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Sample records for cell capture assay

  1. Laser capture microdissection of embryonic cells and preparation of RNA for microarray assays.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Latasha C; Pang, Christopher J; Dumur, Catherine; Haar, Jack L; Lloyd, Joyce A

    2014-01-01

    In order to compare the global gene expression profiles of different embryonic cell types, it is first necessary to isolate the specific cells of interest. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a step-by-step protocol to perform laser capture microdissection (LCM) on embryo samples and obtain sufficient amounts of high-quality RNA for microarray hybridizations. Using the LCM/microarray strategy on mouse embryo samples has some challenges, because the cells of interest are available in limited quantities. The first step in the protocol is to obtain embryonic tissue, and immediately cryoprotect and freeze it in a cryomold containing Optimal Cutting Temperature freezing media (Sakura Finetek), using a dry ice-isopentane bath. The tissue is then cryosectioned, and the microscope slides are processed to fix, stain, and dehydrate the cells. LCM is employed to isolate specific cell types from the slides, identified under the microscope by virtue of their morphology. Detailed protocols are provided for using the currently available ArcturusXT LCM instrument and CapSure(®) LCM Caps, to which the selected cells adhere upon laser capture. To maintain RNA integrity, upon removing a slide from the final processing step, or attaching the first cells on the LCM cap, LCM is completed within 20 min. The cells are then immediately recovered from the LCM cap using a denaturing solution that stabilizes RNA integrity. RNA is prepared using standard methods, modified for working with small samples. To ensure the validity of the microarray data, the quality of the RNA is assessed using the Agilent bioanalyzer. Only RNA that is of sufficient integrity and quantity is used to perform microarray assays. This chapter provides guidance regarding troubleshooting and optimization to obtain high-quality RNA from cells of limited availability, obtained from embryo samples by LCM.

  2. Enhanced and Differential Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells from Lung Cancer Patients by Microfluidic Assays Using Aptamer Cocktail

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Libo; Tang, Chuanhao; Xu, Li; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Xiaoyan; Hu, Haixu; Cheng, Si; Zhou, Wei; Huang, Mengfei; Fong, Anna; Liu, Bing; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Yi; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Collecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from solid tumor through a minimally invasive approach provides an opportunity to solve a long-standing oncology problem, the real-time monitoring of tumor state and analysis of tumor heterogeneity. However, efficient capture and detection of CTCs with diverse phenotypes is still challenging. In this work, a microfluidic assay is developed using the rationally-designed aptamer cocktails with synergistic effect. Enhanced and differential capture of CTCs for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is achieved. It is also demonstrated that the overall consideration of CTC counts obtained by multiple aptamer combinations can provide more comprehensive information in treatment monitoring. PMID:26763166

  3. Comet assay study of DNA damage and repair of tumour cells following boron neutron capture irradiation with fast d(14) + Be neutrons.

    PubMed

    Pöller, F; Bauch, T; Sauerwein, W; Böcker, W; Wittig, A; Streffer, C

    1996-11-01

    We compared the amount of radiation-induced DNA damage and the extent of DNA repair in human melanoma cells (MeWo) using the 'comet assay' after neutron, boron neutron capture and X-irradiation. Using a colony-forming assay it was shown earlier that lethal effects in tumour cells treated with fast neutrons may be increased by the neutron capture reaction 10B(n, alpha)7Li. The effectiveness of boron neutron capture in killing tumour cells depends on the number of 10B atoms delivered to the tumour, the subcellular distribution of 10B and the thermal neutron fluence at the side of the tumour. Using the 'comet assay' the DNA damage of fast neutrons (mean energy 5.8 MeV) was shown to be significantly greater than for the same absorbed dose of X-rays. The presence of 600 ppm 10B (boric acid H5 10BO3) in the cell medium during irradiation with d(14) + Be neutrons in a phantom enhances the DNA damage by 20% compared with neutron irradiation alone. After DNA damage induction by neutrons and neutron capture of boron, the DNA repair capacity of the MeWo cells is significantly reduced in comparison with X-irradiation resulting in proportionally more residual DNA damage after 180 min of repair time.

  4. Comparison of GD2 Binding Capture ELISA Assays for Anti-GD2-Antibodies Using GD2-Coated Plates and a GD2-Expressing Cell-Based ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Gopalan; Yang, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Hengguang; Giardina, Steve; Mitra, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    Two assay methods for quantification of the disialoganglioside (GD2)-specific binding activities of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies and antibody immunofusion proteins, such as ch14.18 and hu14.18-IL2, were developed. The methods differed in the use of either microtiter plates coated with purified GD2 or plates seeded with GD2-expressing cell lines to bind the anti-GD2 molecules. The bound antibodies were subsequently detected using the reactivity of the antibodies to an HRP-labeled anti-IgG Fc or antibodies recognizing the conjugate IL-2 part of the Hu 14.18IL-2 fusion protein. The bound HRP was detected using reagents such as orthophenylene diamine, 2, 2’-azinobis [3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid] or tetramethylbenzidine. The capture ELISA using GD2-coated plates was developed earlier in assay development and used to demonstrate assay specificity and to compare lot-to-lot consistency and stability of ch14.18, and Hu14.18 IL-2 in clinical development. During this study, we found a number of issues related to plate-to-plate variability, GD2 lot variability, and variations due to GD2 storage stability, etc., that frequently lead to assay failure in plates coated with purified GD2. The cell-based ELISA (CbELISA) using the GD2 expressing melanoma cell line, M21/P6, was developed as an alternative to the GD2-coated plate ELISA. The results on the comparability of the capture ELISA on GD2-coated plates and the cell-based assay show that both assays give comparable results. However, the cell-based assay is more consistent and reproducible. Subsequently, the anti-GD2 capture ELISA using the GD2-coated plate was replaced with the CbELISA for product lot release testing and stability assessment. PMID:21893062

  5. Specific Capture of Peptide-Receptive Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules by Antibody Micropatterns Allows for a Novel Peptide-Binding Assay in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Dirscherl, Cindy; Palankar, Raghavendra; Delcea, Mihaela; Kolesnikova, Tatiana A; Springer, Sebastian

    2017-02-02

    Binding assays with fluorescently labeled ligands and recombinant receptor proteins are commonly performed in 2D arrays. But many cell surface receptors only function in their native membrane environment and/or in a specific conformation, such as they appear on the surface of live cells. Thus, receptors on live cells should be used for ligand binding assays. Here, it is shown that antibodies preprinted on a glass surface can be used to specifically array a peptide receptor of the immune system, i.e., the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule H-2K(b) , into a defined pattern on the surface of live cells. Monoclonal antibodies make it feasible to capture a distinct subpopulation of H-2K(b) and hold it at the cell surface. This patterned receptor enables a novel peptide-binding assay, in which the specific binding of a fluorescently labeled index peptide is visualized by microscopy. Measurements of ligand binding to captured cell surface receptors in defined confirmations apply to many problems in cell biology and thus represent a promising tool in the field of biosensors.

  6. Highly sensitive and selective immuno-capture/electrochemical assay of acetylcholinesterase activity in red blood cells: a biomarker of exposure to organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-07

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold (MWCNTs-Au) nanocomposites modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), which is used for the immobilization of AChE specific antibody. Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentrations of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to OP concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposure to OPs.

  7. Highly Sensitive and Selective Immuno-capture/Electrochemical Assay of Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Red Blood Cells: A Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-09

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold nanocomposites (MWCNTs-Au) modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentration of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to its concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in-vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposures to OPs.

  8. Automated filtration capture immunoelectrochemical assay of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewster, Jeffrey D.

    1999-01-01

    An automated system for filtration capture and immunoelectrochemical detection of bactria in liquid samples is described. The detector incorporates a porous electrode in contact with the filter, rather than the solid electrode used previously, to allow sample and reagent solutions to be delivered in a flowing stream. This eliminated the need for manual assembly of the electrode and filter for each assay and allowed repetitive assays on a single filter/electrode. The electrochemical response of the novel gold grid electrode under static and flow conditions was found to be consistent with theory for a planar electrode operating in laminar flow conditions. A computer-controlled fluid handling system was coupled to the detector for delivery of samples and reagents at controlled flow rates and times. The combination of flow detector and fluid handling system allows for automation of the previous assay protocol as well as providing new operating modes with enhanced background rejection and improved sensitivity. The use of these operating modes is demonstrated by a simple assay for Escherichia coli O157:H7 with virtually no background current.

  9. Quick chip assay using locked nucleic acid modified epithelial cell adhesion molecule and nucleolin aptamers for the capture of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Maremanda, Nihal G.; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K.; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Kanwar, Jagat R.

    2015-01-01

    The role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in disease diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring of the therapeutic efficacy, and clinical decision making is immense and has attracted tremendous focus in the last decade. We designed and fabricated simple, flat channel microfluidic devices polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS based) functionalized with locked nucleic acid (LNA) modified aptamers (targeting epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and nucleolin expression) for quick and efficient capture of CTCs and cancer cells. With optimized flow rates (10 μl/min), it was revealed that the aptamer modified devices offered reusability for up to six times while retaining optimal capture efficiency (>90%) and specificity. High capture sensitivity (92%) and specificity (100%) was observed in whole blood samples spiked with Caco-2 cells (10–100 cells/ml). Analysis of blood samples obtained from 25 head and neck cancer patients on the EpCAM LNA aptamer functionalized chip revealed that an average count of 5 ± 3 CTCs/ml of blood were captured from 22/25 samples (88%). EpCAM intracellular domain (EpICD) immunohistochemistry on 9 oral squamous cell carcinomas showed the EpICD positivity in the tumor cells, confirming the EpCAM expression in CTCs from head and neck cancers. These microfluidic devices also maintained viability for in vitro culture and characterization. Use of LNA modified aptamers provided added benefits in terms of cost effectiveness due to increased reusability and sustainability of the devices. Our results present a robust, quick, and efficient CTC capture platform with the use of simple PDMS based devices that are easy to fabricate at low cost and have an immense potential in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic planning. PMID:26487896

  10. The capture proteasome assay (CAPA) to evaluate subtype-specific proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Abi Habib, Joanna; Van den Eynde, Benoît J

    2015-09-01

    We recently developed a new assay to measure proteasome activity in vitro (CAPA for capture proteasome assay) [1], based on proteasome capture on an antibody-coated plate. When used with lysates originating from cells expressing either standard proteasome, immunoproteasome or intermediate proteasomes β5i or β1i-β5i, this assay allows the individual monitoring of the chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like and caspase-like activities of the corresponding proteasome subtypes. The efficiency and specificity of four proteasome inhibitors were studied using the CAPA assay, demonstrating the potential of this assay for the development of subtype-specific proteasome inhibitors.

  11. Cell viability assays: introduction.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of cell viability plays a fundamental role in all forms of cell culture. Sometimes it is the main purpose of the experiment, such as in toxicity assays. Alternatively, cell viability can be used to -correlate cell behaviour to cell number, providing a more accurate picture of, for example, anabolic -activity. There are wide arrays of cell viability methods which range from the most routine trypan blue dye exclusion assay to highly complex analysis of individual cells, such as using RAMAN microscopy. The cost, speed, and complexity of equipment required will all play a role in determining the assay used. This chapter aims to provide an overview of many of the assays available today.

  12. Clonogenic Assay: Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafehi, Haloom; Orlowski, Christian; Georgiadis, George T.; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C.

    2011-01-01

    The clonogenic (or colony forming) assay has been established for more than 50 years; the original paper describing the technique was published in 19561. Apart from documenting the method, the initial landmark study generated the first radiation-dose response curve for X-ray irradiated mammalian (HeLa) cells in culture1. Basically, the clonogenic assay enables an assessment of the differences in reproductive viability (capacity of cells to produce progeny; i.e. a single cell to form a colony of 50 or more cells) between control untreated cells and cells that have undergone various treatments such as exposure to ionising radiation, various chemical compounds (e.g. cytotoxic agents) or in other cases genetic manipulation. The assay has become the most widely accepted technique in radiation biology and has been widely used for evaluating the radiation sensitivity of different cell lines. Further, the clonogenic assay is commonly used for monitoring the efficacy of radiation modifying compounds and for determining the effects of cytotoxic agents and other anti-cancer therapeutics on colony forming ability, in different cell lines. A typical clonogenic survival experiment using adherent cells lines involves three distinct components, 1) treatment of the cell monolayer in tissue culture flasks, 2) preparation of single cell suspensions and plating an appropriate number of cells in petri dishes and 3) fixing and staining colonies following a relevant incubation period, which could range from 1-3 weeks, depending on the cell line. Here we demonstrate the general procedure for performing the clonogenic assay with adherent cell lines with the use of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (FEP-1811)2. Also, our aims are to describe common features of clonogenic assays including calculation of the plating efficiency and survival fractions after exposure of cells to radiation, and to exemplify modification of radiation-response with the use of a natural antioxidant

  13. Elastomeric Capture Microparticles (ECmuPs) and Their use with Acoustophoresis to Perform Affinity Capture Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Kevin Wallace

    This dissertation describes the development of elastomeric capture microparticles (ECmicroPs) and their use with acoustophoresis to perform affinity capture assays. ECμPs that function as negative acoustic contrast particles were developed by crosslinking emulsion-based droplets composed of commercially available silicone precursors followed by functionalization with avidin/biotin reagents. The size distribution of the ECμPs was very broad or narrow depending on the emulsion system that was used during the synthesis process. Elastomeric particles exhibited a very broad size distribution when a bulk-emulsion process was used; however, when microfluidic systems were utilized, their size distribution became comparatively narrow. The functionalization of elastomeric particles was accomplished by the non-specific adsorption of avidin protein followed by bovine serum albumin (BSA) blocking and bio-specific adsorption of a biotinylated-capture antibody. Polydisperse ECμPs were functionalized to bind prostate specific antigen (PSA) or IgG-phycoerythrin (PE) in aqueous media (buffer, plasma, blood); whereas monodisperse ECμPs were functionalized to bind a high density lipoprotein in the aqueous media. Polydisperse ECμPs functionalized to bind PSA in a physiological buffer (PBS pH 7.4) demonstrated nanomolar detection using flow cytometry analysis; whereas ECμPs functionalized to bind IgG-PE demonstrated picomolar detection in 10% porcine plasma. ECμPs have a specific density of ~1.03 and are more compressible than their surrounding aqueous media; which allowed the ECμPs to exhibit negative acoustic contrast properties under an ultrasonic acoustic standing wave field. The negative acoustic contrast property of ECμPs was advantageously utilized in an IgG-PE assay conducted in 0.1% whole porcine blood. The ligand-bound ECμPs suspended in the diluted blood sample were flowed through an acoustofluidic device where the application of an ultrasonic acoustic standing wave

  14. Capture-stabilize approach for membrane protein SPR assays.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ruiyin; Reczek, David; Brondyk, William

    2014-12-08

    Measuring the binding kinetics of antibodies to intact membrane proteins by surface plasmon resonance has been challenging largely because of the inherent difficulties in capturing membrane proteins on chip surfaces while retaining their native conformation. Here we describe a method in which His-tagged CXCR5, a GPCR, was purified and captured on a Biacore chip surface via the affinity tag. The captured receptor protein was then stabilized on the chip surface by limited cross-linking. The resulting chip surface retained ligand binding activity and was used for monoclonal antibody kinetics assays by a standard Biacore kinetics assay method with a simple low pH regeneration step. We demonstrate the advantages of this whole receptor assay when compared to available peptide-based binding assays. We further extended the application of the capture-stabilize approach to virus-like particles and demonstrated its utility analyzing antibodies against CD52, a GPI-anchored protein, in its native membrane environment. The results are the first demonstration of chemically stabilized chip surfaces for membrane protein SPR assays.

  15. B cell helper assays.

    PubMed

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  16. Comparison of Hybrid Capture II, Linear Array, and a Bead-Based Multiplex Genotyping Assay for Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Women with Negative Pap Test Results and Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance

    PubMed Central

    Comar, Manola; Iannacone, Michelle R.; Casalicchio, Giorgia; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Tommasino, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Many methods with different levels of analytical sensitivity and clinical specificity have been developed to detect the presence of high-risk (HR) types of the human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical samples. The Hybrid Capture II (HC-II) assay is broadly used for primary screening. In addition, several HPV genotyping assays, based on PCR methods, display higher sensitivity than the HC-II and are also used in screening programs. We evaluated the performance of three HPV DNA tests, namely, the HC-II, the Linear Array (LA) HPV genotyping assay, and an HPV type-specific E7 PCR bead-based multiplex genotyping assay (TS-MPG) that is a laboratory-developed method for the detection of HPV, in 94 women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and in cytological samples from 86 women with a negative Pap test. The HPV prevalence with the TS-MPG assay was increased compared to the prevalence with the LA and HC-II assays. The HPV DNA prevalence in women with ASC-US was greater with the TS-MPG assay (46.2%) than with the LA (36.3%) and HC-II (29.7%) assays. The HPV DNA prevalence in the control group was greater with the TS-MPG assay (32.1%) than with the LA assay (10.7%). Two women with ASC-US who were HPV DNA negative by the HC-II and positive by the TS-MPG or/and LA assays had lesions that progressed to low-grade squamous intraepithelial and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. This study shows that the TS-MPG assay exhibited higher analytical sensitivity than the LA and HC-II assays for the detection of HPV DNA, which reduces the potential to incorrectly identify a woman's HPV infection status. PMID:23035194

  17. Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxicity Assays.

    PubMed

    Adan, Aysun; Kiraz, Yağmur; Baran, Yusuf

    Cell viability is defined as the number of healthy cells in a sample and proliferation of cells is a vital indicator for understanding the mechanisms in action of certain genes, proteins and pathways involved cell survival or death after exposing to toxic agents. Generally, methods used to determine viability are also common for the detection of cell proliferation. Cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays are generally used for drug screening to detect whether the test molecules have effects on cell proliferation or display direct cytotoxic effects. Regardless of the type of cell-based assay being used, it is important to know how many viable cells are remaining at the end of the experiment. There are a variety of assay methods based on various cell functions such as enzyme activity, cell membrane permeability, cell adherence, ATP production, co-enzyme production, and nucleotide uptake activity. These methods could be basically classified into different categories: (I) dye exclusion methods such as trypan blue dye exclusion assay, (II) methods based on metabolic activity, (III) ATP assay, (IV) sulforhodamine B assay, (V) protease viability marker assay, (VI) clonogenic cell survival assay, (VII) DNA synthesis cell proliferation assays and (V) raman micro-spectroscopy. In order to choose the optimal viability assay, the cell type, applied culture conditions, and the specific questions being asked should be considered in detail. This particular review aims to provide an overview of common cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assays together with their own advantages and disadvantages, their methodologies, comparisons and intended purposes.

  18. Array-based capture, distribution, counting and multiplexed assaying of beads on a centrifugal microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Burger, Robert; Reith, Patrick; Kijanka, Gregor; Akujobi, Victor; Abgrall, Patrick; Ducrée, Jens

    2012-04-07

    We present a novel centrifugal microfluidic platform for the highly efficient manipulation and analysis of particles for applications in bead-based assays. The platform uses an array of geometrical V-cup barriers to trap particles using stopped-flow sedimentation under highly reproducible hydrodynamic conditions. The impact parameters governing the occupancy distribution and capture efficiency of the arrayed traps are investigated. The unique, nearly 100% capture efficiency paired with the capability to establish sharply peaked, single occupancy distributions enables a novel, digital readout mode for color-multiplexed, particle-based assays with low-complexity instrumentation. The presented technology marks an essential step towards a versatile platform for the integration of bead- and cell-based biological assays. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  19. Cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Nystrom, Maria L; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-01-01

    A number of in vitro assays have been developed to study tumor cell motility. Historically, assays have been mainly monocellular, where carcinoma cells are studied in isolation. Scratch assays can be used to study the collective and directional movement of populations of cells, whereas two chamber assays lend themselves to the analysis of chemotactic/haptotactic migration and cell invasion. However, an inherent disadvantage of these assays is that they grossly oversimplify the complex process of invasion, lacking the tumor structural architecture and stromal components. Organotypic assays, where tumor cells are grown at an air/liquid interface on gels populated with stromal cells, are a more physiologically relevant method for studying 3-dimensional tumor invasion.

  20. The capture proteasome assay: A method to measure proteasome activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Abi Habib, Joanna; Van den Eynde, Benoît J

    2015-08-01

    Because of its crucial role in various cellular processes, the proteasome is the focus of intensive research for the development of proteasome inhibitors to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases. Here, we describe a new and easy assay to measure the different proteasome activities in vitro (chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like) based on proteasome capture on antibody-coated plates, namely the capture proteasome assay (CAPA). Applying the CAPA to lysates from cells expressing standard proteasome, immunoproteasome, or intermediate proteasomes β5i or β1i-β5i, we can monitor the activity of the four proteasome subtypes. The CAPA provided similar results as the standard whole-cell proteasome-Glo assay without the problem of contaminating proteases requiring inhibitors. However, the profile of trypsin-like activity differed between the two assays. This could be partly explained by the presence of MgSO4 in the proteasome-Glo buffer, which inhibits the trypsin-like activity of the proteasome. The CAPA does not need MgSO4 and, therefore, provides a more precise measurement of the trypsin-like activity. The CAPA provides a quick and accurate method to measure proteasome activity in vitro in a very specific manner and should be useful for the development of proteasome inhibitors.

  1. Versatile Immunomagnetic Nanocarrier Platform for Capturing Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, Yu-Yen; Chen, Peng; Hoshino, Kazunori; Liu, Huaying; Frenkel, Eugene P.; Zhang, John X.J.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive and quantitative assessment of changes in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can help in cancer prognosis and in the evaluation of therapeutics efficacy. However, extremely low occurrence of CTCs in the peripheral blood (approximately one CTC per billion blood cells) and potential changes in molecular biomarkers during the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) create technical hurdles to the enrichment and enumeration CTCs. Recently, efforts have been directed toward development of antibody-capture assays based on the expression of the common biomarker - the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) of epithelium-derived cancer cells. Despite some promising results, the assays relying on EpCAM capture have shown inconsistent sensitivity in clinical settings and often fail to detect CTCs in patients with metastatic cancer. We have addressed this problem by the development of an assay based on hybrid magnetic/plasmonic nanocarriers and a microfluidic channel. In this assay cancer cells are specifically targeted by antibody-conjugated magnetic nanocarriers and are separated from normal blood cells by a magnetic force in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, immunofluorescence staining is used to differentiate CTCs from normal blood cells. We demonstrated in cell models of colon, breast and skin cancers that this platform can be easily adapted to a variety of biomarkers, targeting both surface receptor molecules and intracellular biomarkers of epithelial-derived cancer cells. Experiments in whole blood showed capture efficiency greater than 90% when two cancer biomarkers are used for cell capture. Thus, the combination of immunotargeted magnetic nanocarriers with microfluidics provides an important platform that can improve the effectiveness of current CTC assays by overcoming the problem of heterogeneity of tumor cells in the circulation. PMID:24016305

  2. A protein chip membrane-capture assay for botulinum neurotoxin activity

    SciTech Connect

    Marconi, Severine; Ferracci, Geraldine; Berthomieu, Maelys; Kozaki, Shunji; Miquelis, Raymond; Boucraut, Jose; Seagar, Michael

    2008-12-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins A and B (BoNT/A and B) are neuromuscular blocking agents which inhibit neurotransmission by cleaving the intra-cellular presynaptic SNARE proteins SNAP-25 and VAMP2, localized respectively in plasma membrane and synaptic vesicles. These neurotoxins are both dangerous pathogens and powerful therapeutic agents with numerous clinical and cosmetic applications. Consequently there is a need for in vitro assays of their biological activity to screen for potential inhibitors and to replace the widely used in vivo mouse assay. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to measure membrane vesicle capture by antibodies against SNAP-25 and VAMP2. Substrate cleavage by BoNTs modified capture providing a method to assay toxin activity. Firstly using synaptic vesicles as a substrate, a comparison of the EC{sub 50}s for BoNT/B obtained by SPR, ELISA or flow cytometry indicated similar sensitivity although SPR assays were more rapid. Sonication of brain or neuronal cultures generated plasma membrane fragments with accessible intra-cellular epitopes adapted to measurement of BoNT/A activity. SPR responses were proportional to antigen concentration permitting detection of as little as 4 pM SNAP-25 in crude lysates. BoNT/A activity was assayed using monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize a SNAP-25 epitope generated by the proteolytic action of the toxin. Incubation of intact primary cultured neurons with BoNT/A yielded an EC{sub 50} of 0.5 pM. The SPR biosensor method was sensitive enough to monitor BoNT/A and B activity in cells cultured in a 96-well format providing an alternative to experimental animals for toxicological assays.

  3. Rare Cell Capture in Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Erica D.; Huang, Chao; Hawkins, Benjamin G.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews existing methods for the isolation, fractionation, or capture of rare cells in microfluidic devices. Rare cell capture devices face the challenge of maintaining the efficiency standard of traditional bulk separation methods such as flow cytometers and immunomagnetic separators while requiring very high purity of the target cell population, which is typically already at very low starting concentrations. Two major classifications of rare cell capture approaches are covered: (1) non-electrokinetic methods (e.g., immobilization via antibody or aptamer chemistry, size-based sorting, and sheath flow and streamline sorting) are discussed for applications using blood cells, cancer cells, and other mammalian cells, and (2) electrokinetic (primarily dielectrophoretic) methods using both electrode-based and insulative geometries are presented with a view towards pathogen detection, blood fractionation, and cancer cell isolation. The included methods were evaluated based on performance criteria including cell type modeled and used, number of steps/stages, cell viability, and enrichment, efficiency, and/or purity. Major areas for improvement are increasing viability and capture efficiency/purity of directly processed biological samples, as a majority of current studies only process spiked cell lines or pre-diluted/lysed samples. Despite these current challenges, multiple advances have been made in the development of devices for rare cell capture and the subsequent elucidation of new biological phenomena; this article serves to highlight this progress as well as the electrokinetic and non-electrokinetic methods that can potentially be combined to improve performance in future studies. PMID:21532971

  4. Biochemical Assays of Cultured Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subpopulations of human embryonic kidney cells isolated from continuous flow electrophoresis experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas and on STS-8 have been analyzed. These analyses have included plasminogen activator assays involving indirect methodology on fibrin plated and direct methodology using chromogenic substrates. Immunological studies were performed and the conditioned media for erythropoietin activity and human granulocyte colony stimulating (HGCSF) activity was analyzed.

  5. Biochemical Assays of Cultured Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subpopulations of human embryonic kidney cells isolated from continuous flow electrophoresis experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas and on STS-8 have been analyzed. These analyses have included plasminogen activator assays involving indirect methodology on fibrin plated and direct methodology using chromogenic substrates. Immunological studies were performed and the conditioned media for erythropoietin activity and human granulocyte colony stimulating (HGCSF) activity was analyzed.

  6. A study on the temperature dependency and time course of the cold capture antibody secretion assay.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Johannes; Hesse, Friedemann; Wieser, Matthias; Kunert, Renate; Galosy, Sybille S; Mott, John E; Borth, Nicole

    2009-04-20

    The cold capture assay as described by Brezinsky et al. [Brezinsky, S.C.G., Chiang, G.G., Szilvasi, A., Mohan, S., Shapiro, R.I., MacLean, A., Sisk, W., Thill, G., 2003. A simple method for enriching populations of transfected CHO cells for cells of higher specific productivity. J. Immunol. Methods 277, 141-155] stands out as the most simple of single cell secretion assays which can be used to sort for high productivity in recombinant cell lines. At low temperatures the process of protein release from transport vesicles is assumed to be delayed as both vesicle fusion and product release is slowed, so that secreted proteins can be stained on the cell surface using a fluorescent antibody. Typically, the fluorescent signal obtained correlates to the cell specific production rate of the analysed cell. In the present study we compared staining of human antibody producing CHO cells performed at different temperatures and we observed the fluorescent signal over 24h. We found that the staining temperature did not influence signal intensity. The fluorescent signal was stable for 24h at 4 degrees C, decreased to 80% at room temperature (21 degrees C), while it decreased significantly already after 2h at 37 degrees C. Initially, the fluorescent signal was observed on the cell surface, however, at later stages it was found in compartments in the cytoplasm. Finally we compared differences in signal stability depending on whether the antibody used for staining bound to the light or heavy chain of the product and on whether the fluorescent label was a relatively stable protein (phycoerythrin) or a pH-dependent small molecule (FITC). Our results indicate that the secreted product is trapped by the staining antibody on the cell surface at all temperatures. Subsequently these aggregates are endocytosed by the cells, a process which is slowed down at low temperatures.

  7. Bioluminescence assay for cell viability.

    PubMed

    Lomakina, G Yu; Modestova, Yu A; Ugarova, N N

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical aspects of the adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay based on the use of the firefly luciferin-luciferase system are considered, as well as its application for assessing cell viability in microbiology, sanitation, medicine, and ecology. Various approaches for the analysis of individual or mixed cultures of microorganisms are presented, and capabilities of the method for investigation of biological processes in live cells including necrosis, apoptosis, as well as for investigation of the dynamics of metabolism are described.

  8. Development of a Quantitative Bead Capture Assay for Soluble IL-7 Receptor Alpha in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Sylvie; Crawley, Angela M.; Decker, Wendy; Sherring, Alice; Bogdanovic, Dragica; Ding, Tao; Bergeron, Michele; Angel, Jonathan B.; Sandstrom, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background IL-7 is an essential cytokine in T-cell development and homeostasis. It binds to the IL-7R receptor, a complex of the IL-7Rα (CD127) and common γ (CD132) chains. There is significant interest in evaluating the expression of CD127 on human T-cells as it often decreased in medical conditions leading to lymphopenia. Previous reports showed the usefulness of CD127 as a prognostic marker in viral infections such as HIV, CMV, EBV and HCV. A soluble CD127 (sCD127) is released in plasma and may contribute to disease pathogenesis through its control on IL-7 activities. Measuring sCD127 is important to define its role and may complement existing markers used in lymphopenic disease management. We describe a new quantitative assay for the measurement of sCD127 in plasma and report sCD127 concentrations in healthy adults. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a quantitative bead-based sCD127 capture assay. Polyclonal CD127-specific antibodies were chosen for capture and a biotinylated monoclonal anti-CD127 antibody was selected for detection. The assay can detect native sCD127 and recombinant sCD127 which served as the calibrator. The analytical performance of the assay was characterized and the concentration and stability of plasma sCD127 in healthy adults was determined. The assay's range was 3.2–1000 ng/mL. The concentration of plasma sCD127 was 164±104 ng/mL with over a log variation between subjects. Individual sCD127 concentrations remained stable when measured serially during a period of up to one year. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report on the quantification of plasma sCD127 in a population of healthy adults. Soluble CD127 plasma concentrations remained stable over time in a given individual and sCD127 immunoreactivity was resistant to repeated freeze-thaw cycles. This quantitative sCD127 assay is a valuable tool for defining the potential role of sCD127 in lymphopenic diseases. PMID:19690616

  9. Enzyme capture assay for rapid identification of Escherichia coli in blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S W; Wu, J J; Chang, T C

    1994-01-01

    An enzyme capture assay (ECA) for rapid identification of Escherichia coli in blood cultures by using beta-D-glucuronidase as a marker was developed. Microdilution plates coated with antiglucuronidase were used to capture this enzyme from the cell lysates of blood cultures which showed growth of gram-negative bacteria. The assay, using 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide as a fluorogenic substrate, had a detection limit of 0.1 ng/ml (3 x 10(-13) M) for the enzyme; this was approximately equal to a cell concentration of 10(6) CFU of E. coli per ml. Among 212 blood cultures showing growth of gram-negative bacteria, 77 specimens were found to contain E. coli by conventional culture procedures and 73 samples were positive by ECA. Among the 135 blood cultures from which E. coli was not isolated, ECA gave one false-positive (Salmonella enteritidis) reaction. Thus, the sensitivity and specificity for the identification of E. coli in blood cultures by ECA were 94.8% (73/77) and 99.3% (134/135), respectively. From the finding of positive growth in the culture bottle, the assay can be completed within 4 h. In view of the high rate of isolation of E. coli from bacteremic patients, the test can be performed in parallel with conventional culture protocols; this may shorten the identification time for E. coli, and proper antimicrobial treatments may be started 24 h earlier than when results of conventional identification systems are used. PMID:8077387

  10. Solid-phase antibody capture hemadsorption assay for detection of hepatitis A virus immunoglobulin M antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, P L; Dubois, D R; Cohen, W H; Macarthy, P O; Binn, L N; Sjogren, M H; Snitbhan, R; Innis, B L; Eckels, K H

    1993-01-01

    A solid-phase antibody capture hemadsorption (SPACH) assay was developed to detect hepatitis A virus (HAV)-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in sera from humans recently infected with hepatitis. The assay is performed with microtiter plates coated with anti-human IgM antibodies to capture IgM antibodies from the test sera. HAV-specific IgM antibody is detected by the addition of HAV hemagglutinating antigen and goose erythrocytes. Hemadsorption of erythrocytes to antigen-antibody complexes attached to the solid phase indicate the presence of IgM antibodies. The SPACH assay was compared to a commercial radioimmunoassay and was found to be equally or more sensitive and specific for the detection of HAV IgM antibodies. The SPACH assay is an alternative, rapid assay that doesn't require hazardous substrates or radioactivity for the detection of HAV-specific antibodies. PMID:8388890

  11. Digital Assays Part II: Digital Protein and Cell Assays.

    PubMed

    Basu, Amar S

    2017-08-01

    A digital assay is one in which the sample is partitioned into many containers such that each partition contains a discrete number of biological entities (0, 1, 2, 3, . . .). A powerful technique in the biologist's toolkit, digital assays bring a new level of precision in quantifying nucleic acids, measuring proteins and their enzymatic activity, and probing single-cell genotype and phenotype. Where part I of this review focused on the fundamentals of partitioning and digital PCR, part II turns its attention to digital protein and cell assays. Digital enzyme assays measure the kinetics of single proteins with enzymatic activity. Digital enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISAs) quantify antigenic proteins with 2 to 3 log lower detection limit than conventional ELISA, making them well suited for low-abundance biomarkers. Digital cell assays probe single-cell genotype and phenotype, including gene expression, intracellular and surface proteins, metabolic activity, cytotoxicity, and transcriptomes (scRNA-seq). These methods exploit partitioning to 1) isolate single cells or proteins, 2) detect their activity via enzymatic amplification, and 3) tag them individually by coencapsulating them with molecular barcodes. When scaled, digital assays reveal stochastic differences between proteins or cells within a population, a key to understanding biological heterogeneity. This review is intended to give a broad perspective to scientists interested in adopting digital assays into their workflows.

  12. Aptamer capturing of enzymes on magnetic beads to enhance assay specificity and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2011-12-15

    Activity and specificity of enzyme molecules are important to enzymatic reactions and enzyme assays. We describe an aptamer capturing approach that improves the specificity and the sensitivity of enzyme detection. An aptamer recognizing the target enzyme molecule is conjugated on a magnetic bead, increasing the local concentration, and serves as an affinity probe to capture and separate minute amounts of the enzyme. The captured enzymes catalyze the subsequent conversion of fluorogenic substrate to fluorescent products, enabling a sensitive measure of the active enzyme. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated through assays for human alpha thrombin and human neutrophil elastase (HNE), two important enzymes. Thrombin (2 fM) and 100 fM HNE can be detected. The incorporation of two binding events, substrate recognition and aptamer binding, greatly improves assay specificity. With its simplicity, this approach is applicable to biosensing and detection of disease biomarkers.

  13. A hybrid-capture assay to detect HPV mRNA ratios in cervical specimens.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Brian; Fulbright, Anna; Nazarenko, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA screening benefits cervical cancer diagnosis, but a few HPV infections result in cancer. Assays that predict cancer are desirable. A potential biomarker is the ratio of HPV E6-7 over E2 transcripts, which may increase during early cancer progression. Modified hybrid-capture technology detected, in separate wells, HPV E6-7 or E2 mRNA of HPV 16 or HPV 18 in samples. The limit of detection was approximately 1000 copies of in vitro transcribed RNA with linear dynamic range approximately four logs. No cross-reactivity between HPV 16 and HPV 18 mRNAs was detected. RNA of SiHa cells was stable in clinical specimen pools for 67 days, as determined by RT-PCR. The ratio of HPV E6-7:E2 mRNAs was relatively high for cancer cells lines, SiHa, Caski and HeLa cells preserved in clinical specimen pools. A broad distribution of HPV 16 E6-7:E2 mRNA ratio was detected in a small set of clinical specimens with various histological diagnoses. Some specimen ratios were so high for cancer cell lines, but the significance of the results needs to be determined. This method may help determine the pattern of gene expression in HPV-related disease or in other systems.

  14. Microdroplet chain array for cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Zhao, Shi-Ping; Lou, Qi; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2016-11-29

    Establishing cell migration assays in multiple different microenvironments is important in the study of tissue repair and regeneration, cancer progression, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. In this work, we developed a miniaturized and massive parallel microfluidic platform for multiple cell migration assays combining the traditional membrane-based cell migration technique and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. Nanoliter-scale droplets are flexibly assembled as building blocks based on a porous membrane to form microdroplet chains with diverse configurations for different assay modes. Multiple operations including in-droplet 2D/3D cell culture, cell co-culture and cell migration induced by a chemoattractant concentration gradient in droplet chains could be flexibly performed with reagent consumption in the nanoliter range for each assay and an assay scale-up to 81 assays in parallel in one microchip. We have applied the present platform to multiple modes of cell migration assays including the accurate cell migration assay, competitive cell migration assay, biomimetic chemotaxis assay, and multifactor cell migration assay based on the organ-on-a-chip concept, for demonstrating its versatility, applicability, and potential in cell migration-related research.

  15. Capturing relevant extracellular matrices for investigating cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Keely, Patricia; Nain, Amrinder

    2015-01-01

    Much progress in understanding cell migration has been determined by using classic two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture platforms. However, increasingly, it is appreciated that certain properties of cell migration in vivo are not represented by strictly 2D assays. There is much interest in creating relevant three-dimensional (3D) culture environments and engineered platforms to better represent features of the extracellular matrix and stromal microenvironment that are not captured in 2D platforms. Important to this goal is a solid understanding of the features of the extracellular matrix—composition, stiffness, topography, and alignment—in different tissues and disease states and the development of means to capture these features PMID:26918156

  16. Detecting West Nile virus in owls and raptors by an antigen-capture assay.

    PubMed

    Gancz, Ady Y; Campbell, Douglas G; Barker, Ian K; Lindsay, Robbin; Hunter, Bruce

    2004-12-01

    We evaluated a rapid antigen-capture assay (VecTest) for detection of West Nile virus in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs, collected at necropsy from owls (N = 93) and raptors (N = 27). Sensitivity was 93.5%-95.2% for northern owl species but <42.9% for all other species. Specificity was 100% for owls and 85.7% for raptors.

  17. A portable circulating tumor cell capture microdevice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datar, Ram H.

    2009-03-01

    Sensitive detection of earliest metastatic spread of tumors in a minimally invasive and user-friendly manner will revolutionize the clinical management of cancer patients. The current methodologies for circulating tumor cell (CTC) capture and identification have significant limitations including time, cost, limited capture efficiency and lack of standardization. We have developed and optimized a novel parylene membrane filter-based portable microdevice for size-based isolation of CTC from human peripheral blood. Following characterization with a model system to study the recovery rate and enrichment factor, a comparison of the microdevice with the commercially available system using blood from cancer patients demonstrated superior recovery rate and the promise of clinical utility of the microdevice. The development of the microdevice and its potential clinical applicability will be discussed.

  18. Detecting West Nile Virus in Owls and Raptors by an Antigen-capture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Douglas G.; Barker, Ian K.; Lindsay, Robbin; Hunter, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a rapid antigen-capture assay (VecTest) for detection of West Nile virus in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs, collected at necropsy from owls (N = 93) and raptors (N = 27). Sensitivity was 93.5%–95.2% for northern owl species but <42.9% for all other species. Specificity was 100% for owls and 85.7% for raptors. PMID:15663862

  19. Rapid antigen-capture assay to detect West Nile virus in dead corvids.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Robbin; Barker, Ian k; Nayar, Gopi; Drebot, Michael; Calvin, Sharon; Scammell, Cherie; Sachvie, Cheril; Fleur, Tracy Scammell-La Fleur; Dibernardo, Antonia; Andonova, Maya; Artsob, Harvey

    2003-11-01

    The utility of the VecTest antigen-capture assay to detect West Nile virus (WNV) in field-collected dead corvids was evaluated in Manitoba and Ontario, Canada, in 2001 and 2002. Swabs were taken from the oropharynx, cloaca, or both of 109 American Crows, 31 Blue Jays, 6 Common Ravens, and 4 Black-billed Magpies from Manitoba, and 255 American Crows and 28 Blue Jays from Ontario. The sensitivity and specificity of the antigen-capture assay were greatest for samples from American Crows; oropharyngeal swabs were more sensitive than cloacal swabs, and interlaboratory variation in the results was minimal. The sensitivity and specificity of the VecTest using oropharyngeal swabs from crows were 83.9% and 93.6%, respectively, for Manitoba samples and 83.3% and 95.8%, respectively, for Ontario birds. The VecTest antigen-capture assay on oropharyngeal secretions from crows is a reliable and rapid diagnostic test that appears suitable for incorporation into a WNV surveillance program.

  20. Rapid Antigen-Capture Assay To Detect West Nile Virus in Dead Corvids

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Ian; Nayar, Gopi; Drebot, Michael; Calvin, Sharon; Scammell, Cherie; Sachvie, Cheryl; La Fleur, Tracy Scammell; Dibernardo, Antonia; Andonova, Maya; Artsob, Harvey

    2003-01-01

    The utility of the VecTest antigen-capture assay to detect West Nile virus (WNV) in field-collected dead corvids was evaluated in Manitoba and Ontario, Canada, in 2001 and 2002. Swabs were taken from the oropharynx, cloaca, or both of 109 American Crows, 31 Blue Jays, 6 Common Ravens, and 4 Black-billed Magpies from Manitoba, and 255 American Crows and 28 Blue Jays from Ontario. The sensitivity and specificity of the antigen-capture assay were greatest for samples from American Crows; oropharyngeal swabs were more sensitive than cloacal swabs, and interlaboratory variation in the results was minimal. The sensitivity and specificity of the VecTest using oropharyngeal swabs from crows were 83.9% and 93.6%, respectively, for Manitoba samples and 83.3% and 95.8%, respectively, for Ontario birds. The VecTest antigen-capture assay on oropharyngeal secretions from crows is a reliable and rapid diagnostic test that appears suitable for incorporation into a WNV surveillance program. PMID:14718083

  1. Monoclonal antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of bovine enteric coronavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, C F; Raybould, T J; Acres, S D

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with three different viral polypeptides were evaluated singly and in combination as the capture antibody(s) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system for the detection of bovine enteric coronavirus. Similar levels of sensitivity were found for all combinations tested. A sensitive, highly specific, and reproducible assay for the detection of bovine enteric coronavirus was developed, using a mixture of two of these monoclonal antibodies reactive with antigenic components either external or internal to the virion. These monoclonal antibodies were bound indirectly to 96-well plates via rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin. After sample application and incubation, virus was detected by using rabbit anti-coronavirus peroxidase conjugate followed by enzyme substrate and chromagen. Fecal samples from a single herd of cows were screened for the presence of coronavirus by this assay. Five percent of clinically normal cows were found to be shedding coronavirus. Images PMID:6325490

  2. Chromosome Conformation Capture in Primary Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, Alice; Bodega, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    3D organization of the genome, its structural and regulatory function of cell identity, is acquiring prominent features in epigenetics studies; more efforts have been done to develop techniques that allow studying nuclear structure. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) has been set up in 2002 from Dekker and from that moment great investments were made to develop genomics variants of 3C technology (4C, 5C, Hi-C) providing new tools to investigate the shape of the genome in a more systematic and unbiased manner. 3C method allows scientists to fix dynamic and variable 3D interactions in nuclear space, and consequently to study which sequences interact, how a gene is regulated by different and distant enhancer, or how a set of enhancer could regulate transcriptional units; to follow the conformation that mediates regulation change in development; and to evaluate if this fine epigenetic mechanism is impaired in disease condition.

  3. Glycopeptide capture for cell surface proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, M C Gilbert; Sun, Bingyun

    2014-05-09

    Cell surface proteins, including extracellular matrix proteins, participate in all major cellular processes and functions, such as growth, differentiation, and proliferation. A comprehensive characterization of these proteins provides rich information for biomarker discovery, cell-type identification, and drug-target selection, as well as helping to advance our understanding of cellular biology and physiology. Surface proteins, however, pose significant analytical challenges, because of their inherently low abundance, high hydrophobicity, and heavy post-translational modifications. Taking advantage of the prevalent glycosylation on surface proteins, we introduce here a high-throughput glycopeptide-capture approach that integrates the advantages of several existing N-glycoproteomics means. Our method can enrich the glycopeptides derived from surface proteins and remove their glycans for facile proteomics using LC-MS. The resolved N-glycoproteome comprises the information of protein identity and quantity as well as their sites of glycosylation. This method has been applied to a series of studies in areas including cancer, stem cells, and drug toxicity. The limitation of the method lies in the low abundance of surface membrane proteins, such that a relatively large quantity of samples is required for this analysis compared to studies centered on cytosolic proteins.

  4. [Assay of plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection].

    PubMed

    Oui, E; Habrioux, G; Mathian, B; Revol, A; Henry, R

    1986-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method for the determination of plasma S-DHA by gas chromatography (GC), with fused silica capillary column (stationary phase SE 54) and electron capture, after solvolysis of the sample and purification by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is described. The interest of the new internal standard (5 alpha androst-9(11)-ene-3 beta ol-17-one) for the determination of the DHA by GC is shown. The analytical characteristics of this method as well as a comparative study of the values obtained by this method and by radioimmuno-assay are described.

  5. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nina; Walzl, Angelika; Unger, Christine; Rosner, Margit; Krupitza, Georg; Hengstschläger, Markus; Dolznig, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Determining the migratory and invasive capacity of tumor and stromal cells and clarifying the underlying mechanisms is most relevant for novel strategies in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, drug development and treatment. Here we shortly summarize the different modes of cell travelling and review in vitro methods, which can be used to evaluate migration and invasion. We provide a concise summary of established migration/invasion assays described in the literature, list advantages, limitations and drawbacks, give a tabular overview for convenience and depict the basic principles of the assays graphically. In many cases particular research problems and specific cell types do not leave a choice for a broad variety of usable assays. However, for most standard applications using adherent cells, based on our experience we suggest to use exclusion zone assays to evaluate migration/invasion. We substantiate our choice by demonstrating that the advantages outbalance the drawbacks e.g. the simple setup, the easy readout, the kinetic analysis, the evaluation of cell morphology and the feasibility to perform the assay with standard laboratory equipment. Finally, innovative 3D migration and invasion models including heterotypic cell interactions are discussed. These methods recapitulate the in vivo situation most closely. Results obtained with these assays have already shed new light on cancer cell spreading and potentially will uncover unknown mechanisms.

  6. Nanoroughened Surfaces for Efficient Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells without Using Capture Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqiang; Weng, Shinuo; Zhang, Feng; Allen, Steven; Li, Xiang; Bao, Liwei; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Macoska, Jill A.; Merajver, Sofia D.; Fu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) detached from both primary and metastatic lesions represent a potential alternative to invasive biopsies as a source of tumor tissue for the detection, characterization and monitoring of cancers. Here we report a simple yet effective strategy for capturing CTCs without using capture antibodies. Our method uniquely utilized the differential adhesion preference of cancer cells to nanorough surfaces when compared to normal blood cells and thus did not depend on their physical size or surface protein expression, a significant advantage as compared to other existing CTC capture techniques. PMID:23194329

  7. Polythiophene derivative on quartz resonators for miRNA capture and assay.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Al; Cheema, Jamal Ahmed; Rajwar, Deepa; Ammanath, Gopal; Xiaohu, Liu; Koon, Lim Seng; Yi, Wang; Yildiz, Umit Hakan; Liedberg, Bo

    2015-12-07

    A novel approach for miRNA assay using a cationic polythiophene derivative, poly[3-(3'-N,N,N-triethylamino-1'-propyloxy)-4-methyl-2,5-thiophene hydrobromide] (PT), immobilized on a quartz resonator is proposed. The cationic PT enables capturing of all RNA sequences in the sample matrix via electrostatic interactions, resulting in the formation of PT-RNA duplex structures on quartz resonators. Biotinylated peptide nucleic acid (b-PNA) sequences are subsequently utilized for the RNA assay, upon monitoring the PT-RNA-b-PNA triplex formation. Signal amplification is achieved by anchoring avidin coated nanoparticles to b-PNA in order to yield responses at clinically relevant concentration regimes. Unlike conventional nucleic acid assay methodologies that usually quantify a specific sequence of RNA, the proposed approach enables the assay of any RNA sequence in the sample matrix upon hybridization with a PNA sequence complementary to the RNA of interest. As an illustration, successful detection of mir21, (a miRNA sequence associated with lung cancer) is demonstrated with a limit of detection of 400 pM. Furthermore, precise quantification of mir21 in plasma samples is demonstrated without requiring PCR and sophisticated instrumentation.

  8. Bioinspired multivalent DNA network for capture and release of cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weian; Cui, Cheryl H; Bose, Suman; Guo, Dagang; Shen, Chong; Wong, Wesley P; Halvorsen, Ken; Farokhzad, Omid C; Teo, Grace Sock Leng; Phillips, Joseph A; Dorfman, David M; Karnik, Rohit; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-27

    Capture and isolation of flowing cells and particulates from body fluids has enormous implications in diagnosis, monitoring, and drug testing, yet monovalent adhesion molecules used for this purpose result in inefficient cell capture and difficulty in retrieving the captured cells. Inspired by marine creatures that present long tentacles containing multiple adhesive domains to effectively capture flowing food particulates, we developed a platform approach to capture and isolate cells using a 3D DNA network comprising repeating adhesive aptamer domains that extend over tens of micrometers into the solution. The DNA network was synthesized from a microfluidic surface by rolling circle amplification where critical parameters, including DNA graft density, length, and sequence, could readily be tailored. Using an aptamer that binds to protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7) that is overexpressed on many human cancer cells, we demonstrate that the 3D DNA network significantly enhances the capture efficiency of lymphoblast CCRF-CEM cells over monovalent aptamers and antibodies, yet maintains a high purity of the captured cells. When incorporated in a herringbone microfluidic device, the 3D DNA network not only possessed significantly higher capture efficiency than monovalent aptamers and antibodies, but also outperformed previously reported cell-capture microfluidic devices at high flow rates. This work suggests that 3D DNA networks may have broad implications for detection and isolation of cells and other bioparticles.

  9. LINE-1 Cultured Cell Retrotransposition Assay.

    PubMed

    Kopera, Huira C; Larson, Peter A; Moldovan, John B; Richardson, Sandra R; Liu, Ying; Moran, John V

    2016-01-01

    The Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition assay has facilitated the discovery and characterization of active (i.e., retrotransposition-competent) LINE-1 sequences from mammalian genomes. In this assay, an engineered LINE-1 containing a retrotransposition reporter cassette is transiently transfected into a cultured cell line. Expression of the reporter cassette, which occurs only after a successful round of retrotransposition, allows the detection and quantification of the LINE-1 retrotransposition efficiency. This assay has yielded insight into the mechanism of LINE-1 retrotransposition. It also has provided a greater understanding of how the cell regulates LINE-1 retrotransposition and how LINE-1 retrotransposition impacts the structure of mammalian genomes. Below, we provide a brief introduction to LINE-1 biology and then detail how the LINE-1 retrotransposition assay is performed in cultured mammalian cells.

  10. Fluorometric assay for red blood cell antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.B.; Lambermont, M.; Strosberg, A.D.; Wybran, J.

    1981-03-01

    A fluorometric assay is described for the detection of red blood cell antibodies. The assay reveals as little as 600 molecules of bound, fluoroesceinated rabbit anti-human IgG antibodies per erythrocyte. Eleven patients with possible autoimmune erythrocyte disorder and negative direct antiglobulin test were studied by the fluorometric assay. The outcome of the fluorometric assay was compared with that of the human allogeneic rosette test. Results obtained by the two methods were in complete agreement. Five of the patients were shown to possess unexpectedly high levels of erythrocyte-bound IgG in spite of a negative, direct antiglobulin test. These findings and the validity of the fluorometric assay are discussed.

  11. Quantum-dot-based cell motility assay.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weiwei; Pellegrino, Teresa; Parak, Wolfgang J; Boudreau, Rosanne; Le Gros, Mark A; Gerion, Daniele; Alivisatos, A Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2005-06-28

    Because of their favorable physical and photochemical properties, colloidal CdSe/ZnS-semiconductor nanocrystals (commonly known as quantum dots) have enormous potential for use in biological imaging. In this report, we present an assay that uses quantum dots as markers to quantify cell motility. Cells that are seeded onto a homogeneous layer of quantum dots engulf and absorb the nanocrystals and, as a consequence, leave behind a fluorescence-free trail. By subsequently determining the ratio of cell area to fluorescence-free track area, we show that it is possible to differentiate between invasive and noninvasive cancer cells. Because this assay uses simple fluorescence detection, requires no significant data processing, and can be used in live-cell studies, it has the potential to be a powerful new tool for discriminating between invasive and noninvasive cancer cell lines or for studying cell signaling events involved in migration.

  12. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Justus, Calvin R; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V

    2014-06-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup.

  13. A microfluidic chip for highly efficient cell capturing and pairing.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shaoyan; Liu, Yaoping; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Fan, Yubo

    2011-09-01

    This paper examined the feasibility of a microfluidics chip for cell capturing and pairing with a high efficiency. The chip was fabricated by the polydimethylsiloxane-based soft-lithography technique and contained two suction duct arrays set in parallel on both sides of a main microchannel. Cells were captured and paired by activating two sets of suction ducts one by one with the help of syringe pumps along with switching the cell suspensions inside the main microchannel correspondingly. The effects of suction flow rate and the dimensions of suction channels on the cell capturing and pairing efficiency were characterized. The present chip was capable of creating 1024 pairs of two different cell populations in parallel. The preliminary experimental results showed that the cell capturing efficiency was 100% and the pairing one was 88% with an optimal suction rate of 5 μl/min in the chip in the 2 μm-sized suction duct chip. The cell viability after capture inside the microfluidic device was 90.0 ± 5.3%. With this cell capturing and pairing chip, interaction between cells in a single pair mode can be studied. The ability to create cell pairs has a number of biological applications for cell fusion, cell-cell interaction studies, and cell toxicity screening.

