium Telluride (Cd(Zn)Te) detector bump-bonded to a large area ASIC and packaged with a high performance data acquisition system. The 80 by 80 pixels each of 250 μm by 250 μm give better than 1 keV FWHM energy resolution at 59.5 keV and 1.5 keV FWHM at 141 keV, at the same time providing a high speed imaging performance. This system uses a relatively simple wire-bonded interconnection scheme but this is being upgraded to allow multiple modules to be used with very small dead space. The readout system and the novel interconnect technology is described and how the system is performing in several target applications.

  6. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  7. Effect of charge trapping on effective carrier lifetime in compound semiconductors: High resistivity CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Kamieniecki, Emil

    2014-11-21

    The dominant problem limiting the energy resolution of compound semiconductor based radiation detectors is the trapping of charge carriers. The charge trapping affects energy resolution through the carrier lifetime more than through the mobility. Conventionally, the effective carrier lifetime is determined using a 2-step process based on measurement of the mobility-lifetime product (μτ) and determining drift mobility using time-of-flight measurements. This approach requires fabrication of contacts on the sample. A new RF-based pulse rise-time method, which replaces this 2-step process with a single non-contact direct measurement, is discussed. The application of the RF method is illustrated with high-resistivity detector-grade CdZnTe crystals. The carrier lifetime in the measured CdZnTe, depending on the quality of the crystals, was between about 5 μs and 8 μs. These values are in good agreement with the results obtained using conventional 2-step approach. While the effective carrier lifetime determined from the initial portion of the photoresponse transient combines both recombination and trapping in a manner similar to the conventional 2-step approach, both the conventional and the non-contact RF methods offer only indirect evaluation of the effect of charge trapping in the semiconductors used in radiation detectors. Since degradation of detector resolution is associated not with trapping but essentially with detrapping of carriers, and, in particular, detrapping of holes in n-type semiconductors, it is concluded that evaluation of recombination and detrapping during photoresponse decay is better suited for evaluation of compound semiconductors used in radiation detectors. Furthermore, based on previously reported data, it is concluded that photoresponse decay in high resistivity CdZnTe at room temperature is dominated by detrapping of carriers from the states associated with one type of point defect and by recombination of carriers at one type of

  8. HPVB AND HPVZM SHAPED GROWTH OF CDZNTE, CDSE AND ZNSE CRYSTALS.

    SciTech Connect

    KOLESNIKOV,N.N.; JAMES,R.B.; BERZIGIAROVA,N.S.; KULAKOV,M.P.

    2002-07-07

    High-pressure Bridgman (HPVB) and vertical zone melting (HPVZM) growth processes have been applied for the manufacturing of Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (x = 0.04-0.2), CdSe and ZnSe crystal tapes with sizes up to 120 x 120 x 12 mm. The influences of the technological parameters describing the growth processes on the crystal quality and some selected material properties are discussed. The dependence of the inclusion (bubbles) content on the deviation from melt stoichiometry is determined. A method for growing plates with low content of inclusions is described. High-resistivity crystal tapes of undoped CdZnTe (10{sup 10} Ohm x cm), CdSe (10{sup 11} Ohm x cm) and ZnSe (>10{sup 11} Ohm x cm) were prepared. The possibility of tape growth on oriented seeds is shown for the example of CdSe. The primary differences between HPVB and HPVZM results are described. The main HPVZM advantage for II-VI compound crystal growth is the possibility of obtaining crystals with more stoichiometric composition or with a controlled deviation from stoichiometry. Hence, HPVZM is preferable for growing high-resistivity II-VI crystals with low inclusion content and possibly with better transport properties. Keywords for this report are: Crystal growth, shaped crystal growth, ZnSe, CdSe, CdZnTe, CZT, HPVB, Bridgman, HPVZM, zone melting, radiation detectors.

  9. Compensation scheme for online neutron detection using a Gd-covered CdZnTe sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Kondrasovs, Vladimir; Boudergui, Karim

    2017-06-01

    The development of portable and personal neutron dosimeters requires compact and efficient radiation sensors. Gd-157, Gd-155 and Cd-113 nuclei present the highest cross-sections for thermal neutron capture among natural isotopes. In order to allow for the exploitation of the low and medium-energy radiative signature of the said captures, the contribution of gamma background radiation, falling into the same energy range, needs to be cancelled out. This paper introduces a thermal neutron detector based on a twin-dense semiconductor scheme. The neutron-sensitive channel takes the form of a Gd-covered CdZnTe crystal, a high density and effective atomic number detection medium. The background compensation will be carried out by means of an identical CdZnTe sensor with a Tb cover. The setting of a hypothesis test aims at discriminating the signal generated by the signature of thermal neutron captures in Gd from statistical fluctuations over the compensation of both independent channels. The measurement campaign conducted with an integrated single-channel chain and two metal Gd and Tb covers, under Cs-137 and Cf-252 irradiations, provides first quantitative results on gamma-rejection and neutron sensitivity. The described study of concept gives grounds for a portable, online-compatible device, operable in conventional to controlled environments.

  10. Study of Transport Behavior and Conversion Efficiency in Pillar Structured Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R

    2007-04-26

    Room temperature, high efficiency and scalable radiation detectors can be realized by manipulating materials at the micro scale. With micro-semiconductor-pillars, we will advance the thermal neutron detection efficiency of semiconductor detectors to over 70% with 50 mm in detector thickness. New material science, new transport behavior, neutron to alpha conversion dynamics and their relationship with neutron detection will be discovered with the proposed structures.

  11. MATERIAL QUALITY CHARACTERIZATION OF CDZNTE SUBSTRATES FOR HGCDTE EPITAXY.

    SciTech Connect

    CARINI, G.A.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; JAMES, R.B.; ET AL.

    2005-08-18

    CdZnTe (CZT) has been traditionally used as substrate for HgCdTe (MCT) epitaxy. The constraint of good lattice matching plays a fundamental role in the use of this substrate. In, fact, despite the difficulties in growing large area of affordable high-quality substrates, CZT wafers remain the best choice for high yield infrared devices. Nevertheless, material quality of the substrate and epilayer play a limiting role in IR focal plane array (FPA) detector technology. Furthermore, data suggest that the quality of the epilayer is affected by imperfections in the CZT substrate. In addition the pixel size for the current generation of FPAs (less than 20 {micro}m) suggests a need for detailed microscale characterization and an understanding of the substrates and epilayers on at least the spatial scale of the pixel dimensions. In an effort to understand the correlation between material quality and device performances, we have begun to study CZT substrates to investigate bulk and surface properties. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS, BNL) permits a wide variety of material investigations that take advantage of the highly collimated photon radiation emitted from the X-ray and VUV-IR rings. Synchrotron radiation offers the capability to combine good resolution and shorter exposure times than conventional X-ray sources, which allow the ability for high-resolution mapping of relatively large areas in an acceptable amount of time. Transmission X-ray diffraction techniques, such as white beam topography and rocking curves, have already been used for bulk investigation [l] as well as IR transmission microspectroscopy. Surface studies on CZT substrates were performed using X-ray diffraction. By correlating results from the different material and device investigations, we offer a more complete characterization of bulk and surface crystalline quality and their effects on device performance. Information on the location of grain boundaries and precipitates, evaluation of

  12. Characterization of HgCdTe and Related Materials and Substrates for Third Generation Infrared Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    bulk CdZnTe ( CZT ) substrates. There have been significant recent efforts to identify alternative substrates to CZT as well as alternative detector...1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...sensing and imaging, and is usually grown on lattice-matched bulk CdZnTe ( CZT ) substrates. There have been significant recent efforts to identify

  13. Optical and electrical study of CdZnTe surfaces passivated by KOH and NH4F solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zázvorka, J.; Franc, J.; Statelov, M.; Pekárek, J.; Veis, M.; Moravec, P.; Mašek, K.

    2016-12-01

    Performance of CdZnTe-based detectors is highly related to surface preparation. Mechanical polishing, chemical etching and passivation are routinely employed for this purpose. However, the relation between these processes and the detector performance in terms of underlying physical phenomena has not been fully explained. The dynamics and properties of CdZnTe surface oxide layers, created by passivation with KOH and NH4F/H2O2 solutions, were studied by optical ellipsometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thicknesses and growth rates of the surface oxide layers differed for each of the passivation methods. Leakage currents which influence the final spectral resolution of the detector were measured simultaneously with ellipsometry. Results of both optical and electrical investigation showed the same trends in the time evolution and correlated to each other. NH4F/H2O2 passivation showed to be a method which produces the most desirable properties of the surface oxide layer.

  14. X-ray Topography to Characterize Surface Damage on CdZnTe Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Black, David; Woicik, Joseph; Duff, Martine C.; Hunter, Douglas B.; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2008-12-05

    Synthetic CdZnTe or 'CZT' crystals can be used for room temperature detection of {gamma}-radiation. Structural/morphological heterogeneities within CZT, such as twinning, secondary phases (often referred to as inclusions or precipitates), and poly-crystallinity can affect detector performance. As part of a broader study using synchrotron radiation techniques to correlate detector performance to microstructure, x-ray topography (XRT) has been used to characterize CZT crystals. We have found that CZT crystals almost always have a variety of residual surface damage, which interferes with our ability to observe the underlying microstructure for purposes of crystal quality evaluation. Specific structures are identifiable as resulting from fabrication processes and from handling and shipping of sample crystals. Etching was found to remove this damage; however, our studies have shown that the radiation detector performance of the etched surfaces was inferior to the as-polished surface due to higher surface currents which result in more peak tailing and less energy resolution. We have not fully investigated the effects of the various types of inducible damage on radiation detector performance.

  15. Internal Electric Field Behavior of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Radiation Detectors Under High Carrier Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.H.; Gul, R.; and James, R.B.

    2010-10-26

    The behavior of the internal electric-field of nuclear-radiation detectors substantially affects the detector's performance. We investigated the distribution of the internal field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors under high carrier injection. We noted the build-up of a space charge region near the cathode that produces a built-in field opposing the applied field. Its presence entails the collapse of the electric field in the rest of detector, other than the portion near the cathode. Such a space-charge region originates from serious hole-trapping in CZT. The device's operating temperature greatly affects the width of the space-charge region. With increasing temperature from 5 C to 35 C, its width expanded from about 1/6 to 1/2 of the total depth of the detector.

  16. Correlation Between Bulk Material Defects and Spectroscopic Response in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, C. M.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Parsons, A. M.; Tueller, J.; VanSant, J. T.; Munoz, B. F.; Snodgrass, S. J.; Mullinix, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    One of the critical challenges for large area cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detector arrays is obtaining material capable of uniform imaging and spectroscopic response. Two complementary nondestructive techniques for characterizing bulk CdZnTe have been developed to identify material with a uniform response. The first technique, infrared transmission imaging, allows for rapid visualization of bulk defects. The second technique, x-ray spectral mapping, provides a map of the material spectroscopic response when it is configured as a planar detector. The two techniques have been used to develop a correlation between bulk defect type and detector performance. The correlation allows for the use of infrared imaging to rapidly develop wafer mining maps. The mining of material free of detrimental defects has the potential to dramatically increase the yield and quality of large area CdZnTe detector arrays.

  17. Ionizing Radiation Detector

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-11-18

    A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

  18. Photo-induced currents in CdZnTe crystals as a function of illumination wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, L. C.; L, Washington A., II; Duff, M. C.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.; Burger, A.

    2012-03-01

    We report variations in the currents of CdZnTe semiconductor crystals during exposure to a series of light emitting diodes of various wavelengths ranging from 470 to 950 nm. The changes in the steady-state current of one CdZnTe crystal with and without illumination along with the time dependence of the illumination effects are discussed. Analysis of the de-trapping and transient bulk currents during and after optical excitation yield insight into the behaviour of charge traps within the crystal. Similar behaviour is observed for illumination of a second CdZnTe crystal suggesting that the overall illumination effects are not crystal dependent.

  19. PHOTOINDUCED CURRENTS IN CDZNTE CRYSTALS AS A FUNCTION OF ILLUMINATION WAVELENGTH

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Washington, A.; Duff, M.

    2012-04-23

    We report variations in the currents of CdZnTe semiconductor crystals during exposure to a series of light emitting diodes of various wavelengths ranging from 470 to 950 nm. The changes in the steady-state current of one CdZnTe crystal with and without illumination along with the time dependence of the illumination effects are discussed. Analysis of the de-trapping and transient bulk currents during and after optical excitation yield insight into the behaviour of charge traps within the crystal. Similar behaviour is observed for illumination of a second CdZnTe crystal suggesting that the overall illumination effects are not crystal dependent.

  20. Evaluation of a multistage CdZnTe Compton camera for prompt γ imaging for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleskey, M.; Kaye, W.; Mackin, D. S.; Beddar, S.; He, Z.; Polf, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    A new detector system, Polaris J from H3D, has been evaluated for its potential application as a Compton camera (CC) imaging device for prompt γ rays (PGs) emitted during proton radiation therapy (RT) for the purpose of dose range verification. This detector system consists of four independent CdZnTe detector stages and a coincidence module, allowing the user to construct a Compton camera in different geometrical configurations and to accept both double and triple scatter events. Energy resolution for the 662 keV line from 137Cs was found to be 9.7 keV FWHM. The raw absolute efficiencies for double and triple scatter events were 2.2 ×10-5 and 5.8 ×10-7, respectively, for γs from a 60Co source. The position resolution for the reconstruction of a point source from the measured CC data was about 2 mm. Overall, due to the low efficiency of the Polaris J CC, the current system was deemed not viable for imaging PGs emitted during proton RT treatment delivery. However, using a validated Monte Carlo model of the CC, we found that by increasing the size of the detectors and placing them in a two stage configuration, the efficiency could be increased to a level to make PG imaging possible during proton RT.

  1. Impact of CdZnTe Substrates on MBE HgCdTe Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, J. D.; Bubulac, L. O.; Jaime-Vasquez, M.; Arias, J. M.; Smith, P. J.; Jacobs, R. N.; Markunas, J. K.; Almeida, L. A.; Stoltz, A.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Peterson, J.; Reddy, M.; Jones, K.; Johnson, S. M.; Lofgreen, D. D.

    2017-09-01

    The highest sensitivity, lowest dark current infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) are produced using HgCdTe on CdZnTe substrates. As-received state-of-the-art CdZnTe 6 × 6 and 7 × 7.5 cm substrates were analyzed using Nomarski phase contrast microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning profilometry. On all CdZnTe substrates tested, we observed as-received large area macro-defect contamination. Using a defect specification limit of 50 contiguous defective pixels, we identified non-compliant 1280 × 720 12- μm pitch focal plane arrays due to as-received substrate macro-defect contamination. Using the above specification, up to 20% IRFPA wafer yield loss is due to state-of-the-art as-received CdZnTe substrate macro-contamination.

  2. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  3. Recent developments in semiconductor gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, Paul N.; Amman, Mark; Tindall, Craig; Lee, Julie S.

    2003-10-28

    The successful development of lithium-drifted Ge detectors in the 1960's marked the beginning of the significant use of semiconductor crystals for direct detection and spectroscopy of gamma rays. In the 1970's, high-purity Ge became available, which enabled the production of complex detectors and multi-detector systems. In the following decades, the technology of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors continued to advance, with significant developments not only in Ge detectors but also in Si detectors and room-temperature compound-semiconductor detectors. In recent years, our group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a variety of gamma ray detectors based on these semiconductor materials. Examples include Ge strip detectors, lithium-drifted Si strip detectors, and coplanar-grid CdZnTe detectors. These advances provide new capabilities in the measurement of gamma rays, such as the ability to perform imaging and the realization of highly compact spectroscopy systems.

  4. Interface chemistry of CdZnTe films studied by a peel-off approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jun; Xu, Haitao; Zhang, Yuelu; Ji, Huanhuan; Xu, Run; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Jijun; Liang, Xiaoyan; Tang, Ke; Wang, Linjun

    2016-12-01

    CdZnTe films with thickness above 50 μm were deposited at temperatures of 200-500 °C by Close Space Sublimation method. A peel-off approach has been adopted to study the interface chemistry of CdZnTe thick films. For all the CdZnTe films, the scanning electron microscopy images show the small and round-like grains formed at interface in contrast to the large ordered grains at surface. For CdZnTe films grown at a low substrate temperature of 200 °C, the interface layer between CdZnTe and substrate is mixed with Te and CdTe, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results. The thickness of the interface layer can be estimated to be 84 nm by depth profile using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In contrast, a thin interface layer less than 14 nm is found at a high substrate temperature of 500 °C. The limited reaction of Te2 and Cd (Zn) to CdZnTe at a low growth temperature is responsible for the formation of the thick interface layer and a slow deposition rate at the nucleation stage.

  5. A method to improve spectral resolution in planar semiconductor gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Keele, B.D.; Addleman, R.S.; Troyer, G.L.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes an empirically derived algorithm to compensate for charge trapping in CdTe, CdZnTe, and other planar semiconductor detectors. The method is demonstrated to be an improvement over available systems and application to experimental data is shown.

  6. Gamma ray detector modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capote, M. Albert (Inventor); Lenos, Howard A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A radiation detector assembly has a semiconductor detector array substrate of CdZnTe or CdTe, having a plurality of detector cell pads on a first surface thereof, the pads having a contact metallization and a solder barrier metallization. An interposer card has planar dimensions no larger than planar dimensions of the semiconductor detector array substrate, a plurality of interconnect pads on a first surface thereof, at least one readout semiconductor chip and at least one connector on a second surface thereof, each having planar dimensions no larger than the planar dimensions of the interposer card. Solder columns extend from contacts on the interposer first surface to the plurality of pads on the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, the solder columns having at least one solder having a melting point or liquidus less than 120 degrees C. An encapsulant is disposed between the interposer circuit card first surface and the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, encapsulating the solder columns, the encapsulant curing at a temperature no greater than 120 degrees C.

  7. New, room-temperature gamma-ray detector for improved assay of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, P.A.; Meier, A.P.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.

    1997-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy for portable and unattended assay of nuclear materials requires rugged, reliable, room-temperature detectors that are stable in variable environments and detect gamma rays with good efficiency and energy resolution. For portable assays especially, compact detectors address needs for large numbers of measurements performed in rapid succession with heavy shielding and collimation by a user who must carry the spectroscopy equipment. Most measurements are made with compact NaI detectors. The assay of variable-burnup plutonium and other plutonium materials of variable isotopic composition challenges low-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in numerous safeguards applications including holdup measurements, safeguards inspections, monitoring, and safeguards close-out in decontamination and decommissioning. A new, commercial-prototype coplanar-grid CdZnTe detector has been evaluated using the assay of variable-burnup plutonium as a metric indicator to show the substantial benefit of its improved performance compared to results of the same measurements performed with the compact NaI detector. Detector performance, spectrum-quality, and assay results as well as gamma-ray spectra of reference sources are compared for the coplanar-grid CdZnTe and compact NaI detectors to illustrate the advantages of the new room-temperature gamma-ray detector. Isotope identification with the coplanar-grid CdZnTe detector is demonstrated. Preliminary calculations (Monte Carlo coupled to simulations of radiation transport and charge collection) of the spectral response of the detector to plutonium indicate promise for the use of the coplanar-grid CdZnTe detector for further improvements in the accuracy of assays and for analysis of gamma-ray isotopic distributions.

  8. The analysis on the origin of high resistivity in Cl-doped polycrystalline CdZnTe thick films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Park, Y. J.; Na, Y. H.; Hong, J. K.; Jung, T. R.; Yi, Y.; Kim, S. U.

    2004-03-01

    Polycrystalline CdZnTe thick films were grown by thermal evaporation method using CdZnTe and CdZnTe:Cl source. Non-doped CdZnTe thick films have Te-rich stoichiometry having resistivity 3.3 × 109 cm. The Cl-doped CdZnTe thick films have 1.2 × 1010 cm in resistivity. To evaluate the role of Cl in the increasement of the resistivity, the density of localized states were calculated from the analysis of transient TOF (time of flight)current. From the comparison of Cl-doped CZT thick films with non-doped and O2 annealed CdZnTe thick films, we have found that Cl doping is related to the formation of states at EV + 0.75 eV region and oxygen reduces grain boundary related defects through formation TeO2 or CdTeO3.

  9. Characterization of Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Comparisons of charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are discussed. These properties along with the detector geometry help to define the limiting energy resolution and spatial resolution of the detector in question. The first detector consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). Signal readout is via discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). This crystal is bonded to a custom-built readout chip (ASIC) providing all front-end electronics to each of the 256 independent pixels. These detectors act as precursors to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation.

  10. Characterization of Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Comparisons of charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are discussed. These properties along with the detector geometry help to define the limiting energy resolution and spatial resolution of the detector in question. The first detector consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). Signal readout is via discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). This crystal is bonded to a custom-built readout chip (ASIC) providing all front-end electronics to each of the 256 independent pixels. These detectors act as precursors to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation.

  11. Development of Gamma-Ray Compton Imager Using Room-Temperature 3-D Position Sensitive Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong He; David Whe; Glenn Knoll

    2003-05-14

    During the three years of this project, two 3-dimensional position sensitive CdZnTe spectrometers were upgraded in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A prototype Compton-scattering gamma-ray imager was assembled using the two upgraded CdZnTe detectors. The performance of both gamma-ray spectrometers were individually tested. The angular resolution and detection sensitivity of the imaging system were measured using both a point and a line-shaped 137 Cs radiation source. The measurement results are consistent with that obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations performed during the early phase of the project.

  12. Effect of de-trapping on carrier transport process in semi-insulating CdZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rong-Rong; Jie, Wan-Qi; Zha, Gang-Qiang; Xu, Ya-Dong; Feng, Tao; Wang, Tao; Du, Zhuo-Tong

    2015-06-01

    The effect of de-trapping on the carrier transport process in the CdZnTe detector is studied by laser beam-induced transient current (LBIC) measurement. Trapping time, de-trapping time, and mobility for electrons are determined directly from transient waveforms under various bias voltages. The results suggest that an electric field strengthens the capture and emission effects in trap center, which is associated with field-assisted capture and the Poole-Frenkel effect, respectively. The electron mobility is calculated to be 950 cm2/V·s and the corresponding electron mobility-lifetime product is found to be 1.32×10-3 cm2/V by a modified Hecht equation with considering the surface recombination effect. It is concluded that the trapping time and de-trapping time obtained from LBIC measurement provide direct information concerning the transport process. Project supported by the National Instrumentation Program, China (Grant No. 2011YQ040082), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274081, 51372205, and 51202197), the National 973 Project of China (Grant No. 2011CB610400), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M550509), and the 111 Project of China (Grant No. B08040).

  13. Energy Calibration of a CdTe Photon Counting Spectral Detector with Consideration of its Non-Convergent Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Seok; Kang, Dong-Goo; Jin, Seung Oh; Kim, Insoo; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2016-04-11

    Fast and accurate energy calibration of photon counting spectral detectors (PCSDs) is essential for their biomedical applications to identify and characterize bio-components or contrast agents in tissues. Using the x-ray tube voltage as a reference for energy calibration is known to be an efficient method, but there has been no consideration in the energy calibration of non-convergent behavior of PCSDs. We observed that a single pixel mode (SPM) CdTe PCSD based on Medipix-2 shows some non-convergent behaviors in turning off the detector elements when a high enough threshold is applied to the comparator that produces a binary photon count pulse. More specifically, the detector elements are supposed to stop producing photon count pulses once the threshold reaches a point of the highest photon energy determined by the tube voltage. However, as the x-ray exposure time increases, the threshold giving 50% of off pixels also increases without converging to a point. We established a method to take account of the non-convergent behavior in the energy calibration. With the threshold-to-photon energy mapping function established by the proposed method, we could better identify iodine component in a phantom consisting of iodine and other components.

  14. Thermodynamics of post-growth annealing of cadmium zinc telluride nuclear radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Aaron Lee

    Nuclear Radiation Detectors are used for detecting, tracking, and identifying radioactive materials which emit high-energy gamma and X-rays. The use of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors is particularly attractive because of the detector's ability to operate at room temperature and measure the energy spectra of gamma-ray sources with a high resolution, typically less than 1% at 662 keV. While CdZnTe detectors are acceptable imperfections in the crystals limit their full market potential. One of the major imperfections are Tellurium inclusions generated during the crystal growth process by the retrograde solubility of Tellurium and Tellurium-rich melt trapped at the growth interface. Tellurium inclusions trap charge carriers generated by gamma and X-ray photons and thus reduce the portion of generated charge carriers that reach the electrodes for collection and conversion into a readable signal which is representative of the ionizing radiation's energy and intensity. One approach in resolving this problem is post-growth annealing which has the potential of removing the Tellurium inclusions and associated impurities. The goal of this project is to use experimental techniques to study the thermodynamics of Tellurium inclusion migration in post-growth annealing of CdZnTe nuclear detectors with the temperature gradient zone migration (TGZM) technique. Systematic experiments will be carried out to provide adequate thermodynamic data that will inform the engineering community of the optimum annealing parameters. Additionally, multivariable correlations that involve the Tellurium diffusion coefficient, annealing parameters, and CdZnTe properties will be analyzed. The experimental approach will involve systematic annealing experiments (in Cd vapor overpressure) on different sizes of CdZnTe crystals at varying temperature gradients ranging from 0 to 60°C/mm (used to migrate the Tellurium inclusion to one side of the crystal), and at annealing temperatures ranging

  15. Measurement of the drift mobilities and the mobility-lifetime products of charge carriers in a CdZnTe crystal by using a transient pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Kwon, Y. K.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present results on the measurement of the drift mobility and the mobility-lifetime product of charge carriers in a 16-pixellated CdZnTe detector. For the determination of an interaction position based on the pulse rise-time method in a CZT detector, it is necessary to characterize the transport properties governed by drift mobility and lifetime for electrons and holes. In order to extract the transport properties of an electron and a hole, we bombarded 5.5-MeV alpha particles from a 241Am source and 81-keV gamma rays emitted from a 133Ba source on the negatively biased contact of the CZT detector. A time-of-flight (TOF) method was used to measure the electron drift mobility at room temperature whose value turned out to be 906.4 cm2/Vċ s. With the Hecht's equation, the electron mobility-lifetime product was also determined from the bias-dependent alpha response and was equal to (9.88 ± 2.33) × 10-3 cm2/V. On the other hand, the hole mobility-lifetime product was evaluated by a model based on the average charge collection efficiency which accounts for the absorption probability with a given photon energy. By using a single parameter fitting of the model, we obtained the hole mobility-lifetime product of (8.28 ± 0.17) × 10-4 cm2/V.

  16. Measurement of the drift mobilities and the mobility-lifetime products of charge carriers in a CdZnTe crystal by using a transient pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Kwon, Y. K.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present results on the measurement of the drift mobility and the mobility-lifetime product of charge carriers in a 16-pixellated CdZnTe detector. For the determination of an interaction position based on the pulse rise-time method in a CZT detector, it is necessary to characterize the transport properties governed by drift mobility and lifetime for electrons and holes. In order to extract the transport properties of an electron and a hole, we bombarded 5.5-MeV alpha particles from a 241Am source and 81-keV gamma rays emitted from a 133Ba source on the negatively biased contact of the CZT detector. A time-of-flight (TOF) method was used to measure the electron drift mobility at room temperature whose value turned out to be 906.4 cm2/Vċ s. With the Hecht's equation, the electron mobility-lifetime product was also determined from the bias-dependent alpha response and was equal to (9.88 ± 2.33) × 10-3 cm2/V. On the other hand, the hole mobility-lifetime product was evaluated by a model based on the average charge collection efficiency which accounts for the absorption probability with a given photon energy. By using a single parameter fitting of the model, we obtained the hole mobility-lifetime product of (8.28 ± 0.17) × 10-4 cm2/V.

  17. Reproductive ability of a cloned male detector dog and behavioral traits of its offspring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Geon A; Kim, Rak Seung; Lee, Jong Su; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Hong, Do Kyo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-09-30

    In 2007, seven detector dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer using one nuclear donor dog, then trained and certified as excellent detector dogs, similar to their donor. In 2011, we crossed a cloned male and normal female by natural breeding and produced ten offspring. In this study, we investigated the puppies' temperaments, which we later compared with those of the cloned parent male. The results show that the cloned male had normal reproductive abilities and produced healthy offspring. All puppies completed narcotic detector dog training with a success rate for selection of 60%. Although the litter of cloned males was small in this study, a cloned male dog bred by natural mating produced puppies that later successfully completed the training course for drug detection. In conclusion, cloning an elite dog with superior genetic factors and breeding of the cloned dog was found to be a useful method to efficiently procure detector dogs.

  18. Reproductive ability of a cloned male detector dog and behavioral traits of its offspring

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Geon A; Kim, Rak Seung; Lee, Jong Su; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Hong, Do Kyo

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, seven detector dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer using one nuclear donor dog, then trained and certified as excellent detector dogs, similar to their donor. In 2011, we crossed a cloned male and normal female by natural breeding and produced ten offspring. In this study, we investigated the puppies' temperaments, which we later compared with those of the cloned parent male. The results show that the cloned male had normal reproductive abilities and produced healthy offspring. All puppies completed narcotic detector dog training with a success rate for selection of 60%. Although the litter of cloned males was small in this study, a cloned male dog bred by natural mating produced puppies that later successfully completed the training course for drug detection. In conclusion, cloning an elite dog with superior genetic factors and breeding of the cloned dog was found to be a useful method to efficiently procure detector dogs. PMID:26435541

  19. Next Generation Semiconductor-Based Radiation Detectors Using Cadmium Magnesium Telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, Sudhir B; Kutcher, Susan W; Palsoz, Witold; Berding, Martha; Burger, Arnold

    2014-11-17

    The primary objective of Phase I was to perform extensive studies on the purification, crystal growth and annealing procedures of CdMgTe to gain a clear understanding of the basic material properties to enable production of detector material with performance comparable to that of CdZnTe. Brimrose utilized prior experience in the growth and processing of II-VI crystals and produced high purity material and good quality single crystals of CdMgTe. Processing techniques for these crystals including annealing, mechanical and chemical polishing, surface passivation and electrode fabrication were developed. Techniques to characterize pertinent electronic characteristics were developed and gamma ray detectors were fabricated. Feasibility of the development of comprehensive defect modeling in this new class of material was demonstrated by our partner research institute SRI International, to compliment the experimental work. We successfully produced a CdMgTe detector that showed 662 keV gamma response with energy resolution of 3.4% (FWHM) at room temperature, without any additional signal correction. These results are comparable to existing CdZnTe (CZT) technology using the same detector size and testing conditions. We have successfully demonstrated detection of gamma-radiation from various isotopes/sources, using CdMgTe thus clearly proving the feasibility that CdMgTe is an excellent, low-cost alternative to CdZnTe.

  20. Characterization of coplanar grid CZT detectors with highly collimated x-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, Gabriella A.; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Wright, Gomez W.; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Siddons, D. P.; James, Ralph B.

    2004-10-01

    CdZnTe detectors demonstrated great potentials for detection of gamma radiation. However, energy resolution of CdZnTe detectors is significantly affected by uncollected holes which have low mobility and short lifetime. To overcome this deleterious effects upon energy resolution special detector designs have to be implemented. The most practical of them are the small pixel effect device, the co-planar grid device, and the virtual Frisch-grid device. We routinely use a highly collimated high-intensity X-ray beams provided by National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to study of CdZnTe material and performances of the different types of devices on the micron-scale. This powerful tool allows us to evaluate electronic properties of the material, device performance, uniformity of the detector responses, effects related to the device's contact pattern and electric field distribution, etc. In particular, in this paper we present new results obtained from the performance studies of 15 x 15 x 7.5 mm3 coplanar-grid devices coupled to readout ASIC. We observed the effect of the strip contacts comprising the grids on the energy resolution of the coplanar-grid device.

  1. Radiation Testing of IR Detectors for WFC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R. J.; Waczynski, A.; Johnson, S. D.; Marshall, P.; Marshall, C.; Foltz, R.; Kimble, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    The near-IR channel of Wide Field Camera 3, an instrument being developed for installation onto the Hubble Space Telescope, employs a Rockwell Scientific Company 1K x 1K HgCdTe detector array hybridized to a Hawaii-1R multiplexer. Radiation testing of test detectors showed that the WFC3 detectors do not exhibit a post-SAA glow of the sort seen in the NICMOS detectors. However, an anomalously high background was observed during the irradiation in the proton beam. This background goes away promptly when the beam is turned off. Subsequent testing and analysis revealed that the background arises due to emission of photons from within the CdZnTe detector substrate at the blue transmission edge of the substrate material. Further testing of devices with the substrate removed show no excess background signal. These results lead to a recommendation that the CdZnTe substrate material should be removed for space applications which require the ability to detect faint objects.

  2. Understanding the detector behavior through Montecarlo and calibration studies in view of the SOX measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminata, A.; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; Cribier, M.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Durero, M.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, T.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jonquères, N.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kornoukhov, V.; Kryn, D.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Link, J.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Veyssiere, C.; Vishneva, A.; Vivier, M.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-02-01

    Borexino is an unsegmented neutrino detector operating at LNGS in central Italy. The experiment has shown its performances through its unprecedented accomplishments in the solar and geoneutrino detection. These performances make it an ideal tool to accomplish a state- of-the-art experiment able to test the existence of sterile neutrinos (SOX experiment). For both the solar and the SOX analysis, a good understanding of the detector response is fundamental. Consequently, calibration campaigns with radioactive sources have been performed over the years. The calibration data are of extreme importance to develop an accurate Monte Carlo code. This code is used in all the neutrino analyses. The Borexino-SOX calibration techniques and program and the advances on the detector simulation code in view of the start of the SOX data taking are presented. 1

  3. Understanding sensitization behavior of lead selenide photoconductive detectors by charge separation model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Lihua E-mail: shi@ou.edu; Qiu, Jijun; Weng, Binbin; Chang, Caleb; Yuan, Zijian; Shi, Zhisheng E-mail: shi@ou.edu

    2014-02-28

    We introduce a charge separation model in this work to explain the mechanism of enhanced photoconductivity of polycrystalline lead salt photoconductors. Our results show that this model could clarify the heuristic fabrication processes of such lead salt detectors that were not well understood and often considered mysterious for nearly a century. The improved lifetime and performance of the device, e.g., responsivity, are attributed to the spatial separation of holes and electrons, hence less possibility of carrier recombination. This model shows that in addition to crystal quality the size of crystallites, the depth of outer conversion layer, and doping concentration could all affect detector performance. The simulation results agree well with experimental results and thus offer a very useful tool for further improvement of lead salt detectors. The model was developed with lead salt family of photoconductors in mind, but may well be applicable to a wider class of semiconducting films.

  4. Spectrometric characteristic improvement of CdTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.I.; Garbusin, V.A.; Dorogov, P.G.; Loutchanski, A.E.; Kondrashov, V.V.

    1995-08-01

    A new pulse shape correction method combined with a pulse shape selection method has been proposed for a CdTe detectors energy resolution improvement and increasing the total absorption peak efficiency. The capabilities of the new technique for the spectrometric characteristic improvement are based on using specific features of the CdTe detectors output pulses. The energy resolution of about 1% FWHM at 662 keV has been achieved with planar CdTe detector under room temperature without decrease of peak efficiency. Standard measurement techniques give 3.7% FWHM. A significant spectrometric characteristic improvement of other room temperature semiconductor detectors such as HgI{sub 2} and CdZnTe detectors was also obtained.

  5. Application of Mythen detector: In-situ XRD study on the thermal expansion behavior of metal indium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Rong; Chen, ZhongJun; Cai, Quan; Fu, JianLong; Gong, Yu; Wu, ZhongHua

    2016-07-01

    A Mythen detector has been equipped at the beamline 4B9A of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF), which is expected to enable BSRF to perform time-resolved measurement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) full-profiles. In this paper, the thermal expansion behavior of metal indium has been studied by using the in-situ XRD technique with the Mythen detector. The indium was heated from 303 to 433 K with a heating rate of 2 K/min. The in-situ XRD full-profiles were collected with a rate of one profile per 10 seconds. Rietveld refinement was used to extract the structural parameters. The results demonstrate that these collected quasi-real-time XRD profiles can be well used for structural analysis. The metal indium was found to have a nonlinear thermal expansion behavior from room temperature to the melting point (429.65 K). The a-axis of the tetragonal unit cell expands with a biquadratic dependency on temperature, while the c-axis contracts with a cubic dependency on temperature. By the time-resolved XRD measurements, it was observed that the [200] preferred orientation can maintain to about 403.15 K. While (110) is the last and detectable crystal plane just before melting of the polycrystalline indium foil. This study is not only beneficial to the application of metal indium, but also exhibits the capacity of in-situ time-resolved XRD measurements at the X-ray diffraction station of BSRF.

  6. Cross-Sectional Study of Macrodefects in MBE Dual-Band HgCdTe on CdZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M.; Lofgreen, D. D.; Jones, K. A.; Peterson, J. M.; Radford, W. A.; Benson, J. D.; Johnson, S. M.

    2013-11-01

    HgCdTe dual-band mid-wave infrared/long-wave infrared focal-plane arrays on CdZnTe are a key component in advanced electrooptic sensor applications. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been used successfully for growth of dual-band layers on larger CdZnTe substrates. However, the macrodefect density, which is known to reduce the pixel operability and its run-to-run variation, is larger when compared with layers grown on Si substrate. This paper reports the macrodefect density versus size signature of a well-optimized MBE dual-band growth and a cross-sectional study of a macrodefect that represents the most prevalent class using focused ion beam, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results show that the macrodefect originates from a void, which in turn is associated with a pit on the CdZnTe substrate.

  7. Effects of sub-bandgap illumination on electrical properties and detector performances of CdZnTe:In

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lingyan; Jie, Wanqi Zha, Gangqiang Feng, Tao; Wang, Ning; Xi, Shouzhi; Fu, Xu; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Yadong; Wang, Tao

    2014-06-09

    The effects of sub-bandgap illumination on electrical properties of CdZnTe:In crystals and spectroscopic performances of the fabricated detectors were discussed. The excitation process of charge carriers through thermal and optical transitions at the deep trap could be described by the modified Shockley-Read-Hall model. The ionization probability of the deep donor shows an increase under illumination, which should be responsible for the variation of electrical properties within CdZnTe bulk materials with infrared (IR) irradiation. By applying Ohm's law, diffusion model and interfacial layer-thermionic-diffusion theory, we obtain the decrease of bulk resistivity and the increase of space charge density in the illuminated crystals. Moreover, the illumination induced ionization will further contribute to improving carrier transport property and charge collection efficiency. Consequently, the application of IR irradiation in the standard working environment is of great significance to improve the spectroscopic characteristics of CdZnTe radiation detectors.

  8. Array of virtual Frisch-grid CZT detectors with common cathode readout and pulse-height correction

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, E.U.; Fochuk, P.M.; Fuerstnau, M.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Jones, F.; Kim, K.; Kopach, O.V.; Taggart, R.; Yang, G.; Ye, Z.; Xu, L.; and James, R.B.

    2010-08-01

    We present our new results from testing 15-mm-long virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors with a common-cathode readout for correcting pulse-height distortions. The array employs parallelepiped-shaped CdZnTe (CZT) detectors of a large geometrical aspect ratio, with two planar contacts on the top and bottom surfaces (anode and cathode) and an additional shielding electrode on the crystal's sides to create the virtual Frisch-grid effect. We optimized the geometry of the device and improved its spectral response. We found that reducing to 5 mm the length of the shielding electrode placed next to the anode had no adverse effects on the device's performance. At the same time, this allowed corrections for electron loss by reading the cathode signals to obtain depth information.

  9. Zinc segregation in CdZnTe grown under Cd/Zn partial pressure control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, M.; Rotter, S.; Gafni, G.; Tenne, R.; Roth, M.

    1992-02-01

    CdZnTe crystals have been grown by the modified vertical gradient freeze (VGF) method. Growth atmosphere control has been introduced to compensate for the Zn depletion in the melt during solidification. The axial Zn concentration in the grown crystals is found to be uniform within ±3%, as evaluated by X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. The radial segregation of Zn is minimal and does not exceed the experimental error due to the nearly planar interface achieved. Zinc microsegregation has been studied as well and is discussed in terms of the temporal variations of the solute concentration at the growth interface.

  10. Impurity gettering effect of Te inclusions in CdZnTe single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Cui, Y.; Camarda, G. S.; Hossain, A.; James, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    The local impurity distribution in Te inclusions of CdZnTe (CZT) crystal was investigated by the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (Tof-SIMS) technique. Direct evidence of impurity gettering in Te inclusions has been observed for the first time. The impurity gettering in Te inclusions originated from the diffusion mechanism during crystal growth and segregation mechanism during crystal cooling. This phenomenon is meaningful, because it reveals how Te inclusions affect CZT properties and provides a possible approach to reduce the impurities in CZT by the way of removing Te inclusions.

  11. Effect of Sub-Bandgap Illumination on the Internal Electric Field of CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.

    2011-09-16

    Post-growth manipulation of the internal electric field in CdZnTe crystals using sub-bandgap illumination is measured as a function of temperature through infrared (IR) transmission measurements. Using near sub-bandgap IR illumination, both the optical de-trapping of charge carriers and the reduction in carrier recombination increased the mobility lifetime in the crystal. The increased carrier transport is a direct result of decreased hole and electron trapping in addition to other underlying mechanisms. Concentration of the electric field near the cathode is also observed. We measured the electric field distribution with sub-bandgap illumination as a function of temperature via the Pockels effect.

  12. The Effect of Subbandgap Illumination on the Bulk Resistivity of CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jonathan S.; Washington II, Aaron L.; Duff, Martine C.; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael; Matei, Liviu; Buliga, Vladimir

    2013-08-24

    The variation in bulk resistivity during infrared (IR) illumination above 950 nm of state-of-the-art CdZnTe (CZT) crystals grown using the traveling heating method or the modified Bridgman method is documented. The change in steady-state current with and without illumination is also evaluated. The influence of secondary phases (SP) on current-voltage (I-V) characteristics is discussed using IR transmission microscopy to determine the defect concentration within the crystal bulk. SP present within the CZT are connected to the existence of deep, IR-excitable traps within the bandgap.

  13. Strong coupling and polariton lasing in Te based microcavities embedding (Cd,Zn)Te quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Rousset, J.-G. Piętka, B.; Król, M.; Mirek, R.; Lekenta, K.; Szczytko, J.; Borysiuk, J.; Suffczyński, J.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Goryca, M.; Smoleński, T.; Kossacki, P.; Nawrocki, M.; Pacuski, W.

    2015-11-16

    We report on properties of an optical microcavity based on (Cd,Zn,Mg)Te layers and embedding (Cd,Zn)Te quantum wells. The key point of the structure design is the lattice matching of the whole structure to MgTe, which eliminates the internal strain and allows one to embed an arbitrary number of unstrained quantum wells in the microcavity. We evidence the strong light-matter coupling regime already for the structure containing a single quantum well. Embedding four unstrained quantum wells results in further enhancement of the exciton-photon coupling and the polariton lasing in the strong coupling regime.

  14. Observation of the dynamic behavior of liquid crystals using T-FDP (Transmission type four detectors polarimeter)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Shuichi; Arizi, Junichi; Shibuya, Takehisa; Wakaki, Moriaki

    2003-11-01

    We have constructed the four detectors polarimeter of transmission type (T-FDP) whose principle was originally invented by Azzam et. al. Some of the distinct features of our instrument are the liner optical axis and high speed data acquisition of msec order. It can determine the polarization state of the light that passed through the anisotropic materials such as liquid crystals in a very short time. We observed the dynamic change of the polarization state of the transmitted light through the liquid crystals (smectic and super twisted nematic) that are driven by alternating voltage. The behaviors of the both liquid crystals showed hysteresis. We also showed the trajectory of the polarization state observed through the super twisted nematic liquid crystal on the Poincare sphere.

  15. Measurements on semiconductor and scintillator detectors at the Advanced Light Source (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Cui, Yonggang; Gul, Rubi; Hossain, Anwar; Roy, Utpal N.; Yang, Ge; James, Ralph B.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2016-09-01

    During the transition period between closure of Beamline X27B at BNL's NSLS and the opening of Beamline MID at NSLS-II, we began operation of LBNL's ALS Beamline 3.3.2 to carry out our radiation detection materials RD. Measurements performed at this Beamline include, X-ray Detector Response Mapping and White Beam X-ray Diffraction Topography (WBXDT), among others. We will introduce the capabilities of the Beamline and present the most recent results obtained on CdZnTe and scintillators. The goal of the studies on CdZnTe is to understand the origin and effects of subgrain boundaries and help to visualize the presence of a higher concentration of impurities, which might be responsible for the deterioration of the energy resolution and response uniformity in the vicinity of the sub-grain boundaries. The results obtained in the second year of measurements will be presented.

  16. Effects of IR irradiation on the transport properties through deep-level defects in CdZnTe crystals studied by thermally stimulated current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lingyan; Fu, Xu; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao; Xu, Yadong; Jie, Wanqi

    2017-06-01

    The effects of infrared (IR) irradiation on the transport properties in CdZnTe crystals were investigated by using thermally stimulated current (TSC) measurements. The temperature increasing process in TSC measurements could be described by the standard Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) model. When applying IR irradiation to this process, the relative balance from the mixing effect of the six thermal and optical transitions could be described by the modified SRH model. Under steady-state condition at room temperature, the increase of the ionization probability of the deep donor (T4) from 0.71 in the dark to 0.93 with IR irradiation, theoretically predicted by the SRH model was identified, which is consistent with the increase of the effective density of T4 from (5.28±0.26)×1013 cm-3 in the dark to (7.25±0.36)×1013 cm-3 with IR irradiation, experimentally measured from TSC results. Therefore, the effects of IR irradiation on the transport properties, by suppressing trapping and encouraging de-trapping through the defect traps, would further contribute to improving the charge collection processes and the consequent spectroscopic characteristics of CZT detectors.

  17. Characterization of pixelated cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors for astrophysical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Sharma, Dharma P.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Mitchell, Shannon; Seller, Paul

    2004-02-01

    Charge sharing and charge loss measurements for a many-pixel, Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) detector are discussed. These properties that are set by the material characteristics and the detector geometry help to define the limiting energy resolution and spatial resolution of the detector in question. The detector consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a 300 micron pixel pitch (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). This crystal is bonded to a custom-built readout chip (ASIC) providing all front-end electronics to each of the 256 independent pixels. These types of detectors act as precursors to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing degrades energy resolution through charge loss and improves spatial resolution through position interpolation.

  18. Determination of 235U enrichment with a large volume CZT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortreau, Patricia; Berndt, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    Room-temperature CdZnTe and CdTe detectors have been routinely used in the field of Nuclear Safeguards for many years [Ivanov et al., Development of large volume hemispheric CdZnTe detectors for use in safeguards applications, ESARDA European Safeguards Research and Development Association, Le Corum, Montpellier, France, 1997, p. 447; Czock and Arlt, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 458 (2001) 175; Arlt et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 428 (1999) 127; Lebrun et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 448 (2000) 598; Aparo et al., Development and implementation of compact gamma spectrometers for spent fuel measurements, in: Proceedings, 21st Annual ESARDA, 1999; Arlt and Rudsquist, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 380 (1996) 455; Khusainov et al., High resolution pin type CdTe detectors for the verification of nuclear material, in: Proceedings, 17th Annual ESARDA European Safeguards Research and Development Association, 1995; Mortreau and Berndt, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 458 (2001) 183; Ruhter et al., UCRL-JC-130548, 1998; Abbas et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 405 (1998) 153; Ruhter and Gunnink, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 353 (1994) 716]. Due to their performance and small size, they are ideal detectors for hand-held applications such as verification of spent and fresh fuel, U/Pu attribute tests as well as for the determination of 235U enrichment. The hemispherical CdZnTe type produced by RITEC (Riga, Latvia) [Ivanov et al., 1997] is the most widely used detector in the field of inspection. With volumes ranging from 2 to 1500 mm 3, their spectral performance is such that the use of electronic processing to correct the pulse shape is not required. This paper reports on the work carried out with a large volume (15×15×7.5 mm 3) and high efficiency hemispherical CdZnTe detector for the determination of 235U enrichment. The measurements were made with certified uranium samples whose enrichment ranging from 0.31% to 92.42%, cover the whole range of in-field measurement conditions. The interposed

  19. Characterization of the metal-semiconductor interface of gold contacts on CdZnTe formed by electroless deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Steven J.; Baker, Mark A.; Duarte, Diana D.; Schneider, Andreas; Seller, Paul; Sellin, Paul J.; Veale, Matthew C.; Wilson, Matthew D.

    2015-06-01

    Fully spectroscopic x/γ-ray imaging is now possible thanks to advances in the growth of wide-bandgap semiconductors. One of the most promising materials is cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT), which has been demonstrated in homeland security, medical imaging, astrophysics and industrial analysis applications. These applications have demanding energy and spatial resolution requirements that are not always met by the metal contacts deposited on the CdZnTe. To improve the contacts, the interface formed between metal and semiconductor during contact deposition must be better understood. Gold has a work function closely matching that of high resistivity CdZnTe and is a popular choice of contact metal. Gold contacts are often formed by electroless deposition however this forms a complex interface. The prior CdZnTe surface preparation, such as mechanical or chemo-mechanical polishing, and electroless deposition parameters, such as gold chloride solution temperature, play important roles in the formation of the interface and are the subject of the presented work. Techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB) cross section imaging, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and current  -  voltage (I-V) analysis have been used to characterize the interface. It has been found that the electroless reaction depends on the surface preparation and for chemo-mechanically polished (1 1 1) CdZnTe, it also depends on the A/B face identity. Where the deposition occurred at elevated temperature, the deposited contacts were found to produce a greater leakage current and suffered from increased subsurface voiding due to the formation of cadmium chloride.

  20. Elevated temperature annealing behaviors of bulk resistivity and space charge density (Neff) of neutron irradiated silicon detectors and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Z., Li

    1996-02-01

    The bulk resistivity of neutron irradiated detector grade silicon material has been measured under the condition of no or low electrical filed (electrical neutral bulk or ENB condition) after elevated temperature (T = 110°C) anneals (ETA). The ENB resistivity (ρ) for as-irradiated silicon material increases with neutron fluence at low fluences (Φn > 1013 n/cm2). The saturation of the ENB resistivity near the intrinsic value can be explained by the near perfect compensation of all neutron induced deep donors and acceptors in the ENB. After ETA, it has been observed that ρ increases with annealing time for silicon materials irradiated below the saturation and decreases with annealing time for those irradiated after saturation. For those irradiated near the saturation point, ρ increases with annealing time initially and decreases thereafter. This ETA behavior of ρ may be explained by the increase of net acceptor-like deep levels in silicon during the anneal, qualitatively consistent with the observed reverse annealing effect of the space charge density (Neff) in silicon detectors which is an increase of negative space charge density (acceptors) after long term room temperature (RTA) anneal and/or ETA. However, the amount of the increase of net hole concentration (p) of about 5 × 1011 cm-3, corresponding to 20 hours of ETA at 110°C for a fluence of 1.5 × 1014 n/cm2, is still much less than the corresponding increase of Neff of about 1.5 × 1013 cm-3. This suggests that while the ETA restores some of the free carrier concentration (namely holes), there is still a large degree of compensation. The space charge density is still dominated by the deep levels and Neff ≠ p.

  1. An investigation of performance characteristics of a pixellated room-temperature semiconductor detector for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, P.; Santos, A.; Darambara, D. G.

    2009-09-01

    The operation of any semiconductor detector depends on the movement of the charge carriers, which are created within the material when radiation passes through, as a result of energy deposition. The carrier movement in the bulk semiconductor induces charges on the metal electrodes, and therefore a current on the electrodes and the external circuit. The induced charge strongly depends on the material transport parameters as well as the geometrical dimensions of a pixellated semiconductor detector. This work focuses on the performance optimization in terms of energy resolution, detection efficiency and intrinsic spatial resolution of a room-temperature semiconductor pixellated detector based on CdTe/CdZnTe. It analyses and inter-relates these performance figures for various dimensions of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors and for an energy range spanning from x-ray (25 keV) to PET (511 keV) imaging. Monte Carlo simulations, which integrate a detailed and accurate noise model, are carried out to investigate several CdTe/CdZnTe configurations and to determine possible design specifications. Under the considered conditions, the simulations demonstrate the superiority of the CdZnTe over the CdTe in terms of energy resolution and sensitivity in the photopeak. Further, according to the results, the spatial resolution is maximized at high energies and the energy resolution at low energies, while a reasonable detection efficiency is achieved at high energies, with a 1 × 1 × 6 mm3 CdZnTe pixellated detector.

  2. Criterion analysis and content validity for standardized behavioral tests in a detector-dog breeding program.

    PubMed

    Rocznik, Dorothee; Sinn, David L; Thomas, Scott; Gosling, Samuel D

    2015-01-01

    Many working-dog programs assess behavior during a dog's first year of life with the aim of predicting success in the field. However, decisions about which tests to administer are frequently made on the basis of tradition or intuition. This study reports results from a survey given to U.S.A.'s Transportation Security Administration (TSA) detection-dog handlers (N = 34). We categorized and summarized handlers' responses regarding traits they felt were important for work. We used this criterion analysis to examine the content validity of the TSA's puppy tests. Results indicate that 13 of 15 traits that are currently being measured are relevant. However, several traits not currently measured were identified as being highly important, notably "play" and off-duty "calmness." These results provide support that the TSA tests are measuring traits relevant to operational search team performance but also highlight other traits that may be profitable to assess in this and other detection-dog programs.

  3. Semiconductor P-I-N detector

    DOEpatents

    Sudharsanan, Rengarajan; Karam, Nasser H.

    2001-01-01

    A semiconductor P-I-N detector including an intrinsic wafer, a P-doped layer, an N-doped layer, and a boundary layer for reducing the diffusion of dopants into the intrinsic wafer. The boundary layer is positioned between one of the doped regions and the intrinsic wafer. The intrinsic wafer can be composed of CdZnTe or CdTe, the P-doped layer can be composed of ZnTe doped with copper, and the N-doped layer can be composed of CdS doped with indium. The boundary layers is formed of an undoped semiconductor material. The boundary layer can be deposited onto the underlying intrinsic wafer. The doped regions are then typically formed by a deposition process or by doping a section of the deposited boundary layer.

  4. Infrared detectors: State of art; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 23, 24, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makky, Wagih H.

    1992-12-01

    The present conference discusses innovative IR detection devices and technologies, HgCdTe-based IR detectors, and quantum-well (QW) devices. Attention is given to uncooled thermal imaging, intersubband transitions and IR hot-electron transistors, the consideration of a novel two-color IR detector on the basis of the 'two-peak' effect, recent developments in MOCVD of Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te photodiode arrays, and the growth of HgCdTe by MBE on CdZnTe substrates. Also discussed are Si-based QW intersubband detectors, increased responsivity and detectivity in asymmetric QW IR detectors, IR internal emission detectors, an InSb monolithic focal-plane cell, and surface plasmons on PtSi for visible and Si Schottky-barrier-enhanced detection. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  5. Statistical behavior analysis and precision optimization for the laser stripe center detector based on Steger's algorithm.

    PubMed

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Shun; Xie, Fei

    2013-06-03

    Triangulation laser range scanning, which has been wildly used in various applications, can reconstruct the 3D geometric of the object with high precision by processing the image of laser stripe. The unbiased line extractor proposed by Steger is one of the most commonly used algorithms in laser stripe center extraction for its precision and robustness. Therefore, it is of great significance to assess the statistical performance of the Steger method when it is applied on laser stripe with Gaussian intensity profile. In this paper, a statistical behavior analysis for the laser stripe center extractor based on Steger method has been carried out. Relationships between center extraction precision, image quality and stripe characteristics have been examined analytically. Optimal scale of Gaussian smoothing kernel can be determined for each laser stripe image to achieve the highest precision according to the derived formula. Flexible three-step noise estimation procedure has been proposed to evaluate the center extraction precision of a typical triangulation laser scanning system by simply referring to the acquired images. The validity of our analysis has been verified by experiments on both artificial and natural images.

  6. Segregation formation, thermal and electronic properties of ternary cubic CdZnTe clusters: MD simulations and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurban, Mustafa; Erkoç, Şakir

    2017-04-01

    Surface and core formation, thermal and electronic properties of ternary cubic CdZnTe clusters are investigated by using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In this work, MD simulations of the CdZnTe clusters are performed by means of LAMMPS by using bond order potential (BOP). MD simulations are carried out at different temperatures to study the segregation phenomena of Cd, Zn and Te atoms, and deviation of clusters and heat capacity. After that, using optimized geometries obtained, excess charge on atoms, dipole moments, highest occupied molecular orbitals, lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, HOMO-LUMO gaps (Eg) , total energies, spin density and the density of states (DOS) have been calculated with DFT. Simulation results such as heat capacity and segregation formation are compared with experimental bulk and theoretical results.

  7. Signal formation and decay in CdTe x-ray detectors under intense irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, A; Matz, R

    1999-01-01

    The response of Cd(Zn)Te Schottky and resistive detectors to intense x-rays is investigated in a commercial computed tomography (CT) system to assess their potential for medical diagnostics. To describe their signal height, responsivity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and detective quantum efficiency the devices are modeled as solid-state ionization chambers with spatially varying electric field and charge collection efficiency. The thicknesses and pixel areas of the discrete detector elements are 0.5-2 mm and a few mm2, respectively. The incident spectrum extends from 26 to 120 keV and comprises 10(10) quanta/s cm2. It photogenerates a carrier concentration in the semiconductor that is two to three orders of magnitude above the intrinsic concentration, but remains to a similar extent below the charge densities on the device electrodes. Stable linear operation is achieved with the Schottky-type devices under high bias. Their behavior can be modeled well if negatively charged near-midgap bulk defects with a concentration of 10(11)-10(13) cm-3 are assumed. The bulk defects explain the amount and time constant (about 100 ms) of the detrapping current measured after x-ray pulses (afterglow). To avoid screening by the trapped space charge the bias voltage should exceed 100(V) x [detector thickness/mm]2. Dark currents are of the order of the generation-recombination current, i.e., 300 pA/mm3 detector volume. With proper device design the signal height approaches the theoretical maximum of 0.2 A/W. This high responsivity, however, is not exploited in CT since the SNR is determined here by the incident quantum noise. As a consequence of the detrapping current, the response speed does not meet CT requirements. A medium-term effort for crystal growth appears necessary to achieve the required reduction of the trap density by an order of magnitude. Scintillation based detectors are, therefore, still preferred in fast operating medical diagnostic systems.

  8. A comparison of emerging gamma detector technologies for airborne radiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, S. J.; Aitken-Smith, P.; Beeke, S.; Collins, S. M.; Regan, P. H.; Shearman, R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of new and emerging gamma detector technologies that have the potential to improve in-situ dose and radioactivity-in-air measurements for national monitoring networks. Five detectors were chosen for investigation; LaBr3(Ce), CeBr3, SiPM-CsI(Tl), Cd(Zn)Te and electromechanically-cooled HPGe. These detectors represent the full range of the price-performance matrix. Comparisons have been made of energy resolution, detection efficiency and minimum detectable activity by exposing each detector to a mixed radionuclide source drop-deposited across a filter. Other factors, such as internal radioactivity, linearity, size and cost have also been considered.

  9. THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS DETECTOR GEOMETRIES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF CZT USING ONE CRYSTAL

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Duff, M.; Teague, L.

    2011-06-21

    CdZnTe (CZT) continues to be a major thrust interest mainly due to its potential application as a room temperature radiation detector. The performance of CZT detectors is directly related to the charge collection ability which can be affected by the configuration of the electrical contact. The charge collection efficiency is determined in part by the specific geometry of the anode contact which serves as the readout electrode. In this report, contact geometries including single pixel, planar, coplanar, and dual anode will be systematically explored by comparing the performance efficiencies of the detector using both low and high energy gamma rays. To help eliminate the effect of crystal quality variations, the contact geometries were fabricated on the same crystal detector with minimal polishing between contact placements.

  10. Carbon monoxide detector. [electrochemical gas detector for spacecraft use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.; Bradspies, J. L.; Brummer, S. B.; Nelsen, L. L.

    1973-01-01

    A sensitive carbon monoxide detector, developed specifically for spacecraft use, is described. An instrument range of 0 to 60 ppm CO in air was devised. The fuel cell type detector is used as a highly sensitive electrolysis cell for electrochemically detecting gases. The concept of an electrochemical CO detector is discussed and the CO oxidation behavior in phosphoric and sulfuric acid electrolytes is reported.