  14. The clinical performance of APTIMA human papillomavirus and Hybrid Capture 2 assays in the triage of lesser abnormal cervical cytologies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanli; You, Ke; Geng, Li; Qiao, Jie

    2014-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical performance of APTIMA human papillomavirus (AHPV) assay and Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) assay in screening for cervical disease, especially in women with atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). A total of 411 women diagnosed with ASC-US or LSIL were referred and further triaged by HC2 test. Prior to colposcopy, liquid-based cytology specimens were collected for the AHPV assay. Sensitivity and specificity were established based on the histological findings of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In all 411 subjects, the positive detection rate of AHPV assay was 70.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 66.4 to 75.2), which was significantly lower than the positive detection rate of 94.9% obtained using HC2 test (95% CI, 92.3 to 96.8). Only one CIN 3-positive case was detected among the 120 AHPV-negative women, which was then confirmed by Pap smear test to be LSIL. The sensitivities of AHPV and HC2 for CIN 3 were similar (94.1% and 100%, respectively). However, AHPV showed a significantly higher specificity than HC2 test (30.2% and 5.3%, respectively; p<0.001). AHPV assay is effective in identifying CIN 3-positive cases because of its high specificity and lower false-negative rate. The use of AHPV for the triage of ASC-US and LSIL might help to reduce the referral rate of colposcopy during cervical cancer screening.

  15. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  16. Innovative Microsystems: Novel Nanostructures to Capture Circulating Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    cells are already captured around the inlet location prior to entering the microchannel. Downstream of the inlet, the number of captured cells...was linearized and transfected into MDA- MB-231 cells (ATCC) using Fugene6 (Roche). Following selec- tion with Neomycin (Invitrogen) at 800 mg ml1...13,14]. A plasmid was transfected into MDA-MB-231 cells and selected with neomycin . N– cadherin positive clones (Ncdh+MDA-MB-231) are characterized

  17. Flexible Octopus-Shaped Hydrogel Particles for Specific Cell Capture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lynna; An, Harry Z; Haghgooie, Ramin; Shank, Aaron T; Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-04-01

    Multiarm hydrogel microparticles with varying geometry are fabricated to specifically capture cells expressing epithelial cell adhesion molecule. Results show that particle shape influences cell-capture efficiency due to differences in surface area, hydrodynamic effects, and steric constraints. These findings can lead to improved particle design for cell separation and diagnostic applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Standardization of Immunoglobulin M Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Routine Diagnosis of Arboviral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Denise A.; Muth, David A.; Brown, Teresa; Johnson, Alison J.; Karabatsos, Nick; Roehrig, John T.

    2000-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA) is a rapid and versatile diagnostic method that readily permits the combination of multiple assays. Test consolidation is especially important for arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) which belong to at least three virus families: the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, and Bunyaviridae. Using prototype viruses from each of these families and a panel of well-characterized human sera, we have evaluated and standardized a combined MAC-ELISA capable of identifying virus infections caused by members of each virus family. Furthermore, by grouping antigens geographically and utilizing known serological cross-reactivities, we have reduced the number of antigens necessary for testing, while maintaining adequate detection sensitivity. We have determined that a 1:400 serum dilution is most appropriate for screening antiviral antibody, using a positive-to-negative ratio of ≥2.0 as a positive cutoff value. With a blind-coded human serum panel, this combined MAC-ELISA was shown to have test sensitivity and specificity that correlated well with those of other serological techniques. PMID:10790107

  19. Antibody class capture assay (ACCA) for rubella-specific IgM antibody.

    PubMed

    Isaac, M; Payne, R A

    1982-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for IgM antirubella were carried out on 1,546 sera, using an IgM capture method with a F (ab')2 conjugate (ACCA). Under the conditions described, sera containing IgM antirubella bound up to 15 times as much enzyme activity as negative specimens. Paired serum specimens from 27 patients, serial serum specimens from 6 patients, and single serum specimens from 15 patients who had had recent rubella were examined by the haemagglutination inhibition test (HAI) in the presence and absence of 2-mercaptoethanol following sucrose density gradient centrifugation (SDGC). ACCA confirmed all the results found with HAI following SDGC. Specimens were examined from ten patients with congenital rubella; ACCA confirmed the results found with both immunofluorescence following SDGC and radioimmunoassay. Pre- and post-vaccination specimens from 123 patients who had been vaccinated against rubella were examined. An IgM response could only be demonstrated in the 57 cases when IgG was absent in the first specimen. The specificity of the assay was confirmed by testing 31 serum specimens from rubella immune patients that also contained rheumatoid factor, 163 serum specimens from patients with acute infections other than rubella, and 12 serum specimens from infants with miscellaneous neonatal abnormalities other than congenital rubella. The ACCA proved a simple, sensitive, and specific test for IgM antirubella and the results compared favourably with those obtained by the SDGC technique.

  20. Microfluidic Transport in Microdevices for Rare Cell Capture

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James P.; Barbati, Alexander C.; Santana, Steven M.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and capture of rare cells is a problem uniquely suited to microfluidic devices, in which geometries on the cellular length scale can be engineered and a wide range of chemical functionalizations can be implemented. The performance of such devices is primarily affected by the chemical interaction between the cell and the capture surface and the mechanics of cell– surface collision and adhesion. As rare cell capture technology has been summarized elsewhere [1], this article focuses on the fundamental adhesion and transport mechanisms in rare cell capture microdevices, and explores modern device design strategies in a transport context. The biorheology and engineering parameters of cell adhesion are defined; adhesion models and reaction kinetics briefly reviewed. Transport at the microscale, including diffusion and steric interactions that result in cell motion across streamlines, is discussed. The review concludes by discussing design strategies with a focus on leveraging the underlying transport phenomena to maximize device performance. PMID:23065634

  1. Comparison of the Third Wave Invader Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Assay and the Digene HPV Hybrid Capture 2 Assay for Detection of High-Risk HPV DNA▿

    PubMed Central

    Ginocchio, C. C.; Barth, D.; Zhang, F.

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the clinical performance of the Digene Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) assay to that of a prototype Third Wave Invader human papillomavirus (HPV) (IHPV) analyte-specific reagent-based assay for the detection of oncogenic or “high-risk” (HR) HPV DNA using liquid-based cytology specimens. In total, 821 ThinPrep vials were tested using both assays. In accordance with the type-specific probes contained within each test, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for the IHPV assay were 95.9%, 97.6%, 97.5%, and 96.1%, respectively, and those for the HC2 assay were 98.1%, 86.2%, 87.1%, and 97.9%. Overall, the sensitivity and NPV were comparable between the assays, but the IHPV assay demonstrated a better specificity and PPV, since the IHPV assay had fewer false-positive HR HPV results. The incorporation of an internal control to evaluate the cellularity of the test material is an important feature of the IHPV assay and should reduce the risk of false-negative results due to insufficient sample collection rather than the lack of HR HPV DNA. An additional benefit of the IHPV assay was the smaller sample volume required (1 ml versus 4 ml for the HC2 assay). PMID:18367578

  2. In Situ Electrochemical ELISA for Specific Identification of Captured Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Tina Saberi; Mohamadi, Reza M; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-07-08

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cancer cells disseminated from a tumor into the bloodstream. Their presence in patient blood samples has been associated with metastatic disease. Here, we report a simple system that enables the isolation and detection of these rare cancer cells. By developing a sensitive electrochemical ELISA method integrated within a microfluidic cell capture system, were we able to reliably detect very low levels of cancer cells in whole blood. Our results indicate that the new system provides the clinically relevant specificity and sensitivity needed for a convenient, point-of-need assay for cancer cell counting.

  3. Selective capture of endothelial and perivascular cells from brain microvessels using laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Kinnecom, Katie; Pachter, Joel S

    2005-12-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of the major cell types comprising brain microvessels offers a powerful technology to explore the molecular basis of the blood-brain barrier in health and disease. However, the ability to selectively retrieve endothelial or perivascular cells, without cross-contamination from the other, has proven difficult. Additionally, histochemical methods previously described for use with LCM have not allowed for identification of all the different size branches of the microvascular tree. Here, we describe a double immunostaining method, combining bright-field and fluorescence microscopy, and using an extensive dehydration with xylene, to clearly identify and spatially resolve endothelial from perivascular cells within all size microvascular branches in frozen brain sections. LCM of these sections, coupled with RNA analysis by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, revealed that captured endothelial cells show endothelial markers but no detectable markers for astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes. Conversely, captured astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes demonstrate their respective markers, but not those of endothelial cells. This approach has applicability to microarray analysis, thereby enabling global gene profiling of the different cell types along the entirety of the brain microvascular tree.

  4. Blood cell capture on antibody microarrays and monitoring of the cell capture using surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Roupioz, Yoann; Milgram, Sarah; Roget, André; Livache, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Blood is a tremendous source of data for diagnostic purposes. Thanks to the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the different cell types carried into the blood stream. To that end, cell capture of several cell types at different locations on a microarray is an interesting alternative to classical techniques run 'in solution' as it allows simultaneous characterization of several cells on a single device. In this chapter, we have described a method based on the production of antibody microarrays specific to two different cell types: B and T lymphocytes. We have also described the real-time monitoring of the cell capture on the microarray using surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi).

  5. Cystatin Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Serodiagnosis of Human Clonorchiasis and Profile of Captured Antigenic Protein of Clonorchis sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Yun; Kang, Shin-Yong; Park, Sun Hyo; Sukontason, Kom; Sukontason, Kabkaew; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2001-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with crude extracts of adult Clonorchis sinensis has been reported to have a high degree of sensitivity with a moderate degree of specificity for the serodiagnosis of clonorchiasis. The cystatin capture ELISA was investigated for its usefulness for the serodiagnosis of human clonorchiasis. Cystatin bound specifically to cysteine proteinases in crude extracts of adult C. sinensis worms, and its binding capacity was not hindered competitively by the other proteinase inhibitors tested. The cystatin capture ELISA for clonorchiasis showed a higher degree of specificity than the conventional ELISA, which produced some cross-reactivities to sera from patients with cysticercosis, sparganosis, and opisthorchiasis. Immunoglobulin G antibodies to C. sinensis cysteine proteinases were produced in experimental rabbits at week 3, and their levels increased rapidly and remained at a plateau after 8 weeks of infection. Of the proteins from the C. sinensis crude extract captured with cystatin, seven proteins were reactive with the serum from patients with clonorchiasis. The cystatin capture ELISA is indicated to be a sensitive and highly specific immunodiagnostic assay for serodiagnosis of human clonorchiasis. PMID:11687443

  6. Capture and Release of Viable Circulating Tumor Cells from Blood.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Agarwal, Ashutosh

    2016-10-28

    We demonstrate a method for size based capture of viable circulating tumor cell (CTC) from whole blood, along with the release of these cells from chip for downstream analysis and/or culture. The strategy employs the use of a novel Parylene C membrane slot pore microfilter to capture CTC and a coating of poly (N-iso-propylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) for thermoresponsive viable release of the captured CTC. The capture of live cells is enabled by leveraging the design of a slot pore geometry with specific dimensions to reduce the shear stress typically associated with the filtration process. While the microfilter exhibits a high capture efficiency, the release of these cells is non-trivial. Typically, only a small percentage of cells are released when techniques such as reverse flow or cell scraping are used. The strong adhesion of these epithelial cancer cells to the Parylene C membrane is attributable to non-specific electrostatic interaction. To counteract this effect, we employed the use of PIPAAm coating and exploited its thermal responsive interfacial properties to release the cells from the filter. Blood is first filtered at room temperature. Below 32 °C, PIPAAm is hydrophilic. Thereafter, the filter is placed in either culture media or a buffer maintained at 37 °C, which results in the PIPAAm turning hydrophobic, and subsequently releasing the electrostatically bound cells.

  7. Laser capture microdissection of intestinal tissue from sea bass larvae using an optimized RNA integrity assay and validated reference genes.

    PubMed

    Schaeck, M; De Spiegelaere, W; De Craene, J; Van den Broeck, W; De Spiegeleer, B; Burvenich, C; Haesebrouck, F; Decostere, A

    2016-02-17

    The increasing demand for a sustainable larviculture has promoted research regarding environmental parameters, diseases and nutrition, intersecting at the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract of fish larvae. The combination of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and gene expression experiments allows cell specific expression profiling. This study aimed at optimizing an LCM protocol for intestinal tissue of sea bass larvae. Furthermore, a 3'/5' integrity assay was developed for LCM samples of fish tissue, comprising low RNA concentrations. Furthermore, reliable reference genes for performing qPCR in larval sea bass gene expression studies were identified, as data normalization is critical in gene expression experiments using RT-qPCR. We demonstrate that a careful optimization of the LCM procedure allows recovery of high quality mRNA from defined cell populations in complex intestinal tissues. According to the geNorm and Normfinder algorithms, ef1a, rpl13a, rps18 and faua were the most stable genes to be implemented as reference genes for an appropriate normalization of intestinal tissue from sea bass across a range of experimental settings. The methodology developed here, offers a rapid and valuable approach to characterize cells/tissues in the intestinal tissue of fish larvae and their changes following pathogen exposure, nutritional/environmental changes, probiotic supplementation or a combination thereof.

  8. Laser capture microdissection of intestinal tissue from sea bass larvae using an optimized RNA integrity assay and validated reference genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaeck, M.; De Spiegelaere, W.; De Craene, J.; Van den Broeck, W.; De Spiegeleer, B.; Burvenich, C.; Haesebrouck, F.; Decostere, A.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for a sustainable larviculture has promoted research regarding environmental parameters, diseases and nutrition, intersecting at the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract of fish larvae. The combination of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and gene expression experiments allows cell specific expression profiling. This study aimed at optimizing an LCM protocol for intestinal tissue of sea bass larvae. Furthermore, a 3′/5′ integrity assay was developed for LCM samples of fish tissue, comprising low RNA concentrations. Furthermore, reliable reference genes for performing qPCR in larval sea bass gene expression studies were identified, as data normalization is critical in gene expression experiments using RT-qPCR. We demonstrate that a careful optimization of the LCM procedure allows recovery of high quality mRNA from defined cell populations in complex intestinal tissues. According to the geNorm and Normfinder algorithms, ef1a, rpl13a, rps18 and faua were the most stable genes to be implemented as reference genes for an appropriate normalization of intestinal tissue from sea bass across a range of experimental settings. The methodology developed here, offers a rapid and valuable approach to characterize cells/tissues in the intestinal tissue of fish larvae and their changes following pathogen exposure, nutritional/environmental changes, probiotic supplementation or a combination thereof. PMID:26883391

  9. Detection of human papillomavirus in pterygium and conjunctival papilloma by hybrid capture II and PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Y; Kubo, E; Tsuzuki, S; Akagi, Y

    2008-11-01

    To elucidate the putative role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in pterygium and conjunctival papilloma. Hybrid capture II (HC-II) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were performed to detect HPV in pterygium (42 samples obtained from 40 patients) and conjunctival papilloma (8 samples from 6 patients). The amount of HPV DNA was evaluated by measurement of relative light units (RLUs) on a luminometer. All papilloma samples were positive for HPV DNA by PCR and HC-II. The RLU values for specimens of recurrent and re-recurrent papilloma were markedly higher than those for specimens of primary lesions. HPV was detected by PCR in 2 of 42 (4.8%) beta-globin-positive pterygium specimens, whereas HC-II showed that HPV was negative in all pterygium samples. Our results support the hypothesis that HPV DNA is associated with the pathogenesis of conjunctival papilloma, but not pterygium. RLU measurement by HC-II may serve as a marker for evaluating the activity of HPV in conjunctival tumours.

  10. Kit-On-A-Lid-Assays for accessible self-contained cell assays.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Erwin; Guckenberger, David J; Cavnar, Peter; Huttenlocher, Anna; Keller, Nancy P; Beebe, David J

    2013-02-07

    Microscale methods for cell-based assays typically rely on macroscopic reagent handling and fluidic loading protocols that are technically challenging and do not scale with the number of assays favorably. Here, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform technology called "Kit-On-A-Lid-Assay" (KOALA), that enables the creation of self-contained microfluidic cell-based assays, integrating all the steps required to perform cell-based assays. The KOALA platform allows the pre-packaging of reagents, cryopreservation of cell suspensions, thawing of cell suspensions, culture of cells, and operation of whole cell-based assays. The operation of the KOALA platform is user-friendly and consists of bringing together a lid containing the microchannels, and a base containing the pre-packaged reagents, thereby causing fluidic exchange in all the channels simultaneously. We demonstrate that the KOALA cell-based assays can be simply operated from start to finish without any external laboratory equipment.

  11. Penetration of multiple thin films in micrometeorite capture cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort to develop cosmic dust detectors/collectors for use in space, we performed a series of hypervelocity impact experiments on combined sensor/capture-cell assemblies using 10-200-micron-diameter glass projectiles and olivine crystals at velocities of 0.9-14.4 km/s. The design objective of the space-flight instrument is to measure the trajectories of individual particles with sufficient accuracy to permit identification of their parent bodies and to capture enough impactor material to allow chemical and isotopic analyses of samples returned to Earth. Three different multiple-film small-particle capture cell designs (0.1-100-micron-thick Al foils with approx. 10, 100, and 1800 micron spacing) were evaluated for their ability to capture impactor fragments and residue. Their performances were compared to two other types of capture cells, foil covered Ge crystals, and 0.50 and 0.120 g/cu cm aerogels. All capture cells were tested behind multifilm (1.4-6.0-micron-thick) polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) velocity/trajectory sensor devices. Several tests were also done without the PVDF sensors for comparison. The results of this study were reported by Simon in a comprehensive report in which the morphology of impacts and impactor residues in various types of capture cells after passage through two PVDF sensor films is discussed. Impactor fragments in selected capture cells from impacts at velocities up to 6.4 km/s were identified using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS).

  12. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) - about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences.

  13. Peptide-based protein capture agents with high affinity, selectivity, and stability as antibody replacements in biodetection assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrow, Blake; Warner, Candice; Finch, Amethist S.; Lai, Bert; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Heath, James R.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2014-05-01

    Current biodetection assays that employ monoclonal antibodies as primary capture agents exhibit limited fieldability, shelf life, and performance due to batch-to-batch production variability and restricted thermal stability. In order to improve upon the detection of biological threats in fieldable assays and systems for the Army, we are investigating protein catalyzed capture (PCC) agents as drop-in replacements for the existing antibody technology through iterative in situ click chemistry. The PCC agent oligopeptides are developed against known protein epitopes and can be mass produced using robotic methods. In this work, a PCC agent under development will be discussed. The performance, including affinity, selectivity, and stability of the capture agent technology, is analyzed by immunoprecipitation, western blotting, and ELISA experiments. The oligopeptide demonstrates superb selectivity coupled with high affinity through multi-ligand design, and improved thermal, chemical, and biochemical stability due to non-natural amino acid PCC agent design.

  14. Dielectrophoretic Capture and Genetic Analysis of Single Neuroblastoma Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Erica L.; Rader, JulieAnn; Ruden, Jacob; Rappaport, Eric F.; Hunter, Kristen N.; Hallberg, Paul L.; Krytska, Kate; O’Dwyer, Peter J.; Mosse, Yael P.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here, we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells (WBCs). Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control WBCs. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples of patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here, we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients. PMID:25133137

  15. Antibody secreting cell assay for influenza A virus in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An ELISPOT assay to enumerate B-cells producing antibodies specific to a given antigen, also known as an antibody secreting cell (ASC) assay, was adapted to detect B-cells specific for influenza A virus (IAV). The assay is performed ex vivo and enumerates ASC at a single cell level. A simple ASC det...

  16. A quantitative FastFUCCI assay defines cell cycle dynamics at a single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Koh, Siang-Boon; Mascalchi, Patrice; Rodriguez, Esther; Lin, Yao; Jodrell, Duncan I; Richards, Frances M; Lyons, Scott K

    2017-01-15

    The fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) is a powerful tool for use in live cells but current FUCCI-based assays have limited throughput in terms of image processing and quantification. Here, we developed a lentiviral system that rapidly introduced FUCCI transgenes into cells by using an all-in-one expression cassette, FastFUCCI. The approach alleviated the need for sequential transduction and characterisation, improving labelling efficiency. We coupled the system to an automated imaging workflow capable of handling large datasets. The integrated assay enabled analyses of single-cell readouts at high spatiotemporal resolution. With the assay, we captured in detail the cell cycle alterations induced by antimitotic agents. We found that treated cells accumulated at G2 or M phase but eventually advanced through mitosis into the next interphase, where the majority of cell death occurred, irrespective of the preceding mitotic phenotype. Some cells appeared viable after mitotic slippage, and a fraction of them subsequently re-entered S phase. Accordingly, we found evidence that targeting the DNA replication origin activity sensitised cells to paclitaxel. In summary, we demonstrate the utility of the FastFUCCI assay for quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics and identify its potential in preclinical drug development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Evaluation of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R D; Jaeger, K L; Wuhib, T; Lima, A A; Guerrant, R L; Sears, C L

    1993-01-01

    The diagnosis of the small (4- to 6-microns) Cryptosporidium oocysts is labor intensive and relies on stool concentration, with subsequent staining and microscopy. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (LMD Laboratories, Carlsbad, Calif.) in detecting Cryptosporidium oocysts in human stools. A total of 591 specimens (76 diarrheal, 515 control) obtained from 213 inhabitants of an urban slum in northeastern Brazil were examined by both ELISA and conventional microscopic examination (CME) of formalin-ethyl acetate-concentrated stool samples stained with modified acid-fast and auramine stains. Forty-eight diarrheal stools (63.2%) were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts by CME, with 40 of these positive by ELISA. Thirty-five control stools (6.8%) had Cryptosporidium oocysts detected by CME, with 15 of these also positive by ELISA. All of the 480 nondiarrheal stools and all but one of the diarrheal stools negative by CME were negative by ELISA. The test had an overall sensitivity of 66.3% and a specificity of 99.8% (positive predictive value, 98.2%; negative predictive value, 94.8%). In the evaluation of human diarrheal stool samples, the test sensitivity increased to 83.3%, with a specificity of 96.4%, and, in analysis of samples from individual patients with diarrhea, the sensitivity was 87.9%, with a specificity of 100%. These results indicate that this stool ELISA is sensitive and specific for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in human diarrheal stool specimens but has limited use in epidemiologic studies for the diagnosis of asymptomatic Cryptosporidium infection. PMID:8370732

  18. Cryptosporidium cell culture infectivity assay design.

    PubMed

    King, B J; Keegan, A R; Robinson, B S; Monis, P T

    2011-05-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium, which cause the gastrointestinal disease cryptosporidiosis, still represent a significant cause of water-borne disease worldwide. While intensive efforts have been invested in the development of techniques for parasite culture, in vitro growth has been hampered by a number of factors including low levels of infectivity as well as delayed life-cycle development and poor synchronicity. In this study we examined factors affecting the timing of contact between excysted sporozoites and target host cells and the subsequent impact of this upon the establishment of infection. We demonstrate that excystation rate impacts upon establishment of infection and that in our standard assay format the majority of sporozoites are not close enough to the cell monolayer when they are released from the oocyst to successfully establish infection. However, this can be easily overcome by centrifugation of oocysts onto the cell monolayer, resulting in approximately 4-fold increases in sporozoite attachment and subsequent infection. We further demonstrate that excystation procedures can be tailored to control excystation rate to match the assay end purpose and that excystation rate can influence data interpretation. Finally, the addition of both a centrifugation and washing step post-sporozoite attachment may be appropriate when considering the design of in vitro culture experiments for developmental analysis and stage-specific gene expression as this appears to increase the synchronicity of early developmental stages.

  19. Laser capture microdissection of single cells from complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Quian, C A; Goldstein, S R; Pohida, T; Smith, P D; Peterson, J I; Wellner, E; Ghany, M; Bonner, R F

    1999-02-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a new method used to select and procure cell clusters from tissue sections. Once captured, the DNA, RNA or protein can be easily extracted from the isolated cells and analyzed by conventional PCR, reverse transcription (RT)-PCR or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, including protein zymography for specific macromolecular changes. In LCM, a thermoplastic polymer coating [ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA)] attached to a rigid support is placed in contact with a tissue section. The EVA polymer over microscopically selected cell clusters is precisely activated by a near-infrared laser pulse and then bonds to the targeted area. Removal of the EVA and its support from the tissue section procures the selected cell aggregates for molecular analysis. This initial NIH LCM approach using a flat transfer EVA film has been recently commercialized and has proven to be an effective routine microdissection technique for subsequent macromolecular analysis in many laboratories around the world. However, reliable and precise capture of individual cells from tissue sections has been difficult to perform with the current LCM instruments. In this report, we describe the capture of individual cells with a new NIH LCM microscope, which epi-irradiates the EVA polymer overlying individual cells with 1-ms laser pulses focused to 6 microns. A computer-controlled arm precisely positions a 40-micron-wide strip of a cylindrical EVA surface onto a sample with a light contact force (ca. 0.1 g). The small contact force and contact area on the film on the sample diminishes nonspecific transfer to negligible levels. By slightly rotating the cylinder to provide a renewable transfer surface, concentration of a distinct cell type on a single cylinder is possible. Using this novel adaptation, we demonstrate the rapid and practical capture of single cells from different types of tissue sections, including immunostained cells.

  20. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Vander Ley, Brian L; Ridpath, Julia F; Sweiger, Shaun H

    2012-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle requires substantial quantities of known positive- and negative-sample material. The objective of this study was to determine what sections of bovine skin contained Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen. Two commercially available antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunoassays were used to test subsamples representing the entire skin of 3 persistently infected calves. Both assays detected Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen in the samples indicated for use by assay protocol. However, one assay identified all subsamples as positive, while the second assay identified 64.4% of subsamples as positive. These results show that use of samples other than those specified by the assay protocol must be validated for each individual assay. In this study, alternative sample sites and use of the entire hide for proficiency testing would be acceptable for only one of the assays tested.

  1. Microfluidic Device for Capture and Isolation of Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Alexander P.; Barbee, Kristopher D.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    We describe a microfluidic device capable of trapping, isolating, and lysing individual cells in parallel using dielectrophoretic forces and a system of PDMS channels and valves. The device consists of a glass substrate patterned with electrodes and two PDMS layers comprising of the microfluidic channels and valve control channels. Individual cells are captured by positive dielectrophoresis using the microfabricated electrode pairs. The cells are then isolated into nanoliter compartments using pneumatically actuated PDMS valves. Following isolation, the cells are lysed open by applying an electric field using the same electrode pairs. With the ability to capture and compartmentalize single cells our device may be combined with analytical methods for in situ molecular analysis of cellular components from single cells in a highly parallel manner. PMID:21614137

  2. Microfluidic device for capture and isolation of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Alexander P.; Barbee, Kristopher D.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2010-08-01

    We describe a microfluidic device capable of trapping, isolating, and lysing individual cells in parallel using dielectrophoretic forces and a system of PDMS channels and valves. The device consists of a glass substrate patterned with electrodes and two PDMS layers comprising of the microfluidic channels and valve control channels. Individual cells are captured by positive dielectrophoresis using the microfabricated electrode pairs. The cells are then isolated into nanoliter compartments using pneumatically actuated PDMS valves. Following isolation, the cells are lysed open by applying an electric field using the same electrode pairs. With the ability to capture and compartmentalize single cells our device may be combined with analytical methods for in situ molecular analysis of cellular components from single cells in a highly parallel manner.

  3. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  4. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  7. Targeted capture enrichment assay for non-invasive prenatal testing of large and small size sub-chromosomal deletions and duplications

    PubMed Central

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Kypri, Elena; Loizides, Charalambos; Ioannides, Marios; Achilleos, Achilleas; Mina, Petros; Keravnou, Anna; Sismani, Carolina; Koumbaris, George; Patsalis, Philippos C.

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using whole genome and targeted sequencing has become increasingly accepted for clinical detection of Trisomy 21 and sex chromosome aneuploidies. Few studies have shown that sub-chromosomal deletions or duplications associated with genetic syndromes can also be detected in the fetus noninvasively. There are still limitations on these methodologies such as the detection of variants of unknown clinical significance, high number of false positives, and difficulties to detect small aberrations. We utilized a recently developed targeted sequencing approach for the development of a NIPT assay, for large and small size deletions/duplications, which overcomes these existing limitations. Artificial pregnancies with microdeletion/microduplication syndromes were created by spiking DNA from affected samples into cell free DNA (cfDNA) from non-pregnant samples. Unaffected spiked samples and normal pregnancies were used as controls. Target Capture Sequences (TACS) for seven syndromes were designed and utilized for targeted capture enrichment followed by sequencing. Data was analyzed using a statistical pipeline to identify deletions or duplications on targeted regions. Following the assay development a proof of concept study using 33 normal pregnancies, 21 artificial affected and 17 artificial unaffected pregnancies was carried out to test the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. All 21 abnormal spiked-in samples were correctly classified as subchromosomal aneuploidies while the 33 normal pregnancies or 17 normal spiked-in samples resulted in a false positive result. We have developed an NIPT assay for the detection of sub-chromosomal deletions and duplications using the targeted capture enrichment technology. This assay demonstrates high accuracy, high read depth of the genomic region of interest, and can identify deletions/duplications as small as 0.5 Mb. NIPT of fetal microdeletion/microduplication syndromes can be of enormous benefit

  8. Standardization of a cytometric p24-capture bead-assay for the detection of main HIV-1 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Merbah, Mélanie; Onkar, Sayali; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Vanpouille, Christophe; Biancotto, Angélique; Bonar, Lydia; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Kijak, Gustavo; Michael, Nelson; Robb, Merlin; Kim, Jerome H; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence

    2016-04-01

    The prevailing method to assess HIV-1 replication and infectivity is to measure the production of p24 Gag protein by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Since fluorescent bead-based technologies offer a broader dynamic range and higher sensitivity, this study describes a p24 capture Luminex assay capable of detecting HIV-1 subtypes A-D, circulating recombinant forms (CRF) CRF01_AE and CRF02_AG, which together are responsible for over 90% of HIV-1 infections worldwide. The success of the assay lies in the identification and selection of a cross-reactive capture antibody (clone 183-H12-5C). Fifty-six isolates that belonged to six HIV-1 subtypes and CRFs were successfully detected with p-values below 0.021; limits of detection ranging from 3.7 to 3 × 104 pg/ml. The intra- and inter-assay variation gave coefficient of variations below 6 and 14%, respectively. The 183-bead Luminex assay also displayed higher sensitivity of 91% and 98% compared to commercial p24 ELISA and a previously described Luminex assay. The p24 concentrations measured by the 183-bead Luminex assay showed a significant correlation (R=0.92, p<0.0001) with the data obtained from quantitative real time PCR. This newly developed p24 assay leverages the advantages of the Luminex platform, which include smaller sample volume and simultaneous detection of up to 500 analytes in a single sample, and delivers a valuable tool for the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection of activity of single microalgae cells in a new microfluidic cell capturing chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junsheng; Meng, Xiongfei; Song, Yongxin; Pan, Xinxiang; Li, Dongqing

    2016-12-01

    The analysis of single microalgae cell plays a very important role in understanding the activity of microalgae cell. In this paper, a new method of capturing and monitoring a microalgae cell is presented. This method uses the surface of an air bubble formed in an aqueous solution in a microchannel to capture a microalgae cell. The aliveness of the captured microalgae cell can be monitored quantitatively by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence intensity of the microalgae cell. To demonstrate the performance of this method, two species of microalgae cells, Dunaliella salina and Tetraselmis Chui, were taken as samples. The effect of pH on the cell capture was studied experimentally. The cells were treated by NaClO or Formaldehyde solutions of different concentrations. The kinetics of the photosynthesis activity of the captured single microalgae cells was investigated under different treatment conditions. The results show that the viability of single microalgae cells can be studied individually and accurately by this method.

  10. Nanostructured Substrates for Capturing Circulating Tumor Cells in Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-03-01

    Over the past decade, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has become an emerging ``biomarker'' for detecting early-stage cancer metastasis, predicting patient prognosis, as well as monitoring disease progression and therapeutic outcomes. However, isolation of CTCs has been technically challenging due to the extremely low abundance (a few to hundreds per ml) of CTCs among a high number of hematologic cells (109 per mL) in the blood. Our joint research team at UCLA has developed a new cell capture technology for quantification of CTCs in whole blood samples. Similar to most of the existing approaches, epithelial cell adhesion molecule antibody (anti-EpCAM) was grafted onto the surfaces to distinguish CTCs from the surrounding hematologic cells. The uniqueness of our technology is the use of nanostructured surfaces, which facilitates local topographical interactions between CTCs and substrates at the very first cell/substrate contacting time point. We demonstrated the ability of these nanostructured substrates to capture CTCs in whole blood samples with significantly improved efficiency and selectivity. The successful demonstration of this cell capture technology using brain, breast and prostate cancer cell lines encouraged us to test this approach in clinical setting. We have been able to bond our first validation study with a commercialized technology based on the use of immunomagnetic nanoparticles. A group of clinically well-characterized prostate cancer patients at UCLA hospital have been recruited and tested in parallel by these two technologies.

  11. Dynamic imaging of cell-free and cell-associated viral capture in mature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Esteban, Olga; Rodriguez-Plata, Maria T; Erkizia, Itziar; Prado, Julia G; Blanco, Julià; García-Parajo, Maria F; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2011-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) capture human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through a non-fusogenic mechanism that enables viral transmission to CD4(+) T cells, contributing to in vivo viral dissemination. Although previous studies have provided important clues to cell-free viral capture by mature DCs (mDCs), dynamic and kinetic insight on this process is still missing. Here, we used three-dimensional video microscopy and single-particle tracking approaches to dynamically dissect both cell-free and cell-associated viral capture by living mDCs. We show that cell-free virus capture by mDCs operates through three sequential phases: virus binding through specific determinants expressed in the viral particle, polarized or directional movements toward concrete regions of the cell membrane and virus accumulation in a sac-like structure where trapped viral particles display a hindered diffusive behavior. Moreover, real-time imaging of cell-associated viral transfer to mDCs showed a similar dynamics to that exhibited by cell-free virus endocytosis leading to viral accumulation in compartments. However, cell-associated HIV type 1 transfer to mDCs was the most effective pathway, boosted throughout enhanced cellular contacts with infected CD4(+) T cells. Our results suggest that in lymphoid tissues, mDC viral uptake could occur either by encountering cell-free or cell-associated virus produced by infected cells generating the perfect scenario to promote HIV pathogenesis and impact disease progression.

  12. Improved Methods for Capture, Extraction, and Quantitative Assay of Environmental DNA from Asian Bigheaded Carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Cameron R.; Miller, Derryl J.; Coyne, Kathryn J.; Corush, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Indirect, non-invasive detection of rare aquatic macrofauna using aqueous environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new approach to population and biodiversity monitoring. As such, the sensitivity of monitoring results to different methods of eDNA capture, extraction, and detection is being investigated in many ecosystems and species. One of the first and largest conservation programs with eDNA-based monitoring as a central instrument focuses on Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.), an invasive fish spreading toward the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, the standard eDNA methods of this program have not advanced since their development in 2010. We developed new, quantitative, and more cost-effective methods and tested them against the standard protocols. In laboratory testing, our new quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for bigheaded carp eDNA was one to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the existing endpoint PCR assays. When applied to eDNA samples from an experimental pond containing bigheaded carp, the qPCR assay produced a detection probability of 94.8% compared to 4.2% for the endpoint PCR assays. Also, the eDNA capture and extraction method we adapted from aquatic microbiology yielded five times more bigheaded carp eDNA from the experimental pond than the standard method, at a per sample cost over forty times lower. Our new, more sensitive assay provides a quantitative tool for eDNA-based monitoring of bigheaded carp, and the higher-yielding eDNA capture and extraction method we describe can be used for eDNA-based monitoring of any aquatic species. PMID:25474207

  13. Improved methods for capture, extraction, and quantitative assay of environmental DNA from Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.).

    PubMed

    Turner, Cameron R; Miller, Derryl J; Coyne, Kathryn J; Corush, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Indirect, non-invasive detection of rare aquatic macrofauna using aqueous environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new approach to population and biodiversity monitoring. As such, the sensitivity of monitoring results to different methods of eDNA capture, extraction, and detection is being investigated in many ecosystems and species. One of the first and largest conservation programs with eDNA-based monitoring as a central instrument focuses on Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.), an invasive fish spreading toward the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, the standard eDNA methods of this program have not advanced since their development in 2010. We developed new, quantitative, and more cost-effective methods and tested them against the standard protocols. In laboratory testing, our new quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for bigheaded carp eDNA was one to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the existing endpoint PCR assays. When applied to eDNA samples from an experimental pond containing bigheaded carp, the qPCR assay produced a detection probability of 94.8% compared to 4.2% for the endpoint PCR assays. Also, the eDNA capture and extraction method we adapted from aquatic microbiology yielded five times more bigheaded carp eDNA from the experimental pond than the standard method, at a per sample cost over forty times lower. Our new, more sensitive assay provides a quantitative tool for eDNA-based monitoring of bigheaded carp, and the higher-yielding eDNA capture and extraction method we describe can be used for eDNA-based monitoring of any aquatic species.

  14. A microfluidic dual-well device for high-throughput single-cell capture and culture.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hui; Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Chang, Hao-Chen; Yeh, Chuan-Feng; He, Cheng-Kun; Salm, Eric M; Chen, Chihchen; Chiu, Ing-Ming; Hsu, Chia-Hsien

    2015-07-21

    In vitro culture of single cells facilitates biological studies by deconvoluting complications from cell population heterogeneity. However, there is still a lack of simple yet high-throughput methods to perform single cell culture experiments. In this paper, we report the development and application of a microfluidic device with a dual-well (DW) design concept for high-yield single-cell loading (~77%) in large microwells (285 and 485 μm in diameter) which allowed for cell spreading, proliferation and differentiation. The increased single-cell loading yield is achieved by using sets of small microwells termed "capture-wells" and big microwells termed "culture-wells" according to their utilities for single-cell capture and culture, respectively. This novel device architecture allows the size of the "culture" microwells to be flexibly adjusted without affecting the single-cell loading efficiency making it useful for cell culture applications as demonstrated by our experiments of KT98 mouse neural stem cell differentiation, A549 and MDA-MB-435 cancer cell proliferation, and single-cell colony formation assay with A549 cells in this paper.

  15. Development of an Easy and High-Throughput Cell Assay System with a Culture Chip and an Assay Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kanako; Kaji, Noritada; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tokeshi, Manabu; Baba, Yoshinobu

    High throughput cell assay is significantly important in drug screening, assessment of toxicity etc. Cell assay with a microchip is one of the candidates for high throughput cell assay. However, reported cell assay system with the microchip requires expensive apparatus for refluxing medium and investigation of optimum experimental condition for steady data. For an inexpensive, easy and high throughput cell assay, we introduce a new cell assay system combined with a culture chip and an assay chip made of poly(dimethyl siloxane). Cell culture chips enabled cell to proliferate along the microchannel without refluxing medium and permitted to prepare cell patterning easily. Also, assay chips formed concentration gradient inside the chip and allowed the cell assay with different concentrations of drug at the same time. Thus, our developed cell assay system can overcome the problems of the present cell assay and would promote the drug discovery, assessment of toxicity etc.

  16. Carboxybetaine methacrylate oligomer modified nylon for circulating tumor cells capture.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chaoqun; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Baorui

    2014-10-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) capture is one of the most effective approaches in diagnosis and treatment of cancers in the field of personalized cancer medicine. In our study, zwitterionic carboxybetaine methacrylate (CBMA) oligomers were grafted onto nylon via atomic transfer random polymerization (ATRP) which would serve as a novel material for the development of convenient CTC capture interventional medical devices. The chemical, physical and biological properties of pristine and modified nylon surfaces were assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectra, atomic force microscope, water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and plasma recalcification time (PRT) determinations, etc. The results, including the significant decrease of proteins adsorption and platelets adhesion, as well as prolonged PRTs demonstrated the extraordinary biocompatibility and blood compatibility of the modified surface. Furthermore, we showed that upon immobilization of anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecular (anti-EpCAM) antibody onto the CBMA moiety, the modified nylon surface can selectively capture EpCAM positive tumor cells from blood with high efficiency, indicating the potential of the modified nylon in the manufacture of convenient interventional CTC capture medical devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetizable stent-grafts enable endothelial cell capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefft, Brandon J.; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Harburn, J. Jonathan; Hlinomaz, Ota; Lerman, Amir; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Sandhu, Gurpreet S.

    2017-04-01

    Emerging nanotechnologies have enabled the use of magnetic forces to guide the movement of magnetically-labeled cells, drugs, and other therapeutic agents. Endothelial cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) have previously been captured on the surface of magnetizable 2205 duplex stainless steel stents in a porcine coronary implantation model. Recently, we have coated these stents with electrospun polyurethane nanofibers to fabricate prototype stent-grafts. Facilitated endothelialization may help improve the healing of arteries treated with stent-grafts, reduce the risk of thrombosis and restenosis, and enable small-caliber applications. When placed in a SPION-labeled endothelial cell suspension in the presence of an external magnetic field, magnetized stent-grafts successfully captured cells to the surface regions adjacent to the stent struts. Implantation within the coronary circulation of pigs (n=13) followed immediately by SPION-labeled autologous endothelial cell delivery resulted in widely patent devices with a thin, uniform neointima and no signs of thrombosis or inflammation at 7 days. Furthermore, the magnetized stent-grafts successfully captured and retained SPION-labeled endothelial cells to select regions adjacent to stent struts and between stent struts, whereas the non-magnetized control stent-grafts did not. Early results with these prototype devices are encouraging and further refinements will be necessary in order to achieve more uniform cell capture and complete endothelialization. Once optimized, this approach may lead to more rapid and complete healing of vascular stent-grafts with a concomitant improvement in long-term device performance.

  18. Aptamer-Conjugated Graphene Oxide Membranes for Highly Efficient Capture and Accurate Identification of Multiple Types of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is responsible for 1 in 4 deaths in the United States. Though it has been well-documented over past two decades that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood can be used as a biomarker for metastatic cancer, there are enormous challenges in capturing and identifying CTCs with sufficient sensitivity and specificity. Because of the heterogeneous expression of CTC markers, it is now well understood that a single CTC marker is insufficient to capture all CTCs from the blood. Driven by the clear need, this study reports for the first time highly efficient capture and accurate identification of multiple types of CTCs from infected blood using aptamer-modified porous graphene oxide membranes. The results demonstrate that dye-modified S6, A9, and YJ-1 aptamers attached to 20–40 μm porous garphene oxide membranes are capable of capturing multiple types of tumor cells (SKBR3 breast cancer cells, LNCaP prostate cancer cells, and SW-948 colon cancer cells) selectively and simultaneously from infected blood. Our result shows that the capture efficiency of graphene oxide membranes is ∼95% for multiple types of tumor cells; for each tumor concentration, 10 cells are present per milliliter of blood sample. The selectivity of our assay for capturing targeted tumor cells has been demonstrated using membranes without an antibody. Blood infected with different cells also has been used to demonstrate the targeted tumor cell capturing ability of aptamer-conjugated membranes. Our data also demonstrate that accurate analysis of multiple types of captured CTCs can be performed using multicolor fluorescence imaging. Aptamer-conjugated membranes reported here have good potential for the early diagnosis of diseases that are currently being detected by means of cell capture technologies. PMID:25565372

  19. Aptamer-conjugated graphene oxide membranes for highly efficient capture and accurate identification of multiple types of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Viraka Nellore, Bhanu Priya; Kanchanapally, Rajashekhar; Pramanik, Avijit; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Chavva, Suhash Reddy; Hamme, Ashton; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2015-02-18

    Tumor metastasis is responsible for 1 in 4 deaths in the United States. Though it has been well-documented over past two decades that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood can be used as a biomarker for metastatic cancer, there are enormous challenges in capturing and identifying CTCs with sufficient sensitivity and specificity. Because of the heterogeneous expression of CTC markers, it is now well understood that a single CTC marker is insufficient to capture all CTCs from the blood. Driven by the clear need, this study reports for the first time highly efficient capture and accurate identification of multiple types of CTCs from infected blood using aptamer-modified porous graphene oxide membranes. The results demonstrate that dye-modified S6, A9, and YJ-1 aptamers attached to 20-40 μm porous garphene oxide membranes are capable of capturing multiple types of tumor cells (SKBR3 breast cancer cells, LNCaP prostate cancer cells, and SW-948 colon cancer cells) selectively and simultaneously from infected blood. Our result shows that the capture efficiency of graphene oxide membranes is ~95% for multiple types of tumor cells; for each tumor concentration, 10 cells are present per milliliter of blood sample. The selectivity of our assay for capturing targeted tumor cells has been demonstrated using membranes without an antibody. Blood infected with different cells also has been used to demonstrate the targeted tumor cell capturing ability of aptamer-conjugated membranes. Our data also demonstrate that accurate analysis of multiple types of captured CTCs can be performed using multicolor fluorescence imaging. Aptamer-conjugated membranes reported here have good potential for the early diagnosis of diseases that are currently being detected by means of cell capture technologies.

  20. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) – about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences. PMID:26493176

  1. Microfluidic device for cell capture and impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ling-Sheng; Wang, Min-How

    2007-10-01

    This work presents a microfluidic device to capture physically single cells within microstructures inside a channel and to measure the impedance of a single HeLa cell (human cervical epithelioid carcinoma) using impedance spectroscopy. The device includes a glass substrate with electrodes and a PDMS channel with micro pillars. The commercial software CFD-ACE+ is used to study the flow of the microstructures in the channel. According to simulation results, the probability of cell capture by three micro pillars is about 10%. An equivalent circuit model of the device is established and fits closely to the experimental results. The circuit can be modeled electrically as cell impedance in parallel with dielectric capacitance and in series with a pair of electrode resistors. The system is operated at low frequency between 1 and 100 kHz. In this study, experiments show that the HeLa cell is successfully captured by the micro pillars and its impedance is measured by impedance spectroscopy. The magnitude of the HeLa cell impedance declines at all operation voltages with frequency because the HeLa cell is capacitive. Additionally, increasing the operation voltage reduces the magnitude of the HeLa cell because a strong electric field may promote the exchange of ions between the cytoplasm and the isotonic solution. Below an operating voltage of 0.9 V, the system impedance response is characteristic of a parallel circuit at under 30 kHz and of a series circuit at between 30 and 100 kHz. The phase of the HeLa cell impedance is characteristic of a series circuit when the operation voltage exceeds 0.8 V because the cell impedance becomes significant.

  2. Antigen-capture blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on a baculovirus recombinant antigen to differentiate Transmissible gastroenteritis virus from Porcine respiratory coronavirus antibodies.

    PubMed

    López, Lissett; Venteo, Angel; García, Marga; Camuñas, Ana; Ranz, Ana; García, Julia; Sarraseca, Javier; Anaya, Carmen; Rueda, Paloma

    2009-09-01

    A new commercially available antigen-capture, blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (antigen-capture b-ELISA), based on baculovirus truncated-S recombinant protein of Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and 3 specific monoclonal antibodies, was developed and evaluated by examining a panel of 453 positive Porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCoV), 31 positive TGEV, and 126 negative field sera by using another commercially available differential coronavirus b-ELISA as the reference technique to differentiate TGEV- from PRCoV-induced antibodies. The recombinant S protein-based ELISA appeared to be 100% sensitive for TGEV and PRCoV detection and highly specific for TGEV and PRCoV detection (100% and 92.06%, respectively), when qualitative results (positive or negative) were compared with those of the reference technique. In variability experiments, the ELISA gave consistent results when the same serum was evaluated on different wells and different plates. These results indicated that truncated recombinant S protein is a suitable alternative to the complete virus as antigen in ELISA assays. The use of recombinant S protein as antigen offers great advantages because it is an easy-to-produce, easy-to-standardize, noninfectious antigen that does not require further purification or concentration. Those advantages represent an important improvement for antigen preparation, in comparison with other assays in which an inactivated virus from mammalian cell cultures is used.

  3. Characterization of cell seeding and specific capture of B cells in microbubble well arrays

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Meghan C.; Kobie, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Development of micro-well array systems for use in high-throughput screening of rare cells requires a detailed understanding of the factors that impact the specific capture of cells in wells and the distribution statistics of the number of cells deposited into wells. In this study we investigate the development of microbubble (MB) well array technology for sorting antigen-specific B-cells. Using Poisson statistics we delineate the important role that the fractional area of MB well opening and the cell seeding density have on determining cell seeding distribution in wells. The unique architecture of the MB well hinders captured cells from escaping the well and provides a unique microenvironmental niche that enables media changes as needed for extended cell culture. Using cell lines and primary B and T cells isolated from human peripheral blood we demonstrate the use of affinity capture agents coated in the MB wells to enrich for the selective capture of B cells. Important differences were noted in the efficacy of bovine serum albumin to block the nonspecific adsorption of primary cells relative to cell lines as well as the efficacy of the capture coatings using mixed primary B and T cells samples. These results emphasize the importance of using primary cells in technology development and suggest the need to utilize B cell capture agents that are insensitive to cell activation. PMID:23358874

  4. Capture and isolation of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are those cells that separate from a solid tumor and spread through the blood or lymphatic systems. While there are many open questions concerning the biology of CTCs, there is mounting evidence that some of these cells go on to create secondary tumors in distant organs, thus enabling metastatic disease. Detection of CTCs may have clinical impact by providing prognostic information. Furthermore, molecular and genetic analysis of CTCs may enable cancer biologists to answer questions about the metastatic process, such as whether these cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Using a photoacoustic flowmeter, in which we induce ultrasonic responses from circulating melanoma cells (CMCs), we identify, capture, and isolate these cells for further analysis. PMID:26659796

  5. Parametric control of collision rates and capture rates in geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture (GEDI) microfluidic devices for rare cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James P.; Lannin, Timothy B.; Syed, Yusef A.; Santana, Steven M.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    The enrichment and isolation of rare cells from complex samples, such as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood, is an important engineering problem with widespread clinical applications. One approach uses a microfluidic obstacle array with an antibody surface functionalization to both guide cells into contact with the capture surface and to facilitate adhesion; geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture is a design strategy in which the array is designed to promote target cell–obstacle contact and minimize other interactions (Gleghorn et al., 2010; Kirby et al., 2012). We present a simulation that uses capture experiments in a simple Hele-Shaw geometry (Santana et al., 2012) to inform a target-cell-specific capture model that can predict capture probability in immunocapture microdevices of any arbitrary complex geometry. We show that capture performance is strongly dependent on the array geometry, and that it is possible to select an obstacle array geometry that maximizes capture efficiency (by creating combinations of frequent target cell–obstacle collisions and shear stress low enough to support capture), while simulatenously enhancing purity by minimizing non-specific adhesion of both smaller contaminant cells (with infrequent cell–obstacle collisions) and larger contaminant cells (by focusing those collisions into regions of high shear stress). PMID:24078270

  6. Study comparing human papillomavirus (HPV) real-time multiplex PCR and Hybrid Capture II INNO-LiPA v2 HPV genotyping PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Iftner, Thomas; Germ, Liesje; Swoyer, Ryan; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Breugelmans, J Gabrielle; Munk, Christian; Stubenrauch, Frank; Antonello, Joseph; Bryan, Janine T; Taddeo, Frank J

    2009-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA genotyping is an essential test to establish efficacy in HPV vaccine clinical trials and HPV prevalence in natural history studies. A number of HPV DNA genotyping methods have been cited in the literature, but the comparability of the outcomes from the different methods has not been well characterized. Clinically, cytology is used to establish possible HPV infection. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of HPV multiplex PCR assays compared to those of the testing scheme of the Hybrid Capture II (HCII) assay followed by an HPV PCR/line hybridization assay (HCII-LiPA v2). SurePath residual samples were split into two aliquots. One aliquot was subjected to HCII testing followed by DNA extraction and LiPA v2 genotyping. The second aliquot was shipped to a second laboratory, where DNA was extracted and HPV multiplex PCR testing was performed. Comparisons were evaluated for 15 HPV types common in both assays. A slightly higher proportion of samples tested positive by the HPV multiplex PCR than by the HCII-LiPA v2 assay. The sensitivities of the multiplex PCR assay relative to those of the HCII-LiPA v2 assay for HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18, for example, were 0.806, 0.646, 0.920, and 0.860, respectively; the specificities were 0.986, 0.998, 0.960, and 0.986, respectively. The overall comparability of detection of the 15 HPV types was quite high. Analyses of DNA genotype testing compared to cytology results demonstrated a significant discordance between cytology-negative (normal) and HPV DNA-positive results. This demonstrates the challenges of cytological diagnosis and the possibility that a significant number of HPV-infected cells may appear cytologically normal.