  11. Characterization of single-sided cadmium zinc telluride strip detectors for high energy astrophysics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Burcin

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) was introduced as a new room temperature semiconductor detector due to its good energy resolution, high atomic number, high density and good stopping power in the early 1990s. UNH has focused on developing CZT strip detector designs for astrophysical measurement applications in the 0.05 to 1 MeV photon energy range. This thesis presents characterization efforts of two types of single-sided CZT strip detector: non- charge sharing orthogonal coplanar strip detectors and charge-sharing strip detectors. The characterization includes spectroscopy, imaging, uniformity and efficiency measurements. Measured energy resolutions with both detector designs are better than those obtainable with NaI(Tl), the scintillator detector material most often used in this energy range. The 3-D imaging capabilities of the detectors were studied using collimated 122 keV photons. Spatial resolution is better than the unit cell pitch in the x and y dimension, and less than 1 mm in the z dimension for both designs. The detection efficiency for photopeak events was calculated for the single-sided charge-sharing CZT strip detector. We also report on Monte Carlo simulations (GEANT4 v7.1) to investigate the effect of multi-hits on detector performance for both spectroscopy and imaging. We compare simulation results with data obtained from laboratory measurements and discuss the implications for future strip detector designs.

  12. Application of a CZT detector to in situ environmental radioactivity measurement in the Fukushima area.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, M; Kubota, T; Shibahara, Y; Fujii, T; Fukutani, S; Takamiya, K; Mizuno, S; Yamana, H

    2015-11-01

    Instead of conventional Ge semiconductor detectors and NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometers, an application of a CdZnTe semiconductor (CZT) whose crystal has the dimension of 1 cm cubic to the in situ environmental radioactivity measurement was attempted in deeply affected areas in Fukushima region. Results of deposition density on soil for (134)Cs/(137)Cs obtained seemed consistent, comparing obtained results with those measured by the Japanese government. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Growth and characterization of CdTe and CdZnTe crystals for substrate application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, Moshe; Zilber, Raphael; Shusterman, Sergy; Goldgirsh, Alex; Zontag, Itzhak

    2003-01-01

    During the last decade we have investigated the synthesis, growth and characterization of CdTe and CdZnTe semiconductor compounds. As a result, substrate crystals, suitable for mercury cadmium telluride thin film growth are prepared. The emphasis will be given to the investigation of the thermal regime during growth, reflected at the solid liquid interface shape and its influence on the crystalline quality. Seeded and unseeded growth experiments are compared in terms of structural crystalline quality. Seeded and unseeded growth experiments are compared in terms of structural crystalline perfection as well as single crystal yield. The effect of thermal annealing on IR transmittance, precipitates and inclusions will be discussed in detail. Moreover, we will show the recent new trends for simulation of crystal growth processes by CRYSVUN software as well as practical implementation of calculated data for the grwoth of II-VI crystals. Preliminary study on the vapor phase control during growth and crystal cooling procedures will also be discussed.

  14. Geometrical Characteristics of Cd-Rich Inclusion Defects in CdZnTe Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chao; Sheng, Fengfeng; Yang, Jianrong

    2017-08-01

    The geometrical characteristics of Cd-rich inclusion defects in CdZnTe crystals have been investigated by infrared transmission (IRT) microscopy and chemical etching methods, revealing that they are composed of a Cd-rich inclusion core zone with high dislocation density and defect extension belts. Based on the experimental results, the orientation and shape of these belts were determined, showing that their extension directions in three-dimensional (3-D) space are along <211> crystal orientation. To explain the observed IRT images of Cd-rich inclusion defects, a 3-D model with plate-shaped structure for dislocation extension belts is proposed. Greyscale IRT images of dislocation extension belts thus depend on their absorption layer thickness. Assuming that defects can be discerned by IRT microscopy only when their absorption layer thickness is greater than twice that of the plate-shaped dislocation extension belts, this 3-D defect model can rationalize the IRT images of Cd-rich inclusion defects.

  15. Growth of CdZnTe Crystals the Bridgman Technique with Controlled Overpressures of Cd

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hu; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te crystals with x = 0.15 and 0.20, were grown in this study by closed-ampoule directional solidification (Bridgman) technique with a controlled Cd overpressure. The growth ampoule was made of quartz with inner diameter from 20 to 40 mm and a tapered length of 2.5 cm at the growth tip. Both unseeded and seeded growths were performed with total material charges up to 400 g. After the loading of starting CdZnTe material, a typical amount of 2 g of Cd was also loaded inside a Cd reservoir basket, which was attached beneath the seal-off cup. The ampoule was sealed off under a vacuum below lxl0(exp -5) Torr. The sealed ampoule was placed inside a 4-zone Bridgman furnace - a Cd reservoir zone with a heat-pipe furnace liner on the top, followed by a hot zone, a booster heating zone and a cold zone at the bottom. The Cd zone was typically 300 to 400 C below the hot zone setting. High resistivity material has been obtained without any intentional dopants but has been reproducibly obtained with In doping. The crystalline and the electrical properties of the crystals will be reported.

  16. Quality improvement of CdZnTe single crystal by ultrasound processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisiansky, M.; Berner, A.; Korchnoy, V.

    2017-06-01

    Intrinsic defects and contaminations removal from the undoped p-type Cd0.96Zn0.04Te single crystals has been achieved by the ultrasound vibration processing at the room temperature. Surface analysis based on Auger Electron Spectroscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, and Scanning Electron Spectroscopy shows a significant reconstruction of the crystal surface after processing, namely, the appearance of numerous ;volcano craters; and triangle-shaped defects with a typical size of 0.2-5.0 μm. Elemental analysis of these defects shows that they are Te inclusions emerged on the surface. The regular crystal surface outside the defects also displays a considerable enrichment by Te. Distinct presence of copper is found in both the thin surface layer and in the defects emerged on the surface. The surface reconstruction is associated with a remarkable change in the bulk material properties, electrical (an increase in the resistivity by a factor of ∼6) and optical (an IR transmittance increase). A post-polishing following the ultrasound processing makes the CdZnTe material more stable and reliable for a wide range of device applications.

  17. Impurities in CdZnTe crystal grown by vertical Bridgman method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqiang; Jie, Wanqi; Wang, Tao; Yang, Ge

    2004-12-01

    The impurity segregation in CdZnTe grown by vertical Bridgman method and its corresponding effects on the crystal optical and electrical properties have been studied in detail. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry reveals that impurities Al and Ga with segregation coefficient larger than one centralize in the first-to-freeze portion of the ingot, while impurities Li, Na, Mn, and Cu with segregation coefficient less than one enrich in the last-to-freeze portion of the ingot. At the same time, all impurities enrich in the grain boundaries. Hall measurement indicates that there exists an approximate linear monotonously increasing relationship between the free-carrier density and the sum of all the impurities concentration, which leads to an increase in the infrared transmission with the increase of wave number within the impurity enriching portions caused by the free carrier absorption. It is also found that the resistivity decreases with the concentration of Li, Na, and Cu, but increases with the concentration of Al, Mn, and Ga. An annealing processing is adopted to extract the impurities and therefore improve the crystal properties.

  18. Modification of solid state CdZnTe (CZT) radiation detectors with high sensitivity or high resolution operation

    DOEpatents

    Washington, II, Aaron L; Duff, Martine C; Teague, Lucile C; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2014-11-11

    An apparatus and process is provided to illustrate the manipulation of the internal electric field of CZT using multiple wavelength light illumination on the crystal surface at RT. The control of the internal electric field is shown through the polarization in the IR transmission image under illumination as a result of the Pockels effect.

  19. Background measurements from balloon-born imaging CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Narita, Tomohiko; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Bloser, Peter F.; Stahle, Carl M.; Parker, Bradford H.; Barthelmy, Scott D.

    2003-03-01

    We report detector characteristics and background measurements from two prototype imaging CdZnTe (CZT) detectors flown on a scientific balloon payload in May 2001. The detectors are both platinum-contact 10 mm × 10 mm × 5 mm CZT crystals, each with a 4 × 4 array of pixels tiling the anode. One is made from IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT, the other from eV Products high-pressure Bridgman CZT. Both detectors were mounted side-by-side in a flip-chip configuration and read out by a 32-channel IDE VA/TA ASIC preamp/shaper. We enclosed the detectors in the same 40o field-of-view collimator used in our previously-reported September 2000 flight. I-V curves for the detectors are diode-like, and we find that the platinum contacts adhere significantly better to the CZT surfaces than gold to previosu detectors. The detectors and instrumentation performed well in a 20-hour balloon flight on 23/24 May 2001. Although we discovered a significant instrumental background component in flight, it was possible to measure and subtract this component from the spectra. The resulting IMARAD detector background spectrum reaches ~5×10-3 counts cm-2s-1keV-1 at 100 keV and has a power-law index of ~2 at hgih energies. The eV Products detector has a similar spectrum, although there is more uncertainty in the enregy scale because of calibration complications.

  20. Charge Loss and Charge Sharing Measurements for Two Different Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    As part of ongoing research at Marshall Space Flight Center, Cadmium-Zinc- Telluride (CdZnTe) pixilated detectors are being developed for use at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope. HERO requires a 64x64 pixel array with a spatial resolution of around 200 microns (with a 6m focal length) and high energy resolution (< 2% at 60keV). We are currently testing smaller arrays as a necessary first step towards this goal. In this presentation, we compare charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two devices that differ both electronically and geometrically. The first device consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). The signal is read out using discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). Instead of using discrete preamplifiers, the crystal is bonded to an ASIC that provides all of the front-end electronics to each of the 256 pixels. what degree the bias voltage (i.e. the electric field) and hence the drift and diffusion coefficients affect our measurements. Further, we compare the measured results with simulated results and discuss to

  1. Charge Loss and Charge Sharing Measurements for Two Different Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    As part of ongoing research at Marshall Space Flight Center, Cadmium-Zinc- Telluride (CdZnTe) pixilated detectors are being developed for use at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope. HERO requires a 64x64 pixel array with a spatial resolution of around 200 microns (with a 6m focal length) and high energy resolution (< 2% at 60keV). We are currently testing smaller arrays as a necessary first step towards this goal. In this presentation, we compare charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two devices that differ both electronically and geometrically. The first device consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). The signal is read out using discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). Instead of using discrete preamplifiers, the crystal is bonded to an ASIC that provides all of the front-end electronics to each of the 256 pixels. what degree the bias voltage (i.e. the electric field) and hence the drift and diffusion coefficients affect our measurements. Further, we compare the measured results with simulated results and discuss to

  2. Charge Loss and Charge Sharing Measurements for Two Different Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, J. A.; Sharma, D. P.; Ramsey, B. D.; Seller, P.

    2003-05-01

    As part of ongoing research at Marshall Space Flight Center, Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) multi-pixel detectors are being developed for use at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope. HERO requires a 64x64 pixel array with a spatial resolution of around 200 microns (with a 6 meter focal length) and high energy resolution (< 2% at 60keV). We are currently testing smaller arrays as a necessary first step towards this goal. In this presentation, we compare charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two devices that differ both electronically and geometrically. The first device consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). The signal is read out using discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). Instead of using discrete preamplifiers, the crystal is bonded to an ASIC that provides all of the front-end electronics to each of the 256 pixels. Further, we compare the measured results with simulated results and discuss to what degree the bias voltage (i.e. the electric field) and hence the drift and diffusion coefficients affect our measurements.

  3. Electrical properties of Au/CdZnTe/Au detectors grown by the boron oxide encapsulated Vertical Bridgman technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turturici, A. A.; Abbene, L.; Gerardi, G.; Benassi, G.; Bettelli, M.; Calestani, D.; Zambelli, N.; Raso, G.; Zappettini, A.; Principato, F.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we report on the results of electrical characterization of new CdZnTe detectors grown by the Boron oxide encapsulated Vertical Bridgman technique (B-VB), currently produced at IMEM-CNR (Parma, Italy). The detectors, with gold electroless contacts, have different thicknesses (1 and 2.5 mm) and the same electrode layout, characterized by a central anode surrounded by a guard-ring electrode. Investigations on the charge transport mechanisms and the electrical contact properties, through the modeling of the measured current-voltage (I-V) curves, were performed. Generally, the detectors are characterized by low leakage currents at high bias voltages even at room temperature: 34 nA/cm2 (T=25 °C) at 10,000 V/cm, making them very attractive for high flux X-ray measurements, where high bias voltage operation is required. The Au/CdZnTe barrier heights of the devices were estimated by using the interfacial layer-thermionic-diffusion (ITD) model in the reverse bias voltage range. Comparisons with CdZnTe detectors, grown by Traveling Heater Method (THM) and characterized by the same electrode layout, deposition technique and resistivity, were also performed.

  4. An analytic model for the response of a CZT detector in diagnostic energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    LeClair, Robert J.; Wang Yinkun; Zhao Peiying; Boileau, Michel; Wang, Lilie; Fleurot, Fabrice

    2006-05-15

    A CdZnTe detector (CZTD) can be very useful for measuring diagnostic x-ray spectra. The semiconductor detector does, however, exhibit poor hole transport properties and fluorescence generation upon atomic de-excitations. This article describes an analytic model to characterize these two phenomena that occur when a CZTD is exposed to diagnostic x rays. The analytical detector response functions compare well with those obtained via Monte Carlo calculations. The response functions were applied to 50, 80, and 110 kV x-ray spectra. Two 50 kV spectra were measured; one with no filtration and the other with 1.35 mm Al filtration. The unfiltered spectrum was numerically filtered with 1.35 mm of Al in order to see whether the recovered spectrum resembled the filtered spectrum actually measured. A deviation curve was obtained by subtracting one curve from the other on an energy bin by bin basis. The deviation pattern fluctuated around the zero line when corrections were applied to both spectra. Significant deviations from zero towards the lower energies were observed when the uncorrected spectra were used. Beside visual observations, the exposure obtained using the numerically attenuated unfiltered beam was compared to the exposure calculated with the actual filtered beam. The percent differences were 0.8% when corrections were applied and 25% for no corrections. The model can be used to correct diagnostic x-ray spectra measured with a CdZnTe detector.

  5. Cadmium Manganese Telluride (Cd1-xMnxTe): A potential material for room-temperature radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, A.; Cui, Y.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Yang, G.; Kim, K-H.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Li, L.; Mycielski, A.; and James, R.B.

    2010-07-11

    Cadmium Manganese Telluride (CdMnTe) recently emerged as a promising material for room-temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. It offers several potential advantages over CdZnTe. Among them is its optimal tunable band gap ranging from 1.7-2.2 eV, and its relatively low (< 50%) content of Mn compared to that of Zn in CdZnTe that assures this favorable band-gap range. Another important asset is the segregation coefficient of Mn in CdTe that is approximately unity compared to 1.35 for Zn in CdZnTe, so ensuring the homogenous distribution of Mn throughout the ingot; hence, a large-volume stoichiometric yield is attained. However, some materials issues primarily related to the growth process impede the production of large, defect-free single crystals. The high bond-ionicity of CdMnTe entails a higher propensity to crystallize into a hexagonal structure rather than to adopt the expected zinc-blend structure, which is likely to generate twins in the crystals. In addition, bulk defects generate in the as-grown crystals due to the dearth of high-purity Mn, which yields a low-resistivity material. In this presentation, we report on our observations of such material defects in current CdMnTe materials, and our evaluation of its potential as an alternative detector material to the well-known CdZnTe detectors. We characterized the bulk defects of several indium- and vanadium-doped Cd1-xMnxTe crystals by using several advanced techniques, viz., micro-scale mapping, white-beam x-ray diffraction/reflection topography, and chemical etching. Thereafter, we fabricated some detectors from selected CdMnTe crystals, characterized their electrical properties, and tested their performance as room-temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. Our experimental results indicate that CdMnTe materials could well prove to become a viable alternative in the near future.

  6. Evaluation of a CdZnTe pixel array for X- and γ-ray spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarati, F.; Hijmering, R. A.; Maehlum, G.; Owens, Alan; Welter, E.

    2006-11-01

    X-ray imaging is an essential tool for a wide range of disciplines. Whilst the majority of applications rely on analog integrating or on photon counting formats, the future development of this field lies in the exploitation of spatially resolved spectroscopy and in particular, using materials which can operate with near Fano limited energy resolution at room temperature. This communication focuses on a new prototype 16×16 cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) pixel array fabricated by eV Products [ http://www.evproducts.com/[1

  7. Hg1-xCdxTe vapor deposition on CdZnTe substrates by Closed Space Sublimation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, Sandra; Sochinskii, Nikolai V.; Repiso, Eva; Tsybrii, Zinoviia; Sizov, Fiodor; Plaza, Jose Luis; Diéguez, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Closed Space Sublimation (CSS) technique has been studied to deposit Hg1-xCdxTe polycrystalline films on CdZnTe substrates at the improved pressure-temperature conditions. The experimental results on film characterization suggest that the CSS optimal conditions are the argon atmospheric pressure (1013 mbar) and the deposition temperature in the range of 500-550 °C. These conditions provide macro-defect free Hg1-xCdxTe films with the uniform size and surface distribution of polycrystals.

  8. Development of EXITE3, Imaging Detectors and a Long Duration Balloon Gondola

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In this Report we summarize the work conducted for the EXITE program under grant NAG5-5103. This grant supported the ongoing EXITE program at Harvard for the development of imaging hard x-ray detectors and telescopes over the 3 year period 1997-2000 with a one year extension to 2001 to transition to the next SR&T grant in this program. Work was conducted in three major parts: analysis of the EXITE2 balloon flight data (from our May 1997 flight); development of pixellated imaging Cd-Zn-Te detector arrays and readout systems for the proposed EXITE3 detector and telescope; and development of systems for a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) gondola. Progress on all three major aspects of this research is summarized for each of the years of this grant.

  9. X-ray detector physics and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 23, 24, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in X-ray and hard X-ray imaging detector, high-intensity sources, hard X-ray imaging optics, calibration, and detection technologies are discussed. Particular attention is given to a high-MTF X-ray image intensifier, application of monolithic CdZnTe linear solid state ionization detectors for X-ray imaging, magnetic response of high-Tc superconductors to X-ray radiation and detection of X-rays, laboratory soft X-ray source with foil target, detection of explosive materials using nuclear radiation, energy response of astronomical CCD X-ray detectors, calibration techniques for high-flux X-ray detectors, fabrication of grazing-incidence optics using flow-polishing techniques, and numerical simulations for capillary-based X-ray optics. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  10. Development and characterization of scintillation based detectors for the use in radiological early warning networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, P.; Dombrowski, H.; Neumaier, S.

    2016-02-01

    To detect radiological incidents, all members of the European Union have installed nationwide radiological early warning networks. Most of the installed detector systems supply only dosimetric information. Novel spectrometry systems are considered to be good candidates for a new detector generation for environmental radiation monitoring because they will supply both nuclide-specific information and ambient dose equivalent rate values. Four different detector types were chosen and compared with each other (LaBr3, CeBr3, SrI2 scintillation detectors, and CdZnTe, a semiconductor detector). As a first step, the inherent background of these detectors was measured in the low background underground laboratory UDO II of PTB. As a second step, the relative detection sensitivity between the various detectors was determined at different energies. Finally, the detectors were exposed to a 4π-radiation field of radon progeny in PTB's radon chamber. The obtained results show that the investigated detectors are well suited for environmental radiation monitoring.

  11. Optimal optoacoustic detector design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosengren, L.-G.

    1975-01-01

    Optoacoustic detectors are used to measure pressure changes occurring in enclosed gases, liquids, or solids being excited by intensity or frequency modulated electromagnetic radiation. Radiation absorption spectra, collisional relaxation rates, substance compositions, and reactions can be determined from the time behavior of these pressure changes. Very successful measurements of gaseous air pollutants have, for instance, been performed by using detectors of this type together with different lasers. The measuring instrument consisting of radiation source, modulator, optoacoustic detector, etc. is often called spectrophone. In the present paper, a thorough optoacoustic detector optimization analysis based upon a review of its theory of operation is introduced. New quantitative rules and suggestions explaining how to design detectors with maximal pressure responsivity and over-all sensitivity and minimal background signal are presented.

  12. CZT Virtual Frisch-grid Detector: Principles and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cui,Y.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Hossain, A.; James, R. B.

    2009-03-24

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a very attractive material for using as room-temperature semiconductor detectors, because it has a wide bandgap and a high atomic number. However, due to the material's poor hole mobility, several special techniques were developed to ensure its suitability for radiation detection. Among them, the virtual Frisch-grid CZT detector is an attractive option, having a simple configuration, yet delivering an outstanding spectral performance. The goal of our group in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is to improve the performance of Frisch-ring CZT detectors; most recently, that effort focused on the non-contacting Frisch-ring detector, allowing us to build an inexpensive, large-volume detector array with high energy-resolution and a large effective area. In this paper, the principles of virtual Frisch-grid detectors are described, especially BNL's innovative improvements. The potential applications of virtual Frisch-grid detectors are discussed, and as an example, a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer using a CZT virtual Frischgrid detector array is introduced, which is a self-contained device with a radiation detector, readout circuit, communication circuit, and high-voltage supply. It has good energy resolution of 1.4% (FWHM of 662-keV peak) with a total detection volume of {approx}20 cm{sup 3}. Such a portable inexpensive device can be used widely in nonproliferation applications, non-destructive detection, radiation imaging, and for homeland security. Extended systems based on the same technology have potential applications in industrial- and nuclear-medical-imaging.

  13. Experimental evaluation and simulation of multi-pixel cadmium-zinc-telluride hard-X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, Jessica Anne

    2004-08-01

    This dissertation describes the evaluation of many-pixel Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) hard-X-ray detectors for future use with the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The detector requirements for the HERO application are good energy resolution (sufficient to resolve cyclotron features and nuclear lines), spatial resolution of ˜200 μm, minimal charge loss of absorbed X rays, and minimal sensitivity to the background environment. This research concentrates on assessing the suitability of these detectors for the focus of HERO, and includes the development of a simulation of the physics involved in an X-ray-detector interaction, a study of the intrinsic material properties, measurements with prototype detectors such as the energy and spatial resolution, charge loss, and X-ray background reduction through 3-dimensional depth sensing. Two types of detectors were available for evaluation. The first type includes 1-mm and 2-mm thick 4 x 4 pixel arrays, developed by Metorex Inc. and Baltic Scientific Instruments. The pixel size is 650 μm with inter-pixel gap of 100 μm. Each of the 16 pixels is wired to a charge sensitive preamplifier and then fed to external electronics. The second detector type includes 1-mm and 2-mm thick 16 x 16 pixel arrays with pixel size of 250 μm square and 50 μm inter-pixel gap. Each array is bonded to an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) readout chip, developed by Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) and fabricated by Metorex Inc. The best energy resolution for both detector types is ˜2% at 60 keV. However, the energy resolution across the 16 x 16 pixel arrays varies dramatically, possibly due to the bonding technique used between the CdZnTe crystal and the ASIC. Position interpolation through charge sharing improves spatial resolution on the 16 x 16 pixel arrays from 300 μm to ˜250 μm. Minimal charge loss was measured for the 16 x 16 pixel arrays. Preliminary

  14. Impact of implementing the Meyer-Neldel behavior of carrier emission pre-factors in solar cell and optical detector modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinelli, Francisco A.; Ramirez, Helena

    2015-03-14

    The Meyer-Neldel behavior reported for the emission probabilities of electrons and holes was included in our code, replacing the gap state capture cross sections of the Shockley-Read-Hall formalisms with capture cross sections containing an exponential function of the trap energy depth. The Meyer-Neldel energies for electrons and holes are the slopes of these exponentials. Our results indicate that emission probabilities of neutral states no deeper than approximately 0.45 eV and 0.37 eV from the conduction and valence band edges, respectively, can show a Meyer-Neldel behavior only, while on the other hand, its implementation in deeper gap states makes the replication of experimental J-V curves of p-i-n solar cells and detectors impossible. The Meyer-Neldel behavior can be included in all neutral capture cross sections of acceptor-like tail states without affecting the J-V characteristics, while it cannot be included in all capture cross sections of neutral donor-like tail states and/or defect states without predicting device performances below the experimental figures, that become even lower when it is also included in charged capture cross sections. The implementation of the anti Meyer-Neldel behavior at tail states gives rise to slightly better and reasonable device performances.

  15. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  16. Optimizing timing performance of CdTe detectors for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhostin, M.

    2017-10-01

    Despite several attractive properties, the poor timing performance of compound semiconductor detectors such as CdTe and CdZnTe has hindered their use in commercial PET imaging systems. The standard method of pulse timing with such detectors is to employ a constant-fraction discriminator at the output of a timing filter which is fed by the pulses from a charge-sensitive preamplifier. The method has led to a time resolution of about 10 ns at full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) with 1 mm thick CdTe detectors. This paper presents a detailed investigation on the parameters limiting the timing performance of Ohmic contact planar CdTe detectors with the standard pulse timing method. The jitter and time-walk errors are studied through simulation and experimental measurements and it is revealed that the best timing results obtained with the standard timing method suffer from a significant loss of coincidence events (~50%). In order to improve the performance of the detectors with full detection efficiency, a new digital pulse timing method based on a simple pattern recognition technique was developed. A time resolution of 3.29  ±  0.10 ns (FWHM) in the energy range of 300–650 keV was achieved with an Ohmic contact planar CdTe detector (5  ×  5  ×  1 mm3). The digital pulse processing method was also used to correct for the charge-trapping effect and an improvement in the energy resolution from 4.83  ±  0.66% to 2.780  ±  0.002% (FWHM) at 511 keV was achieved. Further improvement of time resolution through a moderate cooling of the detector and the application of the method to other detector structures are also discussed.

  17. Performance characteristics of CdTe drift ring detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alruhaili, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Lohstroh, A.; Veeramani, P.; Kazemi, S.; Veale, M. C.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Kachkanov, V.

    2014-03-01

    CdTe and CdZnTe material is an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high energy X-ray spectroscopic detectors due to their good quantum efficiency and room temperature operation. The main material limitation is associated with the poor charge transport properties of holes. The motivation of this work is to investigate the performance characteristics of a detector fabricated with a drift ring geometry that is insensitive to the transport of holes. The performance of a prototype Ohmic CdTe drift ring detector fabricated by Acrorad with 3 drift rings is reported; measurements include room temperature current voltage characteristics (IV) and spectroscopic performance. The data shows that the energy resolution of the detector is limited by leakage current which is a combination of bulk and surface leakage currents. The energy resolution was studied as a function of incident X-ray position with an X-ray microbeam at the Diamond Light Source. Different ring biasing schemes were investigated and the results show that by increasing the lateral field (i.e. the bias gradient across the rings) the active area, evaluated by the detected count rate, increased significantly.

  18. Spatial Pileup Considerations for Pixellated Gamma -ray Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Furenlid, L.R.; Clarkson, E.; Marks, D.G.; Barrett, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution solid-state detectors being developed for gamma-ray applications benefit from having pixel dimensions substantially smaller than detector slab thickness. This leads to an enhanced possibility of charge partially spreading to neighboring pixels as a result of diffusion (and secondary photon emission) transverse to the drift direction. An undesirable consequence is the effective magnification of the event “size“ and the spatial overlap issues which result when two photons are absorbed in close proximity within the integration time of the detector/readout system. In this work, we develop the general statistics of spatial pileup in imaging systems and apply the results to detectors we are developing based on pixellated cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) and a multiplexing application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readout. We consider the limitations imposed on total count rate capacity and explore in detail the consequences for the LISTMODE data-acquisition strategy. Algorithms are proposed for identifying and, where possible, resolving overlapping events by maximum-likelihood estimation. The efficacy and noise tolerance of these algorithms will be tested with a combination of simulated and experimental data in future work. PMID:26568675

  19. Semiconductor detectors for soft γ-ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, François

    2006-07-01

    The study of γ-ray bursts, compact objects, nucleosynthesis and supernova remnants triggers the most interest today in the soft γ-ray domain. These topics have various experimental requirements with emphasis either on imaging or on spectroscopy. Recent progress has shown the great potential of semiconductor detectors for both applications at the expense of classical scintillators such as NaI or CsI. They also gave insight into their long-term in-orbit behaviour. Room temperature semiconductor detectors, particularly CdTe and CdZnTe, are confirmed as the best choice for imaging applications. As illustrated by the INTEGRAL/ISGRI camera, the CdTe stability is better than expected; its internal background is comparable to that of scintillators, and the spectroscopic degradation in space is slow with a lifetime of about 40 years on an eccentric orbit. Cooled germanium detectors offer the best energy resolution but degrade more rapidly under the cosmic-ray irradiation. However, the INTEGRAL/SPI spectrometer has demonstrated that periodic in-orbit annealings, allowing for a full recovery of the energy resolution, can maintain the spectroscopic performance over several years. Most future projects, focussing on coded mask or Compton telescopes, will take advantage of the semiconductor technology, particularly that related to the ambient temperature detectors.

  20. The seasonal and global behavior of water vapor in the Mars atmosphere - Complete global results of the Viking atmospheric water detector experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Farmer, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    A key question regarding the evolution of Mars is related to the behavior of its volatiles. The present investigation is concerned with the global and seasonal abundances of water vapor in the Mars atmosphere as mapped by the Viking Mars Atmospheric Water Detector (MAWD) instrument for almost 1-1/2 Martian years from June 1976 to April 1979. Attention is given to the implications of the observed variations for determining the relative importance of those processes which may be controlling the vapor cycle on a seasonal basis. The processes considered include buffering of the atmosphere water by a surface or subsurface reservior of ground ice, physically adsorbed water, or chemically bound water. Other processes are related to the supply of water from the residual or seasonal north polar ice cap, the redistribution of the vapor resulting from atmospheric circulation, and control of the vapor holding capacity of the atmosphere by the local atmospheric temperatures.

  1. The seasonal and global behavior of water vapor in the Mars atmosphere - Complete global results of the Viking atmospheric water detector experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Farmer, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    A key question regarding the evolution of Mars is related to the behavior of its volatiles. The present investigation is concerned with the global and seasonal abundances of water vapor in the Mars atmosphere as mapped by the Viking Mars Atmospheric Water Detector (MAWD) instrument for almost 1-1/2 Martian years from June 1976 to April 1979. Attention is given to the implications of the observed variations for determining the relative importance of those processes which may be controlling the vapor cycle on a seasonal basis. The processes considered include buffering of the atmosphere water by a surface or subsurface reservior of ground ice, physically adsorbed water, or chemically bound water. Other processes are related to the supply of water from the residual or seasonal north polar ice cap, the redistribution of the vapor resulting from atmospheric circulation, and control of the vapor holding capacity of the atmosphere by the local atmospheric temperatures.

  2. Charge Sharing and Charge Loss in a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Fine-Pixel Detector Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, J. A.; Sharma, D. P.; Ramsey, B. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of its high atomic number, room temperature operation, low noise, and high spatial resolution a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) multi-pixel detector is ideal for hard x-ray astrophysical observation. As part of on-going research at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) to develop multi-pixel CdZnTe detectors for this purpose, we have measured charge sharing and charge loss for a 4x4 (750micron pitch), lmm thick pixel array and modeled these results using a Monte-Carlo simulation. This model was then used to predict the amount of charge sharing for a much finer pixel array (with a 300micron pitch). Future work will enable us to compare the simulated results for the finer array to measured values.