  7. Mycobacteriophage cell binding proteins for the capture of mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Arutyunov, Denis; Singh, Upasana; El-Hawiet, Amr; Seckler, Henrique dos Santos; Nikjah, Sanaz; Joe, Maju; Bai, Yu; Lowary, Todd L; Klassen, John S; Evoy, Stephane; Szymanski, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    Slow growing Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a deadly condition in cattle known as Johne's disease where asymptomatic carriers are the major source of disease transmission. MAP was also shown to be associated with chronic Crohn's disease in humans. Mycobacterium smegmatis is a model mycobacterium that can cause opportunistic infections in a number of human tissues and, rarely, a respiratory disease. Currently, there are no rapid, culture-independent, reliable and inexpensive tests for the diagnostics of MAP or M. smegmatis infections. Bacteriophages are viruses producing a number of proteins that effectively and specifically recognize the cell envelopes of their bacterial hosts. We demonstrate that the mycobacterial phage L5 minor tail protein Gp6 and lysin Gp10 are useful tools for the rapid capture of mycobacteria. Immobilized Gp10 was able to bind both MAP and M. smegmatis cells whereas Gp6 was M. smegmatis specific. Neither of the 2 proteins was able to capture E. coli, salmonella, campylobacter or Mycobacterium marinum cells. Gp6 was detected previously as a component of the phage particle and shows no homology to proteins with known function. Therefore, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to determine whether recombinant Gp6 could bind to a number of chemically synthesized fragments of mycobacterial surface glycans. These findings demonstrate that mycobacteriophage proteins could be used as a pathogen capturing platform that can potentially improve the effectiveness of existing diagnostic methods. PMID:26713219

  8. In-solution virus capture assay helps deconstruct heterogeneous antibody recognition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Leaman, Daniel P; Kinkead, Heather; Zwick, Michael B

    2010-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) on whole virions is heterogeneous, so molecular analysis of Env with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is challenging. Virus capture assays (VCAs) involving immobilized MAbs are typically used, but these assays suffer from immobilization artifacts and do not provide binding constants. Furthermore, we show here that certain HIV-1 neutralizing MAbs, including 2G12, 4E10, 2F5, Z13e1, and D5, will capture virion particles completely devoid of Env. We modified the VCA such that MAbs and virions are incubated in solution, and unbound MAbs are removed prior to the capture step. This modification nearly eliminated evidence of Env-independent binding by MAbs to virions and allowed determination of apparent affinity constants in solution. Three important qualitative observations were further revealed. First, neutralizing MAbs 2F5, 4E10, and Z13e1 against the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 were found to capture virions efficiently only if a significant amount of uncleaved gp160 or synthetic MPER peptide was present. Second, we show how non-native forms of Env vary by Env genotype and that Env from HIV-1(JR-FL) is more homogeneously trimeric than that from HIV-1(JR-CSF). Third, we determined that Env containing all or parts of gp41, including uncleaved gp160, binds spontaneously to free virions. This exogenous Env is an indiscriminate molecular "bridge" between Env-specific Ab and virions and can affect VCA analyses, particularly using pseudotyped virions. Heterogeneity in Env from endogenous and exogenous sources might also subvert humoral immunity to HIV-1, so in-solution VCAs may help to dissect this heterogeneity for vaccine design purposes.

  9. In-Solution Virus Capture Assay Helps Deconstruct Heterogeneous Antibody Recognition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1▿

    PubMed Central

    Leaman, Daniel P.; Kinkead, Heather; Zwick, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) on whole virions is heterogeneous, so molecular analysis of Env with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is challenging. Virus capture assays (VCAs) involving immobilized MAbs are typically used, but these assays suffer from immobilization artifacts and do not provide binding constants. Furthermore, we show here that certain HIV-1 neutralizing MAbs, including 2G12, 4E10, 2F5, Z13e1, and D5, will capture virion particles completely devoid of Env. We modified the VCA such that MAbs and virions are incubated in solution, and unbound MAbs are removed prior to the capture step. This modification nearly eliminated evidence of Env-independent binding by MAbs to virions and allowed determination of apparent affinity constants in solution. Three important qualitative observations were further revealed. First, neutralizing MAbs 2F5, 4E10, and Z13e1 against the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 were found to capture virions efficiently only if a significant amount of uncleaved gp160 or synthetic MPER peptide was present. Second, we show how non-native forms of Env vary by Env genotype and that Env from HIV-1JR-FL is more homogeneously trimeric than that from HIV-1JR-CSF. Third, we determined that Env containing all or parts of gp41, including uncleaved gp160, binds spontaneously to free virions. This exogenous Env is an indiscriminate molecular “bridge” between Env-specific Ab and virions and can affect VCA analyses, particularly using pseudotyped virions. Heterogeneity in Env from endogenous and exogenous sources might also subvert humoral immunity to HIV-1, so in-solution VCAs may help to dissect this heterogeneity for vaccine design purposes. PMID:20089658

  10. Isolation of Circulating Plasma Cells in Multiple Myeloma Using CD138 Antibody-Based Capture in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Qasaimeh, Mohammad A.; Wu, Yichao C.; Bose, Suman; Menachery, Anoop; Talluri, Srikanth; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Prabhala, Rao H.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    The necessity for bone marrow aspiration and the lack of highly sensitive assays to detect residual disease present challenges for effective management of multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell cancer. We show that a microfluidic cell capture based on CD138 antigen, which is highly expressed on plasma cells, permits quantitation of rare circulating plasma cells (CPCs) in blood and subsequent fluorescence-based assays. The microfluidic device is based on a herringbone channel design, and exhibits an estimated cell capture efficiency of ~40–70%, permitting detection of <10 CPCs/mL using 1-mL sample volumes, which is difficult using existing techniques. In bone marrow samples, the microfluidic-based plasma cell counts exhibited excellent correlation with flow cytometry analysis. In peripheral blood samples, the device detected a baseline of 2–5 CD138+ cells/mL in healthy donor blood, with significantly higher numbers in blood samples of MM patients in remission (20–24 CD138+ cells/mL), and yet higher numbers in MM patients exhibiting disease (45–184 CD138+ cells/mL). Analysis of CPCs isolated using the device was consistent with serum immunoglobulin assays that are commonly used in MM diagnostics. These results indicate the potential of CD138-based microfluidic CPC capture as a useful ‘liquid biopsy’ that may complement or partially replace bone marrow aspiration. PMID:28374831

  11. Isolation of Circulating Plasma Cells in Multiple Myeloma Using CD138 Antibody-Based Capture in a Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasaimeh, Mohammad A.; Wu, Yichao C.; Bose, Suman; Menachery, Anoop; Talluri, Srikanth; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Prabhala, Rao H.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-04-01

    The necessity for bone marrow aspiration and the lack of highly sensitive assays to detect residual disease present challenges for effective management of multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell cancer. We show that a microfluidic cell capture based on CD138 antigen, which is highly expressed on plasma cells, permits quantitation of rare circulating plasma cells (CPCs) in blood and subsequent fluorescence-based assays. The microfluidic device is based on a herringbone channel design, and exhibits an estimated cell capture efficiency of ~40-70%, permitting detection of <10 CPCs/mL using 1-mL sample volumes, which is difficult using existing techniques. In bone marrow samples, the microfluidic-based plasma cell counts exhibited excellent correlation with flow cytometry analysis. In peripheral blood samples, the device detected a baseline of 2-5 CD138+ cells/mL in healthy donor blood, with significantly higher numbers in blood samples of MM patients in remission (20-24 CD138+ cells/mL), and yet higher numbers in MM patients exhibiting disease (45-184 CD138+ cells/mL). Analysis of CPCs isolated using the device was consistent with serum immunoglobulin assays that are commonly used in MM diagnostics. These results indicate the potential of CD138-based microfluidic CPC capture as a useful ‘liquid biopsy’ that may complement or partially replace bone marrow aspiration.

  12. Cell migration and invasion assays as tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hulkower, Keren I; Herber, Renee L

    2011-03-11

    Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screening process. This article will review the effective use of several principle formats for studying cell motility: scratch assays, transmembrane assays, microfluidic devices and cell exclusion zone assays.

  13. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P

    2016-12-09

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets.

  14. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets. PMID:28060343

  15. Ferromagnetic Bare Metal Stent for Endothelial Cell Capture and Retention

    PubMed Central

    Uthamaraj, Susheil; Tefft, Brandon J.; Hlinomaz, Ota; Sandhu, Gurpreet S.; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Rapid endothelialization of cardiovascular stents is needed to reduce stent thrombosis and to avoid anti-platelet therapy which can reduce bleeding risk. The feasibility of using magnetic forces to capture and retain endothelial outgrowth cells (EOC) labeled with super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) has been shown previously. But this technique requires the development of a mechanically functional stent from a magnetic and biocompatible material followed by in-vitro and in-vivo testing to prove rapid endothelialization. We developed a weakly ferromagnetic stent from 2205 duplex stainless steel using computer aided design (CAD) and its design was further refined using finite element analysis (FEA). The final design of the stent exhibited a principal strain below the fracture limit of the material during mechanical crimping and expansion. One hundred stents were manufactured and a subset of them was used for mechanical testing, retained magnetic field measurements, in-vitro cell capture studies, and in-vivo implantation studies. Ten stents were tested for deployment to verify if they sustained crimping and expansion cycle without failure. Another 10 stents were magnetized using a strong neodymium magnet and their retained magnetic field was measured. The stents showed that the retained magnetism was sufficient to capture SPION-labeled EOC in our in-vitro studies. SPION-labeled EOC capture and retention was verified in large animal models by implanting 1 magnetized stent and 1 non-magnetized control stent in each of 4 pigs. The stented arteries were explanted after 7 days and analyzed histologically. The weakly magnetic stents developed in this study were capable of attracting and retaining SPION-labeled endothelial cells which can promote rapid healing. PMID:26436434

  16. Graphene Oxide Nanosheets Modified with Single Domain Antibodies for Rapid and Efficient Capture of Cells**

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guan-Yu; Li, Zeyang; Theile, Christopher S.; Bardhan, Neelkanth M.; Kumar, Priyank V.; Duarte, Joao N.; Maruyama, Takeshi; Rashidfarrokh, Ali; Belcher, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral blood can provide valuable information on an individual’s immune status. Cell-based assays typically target leukocytes and their products. Characterization of leukocytes from whole blood requires their separation from the far more numerous red blood cells.[1] Current methods to classify leukocytes, such as recovery on antibody-coated beads or fluorescence-activated cell sorting require long sample preparation times and relatively large sample volumes.[2] A simple method that enables the characterization of cells from a small peripheral whole blood sample could overcome limitations of current analytical techniques. We describe the development of a simple graphene oxide surface coated with single domain antibody fragments. This format allows quick and efficient capture of distinct WBC subpopulations from small samples (~30 μL) of whole blood in a geometry that does not require any specialized equipment such as cell sorters or microfluidic devices. PMID:26472062

  17. Colony forming cell (CFC) assay for human hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Nayan J; Takeda, Akiko; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-12-18

    Human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells are usually obtained from bone marrow, cord blood, or peripheral blood and are used to study hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. They have the capacity to differentiate into lymphoid and myeloid lineages. The colony forming cell (CFC) assay is used to study the proliferation and differentiation pattern of hematopoietic progenitors by their ability to form colonies in a semisolid medium. The number and the morphology of the colonies formed by a fixed number of input cells provide preliminary information about the ability of progenitors to differentiate and proliferate. Cells can be harvested from individual colonies or from the whole plate to further assess their numbers and differentiation states using flow cytometry and morphologic evaluation of Giemsa-stained slides. This assay is useful for assessing myeloid but not lymphoid differentiation. The term myeloid in this context is used in its wider sense to encompass granulocytic, monocytic, erythroid, and megakaryocytic lineages. We have used this assay to assess the effects of oncogenes on the differentiation of primary human CD34+ cells derived from peripheral blood. For this purpose cells are transduced with either control retroviral construct or a construct expressing the oncogene of interest, in this case NUP98-HOXA9. We employ a commonly used retroviral vector, MSCV-IRES-GFP, that expresses a bicistronic mRNA that produces the gene of interest and a GFP marker. Cells are pre-activated by growing in the presence of cytokines for two days prior to retroviral transduction. After another two days, GFP+ cells are isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and mixed with a methylcellulose-containing semisolid medium supplemented with cytokines and incubated till colonies appear on the surface, typically 14 days. The number and morphology of the colonies are documented. Cells are then removed from the plates, washed, counted, and subjected to flow cytometry and

  18. A Novel Collagen Dot Assay for Monitoring Cancer Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Alford, Vincent M; Roth, Eric; Zhang, Qian; Cao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical determinant of cancer invasion and metastasis. Drugs targeting cancer cell migration have been hindered due to the lack of effective assays for monitoring cancer cell migration. Here we describe a novel method to microscopically monitor cell migration in a quantitative fashion. This assay can be used to study genes involved in cancer cell migration, as well as screening anticancer drugs that target this cellular process.

  19. Detection and serogroup differentiation of Salmonella spp. in food within 30 hours by enrichment-immunoassay with a T6 monoclonal antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, S P; Tsui, C O; Roberts, D; Chau, P Y; Ng, M H

    1996-01-01

    We previously described an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay which makes use of monoclonal antibody T6, which recognizes an epitope on the outer core polysaccharide of Salmonella lipopolysaccharide molecules that is common to almost all Salmonella serovars. In this paper, we show that this assay can detect between 10(5) and 10(7) Salmonella cells per ml even in the presence of excess Escherichia coli. A total of 153 of 154 (99%) serogroup A to E strains and 51 of 78 (71%) serogroup F to 67 strains were reactive as determined by this assay. This corresponds to a detection rate of approximately 98% of all salmonellae known to affect humans. None of the 65 strains of non-Salmonella bacteria tested positive. Taking advantage of the O-factor polysaccharides also present on the antigen captured by the immobilized T6 antibody, we showed that 136 of 154 Salmonella serogroup A to E strains (88%) were correctly differentiated according to their serogroups by use of enzyme conjugates of a panel of O-factor-specific monoclonal antibodies. We evaluated this assay for the detection and serogroup differentiation of salmonellae directly from enrichment cultures of simulated food, eggs, pork, and infant formula milk. All 26 samples which had been contaminated with Salmonella spp. were detected by T6 (100% sensitivity), with only one false-positive result from 101 samples not contaminated by Salmonella spp. (99% specificity). The detection time was substantially reduced to between 17 and 29 h, depending on the enrichment methods used. Since there were no false-negative results, we concluded that this enrichment-immunoassay method can afford rapid screening for Salmonella spp. in food samples. PMID:8779567

  20. Serial interactome capture of the human cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Thomas; Albrecht, Anne-Susann; de Melo Costa, Veronica Rodrigues; Sauer, Sascha; Meierhofer, David; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2016-04-04

    Novel RNA-guided cellular functions are paralleled by an increasing number of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Here we present 'serial RNA interactome capture' (serIC), a multiple purification procedure of ultraviolet-crosslinked poly(A)-RNA-protein complexes that enables global RBP detection with high specificity. We apply serIC to the nuclei of proliferating K562 cells to obtain the first human nuclear RNA interactome. The domain composition of the 382 identified nuclear RBPs markedly differs from previous IC experiments, including few factors without known RNA-binding domains that are in good agreement with computationally predicted RNA binding. serIC extends the number of DNA-RNA-binding proteins (DRBPs), and reveals a network of RBPs involved in p53 signalling and double-strand break repair. serIC is an effective tool to couple global RBP capture with additional selection or labelling steps for specific detection of highly purified RBPs.

  1. Time-stretch microscopy on a DVD for high-throughput imaging cell-based assay

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Anson H. L.; Yeung, P.; Chan, Godfrey C. F.; Chan, Barbara P.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2017-01-01

    Cell-based assay based on time-stretch imaging is recognized to be well-suited for high-throughput phenotypic screening. However, this ultrafast imaging technique has primarily been limited to suspension-cell assay, leaving a wide range of solid-substrate assay formats uncharted. Moreover, time-stretch imaging is generally restricted to intrinsic biophysical phenotyping, but lacks the biomolecular signatures of the cells. To address these challenges, we develop a spinning time-stretch imaging assay platform based on the functionalized digital versatile disc (DVD). We demonstrate that adherent cell culture and biochemically-specific cell-capture can now be assayed with time-stretch microscopy, thanks to the high-speed DVD spinning motion that naturally enables on-the-fly cellular imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate of >10MHz. As scanning the whole DVD at such a high speed enables ultra-large field-of-view imaging, it could be favorable for scaling both the assay throughput and content as demanded in many applications, e.g. drug discovery, and rare cancer cell screening. PMID:28270973

  2. Time-stretch microscopy on a DVD for high-throughput imaging cell-based assay.

    PubMed

    Tang, Anson H L; Yeung, P; Chan, Godfrey C F; Chan, Barbara P; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2017-02-01

    Cell-based assay based on time-stretch imaging is recognized to be well-suited for high-throughput phenotypic screening. However, this ultrafast imaging technique has primarily been limited to suspension-cell assay, leaving a wide range of solid-substrate assay formats uncharted. Moreover, time-stretch imaging is generally restricted to intrinsic biophysical phenotyping, but lacks the biomolecular signatures of the cells. To address these challenges, we develop a spinning time-stretch imaging assay platform based on the functionalized digital versatile disc (DVD). We demonstrate that adherent cell culture and biochemically-specific cell-capture can now be assayed with time-stretch microscopy, thanks to the high-speed DVD spinning motion that naturally enables on-the-fly cellular imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate of >10MHz. As scanning the whole DVD at such a high speed enables ultra-large field-of-view imaging, it could be favorable for scaling both the assay throughput and content as demanded in many applications, e.g. drug discovery, and rare cancer cell screening.

  3. Evaluation of red blood cell Pig-a assay and PIGRET assay in rats using chlorambucil.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akihisa; Takahashi, Kei; Tsuchiyama, Hiromi; Oshida, Keiyu

    2016-11-15

    The Pig-a assay is a novel method to assess the in vivo mutagenicity of compounds, and it is expected to be useful for the detection of genotoxicity. In this study, to assess the performance of the Pig-a assay targeting red blood cells (RBCs; RBC Pig-a assay) and reticulocytes (RETs; PIGRET assay), chlorambucil, which is a genotoxicant, was orally administered to male rats once at 10, 20 and 40mg/kg on Day 1, and the mutant frequencies (MFs) of RBCs and RETs were examined periodically. In the RBC Pig-a assay, significant increases in MFs were observed at 40mg/kg on Day 15 and at 20mg/kg or higher on Day 29. In the PIGRET assay, MFs increased significantly at all dose levels on Day 8 and only at 20mg/kg on Day 15, but there was no increase in MFs in the treatment groups on Day 29. In conclusion, the RBC Pig-a assay and PIGRET assay in rats have sufficient sensitivity to detect the mutagenicity of chlorambucil, and the PIGRET assay could detect its mutagenicity earlier and at a lower dose than the RBC Pig-a assay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Solid-Phase Antibody Capture Hemadsorption Assay for Detection of Hepatitis A Virus Immunoglobulin M Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-25

    our tested for HAV IgM antibodies by SPACH and for human ELISAs was negative in our SPACH assay for HAV IgM IgM and IgG with radial immunodiffusion ...radioimmunoassays (RIAs) and ELISAs to de- RIA kits supplied by Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, tect IgM antibodies to a variety of infectious... RID ) plates antibody despite having a HAV HAI titer of 5,120. (Calbiochem Behring, La Jolla, Calif.). These results suggest there is very little if any

  5. Monoclonal antibody passive hemagglutination and capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for direct detection and quantitation of F41 and K99 fimbrial antigens in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Raybould, T J; Crouch, C F; Acres, S D

    1987-01-01

    Production of diarrhea in neonatal calves by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli depends on its ability to attach to the epithelial cells of the intestine via surface adhesins called pili or fimbriae and to secrete enterotoxins. The most important of these fimbriae are designated K99 and F41. We produced and characterized a murine monoclonal antibody specific to F41. This monoclonal antibody and a K99-specific monoclonal antibody were used to develop sensitive and specific passive hemagglutination and capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for detection and quantitation of F41 and K99 antigens in E. coli cultures and culture supernatants. The capture ELISA systems exhibited excellent sensitivity and specificity, whereas the passive hemagglutination systems appeared to be oversensitive. The ability of the capture ELISAs to detect K99 and F41 fimbrial antigens in fecal specimens from calves was evaluated. Fimbrial antigens were detected in six of six specimens from scouring calves but not in four of four specimens from nonscouring calves. PMID:2880866

  6. Maximizing Capture Efficiency and Specificity of Magnetic Separation for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Cells

    PubMed Central

    Foddai, Antonio; Elliott, Christopher T.; Grant, Irene R.

    2010-01-01

    In order to introduce specificity for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis prior to a phage amplification assay, various magnetic-separation approaches, involving either antibodies or peptides, were evaluated in terms of the efficiency of capture (expressed as a percentage) of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells and the percentage of nonspecific binding by other Mycobacterium spp. A 50:50 mixture of MyOne Tosylactivated Dynabeads coated with the chemically synthesized M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific peptides biotinylated aMp3 and biotinylated aMptD (i.e., peptide-mediated magnetic separation [PMS]) proved to be the best magnetic-separation approach for achieving 85 to 100% capture of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and minimal (<1%) nonspecific recovery of other Mycobacterium spp. (particularly if beads were blocked with 1% skim milk before use) from broth samples containing 103 to 104 CFU/ml. When PMS was coupled with a recently optimized phage amplification assay and used to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in 50-ml volumes of spiked milk, the mean 50% limit of detection (LOD50) was 14.4 PFU/50 ml of milk (equivalent to 0.3 PFU/ml). This PMS-phage assay represents a novel, rapid method for the detection and enumeration of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms in milk, and potentially other sample matrices, with results available within 48 h. PMID:20851966

  7. Photon capture and signalling by melanopsin retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Do, Michael Tri H.; Kang, Shin H.; Xue, Tian; Zhong, Haining; Liao, Hsi-Wen; Bergles, Dwight E.; Yau, King-Wai

    2009-01-01

    A subset of retinal ganglion cells has recently been discovered to be intrinsically photosensitive, with melanopsin as the pigment. These cells project primarily to brain centers for non-image-forming visual functions such as the pupillary light reflex and circadian photoentrainment. How well they signal intrinsic light absorption to drive behavior remains unclear. Here we report fundamental parameters governing their intrinsic light responses and associated spike generation. The membrane density of melanopsin is 104-fold lower than that of rod and cone pigments, resulting in a very low photon-catch and a phototransducing role only in relatively bright light. Nonetheless, each captured photon elicits a large and extraordinarily prolonged response, with a unique shape among known photoreceptors. Remarkably, like rods, these cells are capable of signalling single-photon absorption. A flash causing a few hundred isomerized melanopsin molecules in a retina is sufficient for reaching threshold for the pupillary light reflex. PMID:19118382

  8. Photon capture and signalling by melanopsin retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Michael Tri H; Kang, Shin H; Xue, Tian; Zhong, Haining; Liao, Hsi-Wen; Bergles, Dwight E; Yau, King-Wai

    2009-01-15

    A subset of retinal ganglion cells has recently been discovered to be intrinsically photosensitive, with melanopsin as the pigment. These cells project primarily to brain centres for non-image-forming visual functions such as the pupillary light reflex and circadian photoentrainment. How well they signal intrinsic light absorption to drive behaviour remains unclear. Here we report fundamental parameters governing their intrinsic light responses and associated spike generation. The membrane density of melanopsin is 10(4)-fold lower than that of rod and cone pigments, resulting in a very low photon catch and a phototransducing role only in relatively bright light. Nonetheless, each captured photon elicits a large and extraordinarily prolonged response, with a unique shape among known photoreceptors. Notably, like rods, these cells are capable of signalling single-photon absorption. A flash causing a few hundred isomerized melanopsin molecules in a retina is sufficient for reaching threshold for the pupillary light reflex.

  9. Comparison of peptide mass mapping and electron capture dissociation as assays for histone posttranslational modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liwen; Freitas, Michael A.

    2004-05-01

    Posttranslational modifications of core histones play a critical role in the structure of chromatin and the regulation of gene activities. Improved techniques for determining these modification sites may lead to a better understanding of histone regulation at the molecular level. LC-MS peptide mass mapping was performed on pepsin, trypsin and Glu-C digests of bovine thymus H4 using a QqTOF instrument. The well established modification sites of H4 (acetylation of K8, 12, 16 and methylation of K20) were observed in addition to several recently discovered modifications including: methylation of K31, 44, 59 and acetylation of K20, 77, 79. For comparison, electron capture dissociation (ECD) was performed on intact H4 along with several peptides from enzymatic digestion. The results from the ECD experiments of histone H4 indicated the acetylation of K5, 12, 16, 31, 91 and the methylation of K20 and 59 in good agreement with the result from peptide mapping. The work is dedicated to Alan G. Marshall on his 60th birthday. His endeavors in the advancement of FT-ICR facilitated experiments reported herein.

  10. Electrical lysis of cells for detergent-free droplet assays

    PubMed Central

    Tran, T. M.; Abate, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient lysis is critical when analyzing single cells in microfluidic droplets, but existing methods utilize detergents that can interfere with the assays to be performed. We demonstrate robust cell lysis without the use of detergents or other chemicals. In our method, cells are exposed to electric field immediately before encapsulation in droplets, resulting in cell lysis. We characterize lysis efficiency as a function of control parameters and demonstrate compatibility with enzymatic assays by measuring the catalysis of β-glucosidase, an important cellulase used in the conversion of biomass to biofuel. Our method enables assays in microfluidic droplets that are incompatible with detergents. PMID:27051471

  11. Transparent, biocompatible nanostructured surfaces for cancer cell capture and culture

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Boran; He, Zhaobo; Zhao, Libo; Fang, Yuan; Chen, Yuanyuan; He, Rongxiang; Chen, Fangfang; Song, Haibin; Deng, Yuliang; Zhao, Xingzhong; Xiong, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood which have detached from both the primary tumor and any metastases may be considered as a “liquid biopsy” and are expected to replace tumor biopsies in the monitoring of treatment response and determining patient prognosis. Here, we introduce a facile and efficient CTC detection material made of hydroxyapatite/chitosan (HA/CTS), which is beneficial because of its transparency and excellent biological compatibility. Atomic force microscopy images show that the roughness of the HA/CTS nanofilm (HA/CTSNF) substrates can be controlled by changing the HA:CTS ratio. Enhanced local topographic interactions between nano-components on cancer cell membranes, and the antibody coated nanostructured substrate lead to improved CTC capture and separation. This remarkable nanostructured substrate has the potential for CTC culture in situ and merits further analysis. CTCs captured from artificial blood samples were observed in culture on HA/CTSNF substrates over a period of 14 days by using conventional staining methods (hematoxylin eosin and Wright’s stain). We conclude that these substrates are multifunctional materials capable of isolating and culturing CTCs for subsequent studies. PMID:24904216

  12. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity) is disclosed. Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. Mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics, are also disclosed.

  13. Virus detection using Viro-Adembeads, a rapid capture system for viruses, and plaque assay in intentionally virus-contaminated beverages.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Ben; Kojima, Asato; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-01-01

    Intentional contamination of beverages with microbes is one type of bioterrorist threat. While bacteria and fungus can be easily collected by a centrifuge, viruses are difficult to collect from virus-contaminated beverages. In this study, we demonstrated that Viro-Adembeads, a rapid-capture system for viruses using anionic polymer-coated magnetic beads, collected viruses from beverages contaminated intentionally with vaccinia virus and human herpesvirus 8. Real-time PCR showed that the recovery rates of the contaminated viruses in green tea and orange juice were lower than those in milk and water. Plaque assay showed that green tea and orange juice cut the efficiency of vaccinia virus infection in CV-1 cells. These results suggest that the efficiency of virus detection depends on the kind of beverage being tested. Viro-Adembeads would be a useful tool for detecting viruses rapidly in virus-contaminated beverages used in a bioterrorist attack.

  14. Cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic processes coupled by myosin II in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chabaud, Mélanie; Heuzé, Mélina L.; Bretou, Marine; Vargas, Pablo; Maiuri, Paolo; Solanes, Paola; Maurin, Mathieu; Terriac, Emmanuel; Le Berre, Maël; Lankar, Danielle; Piolot, Tristan; Adelstein, Robert S.; Zhang, Yingfan; Sixt, Michael; Jacobelli, Jordan; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    The immune response relies on the migration of leukocytes and on their ability to stop in precise anatomical locations to fulfil their task. How leukocyte migration and function are coordinated is unknown. Here we show that in immature dendritic cells, which patrol their environment by engulfing extracellular material, cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic. This antagonism results from transient enrichment of myosin IIA at the cell front, which disrupts the back-to-front gradient of the motor protein, slowing down locomotion but promoting antigen capture. We further highlight that myosin IIA enrichment at the cell front requires the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, by controlling myosin IIA localization, Ii imposes on dendritic cells an intermittent antigen capture behaviour that might facilitate environment patrolling. We propose that the requirement for myosin II in both cell migration and specific cell functions may provide a general mechanism for their coordination in time and space. PMID:26109323

  15. New flow cytometric assays for monitoring cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zaritskaya, Liubov; Shurin, Michael R; Sayers, Thomas J; Malyguine, Anatoli M

    2010-01-01

    The exact immunologic responses after vaccination that result in effective antitumor immunity have not yet been fully elucidated and the data from ex vivo T-cell assays have not yet defined adequate surrogate markers for clinical efficacy. A more detailed knowledge of the specific immune responses that correlate with positive clinical outcomes should help to develop better or novel strategies to effectively activate the immune system against tumors. Furthermore, clinically relevant material is often limited and, thus, precludes the ability to perform multiple assays. The two main assays currently used to monitor lymphocyte-mediated cytoxicity in cancer patients are the 51Cr-release assay and IFN-γ ELISpot assay. The former has a number of disadvantages, including low sensitivity, poor labeling and high spontaneous release of isotope from some tumor target cells. Additional problems with the 51Cr-release assay include difficulty in obtaining autologous tumor targets, and biohazard and disposal problems for the isotope. The ELISpot assays do not directly measure cytotoxic activity and are, therefore, a surrogate marker of cyotoxic capacity of effector T cells. Furthermore, they do not assess cytotoxicity mediated by the production of the TNF family of death ligands by the cytotoxic cells. Therefore, assays that allow for the simultaneous measurement of several parameters may be more advantageous for clinical monitoring. In this respect, multifactor flow cytometry-based assays are a valid addition to the currently available immunologic monitoring assays. Use of these assays will enable detection and enumeration of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and their specific effector functions and any correlations with clinical responses. Comprehensive, multifactor analysis of effector cell responses after vaccination may help to detect factors that determine the success or failure of a vaccine and its immunological potency. PMID:20518716

  16. New flow cytometric assays for monitoring cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zaritskaya, Liubov; Shurin, Michael R; Sayers, Thomas J; Malyguine, Anatoli M

    2010-06-01

    The exact immunologic responses after vaccination that result in effective antitumor immunity have not yet been fully elucidated and the data from ex vivo T-cell assays have not yet defined adequate surrogate markers for clinical efficacy. A more detailed knowledge of the specific immune responses that correlate with positive clinical outcomes should help to develop better or novel strategies to effectively activate the immune system against tumors. Furthermore, clinically relevant material is often limited and, thus, precludes the ability to perform multiple assays. The two main assays currently used to monitor lymphocyte-mediated cytoxicity in cancer patients are the (51)Cr-release assay and IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. The former has a number of disadvantages, including low sensitivity, poor labeling and high spontaneous release of isotope from some tumor target cells. Additional problems with the (51)Cr-release assay include difficulty in obtaining autologous tumor targets, and biohazard and disposal problems for the isotope. The ELISpot assays do not directly measure cytotoxic activity and are, therefore, a surrogate marker of cyotoxic capacity of effector T cells. Furthermore, they do not assess cytotoxicity mediated by the production of the TNF family of death ligands by the cytotoxic cells. Therefore, assays that allow for the simultaneous measurement of several parameters may be more advantageous for clinical monitoring. In this respect, multifactor flow cytometry-based assays are a valid addition to the currently available immunologic monitoring assays. Use of these assays will enable detection and enumeration of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and their specific effector functions and any correlations with clinical responses. Comprehensive, multifactor analysis of effector cell responses after vaccination may help to detect factors that determine the success or failure of a vaccine and its immunological potency.

  17. Reference cells and ploidy in the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Collins, Andrew; Graupner, Anne; Gutzkow, Kristine B; Olsen, Ann-Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the comet assay single cells are analyzed with respect to their level of DNA damage. Discrimination of the individual cell or cell type based on DNA content, with concomitant scoring of the DNA damage, is useful since this may allow analysis of mixtures of cells. Different cells can then be characterized based on their ploidy, cell cycle stage, or genome size. We here describe two applications of such a cell type-specific comet assay: (i) Testicular cell suspensions, analyzed on the basis of their ploidy during spermatogenesis; and (ii) reference cells in the form of fish erythrocytes which can be included as internal standards to correct for inter-assay variations. With standard fluorochromes used in the comet assay, the total staining signal from each cell - whether damaged or undamaged - was found to be associated with the cell's DNA content. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity of single cells is straightforward since these data are available in scoring systems based on image analysis. The analysis of testicular cell suspensions provides information on cell type specific composition, susceptibility to genotoxicants, and DNA repair. Internal reference cells, either untreated or carrying defined numbers of lesions induced by ionizing radiation, are useful for investigation of experimental factors that can cause variation in comet assay results, and for routine inclusion in experiments to facilitate standardization of methods, and comparison of comet assay data obtained in different experiments or in different laboratories. They can also be used - in combination with a reference curve - to quantify the DNA lesions induced by a certain treatment. Fish cells of a range of genome sizes, both greater and smaller than human, are suitable for this purpose, and they are inexpensive.

  18. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  19. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  20. A novel in vitro assay for murine haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eckmann, L; Freshney, M; Wright, E G; Sproul, A; Wilkie, N; Pragnell, I B

    1988-12-01

    Study of the biology of haematopoietic stem cells is crucially dependent on the availability of suitable in vitro assays. Existing assays have suffered from the fact that they detect small subcompartments of the total stem cell compartment. This limits experiments where it is required to assay a high proportion of stem cells, e.g. the enumeration of stem cell numbers under varying conditions or the identification and purification of stem cell regulators. We describe an in vitro assay which shows macroscopic colony formation and limited self-renewal capacity in vitro. The detected cell (CFU-A) has a low cycling status in normal bone marrow (NBM) and responds to known stem cell regulators. The incidence (100-200 per 10(5) in NBM), the proliferative characteristics under stress and some of the physical properties are similar to stem cells detected by colony formation after transplantation into lethally irradiated recipients (CFU-S). These data indicate that our assay detects a high proportion of haematopoietic stem cells in vitro. This will facilitate experiments on stem cell behaviour which have previously been difficult to conduct.

  1. A novel in vitro assay for murine haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, L.; Freshney, M.; Wright, E. G.; Sproul, A.; Wilkie, N.; Pragnell, I. B.

    1988-01-01

    Study of the biology of haematopoietic stem cells is crucially dependent on the availability of suitable in vitro assays. Existing assays have suffered from the fact that they detect small subcompartments of the total stem cell compartment. This limits experiments where it is required to assay a high proportion of stem cells, e.g. the enumeration of stem cell numbers under varying conditions or the identification and purification of stem cell regulators. We describe an in vitro assay which shows macroscopic colony formation and limited self-renewal capacity in vitro. The detected cell (CFU-A) has a low cycling status in normal bone marrow (NBM) and responds to known stem cell regulators. The incidence (100-200 per 10(5) in NBM), the proliferative characteristics under stress and some of the physical properties are similar to stem cells detected by colony formation after transplantation into lethally irradiated recipients (CFU-S). These data indicate that our assay detects a high proportion of haematopoietic stem cells in vitro. This will facilitate experiments on stem cell behaviour which have previously been difficult to conduct. PMID:3254725

  2. Cell-based resorption assays for bone graft substitutes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyang; Egaña, José T; Reckhenrich, Ann K; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Lohmeyer, Jörn A; Schantz, Jan Thorsten; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F

    2012-01-01

    The clinical utilization of resorbable bone substitutes has been growing rapidly during the last decade, creating a rising demand for new resorbable biomaterials. An ideal resorbable bone substitute should not only function as a load-bearing material but also integrate into the local bone remodeling process. This means that these bone substitutes need to undergo controlled resorption and then be replaced by newly formed bone structures. Thus the assessment of resorbability is an important first step in predicting the in vivo clinical function of bone substitute biomaterials. Compared with in vivo assays, cell-based assays are relatively easy, reproducible, inexpensive and do not involve the suffering of animals. Moreover, the discovery of RANKL and M-CSF for osteoclastic differentiation has made the differentiation and cultivation of human osteoclasts possible and, as a result, human cell-based bone substitute resorption assays have been developed. In addition, the evolution of microscopy technology allows advanced analyses of the resorption pits on biomaterials. The aim of the current review is to give a concise update on in vitro cell-based resorption assays for analyzing bone substitute resorption. For this purpose models using different cells from different species are compared. Several popular two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical methods used for resorption assays are described. The limitations and advantages of the current ISO degradation assay in comparison with cell-based assays are discussed.

  3. A novel flow cytometry-based cell capture platform for the detection, capture and molecular characterization of rare tumor cells in blood

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Personalized cancer treatment relies on the accurate detection of actionable genomic aberrations in tumor cells. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could provide an alternative genetic resource for diagnosis; however, the technical difficulties in isolating and analyzing rare CTCs have limited progress to date. In this preclinical study, we aimed to develop an improved capture system for molecular characterization of CTCs based on a novel cell sorting technology. Methods We developed a cell capture platform using On-chip Sort (On-Chip Biotechnologies), a novel bench-top cell sorter equipped with a disposable microfluidic chip. Spike-in experiments comprising a series of lung cancer cell lines with varying epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) expression levels were conducted to assess the capture and purification efficiency of the platform. Samples were negatively enriched using anti-CD45-coated magnetic beads to remove white blood cells, followed by sample fixation and labeling. The enriched and labeled samples were then sorted by On-chip Sort based on cytokeratin, vimentin, and CD45 expression. Captured cells were immediately subjected to whole genome amplification followed by mutation analysis using deep targeted sequencing, and copy number analysis using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results Spike-in experiments revealed an excellent overall mean capture rate of 70.9%. A 100% success rate in the detection of EGFR, KRAS and BRAF mutations from captured cells was achieved using pyrosequencing and deep sequencing. The mutant variant detection rates were markedly higher than those obtained with the CellSearch profile kit. qPCR analysis of amplified DNA demonstrated reproducible detection of copy number changes of the EGFR in captured tumor cells. Conclusions Using a novel cell sorter, we established an efficient and convenient platform for the capture of CTCs. Results of a proof-of-principle preclinical study indicated that this platform

  4. The next-generation Hybrid Capture High-Risk HPV DNA assay on a fully automated platform.

    PubMed

    Eder, Paul S; Lou, Jianrong; Huff, John; Macioszek, Jerzy

    2009-07-01

    A next-generation diagnostic system has been developed at QIAGEN. The QIAensemble system consists of an analytical subsystem (JE2000) that utilizes a re-engineered Hybrid Capture chemistry (NextGen) to maintain the high level of clinical sensitivity established by the digene High-Risk HPV DNA Test (HC2), while creating improved analytical specificity as shown both in plasmid-based analyses and in processing of clinical specimens. Limit-of-detection and cross-reactivity experiments were performed using plasmid DNA constructs containing multiple high-risk (HR) and low-risk (LR) HPV types. Cervical specimens collected into a novel specimen collection medium, DCM, were used to measure stability of specimens, as well as analytical specificity. Signal carryover, instrument precision, and specimen reproducibility were measured on the prototype JE2000 system using the automated NextGen assay. The Limit of Detection (LOD) is <1000 copies of HPV 16 plasmid in the automated assay. No cross-reactivity (signal above cutoff) was detected on the automated system from any of 13 LR types tested at 10(7) copies per assay. Within-plate, plate-to-plate, and day-to-day performance in the prototype system yielded a CV of 20%. No indication of target carryover was found when samples containing up to 10(9) copies/ml of HPV DNA type 16 were processed on the JE2000 instrument. In an agreement study with HC2, 1038 donor cervical specimens were tested in both the manual NextGen assay and HC2 to evaluate agreement between the two tests. After eliminating discrepant specimens that were adjudicated by HR-HPV genotyping, the adjudicated positive agreement was 98.5% (95% CI: 94.6, 99.6). The JE2000 prototype system automates NextGen assay processing, yielding accurate, reproducible, and highly specific results with both plasmid analytical model tests and cervical specimens collected in DCM. The final system will process more than 2000 specimens in an 8-hour shift, with fully continuous loading.

  5. Integrated microfluidic devices for combinatorial cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zeta Tak For; Kamei, Ken-ichiro; Takahashi, Hiroko; Shu, Chengyi Jenny; Wang, Xiaopu; He, George Wenfu; Silverman, Robert; Radu, Caius G; Witte, Owen N; Lee, Ki-Bum; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-06-01

    The development of miniaturized cell culture platforms for performing parallel cultures and combinatorial assays is important in cell biology from the single-cell level to the system level. In this paper we developed an integrated microfluidic cell-culture platform, Cell-microChip (Cell-microChip), for parallel analyses of the effects of microenvironmental cues (i.e., culture scaffolds) on different mammalian cells and their cellular responses to external stimuli. As a model study, we demonstrated the ability of culturing and assaying several mammalian cells, such as NIH 3T3 fibroblast, B16 melanoma and HeLa cell lines, in a parallel way. For functional assays, first we tested drug-induced apoptotic responses from different cell lines. As a second functional assay, we performed "on-chip" transfection of a reporter gene encoding an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) followed by live-cell imaging of transcriptional activation of cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) expression. Collectively, our Cell-microChip approach demonstrated the capability to carry out parallel operations and the potential to further integrate advanced functions and applications in the broader space of combinatorial chemistry and biology.

  6. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells) or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes. Over a 30 year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been little employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases. PMID:25506353

  7. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells) or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes. Over a 30 year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been little employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases.

  8. An Electrochemical Cell for Selective Lithium Capture from Seawater.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Seong; Lee, Yong-Hee; Choi, Seungyeon; Shin, Jaeho; Dinh, Hung-Cuong; Choi, Jang Wook

    2015-08-18

    Lithium (Li) is a core element of Li-ion batteries (LIBs). Recent developments in mobile electronics such as smartphones and tablet PCs as well as advent of large-scale LIB applications including electrical vehicles and grid-level energy storage systems have led to an increase in demand for LIBs, giving rise to a concern on the availability and market price of Li resources. However, the current Lime-Soda process that is responsible for greater than 80% of worldwide Li resource supply is applicable only in certain regions on earth where the Li concentrations are sufficiently high (salt lakes or salt pans). Moreover, not only is the process time-consuming (12-18 months), but post-treatments are also required for the purification of Li. Here, we have devised a location-independent electrochemical system for Li capture, which can operate within a short time period (a few hours to days). By engaging olivine LiFePO4 active electrode that improves interfacial properties via polydopamine coating, the electrochemical cell achieves 4330 times amplification in Li/Na ion selectivity (Li/Na molar ratio of initial solution = 0.01 and Li/Na molar ratio of final electrode = 43.3). In addition, the electrochemical system engages an I(-)/I3(-) redox couple in the other electrode for balancing of the redox states on both electrode sides and sustainable operations of the entire cell. Based on the electrochemical results, key material and interfacial properties that affect the selectivity in Li capture are identified.

  9. Logistic Proliferation of Cells in Scratch Assays is Delayed.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wang; Shah, Esha T; Penington, Catherine J; McCue, Scott W; Maini, Philip K; Simpson, Matthew J

    2017-03-23

    Scratch assays are used to study how a population of cells re-colonises a vacant region on a two-dimensional substrate after a cell monolayer is scratched. These experiments are used in many applications including drug design for the treatment of cancer and chronic wounds. To provide insights into the mechanisms that drive scratch assays, solutions of continuum reaction-diffusion models have been calibrated to data from scratch assays. These models typically include a logistic source term to describe carrying capacity-limited proliferation; however, the choice of using a logistic source term is often made without examining whether it is valid. Here we study the proliferation of PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a scratch assay. All experimental results for the scratch assay are compared with equivalent results from a proliferation assay where the cell monolayer is not scratched. Visual inspection of the time evolution of the cell density away from the location of the scratch reveals a series of sigmoid curves that could be naively calibrated to the solution of the logistic growth model. However, careful analysis of the per capita growth rate as a function of density reveals several key differences between the proliferation of cells in scratch and proliferation assays. Our findings suggest that the logistic growth model is valid for the entire duration of the proliferation assay. On the other hand, guided by data, we suggest that there are two phases of proliferation in a scratch assay; at short time, we have a disturbance phase where proliferation is not logistic, and this is followed by a growth phase where proliferation appears to be logistic. These two phases are observed across a large number of experiments performed at different initial cell densities. Overall our study shows that simply calibrating the solution of a continuum model to a scratch assay might produce misleading parameter estimates, and this issue can be resolved by making a distinction between the

  10. Liquid biopsy in cancer patients: advances in capturing viable CTCs for functional studies using the EPISPOT assay.

    PubMed

    Alix-Panabières, Catherine; Pantel, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of cancer patients have received increasing attention as new diagnostic tool enabling 'liquid biopsies'. In contrast to the wealth of descriptive studies demonstrating the clinical relevance of CTCs as biomarkers, the extremely low concentration of CTCs in the peripheral blood of most cancer patients challenges further functional studies. This article discusses the current possibilities to enrich and, in particular, detect viable CTCs with emphasis on the EPithelial ImmunoSPOT technology. This functional assay detects viable CTCs at the single-cell level and has been used on hundreds of patients with different tumor types including epithelial tumors (breast, prostate and colon cancer) and melanomas. Moreover, the article summarizes recent advances in the in vitro and in vivo expansion of CTCs from cancer patients. These functional analyses will contribute to identifying the biological properties of metastatic cells and reveal new therapeutic targets against disseminating cancer cells.

  11. Filopodial morphology correlates to the capture efficiency of primary T-cells on nanohole arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Gil-Sung; Seol, Jin-Kyeong; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Park, No-Won; Lee, Mi-Ri; Lee, Myung Kyu; Fan, Rong; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2014-06-01

    Nanostructured surfaces emerge as a new class of material for capture and separation of cell populations including primary immune cells and disseminating rare tumor cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Although it has been speculated that nanoscale topological structures on cell surface are involved in the cell capture process, there are no studies that systematically analyze the relation between cell surface structures and the capture efficiency. Here we report on the first mechanistic study by quantifying the morphological parameters of cell surface nanoprotrusions, including filopodia, lamellipodia, and microvilli in the early stage of cell capture (< 20 min) in correlation to the efficiency of separating primary T lymphocytes. This was conducted by using a set of nanohole arrays (NHAs) with varying hole and pitch sizes. Our results showed that the formation of filopodia (e.g., width of filopodia and the average number of the filopodial filaments per cell) depends on the feature size of the nanostructures and the cell separation efficiency is strongly correlated to the number of filopodial fibers, suggesting a possible role of early stage mechanosensing and cell spreading in determining the efficiency of cell capture. In contrast, the length of filopodial filaments was less significantly correlated to the cell capture efficiency and the nanostructure dimensions of the NHAs. This is the first mechanistic study on nanostructure-based immune cell capture and provides new insights to not only the biology of cell-nanomaterial interaction but also the design of new rare cell capture technologies with improved efficiency and specificity.

  12. Research Techniques Made Simple: Monitoring of T-Cell Subsets using the ELISPOT Assay.

    PubMed

    Möbs, Christian; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay allows characterization of single-cell immune responses through detection of secreted analytes. Although ELISPOT analysis shares similarities with ELISA, it has some essential differences. In general, the ELISPOT assay uses antibodies to capture and detect analytes of interest released by activated immune cells. Released analytes form specific antibody-antigen complexes and are visualized as spots of enzyme-substrate precipitates. These spots indicate both how many cells secrete the respective analyte and how much analyte is produced per individual cell. Initially developed for the detection of antibody-secreting cells, ELISPOT assays are now frequently performed both in the context of clinical diagnostics and in research on T-cell responses, in particular antigen-specific T-cell subpopulations, as related to allergy, cancer, infections, or autoimmune diseases. The one spot-one cell principle allows sensitive detection of specific and rare immune cell subsets. Here we present general principles, applications, and recent modifications of the ELISPOT technique.

  13. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies.

  14. Are in vitro estimates of cell diffusivity and cell proliferation rate sensitive to assay geometry?

    PubMed

    Treloar, Katrina K; Simpson, Matthew J; McElwain, D L Sean; Baker, Ruth E

    2014-09-07

    Cells respond to various biochemical and physical cues during wound-healing and tumour progression. in vitro assays used to study these processes are typically conducted in one particular geometry and it is unclear how the assay geometry affects the capacity of cell populations to spread, or whether the relevant mechanisms, such as cell motility and cell proliferation, are somehow sensitive to the geometry of the assay. In this work we use a circular barrier assay to characterise the spreading of cell populations in two different geometries. Assay 1 describes a tumour-like geometry where a cell population spreads outwards into an open space. Assay 2 describes a wound-like geometry where a cell population spreads inwards to close a void. We use a combination of discrete and continuum mathematical models and automated image processing methods to obtain independent estimates of the effective cell diffusivity, D, and the effective cell proliferation rate, λ. Using our parameterised mathematical model we confirm that our estimates of D and λ accurately predict the time-evolution of the location of the leading edge and the cell density profiles for both assay 1 and assay 2. Our work suggests that the effective cell diffusivity is up to 50% lower for assay 2 compared to assay 1, whereas the effective cell proliferation rate is up to 30% lower for assay 2 compared to assay 1.

  15. Assaying prions in cell culture: the standard scrapie cell assay (SSCA) and the scrapie cell assay in end point format (SCEPA).

    PubMed

    Mahal, Sukhvir P; Demczyk, Cheryl A; Smith, Emery W; Klohn, Peter-Christian; Weissmann, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Prions are usually quantified by bioassays based on intracerebral inoculation of animals, which are slow, imprecise, and costly. We have developed a cell-based prion assay that is based on the isolation of cell lines highly susceptible to certain strains (Rocky Mountain Laboratory and 22L) of mouse prions and a method for identifying individual, prion-infected cells and quantifying them. In the standard scrapie cell assay (SSCA), susceptible cells are exposed to prion-containing samples for 4 days, grown to confluence, passaged two or three times, and the proportion of rPrP(Sc)-containing cells is determined with automated counting equipment. The dose response is dynamic over 2 logs of prion concentrations. The SSCA has a standard error of +/-20-30%, is as sensitive as the mouse bioassay, 10 times faster, at least 2 orders of magnitude less expensive, and it is suitable for robotization. Assays performed in a more time-consuming end point titration format extend the sensitivity and show that infectivity titers measured in tissue culture and in the mouse are similar.

  16. Comparison of cell-based and PCR-based assays as methods for measuring infectivity of Tulane virus.

    PubMed

    Shan, Lei; Yang, David; Wang, Dapeng; Tian, Peng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we used Tulane virus (TV) as a surrogate for HuNoV to evaluate for correlation between two cell-based assays and three PCR-based assays. Specifically, the cell-based plaque and TCID50 assays measure for infectious virus particles, while the PCR-based RNase exposure, porcine gastric mucin in-situ-capture qRT-PCR (PGM-ISC-qRT-PCR), and antibody in-situ-capture qRT-PCR (Ab-ISC-qRT-PCR) assays measure for an amplicon within encapsidated viral genome. Ten batches of viral stocks ranging from 3.41 × 10(5) to 6.67 × 10(6) plaque forming units (PFUs) were used for side by side comparison with PFU as a reference. The results indicate that one PFU was equivalent to 6.69 ± 2.34 TCID50 units, 9.75 ± 10.87 RNase-untreated genomic copies (GCs), 2.87 ± 3.05 RNase-treated GCs, 0.07 ± 0.07 PGM-ISC-qRT-PCR GCs, and 0.52 ± 0.39 Ab-ISC-qRT-PCR GCs. We observed that while the cell-based assays were consistent with each other, the TCID50 assay was more sensitive than the plaque assay. In contrast, the PCR-based assays were not always consistent with the cell-based assays. The very high variations in GCs as measured by both ISC-RT-qPCR assays made them difficult to correlate against the relatively small variations (<20-fold) in the PFUs or TCID50 units as measured by the cell-based assays.

  17. Scaling and automation of a high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chip.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Heng; Chen, Yu-Chih; Brien, Riley; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-10-07

    Recent research suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are the key subpopulation for tumor relapse and metastasis. Due to cancer plasticity in surface antigen and enzymatic activity markers, functional tumorsphere assays are promising alternatives for CSC identification. To reliably quantify rare CSCs (1-5%), thousands of single-cell suspension cultures are required. While microfluidics is a powerful tool in handling single cells, previous works provide limited throughput and lack automatic data analysis capability required for high-throughput studies. In this study, we present the scaling and automation of high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chips, facilitating the tracking of up to ∼10 000 cells on a chip with ∼76.5% capture rate. The presented cell capture scheme guarantees sampling a representative population from the bulk cells. To analyze thousands of single-cells with a variety of fluorescent intensities, a highly adaptable analysis program was developed for cell/sphere counting and size measurement. Using a Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)) coating on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a suspension culture environment was created to test a controversial hypothesis: whether larger or smaller cells are more stem-like defined by the capability to form single-cell-derived spheres. Different cell lines showed different correlations between sphere formation rate and initial cell size, suggesting heterogeneity in pathway regulation among breast cancer cell lines. More interestingly, by monitoring hundreds of spheres, we identified heterogeneity in sphere growth dynamics, indicating the cellular heterogeneity even within CSCs. These preliminary results highlight the power of unprecedented high-throughput and automation in CSC studies.

  18. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics.