  3. Te Inclusions in CZT Detectors: New Method for Correcting Their Adverse Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S.U.; Hawrami, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R.B.

    2009-10-25

    Both Te inclusions and point defects can trap the charge carriers generated by ionizing particles in CdZnTe (CZT) detectors. The amount of charge trapped by point defects is proportional to the carriers’ drift time and can be corrected electronically. In the case of Te inclusions, the charge loss depends upon their random locations with respect to the electron cloud. Consequently, inclusions introduce fluctuations in the charge signals, which cannot be easily corrected. In this paper, we describe direct measurements of the cumulative effect of Te inclusions and its influence on the response of CZT detectors of different thicknesses and different sizes and concentrations of Te inclusions. We also discuss a means of partially correcting their adverse effects.

  4. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  5. Effect of substrates on structural, optical, electrical and morphological properties of evaporated polycrystalline CdZnTe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chander, Subhash; Purohit, A.; Patel, S. L.; Dhaka, M. S.

    2017-05-01

    It is well known fact that the physical properties of a thin film could be tuned by substrate during deposition process. Therefore, a study on the effect of substrates on structural and opto-electrical properties and surface morphology of CdZnTe thin films (400 nm) deposited by electron beam evaporation onto commercial glass, indium tin oxide (ITO) and silicon wafer, has been undertaken. The films exhibited zinc-blende structure and grain size as well as other structural parameters (i.e. internal strain, dislocation density, lattice constant) were found to be affected by the nature of substrates. The optical band gap was found in the range 2.06-2.33 eV and depended on the substrates while the electrical conductivity was observed maximum for films on ITO substrate. The surface morphology of films was also found to be uniform and homogeneous.

  6. Investigation of dislocation migration in substrate-grade CdZnTe crystals during post-annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ningbo; Xu, Yadong; Guo, Rongrong; Gu, Yaxu; Fu, Xu; Wang, Yuhan; Jie, Wanqi

    2017-01-01

    The migration of dislocations in substrate-grade CdZnTe (CZT) single crystals during temperature gradient annealing under Cd/Zn vapor has been investigated. The etch pit density (EPD) and configuration of dislocations have been evaluated before and after annealing in CZT crystals with and without Cd-rich second phase (Cd-SP) particles, respectively. After Cd/Zn overpressure annealing, dislocation reduction in CZT crystals was observed. However, dislocation walls with 120° intervals along <211> crystalline direction were observed in the both types of CZT crystals. The formation of these dislocation walls can be attributed to the reaction of <110> dislocations. Moreover, it is considered that the release of the restored stress during annealing act as the domain driving force for dislocation migration, by comparing the variation of dislocation configuration in CZT crystals with and without Cd-SP particles.

  7. Polarimetric analysis of a CdZnTe spectro-imager under multi-pixel irradiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, M.; da Silva, R. M. Curado; Maia, J. M.; Simões, N.; Marques, J.; Pereira, L.; Trindade, A. M. F.; Caroli, E.; Auricchio, N.; Stephen, J. B.; Gonçalves, P.

    2016-12-01

    So far, polarimetry in high-energy astrophysics has been insufficiently explored due to the complexity of the required detection, electronic and signal processing systems. However, its importance is today largely recognized by the astrophysical community, therefore the next generation of high-energy space instruments will certainly provide polarimetric observations, contemporaneously with spectroscopy and imaging. We have been participating in high-energy observatory proposals submitted to ESA Cosmic Vision calls, such as GRI (Gamma-Ray Imager), DUAL and ASTROGAM, where the main instrument was a spectro-imager with polarimetric capabilities. More recently, the H2020 AHEAD project was launched with the objective to promote more coherent and mature future high-energy space mission proposals. In this context of high-energy proposal development, we have tested a CdZnTe detection plane prototype polarimeter under a partially polarized gamma-ray beam generated from an aluminum target irradiated by a 22Na (511 keV) radioactive source. The polarized beam cross section was 1 cm2, allowing the irradiation of a wide multi-pixelated area where all the pixels operate simultaneously as a scatterer and as an absorber. The methods implemented to analyze such multi-pixel irradiation are similar to those required to analyze a spectro-imager polarimeter operating in space, since celestial source photons should irradiate its full pixilated area. Correction methods to mitigate systematic errors inherent to CdZnTe and to the experimental conditions were also implemented. The polarization level ( 40%) and the polarization angle (precision of ±5° up to ±9°) obtained under multi-pixel irradiation conditions are presented and compared with simulated data.

  8. Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Feldman, William C.; McSween, Harry Y.; Dingler, Robert D.; Enemark, Donald C.; Patrick, Douglas E.; Storms, Steven A.; Hendricks, John S.; Morgenthaler, Jeffery P.; Pitman, Karly M.; Reedy, Robert C.

    2011-12-01

    The NASA Dawn Mission will determine the surface composition of 4 Vesta and 1 Ceres, providing constraints on their formation and thermal evolution. The payload includes a Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND), which will map the surface elemental composition at regional spatial scales. Target elements include the constituents of silicate and oxide minerals, ices, and the products of volcanic exhalation and aqueous alteration. At Vesta, GRaND will map the mixing ratio of end-members of the howardite, diogenite, and eucrite (HED) meteorites, determine relative proportions of plagioclase and mafic minerals, and search for compositions not well sampled by the meteorite collection. The large south polar impact basin may provide an opportunity to determine the composition of Vesta’s mantle and lower crust. At Ceres, GRaND will provide chemical information needed to test different models of Ceres’ origin and thermal and aqueous evolution. GRaND is also sensitive to hydrogen layering and can determine the equivalent H2O/OH content of near-surface hydrous minerals as well as the depth and water abundance of an ice table, which may provide information about the state of water in the interior of Ceres. Here, we document the design and performance of GRaND with sufficient detail to interpret flight data archived in the Planetary Data System, including two new sensor designs: an array of CdZnTe semiconductors for gamma ray spectroscopy, and a loaded-plastic phosphor sandwich for neutron spectroscopy. An overview of operations and a description of data acquired from launch up to Vesta approach is provided, including annealing of the CdZnTe sensors to remove radiation damage accrued during cruise. The instrument is calibrated using data acquired on the ground and in flight during a close flyby of Mars. Results of Mars flyby show that GRaND has ample sensitivity to meet science objectives at Vesta and Ceres. Strategies for data analysis are described and prospective results

  9. Fire Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An early warning fire detection sensor developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter is being evaluated as a possible hazard prevention system for mining operations. The incipient Fire Detector represents an advancement over commercially available smoke detectors in that it senses and signals the presence of a fire condition before the appearance of flame and smoke, offering an extra margin of safety.

  10. Metal Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  11. Vapor Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddell, H. M.; Garrard, G. C.; Houston, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Detector eliminates need for removing covers to take samples. Detector is canister consisting of screw-in base and clear plastic tube that contains two colors of silica gel. Monoethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide vapors are visually monitored with canister containing color-changing gels.

  12. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  13. MS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  14. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  15. Effects of thermal annealing on the structural properties of CdZnTe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Fochuk, P. M.; Cui, Y.; Camarda, G. S.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K. H.; Horace, J.; McCall, B.; Gul, R.; Kopach, O. V.; Egarievwe, S. U.; James, R. B.

    2011-09-01

    Although cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is one of leading materials for fabricating room-temperature nuclear-radiation- detectors, different defects in the crystals can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. Post-growth thermal annealing potentially offers a satisfactory way to eliminate the deleterious influence of these defects. Here, we report that the annealing of CZT in Cd vapor effectively lowers the density of Te inclusions. It takes a much longer annealing time to eliminate separate large Te inclusions than small ones; however, the annealing time is greatly reduced when the large Te inclusions are distributed along grain boundaries. We found that sub-grain boundaries still exist after the annealing at 500 °C, indicating that a higher annealing temperature might be needed.

  16. Development of portable CdZnTe spectrometers for remote sensing of signatures from nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael; Cui, Yunlong; Roy, Utpal N.; Hillman, Damian; Guo, Mike; Li, Longxia; Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.

    2005-03-01

    Room temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) gamma-ray spectrometers are being developed for a number for years for medical, space and national security applications where high sensitivity, low operating power and compactness are indispensable. The technology has matured now to the point where large volume (several cubic centimeters) and high energy resolution (approximately 1% at 660 eV) of gamma photons, are becoming available for their incorporation into portable systems for remote sensing of signatures from nuclear materials. The straightforward approach of utilizing a planar CZT device has been excluded due to the incomplete collection arising from the trapping of holes and causing broadening of spectral lines at energies above 80 keV, to unacceptable levels of performance. Solutions are being pursued by developing devices aimed at processing the signal produced primarily by electrons and practically insensitive to the contribution of holes, and recent progress has been made in the areas of material growth as well as electrode and electronics design. Present materials challenges are in the growth of CZT boules from which large, oriented single crystal pieces can be cut to fabricate such sizable detectors. Since virtually all the detector grade CZT boules consist of several grains, the cost of a large, single crystal section is still high. Co-planar detectors, capacitive Frisch-grid detectors and devices taking advantage of the small pixel effect, are configurations with a range of requirements in crystallinity and defect content and involve variable degrees of complexity in the fabrication, surface passivation and signal processing. These devices have been demonstrated by several research groups and will be discussed in terms of their sensitivity and availability.

  17. Pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, Eugene E.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Hansen, William L.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The multi-agency, long-term Global Change programs, and specifically NASA's Earth Observing system, will require some new and advanced photon detector technology which must be specifically tailored for long-term stability, broad spectral range, cooling constraints, and other parameters. Whereas MCT and GaAs alloy based photovoltaic detectors and detector arrays reach most impressive results to wavelengths as long as 12 microns when cooled to below 70 K, other materials, such as ferroelectrics and pyroelectrics, appear to offer special opportunities beyond 12 microns and above 70 K. These materials have found very broad use in a wide variety of room temperature applications. Little is known about these classes of materials at sub-room temperatures and no photon detector results have been reported. From the limited information available, researchers conclude that the room temperature values of D asterisk greater than or equal to 10(exp 9) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W may be improved by one to two orders of magnitude upon cooling to temperatures around 70 K. Improvements of up to one order of magnitude appear feasible for temperatures achievable by passive cooling. The flat detector response over a wavelength range reaching from the visible to beyond 50 microns, which is an intrinsic advantage of bolometric devices, makes for easy calibration. The fact that these materials have been developed for reduced temperature applications makes ferro- and pyroelectric materials most attractive candidates for serious exploration.

  18. Intruder Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The shadowy prowler is attempting a break-in, unaware that his presence has already been detected and reported by the device in the lower left corner of the photo. It is part of a three-element ntruder Detecti on System developed by NASA's Ames Research Center from technology acquired in the Apollo lunar exploration program. Apollo astronauts left behind on the moon small portable seismic (shock) detectors to record subsurface vibrations and transmit to Earth data on the moon's density and thickness. A similar seismic detector is the key component of the lntruder Detection System. Encased in a stainless steel tube, the detector is implanted in the ground outside the facility being protected-home, bank, industrial or other facilities. The vibration-sensing detector picks up the footstep of anyone within a preset range. The detector is connected by cable to the transmitter, which relays the warning to a portable radio receiver. The radio alerts plant guards or home occupants by emitting an audible tone burst for each footstep.

  19. Spectrum reconstruction method based on the detector response model calibrated by x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruizhe; Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2017-02-01

    Accurate estimation of distortion-free spectra is important but difficult in various applications, especially for spectral computed tomography. Two key problems must be solved to reconstruct the incident spectrum. One is the acquisition of the detector energy response. It can be calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, which requires detailed modeling of the detector system and a high computational power. It can also be acquired by establishing a parametric response model and be calibrated using monochromatic x-ray sources, such as synchrotron sources or radioactive isotopes. However, these monochromatic sources are difficult to obtain. Inspired by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrum modeling, we propose a feasible method to obtain the detector energy response based on an optimized parametric model for CdZnTe or CdTe detectors. The other key problem is the reconstruction of the incident spectrum with the detector response. Directly obtaining an accurate solution from noisy data is difficult because the reconstruction problem is severely ill-posed. Different from the existing spectrum stripping method, a maximum likelihood-expectation maximization iterative algorithm is developed based on the Poisson noise model of the system. Simulation and experiment results show that our method is effective for spectrum reconstruction and markedly increases the accuracy of XRF spectra compared with the spectrum stripping method. The applicability of the proposed method is discussed, and promising results are presented.

  20. Spectrum reconstruction method based on the detector response model calibrated by x-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruizhe; Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2017-02-07

    Accurate estimation of distortion-free spectra is important but difficult in various applications, especially for spectral computed tomography. Two key problems must be solved to reconstruct the incident spectrum. One is the acquisition of the detector energy response. It can be calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, which requires detailed modeling of the detector system and a high computational power. It can also be acquired by establishing a parametric response model and be calibrated using monochromatic x-ray sources, such as synchrotron sources or radioactive isotopes. However, these monochromatic sources are difficult to obtain. Inspired by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrum modeling, we propose a feasible method to obtain the detector energy response based on an optimized parametric model for CdZnTe or CdTe detectors. The other key problem is the reconstruction of the incident spectrum with the detector response. Directly obtaining an accurate solution from noisy data is difficult because the reconstruction problem is severely ill-posed. Different from the existing spectrum stripping method, a maximum likelihood-expectation maximization iterative algorithm is developed based on the Poisson noise model of the system. Simulation and experiment results show that our method is effective for spectrum reconstruction and markedly increases the accuracy of XRF spectra compared with the spectrum stripping method. The applicability of the proposed method is discussed, and promising results are presented.

  1. High-Resolution Compton-Suppressed CZT Detector for Fission Products Identification

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejd; J. K. Hartwell; Wade W. Scates

    2004-10-01

    Room temperature semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors are currently limited to total detector volumes of 1-2 cm3, which is dictated by the poor charge transport characteristics. Because of this size limitation one of the problems in accurately determining isotope identification is the enormous background from the Compton scattering events. Eliminating this background will not only increase the sensitivity and accuracy of measurements but also help us to resolve peaks buried under the background and peaks in close vicinity of others. We are currently developing a fission products detection system based on the Compton-suppressed CZT detector. In this application, the detection system is required to operate in high radiation fields. Therefore, a small 10x10x5 mm3 CZT detector is placed inside the center of a well-shielded 3" in diameter by 3" long Nal detector. So far we have been able to successfully reduce the Compton background by a factor of 5.4 for a 137Cs spectrum. This reduction of background will definitely enhance the quality of the gamma-ray spectrum in the information-rich energy range below 1 MeV, which consequently increases the detection sensitivity. In this work, we will discuss the performance of this detection system as well as its applications.

  2. Deep electronic levels in high-pressure Bridgman Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te

    SciTech Connect

    Szeles, C.; Shan, Y.Y.; Lynn, K.G.; Eissler, E.E.

    1995-12-01

    The behavior of deep electronic levels was studied as a function of Zn concentration in CdZnTe crystals grown by the high-pressure Bridgman technique using thermoelectric effect spectroscopy. A significant increase of the thermal ionization energies of hole traps was observed with the increasing Zn content of the ternary compound. The effect explains the stronger hole trapping and the resulting much shorter hole lifetime usually observed in CdZnTe as compared to CdTe. The behavior also suggests increased carrier recombination and explains the strong deterioration of electron collection in detectors fabricated from CdZnTe of high Zn concentration.

  3. PHASE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1959-09-01

    A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

  4. MAMA Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  5. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi; Ikemoto, Ichiro

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  6. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  7. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  8. Microwave detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1986-12-02

    A detector is described for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations, the detector comprising: a B-dot loop linking the magnetic field of the microwave pulse; a biased ferrite, that produces a magnetization field flux that links the B-dot loop. The ferrite is positioned within the B-dot loop so that the magnetic field of the microwave pulse interacts with the ferrite and thereby participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux; and high-frequency insensitive means for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop.

  9. Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    The use of silicon detectors has experienced an exponential growth in accelerator and space based experiments, similar to trends in the semiconductor industry as a whole, usually paraphrased as ``Moore's Law.'' Some of the essentials for this phenomenon will be presented, together with examples of the exciting science results which it enabled. With the establishment of a ``semiconductor culture'' in universities and laboratories around the world, an increased understanding of the sensors results in thinner, faster, more radiation-resistant detectors, spawning an amazing wealth of new technologies and applications, which will be the main subject of the presentation.

  10. HPVB and HPVZM shaped growth of CdZnTe, CdSe, and ZnSe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Nikolai N.; James, Ralph B.; Berzigiarova, Nadejda S.; Kulakov, Mihail P.

    2003-01-01

    High-pressure Bridgman (HPVB) and vertical zone melting (HPVZM) growth has been applied for manufacturing Cd1-xZnxTe (x = 0.04 - 0.2), CdSe and ZnSe crystal tapes with sizes up to 120×120×12 mm. The influence of the technological parameters of the growth process on the crystal quality and some properties is discussed. The dependence of the inclusion (bubbles) content on deviation from the melt stoichiometry is determined. The method for growing plates with low content of the inclusions is described. High-resistivity crystal tapes of undoped CdZnTe (1010 Ohm×cm), CdSe (1011 Ohm×cm) and ZnSe (>1011 Ohm×cm) were prepared. Possibility of the tape growth on the oriented seed is shown on example of CdSe. The difference between HPVB and HPVZM results is described. Main HPVZM advantage for II-VI compound crystal growth is possibility of obtaining crystals with stoichiometric composition or with controlled deviation from stoichiometry. Hence HPVZM is preferable for growing high-resistivity II-VI crystals with low inclusion content.

  11. Method and apparatus for electron-only radiation detectors from semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    2000-05-30

    A system is disclosed for obtaining improved resolution in room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors such as CdZnTe and HgI{sub 2}, which exhibit significant hole-trapping. A electrical reference plane is established about the perimeter of a semiconductor crystal and disposed intermediately between two oppositely biased end electrodes. The intermediate reference plane comprises a narrow strip of wire in electrical contact with the surface of the crystal, biased at a potential between the end electrode potentials and serving as an auxiliary electrical reference for a chosen electrode--typically the collector electrode for the more mobile charge carrier. This arrangement eliminates the interfering effects of the less mobile carriers as these are gathered by their electrode collector.

  12. Comparison of gamma-ray detectors: Scintillators, scintillating fibers, and semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.

    1994-12-31

    New scintillators that have advantages relative to NaI(Tl) and BGO include GSO, LSO, YAP, and BaF{sub 2}. GSO, for example, is very radiation hard, and BaF{sub 2} is very fast. Scintillating fibers, which allow good spatial resolution and complex geometries, have been used extensively in high energy physics, but they can also be used at lower energies. Semiconductors such as germanium, silicon, CdTe, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2} can provide good resolution. The proliferation of types has made selection of a gamma-ray detector for a particular application difficult. The authors compare the different types and give examples of choices that have been made for laboratory experiments, portable instruments, and space applications.

  13. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  14. A pixellated γ-camera based on CdTe detectors clinical interests and performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambron, J.; Arntz, Y.; Eclancher, B.; Scheiber, Ch; Siffert, P.; Hage Hali, M.; Regal, R.; Kazandjian, A.; Prat, V.; Thomas, S.; Warren, S.; Matz, R.; Jahnke, A.; Karman, M.; Pszota, A.; Nemeth, L.

    2000-07-01

    A mobile gamma camera dedicated to nuclear cardiology, based on a 15 cm×15 cm detection matrix of 2304 CdTe detector elements, 2.83 mm×2.83 mm×2 mm, has been developed with a European Community support to academic and industrial research centres. The intrinsic properties of the semiconductor crystals - low-ionisation energy, high-energy resolution, high attenuation coefficient - are potentially attractive to improve the γ-camera performances. But their use as γ detectors for medical imaging at high resolution requires production of high-grade materials and large quantities of sophisticated read-out electronics. The decision was taken to use CdTe rather than CdZnTe, because the manufacturer (Eurorad, France) has a large experience for producing high-grade materials, with a good homogeneity and stability and whose transport properties, characterised by the mobility-lifetime product, are at least 5 times greater than that of CdZnTe. The detector matrix is divided in 9 square units, each unit is composed of 256 detectors shared in 16 modules. Each module consists in a thin ceramic plate holding a line of 16 detectors, in four groups of four for an easy replacement, and holding a special 16 channels integrated circuit designed by CLRC (UK). A detection and acquisition logic based on a DSP card and a PC has been programmed by Eurorad for spectral and counting acquisition modes. Collimators LEAP and LEHR from commercial design, mobile gantry and clinical software were provided by Siemens (Germany). The γ-camera head housing, its general mounting and the electric connections were performed by Phase Laboratory (CNRS, France). The compactness of the γ-camera head, thin detectors matrix, electronic readout and collimator, facilitates the detection of close γ sources with the advantage of a high spatial resolution. Such an equipment is intended to bedside explorations. There is a growing clinical requirement in nuclear cardiology to early assess the extent of an

  15. Caractérisation temporelle et spectrale de la photoluminescence de boîtes quantiques de CdZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimont, C.; Cronenberger, S.; Crégut, O.; Gallart, M.; Hönerlage, B.; Gilliot, P.

    2006-10-01

    Nous étudions la relaxation des paires électron-trou dans des échantillons de boîtes quantiques auto-assemblées de CdZnTe riches en cadmium incluses dans un puits quantique riche en zinc. Dans ce type de système, le couplage électron-phonon LO est le principal mécanisme responsable de la relaxation d'énergie des porteurs. Nous mesurons cette relaxation par photoluminescence résolue en temps, en fonction de l'intensité et de l'énergie de photon de l'excitation.

  16. Flame Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Scientific Instruments, Inc. has now developed a second generation, commercially available instrument to detect flames in hazardous environments, typically refineries, chemical plants and offshore drilling platforms. The Model 74000 detector incorporates a sensing circuit that detects UV radiation in a 100 degree conical field of view extending as far as 250 feet from the instrument. It operates in a bandwidth that makes it virtually 'blind' to solar radiation while affording extremely high sensitivity to ultraviolet flame detection. A 'windowing' technique accurately discriminates between background UV radiation and ultraviolet emitted from an actual flame, hence the user is assured of no false alarms. Model 7410CP is a combination controller and annunciator panel designed to monitor and control as many as 24 flame detectors. *Model 74000 is no longer being manufactured.

  17. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  18. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  19. Characterization of CdZnTe co-doped with indium and lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Yasir; Jie, Wanqi; Wang, Tao; He, Yihui; Xu, Lingyan; Guo, Rongrong; Xu, Yadong; Zha, Gangqiang

    2015-01-01

    Indium and lead co-doped Cd0.9Zn0.1Te (CZT:(In,Pb)) were characterized by using I-V measurement, thermally stimulated current (TSC) spectroscopy and time-of-flight (TOF). The concentration of doping level of In and Pb was 10 ppm and 2 ppm, respectively. I-V curves showed that CZT:(In,Pb) possessed the resistivity as high as 1.8×1010 Ω cm, and the mobility (μ) of about 868 cm2/V s, which is considered acceptable for detector's fabrication. However, the carrier life time (τ) was only 9.44×10-7 s. Therefore, the μτ (mobility life time product) value was low. TSC results showed thirteen different trap levels, which were much more than that in Indium doped CZT crystal. Several special traps associated with lead were found, which might be the reason for the low carrier life time.

  20. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Côme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water Čerenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  1. THE 15 LAYER SILICON DRIFT DETECTOR TRACKER IN EXPERIMENT 896.

    SciTech Connect

    PANDY,S.U.

    1998-11-08

    Large linear silicon drift detectors have been developed and are in production for use in several experiments. Recently 15 detectors were used as a tracking device in BNL-AGS heavy ion experiment (E896). The detectors were successfully operated in a 6.2 T magnetic field. The behavior of the detectors, such as drift uniformity, resolution, and charge collection efficiency are presented. The effect of the environment on the detector performance is discussed. Some results from the experimental run are presented. The detectors performed well in an experimental environment. This is the first tracking application of these detectors.

  2. Correlated analysis of 2 MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe crystals using photoluminescence and thermally stimulated current techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Rong, Caicai; Wang, Yuhan; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong; Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao; Du, Guanghua; Fu, Xu; Guo, Na; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Radiation damage induced by 2 MeV protons in CdZnTe crystals has been studied by means of photoluminescence (PL) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) techniques. A notable quenching of PL intensity is observed in the regions irradiated with a fluence of 6 × 1013 p/cm2, suggesting the increase of non-radiative recombination centers. Moreover, the intensity of emission peak Dcomplex centered at 1.48 eV dominates in the PL spectrum obtained from irradiated regions, ascribed to the increase of interstitial dislocation loops and A centers. The intensity of TSC spectra in irradiated regions decreases compared to the virgin regions, resulting from the charge collection inefficiency caused by proton-induced recombination centers. By comparing the intensity of identified traps obtained from numerical fitting using simultaneous multiple peak analysis (SIMPA) method, it suggests that proton irradiation under such dose can introduce high density of dislocation and A-centers in CdZnTe crystals, consistent with PL results.

  3. Thermal conductivity studies of CdZnTe with varying Te excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Maxx; Bennett, Brittany; Giltnane, Dustin; Babalola, Stephen; Ohmes, Martin F.; Stowe, A. C.

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium Zine Telluride (CZT) has been extensively studied as a room temperature semiconductor gamma radiation detector. CZT continues to show promise as a bulk and pixelated gamma spectrometer with less than one percent energy resolution; however the fabrication costs are high. Improved yields of high quality, large CZT spectroscopy grade crystals must be achieved. CZT is grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM) with a Te overpressure to account for vaporization losses. This procedure creates Te rich zones. During growth, boules will often cleave limiting the number of harvestable crystals. As a result, crystal growth parameter optimization was evaluated by modeling the heat flow within the system. Interestingly, Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) is used as a thermal conductivity surrogate in the absence of a thorough study of the CZT thermal properties. The current study has measured the thermal conductivity of CZT pressed powders with varying Te concentrations from 50-100% over 25-800°C to understand the variation in this parameter from CdTe. Cd0.9Zn0.1Te1.0 is the base CZT (designated 50%). CZT exhibits a thermal conductivity of nearly 1 W/mK, an order of magnitude greater than CdTe. Further, the thermal conductivity decreased with increasing Te concentration.

  4. X-Ray Photoemission Analysis of Chemically Treated CdZnTe Semiconductor Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Art; Vazquez, Daniel; Bliss, Ann; Evans, Cheryl; Ferreira, Jim; Nikoloc, Rebecca; Payne, Steve

    2007-03-01

    Device-grade Cd(1-x)ZnxTe was subjected to various chemical treatments commonly used in device fabrication to determine the resulting microscopic surface composition/morphology and the effect on contact formation. Br-MeOH (2% Br), N2H4, NH4F/H2O2, and (NH4)2S solutions were used to modify the surface chemistry of the Cd(1-x)ZnxTe crystals. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the resultant surface morphology. Angle-resolved high-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Zn 2p, Cd 3d, Te 3d, O 1s core lines were used to evaluate the chemistry of the chemically treated surfaces. Metal overlayers were then deposited on these chemically treated surfaces and the I-V characteristics were measured. The measurements were correlated to understand the effect of interface chemistry on the electronic structure at these interfaces with the goal of optimizing the metal/Cd(1-x)ZnxTe Schottky barrier for radiation detector devices. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  5. Thermal conductivity studies of CdZnTe with varying Te excess

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, Maxx; Bennett, Brittany; Giltnane, Dustin; ...

    2016-08-28

    Cadmium Zine Telluride (CZT) has been extensively studied as a room temperature semiconductor gamma radiation detector. CZT continues to show promise as a bulk and pixelated gamma spectrometer with less than one percent energy resolution; however the fabrication costs are high. Improved yields of high quality, large CZT spectroscopy grade crystals must be achieved. CZT is grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM) with a Te overpressure to account for vaporization losses. This procedure creates Te rich zones. During growth, boules will often cleave limiting the number of harvestable crystals. As a result, crystal growth parameter optimization was evaluated bymore » modeling the heat flow within the system. Interestingly, Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) is used as a thermal conductivity surrogate in the absence of a thorough study of the CZT thermal properties. The current study has measured the thermal conductivity of CZT pressed powders with varying Te concentrations from 50-100% over 25-800°C to understand the variation in this parameter from CdTe. Cd0.9Zn0.1Te1.0 is the base CZT (designated 50%). CZT exhibits a thermal conductivity of nearly 1 W/mK, an order of magnitude greater than CdTe. Lastly, the thermal conductivity decreased with increasing Te concentration.« less

  6. Thermal conductivity studies of CdZnTe with varying Te excess

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Maxx; Bennett, Brittany; Giltnane, Dustin; Babalola, Stephen; Ohmes, Martin F.; Stowe, A. C.

    2016-08-28

    Cadmium Zine Telluride (CZT) has been extensively studied as a room temperature semiconductor gamma radiation detector. CZT continues to show promise as a bulk and pixelated gamma spectrometer with less than one percent energy resolution; however the fabrication costs are high. Improved yields of high quality, large CZT spectroscopy grade crystals must be achieved. CZT is grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM) with a Te overpressure to account for vaporization losses. This procedure creates Te rich zones. During growth, boules will often cleave limiting the number of harvestable crystals. As a result, crystal growth parameter optimization was evaluated by modeling the heat flow within the system. Interestingly, Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) is used as a thermal conductivity surrogate in the absence of a thorough study of the CZT thermal properties. The current study has measured the thermal conductivity of CZT pressed powders with varying Te concentrations from 50-100% over 25-800°C to understand the variation in this parameter from CdTe. Cd0.9Zn0.1Te1.0 is the base CZT (designated 50%). CZT exhibits a thermal conductivity of nearly 1 W/mK, an order of magnitude greater than CdTe. Lastly, the thermal conductivity decreased with increasing Te concentration.

  7. Thermal conductivity studies of CdZnTe with varying Te excess

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Maxx; Bennett, Brittany; Giltnane, Dustin; Babalola, Stephen; Ohmes, Martin F.; Stowe, A. C.

    2016-08-28

    Cadmium Zine Telluride (CZT) has been extensively studied as a room temperature semiconductor gamma radiation detector. CZT continues to show promise as a bulk and pixelated gamma spectrometer with less than one percent energy resolution; however the fabrication costs are high. Improved yields of high quality, large CZT spectroscopy grade crystals must be achieved. CZT is grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM) with a Te overpressure to account for vaporization losses. This procedure creates Te rich zones. During growth, boules will often cleave limiting the number of harvestable crystals. As a result, crystal growth parameter optimization was evaluated by modeling the heat flow within the system. Interestingly, Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) is used as a thermal conductivity surrogate in the absence of a thorough study of the CZT thermal properties. The current study has measured the thermal conductivity of CZT pressed powders with varying Te concentrations from 50-100% over 25-800°C to understand the variation in this parameter from CdTe. Cd0.9Zn0.1Te1.0 is the base CZT (designated 50%). CZT exhibits a thermal conductivity of nearly 1 W/mK, an order of magnitude greater than CdTe. Lastly, the thermal conductivity decreased with increasing Te concentration.