  19. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  20. Microbubble Array Diffusion Assay for the Detection of Cell Secreting Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bobo, Bryan; Phalen, Dana; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Piepenbrink, Michael S.; Zheng, Bo; Mosmann, Tim R.; Kobie, James J.; DeLouise, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) makes them an ideal tool in both clinical and research applications due to their ability to recognize and bind specific epitopes with high affinity and selectivity. While mAbs offer significant therapeutic potential, their utility is overshadowed by the cost associated with their production, which often relies on the ability to identify minority antigen specific cells out of a heterogeneous population. To address concerns with suboptimal methods for screening cells, we have developed a cell sorting array comprised of nanoliter spherical cell culture compartments, termed microbubble (MB) wells. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept system for the detection of cell secreted factors from both immortalized cell lines and primary B cell samples. Exploiting the unique ability of the MB well architecture to accumulate cell secreted factors as well as affinity capture coatings, we demonstrate on chip detection and recovery of antibody secreting cells for sequencing of immunoglobin genes. Furthermore, rapid image capture and analysis capabilities were developed for the processing of large MB arrays, thus facilitating the ability to conduct high-throughput screening of heterogeneous cell samples faster and more efficiently than ever before. The proof-of-concept assays presented herein lay the groundwork for the progression of MB well arrays as an advanced on chip cell sorting technology. PMID:25079889

  1. AFBI assay – Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, William H.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2016-01-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  2. Multivalent Conjugation of Antibody to Dendrimers for the Enhanced Capture and Regulation on Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jingjing; Wang, Jichuang; Chen, Hongning; Shen, Weiyu; Sinko, Patrick J.; Dong, Haiyan; Zhao, Rongli; Lu, Yusheng; Zhu, Yewei; Jia, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Circulation tumor cells (CTCs) in the bloodstream of early-stage cancer patients carry the important information about valuable biomarkers and biological properties of primary tumor. However, detection and capture of CTCs are challenging owing to their low concentrations. Traditional technologies have the limited detection sensitivity and the low capture efficiency. We, herein, report an effective approach to specifically bind and capture colon cancer HT29 cells by using multiple Sialyl Lewis X antibodies (aSlex)-conjugated PAMAM dendrimers. The conjugation was characterized by using atom force microscope, UV and fluorescence measurements. The capturing and regulating HT29 cells by the aSlex-coated dendrimer conjugate were analyzed by microscopy and flow cytometry. The results indicated that the conjugate showed the enhanced capture of HT29 cells in a concentration-dependent manner and the maximum capture efficiency of 77.88% was obtained within 1 h-exposure. G6-5aSlex-FITC conjugate showed capture efficiency better than FITC-G6-COOH-5aSlex conjugate. G6-5aSlex-FITC conjugate could specifically capture HT29 cells even when the target HT29 cells were diluted with the interfering cells (e.g., RBCs) to a low concentration. The capture resulted in a concentration-dependent restraint of the cell activity. In conclusion, the aSlex-coated dendrimer conjugate displayed the great potential in capturing and restraining colorectal CTCs in blood. PMID:25819426

  3. A Cell-Based Assay to Assess Hemichannel Function

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Srinivasan; Fiori, Mariana C.; Cuello, Luis G.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2017-01-01

    Activation of connexin hemichannels is involved in the pathophysiology of disorders that include deafness, stroke, and cardiac infarct. This aspect makes hemichannels an attractive therapeutic target. Unfortunately, most available inhibitors are not selective or isoform specific, which hampers their translational application. The absence of a battery of useful inhibitors is due in part to the absence of simple screening assays for the discovery of hemichannel-active drugs. Here, we present an assay that we have recently developed to assess hemichannel function. The assay is based on the expression of functional human connexins in a genetically modified bacterial strain deficient in K+ uptake. These modified cells do not grow in low-K+ medium, but functional expression of connexin hemichannels allows K+ uptake and growth. This cell-growth-based assay is simple, robust, and easily scalable to high-throughput multi-well platforms. PMID:28356896

  4. Assessment of biological effectiveness of boron neutron capture therapy in primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Andrés E; Dagrosa, Maria A; Portu, Agustina; Saint Martin, Giselle; Thorp, Silvia; Casal, Mariana; Navarro, Aimé; Juvenal, Guillermo J; Pisarev, Mario A

    2015-01-01

    In order to optimize the effectiveness of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) and Compound Biological Effectiveness (CBE) were determined in two human melanoma cell lines, M8 and Mel-J cells, using the amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) as boron carrier. The effects of BNCT on the primary amelanotic cell line M8 and on the metastatic pigmented melanoma cell line Mel-J were studied using colony formation assay. The RBE values were determined using both a gamma ray source, and the neutron beam from the Nuclear Reactor of the National Atomic Energy Commission (RA-3). For the determination of the RBE, cells were irradiated with increasing doses of both sources, between 1 and 8 Gy; and for the determination of CBE factors, the cells were pre-incubated with BPA before irradiation. Afterwards, the cell surviving fraction (SF) was determined for each treatment. Marked differences were observed between both cell lines. Mel-J cells were more radioresistant than the M8 cell line. The clonogenic assays showed that for a SF of 1%, the RBE values were 1.3 for M8 cells and 1.5 for Mel-J cells. Similarly, the CBE values for a 1% SF were 2.1 for M8 and 3 for Mel-J cell lines. For the endpoint of 0.1% of SF the RBE values obtained were 1.2 for M8 and 1.4 for Mel-J cells. Finally, CBE values calculated for a 0.1% were 2 and 2.6 for M8 and Mel-J cell lines respectively. In order to estimate the uptake of the non-radioactive isotope Boron 10 ((10)B), a neutron induced autoradiographic technique was performed showing discrepancies in (10)B uptake between both cell lines. These obtained in vitro results are the first effectiveness factors determined for human melanoma at the RA-3 nuclear reactor and show that BNCT dosimetry planning for patients could be successfully performed using these new factors.

  5. An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect isometamidium chloride in Oncorhynchus spp.

    PubMed

    Ardelli, B F; Woo, P T

    2000-02-09

    An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect and measure isometamidium chloride in the plasma of Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and O. mykiss. Isometamidium-ovalbumin conjugate and anti-isometamidium antibodies were used to coat polystyrene plates. The peroxidase saturation technique was used to optimize the coating antigen concentration; it demonstrated low affinity of the isometamidium-ovalbumin conjugate but high affinity of the anti-isometamidium antibodies for polystyrene surface sites. The optimal conditions of antiisometamidium antibodies to coat plates was at pH 7.3 and a 1:1000 dilution (0.0012 mg ml(-1) protein). The ELISA was sensitive as it detected 0.0006 mg ml(-1) of isometamidium in fish plasma. Isometamidium diluted with saline could not be detected at concentrations less than 0.05 mg ml(-1). The results indicate that this ELISA is much more sensitive when isometamidium is bound to plasma than unbound isometamidium in saline.

  6. Multifunctional "smart" particles engineered from live immunocytes: toward capture and release of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Yang, Gao; Ha, Qing; Meng, Jinxin; Wang, Shutao

    2015-01-14

    Multifunctional "smart" particles with magnetic, topographic, cell-targeting, and stimulus-responsive properties are obtained using a "live template" strategy. These particles exhibit improved efficiency in capture of target cancer cells by introducing synergistic topographic interactions, and enable the release of captured cells with high viability via reduction of disulfide bonds. Diverse multifunctional particles can be designed using the "live template" strategy.

  7. Mkit: A cell migration assay based on microfluidic device and smartphone.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke; Wu, Jiandong; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Zhu, Ling; Li, Zhigang; Sang, Yaoshuo; Hipolito, Jolly; Zhang, Michael; Santos, Susy; Hillier, Craig; de Faria, Ricardo Lobato; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2018-01-15

    Mobile sensing based on the integration of microfluidic device and smartphone, so-called MS(2) technology, has enabled many applications over recent years, and continues to stimulate growing interest in both research communities and industries. In particular, it has been envisioned that MS(2) technology can be developed for various cell functional assays to enable basic research and clinical applications. Toward this direction, in this paper, we describe the development of a MS(2)-based cell functional assay for testing cell migration (the Mkit). The system is constructed as an integrated test kit, which includes microfluidic chips, a smartphone-based imaging platform, the phone apps for image capturing and data analysis, and a set of reagent and accessories for performing the cell migration assay. We demonstrated that the Mkit can effectively measure purified neutrophil and cancer cell chemotaxis. Furthermore, neutrophil chemotaxis can be tested from a drop of whole blood using the Mkit with red blood cell (RBC) lysis. The effects of chemoattractant dose and gradient profile on neutrophil chemotaxis were also tested using the Mkit. In addition to research applications, we demonstrated the effective use of the Mkit for on-site test at the hospital and for testing clinical samples from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient. Thus, this developed Mkit provides an easy and integrated experimental platform for cell migration related research and potential medical diagnostic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Microscopy assays for evaluation of mast cell migration and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bambousková, Monika; Hájková, Zuzana; Dráber, Pavel; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to mast cell migration and chemotaxis is the long-term goal in mast cell research and is essential for comprehension of mast cell function in health and disease. Various techniques have been developed in recent decades for in vitro and in vivo assessment of mast cell motility and chemotaxis. In this chapter three microscopy assays facilitating real-time quantification of mast cell chemotaxis and migration are described, focusing on individual cell tracking and data analysis.

  9. Keratinocyte-based cell assays: their potential pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Tina; Ozir, Mateja; Törmä, Hans; Komel, Radovan; Liovic, Mirjana

    2012-11-01

    As an in vitro model system, patient-derived epidermolysis bullosa simplex keratinocytes have had an immense impact on what we know today about keratin filament function and their role in disease development. In the absence of gene therapy, screening compound libraries for new or better drugs is another approach to improve existing treatments for genodermatoses. However in this study, we report of the potential pitfalls when using this type of cell lines as a "reporter" system. When cell lines with different genetic backgrounds are being used in cell-based assays, the greatest obstacle is to determine the most appropriate culture conditions (i.e., the composition of medium, number of cells plated and number of days in culture). We demonstrate how culture conditions can greatly interfere with the cellular response in cell-based assays (cell proliferation, metabolic activity and migration), potentially also giving rise to misleading data.

  10. Streamlined duplex live-dead microplate assay for cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Bruce A; Fliesler, Steven J

    2017-08-01

    A duplex fluorescence assay to assess the viability of cells cultured in multi-well plates is described, which can be carried out in the original culture plate using a plate reader, without exchanges of culture or assay medium, or transfer of cells or cell supernatant. The method uses freshly prepared reagents and does not rely on a proprietary, commercially supplied kit. Following experimental treatment, calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CaAM) is added to each well of cultured cells; after 30 min, the fluorescence intensity (emission λmax ∼ 530 nm) is measured. The signal is due to formation of calcein, which is produced from CaAM by action of esterase activity found in intact live cells. Since live cells may express plasma membrane multidrug transport proteins, especially of the ABC transporter family, the CaAM incubation is carried out in the presence of an inhibitor of this efflux process, thereby improving the dynamic range of the assay. Next, SYTOX(®) Orange (SO) is added to the culture wells, and, after a 30-min incubation, fluorescence intensity (emission λmax ∼ 590 nm) is measured again. SO is excluded from cells that have an intact plasma membrane, but penetrates dead/dying cells and can diffuse into the nucleus, where it binds to and forms a fluorescent complex with DNA. The CaAM already added to the wells causes no interference with the latter fluorescent signal. At the conclusion of the duplex assay, both live and dead cells remain in the culture wells and can be documented by digital imaging to demonstrate correlation of cellular morphology with the assay output. Two examples of the application of this method are provided, using cytotoxic compounds having different mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays.

    PubMed

    Straub, T M; Hutchison, J R; Bartholomew, R A; Valdez, C O; Valentine, N B; Dohnalkova, A; Ozanich, R M; Bruckner-Lea, C J

    2013-01-01

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that lead to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be (1) of human gastrointestinal origin, (2) expresses apical microvilli, and (3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log(10) increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. In our hands, using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using qRT-PCR that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  12. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-01-10

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that leads to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be 1) of human gastrointestinal origin, 2) expresses apical microvilli, and 3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log10 increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. Using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  13. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells.Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06368j

  14. Selective Capture and Quick Detection of Targeting Cells with SERS-Coding Microsphere Suspension Chip.

    PubMed

    Li, Dian; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Ruimin; Guo, Jia; Wang, Changchun; Tang, Chuanbing

    2015-05-13

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) captured from blood fluid represent recurrent cancers and metastatic lesions to monitor the situation of cancers. We develop surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-coding microsphere suspension chip as a new strategy for fast and efficient capture, recovery, and detection of targeting cancer cells. Using HeLa cells as model CTCs, we first utilize folate as a recognition molecule to be immobilized in magnetic composite microspheres for capturing HeLa cells and attaining high capturing efficacy (up to 95%). After capturing cells, the composite microsphere, which utilizes a disulfide bond as crosslinker in the polymer shell and as a spacer for linking folate, can recycle 90% cells within 20 min eluted by glutathion solution. Taking advantage of the SERS with fingerprint features, we characterize captured/recovered cells with the unique signal of report-molecule 4-aminothiophenol through introducing the SERS-coding microsphere suspension chip to CTCs. Finally, the exploratory experiment of sieving cells shows that the magnetic composite microspheres can selectively capture the HeLa cells from samples of mixed cells, indicating that these magnetic composite microspheres have potential in real blood samples for capturing CTCs.

  15. A Morphological identification cell cytotoxicity assay using cytoplasm-localized fluorescent probe (CLFP) to distinguish living and dead cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Fangfang; Shen, Zhengwei; Wen, Hui; Chen, Jialing; Zhang, Xiang; Lin, Ping; Yin, Dali; Cui, Huaqing; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2017-01-08

    Cell cytotoxicity assays include cell activity assays and morphological identification assays. Currently, all frequently used cytotoxicity assays belong to cell activity assays but suffer from detection limitations. Morphological identification of cell death remains as the gold standard, although the method is difficult to scale up. At present there is no generally accepted morphological identification based cell cytotoxicity assay. In this study, we applied previous developed cell cytoplasm-localized fluorescent probe (CLFP) to display cell morphologies. Under fluorescence microscopy, the fluorescence morphology and intensity of living cells are distinct from dead cells. Based on these characters we extracted the images of living cells from series of samples via computational analysis. Thus, a novel cell morphological identification cytotoxicity assay (CLFP assay) is developed. The performance of the CLFP assay was similar to cell activity assay (MTT assay), but the accuracy of the CLFP assay was superior when measuring the cytotoxicity of active compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transgenic rodent assay for quantifying male germ cell mutant frequency.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jason M; Beal, Marc A; Gingerich, John D; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R; Yauk, Carole L; Marchetti, Francesco

    2014-08-06

    De novo mutations arise mostly in the male germline and may contribute to adverse health outcomes in subsequent generations. Traditional methods for assessing the induction of germ cell mutations require the use of large numbers of animals, making them impractical. As such, germ cell mutagenicity is rarely assessed during chemical testing and risk assessment. Herein, we describe an in vivo male germ cell mutation assay using a transgenic rodent model that is based on a recently approved Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. This method uses an in vitro positive selection assay to measure in vivo mutations induced in a transgenic λgt10 vector bearing a reporter gene directly in the germ cells of exposed males. We further describe how the detection of mutations in the transgene recovered from germ cells can be used to characterize the stage-specific sensitivity of the various spermatogenic cell types to mutagen exposure by controlling three experimental parameters: the duration of exposure (administration time), the time between exposure and sample collection (sampling time), and the cell population collected for analysis. Because a large number of germ cells can be assayed from a single male, this method has superior sensitivity compared with traditional methods, requires fewer animals and therefore much less time and resources.

  17. Transgenic Rodent Assay for Quantifying Male Germ Cell Mutant Frequency

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Jason M.; Beal, Marc A.; Gingerich, John D.; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R.; Yauk, Carole L.; Marchetti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    De novo mutations arise mostly in the male germline and may contribute to adverse health outcomes in subsequent generations. Traditional methods for assessing the induction of germ cell mutations require the use of large numbers of animals, making them impractical. As such, germ cell mutagenicity is rarely assessed during chemical testing and risk assessment. Herein, we describe an in vivo male germ cell mutation assay using a transgenic rodent model that is based on a recently approved Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. This method uses an in vitro positive selection assay to measure in vivo mutations induced in a transgenic λgt10 vector bearing a reporter gene directly in the germ cells of exposed males. We further describe how the detection of mutations in the transgene recovered from germ cells can be used to characterize the stage-specific sensitivity of the various spermatogenic cell types to mutagen exposure by controlling three experimental parameters: the duration of exposure (administration time), the time between exposure and sample collection (sampling time), and the cell population collected for analysis. Because a large number of germ cells can be assayed from a single male, this method has superior sensitivity compared with traditional methods, requires fewer animals and therefore much less time and resources. PMID:25145276

  18. Detachment of captured cancer cells under flow acceleration in a bio-functionalized microchannel.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Luthur Siu Lun; Zheng, Xiangjun; Stopa, Ashley; Baygents, James C; Guzman, Roberto; Schroeder, Joyce A; Heimark, Ronald L; Zohar, Yitshak

    2009-06-21

    Attachment, deformation and detachment of N-cadherin expressing prostate and breast cancer cell lines in a functionalized microchannel under hydrodynamic loading have been studied. N-cadherin antibodies are immobilized on the microchannel surface to capture the target cancer cells, PC3N and MDA-MB-231-N, from a homogeneous cell suspension. Although difficult, a significant fraction of moving cells can be captured under a low flow rate. More than 90% of the target cells are captured after a certain incubation time under no flow condition. The mechanical response of a captured cancer cell to hydrodynamic flow field is investigated and, in particular, the effect of flow acceleration is examined. The observed cell deformation is dramatic under low acceleration, but is negligible under high acceleration. Consequently, the detachment of captured cells depends on both flow rate and flow acceleration. The flow rate required for cell detachment is a random variable that can be described by a log-normal distribution. Two flow acceleration limits have been identified for proper scaling of the flow rate required to detach captured cells. A time constant for the mechanical response of a captured cell, on the order of 1 min, has been identified for scaling the flow acceleration. Based on these acceleration limits and time constant, an exponential-like empirical model is proposed to predict the flow rate required for cell detachment as a function of flow acceleration.

  19. Electro-magnetic Templates with Magnetic Nanoparticles for Cell-based Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertz, Frederick; Khitun, Alexander

    We discuss the possibility of a specially designed electro-magnetic template with magnetic nanoparticles for cell-based-assays. There is an urgent need for a special type of hardware allowing for biological cell manipulation. We have developed an original technique of using electro-magnetic templates with magnetic nanoparticles for biological cell manipulation. The essence of this approach is to generate a non-uniform magnetic field profile using a system of electric current carrying wires. The gradient of the magnetic field results in the movement of the nanoparticles towards the magnetic energy minima. In turn, the flow of magnetic nanoparticles drags biological cells in the same direction. We present experimental data on biological cells (erythrocytes) manipulations by magnetite (Fe3O4) on specially designed templates The results show controlled biological cell motion and destruction via haemolysis. This technique allows us to capture and to move cells located in the vicinity (10-20 microns) of the current-carrying wires. One of the most interesting results shows a periodic motion of erythrocytes between the two conducting contours, which frequency is controlled by the electric circuit. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of cell manipulation which can be utilized in cell-based assays.

  20. Development and evaluation of a Sarcocystis neurona-specific IgM capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J E; Marsh, A E; Reed, S M; Meadows, C; Bolten, K; Saville, W J A

    2006-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a serious neurologic disease of horses caused primarily by the protozoal parasite Sarcocystis neurona. Currently available antemortem diagnostic testing has low specificity. The hypothesis of this study was that serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of horses experimentally challenged with S neurona would have an increased S neurona-specific IgM (Sn-IgM) concentration after infection, as determined by an IgM capture enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA). The ELISA was based on the S neurona low molecular weight protein SNUCD-1 antigen and the monoclonal antibody 2G5 labeled with horseradish peroxidase. The test was evaluated using serum and CSF from 12 horses experimentally infected with 1.5 million S neurona sporocysts and 16 horses experimentally infected with varying doses (100 to 100,000) of S neurona sporocysts, for which results of histopathologic examination of the central nervous system were available. For horses challenged with 1.5 million sporocysts, there was a significant increase in serum Sn-IgM concentrations compared with values before infection at weeks 2-6 after inoculation (P < .0001). For horses inoculated with lower doses of S neurona, there were significant increases in serum Sn-IgM concentration at various points in time after inoculation, depending on the challenge dose (P < .01). In addition, there was a significant increase between the CSF Sn-IgM concentrations before and after inoculation (P < .0001). These results support further evaluation of the assay as a diagnostic test during the acute phase of EPM.

  1. Live cell assays to identify regulators of ER to Golgi trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Lisauskas, Tautvydas; Matula, Petr; Claas, Christoph; Reusing, Susanne; Wiemann, Stefan; Erfle, Holger; Lehmann, Lars; Fischer, Peter; Eils, Roland; Rohr, Karl; Storrie, Brian; Starkuviene, Vytaute

    2013-01-01

    We applied fluorescence microscopy based quantitative assays to living cells to identify regulators of ER to Golgi trafficking and/or Golgi complex maintenance. We first validated an automated procedure to identify factors, which influence Golgi to ER re-localization of GalT-CFP after brefeldin A (BFA) addition and/or wash-out. We then tested 14 proteins that localize to the ER and/or Golgi complex when over-expressed for a role in ER to Golgi trafficking. Nine of them interfered with the rate of BFA induced redistribution of GalT-CFP from the Golgi complex to the ER, 6 of them interfered with GalT-CFP redistribution from the ER to a juxtanuclear region (i.e., Golgi complex) after BFA wash-out, and 6 of them were positive effectors in both assays. Notably, our live cell approach captures regulator function in ER to Golgi trafficking, that were missed in previous fixed cell assays; as well as assigns putative roles for other less characterized proteins. Moreover, we show that our assays can be extended to RNAi and chemical screens. PMID:22132776

  2. Isolating single cells in a neurosphere assay using inertial microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Nathamgari, S. Shiva P.; Dong, Biqin; Zhou, Fan; Kang, Wonmo; Giraldo-Vela, Juan P.; McGuire, Tammy; McNaughton, Rebecca L.; Sun, Cheng; Kessler, John A.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-01-01

    Sphere forming assays are routinely used for in vitro propagation and differentiation of stem cells. Because the stem cell clusters can become heterogeneous and polyclonal, they must first be dissociated into a single cell suspension for further clonal analysis or differentiation studies. The dissociated population is marred by the presence of doublets, triplets and semi-cleaved/intact clusters which makes identification and further analysis of differentiation pathways difficult. In this work, we use inertial microfluidics to separate the single cells and clusters in a population of chemically dissociated neurospheres. In contrast to previous microfluidic sorting technologies which operated at high flow rates, we implement the spiral microfluidic channel in a novel focusing regime that occurs at lower flow rates. In this regime, the curvature-induced Dean’s force focuses the smaller, single cells towards the inner wall and the larger clusters towards the center. We further demonstrate that sorting in this low flow rate (and hence low shear stress) regime yields a high percentage (> 90%) of viable cells and preserves multipotency by differentiating the sorted neural stem cell population into neurons and astrocytes. The modularity of the device allows easy integration with other lab-on-a-chip devices for upstream mechanical dissociation and downstream high-throughput clonal analysis, localized electroporation and sampling. Although demonstrated in the case of the neurosphere assay, the method is equally applicable to other sphere forming assays. PMID:26511875

  3. An improved resazurin-based cytotoxicity assay for hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    McMillian, M K; Li, L; Parker, J B; Patel, L; Zhong, Z; Gunnett, J W; Powers, W J; Johnson, M D

    2002-01-01

    A simple resazurin-based cytotoxicity assay is presented for screening of cytotoxicity in hepatocytes and liver cell lines. Human hepatoma (HepG2) cells in 96-well culture plates were exposed to known toxic (cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, ethionine, flufenamic acid, and diflunisal) and control (transplatin, 5-chlorouracil, methionine, and acetylsalicylic acid) compounds for 1-3 days, and resazurin (5 micromol/L) was added. A conventional short-term (1 h) assay was first performed, where cytotoxicity is indicated by decreased reduction of resazurin to its fluorescent product resorufin. Our improved assay consists of additionally measuring fluorescence 2-4 days later, when cytotoxicity is indicated by a striking increase in the concentration of resorufin, resulting from two distinct processes. First, viable liver-derived cells slowly convert resorufin to nonfluorescent metabolites. Fluorescence of control cell wells decreased to background during a 2- to 4-day exposure to resazurin. This metabolism of resorufin was largely blocked by dicumarol and to lesser extents by disulfiram and SKF525a. Second, dead or dying cells slowly convert resazurin to resorufin but do not further metabolize resorufin; thus this fluorescent metabolite accumulates to high levels in wells with dead cells by 2 to 4 days. A similar increase in fluorescence associated with cytotoxicity was observed in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes using the long-term resazurin-based assay. In addition to an improved signal relative to the short-term assay, the inversion of the fluorescent signal from high = alive short-term to high = dead long-term allows determination of two independent cytotoxicity endpoints after addition of one innocuous vital dye.

  4. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864.7100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood...

  5. EpCAM-independent capture of circulating tumor cells with a 'universal CTC-chip'.

    PubMed

    Chikaishi, Yasuhiro; Yoneda, Kazue; Ohnaga, Takashi; Tanaka, Fumihiro

    2017-01-01

    Capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), which are shed from the primary tumor site and circulate in the blood, remains a technical challenge. CellSearch® is the only clinically approved CTC detection system, but has provided only modest sensitivity in detecting CTCs mainly because epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-negative tumor cells may not be captured. To achieve more sensitive CTC‑capture, we have developed a novel microfluidic platform, a 'CTC-chip' comprised of light-curable resins that has a unique advantage in that any capture antibody is easily conjugated. In the present study, we showed that EpCAM-negative tumor cells as well as EpCAM-positive cells were captured with the novel 'universal CTC-chip' as follows: i) human lung cancer cells (PC-9), with strong EpCAM expression, were efficiently captured with the CTC-chip coated with an anti-EpCAM antibody (with an average capture efficiency of 101% when tumor cells were spiked in phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS) and 88% when spiked in blood); ii) human mesothelioma cells (ACC-MESO-4), with no EpCAM expression but with podoplanin expression, were captured with the CTC-chip coated with an anti-podoplanin antibody (average capture efficiency of 78% when tumor cells were spiked in PBS and 38% when spiked in blood), whereas ACC-MESO-4 cells were not captured with the CTC-chip coated with the anti-EpCAM antibody. These results indicate that the novel 'CTC-chip' can be useful in sensitive EpCAM-independent detection of CTCs, which may provide new insights into personalized medicine.

  6. Use of an aqueous soluble tetrazolium/formazan assay for cell growth assays in culture.

    PubMed

    Cory, A H; Owen, T C; Barltrop, J A; Cory, J G

    1991-07-01

    A new tetrazolium analog of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) was evaluated as a substitute for MTT in the microculture screening assay for in vitro cell growth. This new tetrazolium compound, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2- (4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS), in the presence of phenazine methosulfate (PMS), gave a water-soluble formazan product that had an absorbance maximum at 490-500 nm in phosphate-buffered saline. The amount of colored product formed was proportional to the number of cells and the time of incubation of the cells with MTS/PMS. MTS/PMS was reactive in all the cell lines tested which included mouse leukemia L1210 cells, mouse Ehrlich tumor cells, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, and human colon tumor cells (HT-29). HT-29 and 3T3 fibroblasts reduced MTS/PMS more efficiently than they reduced MTT. Comparable to the amount of product formed from MTT, MTS/PMS gave excellent product formation. The IC50 value for pyrazoloimidazole obtained using MTS/PMS was 200 microM; for 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, the IC50 value was 0.9 nM. These values compared very favorably with the IC50 values obtained by direct cell counts. Further, the same IC50 values were obtained when the absorbances of the formazan product in the 96-well plates were determined after different times of incubation.

  7. Modulating cell-cell communication with a high-throughput label-free cell assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangshan; Lai, Fang; Fang, Ye

    2012-02-01

    A high-throughput label-free cell assay for modulating cell-cell communication is demonstrated with the Epic® system, a resonant waveguide grating sensor platform. Natural killer (NK) cells are known to be able to recognize abnormal cells (e.g., cancer cells and cells presenting intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM1] through cell surface receptors) and kill them. In this study, the effect of effecter cells NK92MI on two kinds of target cells, cervical cancer cells (HeLa) and Chinese hamster ovarian cells overexpressing ICAM1 (CHO-ICAM1), was examined. Living target cells' response to NK92MI cells was monitored in real time and measured as wavelength shift in picometers. The authors showed that the detectability of target cell response is affected by multiple factors: the ratio of effecter cells to target cells (E/T), the interaction time of the two types of cells, and the target cell type. For example, with the effecter cells NK92MI and the same incubation time of 16 h, a minimal E/T ratio of 1 is required to detect HeLa cell response, whereas an E/T of 0.5 is sufficient to detect CHO-ICAM1 cell response. The authors confirmed that NK92MI cell-mediated target cell cytotoxicity results in negative optical signals and is associated with apoptosis mainly through caspase pathways. Distinct optical signals could be generated with the pretreatment of the target cells with various known pharmaceutical reagents, making the assay useful for discovering new chemicals that may affect cell-cell communications.

  8. Enhancing sensitivity and specificity in rare cell capture microdevices with dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James P.; Huang, Chao; Kirby, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    The capture and subsequent analysis of rare cells, such as circulating tumor cells from a peripheral blood sample, has the potential to advance our understanding and treatment of a wide range of diseases. There is a particular need for high purity (i.e., high specificity) techniques to isolate these cells, reducing the time and cost required for single-cell genetic analyses by decreasing the number of contaminating cells analyzed. Previous work has shown that antibody-based immunocapture can be combined with dielectrophoresis (DEP) to differentially isolate cancer cells from leukocytes in a characterization device. Here, we build on that work by developing numerical simulations that identify microfluidic obstacle array geometries where DEP–immunocapture can be used to maximize the capture of target rare cells, while minimizing the capture of contaminating cells. We consider geometries with electrodes offset from the array and parallel to the fluid flow, maximizing the magnitude of the resulting electric field at the obstacles' leading and trailing edges, and minimizing it at the obstacles' shoulders. This configuration attracts cells with a positive DEP (pDEP) response to the leading edge, where the shear stress is low and residence time is long, resulting in a high capture probability; although these cells are also repelled from the shoulder region, the high local fluid velocity at the shoulder minimizes the impact on the overall transport and capture. Likewise, cells undergoing negative DEP (nDEP) are repelled from regions of high capture probability and attracted to regions where capture is unlikely. These simulations predict that DEP can be used to reduce the probability of capturing contaminating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (using nDEP) from 0.16 to 0.01 while simultaneously increasing the capture of several pancreatic cancer cell lines from 0.03–0.10 to 0.14–0.55, laying the groundwork for the experimental study of hybrid DEP

  9. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  10. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  11. Assay for transposase-accessible chromatin and circularized chromosome conformation capture, two methods to explore the regulatory landscapes of genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Miñán, A; Bessa, J; Tena, J J; Gómez-Skarmeta, J L

    2016-01-01

    Accurate transcriptional control of genes is fundamental for the correct functioning of organs and developmental processes. This control depends on the interplay between the promoter of genes and other noncoding sequences, whose interaction is mediated by 3D chromatin arrangements. Thus, the detailed description of transcriptional regulatory landscapes is essential to understand the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. However, to achieve that, two important challenges have to be faced: (1) the identification of the noncoding sequences that contribute to gene transcription and (2) the association of these sequences to the respective genes they control. In this chapter, we describe two protocols that allow overcoming these important challenges: the assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing (ATAC-seq) and circularized chromosome conformation capture (4C-seq). ATAC-seq is a very efficient technique that, using a very low number of cells as starting material, allows the identification of active chromatin regions genome wide, whereas 4C-seq detects the subset of sequences that interact specifically with the promoter of a given gene. When combined, both techniques provide a comprehensive snapshot of the regulatory landscapes of developmental genes. The protocols we present here have been optimized for teleost fish samples, zebrafish and medaka, allowing the in-depth study of transcriptional regulation in these two emerging animal models. Given the amenability and easy genetic manipulation of these two experimental systems, we anticipate that they will be important in revealing general principles of the vertebrate regulatory genome.

  12. Highly Sensitive Assay for Measurement of Arenavirus-cell Attachment.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Joseph P; Botten, Jason

    2016-03-02

    Arenaviruses are a family of enveloped RNA viruses that cause severe human disease. The first step in the arenavirus life cycle is attachment of viral particles to host cells. While virus-cell attachment can be measured through the use of virions labeled with biotin, radioactive isotopes, or fluorescent dyes, these approaches typically require high multiplicities of infection (MOI) to enable detection of bound virus. We describe a quantitative (q)RT-PCR-based assay that measures Junin virus strain Candid 1 attachment via quantitation of virion-packaged viral genomic RNA. This assay has several advantages including its extreme sensitivity and ability to measure attachment over a large dynamic range of MOIs without the need to purify or label input virus. Importantly, this approach can be easily tailored for use with other viruses through the use of virus-specific qRT-PCR reagents. Further, this assay can be modified to permit measurement of particle endocytosis and genome uncoating. In conclusion, we describe a simple, yet robust assay for highly sensitive measurement of arenavirus-cell attachment.

  13. Capturing CD4 cells using a functionalized circular microfluidic device and glutaraldehyde as biolinker for tuberculosis detection and diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Yeu-Farn; Huang, Nien-Tsu; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2015-03-01

    It is estimated that about one-third of the world's population has already been infected by tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in general, can result in an active case of tuberculosis in approximately 5%-10% of those who suffer from latent tuberculosis and the chance of becoming ill is the highest within one of year of getting the disease. Although a newly developed methods called interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) can monitor CD4 cells secreted cytokine to diagnose tuberculosis (TB) condition. However, it is difficult to count total numbers of cytokine secreted CD4 cells, which make the diagnosis less accurate. Therefore, we develop a functionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device using glutaraldehyde to capture CD4 cells. To enhance the capture efficiency, we use COMSOL simulation to optimize the arrangement of PDMS micro pillars to make cells uniformly distributed in the device. Our preliminary data showed the microfluidic configuration in a circular shape with HCP patterned micro pillars turned 30 degrees offers the highest cell capture rate.

  14. Microscale detection of specific bacterial DNA in soil with a magnetic capture-hybridization and PCR amplification assay.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, C S

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic capture-hybridization PCR technique (MCH-PCR) was developed to eliminate the inhibitory effect of humic acids and other contaminants in PCRs targeting specific soil DNA. A single-stranded DNA probe, which was complementary to an internal part of the target gene, was used to coat magnetic beads. After hybridization in a suspension of soil DNA, magnetic extraction of the beads separated the hybrid DNA from all other soil DNA, humic acids, and other interfering soil components. The MCH was followed by PCR amplification of the specific target DNA. In barley rhizosphere soil, detection of a lux gene inserted in a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain could be demonstrated in nonsterile soil samples (0.5 mg). This corresponded to a detection of fewer than 40 bacterial cells per cm of barley root. The MCH-PCR technique greatly improves the current protocols for PCR detection of specific microorganisms or genes in soil because specific target DNA sequences from very small soil samples can be extracted and determined. PMID:7574645

  15. Detection of target staphylococcal enterotoxin B antigen in orange juice and popular carbonated beverages using antibody-dependent antigen-capture assays.

    PubMed

    Principato, MaryAnn; Njoroge, Joyce M; Perlloni, Andrei; O' Donnell, Michael; Boyle, Thomas; Jones, Robert L

    2010-10-01

    There is a critical need for qualitative and quantitative methodologies that provide the rapid and accurate detection of food contaminants in complex food matrices. However, the sensitivity of the assay can be affected when antigen-capture is applied to certain foods or beverages that are extremely acidic. This study was undertaken to assess the effects of orange juice and popular carbonated soft drink upon the fidelity of antibody-based antigen-capture assays and to develop simple approaches that could rescue assay performance without the introduction of additional or extensive extraction procedures. We examined the effects of orange juice and a variety of popular carbonated soft drink beverages upon a quantitative Interleukin-2 (IL-2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay system and a lateral flow device (LFD) adapted for the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in foods. Alterations in the performance and sensitivity of the assay were directly attributable to the food matrix, and alterations in pH were especially critical. The results demonstrate that approaches such as an alteration of pH and the use of milk as a blocking agent, either singly or in combination, will partially rescue ELISA performance. The same approaches permit lateral flow to efficiently detect antigen. Practical Application: The authors present ways to rescue an ELISA assay compromised by acidity in beverages and show that either the alteration of pH, or the use of milk as a blocking agent are not always capable of restoring the assay to its intended efficiency. However, the same methods, when employed with lateral flow technology, are rapid and extremely successful.

  16. Validation of a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Campylobacter fetus

    PubMed Central

    Devenish, J.; Brooks, B.; Perry, K.; Milnes, D.; Burke, T.; McCabe, D.; Duff, S.; Lutze-Wallace, C. L.

    2005-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb)-based antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was compared with the routine culture methodology for the detection of Campylobacter fetus subspecies from bovine and ovine field samples inoculated into Clark's transport enrichment medium (TEM). The work was a collaboration between two different diagnostic laboratories, one in Canada and the other in England. In both labs, TEM samples were incubated for 4 days at 35°C and then tested by culture and ELISA. The ELISA consisted of initial screening with MAb M1825 against C. fetus subspecies core lipopolysaccharide (LPS). All samples positive on ELISA screening were then retested by ELISA with MAb M1825 and MAbs M1177, M1183, and M1194, which recognize serotype A- and/or serotype B-specific C. fetus subspecies LPS epitopes. The Canadian samples consisted of 1,060 preputial washings from 529 bulls, of which 18 were positive by both culture and ELISA and 1,042 were negative by both methods. The English samples consisted of 321 tissue specimens, mostly stomach contents and placentas, from 190 aborted ovine and bovine fetuses. A total of 262 samples were negative by culture and ELISA, 52 samples were positive by culture and ELISA, and 7 samples were culture negative but ELISA positive. The results for all 70 culture-positive isolates were confirmed by conventional biochemical methods as C. fetus subsp. fetus, with 39 presumptively identified by the ELISA as serotype A and 30 presumptively identified as serotype B and with one sample containing isolates presumptively identified as serotype A and serotype B. A receiver operating characteristic analysis of the combined ELISA data from both countries resulted in an area under the curve of 0.997, with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.5% relative to the results of culture. The data confirm that this ELISA method can be used as an excellent test for the screening of field samples in TEM for the presence of C. fetus

  17. Validation of a monoclonal antibody-based capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Campylobacter fetus.

    PubMed

    Devenish, J; Brooks, B; Perry, K; Milnes, D; Burke, T; McCabe, D; Duff, S; Lutze-Wallace, C L

    2005-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb)-based antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was compared with the routine culture methodology for the detection of Campylobacter fetus subspecies from bovine and ovine field samples inoculated into Clark's transport enrichment medium (TEM). The work was a collaboration between two different diagnostic laboratories, one in Canada and the other in England. In both labs, TEM samples were incubated for 4 days at 35 degrees C and then tested by culture and ELISA. The ELISA consisted of initial screening with MAb M1825 against C. fetus subspecies core lipopolysaccharide (LPS). All samples positive on ELISA screening were then retested by ELISA with MAb M1825 and MAbs M1177, M1183, and M1194, which recognize serotype A- and/or serotype B-specific C. fetus subspecies LPS epitopes. The Canadian samples consisted of 1,060 preputial washings from 529 bulls, of which 18 were positive by both culture and ELISA and 1,042 were negative by both methods. The English samples consisted of 321 tissue specimens, mostly stomach contents and placentas, from 190 aborted ovine and bovine fetuses. A total of 262 samples were negative by culture and ELISA, 52 samples were positive by culture and ELISA, and 7 samples were culture negative but ELISA positive. The results for all 70 culture-positive isolates were confirmed by conventional biochemical methods as C. fetus subsp. fetus, with 39 presumptively identified by the ELISA as serotype A and 30 presumptively identified as serotype B and with one sample containing isolates presumptively identified as serotype A and serotype B. A receiver operating characteristic analysis of the combined ELISA data from both countries resulted in an area under the curve of 0.997, with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.5% relative to the results of culture. The data confirm that this ELISA method can be used as an excellent test for the screening of field samples in TEM for the presence of C. fetus

  18. Surface Design for Efficient Capturing of Rare Cells in Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Thomas, Antony; Chen, Chi-Mon; Yang, Shu

    2012-02-01

    This work aims to design, fabricate, and characterize a micro-patterned surface that will be integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance particle and rare cell capture efficiency. Capture of ultralow concentration of circulating tumor cells in a blood sample is of vital importance for early diagnostics of cancer diseases. Despite the significant progress achieved in development of cell capture techniques, the enhancement in capture efficiency is still limited and often accompanied with drawbacks such as low throughput, low selectivity, pre-diluting requirement, and cell viability issues. The goal of this work is to design a biomimetic surface that could significantly enhance particle/cell capture efficacy through computational modeling, surface patterning, and microfluidic integration and testing. A PDMS surface with microscale ripples is functionalized with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) to capture prostate cancer PC3 cells. Our microfluid chip with micropatterns has shown significantly higher cell capture efficiency and selectivity compared to the chips with plane surface or classical herringbone-grooves.

  19. Surface Design for Efficient Capturing of Rare Cells in Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Depietro, Dan; Thomas, Antony; Chen, Chi-Mon; Yang, Shu

    2011-11-01

    This work aims to design, fabricate, and characterize a micro-patterned surface that will be integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance particle and rare cell capture efficiency. Capture of ultralow concentration of circulating tumor cells in a blood sample is of vital importance for early diagnostics of cancer diseases. Despite the significant progress achieved in development of cell capture techniques, the enhancement in capture efficiency is still limited and often accompanied with drawbacks such as low throughput, low selectivity, pre-diluting requirement, and cell viability issues. The goal of this work is to design a biomimetic surface that could significantly enhance particle/cell capture efficacy through computational modeling, surface patterning, and microfluidic integration and testing. A PDMS surface with microscale ripples is functionalized with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) to capture prostate cancer PC3 cells. Our microfluid chip with micropatterns has shown significantly higher cell capture efficiency and selectivity compared to the chips with plane surface or classical herringbone-grooves.

  20. Velocity valleys enable efficient capture and spatial sorting of nanoparticle-bound cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besant, Justin D.; Mohamadi, Reza M.; Aldridge, Peter M.; Li, Yi; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2015-03-01

    The development of strategies for isolating rare cells from complex matrices like blood is important for a wide variety of applications including the analysis of bloodborne cancer cells, infectious pathogens, and prenatal testing. Due to their high colloidal stability and surface-to-volume ratio, antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles are excellent labels for cellular surface markers. Unfortunately, capture of nanoparticle-bound cells at practical flow rates is challenging due to the small volume, and thus low magnetic susceptibility, of magnetic nanoparticles. We have developed a means to capture nanoparticle-labeled cells using microstructures which create pockets of locally low linear velocity, termed velocity valleys. Cells that enter a velocity valley slow down momentarily, allowing the magnetic force to overcome the reduced drag force and trap the cells. Here, we describe a model for this mechanism of cell capture and use this model to guide the rational design of a device that efficiently captures rare cells and sorts them according to surface expression in complex matrices with greater than 10 000-fold specificity. By analysing the magnetic and drag forces on a cell, we calculate a threshold linear velocity for capture and relate this to the capture efficiency. We find that the addition of X-shaped microstructures enhances capture efficiency 5-fold compared to circular posts. By tuning the linear velocity, we capture cells with a 100-fold range of surface marker expression with near 100% efficiency and sort these cells into spatially distinct zones. By tuning the flow channel geometry, we reduce non-specific cell adhesion by 5-fold.The development of strategies for isolating rare cells from complex matrices like blood is important for a wide variety of applications including the analysis of bloodborne cancer cells, infectious pathogens, and prenatal testing. Due to their high colloidal stability and surface-to-volume ratio, antibody-coated magnetic

  1. Specific rare cell capture using micro-patterned silicon nanowire platform.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Kwon; Kim, Dong-Joo; Lee, GeeHee; Kim, Gil-Sung; Kwak, Minsuk; Fan, Rong

    2014-04-15

    We report on the rapid and direct quantification of specific cell captures using a micro-patterned streptavidin (STR)-functionalized silicon nanowire (SiNW) platform, which was prepared by Ag-assisted wet chemical etching and a photo-lithography process. This platform operates by high-affinity cell capture rendered by the combination of antibody-epithelial cell surface-binding, biotin-streptavidin binding, and the topologically enhanced cell-substrate interaction on a 3-dimensional SiNWs array. In this work, we developed a micro-patterned nanowire platform, with which we were able to directly evaluate the performance enhancement due to nanotopography. An excellent capture efficiency of ~96.6±6.7%, which is the highest value achieved thus far for the targeting specific A549 cells on a selective area of patterned SiNWs, is demonstrated. Direct comparison between the nanowire region and the planar region on the same substrate indicates dramatically elevated cell-capture efficiency on nanotopological surface identical surface chemistry (<2% cell-capture efficiency). An excellent linear response was seen for quantifying captured A549 cells with respect to loaded cells. This study suggests that the micro-patterned STR-functionalized SiNWs platform provides additional advantage for detecting rare cells populations in a more quantitative and specific manner.

  2. Expanding the available assays: adapting and validating In-Cell Westerns in microfluidic devices for cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Paguirigan, Amy L; Puccinelli, John P; Su, Xiaojing; Beebe, David J

    2010-10-01

    Microfluidic methods for cellular studies can significantly reduce costs due to reduced reagent and biological specimen requirements compared with many traditional culture techniques. However, current types of readouts are limited and this lack of suitable readouts for microfluidic cultures has significantly hindered the application of microfluidics for cell-based assays. The In-Cell Western (ICW) technique uses quantitative immunocytochemistry and a laser scanner to provide an in situ measure of protein quantities in cells grown in microfluidic channels of arbitrary geometries. The use of ICWs in microfluidic channels was validated by a detailed comparison with current macroscale methods and shown to have excellent correlation. Transforming growth factor-β-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of an epithelial cell line was used as an example for further validation of the technique as a readout for soluble-factor-based assays performed in high-throughput microfluidic channels. The use of passive pumping for sample delivery and laser scanning for analysis opens the door to high-throughput quantitative microfluidic cell-based assays that integrate seamlessly with existing high-throughput infrastructure.

  3. Characterization of a hybrid dielectrophoresis and immunocapture microfluidic system for cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Santana, Steven M.; Liu, He; Bander, Neil H.; Hawkins, Benjamin G.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    The capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patient blood enables early clinical assessment as well as genetic and pharmacological evaluation of cancer and metastasis. Although there have been many microfluidic immunocapture and electrokinetic techniques developed for isolating rare cancer cells, these techniques are often limited by a capture performance tradeoff between high efficiency and high purity. We present the characterization of shear-dependent cancer cell capture in a novel hybrid dielectrophoresis (DEP)-immunocapture system consisting of interdigitated electrodes fabricated in a Hele-Shaw flow cell that was functionalized with a monoclonal antibody, J591, which is highly specific to prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-expressing prostate cancer cells. We measured the positive and negative DEP response of a prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, as a function of applied electric field frequency, and showed that DEP can control capture performance by promoting or preventing cell interactions with immunocapture surfaces, depending on the sign and magnitude of the applied DEP force, as well as on the local shear stress experienced by cells flowing in the device. This work demonstrates that DEP and immunocapture techniques can work synergistically to improve cell capture performance, and it will aid in the design of future hybrid DEP-immunocapture systems for high-efficiency CTC capture with enhanced purity. PMID:23925921

  4. Micronucleus assay for mouse alveolar Type II and Clara cells.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Hanna K; Falck, Ghita C-M; Catalán, Julia; Santonen, Tiina; Norppa, Hannu

    2010-03-01

    The objective of our study was to develop a micronucleus (MN) assay for detecting genotoxic damage after inhalation exposure in mouse alveolar Type II and Clara cells, potential target cells for lung carcinogens. Ten male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to ethylene oxide (630 mg/m(3)) for 4 hr via inhalation; 10 unexposed mice serving as controls. 72 hr after the exposure, Clara cells and alveolar Type II cells were isolated using two different methods. Method 1 included a 15-min trypsin lavage and a 2-hr incubation of cell suspension. Method 2 involved a 30-min trypsin lavage, Percoll gradient centrifugation, and a 48-hr incubation for cell attachment. Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) -staining was applied to distinguish Clara cells. The frequency of micronuclei (MNi) was scored in NBT-negative cells (defined as Type II cells in Method 2) and NBT-positive cells (Clara cells). To detect possible differences between the techniques, MNi in Clara cells were analyzed from samples prepared by both methods. With Method 2, a clear increase in the mean frequency of micronucleated cells was seen in the exposed mice as compared with the controls, for both alveolar Type II and Clara cells. However, no significant increase in MN frequency was seen in Clara cells analyzed from samples prepared by Method 1. Based on our findings, mouse alveolar Type II and Clara cells seem to be suitable for MN analysis in studies aimed at identifying genotoxic lung carcinogens. Both alveolar Type II and Clara cells can be isolated using Method 2. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. In situ single cell detection via microfluidic magnetic bead assay

    PubMed Central

    KC, Pawan; Zhang, Ge; Zhe, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    We present a single cell detection device based on magnetic bead assay and micro Coulter counters. This device consists of two successive micro Coulter counters, coupled with a high gradient magnetic field generated by an external magnet. The device can identify single cells in terms of the transit time difference of the cell through the two micro Coulter counters. Target cells are conjugated with magnetic beads via specific antibody and antigen binding. A target cell traveling through the two Coulter counters interacts with the magnetic field, and have a longer transit time at the 1st counter than that at the 2nd counter. In comparison, a non-target cell has no interaction with the magnetic field, and hence has nearly the same transit times through the two counters. Each cell passing through the two counters generates two consecutive voltage pulses one after the other; the pulse widths and magnitudes indicating the cell’s transit times through the counters and the cell’s size respectively. Thus, by measuring the pulse widths (transit times) of each cell through the two counters, each single target cell can be differentiated from non-target cells even if they have similar sizes. We experimentally proved that the target human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and non-target rat adipose-derived stem cells (rASCs) have significant different transit time distribution, from which we can determine the recognition regions for both cell groups quantitatively. We further demonstrated that within a mixed cell population of rASCs and HUVECs, HUVECs can be detected in situ and the measured HUVECs ratios agree well with the pre-set ratios. With the simple device structure and easy sample preparation, this method is expected to enable single cell detection in a continuous flow and can be applied to facilitate general cell detection applications such as stem cell identification and enumeration. PMID:28222140

  6. Immobilized Surfactant-Nanotube Complexes Support Selectin-Mediated Capture of Viable Circulating Tumor Cells in the Absence of Capture Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Castellanos, Carlos A.; King, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells from the primary site to anatomically distant organs leads to a poor patient prognosis. Increasing evidence has linked adhesive interactions between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells to metastatic dissemination. Microscale biomimetic flow devices hold promise as a diagnostic tool to isolate CTCs and develop metastatic therapies, utilizing E-selectin (ES) to trigger the initial rolling adhesion of tumor cells under flow. To trigger firm adhesion and capture under flow, such devices also typically require antibodies against biomarkers thought to be expressed on CTCs. This approach is challenged by the fact that CTCs are now known to exhibit heterogeneous expression of conventional biomarkers. Here, we describe surfactant-nanotube complexes to enhance ES-mediated capture and isolation of tumor cells without the use of capture antibodies. While the majority of tumor cells exhibited weaker rolling adhesion on halloysite nanotubes (HNT) coated with ES, HNT functionalization with the sodium dodecanoate (NaL) surfactant induced a switch to firm cellular adhesion under flow. Conversely, surfactant-nanotube complexes significantly reduced the number of primary human leukocytes captured via ES-mediated adhesion under flow. The switch in tumor cell adhesion was exploited to capture and isolate tumor cells in the absence of EpCAM antibodies, commonly utilized as the gold standard for CTC isolation. Additionally, HNT-NaL complexes were shown to capture tumor cells with low to negligible EpCAM expression, that are not efficiently captured using conventional approaches. PMID:25761664

  7. Immunoglobulin M Capture Assay for Serologic Confirmation of Early Lyme Disease: Analysis of Immune Complexes with Biotinylated Borrelia burgdorferi Sonicate Enhanced with Flagellin Peptide Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Michael; Stein, Stanley; Mitchell, Paul D.; Sigal, Leonard H.

    1998-01-01

    We previously reported on the efficacy of the enzyme-linked immunoglobulin M capture immune complex (IC) biotinylated antigen assay (EMIBA) for the seroconfirmation of early Lyme disease and active infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. In earlier work we identified non-cross-reacting epitopes of a number of B. burgdorferi proteins, including flagellin. We now report on an improvement in the performance of EMIBA with the addition of a biotinylated form of a synthetic non-cross-reacting immunodominant flagellin peptide to the biotinylated B. burgdorferi B31 sonicate antigen source with the avidin-biotinylated peroxidase complex detection system used in our recently developed indirect IgM-capture immune complex-based assay (EMIBA). As in our previous studies, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) reactivities of antibodies liberated from circulating ICs (by EMIBA) were compared with those of antibodies in unprocessed serum (antibodies found free in the serum, thus as an IgM-capture ELISA, but not EMIBA, because the antibodies were not liberated from ICs), the sample usually used in standard ELISAs and Western blot assays. The addition of the flagellin epitope enhanced the ELISA signal obtained with untreated sera from many Lyme disease patients but not from healthy controls. In tests with both free antibodies and ICs, with or without the addition of the flagellin epitope to the sonicate, we found the most advantageous combination was IC as the source of antibodies and sonicate plus the flagellin epitope as the antigen. In a blinded study of sera obtained from patients with early and later-phase Lyme disease, EMIBA with the enhanced antigenic preparation compared favorably with other serologic assays, especially for the confirmation of early disease. PMID:9542940

  8. A cancer detection platform which measures telomerase activity from live circulating tumor cells captured on microfilter

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tong; Lu, Bo; Tai, Yu-Chong; Goldkorn, Amir

    2010-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) quantified in cancer patients’ blood can predict disease outcome and response to therapy. However, the CTC analysis platforms commonly used cannot capture live CTCs and only apply to tumors of epithelial origin. To address these limitations, we have developed a novel cancer detection platform which measures telomerase activity from live CTCs captured on a Parylene-C slot microfilter. Using a constant low-pressure delivery system, the new microfilter platform was capable of cell capture from 1 ml of whole blood in less than 5 minutes, achieving 90% capture efficiency, 90% cell viability and 200-fold sample enrichment. Importantly, the captured cells retained normal morphology by scanning electron microscopy and could be readily manipulated, further analyzed, or expanded on or off filter. Telomerase activity – a well-recognized universal cancer marker – was reliably detected by qPCR from as few as 25 cancer cells spiked into 7.5 ml whole blood and captured on microfilter. Moreover, significant telomerase activity elevation also was measured from patient blood samples and from single cancer cells lifted off the microfilter. Live CTC capture and analysis is fast and simple yet highly quantitative, versatile, and applicable to nearly all solid tumor types, making this a highly promising new strategy for cancer detection and characterization. PMID:20663903

  9. Microcystis aeruginosa toxin: cell culture toxicity, hemolysis, and mutagenicity assays.

    PubMed Central

    Grabow, W O; Du Randt, W C; Prozesky, O W; Scott, W E

    1982-01-01

    Crude toxin was prepared by lyophilization and extraction of toxic Microcystis aeruginosa from four natural sources and a unicellular laboratory culture. The responses of cultures of liver (Mahlavu and PCL/PRF/5), lung (MRC-5), cervix (HeLa), ovary (CHO-K1), and kidney (BGM, MA-104, and Vero) cell lines to these preparations did not differ significantly from one another, indicating that toxicity was not specific for liver cells. The results of a trypan blue staining test showed that the toxin disrupted cell membrane permeability within a few minutes. Human, mouse, rat, sheep, and Muscovy duck erythrocytes were also lysed within a few minutes. Hemolysis was temperature dependent, and the reaction seemed to follow first-order kinetics. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, and Tetrahymena pyriformis were not significantly affected by the toxin. The toxin yielded negative results in Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity assays. Microtiter cell culture, trypan blue, and hemolysis assays for Microcystis toxin are described. The effect of the toxin on mammalian cell cultures was characterized by extensive disintegration of cells and was distinguishable from the effects of E. coli enterotoxin, toxic chemicals, and pesticides. A possible reason for the acute lethal effect of Microcystis toxin, based on cytolytic activity, is discussed. Images PMID:6808921

  10. Characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells: potency assay development.

    PubMed

    Hematti, Peiman

    2016-04-01

    Based on their many different mechanisms of action, presumed immune-privileged status, and relative ease of production, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are under intensive clinical investigation for treating a wide range of degenerative, inflammatory, and immunologic disorders. Identification of relevant and robust potency assays is not only a regulatory requirement, but it is also the basis for producing and delivering a product that is consistent, safe, and ultimately an effective therapy. Although development of an appropriate potency assay is one of the most challenging issues in cell-based therapies, it is of paramount importance in the process of developing and testing cellular products. Regardless of the many different tissue sources and methods used in culture expansion of MSCs, they possess many of the same morphologic, cell surface markers, and differentiation characteristics. However, MSC products with similar phenotypic characteristics could still have major differences in their biologic and functional attributes. Understanding the different mechanisms of action and establishment of relevant potency assays is of pivotal importance in allowing investigators and regulatory agencies to compare MSCs used in different clinical trials.