  8. Automated inspection of tellurium inclusions in cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Ribar, Juliana M.; Schweitzer, Robert; Keitzer, Scott A.; Treado, Patrick J.; Harris, Karl A.; Reese, Danny J.

    2000-11-01

    As the demand for high quality, low cost X-ray, (gamma) -ray and imaging detector devices increases, there is a need to improve the quality and production yield of semiconductor materials used in these devices. One effective strategy for improving semiconductor device yield is through the use of better device characterization tools that can rapidly and nondestructively identify defects at early stages in the fabrication process. Early screening helps to elucidate the underlying causes of defects and to reduce downstream costs associated with processing defect laden materials that are ultimately scrapped. We report here a method for characterizing tellurium inclusion defects in cadmium zinc telluride semiconductor materials based on near infrared imaging. With this approach, large area wafers are inspected rapidly and non-destructively in two and three spatial dimensions by collecting NIR image frames at multiple regions of interest throughout the wafer using an automated NIR imaging system. The NIR image frames are subjected to image processing algorithms including background correction and image binarization. Particle analysis is performed on the binarized images to reveal tellurium inclusion statistics, sufficient to pass or fail wafers. In addition, data visualization software is used to view the tellurium inclusions in two and three spatial dimensions.

  9. (135)Xe measurements with a two-element CZT-based radioxenon detector for nuclear explosion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Lily; Farsoni, Abi T; Becker, Eric M

    2017-04-01

    Measurement of elevated concentrations of xenon radioisotopes ((131m)Xe, (133m)Xe, (133)Xe and (135)Xe) in the atmosphere has been shown to be a very powerful method for verifying whether or not a detected explosion is nuclear in nature. These isotopes are among the few with enough mobility and with half-lives long enough to make their detection at long distances realistic. Existing radioxenon detection systems used by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) suffer from problems such as complexity, need for high maintenance and memory effect. To study the response of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors to xenon radioisotopes and investigate whether it is capable of mitigating the aforementioned issues with the current radioxenon detection systems, a prototype detector utilizing two coplanar CZT detectors was built and tested at Oregon State University. The detection system measures xenon radioisotopes through beta-gamma coincidence technique by detecting coincidence events between the two detectors. In this paper, we introduce the detector design and report our measurement results with radioactive lab sources and (135)Xe produced in the OSU TRIGA reactor. Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) for (135)Xe was calculated to be 1.47 ± 0.05 mBq/m(3).

  10. Multiscale Modeling of Crystal Growth and Microstructural Evolution of CdZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henager, Charles, Jr.

    2013-03-01

    Crystal growth models and modeling tools for CdTe and CZT along with experimental melt-growth data will be presented and discussed. The emphasis will be on creating a multiscale-modeling framework that can be applied to solve portions of the crystal quality and reproducibility problem of CZT crystals grown for high-resolution radiation detectors. The growth models and methods include ab initio models of CdTe, ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) models CdTe, MD of solidification of CdTe, equilibrium growth defects in CdTe, and development of coarser-scale microstructural evolution models using phase field methods. These model and theory results will be discussed in terms of designing a multiscale approach to two relevant problems in CZT crystal growth, namely solid-liquid interface (SLI) stability and concurrent defect generation in the hot but cooling CZT solid. This dovetails with recent experimental research focused on the growth of CdTe from Te-rich melts with an emphasis on SLI instability. Experimental data on SLI instabilities will be featured as well as results of transmitted IR data on Te-particle distributions in as-grown CZT. A new mechanism of Te-particle genesis and spatial arrangement in CdTe and CZT is discussed in terms of a Rayleigh instability mechanism coupled with crystallographic SLI instabilities during growth. However, there are gaps in our capabilities at every length and time scale, plus gaps in building coarse-grained models from fine-scale models, in statistical representations of complex equilibria, and in understanding the complexities of solidification in ternary alloy systems where coupled thermal, concentration, stress, liquid flow, and SLI morphological fields exist. The talk concludes with an assessment of methods and approaches to address desired models and simulations of CZT solidification from the melt. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  11. Semiconductor detector developments for high energy space astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuris, A.

    2014-05-01

    The rise of high energy astrophysics and solar physics in the 20th century is linked to the development of space telescopes; since the 1960s they have given access to the X-ray and gamma-ray sky, revealing the most violent phenomena in the Universe. Research and developments in imaging concepts and sensing materials haven't stopped since yet to improve the sensitivity of the X-ray and gamma-ray observatories. The paper proposes an overview of instrument realizations and focuses on the innovative detection techniques and technologies for applications from 0.1 keV to 10 MeV energy range. Solid-state detectors are prominent solutions for space instrumentation because of their excellent imaging and spectroscopic capabilities with limited volume and power resources. Various detection concepts based on semiconductors (Compton camera, Cd(Zn)Te pixel hybrids, DePFET active pixel sensors) are under design or fabrication for the near-future missions like Astro-H, BepiColombo, Solar Orbiter. New technologies on sensing materials, front-end electronics, interconnect processes are under study for the next generation of instruments to push back our knowledge of star and galaxy formation and evolution.

  12. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

  13. Radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2017-06-27

    Alpha particle detecting devices are disclosed that have a chamber that can hold a fluid in a tensioned metastable state. The chamber is tuned with a suitable fluid and tension such that alpha emitting materials such as radon and one or more of its decay products can be detected. The devices can be portable and can be placed in areas, such as rooms in dwellings or laboratories and used to measure radon in these areas, in situ and in real time. The disclosed detectors can detect radon at and below 4 pCi/L in air; also, at and below 4,000 pCi/L or 300 pCi/L in water.

  14. Material properties limiting the performance of CZT gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S. U.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2009-03-16

    CdZnTe (CZT) nuclear radiation detectors are advanced sensors that utilize innovative technologies developed for wide band-gap semiconductor industry and microelectronics. They open opportunities for new types of room-temperature operating, field deployable instruments that provide accurate identification of potential radiological threats and timely awareness for both the civilian and military communities. Room-temperature radiation detectors are an emerging technology that relies on the use of high-quality CZT crystals whose availability is currently limited by material non-uniformities and the presence of extended defects. To address these issues, which are most critical to CZT sensor developments, we developed X-ray mapping and IR transmission microscopy systems to characterize both CZT crystals and devices. Since a customized system is required for such X-ray measurements, we use synchrotron radiation beams available at BNL's National Synchrotron Light Source. A highly-collimated and high-intensity X-ray beam supports measurements of areas as small as 10 x 10 {micro}m{sup 2}, and allowed us to see fluctuations in collected charge over the entire area of the detector in a reasonable time. The IR microscopy system allows for 3D visualization of Te inclusions and other extended defects. In this paper, we describe the experimental techniques used in our measurements and typical results obtained from CZT samples produced by different suppliers.

  15. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  16. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  17. Development of a low-noise, 4th-order readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors in gamma spectrometer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia; Su, Lin; Wei, Xiaomin; Zheng, Ran; Hu, Yann

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an ASIC readout circuit development, which aims to achieve low noise. In order to compensate the leakage current and improve gain, a dual-stage CSA has been utilized. A 4th-order high-linearity shaper is proposed to obtain a Semi-Gaussian wave and further decrease the noise induced by the leakage current. The ASIC has been designed and fabricated in a standard commercial 2P4M 0.35 μm CMOS process. Die area of one channel is about 1190 μm×147 μm. The input charge range is 1.8 fC. The peaking time can be adjusted from 1 μs to 3 μs. Measured ENC is about 55e- (rms) at input capacitor of 0 F. The gain is 271 mV/fC at the peaking time of 1 μs.

  18. Effect of Te atmosphere annealing on the properties of CdZnTe single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Jie, Wanqi; Wang, Tao

    2011-07-01

    Low-resistivity CdZnTe:In (CZT:In) single crystals were annealed under Te atmosphere according to the behaviors of deep-donor Te antisite. The results indicated that the star-like Cd inclusions were completely eliminated after 120 h annealing. Meanwhile, the resistivity is greatly enhanced. The resistivity of the slice annealed after 240 h was achieved as high as 1.8×10 11 Ω cm, five orders of magnitude higher than that of as-grown slice. It suggested that the deep-donor level Te antisites were successfully introduced to pin the Fermi level at the mid band-gap position. The IR transmittances of the slices were also improved, which increased as the annealing time increased. PL measurement revealed that the ( D0, X) peak representing high quality of CZT crystal appeared. It can be concluded that the quality of CZT crystals is obviously improved after annealing under Te atmosphere.

  19. Multi-energy x-ray detectors to improve air-cargo security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulus, Caroline; Moulin, Vincent; Perion, Didier; Radisson, Patrick; Verger, Loïck

    2017-05-01

    X-ray based systems have been used for decades to screen luggage or cargo to detect illicit material. The advent of energy-sensitive photon-counting x-ray detectors mainly based on Cd(Zn)Te semi-conductor technology enables to improve discrimination between materials compared to single or dual energy technology. The presented work is part of the EUROSKY European project to develop a Single European Secure Air-Cargo Space. "Cargo" context implies the presence of relatively heavy objects and with potentially high atomic number. All the study is conducted on simulations with three different detectors: a typical dual energy sandwich detector, a realistic model of the commercial ME100 multi-energy detector marketed by MULTIX, and a ME100 "Cargo": a not yet existing modified multi-energy version of the ME100 more suited to air freight cargo inspection. Firstly, a comparison on simulated measurements shows the performances improvement of the new multi-energy detectors compared to the current dual-energy one. The relative performances are evaluated according to different criteria of separability or contrast-to-noise ratio and the impact of different parameters is studied (influence of channel number, type of materials and tube voltage). Secondly, performances of multi-energy detectors for overlaps processing in a dual-view system is accessed: the case of orthogonal projections has been studied, one giving dimensional values, the other one providing spectral data to assess effective atomic number. A method of overlap correction has been proposed and extended to multi-layer objects case. Therefore, Calibration and processing based on bi-material decomposition have been adapted for this purpose.

  20. Solid-state photon-counting hybrid detector array for high-resolution multi-energy X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sia, R.; Kleinfelder, S.; Nagarkar, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    We present in this article the development of a photon-counting, energy-discriminating modular detector based on a pixelated CdZnTe sensor coupled pixel-by-pixel to a novel Digital Pixel Sensor (DPS) readout. The detector is designed for munitions inspection, breast X-ray CT and SPECT/MRI. The current DPS design can also be used to read out other solid-state sensors. The prototype detector is 5.5 mm×5.5 mm in size, and consists of 19×19 pixels on a 250 μm pitch. The DPS is designed in a 0.35 μm process, and every pixel includes a preamplifier, a leakage-current subtraction circuit, an auto-zeroed programmable-gain stage, five comparators, a variable-delay reset circuit and five 16 bit counters. The module is expected to operate at high X-ray fluence exceeding 80 MHz/mm 2, and to improve resolution and contrast in images, while significantly enhancing their signal-to-noise ratio, and assist in identifying material composition via dual-energy imaging. The detector design, fabrication and anticipated performance are discussed.

  1. Proton irradiation results for long-wave HgCdTe infrared detector arrays for Near-Earth Object Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Meghan L.; Pipher, Judith L.; McMurtry, Craig; Hartman, Spencer; Mainzer, Amy; McKelvey, Mark; McMurray, Robert; Chevara, David; Rosser, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    HgCdTe detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of ˜10 μm intended for the Near-Earth Object Camera (NEOCam) space mission were subjected to proton-beam irradiation at the University of California Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. Three arrays were tested-one with 800-μm substrate intact, one with 30-μm substrate, and one completely substrate-removed. The CdZnTe substrate, on which the HgCdTe detector is grown, has been shown to produce luminescence in shorter wave HgCdTe arrays that causes an elevated signal in nonhit pixels when subjected to proton irradiation. This testing was conducted to ascertain whether or not full substrate removal is necessary. At the dark level of the dewar, we detect no luminescence in nonhit pixels during proton testing for both the substrate-removed detector array and the array with 30-μm substrate. The detector array with full 800-μm substrate exhibited substantial photocurrent for a flux of 103 protons/cm2 s at a beam energy of 18.1 MeV (˜750 e-/s) and 34.4 MeV (˜65 e-/s). For the integrated space-like ambient proton flux level measured by the Spitzer Space Telescope, the luminescence would be well below the NEOCam dark current requirement of <200 e-/s, but the pattern of luminescence could be problematic, possibly complicating calibration.

  2. Designed short RGD peptides for one-pot aqueous synthesis of integrin-binding CdTe and CdZnTe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Feng, Min; Hu, Jing; Chen, Cuixia; Wang, Jiqian; Wang, Xiaojuan; Xu, Hai; Lu, Jian R

    2012-11-01

    We have designed a series of short RGD peptide ligands and developed one-pot aqueous synthesis of integrin-binding CdTe and CdZnTe quantum dots (QDs). We first examined the effects of different RGD peptides, including RGDS, CRGDS, Ac-CRGDS, CRGDS-CONH₂, Ac-CRGDS-CONH₂, RGDSC, CCRGDS, and CCCRGDS, on the synthesis of CdTe QDs. CRGDS were found to be the optimal ligand, providing the CdTe QDs with well-defined wavelength ranges (500-650 nm) and relatively high photoluminescence quantum yields (up to 15%). The key synthesis parameters (the pH value of the Cd²⁺-RGD precursors and the molar ratio of RGD/Cd²⁺) were assessed. In order to further improve the optical properties of the RGD-capped QDs, zinc was then incorporated by the simultaneous reaction of Cd²⁺ and Zn²⁺ with NaHTe. By using a mixture of CRGDS and cysteine as the stabilizer, the quantum yields of CdZnTe alloy QDs reached as high as 60% without any post-treatment, and they also showed excellent stability against time, pH, and salinity. Note that these properties could not be obtained with CRGDS or cysteine alone as the stabilizer. Finally, we demonstrated that the RGD-capped QDs preferentially bind to cell surfaces because of the specific recognition of the RGD sequence to cell surface integrin receptors. Our synthesis strategy based on RGD peptides thus represents a convenient route for opening up QD technologies for cell-specific tagging and labeling applicable to a wide range of diagnostics and therapy.

  3. MIRI/JWST detector characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Stacey N.; Ressler, M. E.; Alberts, Stacey; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Morrison, Jane E.; García-Marín, Macarena; Fox, Ori; Rieke, G. H.; Glasse, Alistair C.; Wright, G. S.; Hines, Dean C.; Bouchet, P.; Dicken, D.

    2016-07-01

    We report on tests of the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) focal plane electronics (FPE) and detectors conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The goals of these tests are to: characterize the performance of readout modes; establish subarray operations; characterize changes to performance when switching between subarrays and/or readout modes; fine tune detector settings to mitigate residual artifacts; optimize anneal effectiveness; and characterize persistence. The tests are part of a continuing effort to support the MIRI pipeline development through better understanding of the detector behavior. An extensive analysis to determine the performance of the readout modes was performed. We report specifically on the comparison of the fast and slow readout modes and subarray tests.

  4. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Advanced UV Detectors and Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankove, Jacques I.; Torvik, John

    1998-01-01

    Gallium Nitride (GaN) with its wide energy bandgap of 3.4 eV holds excellent promise for solar blind UV detectors. We have successfully designed, fabricated and tested GaN p-i-n detectors and detector arrays. The detectors have a peak responsivity of 0.14A/W at 363 nm (3.42 eV) at room temperature. This corresponds to an internal quantum efficiency of 56%. The responsivity decreases by several orders of magnitude to 0.008 A/W at 400 nm (3.10 eV) giving the excellent visible rejection ratio needed for solar-blind applications.

  6. Room-temperature semiconductor detectors for in vivo monitoring of internal contamination.

    PubMed Central

    Genicot, J L

    1997-01-01

    In vivo monitoring of low-energy X-ray and gamma-ray emitters has always been a difficult task, primarily because of lack of accuracy and the high detection limits of classical techniques. Various types of PIN diodes (diodes with a large intrinsic zone) were tested in the Radiation Protection Department of the Studie Centrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d'étude de l'Energie Nucléaire (Mol, Belgium) in the measurement of radioactive body burden by direct methods. Current research is oriented toward the use of room-temperature diodes for the detection of low-energy photons escaping the body. In this paper, a new counting technique that involves a portable jacket containing the diodes is described. The system uses silicon diodes and is used out of shielding room in order to be near the contamination. With this method rapid analysis and long counting times are possible, stress is reduced, and medical treatment can be optimized. CdZnTe detectors were also evaluated for this measurement technique but this type of detector is better adapted for counting inside a shielding room. The improvement of the accuracy of the measurement, taking into account the effect of the ribs, is described here, as well the associated electronics necessary for this type of counting. Images Figure 1. PMID:9467055

  7. Room-temperature semiconductor detectors for in vivo monitoring of internal contamination.

    PubMed

    Genicot, J L

    1997-12-01

    In vivo monitoring of low-energy X-ray and gamma-ray emitters has always been a difficult task, primarily because of lack of accuracy and the high detection limits of classical techniques. Various types of PIN diodes (diodes with a large intrinsic zone) were tested in the Radiation Protection Department of the Studie Centrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d'étude de l'Energie Nucléaire (Mol, Belgium) in the measurement of radioactive body burden by direct methods. Current research is oriented toward the use of room-temperature diodes for the detection of low-energy photons escaping the body. In this paper, a new counting technique that involves a portable jacket containing the diodes is described. The system uses silicon diodes and is used out of shielding room in order to be near the contamination. With this method rapid analysis and long counting times are possible, stress is reduced, and medical treatment can be optimized. CdZnTe detectors were also evaluated for this measurement technique but this type of detector is better adapted for counting inside a shielding room. The improvement of the accuracy of the measurement, taking into account the effect of the ribs, is described here, as well the associated electronics necessary for this type of counting.

  8. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  9. The upgraded DØ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S. N.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J. T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Angstadt, R.; Anosov, V.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Assis Jesus, A. C. S.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Baffioni, S.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bardon, O.; Barg, W.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Baturitsky, M. A.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Baumbaugh, B.; Beauceron, S.; Begalli, M.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Bellavance, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Bishoff, A.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Blumenschein, U.; Bockenthien, E.; Bodyagin, V.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Bonamy, P.; Bonifas, D.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Boswell, C.; Bowden, M.; Brandt, A.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, D.; Butler, J. M.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Bystricky, J.; Canal, L.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Casey, D.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chi, E.; Chiche, R.; Cho, D. K.; Choate, R.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Christiansen, T.; Christofek, L.; Churin, I.; Cisko, G.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Colling, D. J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Coss, J.; Cothenet, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cristetiu, M.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Das, M.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; Davis, W.; De, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; De La Taille, C.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Dean, S.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Delsart, P. A.; Del Signore, K.; DeMaat, R.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doets, M.; Doidge, M.; Dong, H.; Doulas, S.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dvornikov, O.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, D.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fagan, J.; Fast, J.; Fatakia, S. N.; Fein, D.; Feligioni, L.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Ferreira, M. J.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fleck, I.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Flores, R.; Foglesong, J.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, C.; Freeman, W.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Gao, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, A.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Geurkov, G.; Ginther, G.; Gobbi, B.; Goldmann, K.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Golovtsov, V.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Gomez, R.; Goodwin, R.; Gornushkin, Y.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graham, D.; Graham, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Gray, K.; Greder, S.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gu, W.; Guglielmo, J.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggard, E.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Han, L.; Hance, R.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Hazen, E.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Hou, S.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Huang, J.; Huang, Y.; Hynek, V.; Huffman, D.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jacquier, Y.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jayanti, R.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, Y.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, P.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Jöstlein, H.; Jouravlev, N.; Juarez, M.; Juste, A.; Kaan, A. P.; Kado, M. M.; Käfer, D.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J.; Kalmani, S. D.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Ke, Z.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Kim, H.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, T. J.; Kirsch, N.; Klima, B.; Klute, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Komissarov, E. V.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kostritski, A.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kotwal, A. V.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Kryemadhi, A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krane, J.; Kravchuk, N.; Krempetz, K.; Krider, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubinski, R.; Kuchinsky, N.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Kwarciany, R.; Lager, S.; Lahrichi, N.; Landsberg, G.; Larwill, M.; Laurens, P.; Lavigne, B.; Lazoflores, J.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Le Meur, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Leggett, C.; Lehner, F.; Leitner, R.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leveque, J.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Li, X.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Litmaath, M.; Lizarazo, J.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lu, J.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Luo, C.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Machado, E.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Maity, M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manakov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Markley, D.; Markus, M.; Marshall, T.; Martens, M.; Martin, M.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Mattingly, S. E. K.; Matulik, M.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McCroskey, R.; McKenna, M.; McMahon, T.; Meder, D.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Mendoza, D.; Mendoza, L.; Meng, X.; Merekov, Y. P.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Michaut, M.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mikhailov, V.; Miller, D.; Mitrevski, J.; Mokhov, N.; Molina, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Mostafa, M.; Moua, S.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagaraj, P.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimhan, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Neuenschwander, R. T.; Neustroev, P.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nozdrin, A.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurczyk, A.; Nurse, E.; O'Dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Oguri, V.; Olis, D.; Oliveira, N.; Olivier, B.; Olsen, J.; Oshima, N.; Oshinowo, B. O.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padley, P.; Papageorgiou, K.; Parashar, N.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pawloski, G.; Perea, P. M.; Perez, E.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Phaf, L.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pol, M.-E.; Pompoš, A.; Polosov, P.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Porokhovoy, S.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Pritchard, W.; Prokhorov, I.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ramberg, E.; Ramirez-Gomez, R.; Rani, K. J.; Ranjan, K.; Rao, M. V. S.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rapisarda, S.; Raskowski, J.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ray, R. E.; Reay, N. W.; Rechenmacher, R.; Reddy, L. V.; Regan, T.; Renardy, J.-F.; Reucroft, S.; Rha, J.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robinson, S.; Rodrigues, R. F.; Roco, M.; Rotolo, C.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rucinski, R.; Rud, V. I.; Russakovich, N.; Russo, P.; Sabirov, B.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Satyanarayana, B.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schmitt, C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schukin, A. A.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sengupta, S.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shankar, H. C.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Sheahan, P.; Shephard, W. D.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shishkin, A. A.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skow, D.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smith, D. E.; Smith, R. P.; Smolek, K.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, X.; Song, Y.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spartana, N.; Spurlock, B.; Stanton, N. R.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Stefanik, A.; Steinberg, J.; Steinbrück, G.; Stevenson, K.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Tamburello, P.; Taylor, W.; Telford, P.; Temple, J.; Terentyev, N.; Teterin, V.; Thomas, E.; Thompson, J.; Thooris, B.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tolian, C.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Toole, T.; Torborg, J.; Touze, F.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trippe, T. G.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Utes, M.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; van den Berg, P. J.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vartapetian, A.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Vaz, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vigneault, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Vlimant, J.-R.; Von Toerne, E.; Vorobyov, A.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vysotsky, V.; Wahl, H. D.; Walker, R.; Wallace, N.; Wang, L.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Warsinsky, M.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Weerts, H.; Wegner, M.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; White, V.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wijnen, T.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Wilcer, N.; Willutzki, H.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wittlin, J.; Wlodek, T.; Wobisch, M.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wu, Z.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Q.; Xuan, N.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yarema, R.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yen, Y.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yoffe, F.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabi, A.; Zanabria, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zitoun, R.; Zmuda, T.; Zutshi, V.; Zviagintsev, S.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2006-09-01

    The DØ experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to DØ.

  10. The MINOS detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Habig, A.; Grashorn, E.W.; /Minnesota U., Duluth

    2005-07-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment's primary goal is the precision measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the atmospheric neutrino sector. This long-baseline experiment uses Fermilab's NuMI beam, measured with a Near Detector at Fermilab, and again 735 km later using a Far Detector in the Soudan Mine Underground Lab in northern Minnesota. The detectors are magnetized iron/scintillator calorimeters. The Far Detector has been operational for cosmic ray and atmospheric neutrino data from July of 2003, the Near Detector from September 2004, and the NuMI beam started in early 2005. This poster presents details of the two detectors.

  11. Development of Tiled Imaging CZT Detectors for Sensitive Wide-Field Hard X-Ray Surveys to EXIST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the proposed EXIST mission, a "medium-class" space observatory to survey black holes and the Early Universe proposed to the 2010 NAS/NRC Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, we have developed the first "large" area 256 sq cm close-tiled (0.6 mm gaps) hard X-ray (20-600 keV) imaging detector employing pixelated (2.5 mm) CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, each 2 x 2 x 0.5 cubic cm. We summarize the design, development and operation of this detector array (8 x 8 CZTs) and its performance as the imager for a coded aperture telescope on a high altitude (40 km) balloon flight in October. 2009, as the ProtoEX1STl payload. We then outline our current development of a second-generation imager, ProtcEXIST2. with 0.6 mm pixels on a 32 x 32 array on each CZT, and how it will lead to the ultimate imaging system needed for EXIST. Other applications of this technology will also be mentioned.

  12. Grating-based interferometry and hybrid photon counting detectors: Towards a new era in X-ray medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkoumas, Spyridon; Wang, Zhentian; Abis, Matteo; Arboleda, Carolina; Tudosie, George; Donath, Tilman; Brönnimann, Christian; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Progress in X-ray medical imaging and advances in detector developments have always been closely related. Similarly, a strong connection exists between innovations in synchrotron imaging and their implementation on table-top X-ray tube setups. The transfer of phase-based imaging to X-ray tubes can provide table-top setups with improved contrast between areas of low attenuation differences, by exploiting the unit decrement of the real part of the refractive index. Medical imaging is a potential application for such a system. Originally developed for synchrotron experiments, the novel generation of hybrid photon counting detectors is becoming increasingly popular due to their unique characteristics, such as small pixel size, negligible dark noise, fast counting and adjustable energy thresholds. Furthermore, novel room temperature semiconductor materials such as Cd(Zn)Te can provide higher quantum efficiency. In the first part of this article we review phase-contrast techniques and recent research towards medical applications. In the second part we present results and evaluate the potential of combining a table-top Talbot grating interferometry system with latest generation hybrid photon counting detectors.

  13. Development of Tiled Imaging CZT Detectors for Sensitive Wide-Field Hard X-Ray Surveys to EXIST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the proposed EXIST mission, a "medium-class" space observatory to survey black holes and the Early Universe proposed to the 2010 NAS/NRC Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, we have developed the first "large" area 256 sq cm close-tiled (0.6 mm gaps) hard X-ray (20-600 keV) imaging detector employing pixelated (2.5 mm) CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, each 2 x 2 x 0.5 cubic cm. We summarize the design, development and operation of this detector array (8 x 8 CZTs) and its performance as the imager for a coded aperture telescope on a high altitude (40 km) balloon flight in October. 2009, as the ProtoEX1STl payload. We then outline our current development of a second-generation imager, ProtcEXIST2. with 0.6 mm pixels on a 32 x 32 array on each CZT, and how it will lead to the ultimate imaging system needed for EXIST. Other applications of this technology will also be mentioned.

  14. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  15. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  16. Event-sequence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    Detector consists of matrix of storage elements which are activated by coincidence of failure-voltage pulses and clock pulses. Clock frequency used for event sequence detector can be selected to provide time resolution demanded by test at hand.

  17. Thermal kinetic inductance detector

    DOEpatents

    Cecil, Thomas; Gades, Lisa; Miceli, Antonio; Quaranta, Orlando

    2016-12-20

    A microcalorimeter for radiation detection that uses superconducting kinetic inductance resonators as the thermometers. The detector is frequency-multiplexed which enables detector systems with a large number of pixels.

  18. Segmented pyroelector detector

    DOEpatents

    Stotlar, S.C.; McLellan, E.J.

    1981-01-21

    A pyroelectric detector is described which has increased voltage output and improved responsivity over equivalent size detectors. The device comprises a plurality of edge-type pyroelectric detectors which have a length which is much greater than the width of the segments between the edge-type electrodes. External circuitry connects the pyroelectric detector segments in parallel to provide a single output which maintains 50 ohm impedance characteristics.

  19. LGB neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quist, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    The double pulse signature of the Gadolinium Lithium Borate Cerium doped plastic detector suggests its effectiveness for analyzing neutrons while providing gamma ray insensitivity. To better understand this detector, a californium gamma/neutron time of flight facility was constructed in our lab. Reported here are efforts to understand the properties and applications of the LGB detector with regards to neutron spectroscopy.

  20. Tevatron detector upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, R.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The D0 and CDF experiments are in the process of upgrading their detectors to cope with the high luminosities projected for the remainder of Tevatron Run II. They discuss the expected Tevatron environment through 2009, the detector challenges due to increasing luminosity in this period, and the solutions undertaken by the two experiments to mitigate detector problems and maximize physics results.

  1. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  2. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  3. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2012-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  4. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2013-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  5. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  6. Optimization of K-edge imaging for vulnerable plaques using gold nanoparticles and energy resolved photon counting detectors: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Alivov, Yahya; Baturin, Pavlo; Le, Huy Q; Ducote, Justin; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-06

    We investigated the effect of different imaging parameters, such as dose, beam energy, energy resolution and the number of energy bins, on the image quality of K-edge spectral computed tomography (CT) of gold nanoparticles (GNP) accumulated in an atherosclerotic plaque. A maximum likelihood technique was employed to estimate the concentration of GNP, which served as a targeted intravenous contrast material intended to detect the degree of the plaque's inflammation. The simulation studies used a single-slice parallel beam CT geometry with an x-ray beam energy ranging between 50 and 140 kVp. The synthetic phantoms included small (3 cm in diameter) cylinder and chest (33 × 24 cm(2)) phantoms, where both phantoms contained tissue, calcium and gold. In the simulation studies, GNP quantification and background (calcium and tissue) suppression tasks were pursued. The x-ray detection sensor was represented by an energy resolved photon counting detector (e.g., CdZnTe) with adjustable energy bins. Both ideal and more realistic (12% full width at half maximum (FWHM) energy resolution) implementations of the photon counting detector were simulated. The simulations were performed for the CdZnTe detector with a pixel pitch of 0.5-1 mm, which corresponds to a performance without significant charge sharing and cross-talk effects. The Rose model was employed to estimate the minimum detectable concentration of GNPs. A figure of merit (FOM) was used to optimize the x-ray beam energy (kVp) to achieve the highest signal-to-noise ratio with respect to the patient dose. As a result, the successful identification of gold and background suppression was demonstrated. The highest FOM was observed at the 125 kVp x-ray beam energy. The minimum detectable GNP concentration was determined to be approximately 1.06 µmol mL(-1) (0.21 mg mL(-1)) for an ideal detector and about 2.5 µmol mL(-1) (0.49 mg mL(-1)) for a more realistic (12% FWHM) detector. The studies show the optimal

  7. Optimization of the K-edge imaging for vulnerable plaques using gold nanoparticles and energy-resolved photon counting detectors: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Alivov, Yahya; Baturin, Pavlo; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different imaging parameters such as dose, beam energy, energy resolution, and number of energy bins on image quality of K-edge spectral computed tomography (CT) of gold nanoparticles (GNP) accumulated in an atherosclerotic plaque. Maximum likelihood technique was employed to estimate the concentration of GNP, which served as a targeted intravenous contrast material intended to detect the degree of plaque's inflammation. The simulations studies used a single slice parallel beam CT geometry with an X-ray beam energy ranging between 50 and 140 kVp. The synthetic phantoms included small (3 cm in diameter) cylinder and chest (33x24 cm2) phantom, where both phantoms contained tissue, calcium, and gold. In the simulation studies GNP quantification and background (calcium and tissue) suppression task were pursued. The X-ray detection sensor was represented by an energy resolved photon counting detector (e.g., CdZnTe) with adjustable energy bins. Both ideal and more realistic (12% FWHM energy resolution) implementations of photon counting detector were simulated. The simulations were performed for the CdZnTe detector with pixel pitch of 0.5-1 mm, which corresponds to the performance without significant charge sharing and cross-talk effects. The Rose model was employed to estimate the minimum detectable concentration of GNPs. A figure of merit (FOM) was used to optimize the X-ray beam energy (kVp) to achieve the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with respect to patient dose. As a result, the successful identification of gold and background suppression was demonstrated. The highest FOM was observed at 125 kVp X-ray beam energy. The minimum detectable GNP concentration was determined to be approximately 1.06 μmol/mL (0.21 mg/mL) for an ideal detector and about 2.5 μmol/mL (0.49 mg/mL) for more realistic (12% FWHM) detector. The studies show the optimal imaging parameters at lowest patient dose using an energy resolved photon counting detector

  8. Randomized SUSAN edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Ping; Gao, Ying-Hui; Wang, Peng

    2011-11-01

    A speed up technique for the SUSAN edge detector based on random sampling is proposed. Instead of sliding the mask pixel by pixel on an image as the SUSAN edge detector does, the proposed scheme places the mask randomly on pixels to find edges in the image; we hereby name it randomized SUSAN edge detector (R-SUSAN). Specifically, the R-SUSAN edge detector adopts three approaches in the framework of random sampling to accelerate a SUSAN edge detector: procedure integration of response computation and nonmaxima suppression, reduction of unnecessary processing for obvious nonedge pixels, and early termination. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. High-energy detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  10. Nondestructive Characterization of Residual Threading Dislocation Density in HgCdTe Layers Grown on CdZnTe by Liquid-Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourreau, Y.; Pantzas, K.; Patriarche, G.; Destefanis, V.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT)-based infrared (IR) focal-plane arrays is closely related to the crystalline perfection of the HgCdTe thin film. In this work, Te-rich, (111)B-oriented HgCdTe epilayers grown by liquid-phase epitaxy on CdZnTe substrates have been studied. Surface atomic steps are shown on as-grown MCT materials using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and white-light interferometry (WLI), suggesting step-flow growth. Locally, quasiperfect surface spirals are also evidenced. A demonstration is given that these spirals are related to the emergence of almost pure screw threading dislocations. A nondestructive and quantitative technique to measure the threading dislocation density is proposed. The technique consists of counting the surface spirals on the as-grown MCT surface from images obtained by either AFM or WLI measurements. The benefits and drawbacks of both destructive—chemical etching of HgCdTe dislocations—and nondestructive surface imaging techniques are compared. The nature of defects is also discussed. Finally, state-of-the-art threading dislocation densities in the low 104 cm-2 range are evidenced by both etch pit density (EPD) and surface imaging measurements.

  11. Synchrotron white beam x-ray topography characterization of structural defects in microgravity and ground-based CdZnTe crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Larson, D.J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    In a microgravity environment, gravity-dependent effects such as buoyancy, convection and hydrostatic pressure are minimized, providing an ideal environment for investigating diffusion-controlled, nonwetting crystal growth processes. To evaluate the influence of microgravity on the resultant crystal quality, Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topography (SWBXT) is applied to characterize defect structures in both flight and ground-based CdZnTe single crystals. Transmission X-ray topographs recorded from one flight sample revealed regions of very low dislocation density with individual dislocations clearly resolved. Dislocations of very high density arrayed in a mosaic pattern were observed in all ground-base samples grown under identical growth conditions except for the gravity conditions. This observation indicates that the flight samples have much higher structural perfection than the ground-based samples. On the other hand, studies of defect configurations in a different flight sample revealed that structural defects and distributions can be strongly influenced by rapid cooling, thermal gradients, and constrained growth. Large thermal stresses induced by rapid cooling can be multiplied by wall contact leading to the formation of extensive slip bands and small angle tilt boundaries starting at the crystal periphery and propagating into the interior of the sample. It is concluded that an optimization of post solidification cooling rate is important to minimize the occurrence of slip.

  12. Neutrino Detectors: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2011-10-06

    This paper covers possible detector options suitable at future neutrino facilities, such as Neutrino Factories, Super Beams and Beta Beams. The Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND), which is the baseline detector at a Neutrino Factory, will be described and a new analysis which improves the efficiency of this detector at low energies will be shown. Other detectors covered include the Totally Active Scintillating Detectors (TASD), particularly relevant for a low energy Neutrino Factory, emulsion detectors for tau detection, liquid argon detectors and megaton scale water Cherenkov detectors. Finally the requirements of near detectors for long-baseline neutrino experiments will be demonstrated.

  13. Imaging X-ray detector front-end with high dynamic range: IDeF-X HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevin, O.; Lemaire, O.; Lugiez, F.; Michalowska, A.; Baron, P.; Limousin, O.; Delagnes, E.

    2012-12-01

    Presented circuit, IDeF-X HD (Imaging Detector Front-end) is a member of the IDeF-X ASICs family for space applications. It has been optimized for a half millimeter pitch CdTe or CdZnTe pixelated detector arranged in 16×16 array. It is aimed to operate in the hard X-ray range from few keV up to 250 keV or more. The ASIC has been realized in AMS 0.35 μm CMOS process. The IDeF-X HD is a 32 channel analog front-end with self-triggering capability. The architecture of the analog channel includes a chain of charge sensitive amplifier with continuous reset system and non-stationary noise suppressor, adjustable gain stage, pole-zero cancellation stage, adjustable shaping time low pass filter, baseline holder and peak detector with discriminator. The power consumption of the IDeF-X HD is 800 μW per channel. With the in-channel variable gain stage the nominal 250 keV dynamic range of the ASIC can be extended up to 1 MeV anticipating future applications using thick sensors. Measuring the noise performance without a detector at the input with minimized leakage current (programmable) at the input, we achieved ENC of 33 electrons rms at 10.7 μs peak time. Measurements with CdTe detector show good energy resolution FWHM of 1.1 keV at 60 keV and 4.3 keV at 662 keV with detection threshold below 4 keV. In addition, an absolute temperature sensor has been integrated with resolution of 1.5 °C.

  14. BATSE spectroscopy detector calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Ford, L.; Matteson, J.; Lestrade, J. P.; Teegarden, B.; Schaefer, B.; Cline, T.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the channel-to-energy calibration of the Spectroscopy Detectors of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). These detectors consist of NaI(TI) crystals viewed by photomultiplier tubes whose output in turn is measured by a pulse height analyzer. The calibration of these detectors has been complicated by frequent gain changes and by nonlinearities specific to the BATSE detectors. Nonlinearities in the light output from the NaI crystal and in the pulse height analyzer are shifted relative to each other by changes in the gain of the photomultiplier tube. We present the analytical model which is the basis of our calibration methodology, and outline how the empirical coefficients in this approach were determined. We also describe the complications peculiar to the Spectroscopy Detectors, and how our understanding of the detectors' operation led us to a solution to these problems.

  15. Intelligent Detector Design

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    As the complexity and resolution of imaging detectors increases, the need for detailed simulation of the experimental setup also becomes more important. Designing the detectors requires efficient tools to simulate the detector response and reconstruct the events. We have developed efficient and flexible tools for detailed physics and detector response simulation as well as event reconstruction and analysis. The primary goal has been to develop a software toolkit and computing infrastructure to allow physicists from universities and labs to quickly and easily conduct physics analyses and contribute to detector research and development. The application harnesses the full power of the Geant4 toolkit without requiring the end user to have any experience with either Geant4 or C++, thereby allowing the user to concentrate on the physics of the detector system.

  16. The DØ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, W.; Antipov, Yu.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baden, A.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Barasch, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Behnke, T.; Bezzubov, V.; Bhat, P. C.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Bozko, N.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoy, V.; Butler, J. M.; Callot, O.; Chakraborty, D.; Chekulaev, S.; Chen, J.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Daniels, B.; De, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Eartly, D.; Eberhard, P. H.; Edmunds, D.; Efimov, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eroshin, O.; Evdokimov, V.; Fahey, S.; Fanourakis, G.; Fatyga, M.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finley, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Franzini, P.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Gao, C. S.; Geld, T. L.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Good, M. L.; Goozen, F.; Gordon, H.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hodel, K.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hubbard, J. R.; Huehn, T.; Huson, R.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jiang, J.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C. R.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kanekal, S.; Kernan, A.; Kerth, L.; Kirunin, A.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V.; Kochetkov, V.; Kohli, J. M.; Kononenko, W.; Kotcher, J.; Kotov, I.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A.; Kozlovsky, E.; Krafczyk, G.; Krempetz, K.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Kroon, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lanou, R. E.; Laurens, P.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Li, J.; Li, R.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G. R.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.-C.; Lloyd-Owen, D.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lokos, S.; Lueking, L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Malamud, E.; Mangeot, Ph.; Manning, I.; Mansoulié, B.; Manzella, V.; Mao, H.-S.; Marcin, M.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, H. J.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, P. S.; Marx, M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A.; McCarthy, R.; McKinley, J.; Mendoza, D.; Meng, X.-C.; Merritt, K. W.; Milder, A.; Mincer, A.; Mondal, N. K.; Montag, M.; Mooney, P.; Mudan, M.; Mulholland, G. T.; Murphy, C.; Murphy, C. T.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Neal, H. A.; Nemethy, P.; Nešić, D.; Ng, K. K.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Partridge, R.; Paterno, M.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Pi, B.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Yu.; Pizzuto, D.; Pluquet, A.; Podstavkov, V.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Que, Y.-K.; Quintas, P. Z.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rao, M. V. S.; Rasmussen, L.; Read, A. L.; Regan, T.; Repond, S.; Riadovikov, V.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Sculli, J.; Selove, W.; Shea, M.; Shkurenkov, A.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, D.; Smith, R. P.; Snow, G. R.; Snyder, S.; Sosebee, M.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stampke, S.; Stephens, R.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stocker, F.; Stoyanova, D.; Stredde, H.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Suhanov, A.; Taketani, A.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, J. D.; Teiger, J.; Theodosiou, G.; Thompson, J.; Tisserant, S.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Van Berg, R.; Vaz, M.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Volkov, A.; Vorobiev, A.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, D.-C.; Wang, L.-Z.; Weerts, H.; Wenzel, W. A.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wolf, Z.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xie, P.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.-J.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Zeller, R.; Zhang, S.; Zhou, Y. H.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Y.-S.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zylberstejn, A.; DØ Collaboration

    1994-01-01

    The DØ detector is a large general purpose detector for the study of short-distance phenomena in high energy antiproton-proton collisions, now in operation at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The detector focusses upon the detection of electrons, muons, jets and missing transverse momentum. We describe the design and performance of the major elements of the detector, including the tracking chambers, transition radiation detector, liquid argon calorimetry and muon detection. The associated electronics, triggering systems and data acquisition systems are presented. The global mechanical, high voltage, and experiment monitoring and control systems which support the detector are described. We also discuss the design and implementation of software and software support systems that are specific to DØ.

  17. Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam

  18. Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors

    PubMed Central

    Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam

  19. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  20. Detectors (5/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This lecture will serve as an introduction to particle detectors and detection techniques. In the first lecture, a historic overview of particle detector development will be given. In the second lecture, some basic techniques and concepts for particle detection will be discussed. In the third lecture, the interaction of particles with matter, the basis of particle detection, will be presented. The fourth and fifth lectures will discuss different detector types used for particle tracking, energy measurement and particle identification.

  1. Detectors (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This lecture will serve as an introduction to particle detectors and detection techniques. In the first lecture, a historic overview of particle detector development will be given. In the second lecture, some basic techniques and concepts for particle detection will be discussed. In the third lecture, the interaction of particles with matter, the basis of particle detection, will be presented. The fourth and fifth lectures will discuss different detector types used for particle tracking, energy measurement and particle identification.

  2. History of infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  3. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  4. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2015-07-28

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  5. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  6. Photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Lu, S. S.-M.; Moriarty, J. A.; Crouch, R. K.; Miller, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A new class of room-temperature infrared detectors has been developed through use of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) or metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal (MISIM) slabs. The detectors, which have been fabricated from Si, Ge and GaAs, rely for operation on the electrical capacitance variations induced by modulated incident radiation. The peak detectivity for a 1000-A Si MISIM detector is comparable to that of a conventional Si detector functioning in the photovoltaic mode. Optimization of the photocapacitive-mode detection sensitivity is discussed.

  7. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  8. Photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Lu, S. S.-M.; Moriarty, J. A.; Crouch, R. K.; Miller, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A new class of room-temperature infrared detectors has been developed through use of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) or metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal (MISIM) slabs. The detectors, which have been fabricated from Si, Ge and GaAs, rely for operation on the electrical capacitance variations induced by modulated incident radiation. The peak detectivity for a 1000-A Si MISIM detector is comparable to that of a conventional Si detector functioning in the photovoltaic mode. Optimization of the photocapacitive-mode detection sensitivity is discussed.

  9. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  10. Multipixel characterization of imaging CZT detectors for hard x-ray imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadawale, Santosh V.; Hong, Jae Sub; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Williams, Peter; Zhang, Minhua; Bellm, Eric C.; Narita, Tomohiko; Craig, William W.; Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, Carl M.; Yan, Feng

    2004-10-01

    We report our in-depth study of Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) crystals to determine an optimum pixel and guard band configuration for Hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopy. We tested 20x20x5mm crystals with 8x8 pixels on a 2.46mm pitch. We have studied different types of cathode / anode contacts and different pixel pad sizes. We present the measurements of leakage current as well as spectral response for each pixel. Our I-V measurement setup is custom designed to allow automated measurements of the I-V curves sequentially for all 64 pixels, whereas the radiation properties measurement setup allows for interchangeable crystals with the same XAIM3.2 ASIC readout from IDEAS. We have tested multiple crystals of each type, and each crystal in different positions to measure the variation between individual crystals and variation among the ASIC channels. We also compare the same crystals with and without a grounded guard band deposited on the crystal side walls vs. a floating guard band and compare results to simulations. This study was carried out to find the optimum CZT crystal configuration for prototype detectors for the proposed Black-Hole Finder mission, EXIST.

  11. Optical proximity detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, W. A.; Johnston, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    Sensitive, relatively inexpensive instrument uses phase-detection techniques to sense presence of objects. Phase-sensitive detectors, LED, photodiode with response matched to LED output, and filtering lens allow detector to operate over narrow radiation band, giving selectivity over stray light.

  12. Borner Ball Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector measures neutron radiation. Neutrons are uncharged atomic particles that have the ability to penetrate living tissues, harming human beings in space. The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector is one of three radiation experiments during Expedition Two. The others are the Phantom Torso and Dosimetric Mapping.

  13. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  14. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  15. Smoke Detectors and Legislation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Fire Prevention and Control Administration (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This manual, one of a series for use in public education, provides an in-depth review of the current status of state and local smoke detector legislation. First, for the community considering a smoke detector law or ordinance, six decision points are discussed: which residential occupancy sub-classes will be affected; what the time factors are for…

  16. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  17. SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spears, W.G.

    1960-11-01

    A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

  18. Particle impact location detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S. O.

    1974-01-01

    Detector includes delay lines connected to each detector surface strip. When several particles strike different strips simultaneously, pulses generated by each strip are time delayed by certain intervals. Delay time for each strip is known. By observing time delay in pulse, it is possible to locate strip that is struck by particle.

  19. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-01

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas.

  20. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-01

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas.

  1. Plasma model of carrier transportation in photoelectric semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L. Q.; Lu, Q. S.; Du, S. J.

    2006-02-01

    A new model, called the plasma model, describing carrier transportation in photoelectric semiconductor detectors is proposed. Semiconductor material under laser irradiation is regarded as a plasma of low temperature with high carrier density, and it is considered that the carrier temperature is different from the lattice temperature when the irradiating laser power is high but lower than the damage threshold of the detectors. Equations for the carrier density, velocity and temperature are established. According to the model, numerical simulations of a photoconductive semiconductor detector were carried out by programming. The instantaneous change behaviors of the photoconductive detector are obtained. The results of the numerical calculation match well with the experimental results.

  2. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, MunSeong Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-15

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas.

  3. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  4. Advanced far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > {lambda} > 50 {mu}m are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide.

  5. The PERDaix detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Andreas; Beischer, Bastian; Greim, Roman; Kirn, Thomas; Mai, Carsten; Yearwood, Gregorio Roper; Schael, Stefan; Schug, David; Tholen, Heiner; Wienkenhöver, Jens

    2012-12-01

    The PERDaix (Proton Electron Radiation Detector Aix-la-Chapelle) detector is designed to measure charged particles in cosmic rays. It can distinguish particle species up to 5 GV rigidity. PERDaix was flown on the BEXUS-11 balloon on 23rd November 2010. The detector has the dimensions of 246×400×859 mm3, a geometrical acceptance of 32 cm2sr, a low weight of 40 kg and a low power consumption of 60 W. The spectrometer consists of a time-of-flight system, a scintillating fiber tracking detector, a permanent magnet and a transition radiation detector. Silicon photomultipliers are used as photodetectors in the time-of-flight and the tracker system.

  6. Floating-zone growth of CdMnTe crystals and their characterization as room-temperature semiconductor gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. S.; Wang, F. Y.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Roy, U.; Lee, K.; Yang, G.; James, R.; Gu, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    CdMnTe (CMT) is a promising candidate for room-temperature semiconductor gamma-ray detectors. In the past, several groups have grown detector-grade CMT material by using a low-pressure Bridgman method. The performance of the test devices fabricated from CMT crystals was found to be slightly lower to that achieved with CdZnTe detectors. For example, the best electron mu-tau product reported for CMT was about 5 times lower compared to that achieved for the best commercial CZT material. Also, the crystal quality of the CMT crystals was reduced due to strong twinning, presence of subgrain boundaries and, in some cases, Te inclusions. Here, we report on our attempt to grow CMT crystals by using a modified floating-zone growth technique, which has not been used previously to grow CMT crystals. There are several advantages of this technique over the traditional Bridgman methods: a higher purity of as-grown crystals, better doping control, more stable growth conditions with uniform compositional distribution, and a better control of the seeding and morphology of the growing crystal. We present the new growth technique and results from CMT crystal characterization and device testing. The work is supported by office NA22, DOE.

  7. SU-C-201-03: Coded Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Using Pixelated Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S; Kaye, W; Jaworski, J; He, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Improved localization of gamma-ray emissions from radiotracers is essential to the progress of nuclear medicine. Polaris is a portable, room-temperature operated gamma-ray imaging spectrometer composed of two 3×3 arrays of thick CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, which detect gammas between 30keV and 3MeV with energy resolution of <1% FWHM at 662keV. Compton imaging is used to map out source distributions in 4-pi space; however, is only effective above 300keV where Compton scatter is dominant. This work extends imaging to photoelectric energies (<300keV) using coded aperture imaging (CAI), which is essential for localization of Tc-99m (140keV). Methods: CAI, similar to the pinhole camera, relies on an attenuating mask, with open/closed elements, placed between the source and position-sensitive detectors. Partial attenuation of the source results in a “shadow” or count distribution that closely matches a portion of the mask pattern. Ideally, each source direction corresponds to a unique count distribution. Using backprojection reconstruction, the source direction is determined within the field of view. The knowledge of 3D position of interaction results in improved image quality. Results: Using a single array of detectors, a coded aperture mask, and multiple Co-57 (122keV) point sources, image reconstruction is performed in real-time, on an event-by-event basis, resulting in images with an angular resolution of ∼6 degrees. Although material nonuniformities contribute to image degradation, the superposition of images from individual detectors results in improved SNR. CAI was integrated with Compton imaging for a seamless transition between energy regimes. Conclusion: For the first time, CAI has been applied to thick, 3D position sensitive CZT detectors. Real-time, combined CAI and Compton imaging is performed using two 3×3 detector arrays, resulting in a source distribution in space. This system has been commercialized by H3D, Inc. and is being acquired for

  8. Deep levels in high resistive CdTe and CdZnTe explored by photo-Hall effect and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musiienko, Artem; Grill, Roman; Hlídek, Pavel; Moravec, Pavel; Belas, Eduard; Zázvorka, Jakub; Korcsmáros, Gabriel; Franc, Jan; Vasylchenko, Igor

    2017-01-01

    High resistive CdTe and CdZnTe single crystals were measured by photo-Hall effect spectroscopy (PHES) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) with the aim of discovering the position of deep levels (DLs) in the band gap. Illumination in the range of 0.65-1.77 eV, room temperature, and DC electrical measurements were used in the case of PHES. Low temperature (4 K) photoluminescence spectra were recorded in the spectral range above 0.47 eV. Eight samples, both n-type and p-type, were studied and typical shapes of spectra were collected, compared and interpreted for both spectroscopy methods. It was shown that a simple single-level model of PHES often fails in the interpretation of DLs distant from the midgap. Eight DLs with the energy E c - 0.65 eV, E c - 0.8 eV, E c - 0.9 eV, E c - (1.10-1.15) eV, E v + 0.70 eV, E v + 0.85 eV, E v + 1.0 eV, and E c - 1.25 eV were interpreted. A memory effect characterized by a relaxation time of about 60 s was observed at the 0.8 eV level and allowed us to determine the 1.7 × 10-17 cm2 capture cross-section of electrons on this level. It is argued that PHES is a convenient complementary method to identify and characterize DLs, including DLs inaccessible by thermal emission techniques. DLs observed by PHES were consistently verified by PL.

  9. Characterization of HgCdTe Films Grown on Large-Area CdZnTe Substrates by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkun, F. Erdem; Edwall, Dennis D.; Ellsworth, Jon; Douglas, Sheri; Zandian, Majid; Carmody, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in growth of Hg1- x Cd x Te films on large-area (7 cm × 7.5 cm) CdZnTe (CZT) substrates is presented. Growth of Hg1- x Cd x Te with good uniformity on large-area wafers is achieved using a Riber 412 molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) tool designed for growth of Hg1- x Cd x Te compounds. The reactor is equipped with conventional CdTe, Te, and Hg sources for achieving uniform exposure of the wafer during growth. The composition of the Hg1- x Cd x Te compound is controlled in situ by employing a closed-loop spectral ellipsometry technique to achieve a cutoff wavelength ( λ co) of 14 μm at 78 K. We present data on the thickness and composition uniformity of films grown for large-format focal-plane array applications. The composition and thickness nonuniformity are determined to be <1% over the area of a 7 cm × 7.5 cm wafer. The films are further characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and Hall measurements. Additionally, defect maps show the spatial distribution of defects generated during the epitaxial growth of the Hg1- x Cd x Te films. Microdefect densities are in the low 103 cm-2 range, and void defects are below 500 cm-2. Dislocation densities less than 5 × 105 cm-2 are routinely achieved for Hg1- x Cd x Te films grown on CZT substrates. HgCdTe 4k × 4k focal-plane arrays with 15 μm pitch for astronomical wide-area infrared imagers have been produced using the recently developed MBE growth process at Teledyne Imaging Sensors.

  10. Characterization of HgCdTe Films Grown on Large-Area CdZnTe Substrates by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkun, F. Erdem; Edwall, Dennis D.; Ellsworth, Jon; Douglas, Sheri; Zandian, Majid; Carmody, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Recent advances in growth of Hg1-x Cd x Te films on large-area (7 cm × 7.5 cm) CdZnTe (CZT) substrates is presented. Growth of Hg1-x Cd x Te with good uniformity on large-area wafers is achieved using a Riber 412 molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) tool designed for growth of Hg1-x Cd x Te compounds. The reactor is equipped with conventional CdTe, Te, and Hg sources for achieving uniform exposure of the wafer during growth. The composition of the Hg1-x Cd x Te compound is controlled in situ by employing a closed-loop spectral ellipsometry technique to achieve a cutoff wavelength (λ co) of 14 μm at 78 K. We present data on the thickness and composition uniformity of films grown for large-format focal-plane array applications. The composition and thickness nonuniformity are determined to be <1% over the area of a 7 cm × 7.5 cm wafer. The films are further characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and Hall measurements. Additionally, defect maps show the spatial distribution of defects generated during the epitaxial growth of the Hg1-x Cd x Te films. Microdefect densities are in the low 103 cm-2 range, and void defects are below 500 cm-2. Dislocation densities less than 5 × 105 cm-2 are routinely achieved for Hg1-x Cd x Te films grown on CZT substrates. HgCdTe 4k × 4k focal-plane arrays with 15 μm pitch for astronomical wide-area infrared imagers have been produced using the recently developed MBE growth process at Teledyne Imaging Sensors.

  11. Modelling and 3D optimisation of CdTe pixels detector array geometry - Extension to small pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumbiehl, A.; Hage-Ali, M.; Fougeres, P.; Koebel, J. M.; Regal, R.; Rit, C.; Ayoub, M.; Siffert, P.

    2001-08-01

    CdTe and CdZnTe pixel detectors offer great interest for many applications, especially for medical and industrial imaging. Up to now, the material, generally, used and investigated for pixel arrays was CZT (Hamel et al., IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 43 (3) (1996) 1422; Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 (1) (1995) 156; Bennett et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 392 (1997) 260; Eskin et al., J. Appl. Phys. 85 (2) (1999) 647; Brunett et al., J. Appl. Phys. 86 (7) (1999) 3926; Luke, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 380 (1996) 232), but cadmium telluride can also be an appropriate choice, as shown here. However, we clearly demonstrate here that the optimal pixel configuration is highly dependent on the electrical transport properties of the material. Depending on the field of primary interest, either energy resolution or counting rate efficiency in the photopeak, the geometry for each case has to be optimised. For that purpose, we have developed a calculation of the signal induced onto the pixel. Two distinct parts are used: after showing our approach for the weighting potential calculation, we present our results performed by a "pseudo-Monte Carlo" simulation. Results are supported by a few experimental comparisons. We argue about the optimum sizes with clarifying the problems caused by too small and too large pixel sizes. The study field is chosen to be vast, i.e. pixel size to detector thickness ratios ( W/ L) of 1/8-1, and detector thickness of 1.0-8.0 mm. In addition, several electrical transport properties are used. Since efficiency is often of primary interest, thick detectors could be very attractive, which are shown to be really feasible even on CdTe.

  12. Versatile wideband balanced detector for quantum optical homodyne tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barrios, E.; MacRae, A.; Cairns, E.; Huntington, E. H.; Lvovsky, A. I.

    2012-11-01

    We present a comprehensive theory and an easy to follow method for the design and construction of a wideband homodyne detector for time-domain quantum measurements. We show how one can evaluate the performance of a detector in a specific time-domain experiment based on the electronic spectral characteristic of that detector. We then present and characterize a high-performance detector constructed using inexpensive, commercially available components such as low-noise high-speed operational amplifiers and high-bandwidth photodiodes. Our detector shows linear behavior up to a level of over 13 dB clearance between shot noise and electronic noise, in the range from DC to 100 MHz. The detector can be used for measuring quantum optical field quadratures both in the continuous-wave and pulsed regimes with standard commercial mode-locked lasers.

  13. ACCESS: Detector Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Matthew J.; Kaiser, M.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Mott, D. B.; Wen, Y.; Foltz, R.; McCandliss, S. R.; Pelton, R. S.; Wright, E. L.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Riess, A. G.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Woodgate, B. E.; Bohlin, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Kurucz, R. L.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.

    2013-01-01

    ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments that will enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass (overview Kaiser et al.). The flight detector and detector spare have been integrated with their electronics and flight mount. The controller electronics have been flight qualified. Vibration testing to launch loads and thermal vacuum testing of the detector, mount, and housing have been performed. The flight detector controller boards have been installed into a ruggedized flight housing. They have been successfully vacuum tested for periods significantly longer than the flight length, and components have been heat-sunk and reinforced as necessary. Thermal stability tests have been performed, and results will be presented. Goddard Space Flight Center’s Detector Characterization Lab (DCL) executed initial characterization tests for the flight detector in 2007. These were repeated in 2012, to ensure and establish baseline performance. Current lab characterization tests at Johns Hopkins are ongoing, and results will be presented. NASA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  14. The Belle II Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piilonen, Leo; Belle Collaboration, II

    2017-01-01

    The Belle II detector is now under construction at the KEK laboratory in Japan. This project represents a substantial upgrade of the Belle detector (and the KEKB accelerator). The Belle II experiment will record 50 ab-1 of data, a factor of 50 more than that recorded by Belle. This large data set, combined with the low backgrounds and high trigger efficiencies characteristic of an e+e- experiment, should provide unprecedented sensitivity to new physics signatures in B and D meson decays, and in τ lepton decays. The detector comprises many forefront subsystems. The vertex detector consists of two inner layers of silicon DEPFET pixels and four outer layers of double-sided silicon strips. These layers surround a beryllium beam pipe having a radius of only 10 mm. Outside of the vertex detector is a large-radius, small-cell drift chamber, an ``imaging time-of-propagation'' detector based on Cerenkov radiation for particle identification, and scintillating fibers and resistive plate chambers used to identify muons. The detector will begin commissioning in 2017.