  11. Quantitative analysis of cell proliferation by a dye dilution assay: Application to cell lines and cocultures.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soobin; Kim, Seol-Hee; Seo, Yuri; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Lee, Ji Youn

    2017-04-04

    Cell proliferation represents one of the most fundamental processes in biological systems, thus the quantitative analysis of cell proliferation is important in many biological applications such as drug screening, production of biologics, and assessment of cytotoxicity. Conventional proliferation assays mainly quantify cell number based on a calibration curve of a homogeneous cell population, and therefore are not applicable for the analysis of cocultured cells. Moreover, these assays measure cell proliferation indirectly, based on cellular metabolic activity or DNA content. To overcome these shortcomings, a dye dilution assay employing fluorescent cell tracking dyes that are retained within cells was applied and was diluted proportionally by subsequent cell divisions. Here, it was demonstrated that this assay could be implemented to quantitatively analyze the cell proliferation of different types of cell lines, and to concurrently analyze the proliferation of two types of cell lines in coculture by utilizing cell tracking dyes with different spectral characteristics. The mean division time estimated by the dye dilution assay is compared with the population doubling time obtained from conventional methods and values from literature. Additionally, dye transfer between cocultured cells was investigated and it was found that it is a characteristic of the cells rather than a characteristic of the dye. It was suggested that this method can be easily combined with other flow cytometric analyses of cellular properties, providing valuable information on cell status under diverse conditions. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  12. Engineering cholesterol-based fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Celine

    In 2015, the United States is expected to have nearly 600,000 deaths attributed to cancer. Of these 600,000 deaths, 90% will be a direct result of cancer metastasis, the spread of cancer throughout the body. During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors and migrate through bodily fluids, establishing secondary cancer sites. As cancer metastasis is incredibly lethal, there is a growing emphasis on developing "liquid biopsies" that can screen peripheral blood, search for and identify CTCs. One popular method for capturing CTCs is the use of a detection platform with antibodies specifically suited to recognize and capture cancer cells. These antibodies are immobilized onto the platform and can then bind and capture cells of interest. However, current means to immobilize antibodies often leave them with drastically reduced function. The antibodies are left poorly suited for cell capture, resulting in low cell capture efficiencies. This body of work investigates the use of lipid-based fibers to immobilize proteins in a way that retains protein function, ultimately leading to increased cell capture efficiencies. The resulting increased efficiencies are thought to arise from the retained three-dimensional structure of the protein as well as having a complete coating of the material surface with antibodies that are capable of interacting with their antigens. It is possible to electrospin cholesterol-based fibers that are similar in design to the natural cell membrane, providing proteins a more natural setting during immobilization. Such fibers have been produced from cholesterol-based cholesteryl succinyl silane (CSS). These fibers have previously illustrated a keen aptitude for retaining protein function and increasing cell capture. Herein the work focuses on three key concepts. First, a model is developed to understand the immobilization mechanism used by electrospun CSS fibers. The antibody immobilization and cell capturing

  13. Nanoroughened adhesion-based capture of circulating tumor cells with heterogeneous expression and metastatic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiqiang; Allen, Steven G; Reka, Ajaya Kumar; Qian, Weiyi; Han, Shuo; Zhao, Jianing; Bao, Liwei; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G; Merajver, Sofia D; Fu, Jianping

    2016-08-08

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have shown prognostic relevance in many cancer types. However, the majority of current CTC capture methods rely on positive selection techniques that require a priori knowledge about the surface protein expression of disseminated CTCs, which are known to be a dynamic population. We developed a microfluidic CTC capture chip that incorporated a nanoroughened glass substrate for capturing CTCs from blood samples. Our CTC capture chip utilized the differential adhesion preference of cancer cells to nanoroughened etched glass surfaces as compared to normal blood cells and thus did not depend on the physical size or surface protein expression of CTCs. The microfluidic CTC capture chip was able to achieve a superior capture yield for both epithelial cell adhesion molecule positive (EpCAM+) and EpCAM- cancer cells in blood samples. Additionally, the microfluidic CTC chip captured CTCs undergoing transforming growth factor beta-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (TGF-β-induced EMT) with dynamically down-regulated EpCAM expression. In a mouse model of human breast cancer using EpCAM positive and negative cell lines, the number of CTCs captured correlated positively with the size of the primary tumor and was independent of their EpCAM expression. Furthermore, in a syngeneic mouse model of lung cancer using cell lines with differential metastasis capability, CTCs were captured from all mice with detectable primary tumors independent of the cell lines' metastatic ability. The microfluidic CTC capture chip using a novel nanoroughened glass substrate is broadly applicable to capturing heterogeneous CTC populations of clinical interest independent of their surface marker expression and metastatic propensity. We were able to capture CTCs from a non-metastatic lung cancer model, demonstrating the potential of the chip to collect the entirety of CTC populations including subgroups of distinct biological and phenotypical properties. Further

  14. Quantivirus® HPV E6/E7 RNA 3.0 assay (bDNA) is as sensitive, but less specific than Hybrid Capture 2 test.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yong; Gong, Jiaomei; He, Yanxia; Cheng, Guomei; Okunieff, Paul; Li, Xiaofu

    2013-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the primary cause of cervical cancer. The Quantivirus(®) HPV E6/E7 RNA 3.0 assay (DiaCarta, CA, USA) detects E6/E7 mRNA of 13 high risk subtypes and 6 low risk subtypes. Cervical specimens collected in PreservCyt were processed for HPV detection. Cervical biopsies were taken only from those women with abnormal colposcopy. 200 out of 272 (73.5%) cases were mRNA positive. The percentage of HPV E6/E7 mRNA positive samples increases with the severity of the cytological diagnosis, but not in histological diagnosis. In 146 patients with both tests, the E6/E7 mRNA assay had significant higher positivity rate than the Hybrid Capture 2 assay (75.3% versus 62.3%). The HPV mRNA assay and the HC2 assay had the same sensitivity of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+), 82.4% (14/17) (95% confidence interval [CI], 64.3, 100). However, the specificity of CIN 2+ for the HPV mRNA assay was significantly lower than HC2 assay. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to compare the diagnostic performance of the E6/E7 mRNA and HC2. E6/E7 mRNA achieved 58.8% sensitivity with 74.1% specificity, HC2, achieved 47.1% sensitivity with 70.7% specificity. The overall performance of HPV E6/E7 mRNA assay for detecting CIN 2+ was lower than HC2. This study does not support the use of this assay in screening for cervical cancer prevention alone.

  15. Buccal Micronucleus Cytome Assay in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Naga, Mallika Bokka Sri Satya; Gour, Shreya; Nallagutta, Nalini; Velidandla, Surekha; Manikya, Sangameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sickle Cell Anaemia (SCA) is a commonly inherited blood disorder preceded by episodes of pain, chronic haemolytic anaemia and severe infections. The underlying phenomenon which causes this disease is the point mutation in the haemoglobin beta gene (Hbβ) found on chromosome 11 p. Increased oxidative stress leads to DNA damage. DNA damage occurring in such conditions can be studied by the buccal micronucleus cytome assay, which is a minimally invasive method for studying chromosomal instability, cell death and regenerative potential of human buccal tissue. Aim To evaluate genomic instability in patients with sickle cell disease by buccal micronucleus cytome assay. Materials and Methods The study included 40 sickle cell anemia patients (Group A) and 40 age and sex matched controls (Group B). Buccal swabs were collected and stained with Papanicolaou (PAP). Number of cells with micronucleus, binuclei, nuclear bud, pyknosis and karyolysis were counted in two groups as parameters for the evaluation of genome stability. Results All the analysis was done using t-test. A p-value of <0.001 was considered statistically significant. There was a statistically significant increase in micronuclei number in SCA patients when compared with controls. Karyolytic (un-nucleated) cell number in Group A was more than to those of the controls. Conclusion The results might suggest that patients with sickle cell anaemia have genome instability which is represented by the presence of micronuclei in the somatic cells. Presence of apoptotic cells might only indicate the bodily damage to the tissue as a result of the disease. PMID:27504413

  16. Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  17. Microsystems for the Capture of Low-Abundance Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmasiri, Udara; Witek, Małgorzata A.; Adams, Andre A.; Soper, Steven A.

    2010-07-01

    Efficient selection and enumeration of low-abundance biological cells are highly important in a variety of applications. For example, the clinical utility of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood is recognized as a viable biomarker for the management of various cancers, in which the clinically relevant number of CTCs per 7.5 ml of blood is two to five. Although there are several methods for isolating rare cells from a variety of heterogeneous samples, such as immunomagnetic-assisted cell sorting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting, they are fraught with challenges. Microsystem-based technologies are providing new opportunities for selecting and isolating rare cells from complex, heterogeneous samples. Such approaches involve reductions in target-cell loss, process automation, and minimization of contamination issues. In this review, we introduce different application areas requiring rare cell analysis, conventional techniques for their selection, and finally microsystem approaches for low-abundance-cell isolation and enumeration.

  18. A simple electronic volume cell sorter for clonogenicity assays.

    PubMed

    Freyer, J P; Wilder, M E; Schor, P L; Coulter, J; Raju, M R

    1989-05-01

    A single-parameter electronic volume flow cell sorter that can be easily and inexpensively constructed using existing technology is described. The instrument is designed for ease and flexibility of operation, including such features as a large open area for recovering sorted cells into a variety of dishes or vessels; a remote, electrically activated fluidics system; a mechanism for heating or cooling samples during sorting; a simple arrangement for monitoring and adjusting the sorting control parameters; and an interface to a standard IBM personal computer for data acquisition, analysis, and control of the sorting windows. Several researchers in our laboratory now routinely use this sorter for plating precise numbers of cells directly into culture dishes in an aseptic manner for clonogenicity assays. The instrument can sort cells at rates of up to approximately 2,000 per second with greater than 80% sorting efficiency and no cytotoxicity. An advantage of this system is that the sorting windows can be set to exclude acellular debris and include either the entire cell volume distribution or a subset thereof. Applications of the instrument are detailed, including 1) precise cell plating for low-dose survival studies, 2) separation of cells into age compartments, and 3) rapid inoculation of single cells into multiwell dishes for cloning studies. Advantages of this technology for cell survival studies are detailed, along with some limitations to its applicability.

  19. Integrated Device for Circulating Tumor Cell Capture, Characterization and Lens-Free Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    through a finely engineered parylene membrane microfilter, where the larger CTC (15-25 μm) are preferentially retained on the membrane while typical...pertaining to Aim 1 of the proposed studies of achieving tumor cell capture through parylene-based microfiltration technology for breast cancer...proposed studies of achieving tumor cell capture through parylene-based microfiltration technology for breast cancer. Simultaneously, in association with

  20. An assay to measure adriamycin binding in osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, M C; Kusuzaki, K; Mankin, H J; Springfield, D S

    1994-09-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is currently employed in the treatment of patients with osteosarcoma, but the drug regimens, although effective in improving disease-free survival, are unsuccessful in 20-40% of patients and very toxic. It would be useful to know whether tumor cells are sensitive to a given drug prior to its use. To this end, we developed a method of assessing Adriamycin (doxorubicin) binding to tumor nuclei as a possible means of detecting sensitivity to the drug. Adriamycin-sensitive murine osteosarcoma cells were used to develop the assay. The in vitro conditions (drug concentration, duration of incubation, and temperature) were optimized with use of the murine osteosarcoma cells in culture. After the cells had been incubated with Adriamycin, cell viability was determined and Adriamycin fluorescence intensity was measured with a cytofluorometer. The optimal parameters for Adriamycin binding were found to be a 30-minute incubation in a 10 micrograms/ml concentration of Adriamycin at 37 degrees C; the frequency of cells that emitted Adriamycin fluorescence from the nucleus compared with the total number of living cells reached 100% under these conditions. In a murine leukemia cell line with known sensitivity to Adriamycin, the cells emitted red fluorescence from the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas in a resistant line the cells emitted Adriamycin fluorescence from only the cytoplasm. We demonstrated that it is possible to differentiate nuclear from cytoplasmic concentration of Adriamycin in a tumor cell with use of a fluorescent microscope and that resistant cell lines can be distinguished from sensitive cell lines by this method.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Quantitative determination of VEGF165 in cell culture medium by aptamer sandwich based chemiluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Shan, Siwen; He, Ziyi; Mao, Sifeng; Jie, Mingsha; Yi, Linglu; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2017-08-15

    In this work, we have developed a sensitive and selective chemiluminescence (CL) assay for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165) quantitative detection based on two specific VEGF165 binding aptamers (Apt). VEGF is a predominant biomarker in cancer angiogenesis, and sensitive detection method of VEGF are highly demanded for both academic study and clinical diagnosis of multiple cancers. In our experiment, VEGF165 was captured in a sandwich structure assembled by two binding aptamers, one capture aptamer was immobilized on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads (MBs) and another VEGF-binding aptamer was labeled by biotin for further phosphatase conjunction. After Apt-VEGF-Apt sandwich was formed on MBs surface, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was modified to the second aptamer to catalyze CL reaction. By applying 4-methoxy-4-(3-phosphatephenyl)-spiro-(1,2-dioxetane-3,2-adamantane) (AMPPD) as CL substrate, strong signal intensity was achieved. VEGF165 content as low as 1ng/mL was detected in standard spiked samples by our assay, and linear range of working curve was confirmed from 1 to 20ng/mL. Then our method was successfully applied for cell culture medium analysis and on-chip hypoxic HepG2-HUVEC co-culture model study with excellent accuracy equal to ELISA Kit. Our developed assay demonstrated an outstanding performance in VEGF165 quantification and may be further extended to clinical testing of important biomarkers as well as probing microchip cell culture model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Phagocytosis Assay for Apoptotic Cells in Drosophila Embryos.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Saori; Hori, Aki; Nakanishi, Yoshinobu; Kuraishi, Takayuki

    2017-08-03

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells need to be elucidated in more detail because of its role in immune and inflammatory intractable diseases. We herein developed an experimental method to investigate phagocytosis quantitatively using the fruit fly Drosophila, in which the gene network controlling engulfment reactions is evolutionally conserved from mammals. In order to accurately detect and count engulfing and un-engulfing phagocytes using whole animals, Drosophila embryos were homogenized to obtain dispersed cells including phagocytes and apoptotic cells. The use of dispersed embryonic cells enables us to measure in vivo phagocytosis levels as if we performed an in vitro phagocytosis assay in which it is possible to observe all phagocytes and apoptotic cells in whole embryos and precisely quantify the level of phagocytosis. We confirmed that this method reproduces those of previous studies that identified the genes required for the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. This method allows the engulfment of dead cells to be analyzed, and when combined with the powerful genetics of Drosophila, will reveal the complex phagocytic reactions comprised of the migration, recognition, engulfment, and degradation of apoptotic cells by phagocytes.

  3. Development of a Drosophila cell-based error correction assay.

    PubMed

    Salemi, Jeffrey D; McGilvray, Philip T; Maresca, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Accurate transmission of the genome through cell division requires microtubules from opposing spindle poles to interact with protein super-structures called kinetochores that assemble on each sister chromatid. Most kinetochores establish erroneous attachments that are destabilized through a process called error correction. Failure to correct improper kinetochore-microtubule (kt-MT) interactions before anaphase onset results in chromosomal instability (CIN), which has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor adaptation. Thus, it is important to characterize the molecular basis of error correction to better comprehend how CIN occurs and how it can be modulated. An error correction assay has been previously developed in cultured mammalian cells in which incorrect kt-MT attachments are created through the induction of monopolar spindle assembly via chemical inhibition of kinesin-5. Error correction is then monitored following inhibitor wash out. Implementing the error correction assay in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells would be valuable because kt-MT attachments are easily visualized and the cells are highly amenable to RNAi and high-throughput screening. However, Drosophila kinesin-5 (Klp61F) is unaffected by available small molecule inhibitors. To overcome this limitation, we have rendered S2 cells susceptible to kinesin-5 inhibitors by functionally replacing Klp61F with human kinesin-5 (Eg5). Eg5 expression rescued the assembly of monopolar spindles typically caused by Klp61F depletion. Eg5-mediated bipoles collapsed into monopoles due, in part, to kinesin-14 (Ncd) activity when treated with the kinesin-5 inhibitor S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC). Furthermore, bipolar spindles reassembled and error correction was observed after STLC wash out. Importantly, error correction in Eg5-expressing S2 cells was dependent on the well-established error correction kinase Aurora B. This system provides a powerful new cell-based platform for studying error correction and CIN.

  4. Dielectrophoretic capture voltage spectrum for measurement of dielectric properties and separation of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liqun; Lanry Yung, Lin-Yue; Lim, Kian-Meng

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new dielectrophoresis (DEP) method based on capture voltage spectrum is proposed for measuring dielectric properties of biological cells. The capture voltage spectrum can be obtained from the balance of dielectrophoretic force and Stokes drag force acting on the cell in a microfluidic device with fluid flow and strip electrodes. The method was demonstrated with the measurement of dielectric properties of human colon cancer cells (HT-29 cells). From the capture voltage spectrum, the real part of Clausius–Mossotti factor of HT-29 cells for different frequencies of applied electric field was obtained. The dielectric properties of cell interior and plasma membrane were then estimated by using single-shell dielectric model. The cell interior permittivity and conductivity were found to be insensitive to changes in the conductivity of the medium in which the cells are suspended, but the measured permittivity and conductivity of cell membrane were found to increase with the increase of medium conductivity. In addition, the measurement of capture voltage spectrum was found to be useful in providing the optimum operating conditions for separating HT-29 cells from other cells (such as red blood cells) using dielectrophoresis. PMID:22662097

  5. Nanotextured PDMS Substrates for Enhanced Roughness and Aptamer Immobilization for Cancer Cell Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Muhymin; Mahmood, Arif; Bellah, Md.; Kim, Young-Tae; Iqbal, Samir

    2014-03-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the early stages of cancer is requires very sensitive approach. Nanotextured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates were fabricated by micro reactive ion etching (Micro-RIE) to have better control on surface morphology and to improve the affinity of PDMS surfaces to capture cancer cells using surface immobilized aptamers. The aptamers were specific to epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) present in cell membranes, and overexpressed in tumor cells. We also investigated the effect of nano-scale features on cell capturing by implementing various surfaces of different roughnesses. Three different recipes were used to prepare nanotextured PDMS by micro-RIE using oxygen (O2) and carbon tetrafluoride (CF4). The measured average roughness of three nanotextured PDMS surfaces were found to impact average densities of captured cells. In all cases, nanotextured PDMS facilitated cell capturing possibly due to increased effective surface area of roughened substrates at nanoscale. It was also observed that cell capture efficiency was higher for higher surface roughness. The nanotextured PDMS substrates are thus useful for cancer cytology devices.

  6. Human iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cell Sprouting Assay in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Activation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by growth factors initiates a cascade of events in vivo consisting of EC tip cell selection, sprout formation, EC stalk cell proliferation, and ultimately vascular stabilization by support cells. Although EC functional assays can recapitulate one or more aspects of angiogenesis in vitro, they are often limited by a lack of definition to the substratum and lack of dependence on key angiogenic signaling axes. Here, we designed and characterized a chemically-defined model of endothelial sprouting behavior in vitro using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs). Thiol-ene photopolymerization was used to rapidly encapsulate iPSC-ECs at high density in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel spheres and subsequently to rapidly encapsulate iPSC-EC-containing hydrogel spheres in a cell-free over-layer. The hydrogel sprouting array here maintained pro-angiogenic phenotype of iPSC-ECs and supported growth factor-dependent proliferation and sprouting behavior. The sprouting model responded appropriately to several reference pharmacological angiogenesis inhibitors, which suggests the functional role of vascular endothelial growth factor, NF-κB, matrix metalloproteinase-2/9, protein kinase activity, and β-tubulin in endothelial sprouting. A blinded screen of 38 putative vascular disrupting compounds (pVDCs) from the US Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast library identified five compounds th

  7. Sensitivity of Edge Detection Methods for Quantifying Cell Migration Assays

    PubMed Central

    Treloar, Katrina K.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative imaging methods to analyze cell migration assays are not standardized. Here we present a suite of two-dimensional barrier assays describing the collective spreading of an initially-confined population of 3T3 fibroblast cells. To quantify the motility rate we apply two different automatic image detection methods to locate the position of the leading edge of the spreading population after , and hours. These results are compared with a manual edge detection method where we systematically vary the detection threshold. Our results indicate that the observed spreading rates are very sensitive to the choice of image analysis tools and we show that a standard measure of cell migration can vary by as much as 25% for the same experimental images depending on the details of the image analysis tools. Our results imply that it is very difficult, if not impossible, to meaningfully compare previously published measures of cell migration since previous results have been obtained using different image analysis techniques and the details of these techniques are not always reported. Using a mathematical model, we provide a physical interpretation of our edge detection results. The physical interpretation is important since edge detection algorithms alone do not specify any physical measure, or physical definition, of the leading edge of the spreading population. Our modeling indicates that variations in the image threshold parameter correspond to a consistent variation in the local cell density. This means that varying the threshold parameter is equivalent to varying the location of the leading edge in the range of approximately 1–5% of the maximum cell density. PMID:23826283

  8. Sensitivity of edge detection methods for quantifying cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Treloar, Katrina K; Simpson, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative imaging methods to analyze cell migration assays are not standardized. Here we present a suite of two-dimensional barrier assays describing the collective spreading of an initially-confined population of 3T3 fibroblast cells. To quantify the motility rate we apply two different automatic image detection methods to locate the position of the leading edge of the spreading population after 24, 48 and 72 hours. These results are compared with a manual edge detection method where we systematically vary the detection threshold. Our results indicate that the observed spreading rates are very sensitive to the choice of image analysis tools and we show that a standard measure of cell migration can vary by as much as 25% for the same experimental images depending on the details of the image analysis tools. Our results imply that it is very difficult, if not impossible, to meaningfully compare previously published measures of cell migration since previous results have been obtained using different image analysis techniques and the details of these techniques are not always reported. Using a mathematical model, we provide a physical interpretation of our edge detection results. The physical interpretation is important since edge detection algorithms alone do not specify any physical measure, or physical definition, of the leading edge of the spreading population. Our modeling indicates that variations in the image threshold parameter correspond to a consistent variation in the local cell density. This means that varying the threshold parameter is equivalent to varying the location of the leading edge in the range of approximately 1-5% of the maximum cell density.

  9. Blood Meal Identification in Field-Captured Sand flies: Comparison of PCR-RFLP and ELISA Assays

    PubMed Central

    Maleki-Ravasan, N; Oshaghi, MA; Javadian, E; Rassi, Y; Sadraei, J; Mohtarami, F

    2009-01-01

    Background We aimed to develop a PCR-RFLP assay based on available sequences of putative vertebrate hosts to identify blood meals ingested by field female sand fly in the northwest of Iran. In addition, the utility of PCR-RFLP was compared with ELISA as a standard method. Methods: This experimental study was performed in the Insect Molecular Biology Laboratory of School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran in 2006–2007. For PCR-RFLP a set of conserved vertebrate primers were used to amplify a part of the host mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene followed by digestion of the PCR products by Hae III enzyme. Results: The PCR-RFLP and ELISA assays revealed that 34% and 27% of field-collected sand flies had fed on humans, respectively. Additionally, PCR-RFLP assays could reveal specific host DNA as well as the components of mixed blood meals. Results of PCR-RFLP assay showed that the sand flies had fed on cow (54%), human (10%), dog (4%), human and cow (21%), dog and cow (14%), and human and dog (3%). Conclusion: The results can provide a novel method for rapid diagnosis of blood meal taken by sandflies. The advantages and limitations of PCR and ELISA assays are discussed. PMID:22808367

  10. Cell- and biomarker-based assays for predicting nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A; Cooper, Matthew A

    2014-12-01

    Drug-induced nephrotoxicity contributes to the failure rate of investigational drugs during clinical trials. We are still not able to accurately predict drug-induced nephrotoxicity during early drug discovery and development. There is an urgent need for a robust screening system that can identify nephrotoxic compounds before they reach the clinic. This review discusses traditional and emerging kidney injury biomarkers that are used for the determination of nephrotoxicity and for evaluation and diagnosis of other kidney diseases. The potential for in vivo biomarkers to predict renal toxicity in high-throughput in vitro screening assays is discussed. We also compare cell types and highlight novel three-dimensional (3D) culture technologies with potential for in vitro prediction of nephrotoxicity. Traditional cell culture methods and cytotoxicity assays are well established as in vitro tests for nephrotoxicity but the correlation with in vivo results is extremely poor. Recently validated renal biomarkers show promise for early in vivo detection of nephrotoxicity, but have yet to be successfully applied for in vitro prediction of drug-induced nephrotoxicity. Advanced culture technologies 'kidney-on-a-chip' and 3D culture can produce biomarker signatures from relevant kidney cell types that show promise as better predictive systems.

  11. Automation of the ELISpot assay for high-throughput detection of antigen-specific T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Coral-Ann M; Roberts, Steven G; Laird, Rebecca; McKinnon, Elizabeth; Ahmed, Imran; Pfafferott, Katja; Turley, Joanne; Keane, Niamh M; Lucas, Andrew; Rushton, Ben; Chopra, Abha; Mallal, Simon; John, Mina

    2009-05-15

    The enzyme linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay is a fundamental tool in cellular immunology, providing both quantitative and qualitative information on cellular cytokine responses to defined antigens. It enables the comprehensive screening of patient derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells to reveal the antigenic restriction of T-cell responses and is an emerging technique in clinical laboratory investigation of certain infectious diseases. As with all cellular-based assays, the final results of the assay are dependent on a number of technical variables that may impact precision if not highly standardised between operators. When studies that are large scale or using multiple antigens are set up manually, these assays may be labour intensive, have many manual handling steps, are subject to data and sample integrity failure and may show large inter-operator variability. Here we describe the successful automated performance of the interferon (IFN)-gamma ELISpot assay from cell counting through to electronic capture of cytokine quantitation and present the results of a comparison between automated and manual performance of the ELISpot assay. The mean number of spot forming units enumerated by both methods for limiting dilutions of CMV, EBV and influenza (CEF)-derived peptides in six healthy individuals were highly correlated (r>0.83, p<0.05). The precision results from the automated system compared favourably with the manual ELISpot and further ensured electronic tracking, increased through-put and reduced turnaround time.

  12. Appropriate nonwoven filters effectively capture human peripheral blood cells and mesenchymal stem cells, which show enhanced production of growth factors.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hideo; Iwamoto, Ushio; Niimi, Gen; Shinzato, Masanori; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Tokushima, Yasuo; Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Ohashi, Atsushi; Nakai, Shigeru; Yasutake, Mikitomo; Kitaguchi, Nobuya

    2015-03-01

    Scaffolds, growth factors, and cells are three essential components in regenerative medicine. Nonwoven filters, which capture cells, provide a scaffold that localizes and concentrates cells near injured tissues. Further, the cells captured on the filters are expected to serve as a local supply of growth factors. In this study, we investigated the growth factors produced by cells captured on nonwoven filters. Nonwoven filters made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA), or chitin (1.2-22 μm fiber diameter) were cut out as 13 mm disks and placed into cell-capturing devices. Human mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissues (h-ASCs) and peripheral blood cells (h-PBCs) were captured on the filter and cultured to evaluate growth factor production. The cell-capture rates strongly depended on the fiber diameter and the number of filter disks. Nonwoven filter disks were composed of PET or PLA fibers with fiber diameters of 1.2-1.8 μm captured over 70% of leukocytes or 90% of h-ASCs added. The production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor β1, and platelet-derived growth factor AB were significantly enhanced by the h-PBCs captured on PET or PLA filters. h-ASCs on PLA filters showed significantly enhanced production of VEGF. These enhancements varied with the combination of the nonwoven filter and cells. Because of the enhanced growth factor production, the proliferation of human fibroblasts increased in conditioned medium from h-PBCs on PET filters. This device consisting of nonwoven filters and cells should be investigated further for possible use in the regeneration of impaired tissues.

  13. Discontinuous nanoporous membranes reduce non-specific fouling for immunoaffinity cell capture.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sukant; Wong, Ian Y; Yanik, Ahmet Ali; Deen, William M; Toner, Mehmet

    2013-12-20

    The microfluidic isolation of target cells using adhesion-based surface capture has been widely explored for biology and medicine. However, high-throughput processing can be challenging due to interfacial limitations such as transport, reaction, and non-specific fouling. Here, it is shown that antibody-functionalized capture surfaces with discontinuous permeability enable efficient target cell capture at high flow rates by decreasing fouling. Experimental characterization and theoretical modeling reveal that "wall effects" affect cell-surface interactions and promote excess surface accumulation. These issues are partially circumvented by reducing the transport and deposition of cells near the channel walls. Optimized microfluidic devices can be operated at higher cell concentrations with significant improvements in throughput. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Heterochronic Pellet Assay to Test Cell-cell Communication in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Nobuhiko; Zinyk, Dawn; Ringuette, Randy; Wallace, Valerie; Schuurmans, Carol

    2017-01-01

    All seven retinal cell types that make up the mature retina are generated from a common, multipotent pool of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) (Wallace, 2011). One way that RPCs know when sufficient numbers of particular cell-types have been generated is through negative feedback signals, which are emitted by differentiated cells and must reach threshold levels to block additional differentiation of that cell type. A key assay to assess whether negative feedback signals are emitted by differentiated cells is a heterochronic pellet assay in which early stage RPCs are dissociated and labeled with BrdU, then mixed with a 20-fold excess of dissociated differentiated cells. The combined cells are then re-aggregated and cultured as a pellet on a membrane for 7–10 days in vitro. During this time frame, RPCs will differentiate, and the fate of the BrdU+ RPCs can be assessed using cell type-specific markers. Investigators who developed this pellet assay initially demonstrated that neonatal RPCs give rise to rods on an accelerated schedule compared to embryonic RPCs when the two cell types are mixed together (Watanabe and Raff, 1990; Watanabe et al., 1997). We have used this assay to demonstrate that sonic hedgehog (Shh), which we found acts as a negative regulator of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) differentiation, promotes RPC proliferation (Jensen and Wallace, 1997; Ringuette et al., 2014). More recently we modified the heterochronic pellet assay to assess the role of feedback signals for retinal amacrine cells, identifying transforming growth factor β2 (Tgfβ2) as a negative feedback signal, and Pten as a modulator of the Tgfβ2 response (Ma et al., 2007; Tachibana et al., 2016). This assay can be adapted to other lineages and tissues to assess cell-cell interactions between two different cell-types (heterotypic) in either an isochronic or heterochronic manner.

  15. Automated Cell-Based Assay for Screening of Aquaporin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mola, Maria Grazia; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Spray, David C.; Frigeri, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Aquaporins form water channels that play major roles in a variety of physiological processes so that altered expression or function may underlie pathological conditions. In order to identify compounds that modulate aquaporin function, we have implemented a functional assay based on rapid measurement of osmotically induced cell volume changes to screen several libraries of diverse drugs. The time course of fluorescence changes in calcein-loaded cells was analyzed during an osmotic challenge using a 96-multiwell fluorescence plate reader. This system was validated using astrocyte primary cultures and fibroblasts that strongly express endogenous AQP4 and AQP1 proteins, respectively, as well as AQP4-transfected cells. We screened 3575 compounds, including 418 FDA-approved and commercially available drugs, for their effect on AQP-mediated water transport. Primary screening yielded 10 compounds that affected water transport activity in both astrocytes and AQP4-transfected cells and 42 compounds that altered cell volume regulation in astrocytes. Selected drugs were then analyzed on AQP1-expressing erythrocytes and AQP4-expressing membrane vesicles by stopped-flow light scattering. Four molecules of the National Cancer Institute's chemical library (NSC164914, NSC670229, NSC168597, NSC301460) were identified that differentially affected both AQP4 and AQP1 mediated water transport, with EC50 values between 20 and 50 μM. This fluorescence microplate reader-based assay may, thus, provide a platform for high-throughput screening which, when coupled to a secondary evaluation to confirm target specificity, should allow discovery of AQP-specific compounds for novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of water balance disorders. PMID:19705854

  16. Automated cell-based assay for screening of aquaporin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mola, Maria Grazia; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Spray, David C; Frigeri, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    Aquaporins form water channels that play major roles in a variety of physiological processes so that altered expression or function may underlie pathological conditions. In order to identify compounds that modulate aquaporin function, we have implemented a functional assay based on rapid measurement of osmotically induced cell volume changes to screen several libraries of diverse drugs. The time course of fluorescence changes in calcein-loaded cells was analyzed during an osmotic challenge using a 96-multiwell fluorescence plate reader. This system was validated using astrocyte primary cultures and fibroblasts that strongly express endogenous AQP4 and AQP1 proteins, respectively, as well as AQP4-transfected cells. We screened 3575 compounds, including 418 FDA-approved and commercially available drugs, for their effect on AQP-mediated water transport. Primary screening yielded 10 compounds that affected water transport activity in both astrocytes and AQP4-transfected cells and 42 compounds that altered cell volume regulation in astrocytes. Selected drugs were then analyzed on AQP1-expressing erythrocytes and AQP4-expressing membrane vesicles by stopped-flow light scattering. Four molecules of the National Cancer Institute's chemical library (NSC164914, NSC670229, NSC168597, NSC301460) were identified that differentially affected both AQP4 and AQP1 mediated water transport, with EC50 values between 20 and 50 microM. This fluorescence microplate reader-based assay may, thus, provide a platform for high-throughput screening which, when coupled to a secondary evaluation to confirm target specificity, should allow discovery of AQP-specific compounds for novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of water balance disorders.

  17. Oxygen Control For Bioreactors And In-vitro Cell Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nock, V.; Blaikie, R. J.; David, T.

    2009-07-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is an important parameter in biomedical and cell-culture applications. Several studies have found cell survival and function to be intimately linked to oxygen concentration. Laminar flow, as observed in microfluidic devices, provides an ideal environment to manipulate and control concentration gradients. In this paper we demonstrate the first characterization of integrated fluorescence-based oxygen sensors for DO measurement within a cell-culture bioreactor device. Solid-state PtOEPK/PS sensor patterns were integrated into the PDMS-based bioreactor and calibrated for detection of DO concentration with a superimposed layer of collagen and Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells. The sensor signal of the layer subjacent to the cells was found to follow a Stern-Volmer model and the intensity ratio was measured to I0/I100 = 3.9 after 3 days in culture. The device provides a novel tool for the control and spatially-resolved measurement of oxygen levels in cellular assays and cell-culture applications.

  18. Live-cell migration and adhesion turnover assays.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, J; Young, K; Brown, Claire M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has revolutionized the way live-cell imaging is achieved. At the same time, it is also potentially harmful to a living specimen. Therefore, the specimen must be monitored for viability and health before, during, and after imaging sessions. Methods for monitoring cell viability and health will be discussed in this chapter. Another key to successful live-cell imaging is to minimize light exposure as much as possible. A summary of strategies for minimizing light exposure including maximizing the light throughput of the microscope and the sensitivity of light detection is presented. Various fluorescence microscopy techniques are presented with a focus on how the light is delivered to the sample (i.e., light density) and pros and cons for use with living specimens. The reader is also directed to other publications that go into these topics in more detail. Methods are described on how to prepare samples for single cell migration assays, how to measure cell migration rates (e.g., bright-field, semi-automated, and automated), and how to measure focal adhesion turnover rates. Details of how to correct images for background intensity and field-illumination uniformity artifacts for quantitative imaging are also described. Overall, this chapter will be helpful to scientists who are interested in imaging live specimens using fluorescence microscopy techniques. It will be of particular interest to anyone wanting to perform quantitative fluorescence imaging, and wanting to measure cell migration rates, and focal adhesion dynamics.

  19. A microchip for integrated single-cell genotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui; Sun, Hao; Zheng, Jianping

    2016-12-01

    With the development of large-scale biologic databases, precision medicine is becoming a frontier in biomedical research. As a main focus of precision medicine study, cancer has been widely accepted as a disease born out of inherited genetic variations or accumulating genomic damage. At the single-cell level, microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip technology for cancer study is an emerging tool for improving risk assessment, diagnostic categories and therapeutic strategies. This work presents a multi-layer microchip for single-cell gene expression profiling. Treated by three drug reagents (i.e. methyl methanesulfonate, docetaxel and colchicine) with varied concentrations and time lengths, individual human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) are then lysed on-chip, and the released mRNA templates are captured and reversely transcribed into cDNA on microbead surface. Three genes (GAPDH, CDKN1A, AURKA) are amplified and quantified simultaneously through triplex real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR). Readout per run is set to be eighteen, and can be further improved following same approach. The microchip is able to integrate all steps of single-cell gene expression profiling, and provide precision study of drug induced genotoxicity with reduced reagents consumption per reaction and instrumental cost.

  20. A minimal physical model captures the shapes of crawling cells.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, E; Tiribocchi, A; Marenduzzo, D; Cates, M E

    2015-01-21

    Cell motility in higher organisms (eukaryotes) is crucial to biological functions ranging from wound healing to immune response, and also implicated in diseases such as cancer. For cells crawling on hard surfaces, significant insights into motility have been gained from experiments replicating such motion in vitro. Such experiments show that crawling uses a combination of actin treadmilling (polymerization), which pushes the front of a cell forward, and myosin-induced stress (contractility), which retracts the rear. Here we present a simplified physical model of a crawling cell, consisting of a droplet of active polar fluid with contractility throughout, but treadmilling connected to a thin layer near the supporting wall. The model shows a variety of shapes and/or motility regimes, some closely resembling cases seen experimentally. Our work strongly supports the view that cellular motility exploits autonomous physical mechanisms whose operation does not need continuous regulatory effort.

  1. A minimal physical model captures the shapes of crawling cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjhung, E.; Tiribocchi, A.; Marenduzzo, D.; Cates, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Cell motility in higher organisms (eukaryotes) is crucial to biological functions ranging from wound healing to immune response, and also implicated in diseases such as cancer. For cells crawling on hard surfaces, significant insights into motility have been gained from experiments replicating such motion in vitro. Such experiments show that crawling uses a combination of actin treadmilling (polymerization), which pushes the front of a cell forward, and myosin-induced stress (contractility), which retracts the rear. Here we present a simplified physical model of a crawling cell, consisting of a droplet of active polar fluid with contractility throughout, but treadmilling connected to a thin layer near the supporting wall. The model shows a variety of shapes and/or motility regimes, some closely resembling cases seen experimentally. Our work strongly supports the view that cellular motility exploits autonomous physical mechanisms whose operation does not need continuous regulatory effort.

  2. Biodegradable nano-films for capture and non-invasive release of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Myoung-Hwan; Castleberry, Steven; Deng, Jason Z.; Hsu, Bryan; Mayner, Sarah; Jensen, Anne E.; Sequist, Lecia V.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2016-01-01

    Selective isolation and purification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood is an important capability for both clinical medicine and biological research. Current techniques to perform this task place the isolated cells under excessive stresses that reduce cell viability, and potentially induce phenotype change, therefore losing valuable information about the isolated cells. We present a biodegradable nano-film coating on the surface of a microfluidic chip, which can be used to effectively capture as well as non-invasively release cancer cell lines such as PC-3, LNCaP, DU 145, H1650 and H1975. We have applied layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly to create a library of ultrathin coatings using a broad range of materials through complementary interactions. By developing an LbL nano-film coating with an affinity-based cell-capture surface that is capable of selectively isolating cancer cells from whole blood, and that can be rapidly degraded on command, we are able to gently isolate cancer cells and recover them without compromising cell viability or proliferative potential. Our approach has the capability to overcome practical hurdles and provide viable cancer cells for downstream analyses, such as live cell imaging, single cell genomics, and in vitro cell culture of recovered cells. Furthermore, CTCs from cancer patients were also captured, identified, and successfully released using the LbL-modified microchips. PMID:26142780

  3. Cell based assays for anti-Plasmodium activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mokgethi-Morule, Thabang; N'Da, David D

    2016-03-10

    Malaria remains one of the most common and deadly infectious diseases worldwide. The severity of this global public health challenge is reflected by the approximately 198 million people, who were reportedly infected in 2013 and by the more than 584,000 related deaths in that same year. The rising emergence of drug resistance towards the once effective artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) has become a serious concern and warrants more robust drug development strategies, with the objective of eradicating malaria infections. The intricate biology and life cycle of Plasmodium parasites complicate the understanding of the disease in such a way that would enhance the development of more effective chemotherapies that would achieve radical clinical cure and that would prevent disease relapse. Phenotypic cell based assays have for long been a valuable approach and involve the screening and analysis of diverse compounds with regards to their activities towards whole Plasmodium parasites in vitro. To achieve the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of malaria eradication by 2020, new generation drugs that are active against all parasite stages (erythrocytic (blood), exo-erythrocytic (liver stages and gametocytes)) are needed. Significant advances are being made in assay development to overcome some of the practical challenges of assessing drug efficacy, particularly in the liver and transmission stage Plasmodium models. This review discusses primary screening models and the fundamental progress being made in whole cell based efficacy screens of anti-malarial activity. Ongoing challenges and some opportunities for improvements in assay development that would assist in the discovery of effective, safe and affordable drugs for malaria treatments are also discussed.

  4. Cell-based assays in GPCR drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Siehler, Sandra

    2008-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals into the intracellular space, and play key roles in the physiological regulation of virtually every cell and tissue. Characteristic for the GPCR superfamily of cell surface receptors are their seven transmembrane-spanning alpha-helices, an extracellular N terminus and intracellular C-terminal tail. Besides transmission of extracellular signals, their activity is modulated by cellular signals in an auto- or transregulatory fashion. The molecular complexity of GPCRs and their regulated signaling networks triggered the interest in academic research groups to explore them further, and their drugability and role in pathophysiology triggers pharmaceutical research towards small molecular weight ligands and therapeutic antibodies. About 30% of marketed drugs target GPCRs, which underlines the importance of this target class. This review describes current and emerging cellular assays for the ligand discovery of GPCRs.

  5. Photosynthetic light capture and processing from cell to canopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stenberg, P.; DeLucia, E.H.; Schoettle, A.W.; Smolander, H.

    1995-07-01

    We have addressed the unique structural features of conifers, as they relate to photosynthetic production, at different levels of organization (from needle to canopy). Many concepts and measures must be defined for conifers so that they are consistent with the structural properties of needles and shoots. Consistency is needed in comparing the photosynthetic performance of conifers and broad leaves, wherein it is important to distinguish the effect of structural factors on light capture from differences in the photosynthetic response at a fixed interception. Needles differ from broad leaves both with respect to inner structure and external shape, which includes a continuum from nearly flat to cylindrical. For nonflat three-dimensional objects such as for conifer needles, total surface area is the natural measure. The meaning of the one-sided area of needles is not clear, but consistency requires that it be defined as half the total needle surface area, as concluded. Characteristic structural factors of conifers that affect their ability to harvest light are a deep canopy combined with a small needle size, which create an important penumbra effect, and the clustering of needles on shoots, which creates a discontinuous distribution of needle area. These factors imply that, at a fixed leaf area index, the intercepted PAR would be smaller in coniferous than in broad-leafed canopies, but the vertical gradient of light in conifers is less steep and light reaching the lower canopy is all penumbral (diffuse). Conifers can maintain a higher leaf area index, and this may be accomplished by a more even distribution of light between shoots at different locations in the canopy and also because shade shoots have a structure that effectively intercepts light. Broad leaves in general have higher maximum photosynthetic rates than do needles, and yet conifers are at least equally productive on a stand basis. Possible reasons are discussed.

  6. Viable capture and release of cancer cells in human whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Il; Yoo, Hwan-il; Cho, Young-Ho; Lee, Jinseon; Kwan Kim, Hong; Kim, Jhingook

    2012-07-01

    We present viable cancer cell isolation devices utilizing the physical properties of cells. The tapered slit structure is proposed to isolate cancer cells from blood cells and collect them by reversed flow. From the experimental study using the spiked cancer cells in human whole blood, we verified the capability of the present cancer cell isolation chip in terms of capture efficiency, viability, and release rate. The viable cancer cells obtained from the present chip can be used for the further applications of cancer diagnosis, treatment monitoring, and new target drug development for cancer stem cells.

  7. Stamping vital cells - a force-based ligand receptor assay.

    PubMed

    Wienken, Uta; Gaub, Hermann E

    2013-12-17

    Gaining information about receptor profiles on cells, and subsequently finding the most efficient ligands for these signaling receptors, remain challenging tasks in stem cell and cancer research as well as drug development. We introduce a live-cell method with great potential in both screening for surface receptors and analysing binding forces of different ligands. The technique is based on the molecular force assay, a parallel-format, high-throughput experiment on a single-molecule level. On human red blood cells, we demonstrate the detection of the interaction of N-acetyl-α-D-galactosaminyl residues with the lectin helix pomatia agglutinine and of the CD47 receptor with its antibody. The measurements are performed under nearly physiological conditions and still provide a highly specific binding signal. Moreover, with a detailed comparative force analysis on two cell types with different morphology, we show that our method even allows the determination of a DNA force equivalent for the interaction of the CD47 receptor and its antibody. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Use of Nanotrap Particles Technology in Capturing HIV-1 Virions and Viral Proteins from Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sampey, Gavin; Shafagati, Nazly; Van Duyne, Rachel; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel; Young, Mary; Lepene, Benjamin; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic but incurable illness since long-term HAART can keep the virus to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases viral burden. Moreover, patients under HAART frequently develop various metabolic disorders and HIV-associated neuronal disease. Today, the main challenge of HIV-1 research is the elimination of the residual virus in infected individuals. The current HIV-1 diagnostics are largely comprised of serological and nucleic acid based technologies. Our goal is to integrate the nanotrap technology into a standard research tool that will allow sensitive detection of HIV-1 infection. This study demonstrates that majority of HIV-1 virions in culture supernatants and Tat/Nef proteins spiked in culture medium can be captured by nanotrap particles. To determine the binding affinities of different baits, we incubated target molecules with nanotrap particles at room temperature. After short sequestration, materials were either eluted or remained attached to nanotrap particles prior to analysis. The unique affinity baits of nanotrap particles preferentially bound HIV-1 materials while excluded albumin. A high level capture of Tat or Tat peptide by NT082 and NT084 particles was measured by western blot (WB). Intracellular Nef protein was captured by NT080, while membrane-associated Nef was captured by NT086 and also detected by WB. Selective capture of HIV-1 particles by NT073 and NT086 was measured by reverse transcriptase assay, while capture of infectious HIV-1 by these nanoparticles was demonstrated by functional transactivation in TZM-bl cells. We also demonstrated specific capture of HIV-1 particles and exosomes-containing TAR-RNA in patients' serum by NT086 and NT082 particles, respectively, using specific qRT-PCR. Collectively, our data indicate that certain types of nanotrap particles selectively capture specific HIV-1 molecules, and we propose to use this technology as a platform to enhance HIV-1

  9. Capturing the Potential of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, James

    2010-10-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells are a continually developing type of low-cost solar cells that have commercial efficiency around 6-10%. The proposed research here will be focusing on the photo-bleaching and improving techniques for electron transport. Nature has given us a goal to reach towards with proven techniques for converting light into energy with around 30-40% efficiency, however, chlorophyll, the light absorber in plants, is expensive and it is not practical to make solar cells with only chlorophyll as the absorber. One such alternative to chlorophyll is phthalocyanines which is a common industrial dye used in many applications. This dye has a common similar ring without the long phytol chain that chlorophyll has. Previous research has shown that encapsulating organic dyes can magnify the properties of dye from the increased concentration with a possible benefit of stabilizing the dye allowing it to slow down the photo bleaching significantly. Likewise, such encapsulation may help with thermal stability since many dye-sensitized solar cells require a liquid or gel solution that is sensitive to thermal expansion. Many researchers are also finding new ways to encapsulate the dyes or dope the p-n layers with nano and meso tubes to help with electron transport or build the p-n layers right in the tubes. This allows for countless layers and an overall more efficient design.

  10. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C.; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force (FDEP) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10). PMID:26392836

  11. Comparison of the analytical and clinical performances of Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV, Hybrid Capture 2, and DNA Chip assays in gynecology patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungman; Kang, Youjin; Kim, Dong Geun; Kim, Eui-Chong; Park, Sung Sup; Seong, Moon-Woo

    2013-08-01

    The detection of high-risk (HR) HPV in cervical cancer screening is important for early diagnosis of cervical cancer or pre-cancerous lesions. We evaluated the analytical and clinical performances of 3 HR HPV assays in Gynecology patients. A total of 991 specimens were included in this study: 787 specimens for use with a Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) and 204 specimens for a HPV DNA microarray (DNA Chip). All specimens were tested using an Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV assay (Real-time HR), PGMY PCR, and sequence analysis. Clinical sensitivities for severe abnormal cytology (severe than high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) were 81.8% for Real-time HR, 77.3% for HC2, and 66.7% for DNA Chip, and clinical sensitivities for severe abnormal histology (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+) were 91.7% for HC2, 87.5% for Real-time HR, and 73.3% for DNA Chip. As compared to results of the sequence analysis, HC2, Real-time HR, and DNA Chip showed concordance rates of 94.3% (115/122), 90.0% (117/130), and 61.5% (16/26), respectively. The HC2 assay and Real-time HR assay showed comparable results to each other in both clinical and analytical performances, while the DNA Chip assay showed poor clinical and analytical performances. The Real-time HR assay can be a good alternative option for HR HPV testing with advantages of allowing full automation and simultaneous genotyping of HR types 16 and 18.

  12. Live cell quality control and utility of real-time cell electronic sensing for assay development.

    PubMed

    Kirstein, Shelli L; Atienza, Josephine M; Xi, Biao; Zhu, Jenny; Yu, Naichen; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiao; Abassi, Yama A

    2006-10-01

    In this paper we have explored the utility of the real-time cell electronic sensing (RTCES, ACEA Biosciences Inc., San Diego, CA) system for monitoring the quality of live cells in cell-based assays as well as for assay development. We have demonstrated that each cell type displays unique growth kinetic profiles that provide a quantitative account of cell behavior and can be used as a diagnostic tool for cellular quality control. The utility of the specific signature patterns was shown by demonstrating the significant differences in primary cell behavior depending on the supplier. In addition, the RT-CES system was able to differentiate cell behavior depending on the passage stage of the cells. The utility of the RT-CES system as an assay development tool was demonstrated in cytotoxicity assays. The RT-CES system not only provides information regarding the potency of cytotoxic compounds, but in addition relates potency to the rate of the response for each concentration of the compound tested, which is important for understanding the mechanism of compound action. Moreover, real-time display of cytotoxicity data by the RT-CES system allows for calculation of real-time 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values or determination of optimal IC(50) value. In summary, the RT-CES system provides high content and information-rich data that are beyond the scope of single-point assays.

  13. Fabrication of endothelial progenitor cell capture surface via DNA aptamer modifying dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Deng, Jinchuan; Yuan, Shuheng; Wang, Juan; Luo, Rifang; Chen, Si; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2016-11-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are mainly located in bone marrow and circulate, and play a crucial role in repairmen of injury endothelium. One of the most promising strategies of stents designs were considered to make in-situ endothelialization in vivo via EPC-capture biomolecules on a vascular graft to capture EPCs directly from circulatory blood. In this work, an EPC specific aptamer with a 34 bases single strand DNA sequence was conjugated onto the stent surface via dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film as a platform and linker. The assembled density of DNA aptamer could be regulated by controlling dopamine percentage in this copolymer film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle (WCA) and fluorescence test confirmed the successful immobilization of DNA aptamer. To confirm its biofunctionality and cytocompatibility, the capturing cells ability of the aptamer modified surface and the effects on the growth behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were investigated. The aptamer functionalized sample revealed a good EPC-capture ability, and had a cellular friendly feature for both EPC and EC growth, while not stimulated the hyperplasia of SMCs. And, the co-culture experiment of three types of cells confirmed the specificity capturing of EPCs to aptamer modified surface, rather than ECs and SMCs. These data suggested that this aptamer functionalized surface may have a large potentiality for the application of vascular grafts with targeted endothelialization.

  14. Measurement of DNA damage in individual cells using the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet) assay.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Janet M; Spanswick, Victoria J; Hartley, John A

    2011-01-01

    The Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet) assay is a simple, versatile and sensitive method for measuring DNA damage in individual cells, allowing the determination of heterogeneity of response within a cell population. The basic alkaline technique described is for the determination of DNA strand break damage and its repair at a single cell level. Specific modifications to the method use a lower pH ('neutral' assay), or allow the measurement of DNA interstrand cross-links. It can be further adapted to, for example, study specific DNA repair mechanisms, be combined with fluorescent in situ hybridisation, or incorporate lesion specific enzymes.