  15. Detectors for Tomorrow's Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled superconducting detectors have become essential tools for a wide range of measurement applications, ranging from quantum limited heterodyne detection in the millimeter range to direct searches for dark matter with superconducting phonon detectors operating at 20 mK. Superconducting detectors have several fundamental and practical advantages which have resulted in their rapid adoption by experimenters. Their excellent performance arises in part from reductions in noise resulting from their low operating temperatures, but unique superconducting properties provide a wide range of mechanisms for detection. For example, the steep dependence of resistance with temperature on the superconductor/normal transition provides a sensitive thermometer for calorimetric and bolometric applications. Parametric changes in the properties of superconducting resonators provides a mechanism for high sensitivity detection of submillimeter photons. From a practical point of view, the use of superconducting detectors has grown rapidly because many of these devices couple well to SQUID amplifiers, which are easily integrated with the detectors. These SQUID-based amplifiers and multiplexers have matured with the detectors; they are convenient to use, and have excellent noise performance. The first generation of fully integrated large scale superconducting detection systems are now being deployed. I will discuss the prospects for a new generation of instruments designed to take full advantage of the revolution in detector technology.

  16. Detectors for Tomorrow's Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled superconducting detectors have become essential tools for a wide range of measurement applications, ranging from quantum limited heterodyne detection in the millimeter range to direct searches for dark matter with superconducting phonon detectors operating at 20 mK. Superconducting detectors have several fundamental and practical advantages which have resulted in their rapid adoption by experimenters. Their excellent performance arises in part from reductions in noise resulting from their low operating temperatures, but unique superconducting properties provide a wide range of mechanisms for detection. For example, the steep dependence of resistance with temperature on the superconductor/normal transition provides a sensitive thermometer for calorimetric and bolometric applications. Parametric changes in the properties of superconducting resonators provides a mechanism for high sensitivity detection of submillimeter photons. From a practical point of view, the use of superconducting detectors has grown rapidly because many of these devices couple well to SQUID amplifiers, which are easily integrated with the detectors. These SQUID-based amplifiers and multiplexers have matured with the detectors; they are convenient to use, and have excellent noise performance. The first generation of fully integrated large scale superconducting detection systems are now being deployed. I will discuss the prospects for a new generation of instruments designed to take full advantage of the revolution in detector technology.

  17. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  18. Semiconductor neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueorguiev, Andrey; Hong, Huicong; Tower, Joshua; Kim, Hadong; Cirignano, Leonard; Burger, Arnold; Shah, Kanai

    2016-09-01

    Lithium Indium Selenide (LiInSe2) has been under development in RMD Inc. and Fisk University for room temperature thermal neutron detection due to a number of promising properties. The recent advances of the crystal growth, material processing, and detector fabrication technologies allowed us to fabricate large detectors with 100 mm2 active area. The thermal neutron detection sensitivity and gamma rejection ratio (GRR) were comparable to 3He tube with 10 atm gas pressure at comparable dimensions. The synthesis, crystal growth, detector fabrication, and characterization are reported in this paper.

  19. Absolute radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John E.

    1996-11-01

    An absolute radiation detector (a cryogenic radiometer) is being developed to replace the existing UK primary national standard cryogenic radiometer with an improved uncertainty. The cryogenic radiometer will be capable of measuring black body radiation and laser radiation with an uncertainty approaching 10 ppm. From these measurements it will be possible to determine the fundamental constant, the Stefan Boltzmann constant, confirming the radiometer as an absolute detector, and link this determination to the SI unit of luminous intensity, the candela. Thus detector and source based scales/standards will be tied to an invariant physical quantity ensuring their long-term stability.

  20. The Silicon Cube detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matea, I.; Adimi, N.; Blank, B.; Canchel, G.; Giovinazzo, J.; Borge, M. J. G.; Domínguez-Reyes, R.; Tengblad, O.; Thomas, J.-C.

    2009-08-01

    A new experimental device, the Silicon Cube detector, consisting of six double-sided silicon strip detectors placed in a compact geometry was developed at CENBG. Having a very good angular coverage and high granularity, it allows simultaneous measurements of energy and angular distributions of charged particles emitted from unbound nuclear states. In addition, large-volume Germanium detectors can be placed close to the collection point of the radioactive species to be studied. The setup is ideally suited for isotope separation on-line (ISOL)-type experiments to study multi-particle emitters and was tested during an experiment at the low-energy beam line of SPIRAL at GANIL.

  1. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  2. Directional radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Jonathan L.

    2017-09-12

    Directional radiation detectors and systems, methods, and computer-readable media for using directional radiation detectors to locate a radiation source are provided herein. A directional radiation detector includes a radiation sensor. A radiation attenuator partially surrounds the radiation sensor and defines an aperture through which incident radiation is received by the radiation sensor. The aperture is positioned such that when incident radiation is received directly through the aperture and by the radiation sensor, a source of the incident radiation is located within a solid angle defined by the aperture. The radiation sensor senses at least one of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma particles, or neutrons.

  3. SemiSPECT: A small-animal SPECT imager based on eight cadmium zinc tellurium detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunki

    We have completed a new small-animal imaging system, called SemiSPECT, based on eight pixellated cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) gamma-ray detector arrays. The detector is a 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm x 0.15 cm slab having a 64 x 64 pixel array. A read-out application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is attached onto the detector via indium-bump bonding, and a -180 V bias is applied onto the detector surface to transport electron-hole pairs generated by gamma-ray interaction. Eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. An eight-pinhole aperture is placed at the center of the ring, and an object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole. The object can be rotated about a vertical axis to attain sufficient angular projections for tomographic reconstruction. The whole system gantry is compact enough to be placed onto a desktop-sized optical breadboard. Eight front-end boards were developed to detect events, generate list-mode data arrays, and send them to back-end boards. Four back-end boards are utilized to hold the list-mode data arrays and transfer them to a host computer. Eight clock-and-bias boards provide clock and bias signals to the eight ASICs. Eight control-and-bias boards were developed to monitor and control the temperatures on the eight detectors, analog and digital currents supplied to the eight ASICs, and -180 V biases applied to the eight detector surfaces. The spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, estimated both based on the system geometry and via the Fourier crosstalk approach, is about 1˜2 mm. The system sensitivity measured with a point source is about 1.53 x 10-4, and the estimated one from the system geometry is about 1.41 x 10-4. The energy resolution acquired by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 x 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum for 140 keV gamma rays. The detectabilities for multiple signal spheres simulating various lesions or organs in a small animal are presented and discussed. A line

  4. The CBM RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Chernogorov, A.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höohne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2016-05-01

    The CBM RICH detector will use CO2 as radiator gas, focussing glass mirrors with Al+MgF2 reflective and protective coating and Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs as photon detectors. The detector will serve for electron to pion separation up to momenta of 8 GeV/c and thus enable in CBM the measurement of electromagnetic radiation from the early and dense fireball in A+A collisions at SIS 100. In this article, the current status of the CBM RICH development will be presented including new measurements of the radiation hardness of the H12700 MAPMT and WLS coatings with p-terphenyl, the new concept for the readout electronics, and optimizations ongoing with respect to the mirror mount structure and overall geometry. Prior to the usage in CBM, part of the already ordered MAPMTs will be used to upgrade the HADES RICH detector for a new measurement campaign at SIS 18 from 2018-2020.

  5. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOEpatents

    Gonsalves, John M.

    1997-01-01

    A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

  6. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOEpatents

    Gonsalves, J.M.

    1997-09-30

    A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

  7. Inverter ratio failure detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, A. P.; Ebersole, T. J.; Andrews, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A failure detector which detects the failure of a dc to ac inverter is disclosed. The inverter under failureless conditions is characterized by a known linear relationship of its input and output voltages and by a known linear relationship of its input and output currents. The detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the detector's input and output voltages and which provides a failure-indicating signal only when the monitored output voltage is less by a selected factor, than the expected output voltage for the monitored input voltage, based on the known voltages' relationship. Similarly, the detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the input and output currents and provides a failure-indicating signal only when the input current exceeds by a selected factor the expected input current for the monitored output current based on the known currents' relationship.

  8. Lightning Current Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Lightning Current Detector (LCD) was developed to monitor the magnitude of lightning strikes. Information it supplies is useful in evaluating lightning protection designs for such systems as telephone cables, radio broadcast towers, power transmission equipment and oil well towers.

  9. Subspace Detectors: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D B

    2006-07-11

    Broadband subspace detectors are introduced for seismological applications that require the detection of repetitive sources that produce similar, yet significantly variable seismic signals. Like correlation detectors, of which they are a generalization, subspace detectors often permit remarkably sensitive detection of small events. The subspace detector derives its name from the fact that it projects a sliding window of data drawn from a continuous stream onto a vector signal subspace spanning the collection of signals expected to be generated by a particular source. Empirical procedures are presented for designing subspaces from clusters of events characterizing a source. Furthermore, a solution is presented for the problem of selecting the dimension of the subspace to maximize the probability of detecting repetitive events at a fixed false alarm rate. An example illustrates subspace design and detection using events in the 2002 San Ramon, California earthquake swarm.

  10. SRAM Detector Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soli, G. A.; Blaes, B. R.; Beuhler, M. G.

    1994-01-01

    Custom proton sensitive SRAM chips are being flown on the BMDO Clementine missions and Space Technology Research Vehicle experiments. This paper describes the calibration procedure for the SRAM proton detectors and their response to the space environment.

  11. Pocked surface neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas; Klann, Raymond

    2003-04-08

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  12. Toroidal magnetic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, B G

    1981-01-01

    Properties of the superconducting toroidal magnet for the detector at ISABELLE are discussed, along with ways it could be used to make significant physics contributions at a high energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. (GHT)

  13. Modular optical detector system

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Brent A.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2006-02-14

    A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

  14. PHENIX detector overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcox, K.; Adler, S. S.; Aizama, M.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akikawa, H.; Alexander, J.; Al-Jamel, A.; Allen, M.; Alley, G.; Amirikas, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Arai, Y.; Archuleta, J. B.; Archuleta, J. R.; Armendariz, R.; Armijo, V.; Aronson, S. H.; Autrey, D.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Baldisseri, A.; Banning, J.; Barish, K. N.; Barker, A. B.; Barnes, P. D.; Barrette, J.; Barta, F.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V. V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Begay, R.; Behrendt, J.; Belikov, S.; Belkin, R.; Bellaiche, F. G.; Belyaev, S. T.; Bennett, M. J.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhaganatula, S.; Biggs, J. C.; Bland, A. W.; Blume, C.; Bobrek, M.; Boissevain, J. G.; Boose, S.; Borel, H.; Borland, D.; Bosze, E.; Botelho, S.; Bowers, J.; Britton, C.; Britton, L.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, A. W.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bryan, W. L.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J.; Butsyk, S. A.; Cafferty, M. M.; Carey, T. A.; Chai, J. S.; Chand, P.; Chang, J.; Chang, W. C.; Chappell, R. B.; Chavez, L. L.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Chollet, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christ, T.; Chujo, T.; Chung, M. S.; Chung, P.; Cianciolo, V.; Clark, D. J.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Constantin, P.; Conway, R.; Cook, K. C.; Crook, D. W.; Cunitz, H.; Cunningham, R.; Cutshaw, M.; D'Enterria, D. G.; Dabrowski, C. M.; Danby, G.; Daniels, S.; Danmura, A.; David, G.; Debraine, A.; Delagrange, H.; Demoss, J.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dinesh, B. V.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Ebisu, K.; Echave, M. A.; Efremenko, Y. V.; El Chenawi, K.; Emery, M. S.; Engo, D.; Enokizono, A.; Enosawa, K.; En'yo, H.; Ericson, N.; Esumi, S.; Evseev, V. A.; Ewell, L.; Fackler, O.; Fellenstein, J.; Ferdousi, T.; Ferrierra, J.; Fields, D. E.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frank, S.; Franz, A.; Frantz, J. E.; Frawley, A. D.; Fried, J.; Freidberg, J. P.; Fujisawa, E.; Funahashi, H.; Fung, S.-Y.; Gadrat, S.; Gannon, J.; Garpman, S.; Gastaldi, F.; Gee, T. F.; Gentry, R.; Ghosh, T. K.; Giannotti, P.; Glenn, A.; Godoi, A. L.; Gonin, M.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Greene, S. V.; Griffin, V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gupta, S. K.; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, S.; Halliwell, J.; Hamagaki, H.; Hance, R. H.; Hansen, A. G.; Hara, H.; Harder, J.; Hart, G. W.; Hartouni, E. P.; Harvey, A.; Hawkins, L.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayashi, H.; Hayashi, N.; He, X.; Heine, N.; Heistermann, F.; Held, S.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hibino, M.; Hicks, J. S.; Higuchi, R.; Hill, J. C.; Hirano, T.; Ho, D. S.; Hoade, R.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Honaguchi, T.; Hunter, C. T.; Hurst, D. E.; Hutter, R.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M. S.; Davis Isenhower, L.; Donald Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanov, V. I.; Jacak, B. V.; Jackson, G.; Jackson, J.; Jaffe, D.; Jagadish, U.; Jang, W. Y.; Jayakumar, R.; Jia, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, J.; Johnson, S. C.; Jones, J. P.; Jones, K.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kahn, S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kandasamy, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kann, M. R.; Kapoor, S. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karadjev, K. V.; Kashikhin, V.; Kato, S.; Katou, K.; Kehayias, H.-J.; Kelley, M. A.; Kelly, S.; Kennedy, M.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A. V.; Khomutnikov, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.-W.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Klinksiek, S.; Kluberg, L.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Komkov, B. G.; Kopytine, M. L.; Koseki, K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kotchetkov, D.; Koutcheryaev, Iou. A.; Kozlov, A.; Kozlov, V. S.; Kravtsov, P. A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kudin, L. G.; Kurata-Nishimura, M.; Kuriatkov, V. V.; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Labounty, J. J.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lebedev, V. A.; Lebedev, V. D.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, S.; Leitch, M. J.; Lenz, M.; Lenz, W.; Li, X. H.; Li, Z.; Libby, B.; Libkind, M.; Liccardi, W.; Lim, D. J.; Lin, S.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockner, E.; Longbotham, N.; Lopez, J. D.; Machnowski, R.; Maguire, C. F.; Mahon, J.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Marino, S.; Mark, S. K.; Markacs, S.; Markushin, D. G.; Martinez, G.; Martinez, X. B.; Marx, M. D.; Masaike, A.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, P. L.; McCain, M. C.; Mead, J.; Melnikov, E.; Melnikov, Y.; Meng, W. Z.; Merschmeyer, M.; Messer, F.; Messer, M.; Miake, Y.; Miftakhov, N. M.; Migluolio, S.; Milan, J.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Minuzzo, K.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, R. E.; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyamoto, Y.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montoya, B. C.; Moore, A.; Moore, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moscone, G. G.; Moss, J. M.; Mühlbacher, F.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Murray, M. M.; Musrock, M.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Nakada, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, B. K.; Negrin, J.; Newby, J.; Nikkinen, L.; Nikolaev, S. A.; Nilsson, P.; Nishimura, S.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; O'Conner, P.; Obenshain, F.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Österman, L.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Paffrath, L.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pancake, C. E.; Pantuev, V. S.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S. F.; Peitzmann, T.; Petersen, R.; Petridis, A. N.; Pinkenburg, C. H.; Pisani, R. P.; Pitukhin, P.; Plagge, T.; Plasil, F.; Pollack, M.; Pope, K.; Prigl, R.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qualls, J. M.; Rankowitz, S.; Rao, G.; Rao, R.; Rau, M.; Ravinovich, I.; Raynis, R.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, G.; Riabov, V. G.; Riabov, Yu. G.; Robinson, S. H.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Roschin, E. V.; Rose, A. A.; Rosnet, P.; Roth, R.; Ruggiero, R.; Ryu, S. S.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sako, H.; Sakuma, T.; Salomone, S.; Samsonov, V. M.; Sandhoff, W. F.; Sanfratello, L.; Sangster, T. C.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Savino, R.; Sawada, S.; Schlei, B. R.; Schleuter, R.; Schutz, Y.; Sekimoto, M.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Severgin, Y.; Shajii, A.; Shangin, V.; Shaw, M. R.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shelikhov, V.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Shimada, T.; Shin, Y. H.; Sibiriak, I. G.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Simon-Gillo, J.; Simpson, M.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Sippach, W.; Sivertz, M.; Skank, H. D.; Skutnik, S.; Sleege, G. A.; Smith, D. C.; Smith, G. D.; Smith, M.; Soldatov, A.; Solodov, G. P.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S.; Sourikova, I.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Starinsky, N.; Steffens, S.; Stein, E. M.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stewering, J.; Stokes, W.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugioka, M.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sumi, Y.; Sun, Z.; Suzuki-Nara, M.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taniguchi, E.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarakanov, V. I.; Tarasenkova, O. P.; Tepe, J. D.; Thern, R.; Thomas, J. H.; Thomas, J. L.; Thomas, T. L.; Thomas, W. D.; Thornton, G. W.; Tian, W.; Todd, R.; Tojo, J.; Toldo, F.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tradeski, J.; Trofimov, V. A.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tsvetkov, A. A.; Tuli, S. K.; Turner, G.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Urasawa, S.; Usachev, A.; Ushiroda, T.; van Hecke, H. W.; van Lith, M.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Vasiliev, V.; Vassent, M.; Velissaris, C.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Verhoeven, W.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Vishnevskii, V. I.; Volkov, M. A.; von Achen, W.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vznuzdaev, E. A.; Vznuzdaev, M.; Walker, J. W.; Wan, Y.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Watkins, L. C.; Weimer, T.; White, S. N.; Whitus, B. R.; Williams, C.; Willis, P. S.; Wintenberg, A. L.; Witzig, C.; Wohn, F. K.; Wolniewicz, K.; Wong-Swanson, B. G.; Wood, L.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, L. W.; Wu, J.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Yagi, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Yang, Y.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yokota, Y.; Yoneyama, S.; Young, G. R.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhou, S.; Phenix Collaboration

    2003-03-01

    The PHENIX detector is designed to perform a broad study of A-A, p-A, and p-p collisions to investigate nuclear matter under extreme conditions. A wide variety of probes, sensitive to all timescales, are used to study systematic variations with species and energy as well as to measure the spin structure of the nucleon. Designing for the needs of the heavy-ion and polarized-proton programs has produced a detector with unparalleled capabilities. PHENIX measures electron and muon pairs, photons, and hadrons with excellent energy and momentum resolution. The detector consists of a large number of subsystems that are discussed in other papers in this volume. The overall design parameters of the detector are presented.

  15. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1985-06-19

    A neutron detector of very high temporal resolution is described. It may be used to measure distributions of neutrons produced by fusion reactions that persist for times as short as about 50 picoseconds.

  16. Degradation of silicon ac-coupled microstrip detectors induced by radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchetta, N.; Gotra, Yu.; Bisello, D. |; Canali, C.; Fuochi, P.G.; Paccagnella, A.; Verzellesi, G. |

    1993-12-01

    Results are presented showing the radiation response of ac-coupled FOXFET biased microstrip detectors and related test patterns to be used in the microvertex detector of the CDF experiment at Fermi National Laboratory. Radiation tolerance of detectors to gamma and proton irradiation has been tested and the radiation induced variations of the dc electrical parameters have been analyzed. Long term post-irradiation behavior of detector characteristics have been studied, and the relevant room temperature annealing phenomena have been discussed.

  17. Fiber optic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  18. Improved gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, F.E. Jr.

    1983-10-06

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  19. Gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, Jr., Frank E.

    1988-01-01

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  20. Advanced Slit Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    detector preselection procedures will be found In Section 2.2. Finally, methods used to characterize the perfor- mance of detectors are described...type material resulting from recrystallizations performed under the current program. The run utilized starting GaP from Imanco Czochralski ingot one...stallizations employed starting material from Imanco Czochralski ingot one. Preliminary data indicated material of high resistivi- ties (106 - 108

  1. Gallium arsenide pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, R.; Campbell, M.; Cantatore, E.; D'Auria, S.; da Vià, C.; del Papa, C.; Heijne, E. M.; Middelkamp, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Ropotar, I.; Scharfetter, L.; Smith, K.; Snoeys, W.

    1998-02-01

    GaAs detectors can be fabricated with bidimensional single-sided electrode segmentation. They have been successfully bonded using flip-chip technology to the Omega-3 silicon read-out chip. We present here the design features of the GaAs pixel detectors and results from a test performed at the CERN SpS with a 120 GeV π- beam. The detection efficiency was 99.2% with a nominal threshold of 5000 e -.

  2. Fiber optic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Judy K.; Ward, Thomas E.; Grey, Alan E.

    1990-04-01

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  3. Fabrication of Pop-up Detector Arrays on Si Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary J.; Allen, Christine A.; Gordon, Scott A.; Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Mott, David B.; Stahle, Caroline K.; Wang, Liqin L.

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity is a basic requirement for a new generation of thermal detectors. To meet the requirement, close-packed, two-dimensional silicon detector arrays have been developed in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goal of the task is to fabricate detector arrays configured with thermal detectors such as infrared bolometers and x-ray calorimeters to use in space fliGht missions. This paper focuses on the fabrication and the mechanical testing of detector arrays in a 0.2 mm pixel size, the smallest pop-up detectors being developed so far. These array structures, nicknamed "PUDS" for "Pop-Up Detectors", are fabricated on I pm thick, single-crystal, silicon membranes. Their designs have been refined so we can utilize the flexibility of thin silicon films by actually folding the silicon membranes to 90 degrees in order to obtain close-packed two-dimensional arrays. The PUD elements consist of a detector platform and two legs for mechanical support while also serving as electrical and thermal paths. Torsion bars and cantilevers connecting the detector platform to the legs provide additional flexures for strain relief. Using micro-electromechanical structure (MEMS) fabrication techniques, including photolithography, anisotropic chemical etching, reactive-ion etching, and laser dicing, we have fabricated PLTD detector arrays of fourteen designs with a variation of four parameters including cantilever length, torsion bar length and width, and leg length. Folding tests were conducted to test mechanical stress distribution for the array structures. We obtained folding yields and selected optimum design parameters to reach minimal stress levels. Computer simulation was also employed to verify mechanical behaviors of PUDs in the folding process. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was utilized to examine the flatness of detectors and the alignment of detector pixels in arrays. The fabrication of thermistors and heaters on the pop-up detectors is under way

  4. Fabrication of Pop-up Detector Arrays on Si Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary J.; Allen, Christine A.; Gordon, Scott A.; Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Mott, David B.; Stahle, Caroline K.; Wang, Liqin L.

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity is a basic requirement for a new generation of thermal detectors. To meet the requirement, close-packed, two-dimensional silicon detector arrays have been developed in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goal of the task is to fabricate detector arrays configured with thermal detectors such as infrared bolometers and x-ray calorimeters to use in space fliGht missions. This paper focuses on the fabrication and the mechanical testing of detector arrays in a 0.2 mm pixel size, the smallest pop-up detectors being developed so far. These array structures, nicknamed "PUDS" for "Pop-Up Detectors", are fabricated on I pm thick, single-crystal, silicon membranes. Their designs have been refined so we can utilize the flexibility of thin silicon films by actually folding the silicon membranes to 90 degrees in order to obtain close-packed two-dimensional arrays. The PUD elements consist of a detector platform and two legs for mechanical support while also serving as electrical and thermal paths. Torsion bars and cantilevers connecting the detector platform to the legs provide additional flexures for strain relief. Using micro-electromechanical structure (MEMS) fabrication techniques, including photolithography, anisotropic chemical etching, reactive-ion etching, and laser dicing, we have fabricated PLTD detector arrays of fourteen designs with a variation of four parameters including cantilever length, torsion bar length and width, and leg length. Folding tests were conducted to test mechanical stress distribution for the array structures. We obtained folding yields and selected optimum design parameters to reach minimal stress levels. Computer simulation was also employed to verify mechanical behaviors of PUDs in the folding process. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was utilized to examine the flatness of detectors and the alignment of detector pixels in arrays. The fabrication of thermistors and heaters on the pop-up detectors is under way

  5. Extrinsic germanium Blocked Impurity Bank (BIB) detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabach, Timothy N.; Huffman, James E.; Watson, Dan M.

    1989-01-01

    Ge:Ga blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detectors with long wavelength thresholds greater than 190 microns and peak quantum efficiencies of 4 percent, at an operating temperature of 1.8 K, have been fabricated. These proof of concept devices consist of a high purity germanium blocking layer epitaxially grown on a Ga-doped Ge substrate. This demonstration of BIB behavior in germanium enables the development of far infrared detector arrays similar to the current silicon-based devices. Present efforts are focussed on improving the chemical vapor deposition process used to create the blocking layer and on the lithographic processing required to produce monolithic detector arrays in germanium. Approaches to test the impurity levels in both the blocking and active layers are considered.

  6. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  7. The Belle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Morgan, N.; Piilonen, L.; Schrenk, S.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Alexander, J. P.; Aoki, K.; Behari, S.; Doi, Y.; Enomoto, R.; Fujii, H.; Fujita, Y.; Funahashi, Y.; Haba, J.; Hamasaki, H.; Haruyama, T.; Hayashi, K.; Higashi, Y.; Hitomi, N.; Igarashi, S.; Igarashi, Y.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikeda, Hitomi; Itoh, R.; Iwai, M.; Iwasaki, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Joo, K. K.; Kasami, K.; Katayama, N.; Kawai, M.; Kichimi, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Koike, S.; Kondo, Y.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Manabe, A.; Matsuda, T.; Murakami, T.; Nagayama, S.; Nakao, M.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, K.; Ohkubo, R.; Ohnishi, Y.; Ozaki, H.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, M.; Sakai, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, N.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, J.; Suzuki, J. I.; Suzuki, S.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tatomi, T.; Tsuboyama, T.; Tsukada, K.; Tsukamoto, T.; Uehara, S.; Ujiie, N.; Uno, S.; Yabsley, B.; Yamada, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamaoka, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Zhao, H.; Abe, R.; Iwai, G.; Kawasaki, T.; Miyata, H.; Shimada, K.; Takahashi, S.; Tamura, N.; Abe, K.; Hanada, H.; Nagamine, T.; Nakajima, M.; Nakajima, T.; Narita, S.; Sanpei, M.; Takayama, T.; Ueki, M.; Yamaga, M.; Yamaguchi, A.; Ahn, B. S.; Kang, J. S.; Kim, Hyunwoo; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Ahn, H. S.; Jang, H. K.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, S. H.; Park, C. S.; Won, E.; Aihara, H.; Higuchi, T.; Kawai, H.; Matsubara, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Tajima, H.; Tanaka, J.; Tomura, T.; Yokoyama, M.; Akatsu, M.; Fujimoto, K.; Hirose, M.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itami, S.; Kani, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Nagai, I.; Okabe, T.; Oshima, T.; Senyo, K.; Sugi, A.; Sugiyama, A.; Suitoh, S.; Suzuki, S.; Tomoto, M.; Yoshida, K.; Akhmetshin, R.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, Y. Q.; Hou, W. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Huang, H. C.; Huang, T. J.; Lee, M. C.; Lu, R. S.; Peng, J. C.; Peng, K. C.; Sahu, S.; Sung, H. F.; Tsai, K. L.; Ueno, K.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, M. Z.; Alimonti, G.; Browder, T. E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Fang, F.; Guler, H.; Jones, M.; Li, Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Peters, M.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Rosen, M.; Swain, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Varner, G.; Yamamoto, H.; Zheng, Y. H.; An, Q.; Chen, H. F.; Wang, Y. F.; Xu, Z. Z.; Ye, S. W.; Zhang, Z. P.; Asai, M.; Asano, Y.; Mori, S.; Stanič, S.; Tsujita, Y.; Zhang, J.; Žontar, D.; Aso, T.; Aulchenko, V.; Beiline, D.; Bondar, A.; Dneprovsky, L.; Eidelman, S.; Garmash, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Romanov, L.; Root, N.; Shwartz, B.; Sidorov, A.; Sidorov, V.; Usov, Y.; Zhilich, V.; Bakich, A. M.; Peak, L. S.; Varvell, K. E.; Banas, E.; Bozek, A.; Jalocha, P.; Kapusta, P.; Natkaniec, Z.; Ostrowicz, W.; Palka, H.; Rozanka, M.; Rybicki, K.; Behera, P. K.; Mohapatra, A.; Satapathy, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, H. S.; Dong, L. Y.; Li, J.; Liu, H. M.; Mao, Z. P.; Yu, C. X.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zheng, Z. P.; Cheon, B. G.; Choi, Y.; Kim, D. W.; Nam, J. W.; Chidzik, S.; Korotuschenko, K.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Liu, T.; Marlow, D.; Mindas, C.; Prebys, E.; Rabberman, R.; Sands, W.; Wixted, R.; Choi, S.; Dragic, J.; Everton, C. W.; Gordon, A.; Hastings, N. C.; Heenan, E. M.; Moffitt, L. C.; Moloney, G. R.; Moorhead, G. F.; Sevior, M. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Tovey, S. N.; Drutskoy, A.; Kagan, R.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Fukunaga, C.; Suda, R.; Fukushima, M.; Goriletsky, V. I.; Grinyov, B. V.; Lyubinsky, V. R.; Panova, A. I.; Shakhova, K. V.; Shpilinskaya, L. I.; Vinograd, E. L.; Zaslavsky, B. G.; Guo, R. S.; Haitani, F.; Hoshi, Y.; Neichi, K.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Hazumi, M.; Hojo, T.; Jackson, D.; Miyake, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Ryuko, J.; Sumisawa, K.; Takita, M.; Yamanaka, T.; Hayashii, H.; Miyabayashi, K.; Noguchi, S.; Hikita, S.; Hirano, H.; Hoshina, K.; Mamada, H.; Nitoh, O.; Okazaki, N.; Yokoyama, T.; Ishino, H.; Ichizawa, S.; Hirai, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kaneko, J.; Nakamura, T.; Ohshima, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Yanaka, S.; Inoue, Y.; Nakano, E.; Takahashi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Kang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Heejong; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kawai, H.; Kurihara, E.; Ooba, T.; Suzuki, K.; Unno, Y.; Kawamura, N.; Yuta, H.; Kinoshita, K.; Satpathy, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Kuniya, T.; Murakami, A.; Tsukamoto, T.; Kumar, S.; Singh, J.; Lange, J.; Stock, R.; Matsumoto, S.; Watanabe, M.; Matsuo, H.; Nishida, S.; Nomura, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sasao, N.; Ushiroda, Y.; Nagasaka, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ogawa, S.; Shibuya, H.; Hanagaki, K.; Okuno, S.; Shen, D. Z.; Yan, D. S.; Yin, Z. W.; Tan, N.; Wang, C. H.; Yamaki, T.; Yamashita, Y.

    2002-02-01

    The Belle detector was designed and constructed to carry out quantitative studies of rare B-meson decay modes with very small branching fractions using an asymmetric e +e - collider operating at the ϒ(4S) resonance, the KEK-B-factory. Such studies require data samples containing ˜10 7 B-meson decays. The Belle detector is configured around a 1.5 T superconducting solenoid and iron structure surrounding the KEK-B beams at the Tsukuba interaction region. B-meson decay vertices are measured by a silicon vertex detector situated just outside of a cylindrical beryllium beam pipe. Charged particle tracking is performed by a wire drift chamber (CDC). Particle identification is provided by d E/d x measurements in CDC, aerogel threshold Cherenkov counter and time-of-flight counter placed radially outside of CDC. Electromagnetic showers are detected in an array of CsI( Tl) crystals located inside the solenoid coil. Muons and K L mesons are identified by arrays of resistive plate counters interspersed in the iron yoke. The detector covers the θ region extending from 17° to 150°. The part of the uncovered small-angle region is instrumented with a pair of BGO crystal arrays placed on the surfaces of the QCS cryostats in the forward and backward directions. Details of the design and development works of the detector subsystems, which include trigger, data acquisition and computer systems, are described. Results of performance of the detector subsystems are also presented.

  8. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sanpietro, M.; Kemmer, J.; Dietl, H.; Holl, P.; Klanner, R.; Lutz, G.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements.

  9. Photon-number resolving detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haderka, O.; Peřina, J., Jr.; Hamar, M.; Michálek, V.; Černoch, A.; Soubusta, J.

    2010-12-01

    An overview of current commercial and emerging approaches to single-photon-sensitive detection is given. Special attention is devoted to the detectors providing photon-number resolution with respect to their application in quantum optics and quantum information. Besides detectors offering photon-number resolution intrinsically, also multiplexing detectors are treated. A comparison of the detector technologies is presented.

  10. Cadmium mercury telluride infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, C. T.

    Signal Processing In The Element (SPITE) detectors used in high performance thermal imaging systems are discussed. Developments to improve spatial and temperature resolution are outlined. Focal plane arrays of electronically scanned two-dimensional arrays of CMT detectors are treated. Use of photovoltaic CMT detectors hybridized with silicon addressing circuits is reported. Research to raise the operating temperature of infrared detectors is summarized.

  11. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannheim, D.

    2015-03-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a measurement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → Wb will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit timing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin planar or active HV-CMOS sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. This contribution reviews the requirements and design optimisation for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensors, readout and detector integration.

  12. Effect of ZnTe and CdZnTe Alloys at the Back Contact of 1-μm-Thick CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Nowshad; Yamada, Akira; Konagai, Makoto

    2002-05-01

    N2-doped ZnTe was introduced onto 1-μm-thick CdTe absorbers in order to reduce the carrier recombination at the back contact of CdS/CdTe/C/Ag configuration solar cells. ZnTe films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs and Corning glass substrates to investigate the characteristics of the films. Epitaxial growth of ZnTe was realized on GaAs substrates and a hole concentration of 8 × 1018 cm-3 with a resistivity of 0.045 Ω \\cdotcm was achieved as a result of nitrogen doping. In contrast, polycrystalline ZnTe films were grown on Corning glass and CdTe thin films. Dark and photoconductivity of ZnTe films increased to 1.43 × 10-5 S/cm and 1.41 × 10-4 S/cm, respectively, while the Zn to Te ratio was decreased to 0.25 during MBE growth. These ZnTe films with different thicknesses were inserted into close-spaced sublimation (CSS)-grown 1-μm-thick CdTe solar cells. A conversion efficiency of 8.31% (Voc: 0.74 V, Jsc: 22.98 mA/cm2, FF: 0.49, area: 0.5 cm2) was achieved for a 0.2-μm-thick ZnTe layer with a cell configuration of CdS/CdTe/ZnTe/Cu-doped-C/Ag. Furthermore, to overcome the problem of possible recombination loss in the interface layer of CdTe and ZnTe, the intermediate ternary CdZnTe is investigated. The compositional factor in Cd1-xZnxTe:N alloy is varied and the dependence of the conductivity is evaluated. For instance, Cd0.5Zn0.5Te:N, with dark and photoconductivity of 2.13 × 10-6 and 2.9 × 10-5 S/cm, respectively, is inserted at the back contact of a 1-μm-thick CdTe solar cell. A conversion efficiency of 7.46% (Voc: 0.68 V, Jsc: 22.60 mA/cm2, FF: 0.49, area: 0.086 cm2) was achieved as the primary result for a 0.2-μm-thick Cd0.5Zn0.5Te:N layer with the cell configuration of CdS/CdTe/Cd0.5Zn0.5Te:N/Au.

  13. Focal Plane Array Technology for IR Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    Bulk Crystals CdTe, CdSe , CdS, CdO, ZnTe, Cd(SSe) Continue: (HgCd)Te, (CdZn)Te Crystal growth: Vertical Bridgman Method (VBM), Horizontal Bridgman ...Method (HBM), Vertical Zone Melting (VZM), Vapour Phase Transport Method (VPTM), Travelling Heater Method (THM) Continue: Bridgman Growth from Melt of...growth of (HgCd)Te, is shown in Figs.2.1-2.2. Our Bridgman growth from melt of constant composition (BGCC) is based on a demand to ensure melt of

  14. The use of Schottky CdTe detectors for high-energy astronomy: application to the detection plane of the instrument SVOM/ECLAIRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasser, G.; Godet, O.; Atteia, J.-L.; Amoros, C.; Barret, D.; Bordon, S.; Cordier, B.; Gevin, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Houret, B.; Lacombe, K.; Mandrou, P.; Marty, W.; Mercier, K.; Pons, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Waegebaert, V.

    2014-07-01

    Ohmic CdZnTe and CdTe detectors have been successfully used in high-energy missions such as IBIS on-board INTEGRAL and the Swift-BAT in the past two decades. Such detectors provide very good quantum efficiency in the hard X-ray band. For the future generation of hard X-ray coded mask detectors, a higher sensitivity will be required. A way to achieve this is to increase the effective area of the pixilated detection plane, to change the mask pattern and/or the properties of the semi-conductors paving the detection plane. For the future Chinese-French Gamma-ray burst mission SVOM, the GRB trigger camera ECLAIRs will make use of a new type of high-energy detectors, the Schottky CdTe detectors. Such detectors, when reversely biased, are known to present very low leakage current, resulting in lower values of the low-energy threshold (down to 4 keV or less) than for previous missions (i.e. > 10 keV for the Swift-BAT and INTEGRAL/IBIS). Such low values will enable ECLAIRs with a moderate geometrical area of 1024 cm2 and a low-energy threshold of 4 keV to be more sensitive to high-redshift GRBs (emitting mainly in X-rays) than the Swift-BAT with a higher effective area and low-energy threshold. However, the spectral performance of such detectors are known to degrade over time, once polarized, due to the polarization effect that strongly depends on the temperature and the bias voltage applied to the detectors. In this paper, we present an intensive study of the properties of Schottky CdTe detectors as used on SVOM/ECLAIRs such as I-V characteristics, polarization effect, activation energy and low temperature annealing effects. We discuss the implications of these measurements on the use of this type of detectors in future high-energy instruments.

  15. Heterostructure infrared photovoltaic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, Antoni

    2000-08-01

    HgCdTe remains the most important material for infrared (IR) photodetectors despite numerous attempts to replace it with alternative materials such as closely related mercury alloys (HgZnTe, HgMnTe), Schottky barriers on silicon, SiGe heterojunctions, GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells, InAs/GaInSb strained layer superlattices, high temperature superconductors and especially two types of thermal detectors: pyroelectric detectors and silicon bolometers. It is interesting, however, that none of these competitors can compete in terms of fundamental properties. In addition, HgCdTe exhibits nearly constant lattice parameter which is of extreme importance for new devices based on complex heterostructures. The development of sophisticated controllable vapour phase epitaxial growth methods, such as MBE and MOCVD, has allowed fabrication of almost ideally designed heterojunction photodiodes. In this paper, examples of novel devices based on heterostructures operating in the long wavelength, middle wavelength and short wavelength spectral ranges are presented. Recently, more interest has been focused on p-n junction heterostructures. As infrared technology continues to advance, there is a growing demand for multispectral detectors for advanced IR systems with better target discrimination and identification. HgCdTe heterojunction detectors offer wavelength flexibility from medium wavelength to very long wavelength and multicolour capability in these regions. Recent progress in two-colour HgCdTe detectors is also reviewed.

  16. Detectors in Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Blaj, G.; Carini, G.; Carron, S.; Haller, G.; Hart, P.; Hasi, J.; Herrmann, S.; Kenney, C.; Segal, J.; Tomada, A.

    2015-08-06

    Free Electron Lasers opened a new window on imaging the motion of atoms and molecules. At SLAC, FEL experiments are performed at LCLS using 120Hz pulses with 1012 - 1013 photons in 10 femtoseconds (billions of times brighter than the most powerful synchrotrons). This extreme detection environment raises unique challenges, from obvious to surprising. Radiation damage is a constant threat due to accidental exposure to insufficiently attenuated beam, focused beam and formation of ice crystals reflecting the beam onto the detector. Often high power optical lasers are also used (e.g., 25TW), increasing the risk of damage or impeding data acquisition through electromagnetic pulses (EMP). The sample can contaminate the detector surface or even produce shrapnel damage. Some experiments require ultra high vacuum (UHV) with strict design, surface contamination and cooling requirements - also for detectors. The setup is often changed between or during experiments with short turnaround times, risking mechanical and ESD damage, requiring work planning, training of operators and sometimes continuous participation of the LCLS Detector Group in the experiments. The detectors used most often at LCLS are CSPAD cameras for hard x-rays and pnCCDs for soft x-rays.

  17. Analysis of CZT crystals and detectors grown in Russia and the Ukraine by high-pressure Bridgman methods

    SciTech Connect

    H. Hermon; M. Schieber; R. B. James; E. Y. Lee; N. Yang; A. J. Antolak; D. H. Morse; C. Hackett; E. Tarver; N. N. P. Kolesnikov; Yu N. Ivanov; V. Komar; M. S. Goorsky; H. Yoon

    2000-01-10

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is leading an effort to evaluate vertical high pressure Bridgman (VHPB) Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT) crystals grown in the former Soviet Union (FSU) (Ukraine and Russia), in order to study the parameters limiting the crystal quality and the radiation detector performance. The stoichiometry of the CZT crystals, with 0.04 < x < 0.25, has been determined by methods such as proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), X-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis and laser ablation ICP mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP/MS). Other methods such as triaxial double crystal x-ray diffraction (TADXRD), infrared transmission spectroscopy (IR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermoelectric emission spectroscopy (TEES) and laser induced transient charge technique (TCT) were also used to evaluate the material properties. The authors have measured the zinc distribution in a CZT ingot along the axial direction and also its homogeneity. The (Cd+Zn)/Te average ratio measured on the Ukraine crystals was 1.2, compared to the ratio of 0.9-1.06 on the Russian ingots. The IR transmission showed highly decorated grain boundaries with precipitates and hollow bubbles. Microprobe elemental analysis and LA-ICP/MS showed carbon precipitates in the CZT bulk and carbon deposits along grain boundaries. The higher concentration of impurities and the imperfect crystallinity lead to shorter electron and hole lifetimes in the range of 0.5--2 {micro}s and 0.1 {micro}s respectively, compared to 3--20 {micro}s and 1--7 {micro}s measured on US spectrometer grade CZT detectors. These results are consistent with the lower resistivity and worse crystalline perfection of these crystals, compared to US grown CZT. However, recently grown CZT from FSU exhibited better detector performance and good response to alpha particles.

  18. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Tull, Carolyn R.; Vilkelis, Gintas

    2002-01-01

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  19. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  20. JSATS Detector Field Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Eric Y.; Flory, Adam E.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2014-06-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) Detector is a software and hardware system that captures JSATS Acoustic Micro Transmitter (AMT) signals. The system uses hydrophones to capture acoustic signals in the water. This analog signal is then amplified and processed by the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP) board in the computer. This board digitizes and processes the acoustic signal to determine if a possible JSATS tag is present. With this detection, the data will be saved to the computer for further analysis. This document details the features and functionality of the JSATS Detector software. The document covers how to install the software, setup and run the detector software. The document will also go over the raw binary waveform file format and CSV files containing RMS values

  1. Models of neural novelty detectors, with similarities to cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Salu, Y

    1988-01-01

    A novelty detector is a functional unit, that indicates whether an incoming stimulus is familiar or novel. Novelty detection is prevalent in the central nervous system (CNS), and is involved in various activities. Its basic characteristics are discussed first. Then, models of neural novelty detectors are described, and tested and evaluated in simulations. The simulations have shown that one novelty detector, the bi-compartmental, simulates very closely the behavior of neural novelty detectors. This model is constructed in a way that resembles the observed architecture and function of area 17, and similar regions in the cortex. The first step in novelty detection is data retrieval. The proposed novelty detectors can utilize various compatible modes of data storage and retrieval, and one of those has been utilized in the simulations.

  2. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Kotz, Dennis M.; Hinz, William R.

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  3. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  4. Fissile material detector

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Alexander I.; Lushchikov, Vladislav I.; Shabalin, Eugeny P.; Maznyy, Nikita G.; Khvastunov, Michael M.; Rowland, Mark

    2002-01-01

    A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

  5. Glow discharge detector

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2002-01-01

    A highly sensitive electronic ion cell for the measurement of trace elements in He carrier gas which involves glow discharge. A constant wave (CW) glow discharge detector which is controlled through a biased resistor, can detect the change of electron density caused by impurities in the He carrier gas by many orders of magnitude larger than that caused by direct ionization or electron capture. The glow discharge detector utilizes a floating pseudo-electrode to form a probe in or near the plasma. By using this probe, the large variation of electron density due to trace amounts of impurities can be directly measured.

  6. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-01-31

    A high efficiency photoionization detector is described using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 [+-] 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20 C. 6 figs.

  7. Radiation Detectors and Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Andrea

    The use of radiation detectors in the analysis of art objects represents a very special application in a true interdisciplinary field. Radiation detectors employed in this field detect, e.g., x-rays, γ-rays, β particles, and protons. Analyzed materials range from stones, metals, over porcelain to paintings. The available nondestructive and noninvasive analytical methods cover a broad range of techniques. Hence, for the sake of brevity, this chapter will concentrate on few techniques: Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Induced γ-ray Emission (PIGE).

  8. Novel Cherenkov photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, Fabio

    2005-11-01

    Gaseous detectors using multiple gas electron multiplier (GEM) electrodes permit to attain large amplification factors with a strong suppression of photon and ion-mediated feedback. With the first GEM in a cascade coated with a photosensitive layer, they provide efficient and fast single photon detection, with excellent position resolution. General performances of CsI-coated multi-GEM detectors are described, as well as a promising method of signal readout, the so-called hexaboard, a matrix of interconnected pads that permits to achieve ambiguity-free reconstruction of multi-photon events, a major requirement for RICH applications.

  9. Dosimetry with diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, G.; Marino, C.; Silvestri, F.; Lavagno, A.; Truc, F.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present the dosimetry analysis in terms of stability and repeatability of the signal and dose rate dependence of a synthetic single crystal diamond grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique. The measurements carried out by 5 MeV X-ray photons beam show very promising results, even if the dose rate detector response points out that the charge trapping centers distribution is not uniform inside the crystal volume. This handicap that affects the detectors performances, must be ascribed to the growing process. Synthetic single crystal diamonds could be a valuable alternative to air ionization chambers for quality beam control and for intensity modulated radiation therapy beams dosimetry.

  10. The Advanced Virgo detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; Adams, T.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Allocca, A.; Astone, P.; Ballardin, G.; Barone, F.; Barsuglia, M.; Basti, A.; Bauer, Th S.; Bavigadda, V.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Bloemen, S.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Boschi, V.; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Branchesi, M.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brisson, V.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Carbognani, F.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chua, S.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Coulon, J.-P.; Cuoco, E.; D'Antonio, S.; Dattilo, V.; Davier, M.; Day, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dereli, H.; De Rosa, R.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Drago, M.; Ducrot, M.; Endrőczi, G.; Fafone, V.; Farinon, S.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giazotto, A.; Gouaty, R.; Granata, M.; Greco, G.; Groot, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Harms, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hofman, D.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Kasprzack, M.; Kéfélian, F.; Królak, A.; Kutynia, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Lebigot, E.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Losurdo, G.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mangano, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martinelli, L.; Masserot, A.; Meacher, D.; Meidam, J.; Mezzani, F.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Minenkov, Y.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mours, B.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Nocera, F.; Palomba, C.; Paoletti, F.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Poggiani, R.; Prijatelj, M.; Prodi, G. A.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Rapagnani, P.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Regimbau, T.; Ricci, F.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Romano, R.; Ruggi, P.; Sassolas, B.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Shah, S.; Siellez, K.; Straniero, N.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Tonelli, M.; Travasso, F.; Vajente, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; Vasúth, M.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vocca, H.; Wei, L.-W.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zendri, J.-P.

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Virgo interferometer is the upgraded version of the Virgo detector having the goal to extend by a factor 10 the observation horizon in the universe and consequently increase the detection rate by three orders of magnitude. Its installation is in progress and is expected to be completed in late 2015. In this proceeding we will present the scheme and the main challenging technical features of the detector and we will give an outline of the installation status and the foreseen time schedule which will bring Advanced Virgo to its full operation.

  11. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36.+-.0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20.degree. C.

  12. Semiconductor neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Littlewood, Peter B.; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Smith, James L.; Sullivan, Clair J.; Alexandrov, Boian S.; Lashley, Jason Charles

    2011-03-08

    A neutron detector has a compound of lithium in a single crystal form as a neutron sensor element. The lithium compound, containing improved charge transport properties, is either lithium niobate or lithium tantalate. The sensor element is in direct contact with a monitor that detects an electric current. A signal proportional to the electric current is produced and is calibrated to indicate the neutrons sensed. The neutron detector is particularly useful for detecting neutrons in a radiation environment. Such radiation environment may, e.g. include gamma radiation and noise.

  13. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  14. The Upgraded D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  15. High performance pyroelectric infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xu; Luo, Haosu; Ji, Yulong; Yang, Chunli

    2015-10-01

    Single infrared detector made with Relaxative ferroelectric crystal(PMNT) present excellence performance. In this paper include detector capacitance, characteristic of frequency--response, characteristic of detectivity. The measure result show that detectivity of detector made with relaxative ferroelectric crystal(PMNT) exceed three times than made with LT, the D*achieved than 1*109cmHz0.5W-1. The detector will be applied on NDIR spectrograph, FFT spectrograph and so on. The high performance pyroelectric infrared detector be developed that will be broadened application area of infrared detector.

  16. Fast Detector Simulation Using Lelaps, Detector Descriptions in GODL

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, Willy; /SLAC

    2005-07-06

    Lelaps is a fast detector simulation program which reads StdHep generator files and produces SIO or LCIO output files. It swims particles through detectors taking into account magnetic fields, multiple scattering and dE/dx energy loss. It simulates parameterized showers in EM and hadronic calorimeters and supports gamma conversions and decays. In addition to three built-in detector configurations, detector descriptions can also be read from files in the new GODL file format.

  17. Large-Area Liquid Scintillation Detector Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, M. F.; Gurr, H. S.; Hruschka, A. A.; Jenkins, T. L.; Kropp, W. P.; Reines, P.; Sobel, H.

    The following sections are included: * SUMMARY * INTRODUCTION * DETECTOR RESPONSE FUNCTION F(z) AND EVENT POSITION DETERMINATION * REFINEMENTS IN THE DETECTOR CONFIGURATION DESIGN * DETECTOR PERFORMANCE * APPENDIX * REFERENCES

  18. Optical detector calibrator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobel, James P. (Inventor); Moerk, John S. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An optical detector calibrator system simulates a source of optical radiation to which a detector to be calibrated is responsive. A light source selected to emit radiation in a range of wavelengths corresponding to the spectral signature of the source is disposed within a housing containing a microprocessor for controlling the light source and other system elements. An adjustable iris and a multiple aperture filter wheel are provided for controlling the intensity of radiation emitted from the housing by the light source to adjust the simulated distance between the light source and the detector to be calibrated. The geared iris has an aperture whose size is adjustable by means of a first stepper motor controlled by the microprocessor. The multiple aperture filter wheel contains neutral density filters of different attenuation levels which are selectively positioned in the path of the emitted radiation by a second stepper motor that is also controlled by the microprocessor. An operator can select a number of detector tests including range, maximum and minimum sensitivity, and basic functionality. During the range test, the geared iris and filter wheel are repeatedly adjusted by the microprocessor as necessary to simulate an incrementally increasing simulated source distance. A light source calibration subsystem is incorporated in the system which insures that the intensity of the light source is maintained at a constant level over time.

  19. Optimizing WIMP directional detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2007-03-01

    We study the dependence of the exposure required to directly detect a WIMP directional recoil signal on the capabilities of a directional detector. Specifically we consider variations in the nuclear recoil energy threshold, the background rate, whether the detector measures the recoil momentum vector in two or three dimensions and whether or not the sense of the momentum vector can be determined. We find that the property with the biggest effect on the required exposure is the measurement of the momentum vector sense. If the detector cannot determine the recoil sense, the exposure required is increased by an order of magnitude for 3-d read-out and two orders of magnitude for 2-d read-out. For 2-d read-out the required exposure, in particular if the senses cannot be measured, can be significantly reduced by analyzing the reduced angles with the, time dependent, projected direction of solar motion subtracted. The background rate effectively places a lower limit on the WIMP cross-section to which the detector is sensitive; it will be very difficult to detect WIMPs with a signal rate more than an order of magnitude below the background rate. Lowering the energy threshold also reduces the required exposure, but only for thresholds above 20 keV.

  20. Optimizing WIMP Directional Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. M.; Morgan, B.

    2007-08-01

    We study the dependence of the number of events required to directly detect a WIMP directional recoil signal on the capabilities of a directional detector. We consider variations in the nuclear recoil energy threshold, the background rate, whether the detector measures the recoil momentum vector in 2 or 3 dimensions and whether or not the sense of the momentum vector can be determined. The property with the biggest effect on the required exposure is the measurement of the momentum vector sense. If the detector cannot determine the recoil sense, the exposure required is increased by an order of magnitude for 3-d read-out and two orders of magnitude for 2-d read-out. For 2-d read-out the required exposure, in particular if the senses can not be measured, can be significantly reduced by analyzing the reduced angles with the, time dependent, projected direction of solar motion subtracted. The background rate effectively places a lower limit on the WIMP cross-section to which the detector is sensitive; it will be very difficult to detect WIMPs with a signal rate more than an order of magnitude below the background rate. Lowering the energy threshold also reduces the required exposure, but only for thresholds above 20 keV.

  1. Gaseous wire detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1997-08-01

    This article represents a series of three lectures describing topics needed to understand the design of typical gaseous wire detectors used in large high energy physics experiments; including the electrostatic design, drift of electrons in the electric and magnetic field, the avalanche, signal creation, limits on the position accuracy as well as some problems one encounters in practical operations.

  2. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  3. The Watchman Detector Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dazeley, Steven

    2014-03-01

    The Watchman collaboration is proposing a kiloton scale antineutrino detector of reactor-based antineutrinos for non-proliferation purposes. As an added bonus the detector will also have the capability to search for evidence of sterile neutrino oscillation, super-nova antineutrinos and, in a second phase, measure the neutrino mass hierarchy. Despite that fact that KamLAND demonstrated the feasibility of kiloton scale, long distance antineutrino detection with liquid scintillator, similar detectors at the megaton scale remain problematic for environmental, cost and light attenuation reasons. Water, with gadolinium added for neutron sensitivity, may be the detection medium of choice if its efficiency can be shown to be competitive with scintillator. The goal of the Watchman project, therefore, is to demonstrate medium distance reactor antineutrino detection, and thus demonstrate the feasibility of moving to water-based megaton scale antineutrino detectors in the future. In this talk I will describe the scope of the experiment, the physics and engineering challenges involved, the proposed design and the predicted performance of the experimental non-proliferation and high-energy physics program. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Release number LLNL-ABS-648381.

  4. The BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Luth, Vera G

    2001-05-18

    BABAR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} B Factory operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagentic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by dE/dx measurements in the tracking detectors and in a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  5. Multiple detectors "Influence Method".

    PubMed

    Rios, I J; Mayer, R E

    2016-05-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency and without the need to register coincidences of any kind. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector in the count rate of another detector, when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency (Rios and Mayer, 2015a). Its detailed mathematical description was recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015b) and its practical implementation in the measurement of a moderated neutron flux arising from an isotopic neutron source was exemplified in (Rios and Mayer, 2016). With the objective of further reducing the measurement uncertainties, in this article we extend the method for the case of multiple detectors placed one behind the other. The new estimators for the number of particles and the detection efficiency are herein derived. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Directional gamma detector

    DOEpatents

    LeVert, Francis E.; Cox, Samson A.

    1981-01-01

    An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

  7. The Friendship Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Scott

    2012-01-01

    After years of using Rube Goldberg-inspired projects to teach concepts of simple machines, the author sought a comparable project to reinforce electricity lessons in his ninth-grade Science and Technology course. The Friendship Detector gives students a chance to design, test, and build a complex circuit with multiple switches and battery-powered…

  8. Choosing a Motion Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of three types of motion detectors: Doppler radar, infrared, and ultrasonic wave, and how they are used on school buses to prevent students from being killed by their own school bus. Other safety devices cited are bus crossing arms and a camera monitor system. (MLF)

  9. Detectors and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptman, John

    2016-11-01

    The talks in the Program and the Conference parallel sessions make clear that high quality pixel vertex chambers are presently well developed and with continuing improvements (M. Caccia,1 X. Sun,2 M. Stanitzki,3 J. Qian4); that there are at least two major tracking chambers that are well studied, a TPC and silicon-strip chambers (H. Qi,5,6 C. Young,7,8 A. de Roeck9,10); that the energy measurement of photons and electrons is generally very good (H. Yang,11 S. Franchino12); and, that the last remaining detector that has not yet achieved the high precision required for good e+e- physics is the hadronic calorimeter for the measurement of jets, most importantly, jets from the decays of W and Z to quarks (S. Lee,13,14 M. Cascella,15 A. de Roeck16). The relationship of the detectors to physics and the overall design of detectors was addressed and questioned (Y. Gao,17 M. Ruan,18 G. Tonelli,19 H. Zhu,20 M. Mangano,21 C. Quigg22) in addition to precision time measurements in detectors (C. Tully23).

  10. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  11. Electromagnetic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Benson, Jay L.; Hansen, Gordon J.

    1976-01-01

    An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

  12. Gas Detectors, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Documentation Center, Alexandria, VA.

    The report contains annotated references on gas detectors compiled from the Defense Documentation Center's data bank. The range of the topics deals with detection of toxic propellants, odors, gas leaks, oxygen, etc. Included with the bibliographic reference are the corporate author-monitoring agency, subject, and title indexes. (Author/JR)

  13. Understanding the SNO+ Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kamdin, K.

    2015-03-24

    SNO+, a large liquid scintillator experiment, is the successor of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. The scintillator volume will be loaded with large quantities of 130Te, an isotope that undergoes double beta decay, in order to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. In addition to this search, SNO+ has a broad physics program due to its sensitivity to solar and supernova neutrinos, as well as reactor and geo anti-neutrinos. SNO+ can also place competitive limits on certain modes of invisible nucleon decay during its first phase. The detector is currently undergoing commissioning in preparation for its first phase, in which the detector is filled with ultra pure water. This will be followed by a pure scintillator phase, and then a Tellurium-loaded scintillator phase to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Here we present the work done to model detector aging, which was first observed during SNO. The aging was found to reduce the optical response of the detector. We also describe early results from electronics calibration of SNO+.

  14. Understanding the SNO+ Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Kamdin, K.

    2015-03-24

    SNO+, a large liquid scintillator experiment, is the successor of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. The scintillator volume will be loaded with large quantities of 130Te, an isotope that undergoes double beta decay, in order to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. In addition to this search, SNO+ has a broad physics program due to its sensitivity to solar and supernova neutrinos, as well as reactor and geo anti-neutrinos. SNO+ can also place competitive limits on certain modes of invisible nucleon decay during its first phase. The detector is currently undergoing commissioning in preparation for its first phase, inmore » which the detector is filled with ultra pure water. This will be followed by a pure scintillator phase, and then a Tellurium-loaded scintillator phase to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Here we present the work done to model detector aging, which was first observed during SNO. The aging was found to reduce the optical response of the detector. We also describe early results from electronics calibration of SNO+.« less

  15. Direct Electron Detectors.

    PubMed

    McMullan, G; Faruqi, A R; Henderson, R

    2016-01-01

    Direct electron detectors have played a key role in the recent increase in the power of single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM). In this chapter, we summarize the background to these recent developments, give a practical guide to their optimal use, and discuss future directions. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gas Detectors, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Documentation Center, Alexandria, VA.

    The report contains annotated references on gas detectors compiled from the Defense Documentation Center's data bank. The range of the topics deals with detection of toxic propellants, odors, gas leaks, oxygen, etc. Included with the bibliographic reference are the corporate author-monitoring agency, subject, and title indexes. (Author/JR)

  17. Thallium selenide infrared detector.

    PubMed

    Nayar, P S; Hamilton, W O

    1977-11-01

    The application of semiconducting thallium selenide for ir detection is described. A responsivity of 10(6) V/W and NEP of the order of 10(-15) W/ radicalHz with a response time of 3 msec can be obtained by operating the detector at 1.5 K.

  18. The Friendship Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Scott

    2012-01-01

    After years of using Rube Goldberg-inspired projects to teach concepts of simple machines, the author sought a comparable project to reinforce electricity lessons in his ninth-grade Science and Technology course. The Friendship Detector gives students a chance to design, test, and build a complex circuit with multiple switches and battery-powered…

  19. Smoke Detector Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Pamela, Ed.; Portugill, Jestyn, Ed.

    This manual, one in a series developed for public education, provides information on smoke detector selection, installation, operation, and maintenance. For the prospective buyer, the importance of looking for the seal of a recognized national testing laboratory--such as Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. (UL)--indicating adequate laboratory testing…

  20. Understanding the SNO+ Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, K.

    SNO+, a large liquid scintillator experiment, is the successor of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. The scintillator volume will be loaded with large quantities of 130Te, an isotope that undergoes double beta decay, in order to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. In addition to this search, SNO+ has a broad physics program due to its sensitivity to solar and supernova neutrinos, as well as reactor and geo anti-neutrinos. SNO+ can also place competitive limits on certain modes of invisible nucleon decay during its first phase. The detector is currently undergoing commissioning in preparation for its first phase, in which the detector is filled with ultra pure water. This will be followed by a pure scintillator phase, and then a Tellurium-loaded scintillator phase to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Here we present the work done to model detector aging, which was first observed during SNO. The aging was found to reduce the optical response of the detector. We also describe early results from electronics calibration of SNO+.