  15. High content cell-based assay for the inflammatory pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-07-01

    Cellular inflammation is a non-specific immune response to tissue injury that takes place via cytokine network orchestration to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. However chronic inflammation that lasts for a longer period, plays the key role in human diseases like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer development. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways may be effective in targeting and modulating their outcome. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that effectively combines the pro-inflammatory features with the pro-apoptotic potential. Increased levels of TNF-α observed during acute and chronic inflammatory conditions are believed to induce adverse phenotypes like glucose intolerance and abnormal lipid profile. Natural products e. g., amygdalin, cinnamic acid, jasmonic acid and aspirin have proven efficacy in minimizing the TNF-α induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Cell lysis-free quantum dot (QDot) imaging is an emerging technique to identify the cellular mediators of a signaling cascade with a single assay in one run. In comparison to organic fluorophores, the inorganic QDots are bright, resistant to photobleaching and possess tunable optical properties that make them suitable for long term and multicolor imaging of various components in a cellular crosstalk. Hence we tested some components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway during TNF-α induced inflammation and the effects of aspirin in HepG2 cells by QDot multicolor imaging technique. Results demonstrated that aspirin showed significant protective effects against TNF-α induced cellular inflammation. The developed cell based assay paves the platform for the analysis of cellular components in a smooth and reliable way.

  16. Establishment of a molecular embryonic stem cell developmental toxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Panzica-Kelly, Julieta M; Brannen, Kimberly C; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Cindy X; Flint, Oliver P; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Augustine-Rauch, Karen A

    2013-02-01

    The mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST) is a 10-day screen for teratogenic potential developed to reduce animal use for embryotoxicity testing of chemicals (Spielmann, 2005; Spielmann et al., 1997). In this study, we used the cytotoxicity IC(50) values and transcriptional expression changes as primary endpoints in a shorter 4-day version of the EST, the molecular embryonic stem cell assay. Mouse D3 embryonic stem cells were used for cytotoxicity assessment (monolayers) or grown as embryoid bodies in low attachment plates for transcriptional profiling. Sixty-five compounds with known in vivo teratogenicity (33 teratogens and 32 nonteratogens) were evaluated to develop a model for classifying compounds with teratogenic potential. The expression of 12 developmentally regulated gene targets (nanog, fgf5, gsc, cd34, axin2, apln, chst7, lhx1, fgf8, sox17, foxa2, and cxcr4) was measured following exposure of embryoid bodies to a single compound concentration (0.1 × the cytotoxicity IC(20)) for 4 days. In the decision-tree model, compounds with IC(50) values < 22 µM were categorized as teratogens, whereas compounds in the two groups with IC(50) values between 22-200 µM and > 200 µM were categorized as teratogens if ≥ 8 and 12 genes, respectively, were deregulated by at least 10%. Forty-seven of 65 compounds of the training set were correctly identified (72% total concordance). In a test set of 12 additional compounds (5 teratogens, 7 nonteratogens), 10 were correctly classified by this approach (83% concordance). The false positive rate in the training and test sets was 24 and 0%, respectively, indicating that this assay has potential to identify teratogens.

  17. Single-Cell Analysis of B Cell/Antibody Cross-Reactivity Using a Novel Multicolor FluoroSpot Assay.

    PubMed

    Hadjilaou, Alexandros; Green, Angela M; Coloma, Josefina; Harris, Eva

    2015-10-01

    Dengue is a major public health problem globally. It is caused by four antigenically distinct serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1-4), and although serotype-specific and strongly neutralizing cross-reactive immune responses against the four DENV serotypes are thought to be protective, subneutralizing Abs can contribute to increased disease severity upon secondary infection with a different DENV serotype. Understanding the breadth of the immune response in natural DENV infections and in vaccinees is crucial for determining the correlates of protection or disease severity. Transformation of B cell populations to generate mAbs and ELISPOT assays have been used to determine B cell and Ab specificity to DENV; however, both methods have technical limitations. We therefore modified the conventional ELISPOT to develop a Quad-Color FluoroSpot to provide a means of examining B cell/Ab serotype specificity and cross-reactivity on a single-cell basis. Abs secreted by B cells are captured by an Fc-specific Ab on a filter plate. Subsequently, standardized concentrations of all four DENV serotypes are added to allow equal stoichiometry for Ag binding. After washing, the spots, representing individual B cells, are visualized using four fluorescently labeled DENV serotype-specific detection mAbs. This method can be used to better understand the breadth and magnitude of B cell responses following primary and secondary DENV infection or vaccination and their role as immune correlates of protection from subsequent DENV infections. Furthermore, the Quad-Color FluoroSpot assay can be applied to other diseases caused by multiple pathogen serotypes in which determining the serotype or subtype-specific B cell response is important.

  18. A Reproducible Immunopotency Assay to Measure Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Mediated T cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Debra D.; Centanni, John M.; Bhatia, Neehar; Emler, Carol A.; Drier, Diana; Leverson, Glen E.; McKenna, David H.; Gee, Adrian P.; Lindblad, Robert; Hei, Derek J.; Hematti, Peiman

    2014-01-01

    Background The T cell suppressive property of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been considered a major mode of action and basis for their utilization in a number of human clinical trials. However, there is no well-established reproducible assay to measure MSC-mediated T cell suppression. Methods At the University of Wisconsin-Madison Production Assistance for Cellular Therapy (PACT) Center we developed an in vitro quality control T cell suppression immunopotency assay (IPA) which utilizes anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies to stimulate T cell proliferation. We measured MSC-induced suppression of CD4+ T cell proliferation at various effector to target cell ratios using defined peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in parallel compared to a reference standard MSC product. We calculated an IPA value for suppression of CD4+ T cells for each MSC product. Results Eleven MSC products generated at three independent PACT centers were evaluated for cell surface phenotypic markers and T cell suppressive properties. Flow cytometry results demonstrated typical MSC cell surface marker profiles. There was significant variability in the level of suppression of T cell proliferation with IPA values ranging from 27% to 88%. However, MSC suppression did not correlate with HLA-DR expression. Discussion We have developed a reproducible immunopotency assay to measure allogeneic MSC-mediated suppression of CD4+ T cells. Additional studies may be warranted to determine how these in vitro assay results may correlate with other immunomodulatory properties of MSCs, in addition to evaluating the ability of this assay to predict in vivo efficacy. PMID:25455739

  19. Cell Image Velocimetry (CIV): boosting the automated quantification of cell migration in wound healing assays.

    PubMed

    Milde, Florian; Franco, Davide; Ferrari, Aldo; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Poulikakos, Dimos; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-11-01

    Cell migration is commonly quantified by tracking the speed of the cell layer interface in wound healing assays. This quantification is often hampered by low signal to noise ratio, in particular when complex substrates are employed to emulate in vivo cell migration in geometrically complex environments. Moreover, information about the cell motion, readily available inside the migrating cell layers, is not usually harvested. We introduce Cell Image Velocimetry (CIV), a combination of cell layer segmentation and image velocimetry algorithms, to drastically enhance the quantification of cell migration by wound healing assays. The resulting software analyses the speed of the interface as well as the detailed velocity field inside the cell layers in an automated fashion. CIV is shown to be highly robust for images with low signal to noise ratio, low contrast and frame shifting and it is portable across various experimental settings. The modular design and parametrization of CIV is not restricted to wound healing assays and allows for the exploration and quantification of flow phenomena in any optical microscopy dataset. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of CIV in wound healing assays over topographically engineered surfaces and quantify the relative merits of differently aligned gratings on cell migration.

  20. Human endothelial cell-based assay for endotoxin as sensitive as the conventional Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay.

    PubMed

    Unger, Ronald E; Peters, Kirsten; Sartoris, Anne; Freese, Christian; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2014-03-01

    Endotoxin, also known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced by bacteria can be present in any liquid or on any biomaterial even if the material is sterile. Endotoxin in mammals can cause fever, inflammation, cell and tissue damage and irreversible septic shock and death. In the body, endothelial cells making up the blood vasculature and endothelial cells in vitro rapidly react to minute amounts of endotoxin resulting in a rapid induction of the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin. In this study we have used immunofluorescent staining to evaluate the expression of E-selectin on human microvascular endothelial cells from the skin (HDMEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to various concentrations of LPS. In addition, the sensitivity of detection was compared with the most widely used assay for the presence of endotoxin, the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay (LAL). The detection of E-selectin on endothelial cells in the presence of LPS for 4 h was found to be at least as sensitive in detecting the same concentration using the LAL assay. A cell adhesion molecule-enzyme immunosorbent assay was also developed and used to quantify LPS using the endothelial cell model. A comparison of LAL and the immunofluorescent staining method was carried out with solutions, nanoparticles, biomaterial extracts and endothelial cells grown directly on biomaterials. Under all conditions, the endothelial/E-selectin model system was positive for the test samples that were positive by LAL. Thus, we propose the use of this highly sensitive, rapid, reproducible assay for the routine testing of endotoxin in all steps in the manufacturing process of materials destined for use in humans. This can give a rapid feedback and localization of bacterial contamination sources with the LAL being reserved for the testing of the final product.

  1. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A; Bradford, William D; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S; Li, Rong

    2015-03-30

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein-based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation. Copyright © 2015 Zhu et al.

  2. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A.; Bradford, William D.; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein−based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation. PMID:25823586

  3. A microfluidic device for label-free, physical capture of circulating tumor cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, A Fatih; Aceto, Nicola; Kojic, Nikola; Donaldson, Maria C; Zeinali, Mahnaz; Hamza, Bashar; Engstrom, Amanda; Zhu, Huili; Sundaresan, Tilak K; Miyamoto, David T; Luo, Xi; Bardia, Aditya; Wittner, Ben S; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshi; Ting, David T; Stott, Shannon L; Kapur, Ravi; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells metastasize through the bloodstream either as single migratory circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or as multicellular groupings (CTC clusters). Existing technologies for CTC enrichment are designed to isolate single CTCs, and although CTC clusters are detectable in some cases, their true prevalence and significance remain to be determined. Here we developed a microchip technology (the Cluster-Chip) to capture CTC clusters independently of tumor-specific markers from unprocessed blood. CTC clusters are isolated through specialized bifurcating traps under low-shear stress conditions that preserve their integrity, and even two-cell clusters are captured efficiently. Using the Cluster-Chip, we identified CTC clusters in 30-40% of patients with metastatic breast or prostate cancer or with melanoma. RNA sequencing of CTC clusters confirmed their tumor origin and identified tissue-derived macrophages within the clusters. Efficient capture of CTC clusters will enable the detailed characterization of their biological properties and role in metastasis.

  4. [Establishment and preliminary application of dengue virus envelope domain III IgG antibody capture enzyme-linked immuno-absorbent assay].

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong-mei; Cai, Jian-piao; Wang, Da-hu; DI, Biao; Qiu, Li-wen; Wang, Ya-di; Chen, Yue; Ding, Xi-xia; Che, Xiao-yan

    2013-04-01

    To establish a highly sensitive and specific assay to detect dengue virus (DENV) envelope protein domain III (EDIII) IgG antibody, and to explore its value in the diagnosis and seroepidemiological survey of dengue. The DENV EDIII IgG antibody capture ELISA was developed using the recombinant full-length DENV EDIII, which was prepared by Pichia yeast expression system as the capture antigen. The serum samples were collected from the same group of 35 DENV-1 patients of primary infection during disease period in 2006 and their follow-up phase in 2010; and the sensitivity of the assay was compared to that of the commercial Panbio DENV IgG ELISA. The sensitivity of DENV EDIII IgG ELISA in detecting the serum samples from disease period and follow-up phase was 87% (20/23) and 94% (33/35), respectively; whereas the sensitivity of Panbio DENV IgG ELISA was 71% (25/35) and 0, respectively. The sensitivity of DENV EDIII IgG ELISA in detecting the serum samples from both periods was similar, without statistical significance (χ(2) = 0.946, P = 0.331). For serum samples from disease period, the sensitivity of DENV EDIII IgG ELISA was comparable with that of Panbio DENV IgG ELISA (χ(2) = 1.924, P = 0.165). However, DENV EDIII IgG ELISA demonstrated a significantly higher sensitivity than Panbio DENV IgG ELISA in detecting the serum samples from follow-up phase (χ(2) = 62.432, P = 0.000). DENV EDIII IgG capture ELISA is highly sensitive in detecting IgG in the serum samples from either disease period or follow-up phase. This method might be a promising alternative for diagnosis and seroepidemiologic survey of dengue.

  5. Epithelial cells captured from ductal carcinoma in situ reveal a gene expression signature associated with progression to invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abuázar, Carolina Sens; de Toledo Osorio, Cynthia Aparecida Bueno; Pinilla, Mabel Gigliola; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; Silva, Wilson Araujo; e Ferreira, Elisa Napolitano; Brentani, Helena Paula; Carraro, Dirce Maria

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer biomarkers that can precisely predict the risk of progression of non-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions to invasive disease are lacking. The identification of molecular alterations that occur during the invasion process is crucial for the discovery of drivers of transition to invasive disease and, consequently, biomarkers with clinical utility. In this study, we explored differences in gene expression in mammary epithelial cells before and after the morphological manifestation of invasion, i.e., early and late stages, respectively. In the early stage, epithelial cells were captured from both pre-invasive lesions with distinct malignant potential [pure DCIS as well as the in situ component that co-exists with invasive breast carcinoma lesions (DCIS-IBC)]; in the late stage, epithelial cells were captured from the two distinct morphological components of the same sample (in situ and invasive components). Candidate genes were identified using cDNA microarray and rapid subtractive hybridization (RaSH) cDNA libraries and validated by RT-qPCR assay using new samples from each group. These analyses revealed 26 genes, including 20 from the early and 6 from the late stage. The expression profile based on the 20 genes, marked by a preferential decrease in expression level towards invasive phenotype, discriminated the majority of DCIS samples. Thus, this study revealed a gene expression signature with the potential to predict DCIS progression and, consequently, provides opportunities to tailor treatments for DCIS patients. PMID:27708222

  6. Development of an Automated and Sensitive Microfluidic Device for Capturing and Characterizing Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) from Clinical Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Priya; Sepehri, Saedeh; Zhou, Yi; Gorin, Michael A.; Paolillo, Carmela; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gleason, Kyle; Payne, Austin; Boniface, Brian; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Morgan, Todd M.; Fortina, Paolo; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Handique, Kalyan; Wang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hindered by sub-optimal sensitivity and specificity of devices or assays as well as lack of capability of characterization of CTCs with clinical biomarkers. Here, we validate a novel technology to enrich and characterize CTCs from blood samples of patients with metastatic breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using a microfluidic chip which is processed by using an automated staining and scanning system from sample preparation to image processing. The Celsee system allowed for the detection of CTCs with apparent high sensitivity and specificity (94% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Moreover, the system facilitated rapid capture of CTCs from blood samples and also allowed for downstream characterization of the captured cells by immunohistochemistry, DNA and mRNA fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). In a subset of patients with prostate cancer we compared the technology with a FDA-approved CTC device, CellSearch and found a higher degree of sensitivity with the Celsee instrument. In conclusion, the integrated Celsee system represents a promising CTC technology for enumeration and molecular characterization. PMID:26808060

  7. Development of an Automated and Sensitive Microfluidic Device for Capturing and Characterizing Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) from Clinical Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Priya; Sepehri, Saedeh; Zhou, Yi; Gorin, Michael A; Paolillo, Carmela; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gleason, Kyle; Payne, Austin; Boniface, Brian; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Morgan, Todd M; Fortina, Paolo; Pienta, Kenneth J; Handique, Kalyan; Wang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hindered by sub-optimal sensitivity and specificity of devices or assays as well as lack of capability of characterization of CTCs with clinical biomarkers. Here, we validate a novel technology to enrich and characterize CTCs from blood samples of patients with metastatic breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using a microfluidic chip which is processed by using an automated staining and scanning system from sample preparation to image processing. The Celsee system allowed for the detection of CTCs with apparent high sensitivity and specificity (94% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Moreover, the system facilitated rapid capture of CTCs from blood samples and also allowed for downstream characterization of the captured cells by immunohistochemistry, DNA and mRNA fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). In a subset of patients with prostate cancer we compared the technology with a FDA-approved CTC device, CellSearch and found a higher degree of sensitivity with the Celsee instrument. In conclusion, the integrated Celsee system represents a promising CTC technology for enumeration and molecular characterization.

  8. T-Cell Proliferation Assay: Determination of Immunodominant T-Cell Epitopes of Food Allergens.

    PubMed

    Masilamani, Madhan; Pascal, Mariona; Sampson, Hugh A

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of allergen-specific T cells is critical to understand their contribution to disease pathogenesis. The identification of immunodominant T-cell epitopes is crucial for development of T-cell-based vaccines. Peptide-specific T-cell proliferation studies are usually performed in a library of short synthetic peptides (15mer or 20mer) with 3 or 5 offset spanning the entire length of the allergen. T-cell peptide epitopes lack the primary and tertiary structure of the native protein to cross-link IgE, but retain the ability to stimulate T cells. The peptides sequences can also be obtained either by in silico approaches and in vitro binding assays. The efficacy of T-cell epitope-based peptide immunotherapy has been proven in certain allergies. The present methodology describes T-cell proliferation assays using whole blood sample from allergic subjects.

  9. Efficient capture of circulating tumor cells with a novel immunocytochemical microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Nora Dickson, Mary; Tsinberg, Pavel; Tang, Zhongliang; Bischoff, Farideh Z.; Wilson, Timothy; Leonard, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    Ability to perform cytogenetic interrogations on circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of cancer patients is vital for progressing toward targeted, individualized treatments. CTCs are rare compared to normal (bystander) blood cells, found in ratios as low as 1:109. The most successful isolation techniques have been immunocytochemical technologies that label CTCs for separation based on unique surface antigens that distinguish them from normal bystander cells. The method discussed here utilizes biotin-tagged antibodies that bind selectively to CTCs. The antibodies are introduced into a suspension of blood cells intending that only CTCs will display surface biotin molecules. Next, the cell suspension is passed through a microfluidic channel that contains about 9000 transverse, streptavidin coated posts. A CTC making contact with a post has the opportunity to engage in a biotin-streptavidin reaction that immobilizes the cell. Bystander blood cells remain in suspension and pass through the channel. The goal of the present study is to establish the technical performance of these channels as a function of antigen density and operating conditions, especially flow rate. At 18 μL/min, over 70% of cells are captured at antigen densities greater than 30 000 sites/cell while 50% of cells are captured at antigen densities greater than 10 000. It is found that lower flow rates lead to decreasing cell capture probabilities, indicating that some streamlines develop which are never close enough to a post to allow cell-post contact. Future modeling and streamline studies using computational fluid dynamics software could aid in optimization of channel performance for capture of rare cells. PMID:22662044

  10. Efficient capture and simple quantification of circulating tumor cells using quantum dots and magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyegeun; Jo, Seong-Min; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-06-03

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are valuable biomarkers for monitoring the status of cancer patients and drug efficacy. However, the number of CTCs in the blood is extremely low, and the isolation and detection of CTCs with high efficiency and sensitivity remain a challenge. Here, we present an approach to the efficient capturing and simple quantification of CTCs using quantum dots and magnetic beads. Anti-EpCAM antibody-conjugated quantum dots are used for the targeting and quantification of CTCs, and quantum-dot-attached CTCs are isolated using anti-IgG-modified magnetic beads. Our approach is shown to result in a capture efficiency of about 70%-80%, enabling the simple quantification of captured CTCs based on the fluorescence intensity of the quantum dots. The present method can be used effectively in the capturing and simple quantification of CTCs with high efficiency for cancer diagnosis and monitoring.

  11. Capture and printing of fixed stromal cell membranes for bioactive display on PDMS surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoo; Wang, Jennifer B.; Bersani, Francesca; Parekkadan, Biju

    2013-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has emerged as an extremely useful polymer for various biological applications. The conjugation of PDMS with bioactive molecules to create functional surfaces is feasible, yet limited to single molecule display with imprecise localization of the molecules on PDMS. Here we report a robust technique that can transfer and print the membrane surface of glutaraldehyde-fixed stromal cells intact to a PDMS substrate using an intermediate polyvinylalcohol (PVA) film as a transporter system. The cell-PVA film capturing the entirety of surface molecules can be peeled off and subsequently printed onto PDMS while maintaining the spatial display of the original cell surface molecules. Proof-of-concept studies are described using human bone marrow stromal cell membranes, including the demonstration of bioactivity of transferred membranes to capture and adhere hematopoietic cells. The presented process is applicable to virtually any adherent cell and can broaden the functional display of biomolecules on PDMS for biotechnology applications. PMID:23927769

  12. Capture and printing of fixed stromal cell membranes for bioactive display on PDMS surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwoo; Wang, Jennifer B; Bersani, Francesca; Parekkadan, Biju

    2013-08-27

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) has emerged as an extremely useful polymer for various biological applications. The conjugation of PDMS with bioactive molecules to create functional surfaces is feasible yet limited to a single-molecule display with imprecise localization of the molecules on PDMS. Here we report a robust technique that can transfer and print the membrane surface of glutaraldehyde-fixed stromal cells intact onto a PDMS substrate using an intermediate polyvinylalcohol (PVA) film as a transporter system. The cell-PVA film capturing the entirety of surface molecules can be peeled off and subsequently printed onto PDMS while maintaining the spatial display of the original cell surface molecules. Proof-of-concept studies are described using human bone marrow stromal cell membranes including a demonstration of the bioactivity of transferred membranes to capture and adhere hematopoietic cells. The presented process is applicable to virtually any adherent cell and can broaden the functional display of biomolecules on PDMS for biotechnology applications.

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy induces cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis of glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma stem cells in the quiescent state are resistant to clinical radiation therapy. An almost inevitable glioma recurrence is due to the persistence of these cells. The high linear energy transfer associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could kill quiescent and proliferative cells. Methods The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of BNCT on glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro. The damage induced by BNCT was assessed using cell cycle progression, apoptotic cell ratio and apoptosis-associated proteins expression. Results The surviving fraction and cell viability of glioma stem/progenitor cells were decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells using the same boronophenylalanine pretreatment and the same dose of neutron flux. BNCT induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, with changes in the expression of associated proteins. Conclusions Glioma stem/progenitor cells, which are resistant to current clinical radiotherapy, could be effectively killed by BNCT in vitro via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis using a prolonged neutron irradiation, although radiosensitivity of glioma stem/progenitor cells was decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells when using the same dose of thermal neutron exposure and boronophenylalanine pretreatment. Thus, BNCT could offer an appreciable therapeutic advantage to prevent tumor recurrence, and may become a promising treatment in recurrent glioma. PMID:23915425

  14. Dendritic Cells from the Human Female Reproductive Tract Rapidly Capture and respond to HIV

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, M; Shen, Zheng; Barr, Fiona D.; Boesch, Austin W.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Wira, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) throughout the female reproductive tract (FRT) were examined for phenotype, HIV capture ability and innate anti-HIV responses. Two main CD11c+ DC subsets were identified: CD11b+ and CD11blow DCs. CD11b+CD14+ DCs were the most abundant throughout the tract.A majority of CD11c+CD14+ cells corresponded to CD1c+ myeloid DCs while the rest lacked CD1c and CD163 expression (macrophage marker) and may represent monocyte-derived cells. Additionally we identified CD103+ DCs, located exclusively in the endometrium, while DC-SIGN+ DCs were broadly distributed throughout the FRT. Following exposure to GFP-labeled HIV particles, CD14+ DC-SIGN+ as well as CD14+ DC-SIGN- cells captured virus, with approximately 30% of these cells representing CD1c+ myeloid DCs. CD103+ DCs lacked HIV capture ability. Exposure of FRT DCs to HIV induced secretion of CCL2, CCR5 ligands, IL-8, elafin and SLPI within 3h of exposure, while classical pro-inflammatory molecules did not change and IFNα2 and IL10 were undetectable. Furthermore, elafin and SLPI up-regulation, but not CCL5, were suppressed by estradiol pretreatment. Our results suggest that specific DC subsets in the FRT have the potential for capture and dissemination of HIV, exert antiviral responses and likely contribute to the recruitment of HIV-target cells through the secretion of innate immune molecules. PMID:27579858

  15. Progress with the development of a CO 2 capturing solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, M. R.; Heidug, W. K.; Li, K. J.; Moore, J. B.

    In April 2000 Siemens Westinghouse started work under a co-operation agreement with Shell International to develop and demonstrate a natural gas fired 0.25 MW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) modified to enable capture of carbon dioxide. The basic principles of this development and initial plans for the demonstration, which is due to start up at a Norwegian location in 2003, have been presented in environmental and fuel cell forums during 1999/2000. This paper reviews the latest technical progress with this development and discusses the large potential market for stationary power generation using SOFCs with CO 2 capturing capability.

  16. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Hou, J.; Zhao, C.; Xin, Z.; Jin, J.; Li, C.; Wong, S.-C.; Yin, J.

    2016-01-01

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus envelope-dependent cell-cell fusion: a quantitative fluorescence cytometric assay.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Leonor; Lamoyi, Edmundo; Báez-Saldaña, Armida; Larralde, Carlos

    2002-02-01

    In vitro fusion of transfected cells expressing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope proteins gp120/gp41, with target cells expressing CD4, and a suitable chemokine coreceptor is used widely to investigate the mechanisms of molecular recognition and membrane fusion involved in the entry of the HIV genome into cells and in syncytia formation. We developed an assay that uses two different fluorescent lipophilic probes to single label each reacting cell population and flow cytometry to quantify the extent of cellular fusion after coculture. Fused cells are detected as double-fluorescent particles in this assay, therefore permitting measurement of their proportion in the total cell population. The time course and extent of HIV-glycoprotein-related cellular fusion, the optimal cell ratio, the size and cell composition of the fusion products, and the inhibition of fusion caused by soluble CD4 and anti-CXCR4 antibody 12G5 were determined. The assay was applied to measure fusion between gp120/gp41 and CD4-expressing cells growing as monolayers (HeLa/CHO fusion), as well as to suspension lymphocyte cultures (Jurkat/Jurkat fusion). The method's simple technical and minimal cell-invasive procedures, as well as its non-ambiguous automatic numerical quantification should be useful for the study of factors influencing cell-cell fusion. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Prevalence estimation of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) antibodies in dogs from Finland using novel dog anti-TBEV IgG MAb-capture and IgG immunofluorescence assays based on recombinant TBEV subviral particles.

    PubMed

    Levanov, Lev; Vera, Cristina Pérez; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-07-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is one of the most dangerous human neurological infections occurring in Europe and Northern parts of Asia with thousands of cases and millions vaccinated against it. The risk of TBE might be assessed through analyses of the samples taken from wildlife or from animals which are in close contact with humans. Dogs have been shown to be a good sentinel species for these studies. Serological assays for diagnosis of TBE in dogs are mainly based on purified and inactivated TBEV antigens. Here we describe novel dog anti-TBEV IgG monoclonal antibody (MAb)-capture assay which is based on TBEV prME subviral particles expressed in mammalian cells from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon as well as IgG immunofluorescence assay (IFA) which is based on Vero E6 cells transfected with the same SFV replicon. We further demonstrate their use in a small-scale TBEV seroprevalence study of dogs representing different regions of Finland. Altogether, 148 dog serum samples were tested by novel assays and results were compared to those obtained with a commercial IgG enzyme immunoassay (EIA), hemagglutination inhibition test and IgG IFA with TBEV infected cells. Compared to reference tests, the sensitivities of the developed assays were 90-100% and the specificities of the two assays were 100%. Analysis of the dog serum samples showed a seroprevalence of 40% on Åland Islands and 6% on Southwestern archipelago of Finland. In conclusion, a specific and sensitive EIA and IFA for the detection of IgG antibodies in canine sera were developed. Based on these assays the seroprevalence of IgG antibodies in dogs from different regions of Finland was assessed and was shown to parallel the known human disease burden as the Southwestern archipelago and Åland Islands in particular had considerable dog TBEV antibody prevalence and represent areas with high risk of TBE for humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of the f-HPV typing™ and Hybrid Capture II® assays for detection of high-risk HPV genotypes in cervical samples.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, María-Paz; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Darwich, Laila; Sirera, Guillermo; Coll, Josep; Clotet, Bonaventura; Videla, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    Human papillomavirus genotyping is being considered in cervical screening programs and for monitoring the effectiveness of HPV vaccination. Both approaches require access to fast, easy and high-throughput technology. The aim of this study was to compare a new commercial assay (f-HPV typing™) with the Hybrid Capture II® (HC2) to detect HPV infection. The F-HPV typing is a multiplex fluorescent PCR method recognizing E6 and E7 regions of 13 high-risk (HR) HPV types, the same set of HR-types targeted HC2 test. A subset of 157 cervical samples was tested with both assays. The percentage of positive HR-HPV DNA samples was 24% (37/155) by HC2 and 33% (49/155) by f-HPV typing. Concordant results were found in 133/155 (overall agreement, 85.8%; Cohen's kappa=0.65). The analytical sensitivity and specificity of f-HPV were 97.6 and 93, respectively. In conclusion, this study shows that the f-HPV assay provides a good alternative to HC2 to detect HPV infection, allowing simple and rapid HPV genotyping and detecting multiple infections.

  20. Quantification and viability assays of Toxoplasma gondii in commercial "Serrano" ham samples using magnetic capture real-time qPCR and bioassay techniques.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Samblas, M; Vílchez, S; Racero, J C; Fuentes, M V; Osuna, A

    2015-04-01

    "Serrano" ham is a typical pork product from the Mediterranean area, highly valued for its flavour. To make Serrano ham, pork undergoes a salting and a subsequent fermentation process known as curing. Certain pigs used for meat production are an important source of Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans. We have developed a method for quantifying and assaying the viability of the T. gondii present in commercial Serrano ham samples. A magnetic capture method for the isolation of T. gondii DNA and a qRT-PCR were used to estimate the T. gondii burden in 475 commercial samples of "Serrano" ham in two presentation formats: ham pieces and sliced ham. The infectivity capacity of T. gondii in positive samples was assayed in mice. The global prevalence of T. gondii was 8.84%, ranging from 32.35% in one of the companies to 0% prevalence in three other companies. The infectivity assays revealed that only 4.84% of the positive samples were infective. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report focussing on the prevalence of T. gondii in commercial "Serrano" ham. The method described here could be useful for producers to guarantee the safety of their products.

  1. A rapid dipstick antigen capture assay for the diagnosis of falciparum malaria. WHO Informal Consultation on Recent Advances in Diagnostic Techniques and Vaccines for Malaria.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infections have made it possible to consider supplementing light microscopy with a standardized dipstick antigen capture assay based on the detection of a parasite-specific protein, which is secreted by the asexual blood stages and immature gametocytes but not by the other stages. Field trials indicate that this dipstick assay provides consistently reproducible results, with a threshold of detection of P. falciparum parasitaemia similar to that obtained by high quality routine malaria microscopy and a specificity and sensitivity of around 90% compared with standard thick blood film microscopy. The stability, reproducibility, and ease of use of the assay clearly indicate that it has potential for application in the management of malaria, particularly at the peripheral health care level, provided its accuracy can be assured and that it can be made affordable. Consideration should be given to its wider use where operational requirements and resources so justify, and where decisions are based on adequate evaluation of the existing health delivery systems. PMID:8653815

  2. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  3. Continuous perfusion microfluidic cell culture array for high-throughput cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Hung, Paul J; Lee, Philip J; Sabounchi, Poorya; Lin, Robert; Lee, Luke P

    2005-01-05

    We present for the first time a microfluidic cell culture array for long-term cellular monitoring. The 10 x 10 array could potentially assay 100 different cell-based experiments in parallel. The device was designed to integrate the processes used in typical cell culture experiments on a single self-contained microfluidic system. Major functions include repeated cell growth/passage cycles, reagent introduction, and real-time optical analysis. The single unit of the array consists of a circular microfluidic chamber, multiple narrow perfusion channels surrounding the main chamber, and four ports for fluidic access. Human carcinoma (HeLa) cells were cultured inside the device with continuous perfusion of medium at 37 degrees C. The observed doubling time was 1.4 +/- 0.1 days with a peak cell density of approximately 2.5*10(5) cells/cm(2). Cell assay was demonstrated by monitoring the fluorescence localization of calcein AM from 1 min to 10 days after reagent introduction. Confluent cell cultures were passaged within the microfluidic chambers using trypsin and successfully regrown, suggesting a stable culture environment suitable for continuous operation. The cell culture array could offer a platform for a wide range of assays with applications in drug screening, bioinformatics, and quantitative cell biology. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cell-based assays in practice: cell markers from autofluorescent proteins of the GFP-family.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Michael; Kredel, Simone; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Heilker, Ralf

    2008-09-01

    The more recently discovered anthozoan fluorescent proteins (FPs) and the classic Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (avGFP) as well as their derivatives have become versatile tools as live cell markers in fluorescence microscopy. In this review, we show the use of these FPs in drug discovery assays. Assay examples are given for the application of FPs in multiplexed imaging, as photosensitizers, as fluorescent timers, as pulse-chase labels and for robotically integrated compound testing. The development of fast microscopic imaging devices has enabled the application of automated fluorescence microscopy combined with image analysis to pharmaceutical high throughput drug discovery assays, generally referred to as High Content Screening (HCS).

  5. High-content assays for hepatotoxicity using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Sirenko, Oksana; Hesley, Jayne; Rusyn, Ivan; Cromwell, Evan F

    2014-01-01

    Development of predictive in vitro assays for early toxicity evaluation is extremely important for improving the drug development process and reducing drug attrition rates during clinical development. High-content imaging-based in vitro toxicity assays are emerging as efficient tools for safety and efficacy testing to improve drug development efficiency. In this report we have used an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived hepatocyte cell model having a primary tissue-like phenotype, unlimited availability, and the potential to compare cells from different individuals. We examined a number of assays and phenotypic markers and developed automated screening methods for assessing multiparameter readouts of general and mechanism-specific hepatotoxicity. Endpoints assessed were cell viability, nuclear shape, average and integrated cell area, mitochondrial membrane potential, phospholipid accumulation, cytoskeleton integrity, and apoptosis. We assayed compounds with known mechanisms of toxicity and also evaluated a diverse hepatotoxicity library of 240 compounds. We conclude that high-content automated screening assays using iPSC-derived hepatocytes are feasible, provide information about mechanisms of toxicity, and can facilitate the safety assessment of drugs and chemicals.

  6. Complete voltage recovery in quantum dot solar cells due to suppression of electron capture.

    PubMed

    Varghese, A; Yakimov, M; Tokranov, V; Mitin, V; Sablon, K; Sergeev, A; Oktyabrsky, S

    2016-04-07

    Extensive investigations in recent years have shown that addition of quantum dots (QDs) to a single-junction solar cell decreases the open circuit voltage, VOC, with respect to the reference cell without QDs. Despite numerous efforts, the complete voltage recovery in QD cells has been demonstrated only at low temperatures. To minimize the VOC reduction, we propose and investigate a new approach that combines nanoscale engineering of the band structure and the potential profile. Our studies of GaAs solar cells with various InAs QD media demonstrate that the main cause of the VOC reduction is the fast capture of photoelectrons from the GaAs conduction band (CB) to the localized states in QDs. As the photoelectron capture into QDs is mainly realized via the wetting layers (WLs), we substantially reduced the WLs using two monolayer AlAs capping of QDs. In the structures with reduced WLs, the direct CB-to-QD capture is further suppressed due to charging of QDs via doping of the interdot space. The QD devices with suppressed photoelectron capture show the same VOC as the GaAs reference cell together with some improvements in the short circuit current.

  7. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule independent capture of non-small lung carcinoma cells with peptide modified microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Pu, Kefeng; Li, Chunlin; Zhang, Nengpan; Wang, Hui; Shen, Wenjiang; Zhu, Yimin

    2017-03-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) present in the blood of patients with non-hematological cancers are accessible sources for diagnosis and monitoring of cancers. By the aid of the ability of the anti-EpCAM antibody to recognize the epithelial cells, microsystem-based technologies provide robust means for effectively detecting CTCs in vitro. Considering the EpCAM expression is down-regulated during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, the amount of CTCs detected based on anti-EpCAM antibody is underestimated. In our study, the A549 cells targeting peptide (A-1 peptide), as the substitute of anti-EpCAM antibody, was introduced to microfluidic chip to capture A549 cells. Our results showed that both epithelial-like and mesenchymal-like A549 cells could efficiently be captured by the A-1 peptide modified microfluidic chip, and the capture efficiency for epithelial-like cells is comparable to that captured by the EpCAM antibody. Thus, we concluded that the peptide could be a better supplement to the EpCAM antibody for capturing CTCs in microfluidic system with broader spectrum.

  8. A cell-based phenotypic assay to identify cardioprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Stephanie; Olm-Shipman, Adam; Walters, Andrew; Urciuoli, William R.; Devito, Stefanie; Nadtochiy, Sergiy M.; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Brookes, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Tissue ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury underlies several leading causes of death such as heart-attack and stroke. The lack of clinical therapies for IR injury may be partly due to the difficulty of adapting IR injury models to high-throughput screening (HTS). Objective To develop a model of IR injury that is both physiologically relevant and amenable to HTS. Methods and Results A micro-plate based respirometry apparatus was used. Controlling gas flow in the plate head space, coupled with the instrument’s mechanical systems, yielded a 24 well model of IR injury in which H9c2 cardiomyocytes were transiently trapped in a small volume, rendering them ischemic. Following initial validation with known protective molecules, the model was used to screen a 2000 molecule library, with post IR cell death as an endpoint. pO2 and pH monitoring in each well also afforded metabolic data. Ten protective, detrimental and inert molecules from the screen were subsequently tested in a Langendorff perfused heart model of IR injury, revealing strong correlations between the screening endpoint and both recovery of cardiac function (negative r2=0.66), and infarct size (positive, r2=0.62). Relationships between the effects of added molecules on cellular bioenergetics, and protection against IR injury, were also studied. Conclusion This novel cell-based assay can predict either protective or detrimental effects on IR injury in the intact heart. Its application may help identify therapeutic or harmful molecules. PMID:22394516

  9. A cell culture assay for the detection of cardiotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Loew-Friedrich, Iv.; von Bredow, F.; Schoeppe, W. )

    1991-04-01

    An important step in minimizing the number of animal experiments in medical research is the study of in vitro model systems. The authors propose the use of shock protein formation, which is a cellular response to cell-damaging stress as an assay to monitor cardiotoxicity. Isolated and cultured cardiac myocytes were prepared by a trypsin digestion method from 18-day-old fetal mice. These cells respond to typical substances inducing shock protein formation in other cellular systems as well as to known cardiotoxins with the de novo synthesis of shock proteins. Pharmaceuticals relevant in transplant medicine were tested for possible cardiotoxic effects: Cyclosporine A evokes shock protein formation at subtherapeutic concentrations. Azathioprine and methyl-prednisolone exert the same effect but at concentration ranges highly above the therapeutic level. The ability to induce shock protein synthesis obviously seems to be restricted to toxic drugs. The data presented demonstrate that the proposed in vitro model system for cardiotoxicity is animal saving and sensitive.

  10. Microfluidic accumulation assay probes attachment of biofilm forming diatom cells.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Kim A; Schwarze, Jana; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2017-08-01

    Testing of fouling release (FR) technologies is of great relevance for discovery of the next generation of protective marine coatings. In this paper, an accumulation assay to test diatom interaction under laminar flow with the model organism Navicula perminuta is introduced. Using time lapse microscopy with large area sampling allows determination of the accumulation kinetics of the diatom on three model surfaces with different surface properties at different wall shear stresses. The hydrodynamic conditions within the flow cell are described and a suitable shear stress range to perform accumulation experiments is identified at which statistically significant discrimination of surfaces is possible. The observed trends compare well to published adhesion preferences of N. perminuta. Also, previously determined trends of critical wall shear stresses required for cell removal from the same set of functionalized interfaces shows consistent trends. Initial attachment mediated by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) present outside the diatoms leads to the conclusion that the FR potential of the tested coating candidates can be deducted from dynamic accumulation experiments under well-defined hydrodynamic conditions. As well as testing new coating candidates for their FR properties, monitoring of the adhesion process under flow provides additional information on the mechanism and geometry of attachment and the population kinetics.

  11. Cell-Type-Specific Genome-wide Expression Profiling after Laser Capture Microdissection of Living Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Manohar, C F

    2005-02-09

    The purpose of this technical feasibility study was to develop and evaluate robust microgenomic tools for investigations of genome-wide expression of very small numbers of cells isolated from whole tissue sections. Tissues contain large numbers of cell-types that play varied roles in organ function and responses to endogenous and exogenous toxicants whether bacterial, viral, chemical or radiation. Expression studies of whole tissue biopsy are severely limited because heterogeneous cell-types result in an averaging of molecular signals masking subtle but important changes in gene expression in any one cell type(s) or group of cells. Accurate gene expression analysis requires the study of specific cell types in their tissue environment but without contamination from surrounding cells. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a new technology to isolate morphologically distinct cells from tissue sections. Alternative methods are available for isolating single cells but not yet for their reliable genome-wide expression analyses. The tasks of this feasibility project were to: (1) Develop efficient protocols for laser capture microdissection of cells from tissues identified by antibody label, or morphological stain. (2) Develop reproducible gene-transcript analyses techniques for single cell-types and determine the numbers of cells needed for reliable genome-wide analyses. (3) Validate the technology for epithelial and endothelial cells isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of mice.

  12. Mapping long-range promoter contacts in human cells with high-resolution capture Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Mifsud, Borbala; Tavares-Cadete, Filipe; Young, Alice N; Sugar, Robert; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Ferreira, Lauren; Wingett, Steven W; Andrews, Simon; Grey, William; Ewels, Philip A; Herman, Bram; Happe, Scott; Higgs, Andy; LeProust, Emily; Follows, George A; Fraser, Peter; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Osborne, Cameron S

    2015-06-01

    Transcriptional control in large genomes often requires looping interactions between distal DNA elements, such as enhancers and target promoters. Current chromosome conformation capture techniques do not offer sufficiently high resolution to interrogate these regulatory interactions on a genomic scale. Here we use Capture Hi-C (CHi-C), an adapted genome conformation assay, to examine the long-range interactions of almost 22,000 promoters in 2 human blood cell types. We identify over 1.6 million shared and cell type-restricted interactions spanning hundreds of kilobases between promoters and distal loci. Transcriptionally active genes contact enhancer-like elements, whereas transcriptionally inactive genes interact with previously uncharacterized elements marked by repressive features that may act as long-range silencers. Finally, we show that interacting loci are enriched for disease-associated SNPs, suggesting how distal mutations may disrupt the regulation of relevant genes. This study provides new insights and accessible tools to dissect the regulatory interactions that underlie normal and aberrant gene regulation.

  13. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Hou, J; Zhao, C; Xin, Z; Jin, J; Li, C; Wong, S-C; Yin, J

    2016-01-28

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.

  14. Tunable nanostructured coating for the capture and selective release of viable circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reátegui, Eduardo; Aceto, Nicola; Lim, Eugene J; Sullivan, James P; Jensen, Anne E; Zeinali, Mahnaz; Martel, Joseph M; Aranyosi, Alexander J; Li, Wei; Castleberry, Steven; Bardia, Aditya; Sequist, Lecia V; Haber, Daniel A; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Hammond, Paula T; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L

    2015-03-04

    A layer-by-layer gelatin nanocoating is presented for use as a tunable, dual response biomaterial for the capture and release of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patient blood. The entire nanocoating can be dissolved from the surface of microfluidic devices through biologically compatible temperature shifts. Alternatively, individual CTCs can be released through locally applied mechanical stress.

  15. IMAC capture of recombinant protein from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams

    PubMed Central

    Kinna, Alexander; Tolner, Berend; Rota, Enrique Miranda; Titchener‐Hooker, Nigel; Nesbeth, Darren

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fusion‐tag affinity chromatography is a key technique in recombinant protein purification. Current methods for protein recovery from mammalian cells are hampered by the need for feed stream clarification. We have developed a method for direct capture using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of hexahistidine (His6) tagged proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams. The process employs radial flow chromatography with 300–500 μm diameter agarose resin beads that allow free passage of cells but capture His‐tagged proteins from the feed stream; circumventing expensive and cumbersome centrifugation and/or filtration steps. The method is exemplified by Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell expression and subsequent recovery of recombinant His‐tagged carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA); a heavily glycosylated and clinically relevant protein. Despite operating at a high NaCl concentration necessary for IMAC binding, cells remained over 96% viable after passage through the column with host cell proteases and DNA detected at ∼8 U/mL and 2 ng/μL in column flow‐through, respectively. Recovery of His‐tagged CEA from unclarified feed yielded 71% product recovery. This work provides a basis for direct primary capture of fully glycosylated recombinant proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 130–140. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26174988

  16. Dynamic and label-free cell-based assays using the real-time cell electronic sensing system.

    PubMed

    Atienza, Josephine M; Yu, Naichen; Kirstein, Shelli L; Xi, Biao; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiao; Abassi, Yama A

    2006-10-01

    Cell-based assays have become an integral part of the preclinical drug development process. Recently, noninvasive label-free cell-based assay technologies have taken center stage, offering important and distinct advantages over and in addition to traditional label-based endpoint assays. Dynamic monitoring of live cells, the preclusion of label, and kinetics are some of the fundamental features of cell-based label-free technologies. In this article we will discuss the real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES, ACEA Biosciences Inc., San Diego, CA) system and some of its key applications for cell-based assays such as cell proliferation and cytotoxicity, functional assays for receptor-ligand analysis, cell adhesion and spreading assays, dynamic monitoring of endothelial barrier function, and dynamic monitoring of cell migration and invasion. Also, where appropriate we will briefly discuss other label-free technologies in an application-specific manner.

  17. In vitro cytotoxicity assays: comparison of LDH, neutral red, MTT and protein assay in hepatoma cell lines following exposure to cadmium chloride.

    PubMed

    Fotakis, George; Timbrell, John A

    2006-01-05

    The aim of this study was to compare four in vitro cytotoxicity assays and determine their ability to detect early cytotoxic events. Two hepatoma cell lines, namely HTC and HepG2 cells, were exposed to cadmium chloride (0-300 microM) for 3, 5 and 8 h. Following exposure to the toxic metal cytotoxicity was determined with the lactate dehydrogenase leakage assay (LDH), a protein assay, the neutral red assay and the methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. In HTC cells no toxicity was observed for any incubation period when the LDH leakage, the MTT and the protein assay were employed whereas the neutral red assay revealed early cytotoxicity starting after incubation of HTC cells with CdCl(2) for 3 h. In the case of HepG2 cells the MTT assay reveals cytotoxicity due to CdCl(2) exposure after 3 h whereas no such effect is seen with the other three assays. Following 5 h exposure of HepG2 cells to CdCl(2), toxicity is observed with the MTT assay at lower concentrations compared to the ones required for detection of toxicity with the LDH leakage and the neutral red assay. In conclusion different sensitivity was observed for each assay with the neutral red and the MTT assay being the most sensitive in detecting cytotoxic events compared to the LDH leakage and the protein assay.

  18. A cell-based assay using HepaRG cells for predicting drug-induced phospholipidosis.

    PubMed

    Tomida, Takafumi; Ishimura, Masakazu; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    The utility of HepaRG cells as an in vitro cell-based assay system for predicting drug-induced phospholipidosis (PLD) was investigated. In experiment 1, 10 PLD-positive compounds and 11 PLD-negative compounds were selected. HepaRG cells were treated with each compound for 48 hr. In experiment 2, loratadine and desloratadine, a major metabolite of loratadine, were used to assess metabolic activation for PLD. HepaRG cells were treated with loratadine and desloratadine in the presence or absence of 500 μM 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT), a broad CYP inhibitor, for 48 hr. After treatment with compounds in experiments 1 and 2, the relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) was measured using LYSO-ID Red dye to assess the PLD induction. In experiment 1, our cell-based assay system using HepaRG cells exhibited 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for predicting drug-induced PLD. In experiment 2, loratadine increased the RFI in the PLD assay. However, the increase in the RFI was not observed in co-treatment with loratadine and ABT. In addition, desloratadine increased the RFI in the presence and absence of ABT. These results suggested that metabolic activation of loratadine may contribute to PLD in HepaRG cells. We newly demonstrated that HepaRG cells have a high ability for predicting drug-induced PLD. In addition, we newly showed that HepaRG cells may predict drug-induced PLD mediated by metabolic activation of loratadine. Thus, a cell-based assay system using HepaRG cells is a useful model for predicting drug-induced PLD.

  19. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Yellow Fever Virus and Application in Antigen Detection and IgM Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    PubMed

    Adungo, Ferdinard; Yu, Fuxun; Kamau, David; Inoue, Shingo; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Sang, Rosemary; Mwau, Matilu; Morita, Kouichi

    2016-08-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is an acute hemorrhagic viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes in Africa and South America. The major challenge in YF disease detection and confirmation of outbreaks in Africa is the limited availability of reference laboratories and the persistent lack of access to diagnostic tests. We used wild-type YF virus sequences to generate recombinant envelope protein in an Escherichia coli expression system. Both the recombinant protein and sucrose gradient-purified YF vaccine virus 17D (YF-17D) were used to immunize BALB/c mice to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Eight MAbs were established and systematically characterized by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The established MAbs showed strong reactivity with wild-type YF virus and recombinant protein with no detectable cross-reactivity to dengue virus or Japanese encephalitis virus. Epitope mapping showed strong binding of three MAbs to amino acid positions 1 to 51, while two MAbs mapped to amino acid positions 52 to 135 of the envelope protein. The remaining three MAbs did not show reactivity to envelope fragments. The established MAbs exert no neutralization against wild-type YF and 17D viruses (titer of <10 for both strains). The applicability of MAbs 8H3 and 3F4 was further evaluated using IgM capture ELISA. A total of 49 serum samples were analyzed, among which 12 positive patient and vaccinee samples were correctly identified. Using serum samples that were 2-fold serially diluted, the IgM capture ELISA was able to detect all YF-positive samples. Furthermore, MAb-based antigen detection ELISA enabled the detection of virus in culture supernatants containing titers of about 1,000 focus-forming units. Copyright © 2016 Adungo et al.

  20. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Yellow Fever Virus and Application in Antigen Detection and IgM Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Adungo, Ferdinard; Kamau, David; Inoue, Shingo; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Sang, Rosemary; Mwau, Matilu

    2016-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is an acute hemorrhagic viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes in Africa and South America. The major challenge in YF disease detection and confirmation of outbreaks in Africa is the limited availability of reference laboratories and the persistent lack of access to diagnostic tests. We used wild-type YF virus sequences to generate recombinant envelope protein in an Escherichia coli expression system. Both the recombinant protein and sucrose gradient-purified YF vaccine virus 17D (YF-17D) were used to immunize BALB/c mice to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Eight MAbs were established and systematically characterized by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The established MAbs showed strong reactivity with wild-type YF virus and recombinant protein with no detectable cross-reactivity to dengue virus or Japanese encephalitis virus. Epitope mapping showed strong binding of three MAbs to amino acid positions 1 to 51, while two MAbs mapped to amino acid positions 52 to 135 of the envelope protein. The remaining three MAbs did not show reactivity to envelope fragments. The established MAbs exert no neutralization against wild-type YF and 17D viruses (titer of <10 for both strains). The applicability of MAbs 8H3 and 3F4 was further evaluated using IgM capture ELISA. A total of 49 serum samples were analyzed, among which 12 positive patient and vaccinee samples were correctly identified. Using serum samples that were 2-fold serially diluted, the IgM capture ELISA was able to detect all YF-positive samples. Furthermore, MAb-based antigen detection ELISA enabled the detection of virus in culture supernatants containing titers of about 1,000 focus-forming units. PMID:27307452

  1. The volumes and transcript counts of single cells reveal concentration homeostasis and capture biological noise

    PubMed Central

    Kempe, Hermannus; Schwabe, Anne; Crémazy, Frédéric; Verschure, Pernette J.; Bruggeman, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional stochasticity can be measured by counting the number of mRNA molecules per cell. Cell-to-cell variability is best captured in terms of concentration rather than molecule counts, because reaction rates depend on concentrations. We combined single-molecule mRNA counting with single-cell volume measurements to quantify the statistics of both transcript numbers and concentrations in human cells. We compared three cell clones that differ only in the genomic integration site of an identical constitutively expressed reporter gene. The transcript number per cell varied proportionally with cell volume in all three clones, indicating concentration homeostasis. We found that the cell-to-cell variability in the mRNA concentration is almost exclusively due to cell-to-cell variation in gene expression activity, whereas the cell-to-cell variation in mRNA number is larger, due to a significant contribution of cell volume variability. We concluded that the precise relationship between transcript number and cell volume sets the biological stochasticity of living cells. This study highlights the importance of the quantitative measurement of transcript concentrations in studies of cell-to-cell variability in biology. PMID:25518937

  2. Innate NKT lymphocytes confer superior adaptive immunity via tumor-capturing dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Idoyaga, Juliana; Charalambous, Anna; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Bonito, Anthony; Mordoh, Jose; Wainstok, Rosa; Bai, Xue-Feng; Liu, Yang; Steinman, Ralph M

    2005-12-05

    If irradiated tumor cells could be rendered immunogenic, they would provide a safe, broad, and patient-specific array of antigens for immunotherapies. Prior approaches have emphasized genetic transduction of live tumor cells to express cytokines, costimulators, and surrogate foreign antigens. We asked if immunity could be achieved by delivering irradiated, major histocompatibility complex-negative plasmacytoma cells to maturing mouse dendritic cells (DCs) within lymphoid organs. Tumor cells injected intravenously (i.v.) were captured by splenic DCs, whereas subcutaneous (s.c.) injection led only to weak uptake in lymph node or spleen. The natural killer T (NKT) cells mobilizing glycolipid alpha-galactosyl ceramide, used to mature splenic DCs, served as an effective adjuvant to induce protective immunity. This adjuvant function was mimicked by a combination of poly IC and agonistic alphaCD40 antibody. The adjuvant glycolipid had to be coadministered with tumor cells i.v. rather than s.c. Specific resistance was generated both to a plasmacytoma and lymphoma. The resistance afforded by a single vaccination lasted >2 mo and required both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Mature tumor capturing DCs stimulated the differentiation of P1A tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ T cells and uniquely transferred tumor resistance to naive mice. Therefore, the access of dying tumor cells to DCs that are maturing to activated NKT cells efficiently induces long-lived adaptive resistance.

  3. Smart interface materials integrated with microfluidics for on-demand local capture and release of cells.

    PubMed

    Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Tasoglu, Savas; Akkaynak, Derya; Avci, Oguzhan; Unluisler, Sebnem; Canikyan, Serli; Maccallum, Noah; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-09-01

    Stimuli responsive, smart interface materials are integrated with microfluidic technologies creating new functions for a broad range of biological and clinical applications by controlling the material and cell interactions. Local capture and on-demand local release of cells are demonstrated with spatial and temporal control in a microfluidic system. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The dominant role of CD8+ dendritic cells in cross-presentation is not dictated by antigen capture

    PubMed Central

    Schnorrer, Petra; Behrens, Georg M. N.; Wilson, Nicholas S.; Pooley, Joanne L.; Smith, Christopher M.; El-Sukkari, Dima; Davey, Gayle; Kupresanin, Fiona; Li, Ming; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Carbone, Francis R.; Shortman, Ken; Heath, William R.; Villadangos, Jose A.

    2006-01-01

    Mouse spleens contain three populations of conventional (CD11chigh) dendritic cells (DCs) that play distinct functions. The CD8+ DC are unique in that they can present exogenous antigens on their MHC class I molecules, a process known as cross-presentation. It is unclear whether this special ability is because only the CD8+ DC can capture the antigens used in cross-presentation assays, or because this is the only DC population that possesses specialized machinery for cross-presentation. To solve this important question we examined the splenic DC subsets for their ability to both present via MHC class II molecules and cross-present via MHC class I using four different forms of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA). These forms include a cell-associated form, a soluble form, OVA expressed in bacteria, or OVA bound to latex beads. With the exception of bacterial antigen, which was poorly cross-presented by all DC, all antigenic forms were cross-presented much more efficiently by the CD8+ DC. This pattern could not be attributed simply to a difference in antigen capture because all DC subsets presented the antigen via MHC class II. Indeed, direct assessments of endocytosis showed that CD8+ and CD8− DC captured comparable amounts of soluble and bead-associated antigen, yet only the CD8+ DC cross-presented these antigenic forms. Our results indicate that cross-presentation requires specialized machinery that is expressed by CD8+ DC but largely absent from CD8− DC. This conclusion has important implications for the design of vaccination strategies based on antigen targeting to DC. PMID:16807294

  5. High-throughput viability assay using an autonomously bioluminescent cell line with a bacterial Lux reporter.

    PubMed

    Class, Bradley; Thorne, Natasha; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Cell viability assays are extensively used to determine cell health, evaluate growth conditions, and assess compound cytotoxicity. Most existing assays are endpoint assays, in which data are collected at one time point after termination of the experiment. The time point at which toxicity of a compound is evident, however, depends on the mechanism of that compound. An ideal cell viability assay allows the determination of compound toxicity kinetically without having to terminate the assay prematurely. We optimized and validated a reagent-addition-free cell viability assay using an autoluminescent HEK293 cell line that stably expresses bacterial luciferase and all substrates necessary for bioluminescence. This cell viability assay can be used for real-time, long-term measurement of compound cytotoxicity in live cells with a signal-to-basal ratio of 20- to 200-fold and Z-factors of ~0.6 after 24-, 48- 72-, or 96-h incubation with compound. We also found that the potencies of nine cytotoxic compounds correlated well with those measured by four other commonly used cell viability assays. The results demonstrated that this kinetic cell viability assay using the HEK293(lux) autoluminescent cell line is useful for high-throughput evaluation of compound cytotoxicity.

  6. Analysis of Histone Deacetylase-Dependent Effects on Cell Migration Using the Stripe Assay.

    PubMed

    Mertsch, Sonja; Thanos, Solon

    2017-01-01

    For normal embryonic development/morphogenesis, cell migration and homing are well-orchestrated and important events requiring specific cellular mechanisms. In diseases such as cancer deregulated cell migration represents a major problem. Therefore, numerous efforts are under way to understand the molecular mechanisms of tumor cell migration and to generate more efficient tumor therapies. Cell migration assays are one of the most commonly used functional assays. The wound-healing assay or the Boyden chamber assay are variations of these assays. Nearly all of them are two-dimensional assays and the cells can only migrate on one substrate at a time. This is in contrast to the in vivo situation where the cells are faced simultaneously with different surfaces and interact with different cell types. To approach this in vivo situation we used a modified version of the stripe assay designed by Bonhoeffer and colleagues to examine mechanisms of axonal guidance. The design of this assay allows cells to decide between two different substrates offered at the same time. Utilizing alternating neuronal substrates for migration analyses we can partially mimic the complex in vivo situation for brain tumor cells. Here we describe the detailed protocol to perform a modified version of the stripe assay in order to observe substrate-dependent migration effects in vitro, to analyze the effect of Rho-dependent kinases (ROCKS), of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and of other molecules on glioma cells.

  7. Combined cell surface carbonic anhydrase 9 and CD147 antigens enable high-efficiency capture of circulating tumor cells in clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijie; Tian, Zuhong; Zhang, Lei; Hou, Shuang; Hu, Sijun; Wu, Junshen; Jing, Yuming; Sun, Huimin; Yu, Fei; Zhao, Libo; Wang, Ruoxiang; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K; Wu, Kaichun; Wang, Hao; Wu, Jason Boyang; Nie, Yongzhan; Shao, Chen

    2016-09-13

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as promising tools for noninvasive cancer detection and prognosis. Most conventional approaches for capturing CTCs use an EpCAM-based enrichment strategy, which does not work well in cancers that show low or no expression of EpCAM, such as renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In this study, we developed a new set of cell surface markers including CA9 and CD147 as alternative CTC-capture antigens specifically designed for RCC patients. We showed that the expression of both CA9 and CD147 was prevalent in a RCC patient cohort (n=70) by immunohistochemical analysis, with both molecules in combination covering 97.1% of cases. The NanoVelcro platform combined with CA9-/CD147-capture antibodies demonstrated significantly higher efficiency for capturing both CTC-mimicking renal cancer cells and RCC CTCs in peripheral blood, compared to the conventional EpCAM-based method. Using immunofluorescence cytological validation at the single-cell level, we were able to identify bona fide CTCs in RCC patient blood following the well-accepted criteria in our CTC-capture system. We further demonstrated a significant association of CTC numbers as well as the CTC expression status of Vimentin, a mesenchymal marker, with disease progression, including pathologic features and clinical staging. These results provide new insights into developing novel, effective targets/approaches for capturing CTCs, making CTCs a valuable tool for improved cancer detection, prognosis and treatment in RCC.

  8. Combined cell surface carbonic anhydrase 9 and CD147 antigens enable high-efficiency capture of circulating tumor cells in clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shuang; Hu, Sijun; Wu, Junshen; Jing, Yuming; Sun, Huimin; Yu, Fei; Zhao, Libo; Wang, Ruoxiang; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Chung, Leland W.K.; Wu, Kaichun; Wang, Hao; Wu, Jason Boyang; Nie, Yongzhan; Shao, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as promising tools for noninvasive cancer detection and prognosis. Most conventional approaches for capturing CTCs use an EpCAM-based enrichment strategy, which does not work well in cancers that show low or no expression of EpCAM, such as renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In this study, we developed a new set of cell surface markers including CA9 and CD147 as alternative CTC-capture antigens specifically designed for RCC patients. We showed that the expression of both CA9 and CD147 was prevalent in a RCC patient cohort (n=70) by immunohistochemical analysis, with both molecules in combination covering 97.1% of cases. The NanoVelcro platform combined with CA9-/CD147-capture antibodies demonstrated significantly higher efficiency for capturing both CTC-mimicking renal cancer cells and RCC CTCs in peripheral blood, compared to the conventional EpCAM-based method. Using immunofluorescence cytological validation at the single-cell level, we were able to identify bona fide CTCs in RCC patient blood following the well-accepted criteria in our CTC-capture system. We further demonstrated a significant association of CTC numbers as well as the CTC expression status of Vimentin, a mesenchymal marker, with disease progression, including pathologic features and clinical staging. These results provide new insights into developing novel, effective targets/approaches for capturing CTCs, making CTCs a valuable tool for improved cancer detection, prognosis and treatment in RCC. PMID:27494883

  9. Capture and On-chip analysis of Melanoma Cells Using Tunable Surface Shear forces

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Dey, Shuvashis; Carrascosa, Laura G.; Christophi, Christopher; Cebon, Jonathan; Shiddiky, Muhammad J. A.; Behren, Andreas; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    With new systemic therapies becoming available for metastatic melanoma such as BRAF and PD-1 inhibitors, there is an increasing demand for methods to assist with treatment selection and response monitoring. Quantification and characterisation of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) has been regarded as an excellent non-invasive candidate but a sensitive and efficient tool to do these is lacking. Herein we demonstrate a microfluidic approach for melanoma cell capture and subsequent on-chip evaluation of BRAF mutation status. Our approach utilizes a recently discovered alternating current electrohydrodynamic (AC-EHD)-induced surface shear forces, referred to as nanoshearing. A key feature of nanoshearing is the ability to agitate fluid to encourage contact with surface-bound antibody for the cell capture whilst removing nonspecific cells from the surface. By adjusting the AC-EHD force to match the binding affinity of antibodies against the melanoma-associated chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (MCSP), a commonly expressed melanoma antigen, this platform achieved an average recovery of 84.7% from biological samples. Subsequent staining with anti-BRAFV600E specific antibody enabled on-chip evaluation of BRAFV600E mutation status in melanoma cells. We believe that the ability of nanoshearing-based capture to enumerate melanoma cells and subsequent on-chip characterisation has the potential as a rapid screening tool while making treatment decisions. PMID:26815318

  10. Capture and On-chip analysis of Melanoma Cells Using Tunable Surface Shear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Dey, Shuvashis; Carrascosa, Laura G.; Christophi, Christopher; Cebon, Jonathan; Shiddiky, Muhammad J. A.; Behren, Andreas; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    With new systemic therapies becoming available for metastatic melanoma such as BRAF and PD-1 inhibitors, there is an increasing demand for methods to assist with treatment selection and response monitoring. Quantification and characterisation of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) has been regarded as an excellent non-invasive candidate but a sensitive and efficient tool to do these is lacking. Herein we demonstrate a microfluidic approach for melanoma cell capture and subsequent on-chip evaluation of BRAF mutation status. Our approach utilizes a recently discovered alternating current electrohydrodynamic (AC-EHD)-induced surface shear forces, referred to as nanoshearing. A key feature of nanoshearing is the ability to agitate fluid to encourage contact with surface-bound antibody for the cell capture whilst removing nonspecific cells from the surface. By adjusting the AC-EHD force to match the binding affinity of antibodies against the melanoma-associated chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (MCSP), a commonly expressed melanoma antigen, this platform achieved an average recovery of 84.7% from biological samples. Subsequent staining with anti-BRAFV600E specific antibody enabled on-chip evaluation of BRAFV600E mutation status in melanoma cells. We believe that the ability of nanoshearing-based capture to enumerate melanoma cells and subsequent on-chip characterisation has the potential as a rapid screening tool while making treatment decisions.

  11. Cell-of-Origin of Cancer versus Cancer Stem Cells: Assays and Interpretations.

    PubMed

    Rycaj, Kiera; Tang, Dean G

    2015-10-01

    A tumor originates from a normal cell that has undergone tumorigenic transformation as a result of genetic mutations. This transformed cell is the cell-of-origin for the tumor. In contrast, an established clinical tumor is sustained by subpopulations of self-renewing cancer cells operationally called cancer stem cells (CSC) that can generate, intraclonally, both tumorigenic and nontumorigenic cells. Identifying and characterizing tumor cell-of-origin and CSCs should help elucidate tumor cell heterogeneity, which, in turn, should help understand tumor cell responses to clinical treatments, drug resistance, tumor relapse, and metastatic spread. Both tumor transplantation and lineage-tracing assays have been helpful in characterizing these cancer cell populations, although each system has its strengths and caveats. In this article, we briefly review and summarize advantages and limitations of both assays in support of a combinatorial approach to accurately define the roles of both cancer-initiating and cancer-propagating cells. As an aside, we also wish to clarify the definitions of cancer cell-of-origin and CSCs, which are often interchangeably used by mistake. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Beyond the Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells: Next-Generation Devices and Materials.

    PubMed

    Green, Brenda J; Saberi Safaei, Tina; Mepham, Adam; Labib, Mahmoud; Mohamadi, Reza M; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-01-22

    Over the last decade, significant progress has been made towards the development of approaches that enable the capture of rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of cancer patients, a critical capability for noninvasive tumor profiling. These advances have leveraged new insights in materials chemistry and microfluidics and allowed the capture and enumeration of CTCs with unprecedented sensitivity. However, it has become increasingly clear that simply capturing and counting tumor cells launched into the bloodstream may not provide the information needed to advance our understanding of the biology of these rare cells, or to allow us to better exploit them in medicine. A variety of advances have now emerged demonstrating that more information can be extracted from CTCs with next-generation devices and materials featuring tailored physical and chemical properties. In this Minireview, the last ten years of work in this area will be discussed, with an emphasis on the groundbreaking work of the last five years, during which the focus has moved beyond the simple capture of CTCs and gravitated towards approaches that enable in-depth analysis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Detection, isolation, and capture of circulating breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Njoroge, Martin; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Gaffigan, Brian; Rood, Kyle; Viator, John A.

    2013-03-01

    According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis, or the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. In this study, a technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser with a 5 ns pulse at 532 nm is used to interrogate thousands of cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells which are pigmented, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to provide pigment. After which, the device is calibrated to demonstrate a single-cell detection limit. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25-45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro photoacoustic flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy, it can also be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  14. Detection and capture of breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2016-08-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis-the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems-significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. A technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser is used to interrogate thousands of blood cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells that are optically absorbing, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to enhance optical absorption. After which, the PA cytometry device is calibrated to demonstrate the ability to detect single cells. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25 to 45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro PA flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy but also it can be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  15. Detection and capture of single circulating melanoma cells using photoacoustic flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine; Mosley, Jeffrey; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2010-02-01

    Photoacoustic flowmetry has been used to detect single circulating melanoma cells in vitro. Circulating melanoma cells are those cells that travel in the blood and lymph systems to create secondary tumors and are the hallmark of metastasis. This technique involves taking blood samples from patients, separating the white blood and melanoma cells from whole blood and irradiating them with a pulsed laser in a flowmetry set up. Rapid, visible wavelength laser pulses on the order of 5 ns can induce photoacoustic waves in melanoma cells due to their melanin content, while surrounding white blood cells remain acoustically passive. We have developed a system that identifies rare melanoma cells and captures them in 50 microliter volumes using suction applied near the photoacoustic detection chamber. The 50 microliter sample is then diluted and the experiment is repeated using the new sample until only a melanoma cell remains. We have tested this system on dyed microspheres ranging in size from 300 to 500 microns. Capture of circulating melanoma cells may provide the opportunity to study metastatic cells for basic understanding of the spread of cancer and to optimize patient specific therapies.

  16. Detection and capture of breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis—the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems—significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. A technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser is used to interrogate thousands of blood cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells that are optically absorbing, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to enhance optical absorption. After which, the PA cytometry device is calibrated to demonstrate the ability to detect single cells. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25 to 45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro PA flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy but also it can be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied. PMID:27580367

  17. Comparison among three anion exchange chromatographic supports to capture erythropoietin from cell culture supernatant.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Lourdes; Stewart, Diobel; Zumalacárregui, Lourdes; Amaro, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Affinity and ion exchange conventional chromatography have been used to capture erythropoietin (EPO) from mammalian cell culture supernatant. Currently, chromatographic adsorbent perfusion is available, however a limited number of applications have been found in the literature. In this work, three anion exchange chromatographic supports (gel, membrane and monolithic) were evaluated in the capture step of the recombinant erythropoietin purification process. The influences of load and flow rate on each support performance were analyzed. Also the purity of the EPO molecules was determined. A productivity analysis, as a decision tool for larger scale implementation, was done. As a conclusion, the evaluated supports are technically suitable to capture EPO with adequate recovery and good purity. However, the monolithic column admits high operating velocity, showing the highest adsorption capacity and productivity.

  18. Genomic matrix attachment region and chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays identify novel putative regulatory elements at the imprinted Dlk1/Gtl2 locus.

    PubMed

    Braem, Caroline; Recolin, Bénédicte; Rancourt, Rebecca C; Angiolini, Christopher; Barthès, Pauline; Branchu, Priscillia; Court, Franck; Cathala, Guy; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Forné, Thierry

    2008-07-04

    We previously showed that genomic imprinting regulates matrix attachment region activities at the mouse Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) locus and that these activities are functionally linked to neighboring differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Here, we investigate the similarly structured Dlk1/Gtl2 imprinted domain and show that in the mouse liver, the G/C-rich intergenic germ line-derived DMR, a sequence involved in domain-wide imprinting, is highly retained within the nuclear matrix fraction exclusively on the methylated paternal copy, reflecting its differential function on that chromosome. Therefore, not only "classical" A/T-rich matrix attachment region (MAR) sequences but also other important regulatory DNA elements (such as DMRs) can be recovered from genomic MAR assays following a high salt treatment. Interestingly, the recovery of one A/T-rich sequence (MAR4) from the "nuclear matrix" fraction is strongly correlated with gene expression. We show that this element possesses an intrinsic activity that favors transcription, and using chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays, we demonstrate that the MAR4 interacts with the intergenic germ line-derived DMR specifically on the paternal allele but not with the Dlk1/Gtl2 promoters. Altogether, our findings shed a new light on gene regulation at this locus.

  19. The effect of stem cell proliferation regulators demonstrated with an in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Pragnell, I B; Wright, E G; Lorimore, S A; Adam, J; Rosendaal, M; DeLamarter, J F; Freshney, M; Eckmann, L; Sproul, A; Wilkie, N

    1988-07-01

    Spleen colony formation after transplantation of bone marrow cells into irradiated mice has been used as an assay for hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S), but has serious limitations intrinsic to an in vivo assay. In this report we describe experiments using an in vitro clonogenic assay that is especially suitable for studies of stem cell regulation as defined growth factors and normal untreated bone marrow can be used. We have demonstrated that the colony-forming cells have proliferative properties in common with CFU-S and respond to specific proliferation regulators previously detected using the spleen colony assay.

  20. Evaluation of effect during cell isolation process in alkaline comet assay using epidermal skin cells.

    PubMed

    Toyoizumi, Tomoyasu; Watanabe, Mika; Sui, Hajime; Nakagawa, Yuzuki; Ohta, Ryo; Yamakage, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the cell isolation process in the alkaline comet assay using epidermal skin cells. When we explored the cell isolation method for the alkaline comet assay using the 3-dimensional (3D) human epidermal skin model, we found that DNA damage and cytotoxicity were induced during the cell isolation process. In particular, trypsin 5 min treatment with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) showed about 5 times %DNA in the tail value compared to without EDTA treatment. In general, EDTA is commonly used for cell isolation, but it is known to induce genotoxicity due to secondary effects. We therefore evaluated the effect of EDTA and pH in the alkaline comet assay on a monolayer culture of rat keratinocytes. As a result, there was a significant increase of %DNA in tail values by treatment with 0.1 w/v% EDTA for 60 min; however, there was no difference in the %DNA in tail values between 0.1 w/v% EDTA/PBS(-) (pH 6.8) and 0.1 w/v% EDTA/PBS(-) (pH 7.4). These data imply that there is a need to control the EDTA conditions for cell isolation in the epidermal skin cells.

  1. Human cell chips: adapting DNA microarray spotting technology to cell-based imaging assays.

    PubMed

    Hart, Traver; Zhao, Alice; Garg, Ankit; Bolusani, Swetha; Marcotte, Edward M

    2009-10-28

    Here we describe human spotted cell chips, a technology for determining cellular state across arrays of cells subjected to chemical or genetic perturbation. Cells are grown and treated under standard tissue culture conditions before being fixed and printed onto replicate glass slides, effectively decoupling the experimental conditions from the assay technique. Each slide is then probed using immunofluorescence or other optical reporter and assayed by automated microscopy. We show potential applications of the cell chip by assaying HeLa and A549 samples for changes in target protein abundance (of the dsRNA-activated protein kinase PKR), subcellular localization (nuclear translocation of NFkappaB) and activation state (phosphorylation of STAT1 and of the p38 and JNK stress kinases) in response to treatment by several chemical effectors (anisomycin, TNFalpha, and interferon), and we demonstrate scalability by printing a chip with approximately 4,700 discrete samples of HeLa cells. Coupling this technology to high-throughput methods for culturing and treating cell lines could enable researchers to examine the impact of exogenous effectors on the same population of experimentally treated cells across multiple reporter targets potentially representing a variety of molecular systems, thus producing a highly multiplexed dataset with minimized experimental variance and at reduced reagent cost compared to alternative techniques. The ability to prepare and store chips also allows researchers to follow up on observations gleaned from initial screens with maximal repeatability.

  2. Rational Design of Materials Interface for Efficient Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong‐Qiang; Chandran, Bevita K.

    2015-01-01

    Originating from primary tumors and penetrating into blood circulation, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a vital role in understanding the biology of metastasis and have great potential for early cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized therapy. By exploiting the specific biophysical and biochemical properties of CTCs, various material interfaces have been developed for the capture and detection of CTCs from blood. However, due to the extremely low number of CTCs in peripheral blood, there exists a need to improve the efficiency and specificity of the CTC capture and detection. In this regard, a critical review of the numerous reports of advanced platforms for highly efficient and selective capture of CTCs, which have been spurred by recent advances in nanotechnology and microfabrication, is essential. This review gives an overview of unique biophysical and biochemical properties of CTCs, followed by a summary of the key material interfaces recently developed for improved CTC capture and detection, with focus on the use of microfluidics, nanostructured substrates, and miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance‐based systems. Challenges and future perspectives in the design of material interfaces for capture and detection of CTCs in clinical applications are also discussed. PMID:27980914

  3. Crossing barriers: the new dimension of 2D cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Van Horssen, Remco; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2011-01-01

    In our body cells move in three dimensions, embedded in an extracellular matrix that varies in composition, density and stiffness, and this movement is fundamental to life. Next to 3D cell migration assays, representing these physiological circumstances, still we need 2D migrations assays to perform detailed studies on the contribution of matrix-components and (extra)cellular proteins to cell movements. Next to the debate on differences between 3D and 2D migration, there also are many new perspectives on the use and development of novel or modified 2D cell migration assays. Of special significance is the introduction of so-called barrier migration assays, methods that avoid cell and matrix damage, as complementation or replacement of scratch/wound healing assays. Here, we discuss the possibilities and limitations of different 2D barrier migration assays.

  4. Comparison of clinical performances among Roche Cobas HPV, RFMP HPV PapilloTyper and Hybrid Capture 2 assays for detection of high-risk types of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shinae; Kwon, Min-Jung; Lee, Eun Hee; Park, Hyosoon; Woo, Hee-Yeon

    2015-09-01

    The cervical cancer screening guidelines suggest that early detection of HPV16 and HPV18 is helpful for identifying women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade two or higher. We comparatively evaluated three HPV DNA assays, Roche Cobas HPV, RFMP HPV PapilloTyper, and Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2). A total of 861 cervical swab samples from women over 30 years of age were classified into two groups, that is, high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) and non-HSIL, according to cervical cytology results and analyzed by three assays. The results of direct sequencing or Linear array HPV genotyping test were considered true when the three assays presented discrepancies. The concordance rates between Roche Cobas HPV versus RFMP HPV PapilloTyper, RFMP HPV PapilloTyper versus HC2, and Roche Cobas versus HC2 were 94.5%, 94.3%, and 95.9%, respectively. For detection of HPV16 and HPV18, Roche Cobas HPV showed the concordance rates of 98.3% (κ = 0.73) and 99.4% (κ = 0.40) with the confirmation tests, respectively; and RFMP HPV PapilloTyper showed the concordance rates of 99.5% (κ = 0.92) and 100.0% (κ = 1.00), respectively. In conclusion, Roche Cobas HPV, RFMP HPV PapilloTyper, and HC2 showed high agreement rates. Roche Cobas HPV and RFMP HPV PapilloTyper are particularly useful, since both provide HPV specific genotypes, HPV16 and HPV18. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Advanced Materials for the Recognition and Capture of Whole Cells and Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bole, Amanda L; Manesiotis, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    Selective cell recognition and capture has recently attracted significant interest due to its potential importance for clinical, diagnostic, environmental, and security applications. Current methods for cell isolation from complex samples are largely dependent on cell size and density, with limited application scope as many of the target cells do not exhibit appreciable differences in this respect. The most recent and forthcoming developments in the area of selective recognition and capture of whole cells, based on natural receptors, as well as synthetic materials utilising physical and chemical properties of the target cell or microorganism, are highlighted. Particular focus is given to the development of cell complementary surfaces using the cells themselves as templating agents, by means of molecular imprinting, and their combination with sensing platforms for rapid cell detection in complex media. The benefits and challenges of each approach are discussed and a perspective of the future of this research area is given. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastastic melanoma cells in blood.

  7. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastastic melanoma cells in blood. PMID:22734751

  8. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Christine M; Rood, Kyle D; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K; Mosley, Jeffrey D; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Viator, John A

    2012-06-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastatic melanoma cells in blood.

  9. RNA Isolation from Cell Specific Subpopulations Using Laser-capture Microdissection Combined with Rapid Immunolabeling

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) allows the isolation of specific cells from thin tissue sections with high spatial resolution. Effective LCM requires precise identification of cells subpopulations from a heterogeneous tissue. Identification of cells of interest for LCM is usually based on morphological criteria or on fluorescent protein reporters. The combination of LCM and rapid immunolabeling offers an alternative and efficient means to visualize specific cell types and to isolate them from surrounding tissue. High-quality RNA can then be extracted from a pure cell population and further processed for downstream applications, including RNA-sequencing, microarray or qRT-PCR. This approach has been previously performed and briefly described in few publications. The goal of this article is to illustrate how to perform rapid immunolabeling of a cell population while keeping RNA integrity, and how to isolate these specific cells using LCM. Herein, we illustrated this multi-step procedure by immunolabeling and capturing dopaminergic cells in brain tissue from one-day-old mice. We highlight key critical steps that deserve special consideration. This protocol can be adapted to a variety of tissues and cells of interest. Researchers from different fields will likely benefit from the demonstration of this approach. PMID:25939046

  10. A Functional Assay to Assess Connexin43 Mediated Cell-to-Cell Communication of Second Messengers in Cultured Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stains, Joseph P.; Civitelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cell-to-cell transfer of small molecules is a fundamental way by which multicellular organisms coordinate function. Recent work has highlighted the complexity of biologic responses downstream of gap junctions. As the connexin-regulated effectors are coming into focus, there is a need to develop functional assays that allow the specific testing of biologically relevant second messengers. Here, we describe a modification of the classic gap junction parachute assay to assess biologically relevant molecules passed though gap junctions. PMID:27207296

  11. An acid phosphatase assay for quantifying the growth of adherent and nonadherent cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, T T; Sinai, P; Kain, S R

    1996-10-01

    We describe an acid phosphatase assay for determination of cell growth based on quantification of cytosolic acid phosphatase activity. The assay is based on the hydrolysis of the p-nitrophenyl phosphate by intracellular acid phosphatases in viable cells to produce p-nitrophenol. For all cell types examined, absorbance of p-nitrophenol at 405 nm is directly proportional to the cell number in the range of 10(3)-10(5) cells. The assay can quantify as few as 1000 cells per well in 96-well microtiter plates. The acid phosphatase assay was used to count various adherent and nonadherent cells, including human tumors, L6, and HT-2 cells. We also demonstrate the utility of this assay for analysis of growth factor and cytokine bioactivity on mammalian cells in culture. In comparison to [3H]thymidine incorporation, the acid phosphatase assay has similar sensitivity but a wider linear response range. The method also shows higher sensitivity and reproducibility in comparison to cell proliferation assays based on the reduction of tetrazolium salts. Because of the ease of use, sensitivity, and low cost, the acid phosphatase method is especially suited to applications where a large number of samples are assayed.

  12. Soft landing of cell-sized vesicles on solid surfaces for robust vehicle capture/release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dehui; Wu, Zhengfang; Gao, Aiting; Zhang, Weihong; Kang, Chengying; Tao, Qi; Yang, Peng

    2015-04-28

    Based on a concept of a smooth and steady landing of fragile objects without destruction via a soft cushion, we have developed a model for the soft landing of deformable lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) on solid surfaces. The foundation for a successful soft landing is a solid substrate with a two-layer coating, including a bottom layer of positively charged lysozymes and an upper lipid membrane layer. We came to a clear conclusion that anionic GUVs when sedimented on a surface, the vesicle rupture occurs upon the direct contact with the positively charged lysozyme layer due to the strong coulombic interactions. In contrast, certain separation distances was achieved by the insertion of a soft lipid membrane cushion between the charged GUVs and the lysozyme layer, which attenuated the coulombic force and created a mild buffer zone, ensuring the robust capture of GUVs on the substrate without their rupture. The non-covalent bonding facilitated a fully reversible stimuli-responsive capture/release of GUVs from the biomimetic solid surface, which has never been demonstrated before due to the extreme fragility of GUVs. Moreover, the controllable capture/release of cells has been proven to be of vital importance in biotechnology, and similarity the present approach to capture/release cells is expected to open the previously inaccessible avenues of research.

  13. Microtube device for selectin-mediated capture of viable circulating tumor cells from blood.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew D; Mattison, Jeff; Western, Laura T; Powderly, John D; Greene, Bryan T; King, Michael R

    2012-05-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be used clinically to treat cancer. As a diagnostic tool, the CTC count can be used to follow disease progression, and as a treatment tool, CTCs can be used to rapidly develop personalized therapeutic strategies. To be effectively used, however, CTCs must be isolated at high purity without inflicting cellular damage. We designed a microscale flow device with a functionalized surface of E-selectin and antibody molecules against epithelial markers. The device was additionally enhanced with a halloysite nanotube coating. We created model samples in which a known number of labeled cancer cells were suspended in healthy whole blood to determine device capture efficiency. We then isolated and cultured primary CTCs from buffy coat samples of patients diagnosed with metastatic cancer. Approximately 50% of CTCs were captured from model samples. Samples from 12 metastatic cancer patients and 8 healthy participants were processed in nanotube-coated or smooth devices to isolate CTCs. We isolated 20-704 viable CTCs per 3.75-mL sample, achieving purities of 18%-80% CTCs. The nanotube-coated surface significantly improved capture purities (P = 0.0004). Experiments suggested that this increase in purity was due to suppression of leukocyte spreading. The device successfully isolates viable CTCs from both blood and buffy coat samples. The approximately 50% capture rate with purities >50% with the nanotube coating demonstrates the functionality of this device in a clinical setting and opens the door for personalized cancer therapies.

  14. [Cytomegalovirus isolation by conventional cell culture and shell vial assay].

    PubMed

    Galiano, M C; Videla, C M; Sánchez Puch, S; Carballal, G

    2001-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients, diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) active infection is of utmost importance for the initiation, monitoring and ending of antiviral therapy. Therefore, the presence of viral replication should be demonstrated. Isolation in tissue culture is one of the standard methods. The objective of the present paper was to compare two isolation procedures for CMV: conventional cell culture (CC) and rapid shell vial (SV) assay in human fibroblasts. A total of 584 clinical samples were studied between 1991 and 1998. CMV was isolated in 14.4% of the samples, 11.8% of which were positive by SV and 7.7% by CC. Out of 84 positive samples, concordance between both methods was observed in 36% of the cases. We found that 46% of the samples were positive only by SV, while 18% were positive only by CC. The average time required for obtaining the results by CC was 22.6 +/- 2.3 days. Out of the 69 samples positive by SV, 43% were already positive after 24 hours and the rest after 48 hours. These results indicate that SV was more sensitive and rapid than CC. The main advantage of CC, despite its time-consuming process, is the ability to recover the viral strain for both antiviral susceptibility phenotypical tests and strain characterization. Furthermore, in this study, absence of CC would have resulted in the loss of 18% of the positive diagnoses. In conclusion, simultaneous use of both methods is suggested in order to obtain a rapid result and the highest sensitivity.

  15. Effect of electroporation on cell killing by boron neutron capture therapy using borocaptate sodium (10B-BSH).

    PubMed

    Ono, K; Kinashi, Y; Masunaga, S; Suzuki, M; Takagaki, M

    1998-12-01

    The cell membrane permeability of 10B-enriched borocaptate sodium (BSH) and the extent to which BSH is accumulated in cells are controversial. To elucidate these points and to enhance the accumulation of BSH in cells, the effect of electroporation on boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using BSH was investigated. The first group of SCCVII tumor cells was incubated in culture medium with 10B-BSH or 10B-enriched boric acid, and exposed to neutrons from the heavy water facility of the Kyoto University Reactor. More than 99% of neutrons were thermal neutrons at flux base. The second group was pretreated with electroporation in combination with 10B-BSH, and thereafter the cells were irradiated with neutrons. The cell-killing effect of BNCT was measured by colony formation assay. The surviving cell fraction decreased exponentially with neutron fluence, and addition of BSH significantly enhanced the cell-killing effect of NCT depending on 10B concentration and the preincubation time of cells in the BSH-containing culture medium. The electroporation of cells with BSH markedly enhanced the BNCT effect in comparison with that obtained with preincubation alone. The effect of BSH-BNCT with electroporation was almost equal to that of BNCT using 10B-boric acid at the same 10B concentration. The effect of BNCT on cells pretreated with BSH and electroporation was not reduced by repeated washing of the cells before neutron irradiation. Decrease of the effect of BSH-BNCT plus electroporation with increase in the waiting time between the electroporation and the neutron irradiation could be explained in terms of the extent of cell growth during that time. These data suggest that BSH penetrates the cells slowly and remains after washing. Electroporation can introduce BSH into the cells very efficiently, and BSH thus introduced stays in the cells and is not lost in spite of the intensive washing of the cells. Therefore, if electroporation is applied to tumors after BSH injection, 10B

  16. Laser cross-linking protein captures for living cells on a biochip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Pan, Ming-Jeng; Chen, Hai-Wen; Lin, Che-Kuan; Lin, Chuen-Fu; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, bio-sensing pads are proposed to capture living cells, which are fabricated on cover glasses by cross-linking proteins/antibodies using laser induced photochemistry. The biological functions of the cross-linked protein/antibody were verified by capturing Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Leptospira, and red blood cells (RBCs), separately, with associated protein/antibody sensing pads. The experimental results show that S. aureus were bound on GFP-AcmA' pad after minutes of incubation and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) rinsing. No binding was observed with reference pad made of neutral bovine serum albumin (BSA). Second, A-type RBCs were chosen as the model cell to demonstrate the blood typing feasibility of the anti-A pad in microchannel. The A-type RBCs were captured only by the anti-A pad, but not the reference pad made of BSA. The same experimental model was carried out on the Leptospira, which stuck on the blood serum pad after PBS rinsing, but not BSA pad. This study provides a potential platform for simple and direct detection of living full cells without culture that could be used in point-of-care settings.

  17. Carboxybetaine methacrylate-modified nylon surface for circulating tumor cell capture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiyu; Yue, Guofeng; Dong, Chaoqun; Wu, Fenglei; Wei, Jia; Yang, Yang; Zou, Zhengyun; Wang, Lifeng; Qian, Xiaoping; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Baorui

    2014-03-26

    Conventional in vitro circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection methods are always limited by blood sample volume because of the requirement of a large amount of blood. The aim of this study was to overcome the limitation by designing and making an in vivo CTC capture device. In this study, we designed and prepared a kind of proper material to serve the purpose of intervention. A method employing 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) as the coupling reagent to graft carboxybetaine methacrylate (CBMA) and to immobilize an anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecular (EpCAM) antibody on Nylon was developed. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy proved the successful graft of γ-APS and CBMA to Nylon. Furthermore, the predicted improvement in the biocompatibilities of our modified Nylon was confirmed by water contact angle measurement, bovine serum albumin adhesion, platelet adhesion, plasma recalcification time determination, and cytotoxicity tests. The tumor cells adhesion experiment revealed that Nylon with the antibody immobilized on it had an affinity for EpCAM positive tumor cells higher than that of pristine Nylon. Additionally, the capture ability of the CTCs was demonstrated in a nude mouse tumor model using the interventional device made of the modified Nylon wire. The positive results suggest that CBMA-grafted and anti-EpCAM antibody-immobilized Nylon is a promising new material for in vivo CTC capture devices.

  18. IL-2 absorption affects IFN-gamma and IL-5, but not IL-4 producing memory T cells in double color cytokine ELISPOT assays.

    PubMed

    Quast, Stefan; Zhang, Wenji; Shive, Carey; Kovalovski, Damian; Ott, Patrick A; Herzog, Bernhard A; Boehm, Bernhard O; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Karulin, Alexey Y; Lehmann, Paul V

    2005-09-01

    Cytokine assays are gaining increasing importance for human immune monitoring because they reliably detect antigen-specific T cells in primary PBMC, even at low clonal sizes. Double color ELISPOT assays permit the simultaneous visualization of cells producing two different cytokines. Permitting the simultaneous assessment of type 1 and 2 immunity and due to the limited numbers of PBMC available from human study subjects, double color assays should be particularly attractive for clinical trials. Since the performance of double color assays has not yet been validated, we set out to compare them to single color measurements. Testing the recall antigen-induced cytokine response of PBMC, we found that double color assays regularly provided lower numbers of IFN-gamma and IL-5 spots than single color measurements when IL-2 detection was part of the double color assay. We showed that the inhibitory effect resulted from IL-2 absorption and could be overcome by either antibody free preactivation cultures or by inclusion of anti-CD28 antibody. In contrast, the simultaneous detection of IL-2 did not affect the numbers of IL-4 spots. Therefore, unlike IL-2/IL-4 and IFN-gamma/IL-5 assays, IL-2/IFN-gamma, and IL-2/IL-5 assays require compensation for the IL-2 capture to provide accurate numbers for the frequencies of cytokine producing memory T cells.

  19. A novel microchannel-based device to capture and analyze circulating tumor cells (CTCs) of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    RIAHI, REZA; GOGOI, PRIYADARSHINI; SEPEHRI, SAEDEH; ZHOU, YI; HANDIQUE, KALYAN; GODSEY, JIM; WANG, YIXIN

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been shown in many studies as a possible biomarker for metastasis and may be instrumental for the spread of the disease. Despite advances in CTC capturing technologies, the low frequency of CTCs in cancer patients and the heterogeneity of the CTCs have limited the wide application of the technology in clinic. In this study, we investigated a novel microfluidic technology that uses a size- and deformability-based capture system to characterize CTCs. This unique platform not only allows flexibility in the selection of antibody markers but also segregates the CTCs in their own chambers, thus, enabling morphological, immunological and genetic characterization of each CTC at the single cell level. In this study, different breast cancer cell lines including MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and SKBR3, as well as a panel of breast cancer biomarkers were used to test the device. The technology can capture a wide range of cells with high reproducibility. The capturing efficiency of the cells is greater than 80%. In addition, the background of leukocytes is minimized because individual cells are segregated in their own chambers. The device captured both epithelial cancer cells such as MCF7 and SKBR3 and mesenchymal cells such as MDA-MB-231. Immunostaining of the captured cells on the microchannel device suggests that a panel of breast cancer biomarkers can be used to further characterize differential expression of the captured cells. PMID:24676558

  20. Heat-transfer-method-based cell culture quality assay through cell detection by surface imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Eersels, Kasper; van Grinsven, Bart; Khorshid, Mehran; Somers, Veerle; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph; Barth, Stefan; Diliën, Hanne; Bos, Gerard M J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; Cleij, Thomas J; Thoelen, Ronald; De Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick

    2015-02-17

    Previous work has indicated that surface imprinted polymers (SIPs) allow for highly specific cell detection through macromolecular cell imprints. The combination of SIPs with a heat-transfer-based read-out technique has led to the development of a selective, label-free, low-cost, and user-friendly cell detection assay. In this study, the breast cancer cell line ZR-75-1 is used to assess the potential of the platform for monitoring the quality of a cell culture in time. For this purpose, we show that the proposed methodology is able to discriminate between the original cell line (adherent growth, ZR-75-1a) and a descendant cell line (suspension growth, ZR-75-1s). Moreover, ZR-75-1a cells were cultured for a prolonged period of time and analyzed using the heat-transfer method (HTM) at regular time intervals. The results of these experiments demonstrate that the thermal resistance (Rth) signal decays after a certain number of cell culture passages. This can likely be attributed to a compromised quality of the cell culture due to cross-contamination with the ZR-75-1s cell line, a finding that was confirmed by classical STR DNA profiling. The cells do not express the same functional groups on their membrane, resulting in a weaker bond between cell and imprint, enabling cell removal by mechanical friction, provided by flushing the measuring chamber with buffer solution. These findings were further confirmed by HTM and illustrate that the biomimetic sensor platform can be used as an assay for monitoring the quality of cell cultures in time.

  1. Standardization and validation of Vero cell assay for potency estimation of diphtheria antitoxin serum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Kanwar, Sarika; Bansal, Vivek; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2009-10-01

    Diphtheria toxin has the capacity to block protein synthesis in cultured mammalian cells, and thus causing cell death. This capacity of diphtheria toxin was utilized for in-vitro neutralization test to determine antibody titer, using Vero cells, which have been found to be susceptible to diphtheria toxin. In the present study, a Vero cell assay was standardized and validated for potency estimation of diphtheria antitoxin serum (DATS). The results obtained by Vero cell assay were compared with in-vivo biological assay. High degree of correlation (+0.98) was found between in-vivo biological assay and in-vitro Vero cell assay. The assay has also been found to be effective in determining the rising antibody titer in the equines inducted in DATS production. The present study indicated that although biological assays hold the key for final potency estimations till date but in the future scenario in-vitro Vero cell assay may be a good alternative to in-vivo biological assay.

  2. Selection and Separation of Viable Cells Based on a Cell-Lethal Assay

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Herman, Annadele; Phillips, Colleen; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    A method to select and separate viable cells based on the results of a cell-lethal assay was developed. Cells were plated on an array of culture sites with each site composed of closely spaced, releasable micropallets. Clonal colonies spanning multiple micropallets on individual culture sites were established within 72 h of plating. Adjacent sites were widely spaced with 100% of the colonies remaining sequestered on a single culture site during expansion. A laser-based method mechanically released a micropallet underlying a colony to segment the colony into two genetically identical colonies. One portion of the segmented colony was collected with 90% efficiency while viability of both fractions was 100%. The segmented colonies released from the array were fixed and subjected to immunofluorescence staining of intracellular phospho-ERK kinase to identify colonies that were highly resistant or sensitive to phorbol ester-induced activation of ERK. These resistant and sensitive cells were then matched to the corresponding viable colonies on the array. Sensitive and resistant colonies on the array were released and cultured. When these cultured cells were reanalyzed for phorbol ester-induced ERK activity, the cells retained the sensitive or resistant phenotype of the originally screened subcolony. Thus cells were separated and collected based using the result of a cell-lethal assay as selection criteria. These microarrays enabling clonal colony segmentation permitted sampling and manipulation of the colonies at very early times and at small cell numbers to reduce reagent, time and manpower requirements. PMID:21142138

  3. Eyes Wide Open: A Critical Review of Sphere-Formation as an Assay For Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Erika; Silva-Vargas, Violeta; Doetsch, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Sphere-forming assays have been widely used to retrospectively identify stem cells based on their reported capacity to evaluate self-renewal and differentiation at the single cell level in vitro. The discovery of markers that allow the prospective isolation of stem cells and their progeny from their in vivo niche allows the functional properties of purified populations to be defined. We provide an historical perspective of the evolution of the neurosphere assay, and highlight limitations in the use of sphere-forming assays, in the context of neurospheres. We discuss theoretical and technical considerations of experimental design and interpretation that surround the use of this assay with any tissue. PMID:21549325

  4. Highly efficient assay of circulating tumor cells by selective sedimentation with a density gradient medium and microfiltration from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Myeon; Lee, June-Young; Lee, Jeong-Gun; Jeong, Hyoyoung; Oh, Jin-Mi; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Park, Donghyun; Kim, Minseok S; Lee, Hun Joo; Oh, Jin Ho; Lee, Soo Suk; Lee, Won-Yong; Huh, Nam

    2012-09-04

    Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) by size exclusion can yield poor purity and low recovery rates, due to large variations in size of CTCs, which may overlap with leukocytes and render size-based filtration methods unreliable. This report presents a very sensitive, selective, fast, and novel method for isolation and detection of CTCs. Our assay platform consists of three steps: (i) capturing CTCs with anti-EpCAM conjugated microbeads, (ii) removal of unwanted hematologic cells (e.g., leukocytes, erythrocytes, etc.) by selective sedimentation of CTCs within a density gradient medium, and (iii) simple microfiltration to collect these cells. To demonstrate the efficacy of this assay, MCF-7 breast cancer cells (average diameter, 24 μm) and DMS-79 small cell lung cancer cells (average diameter, 10 μm) were used to model CTCs. We investigated the relative sedimentation rates for various cells and/or particles, such as CTCs conjugated with different types of microbeads, leukocytes, and erythrocytes, in order to maximize differences in the physical properties. We observed that greater than 99% of leukocytes in whole blood were effectively removed at an optimal centrifugal force, due to differences in their sedimentation rates, yielding a much purer sample compared to other filter-based methods. We also investigated not only the effect of filtration conditions on recovery rates and sample purity but also the sensitivity of our assay platform. Our results showed a near perfect recovery rate (~99%) for MCF-7 cells and very high recovery rate (~89%) for DMS-79 cells, with minimal amounts of leukocytes present.

  5. Neutron capture nuclei-containing carbon nanoparticles for destruction of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kuo Chu; Lai, Po Dong; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Wang, Pei-Jen; Yuan, Chiun-Jye

    2010-11-01

    HeLa cells were incubated with neutron capture nuclei (boron-10 and gadolinium)-containing carbon nanoparticles, followed by irradiation of slow thermal neutron beam. Under a neutron flux of 6 x 10(11) n/cm(2) (or 10 min irradiation at a neutron flux of 1 x 10(9) n/cm(2) s), the percentages of acute cell death at 8 h after irradiation are 52, 55, and 28% for HeLa cells fed with BCo@CNPs, GdCo@CNPs, and Co@CNPs, respectively. The proliferation capability of the survived HeLa cells was also found to be significantly suppressed. At 48 h after neutron irradiation, the cell viability further decreases to 35 +/- 5% as compared to the control set receiving the same amount of neutron irradiation dose but in the absence of carbon nanoparticles. This work demonstrates "proof-of-concept" examples of neutron capture therapy using (10)B-, (157)Gd-, and (59)Co-containing carbon nanoparticles for effective destruction of cancer cells. It will also be reported the preparation and surface functionalization of boron or gadolinium doped core-shell cobalt/carbon nanoparticles (BCo@CNPs, GdCo@CNPs and Co@CNPs) using a modified DC pulsed arc discharge method, and their characterization by various spectroscopic measurements, including TEM, XRD, SQUID, FT-IR, etc. Tumor cell targeting ability was introduced by surface modification of these carbon nanoparticles with folate moieties.

  6. Advances in wound-healing assays for probing collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Yang, Yongliang; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2012-02-01

    Collective cell migration plays essential roles in a wide spectrum of biological processes, such as embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and cancer metastasis. Numerous wound-healing assays based on mechanical, chemical, optical, and electrical approaches have been developed to create model "wounds" in cell monolayers to study the collective cell migration processes. These approaches can result in different microenvironments for cells to migrate and possess diverse assay characteristics in terms of simplicity, throughput, reproducibility, and multiplexability. In this review, we provide an overview of advances in wound-healing assays and discuss their advantages and limitations in studying collective cell migration.

  7. 3D inverted colloidal crystals in realistic cell migration assays for drug screening applications.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Kuo, Cheng-Hwa R; Guck, Jochen; Sivaniah, Easan

    2011-12-01

    Screening drugs for their specific impact on cell mechanics, in addition to targeting adhesion and proteolysis, will be important for successfully moderating migration in infiltrative disorders including cancer metastasis. We present 3D inverted colloidal crystals made of hydrogel as a realistic cell migration assay, where the geometry and stiffness can be set independently to mimic the tissue requirements in question. We show the utility of this 3D assay for drug screening purposes, specifically in contrast to conventional 2D migration studies, by surveying the effects of commonly used cytoskeletal toxins that impact cell mechanics. This assay allows studying large cell numbers for good statistics but at single-cell resolution.

  8. Evaluation of cell lines and immunofluorescence and plaque assay procedures for quantifying reoviruses in sewage.

    PubMed Central

    Ridinger, D N; Spendlove, R S; Barnett, B B; George, D B; Roth, J C

    1982-01-01

    Twelve continuous cell lines were tested to determine their sensitivity to reovirus types 1, 2, and 3 isolated from sewage. Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK), rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK2), and human embryonic intestinal (intestinal 407) cells were most sensitive, respectively. In a similar study, MDBK cells were more sensitive than LLC-MK2 and Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGM) cells to sewage-isolated, protamine-precipitated reoviruses which had not been serotyped and had no previous cell contact. Sewage-isolated, protamine-precipitated reoviruses were also used in conjunction with MDBK cells in a comparative evaluation of immunofluorescent cell count and plaque assay procedures. The immunofluorescence assay is more sensitive and more rapid than the plaque assay. Reoviruses in excess of 10(4)/liter of raw sewage were detected by the immunofluorescent cell count assay. PMID:7044308

  9. Integrated Device for Circulating Tumor Cell Capture, Characterization and Lens-Free Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    microfilter platform captures CTC from the cancer patients’ blood cost effectively, where the larger CTC are preferentially retained on the membrane ... membrane microfilter, where the larger CTC (15-25 μm) are preferentially retained on the membrane while typical blood cells (2-12 μm) flow through. Our...between University of Miami and California Institute of Technology. Specific Aims • Aim 1: Adapt the membrane microfilter device for breast CTC

  10. Enhanced Cell Capture on Functionalized Graphene Oxide Nanosheets through Oxygen Clustering.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Neelkanth M; Kumar, Priyank V; Li, Zeyang; Ploegh, Hidde L; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Belcher, Angela M; Chen, Guan-Yu

    2017-02-28

    With the global rise in incidence of cancer and infectious diseases, there is a need for the development of techniques to diagnose, treat, and monitor these conditions. The ability to efficiently capture and isolate cells and other biomolecules from peripheral whole blood for downstream analyses is a necessary requirement. Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive template nanomaterial for such biosensing applications. Favorable properties include its two-dimensional architecture and wide range of functionalization chemistries, offering significant potential to tailor affinity toward aromatic functional groups expressed in biomolecules of interest. However, a limitation of current techniques is that as-synthesized GO nanosheets are used directly in sensing applications, and the benefits of their structural modification on the device performance have remained unexplored. Here, we report a microfluidic-free, sensitive, planar device on treated GO substrates to enable quick and efficient capture of Class-II MHC-positive cells from murine whole blood. We achieve this by using a mild thermal annealing treatment on the GO substrates, which drives a phase transformation through oxygen clustering. Using a combination of experimental observations and MD simulations, we demonstrate that this process leads to improved reactivity and density of functionalization of cell capture agents, resulting in an enhanced cell capture efficiency of 92 ± 7% at room temperature, almost double the efficiency afforded by devices made using as-synthesized GO (54 ± 3%). Our work highlights a scalable, cost-effective, general approach to improve the functionalization of GO, which creates diverse opportunities for various next-generation device applications.

  11. Human Mucosal Mast Cells Capture HIV-1 and Mediate Viral trans-Infection of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ai-Ping; Jiang, Jin-Feng; Wei, Ji-Fu; Guo, Ming-Gao; Qin, Yan; Guo, Qian-Qian; Ma, Li; Liu, Bao-Chi; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gastrointestinal mucosa is the primary site where human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades, amplifies, and becomes persistently established, and cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 plays a pivotal role in mucosal viral dissemination. Mast cells are widely distributed in the gastrointestinal tract and are early targets for invasive pathogens, and they have been shown to have increased density in the genital mucosa in HIV-infected women. Intestinal mast cells express numerous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and have been shown to combat various viral, parasitic, and bacterial infections. However, the role of mast cells in HIV-1 infection is poorly defined. In this study, we investigated their potential contributions to HIV-1 transmission. Mast cells isolated from gut mucosal tissues were found to express a variety of HIV-1 attachment factors (HAFs), such as DC-SIGN, heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), and α4β7 integrin, which mediate capture of HIV-1 on the cell surface. Intriguingly, following coculture with CD4+ T cells, mast cell surface-bound viruses were efficiently transferred to target T cells. Prior blocking with anti-HAF antibody or mannan before coculture impaired viral trans-infection. Cell-cell conjunctions formed between mast cells and T cells, to which viral particles were recruited, and these were required for efficient cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission. Our results reveal a potential function of gut mucosal mast cells in HIV-1 dissemination in tissues. Strategies aimed at preventing viral capture and transfer mediated by mast cells could be beneficial in combating primary HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE In this study, we demonstrate the role of human mast cells isolated from mucosal tissues in mediating HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. This finding facilitates our understanding of HIV-1 mucosal infection and will benefit the development of strategies to combat primary HIV-1 dissemination. PMID:26719250

  12. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted by conditioned medium

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Cai, Changzu; Yu, Zhilong; Pang, Yuhong; Zhou, Ying; Qian, Lili; Wei, Wensheng; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    It is technically challenging to investigate the function of secreted protein in real time by supply of conditioned medium that contains secreted protein of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) and its receptor, and eventually leads to cell lethality. To monitor the dynamic interplay between these components in live cells, we use an integrated microfluidic device to perform the cell viability assays with real-time controlled culture microenvironment in parallel. Conditioned medium, which contains the secreted proteins from specific cell lines, can be continuously pumped towards the cells that exposed to toxin. The exogenous DKK1 secreted from distant cells is able to rescue the sensitivity to toxin for those DKK1-knocked-down cells. This high-throughput assay allows us to precisely quantify the dynamic interaction between key components that cause cell death, and provide independent evidence of the function of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. PMID:25731605

  13. A Macroscopic Mathematical Model for Cell Migration Assays Using a Real-Time Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Claudia; Carfora, Maria Francesca; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Natalini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Experiments of cell migration and chemotaxis assays have been classically performed in the so-called Boyden Chambers. A recent technology, xCELLigence Real Time Cell Analysis, is now allowing to monitor the cell migration in real time. This technology measures impedance changes caused by the gradual increase of electrode surface occupation by cells during the course of time and provide a Cell Index which is proportional to cellular morphology, spreading, ruffling and adhesion quality as well as cell number. In this paper we propose a macroscopic mathematical model, based on advection-reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, describing the cell migration assay using the real-time technology. We carried out numerical simulations to compare simulated model dynamics with data of observed biological experiments on three different cell lines and in two experimental settings: absence of chemotactic signals (basal migration) and presence of a chemoattractant. Overall we conclude that our minimal mathematical model is able to describe the phenomenon in the real time scale and numerical results show a good agreement with the experimental evidences. PMID:27680883

  14. A Macroscopic Mathematical Model for Cell Migration Assays Using a Real-Time Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Costanzo, Ezio; Ingangi, Vincenzo; Angelini, Claudia; Carfora, Maria Francesca; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Natalini, Roberto

    Experiments of cell migration and chemotaxis assays have been classically performed in the so-called Boyden Chambers. A recent technology, xCELLigence Real Time Cell Analysis, is now allowing to monitor the cell migration in real time. This technology measures impedance changes caused by the gradual increase of electrode surface occupation by cells during the course of time and provide a Cell Index which is proportional to cellular morphology, spreading, ruffling and adhesion quality as well as cell number. In this paper we propose a macroscopic mathematical model, based on advection-reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, describing the cell migration assay using the real-time technology. We carried out numerical simulations to compare simulated model dynamics with data of observed biological experiments on three different cell lines and in two experimental settings: absence of chemotactic signals (basal migration) and presence of a chemoattractant. Overall we conclude that our minimal mathematical model is able to describe the phenomenon in the real time scale and numerical results show a good agreement with the experimental evidences.

  15. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Tony J.; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose–response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  16. High-Throughput Selective Capture of Single Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis at a Wireless Electrode Array.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Anand, Robbyn K

    2017-07-05

    We demonstrate continuous high-throughput selective capture of circulating tumor cells by dielectrophoresis at arrays of wireless electrodes (bipolar electrodes, BPEs). The use of BPEs removes the requirement of ohmic contact to individual array elements, thus enabling otherwise unattainable device formats. Capacitive charging of the electrical double layer at opposing ends of each BPE allows an AC electric field to be transmitted across the entire device. Here, two such designs are described and evaluated. In the first design, BPEs interconnect parallel microchannels. Pockets extruding from either side of the microchannels volumetrically control the number of cells captured at each BPE tip and enhance trapping. High-fidelity single-cell capture was achieved when the pocket dimensions were matched to those of the cells. A second, open design allows many non-targeted cells to pass through. These devices enable high-throughput capture of rare cells and single-cell analysis.

  17. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    ALAPAN, YUNUS; KIM, CEONNE; ADHIKARI, ANIMA; GRAY, KAYLA E.; GURKAN-CAVUSOGLU, EVREN; LITTLE, JANE A.; GURKAN, UMUT A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  18. Measuring stem cell frequency in epidermis: A quantitative in vivo functional assay for long-term repopulating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T. E.; Barland, C.; Alex, A. M.; Mancianti, M. L.; Lu, Y.; Cleaver, J. E.; Lawrence, H. J.; Ghadially, R.

    2003-09-01

    Epidermal stem cells play a central role in tissue homeostasis, wound repair, tumor initiation, and gene therapy. A major impediment to the purification and molecular characterization of epidermal stem cells is the lack of a quantitative assay for cells capable of long-term repopulation in vivo, such as exists for hematopoietic cells. The tremendous strides made in the characterization and purification of hematopoietic stem cells have been critically dependent on the availability of competitive transplantation assays, because these assays permit the accurate quantitation of long-term repopulating cells in vivo. We have developed an analogous functional assay for epidermal stem cells, and have measured the frequency of functional epidermal stem cells in interfollicular epidermis. These studies indicate that cells capable of long-term reconstitution of a squamous epithelium reside in the interfollicular epidermis. We find that the frequency of these long-term repopulating cells is 1 in 35,000 total epidermal cells, or in the order of 1 in 104 basal epidermal cells, similar to that of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, and much lower than previously estimated in epidermis. Furthermore, these studies establish a novel functional assay that can be used to validate immunophenotypic markers and enrichment strategies for epidermal stem cells, and to quantify epidermal stem cells in various keratinocyte populations. Thus further studies using this type of assay for epidermis should aid in the progress of cutaneous stem cell-targeted gene therapy, and in more basic studies of epidermal stem cell regulation and differentiation.

  19. SpyLigase peptide–peptide ligation polymerizes affibodies to enhance magnetic cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Jacob O.; Veggiani, Gianluca; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Individual proteins can now often be modified with atomic precision, but there are still major obstacles to connecting proteins into larger assemblies. To direct protein assembly, ideally, peptide tags would be used, providing the minimal perturbation to protein function. However, binding to peptides is generally weak, so assemblies are unstable over time and disassemble with force or harsh conditions. We have recently developed an irreversible protein–peptide interaction (SpyTag/SpyCatcher), based on a protein domain from Streptococcus pyogenes, that locks itself together via spontaneous isopeptide bond formation. Here we develop irreversible peptide–peptide interaction, through redesign of this domain and genetic dissection into three parts: a protein domain termed SpyLigase, which now ligates two peptide tags to each other. All components expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli and peptide tags were reactive at the N terminus, at the C terminus, or at internal sites. Peptide–peptide ligation enabled covalent and site-specific polymerization of affibodies or antibodies against the tumor markers epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2. Magnetic capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the most promising approaches to improve cancer prognosis and management, but CTC capture is limited by inefficient recovery of cells expressing low levels of tumor antigen. SpyLigase-assembled protein polymers made possible the isolation of cancerous cells expressing lower levels of tumor antigen and should have general application in enhancing molecular capture. PMID:24639550

  20. A microfluidic device for label-free, physical capture of circulating tumor cell-clusters

    PubMed Central

    Sarioglu, A. Fatih; Aceto, Nicola; Kojic, Nikola; Donaldson, Maria C.; Zeinali, Mahnaz; Hamza, Bashar; Engstrom, Amanda; Zhu, Huili; Sundaresan, Tilak K.; Miyamoto, David T.; Luo, Xi; Bardia, Aditya; Wittner, Ben S.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshi; Ting, David T.; Stott, Shannon L.; Kapur, Ravi; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells metastasize through the bloodstream either as single migratory circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or as multicellular groupings (CTC-clusters). Existing technologies for CTC enrichment are designed primarily to isolate single CTCs, and while CTC-clusters are detectable in some cases, their true prevalence and significance remain to be determined. Here, we developed a microchip technology (Cluster-Chip) specifically designed to capture CTC-clusters independent of tumor-specific markers from unprocessed blood. CTC-clusters are isolated through specialized bifurcating traps under low shear-stress conditions that preserve their integrity and even two-cell clusters are captured efficiently. Using the Cluster-Chip, we identify CTC-clusters in 30–40% of patients with metastatic cancers of the breast, prostate and melanoma. RNA sequencing of CTC-clusters confirms their tumor origin and identifies leukocytes within the clusters as tissue-derived macrophages. Together, the development of a device for efficient capture of CTC-clusters will enable detailed characterization of their biological properties and role in cancer metastasis. PMID:25984697

  1. Monoclonal antibody binding-site diversity assessment with a cell-based clustering assay.

    PubMed

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Zachwieja, Joseph; Gomez, Steven; Duey, Dana; Lippincott, John; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2014-03-01

    The diversity of a panel of antibodies that target a specific antigen can be established in various assay formats. In conventional epitope binning assays purified antibodies are tested in a pairwise manner: two antibodies that compete with each other for binding to an antigen are grouped into the same cluster or bin, while they are assigned to two different clusters when they do not compete. Here we present a high through put assay that enables grouping of crude hybridoma supernatants without a need for antibody purification. In addition, the assay does not require recombinant protein, because it is conducted on cells that express the antigen of interest. Hence, one can use the antibody-clustering assay for cell surface proteins that are not amenable to purification. Heavy chain variable region (VH) sequencing shows that VH composition within clusters is conserved. Finally, the assay is in good agreement with a conventional epitope binning assay with purified antigen.

  2. Microfluidic assay of circulating endothelial cells in coronary artery disease patients with angina pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuiyu; Sun, Yukun; Neoh, Kuang Hong; Chen, Anqi; Li, Weiju; Yang, Xiaorui

    2017-01-01

    Background Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are widely reported as a promising biomarker of endothelial damage/dysfunction in coronary artery disease (CAD). The two popular methods of CEC quantification include the use of immunomagnetic beads separation (IB) and flow cytometry analysis (FC); however, they suffer from two main shortcomings that affect their diagnostic and prognostic responses: non-specific bindings of magnetic beads to non-target cells and a high degree of variability in rare cell identification, respectively. We designed a microfluidic chip with spatially staggered micropillars for the efficient harvesting of CECs with intact cellular morphology in an attempt to revisit the diagnostic goal of CEC counts in CAD patients with angina pectoris. Methods A label-free microfluidic assay that involved an in-situ enumeration and immunofluorescent identification (DAPI+/CD146+/VEGFR1+/CD45-) of CECs was carried out to assess the CEC count in human peripheral blood samples. A total of 55 CAD patients with angina pectoris [16 with chronic stable angina (CSA) and 39 with unstable angina (UA)], together with 15 heathy controls (HCs) were enrolled in the study. Results CEC counts are significantly higher in both CSA and UA groups compared to the HC group [respective medians of 6.9, 10.0 and 1.5 cells/ml (p < 0.01)]. Further, a significant elevation of CEC count was observed in the three UA subgroups [low risk (5.3) vs. intermediate risk (10.8) vs. high risk (18.0) cells/ml, p < 0.001) classified in accordance to the TIMI NSTEMI/UA risk score system. From the receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, the AUCs for distinguishing CSA and UA from HC were 0.867 and 0.938, respectively. The corresponding sensitivities were 87.5% and 84.6% and the specificities were 66.7% and 86.7%, respectively. Conclusions Our microfluidic assay system is efficient and stable for CEC capture and enumeration. The results showed that the CEC count has the potential to be a

  3. Microfluidic assay of circulating endothelial cells in coronary artery disease patients with angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuiyu; Sun, Yukun; Neoh, Kuang Hong; Chen, Anqi; Li, Weiju; Yang, Xiaorui; Han, Ray P S

    2017-01-01

    Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are widely reported as a promising biomarker of endothelial damage/dysfunction in coronary artery disease (CAD). The two popular methods of CEC quantification include the use of immunomagnetic beads separation (IB) and flow cytometry analysis (FC); however, they suffer from two main shortcomings that affect their diagnostic and prognostic responses: non-specific bindings of magnetic beads to non-target cells and a high degree of variability in rare cell identification, respectively. We designed a microfluidic chip with spatially staggered micropillars for the efficient harvesting of CECs with intact cellular morphology in an attempt to revisit the diagnostic goal of CEC counts in CAD patients with angina pectoris. A label-free microfluidic assay that involved an in-situ enumeration and immunofluorescent identification (DAPI+/CD146+/VEGFR1+/CD45-) of CECs was carried out to assess the CEC count in human peripheral blood samples. A total of 55 CAD patients with angina pectoris [16 with chronic stable angina (CSA) and 39 with unstable angina (UA)], together with 15 heathy controls (HCs) were enrolled in the study. CEC counts are significantly higher in both CSA and UA groups compared to the HC group [respective medians of 6.9, 10.0 and 1.5 cells/ml (p < 0.01)]. Further, a significant elevation of CEC count was observed in the three UA subgroups [low risk (5.3) vs. intermediate risk (10.8) vs. high risk (18.0) cells/ml, p < 0.001) classified in accordance to the TIMI NSTEMI/UA risk score system. From the receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, the AUCs for distinguishing CSA and UA from HC were 0.867 and 0.938, respectively. The corresponding sensitivities were 87.5% and 84.6% and the specificities were 66.7% and 86.7%, respectively. Our microfluidic assay system is efficient and stable for CEC capture and enumeration. The results showed that the CEC count has the potential to be a promising clinical biomarker for the

  4. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

  5. Highly Efficient Capture and Electrochemical Release of Circulating Tumor Cells by Using Aptamers Modified Gold Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ting-Ting; Ye, Dekai; Zhang, Qian-Wen; Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2017-10-11

    The effective capture and release of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is of significant importance in cancer prognose and treatment. Here we report a highly efficient method to capture and release human leukemic lymphoblasts (CCRF-CEM) using aptamers modified gold nanowire arrays (AuNWs). The gold nanowires, showing tunable morphologies from relatively random pillar deposit to relatively uniform arrays, were fabricated by electrochemical deposition using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) as template. Upon simply being modified with aptamers by Au-S chemistry, the AuNWs exhibit higher specificity to target cells. Also compared to flat gold substrate, the AuNWs with nanostructure can capture target cells with much higher capture yield. Moreover, the captured CCRF-CEM cells can be released from AuNWs efficiently with little damage through an electrochemical desorption process. We predict that our strategy has great potential in providing a simple and economical platform for CTCs isolation, cancer diagnosis, and therapy.

  6. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  7. Quantitative bioanalysis of antibody-conjugated payload in monkey plasma using a hybrid immuno-capture LC-MS/MS approach: Assay development, validation, and a case study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ang; Kozhich, Alexander; Passmore, David; Gu, Huidong; Wong, Richard; Zambito, Frank; Rangan, Vangipuram S; Myler, Heather; Aubry, Anne-Françoise; Arnold, Mark E; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) are complex molecules composed of two pharmacologically distinct components, the cytotoxic payload and the antibody. The measurement of the payload molecules that are attached to the antibody in vivo is important for the evaluation of the safety and efficacy of ADCs, and can also provide distinct information compared to the antibody-related analytes. However, analyzing the antibody-conjugated payload is challenging and in some cases may not be feasible. The in vivo change in drug antibody ratio (DAR), due to deconjugation, biotransformation or other clearance phenomena, generates unique and additional challenges for ADC analysis in biological samples. Here, we report a novel hybrid approach with immuno-capture of the ADC, payload cleavage by specific enzyme, and LC-MS/MS of the cleaved payload to quantitatively measure the concentration of payload molecules still attached to the antibody via linker in plasma. The ADC reference material used for the calibration curve is not likely to be identical to the ADC measured in study samples due to the change in DAR distribution over the PK time course. The assay clearly demonstrated that there was no bias in the measurement of antibody-conjugated payload for ADC with varying DAR, which thus allowed accurate quantification even when the DAR distribution dynamically changes in vivo. This hybrid assay was fully validated based on a combination of requirements for both chromatographic and ligand binding methods, and was successfully applied to support a GLP safety study in monkeys. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reduction of misleading ("false") positive results in mammalian cell genotoxicity assays. I. Choice of cell type.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Paul; Smith, Katie; Young, Jamie; Jeffrey, Laura; Kirkland, David; Pfuhler, Stefan; Carmichael, Paul

    2012-02-18

    Current in vitro mammalian cell genotoxicity assays show a high rate of positive results, many of which are misleading when compared with in vivo genotoxicity or rodent carcinogenicity data. P53-deficiency in many of the rodent cell lines may be a key factor in this poor predictivity. As part of an European Cosmetics Industry Association initiative for improvement of in vitro mammalian cell assays, we have compared several rodent cell lines (V79, CHL, CHO) with p53-competent human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HuLy), TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells, and the human liver cell line, HepG2. We have compared in vitro micronucleus (MN) induction following treatment with 19 compounds that were accepted as producing misleading or "false" positive results in in vitro mammalian cell assays [6]. Of these, six chemicals (2-ethyl-1,3-hexandiol, benzyl alcohol, urea, sodium saccharin, sulfisoxazole and isobutyraldehyde) were not toxic and did not induce any MN at concentrations up to 10mM. d,l-Menthol and ethionamide induced cytotoxicity, but did not induce MN. o-Anthranilic acid was not toxic and did not induce MN in V79, CHL, CHO, HuLy and HepG2 cells up to 10mM. Toxicity was induced in TK6 cells, although there were no increases in MN frequency up to and above the 55% toxicity level. The other 10 chemicals (1,3-dihydroxybenzene, curcumin, propyl gallate, p-nitrophenol, ethyl acrylate, eugenol, tert-butylhydroquinone, 2,4-dichlorophenol, sodium xylene sulfonate and phthalic anhydride) produced cytotoxicity in at least one cell type, and were evaluated further for MN induction in most or all of the cell types listed above. All these chemicals induced MN at concentrations <10mM, with levels of cytotoxicity below 60% (measured as the replication index) in at least one cell type. The rodent cell lines (V79, CHO and CHL) were consistently more susceptible to cytotoxicity and MN induction than p53-competent cells, and are therefore more susceptible to giving misleading positive

  9. Method of assay of red cell folate activity and the value of the assay as a test for folate deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoffbrand, A. V.; Newcombe, Beverley F. A.; Mollin, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    A simplified microbiological assay for determining the folate content of red cells is described. As in previously reported methods Lactobacillus casei is used as test organism but two modifications are introduced. First, haemolysis is carried out in water containing 1 g.% of ascorbic acid; secondly, haemolysates are not incubated before the assay. Using this assay, recovery of pteroylglutamic acid added in two different concentrations to five different whole blood samples was 97·0 ± 1·9 S.E. % and 106·1 ± 4·7 S.E. % respectively. The coefficient of variation of the assay was between 11·2 and 15·0%. Haemolysates were best stored deep frozen, showing no significant loss of L. casei activity for three to five months at −20°C. On the other hand, non-haemolysed blood samples were best stored at 4°C. when there was no loss of activity for seven to 10 days. Experiments confirmed that plasma is necessary for the maximum release of red cell L. casei activity, and showed that only small amounts of plasma are necessary; folate- and B12-deficient plasma released slightly lower L. casei activities from red cells than did normal plasma. The red cell folate levels of 40 healthy normal subjects ranged from 160 to 640 mμg. per ml. of packed red cells. One hundred and twenty patients with subnormal serum folate levels due to idiopathic steatorrhoea, nutritional folate deficiency and Crohn's disease, partial gastrectomy, myelosclerosis, and polycythaemia vera were studied. Red cell folate levels were subnormal (range from 7 to 143 mμg. per ml.) in 40 patients with megaloblastic anaemia, the lowest levels occurring in the most anaemic patients. Subnormal red cell folate levels also occurred in 23 (29%) of the 80 non-anaemic patients. There was a good correlation between red cell folate level and severity of folate deficiency assessed by polymorph nuclear lobe counts, and, in the non-anaemic patients bone marrow morphology. It is concluded that, in the absence of B12

  10. Automated Cell Enrichment of Cytomegalovirus-specific T cells for Clinical Applications using the Cytokine-capture System.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Pappanaicken; Figliola, Mathew; Moyes, Judy S; Huls, M Helen; Tewari, Priti; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2015-10-05

    The adoptive transfer of pathogen-specific T cells can be used to prevent and treat opportunistic infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Viral-specific T cells from allogeneic donors, including third party donors, can be propagated ex vivo in compliance with current good manufacturing practice (cGMP), employing repeated rounds of antigen-driven stimulation to selectively propagate desired T cells. The identification and isolation of antigen-specific T cells can also be undertaken based upon the cytokine capture system of T cells that have been activated to secrete gamma-interferon (IFN-γ). However, widespread human application of the cytokine capture system (CCS) to help restore immunity has been limited as the production process is time-consuming and requires a skilled operator. The development of a second-generation cell enrichment device such as CliniMACS Prodigy now enables investigators to generate viral-specific T cells using an automated, less labor-intensive system. This device separates magnetically labeled cells from unlabeled cells using magnetic activated cell sorting technology to generate clinical-grade products, is engineered as a closed system and can be accessed and operated on the benchtop. We demonstrate the operation of this new automated cell enrichment device to manufacture CMV pp65-specific T cells obtained from a steady-state apheresis product obtained from a CMV seropositive donor. These isolated T cells can then be directly infused into a patient under institutional and federal regulatory supervision. All the bio-processing steps including removal of red blood cells, stimulation of T cells, separation of antigen-specific T cells, purification, and washing are fully automated. Devices such as this raise the possibility that T cells for human application can be manufactured outside of dedicated good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities and instead be produced

  11. Macrophage infection via selective capture of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Amy E; Russell, Rebecca A; Duncan, Christopher J A; Moore, Michael D; Willberg, Christian B; Pablos, Jose L; Finzi, Andrés; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Groot, Fedde; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2014-12-10

    Macrophages contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis by forming a viral reservoir and mediating neurological disorders. Cell-free HIV-1 infection of macrophages is inefficient, in part due to low plasma membrane expression of viral entry receptors. We find that macrophages selectively capture and engulf HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells leading to efficient macrophage infection. Infected T cells, both healthy and dead or dying, were taken up through viral envelope glycoprotein-receptor-independent interactions, implying a mechanism distinct from conventional virological synapse formation. Macrophages infected by this cell-to-cell route were highly permissive for both CCR5-using macrophage-tropic and otherwise weakly macrophage-tropic transmitted/founder viruses but restrictive for nonmacrophage-tropic CXCR4-using virus. These results have implications for establishment of the macrophage reservoir and HIV-1 dissemination in vivo.

  12. A ring barrier-based migration assay to assess cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Das, Asha M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2015-06-01

    Cell migration is a key feature of virtually every biological process, and it can be studied in a variety of ways. Here we outline a protocol for the in vitro study of cell migration using a ring barrier-based assay. A 'barrier' is inserted in the culture chamber, which prevents cells from entering a defined area. Cells of interest are seeded around this barrier, and after the formation of a peripheral monolayer the barrier is removed and migration into the cell-free area is monitored. This assay is highly reproducible and convenient to perform, and it allows the deduction of several parameters of migration, including total and effective migration, velocity and cell polarization. An advantage of this assay over the conventional scratch assay is that the cells move over an unaltered and virgin surface, and thus the effect of matrix components on cell migration can be studied. In addition, the cells are not harmed at the onset of the assay. Through computer automation, four individual barrier assays can be monitored at the same time. The procedure can be used in a 12-well standard plate allowing higher throughput, or it can be modified to perform invasion assays. The basic procedure takes 2-3 d to complete.

  13. Fluorescent target array killing assay: a multiplex cytotoxic T-cell assay to measure detailed T-cell antigen specificity and avidity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Quah, Benjamin J C; Wijesundara, Danushka K; Ranasinghe, Charani; Parish, Christopher R

    2012-08-01

    Here we describe a multiplex, fluorescence-based, in vivo cytotoxic T-cell assay using the three vital dyes carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester, cell trace violet, and cell proliferation dye efluor 670. When used to label cells in combination, these dyes can discriminate >200 different target cell populations in the one animal due to each target population having a unique fluorescence signature based on fluorescence intensity and the different emission wavelengths of the dyes. This allows the simultaneous measurement of the in vivo killing of target cells pulsed with numerous peptides at different concentrations and the inclusion of many replicates. This fluorescent target array killing assay can be used to measure the fine antigen specificity and avidity of polyclonal cytotoxic T-cell responses in vivo, immunological parameters that were previously impossible to monitor.

  14. Liposomes and MTT cell viability assay: an incompatible affair.

    PubMed

    Angius, Fabrizio; Floris, Alice

    2015-03-01

    The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay is commonly used to evaluate the cytotoxicity potential of drugs vehicled by liposomes. However, liposome delivering drugs could produce inconsistent values of MTT absorbance. On the basis of previous experiments demonstrating the MTT affinity for lipid droplets, this paper aims to show that empty-liposomes interfere, per se, on MTT assay due to its lipidic nature. This brings into question the use of MTT testing cytotoxicity when liposomes are involved in delivering drugs.

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy as new treatment for clear cell sarcoma: trial on different animal model.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tooru; Fujimoto, Takuya; Sudo, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Epstein, Alan L; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki

    2014-06-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. In our previous study, the tumor disappeared under boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on subcutaneously-transplanted CCS-bearing animals. In the present study, the tumor disappeared under this therapy on model mice intramuscularly implanted with three different human CCS cells. BNCT led to the suppression of tumor-growth in each of the different model mice, suggesting its potentiality as an alternative to, or integrative option for, the treatment of CCS.

  16. A Novel Method of Safely Measuring Influenza Virus Aerosol Using Antigen-Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Performance Evaluation of Protective Clothing Materials.

    PubMed

    Shimasaki, Noriko; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Okaue, Akira; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Hamamoto, Itsuki; Shinohara, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Currently, threats caused by pathogens are serious public health problems worldwide. Protective clothing is essential when one is treating infected patients or dealing with unknown pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the performance of protective clothing against pathogens. In Japan, some methods for evaluating the performance of protective clothing have been established in the Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS). However, a test method against virus aerosols has not been established. Because there is a risk of infection from a live virus during the test, it is necessary to devise a safe method for the virus-aerosol-based test. Here, we propose a new method of safely measuring virus aerosols for the performance evaluation of protective clothing materials. To ensure safety, an inactivated virus was used. As a model virus, the influenza virus was selected owing to the proper small diameter of the virus particles. To quantitatively measure the particle-amount of the inactivated influenza virus, we developed an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) targeting the M1 protein. Furthermore, we evaluated two materials using our method. Significant differences in the protection performance against the virus aerosol were observed between different sample materials, thereby confirming the applicability of our new method for performance evaluation.

  17. Prevalence of Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Performance of Cepheid Xpert and Hybrid Capture 2 (hc2) HPV Assays in South African HIV-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    Mbulawa, Zizipho Z A; Wilkin, Timothy; Goeieman, Bridgette J; Jong, Eefje; Michelow, Pamela; Swarts, Avril; Smith, Jennifer S; Kegorilwe, Patricia; Firnhaber, Cynthia S; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated anal high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) prevalence in HIV-infected women using the Cepheid Xpert HPV assay and compares its performance with that of Hybrid Capture-2 (hc2). A total of 199 HIV-infected women were recruited from Helen Joseph Hospital, Johannesburg. Stored ThinPrep anal swabs that had previously been tested using hc2 were tested for HPV using Xpert. The HR-HPV prevalence by Xpert was 40.8% and similar to hc2 (41.8%) with overall agreement of 86.7%; Cohen's kappa 0.73 (95% CI 0.63-0.82). High grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) was associated with increasing number of multiple HPV infection (P < .001). Xpert and hc2 were similarly sensitive (77.4% and 77.4%, respectively) and specific (66.1% and 64.8% respectively) for HSIL detection. HPV16 (OR: 14.0, 95% CI: 3.9-48.0, P < .0001), HPV39/68/56/66 (OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 1.4-12, P = .01) and HPV51/59 (OR: 2.8, 95% CI: 1.1-7.6, P = .04) were independently associated with anal HSIL. Xpert HPV typing is a promising anal screening test in HIV-infected women that performs similarly to hc2.

  18. A Contingent Replication Assay for the Detection of Protein-Protein Interactions in Animal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasavada, Haren A.; Ganguly, Subinay; Germino, F. Joseph; Wang, Zhen Xi; Weissman, Sherman M.

    1991-12-01

    We have developed a sensitive and rapid assay system termed the contingent replication assay (CRA) for selecting cDNAs with desired functional properties from a cDNA library. The system functions in animal cells and permits enrichment of the desired cDNA in small-scale and convenient experiments. The assay can be used for the enrichment of proteins that activate transcription from conditional enhancers, bind to specific DNA sequences, or interact with target proteins of interest. In this communication we report the application of this assay to study protein-protein interactions in animal cells.

  19. Trajectory-capture cell instrumentation for measurement of dust particle mass, velocity and trajectory, and particle capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detector for space missions--such as the Halley Comet Missions where the impact velocity was very high as well as for missions where the impact velocity is low was extended to include: (1) the capability for impact position determination - i.e., x,y coordinate of impact; and (2) the capability for particle velocity determination using two thin PVDF sensors spaced a given distance apart - i.e., by time-of-flight. These developments have led to space flight instrumentation for recovery-type missions, which will measure the masses (sizes), fluxes and trajectories of incoming dust particles and will capture the dust material in a form suitable for later Earth-based laboratory measurements. These laboratory measurements would determine the elemental, isotopic and mineralogical properties of the captured dust and relate these to possible sources of the dust material (i.e., comets, asteroids), using the trajectory information. The instrumentation described here has the unique advantages of providing both orbital characteristics and physical and chemical properties--as well as possible origin--of incoming dust.

  20. Affinity capture and identification of host cell factors associated with hepatitis C virus (+) strand subgenomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Alok; Dixit, Updesh; Manvar, Dinesh; Chaturvedi, Nootan; Pandey, Virendra N

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leading to chronic hepatitis is a major factor in the causation of liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. This process may involve the interplay of various host cell factors, as well as the interaction of these factors with viral RNA and proteins. We report a novel strategy using a sequence-specific biotinylated peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-neamine conjugate targeted to HCV RNA for the in situ capture of subgenomic HCV (+) RNA, along with cellular and viral factors associated with it in MH14 host cells. Using this affinity capture system in conjunction with LC/MS/MS, we have identified 83 cellular factors and three viral proteins (NS5B, NS5A, and NS3-4a protease-helicase) associated with the viral genome. The capture was highly specific. These proteins were not scored with cured MH14 cells devoid of HCV replicons because of the absence of the target sequence in cells for the PNA-neamine probe and also because, unlike oligomeric DNA, cellular proteins have no affinity for PNA. The identified cellular factors belong to different functional groups, including signaling, oncogenic, chaperonin, transcriptional regulators, and RNA helicases as well as DEAD box proteins, ribosomal proteins, translational regulators/factors, and metabolic enzymes, that represent a diverse set of cellular factors associated with the HCV RNA genome. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of a diverse class of selected proteins in an HCV replicon cell line either enhanced or inhibited HCV replication/translation, suggesting that these cellular factors have regulatory roles in HCV replication.

  1. Development of microfluidics as endothelial progenitor cell capture technology for cardiovascular tissue engineering and diagnostic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, Brian D.; Kniazeva, Tatiana; Mayer, John E.; Murthy, Shashi K.; Sales, Virna L.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a unique microfluidic platform capable of capturing circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) by understanding surface chemistries and adhesion profiles. The surface of a variable-shear-stress microfluidic device was conjugated with 6 different antibodies [anti-CD34, -CD31, -vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), -CD146, -CD45, and -von Willebrand factor (vWF)] designed to match the surface antigens on ovine peripheral blood-derived EPCs. Microfluidic analysis showed a shear-stress-dependent decrease in EPC adhesion on attached surface antigens. EPCs exhibited increased adhesion to antibodies against CD34, VEGFR-2, CD31, and CD146 compared to CD45, consistent with their endothelial cell-specific surface profile, when exposed to a minimum shear stress of 1.47 dyn/cm2. Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and artery-derived endothelial and smooth muscle cells were used to demonstrate the specificity of the EPC microfluidic device. Coated hematopoietic specific-surface (CD45) and granular vWF antibodies, as well as uncoated bare glass and substrate (1% BSA), were utilized as controls. Microfluidic devices have been developed as an EPC capture platform using immobilized antibodies targeted as EPC surface antigens. This EPC chip may provide a new and effective tool for addressing challenges in cardiovascular disease and tissue engineering.—Plouffe, B. D., Kniazeva, T., Mayer, J. E., Jr., Murthy, S. K., Sales, V. L. Development of microfluidics as endothelial progenitor cell capture technology for cardiovascular tissue engineering and diagnostic medicine. PMID:19487310

  2. In vitro assays for cobblestone area-forming cells, LTC-IC, and CFU-C.

    PubMed

    van Os, Ronald P; Dethmers-Ausema, Bertien; de Haan, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Various assays exist that measure the function of hematopoietic stemcells (HSCs). In this chapter, in vitro assays are described that measure the frequency of progenitors (colony-forming unit in culture; CFU-C), stem cells (long-term culture-initiating cell; LTC-IC), or both (cobblestone area-forming cell assay; CAFC). These assays measure the potential of a test cell population retrospectively, i.e., at the time its activity is evident when the stem cell itself is often not detectable anymore. Although the in vitro LTC-IC and CAFC assays have been shown to correlate with in vivo activity, in vivo transplantation assays, where it can be shown that cells possess the ability to indefinitely repopulate all blood lineages, are the ultimate proof for HSC activity. Nevertheless, these in vitro assays provide an excellent method to screen for stem cell activity of a putative stem cell population or for screening the effect of a certain treatment on HSCs.

  3. Inhibition of neuronal cell-cell adhesion measured by the microscopic aggregation assay and impedance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiertz, R. W. F.; Marani, E.; Rutten, W. L. C.

    2010-10-01

    Microscopic aggregation assay and impedance sensing (IS) were used to monitor a change in in vitro neuron-neuron adhesion in response to blocking of cell adhesion molecules. By blocking neuron-neuron adhesion, migration and aggregation of neuronal cells can be inhibited. This leads to better control of spatial arrangement of cells in culture. In the literature N-CAM, L1 and N-cadherin proteins are pointed out as main regulators of neuronal adhesion. In this study, these three main cell adhesion molecules were used to inhibit neuron-to-neuron adhesion and aggregation. Both soluble extracellular domains and antigen antibodies were added to these adhesion molecules. They were investigated for their blocking ability in neuronal cultures. First, in a 96 h aggregation assay on a low-adhesive substrate, the effect of inhibition of the three proteins on aggregation of cortical neurons was investigated optically. Both L1 antibody and L1 protein had no effect on the degree of aggregation. An N-cadherin antibody however was shown to be effective in aggregation inhibition at concentrations of 1 and 3 µg ml-1. Up to 96 h no aggregation occurred. A similar effect was achieved by the N-cadherin protein, although less distinct. N-CAM blocking revealed no inhibition of aggregation. Second, results from IS corresponded to those of the aggregation assays. In these experiments neuron-neuron adhesion was also inhibited by blocking N-CAM L1 and N-cadherin. Cortical neurons were cultured in small wells containing circular 100 µm diameter gold electrodes, so small changes in cell-cell interactions in monolayers of neurons could be monitored by IS. Impedances of neuron-covered electrodes were significantly lower in the presence of the N-cadherin antibody and protein at concentrations of 1, 3 and 10 µg ml-1, indicating a less profound binding between adjacent neurons. Results from the aggregation assays and impedance measurements demonstrate the applicability of blocking cell adhesion

  4. Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells capture protein antigens in the skin: Possible targets for vaccination through the skin

    PubMed Central

    Sparber, Florian; Tripp, Christoph H.; Hermann, Martin; Romani, Nikolaus; Stoitzner, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells capture and process antigen and present it to T lymphocytes in the lymphoid organs. Dendritic cells of the skin, including epidermal Langerhans cells, langerin+ and langerinnegative dermal dendritic cells are ideally positioned to take up pathogens that enter the body through the skin or vaccines that are administered into (intradermal) or onto (epicutaneous) the skin. The antigen uptake properties of skin dendritic cells have not thoroughly been studied yet. We therefore investigated the uptake of the fluorochrome-conjugated model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) by skin dendritic cells in the mouse. OVA was readily taken up by immature Langerhans cells both in situ and in cell suspensions. When offered to Langerhans cells in situ either by “bathing” skin explants in OVA-containing culture medium or by intradermal injection they retained the captured OVA for at least 2–3 days when migrating into the culture medium and, importantly, into the draining lymph nodes. Also langerin+ and – to a larger extent – langerinnegative skin dendritic cells took up and transported OVA to the lymph nodes. Interestingly, mature Langerhans cells were still capable of ingesting substantial amounts of OVA, indicating that predominantly receptor-mediated endocytosis is operative in these cells. Unlike macropinocytosis, this pathway of endocytosis is not shut down upon dendritic cell maturation. These observations indicate that in intradermal vaccination schemes, Langerhans cells from the epidermis are prominently involved. They were recently shown to possess the capacity to induce functional cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Furthermore, the potential to markedly enhance antigen uptake and processing by targeting antigen to c-type lectin receptors on Langerhans cells was also recently demonstrated. Our data provide a rationale and an incentive to explore in more detail antigen targeting to Langerhans cells with the aim of harnessing it for immunotherapy. PMID:20599290

  5. A novel clonality assay for the assessment of canine T cell proliferations.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stefan M; Moore, Peter F

    2012-01-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based clonality assays are an important tool to differentiate neoplastic from reactive lymphocyte populations. A recent description of the canine T cell receptor γ locus identified a large number of formerly unknown genes, and determined the locus topology consisting of 8 cassettes with up to 3 variable (V) genes, 2 joining (J) genes and one constant (C) gene each. Given that these data were not available when existing canine T cell clonality assays were developed, it is likely that they will fail to detect a subset of clonal lymphocyte populations. The objective of this study was to gauge the potential of canine T cell clonality assays to detect all rearranged T cell receptor γ genes and to develop an improved clonality assay. The primer sequences of existing clonality assays were aligned to the reference sequences of all rearranged genes and genes were scored as to the likelihood of being recognized by a primer. All four assays likely recognized subgroup Vγ2 and Vγ6 genes but 3 out of 4 assays were unlikely to detect subgroup Vγ3 and Vγ7 genes. All assays likely recognized Jγx-2 genes, but only two assays were likely to detect most Jγx-1 genes. Two assays had forward primers located as close as four nucleotides to the junctional region. A new multiplex PCR was designed with all primers combined in a single tube. An alternative primer set allowed identification of variable gene usage through gene specific forward primers. The coverage of all rearranged genes facilitated the detection of multiple clonal rearrangements per neoplastic sample. The new assay detected clonal DNA at a concentration of 5% within polyclonal background but detection thresholds were dependent on the gene usage of clonal rearrangements as well as the position of the clonal peak in respect to the polyclonal background. The new multiplex assay recognized 12/12 (100%) of confirmed neoplastic samples as compared to 2/12 (17%) by an existing assay. On a

  6. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Reverté, Laia; Soliño, Lucía; Carnicer, Olga; Diogène, Jorge; Campàs, Mònica

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs. PMID:25431968

  7. Determination of Metabolic Viability and Cell Mass Using a Tandem Resazurin/Sulforhodamine B Assay.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filomena S G; Starostina, Irina G; Ivanova, Vilena V; Rizvanov, Albert A; Oliveira, Paulo J; Pereira, Susana P

    2016-05-04

    The identification of rapid, reliable, and highly reproducible biological assays that can be standardized and routinely used in preclinical tests constitutes a promising approach to reducing drug discovery costs and time. This unit details a tandem, rapid, and reliable cell viability method for preliminary screening of chemical compounds. This assay measures metabolic activity and cell mass in the same cell sample using a dual resazurin/sulforhodamine B assay, eliminating the variation associated with cell seeding and excessive manipulations in assays that test different cell samples across plates. The procedure also reduces the amount of cells, test compound, and reagents required, as well as the time expended in conventional tests, thus resulting in a more confident prediction of toxic thresholds for the tested compounds. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Use of cryopreserved transiently transfected cells in high-throughput pregnane X receptor transactivation assay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhengrong; Puglisi, Jaime; Connors, David; Stewart, Jeremy; Herbst, John; Marino, Anthony; Sinz, Michael; O'Connell, Jonathan; Banks, Martyn; Dickinson, Kenneth; Cacace, Angela

    2007-03-01

    Cryopreserved, transiently transfected HepG2 cells were compared to freshly transfected HepG2 cells for use in a pregnane X receptor (PXR) transactivation assay. Assay performance was similar for both cell preparations; however, cryopreserved cells demonstrated less interassay variation. Validation with drugs of different PXR activation potencies and efficacies demonstrated an excellent correlation (r(2) > 0.95) between cryopreserved and fresh cells. Cryopreservation did not change the effect of known CYP3A4 inducers that have poor cell permeability, indicating that cryopreservation had little effect on membrane permeability. In addition, cryopreserved HepG2 cells did not exhibit enhanced susceptibility to cytotoxic compounds compared to transiently transfected control cells. The use of cryopreserved cells enables this assay to run with enhanced efficiency.

  9. Micro-abrasion package capture cell experiment on the trailing edge of LDEF: Impactor chemistry and whipple bumper shield efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, Howard J.; Yano, Hajime

    1995-01-01

    Four of the eight available double layer microparticle capture cells, flown as the experiment A0023 on the trailing (West) face of LDEF, have been extensively studied. An investigation of the chemistry of impactors has been made using SEM/EDX techniques and the effectiveness of the capture cells as bumper shields has also been examined. Studies of these capture cells gave positive EDX results, with 53 percent of impact sites indicating the presence of some chemical residues, the predominant residue identified as being silicon in varying quantities.

  10. Cell cycle dependence of boron uptake from two boron compounds used for clinical neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, F; Matsumura, A; Shibata, Y; Yamamoto, T; Nakauchi, H; Okumura, M; Nose, T

    2002-12-10

    In neutron capture therapy, it is important that the boron is selectively uptaken by tumor cells. In the present study, we used flow cytometry to sort the cells in the G0/G1 phase and those in the G2/M phase, and the boron concentration in each fraction was measured with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The results revealed that sodium borocaptate and boronophenylalanine (BPA), were associated with higher rates of boron uptake in the G2/M than in the G0/G1 phase. However, the difference was more prominent in the case of BPA. The G2/M:G0/G1 ratio decreased as a function of exposure time in BPA containing culture medium, thereby indicating the cell cycle dependency of BPA uptake. Such heterogeneity of boron uptake by tumor cells should be considered for microdosimetry.

  11. Endothelial Cell Capture of Heparin-Binding Growth Factors under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Forsten-Williams, Kimberly; Zhang, Jun; Fannon, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Circulation is an important delivery method for both natural and synthetic molecules, but microenvironment interactions, regulated by endothelial cells and critical to the molecule's fate, are difficult to interpret using traditional approaches. In this work, we analyzed and predicted growth factor capture under flow using computer modeling and a three-dimensional experimental approach that includes pertinent circulation characteristics such as pulsatile flow, competing binding interactions, and limited bioavailability. An understanding of the controlling features of this process was desired. The experimental module consisted of a bioreactor with synthetic endothelial-lined hollow fibers under flow. The physical design of the system was incorporated into the model parameters. The heparin-binding growth factor fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was used for both the experiments and simulations. Our computational model was composed of three parts: (1) media flow equations, (2) mass transport equations and (3) cell surface reaction equations. The model is based on the flow and reactions within a single hollow fiber and was scaled linearly by the total number of fibers for comparison with experimental results. Our model predicted, and experiments confirmed, that removal of heparan sulfate (HS) from the system would result in a dramatic loss of binding by heparin-binding proteins, but not by proteins that do not bind heparin. The model further predicted a significant loss of bound protein at flow rates only slightly higher than average capillary flow rates, corroborated experimentally, suggesting that the probability of capture in a single pass at high flow rates is extremely low. Several other key parameters were investigated with the coupling between receptors and proteoglycans shown to have a critical impact on successful capture. The combined system offers opportunities to examine circulation capture in a straightforward quantitative manner that should prove

  12. CANDLES, an assay for monitoring GPCR induced cAMP generation in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Trehan, Ashutosh; Rotgers, Emmi; Coffey, Eleanor T; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2014-11-04

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a physiologically and pharmacologically important family of receptors that upon coupling to GαS stimulate cAMP production catalyzed by adenylyl cyclase. Thus, developing assays to monitor cAMP production is crucial to screen for ligands in studies of GPCR signaling. Primary cell cultures represent a more robust model than cell lines to study GPCR signaling since they physiologically resemble the parent tissue. Current cAMP assays have two fundamental limitations: 1) absence of cAMP kinetics as competition-based assays require cell lysis and measure only a single time-point, and 2) high variation with separate samples needed to measure consecutive time points. The utility of real-time cAMP biosensors is also limited in primary cell cultures due to their poor transfection efficiency, variable expression levels and inability to select stable clones. We therefore, decided to develop an assay that can measure cAMP not only at a single time-point but the entire cAMP kinetics after GPCR activation in untransfected primary cells. CANDLES (Cyclic AMP iNdirect Detection by Light Emission from Sensor cells) assay for monitoring cAMP kinetics in cell cultures, particularly in primary cultures was developed. The assay requires co-culturing of primary cells with sensor cells that stably express a luminescent cAMP sensor. Upon GPCR activation in primary cells, cAMP is transferred to sensor cells via gap junction channels, thereby evoking a luminescent read-out. GPCR activation using primary cultures of rat cortical neurons and mouse granulosa cells was measured. Kinetic responses of different agonists to adrenergic receptors were also compared using rat cortical neurons. The assay optimization was done by varying sensor-test cell ratio, using phosphodiesterase inhibitors and testing cell-cell contact requirement. Here we present CANDLES assay based on co-culturing test cells with cAMP-detecting sensor cells. This co-culture setup

  13. Comparison of the SPF10-LiPA System to the Hybrid Capture 2 Assay for Detection of Carcinogenic Human Papillomavirus Genotypes among 5,683 Young Women in Guanacaste, Costa Rica▿

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Quint, Wim; Freer, Enrique; Van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Porras, Carolina; Silva, Sandra; González, Paula; Bratti, M. Concepcion; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Castle, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to compare the performance characteristics of two human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA detections assays, the Hybrid Capture 2 assay (HC2) and the SPF10 assay, for the detection of carcinogenic HPV. Data are from the enrollment visits of women who participated in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III HPV16/18 Vaccine Trial in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We compared the results of HC2 and SPF10 testing of cervical specimens. Since the line probe assay (LiPA) detection system does not distinguish between HPV type 68 (HPV68; which is targeted by HC2) and HPV73 (which is not targeted by HC2), for SPF10-LiPA, we defined the carcinogenic HPV types as the 12 HC2-targeted types (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, and 59), HPV68/73, and the HC2-cross-reactive, carcinogenic type HPV66. The kappa values and the performance characteristics for the detection of cervical abnormalities were ascertained. Paired observations were available for 5,683 sexually active, young women (median age, 21 years). The prevalence of carcinogenic HPV types was 35% (n = 1,962) by HC2 and 35% (n = 2,003) by SPF10-LiPA. There were no differences in the prevalence of carcinogenic HPV types by HC2 and SPF10-LiPA among women with normal, atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cytology. Among women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cytology, HC2 was more likely to test positive than SPF10-LiPA for the carcinogenic HPV types (87% and 79%, respectively; P = 0.001) as a result of HC2 cross-reactivity with HPV types 40, 43, 44, 53, 54, 60, 70, and 74. The crude agreement between the two assays was 88%, with a kappa value of 0.75 (95% confidence limits, 0.73 to 0.76). We observed very good agreement between HC2 and SPF10-LiPA for carcinogenic HPV type detection. PMID:17344361

  14. Human iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cell Sprouting Assay in Synthetic Hydrogel Arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by growth factors initiates a cascade of events in vivo consisting of EC tip cell selection, sprout formation, EC stalk cell proliferation, and ultimately vascular stabilization by support cells. Although EC functional assays can rec...

  15. Human iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cell Sprouting Assay in Synthetic Hydrogel Arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by growth factors initiates a cascade of events in vivo consisting of EC tip cell selection, sprout formation, EC stalk cell proliferation, and ultimately vascular stabilization by support cells. Although EC functional assays can rec...

  16. MOBE-ChIP: a large-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation assay for cell type-specific studies.

    PubMed

    Lau, On Sun; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2015-10-01

    Cell type-specific transcriptional regulators play critical roles in the generation and maintenance of multicellularity. As they are often expressed at low levels, in vivo DNA-binding studies of these regulators by standard chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays are technically challenging. We describe here an optimized ChIP protocol termed Maximized Objects for Better Enrichment (MOBE)-ChIP, which enhances the sensitivity of ChIP assays for detecting cell type-specific signals. The protocol, which is based on the disproportional increase of target signals over background at higher scales, uses substantially greater volume of starting materials than conventional ChIPs to achieve high signal enrichment. This technique can capture weak binding events that are ambiguous in standard ChIP assays, and is useful both in gene-specific and whole-genome analysis. This protocol has been optimized for Arabidopsis, but should be applicable to other model systems with minor modifications. The full procedure can be completed within 3 days. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Quality Assurance in the Polio Laboratory. Cell Sensitivity and Cell Authentication Assays.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Glynis

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of poliovirus surveillance is largely dependent on the quality of the cell lines used for virus isolation, which is the foundation of poliovirus diagnostic work. Many cell lines are available for the isolation of enteroviruses, whilst genetically modified L20B cells can be used as a diagnostic tool for the identification of polioviruses. To be confident that cells can consistently isolate the virus of interest, it is necessary to have a quality assurance system in place, which will ensure that the cells in use are not contaminated with other cell lines or microorganisms and that they remain sensitive to the viruses being studied.The sensitivity of cell lines can be assessed by the regular testing of a virus standard of known titer in the cell lines used for virus isolation. The titers obtained are compared to previously obtained titers in the same assay, so that any loss of sensitivity can be detected.However, the detection of cell line cross contamination is more difficult. DNA bar coding is a technique that uses a short DNA sequence from a standardized position in the genome as a molecular diagnostic assay for species-level identification. For almost all groups of higher animals, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 of mitochondrial DNA (CO1) is emerging as the standard barcode region. This region is 648 nucleotide base pairs long in most phylogenetic groups and is flanked by regions of conserved sequences, making it relatively easy to isolate and analyze. DNA barcodes vary among individuals of the same species to a very minor degree (generally less than 1-2 %), and a growing number of studies have shown that the COI sequences of even closely related species differ by several per cent, making it possible to identify different species with high confidence.

  18. Engineering nanostructured porous SiO2 surfaces for bacteria detection via "direct cell capture".

    PubMed

    Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Shtenberg, Giorgi; Tzur, Adi; Krepker, Maksym A; Segal, Ester

    2011-05-01

    An optical label-free biosensing platform for bacteria detection ( Escherichia coli K12 as a model system) based on nanostructured oxidized porous silicon (PSiO(2)) is introduced. The biosensor is designed to directly capture the target bacteria cells on its surface with no prior sample processing (such as cell lysis). The optical reflectivity spectrum of the PSiO(2) nanostructure displays Fabry-Pérot fringes characteristic of thin-film interference, enabling direct, real-time observation of bacteria attachment within minutes. The PSiO(2) optical nanostructure is synthesized and used as the optical transducer element. The porous surface is conjugated with specific monoclonal antibodies (immunoglobulin G's) to provide the active component of the biosensor. The immobilization of the antibodies onto the biosensor system is confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescent labeling experiments, and refractive interferometric Fourier transform spectroscopy. We show that the immobilized antibodies maintain their immunoactivity and specificity when attached to the sensor surface. Exposure of these nanostructures to the target bacteria results in "direct cell capture" onto the biosensor surface. These specific binding events induce predictable changes in the thin-film optical interference spectrum of the biosensor. Our preliminary studies demonstrate the applicability of these biosensors for the detection of low bacterial concentrations. The current detection limit of E. coli K12 bacteria is 10(4) cells/mL within several minutes.

  19. Modification of the diphenylamine assay for cell quantification in three-dimensional biodegradable polymeric scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Pham, Edward A; Ho, Won Jin; Kamei, Daniel T; Wu, Benjamin M

    2010-02-01

    As three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems gain popularity in biomedical research, reliable assays for cell proliferation within 3D matrices become more important. Although many cell quantification techniques have been established for cells cultured on nondegradable plastic culture dishes and cells suspended in media, it is becoming increasingly clear that cell quantification after prolonged culture in 3D polymeric scaffolds imposes unique challenges because the added presence of polymeric materials may contribute to background signal via various mechanisms including autofluorescence, diffusion gradients, and sequestering effects. Thus, additional steps are required to ensure complete isolation of cells from the 3D scaffold. The diphenylamine assay isolates cellular DNA, degrades the polymeric matrix materials, and reacts with the DNA to yield a colorimetric response. Thus, we report here a practical modification of the diphenylamine assay and show that the assay quantifies cells in 3D polyester scaffolds reliably and reproducibly as long as the necessary amount of the acidic working reagent is present. Our study also demonstrates that the sensitivity of the assay can be optimized by controlling the dimensions of the sampling volume. Overall, the DPA assay offers an attractive solution for challenges associated with 3D cell quantification.

  20. A high-throughput, multiplex cell death assay using an RNAi screening approach.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, Katrina J; Saunders, Darren N; Simpson, Kaylene J

    2014-06-02

    This protocol outlines a high-throughput, multiplex cell death assay and its use in conjunction with a genome-scale siRNA screen to identify genes that cooperate with a drug to induce apoptosis. The assay, ApoLive-Glo (Promega), measures viability of drug-treated, reverse-transfected cells via the fluorescent CellTiter-Fluor reagent, which includes a substrate that is cleaved by a live cell protease. ApoLive-Glo also quantitates cell death by the amount of cleaved caspases 3 and 7 using a luminescent Caspase-Glo 3/7 caspase activation assay. The advantage of the multiplex assay is that it distinguishes rapid cell death from the slower activation of caspase activity, permitting measurement of different stages of cell death in the same sample at a single time point. In parallel, a high-content imaging protocol involving 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained nuclei is used as a cost-effective way to quantitate viability of vehicle-treated control cells. Automation and robotic liquid handling are built into the protocol to increase speed of workflow and improve reproducibility. A screen using these assays will identify gene targets that are essential for viability irrespective of drug treatment and gene targets that cause a synergistic enhancement of cell death in the presence of drug. Candidate target activity can then be validated by conventional flow cytometry-based assays. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Rapid fluorescence-based assay for radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity testing in mammalian cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Begg, A.C.; Mooren, E.

    1989-02-01

    An efficient and rapid cytotoxicity assay has been developed, particularly for radiobiological studies, utilizing 96-well microtiter plates. Several days after treatment, cell numbers per well were measured by fluorescent intensity using an automatic reader after staining with the DNA specific dye Hoechst 33258. For radiobiological applications, a microtiter plate irradiation box was designed and built which allowed a variable number of wells (minimum 4, maximum 16) to be irradiated at one time. In this manner, complete dose-response curves could be obtained from one plate. The assay depends on the growth of surviving and untreated cells, and by appropriate choice of conditions (cell numbers plated, time of assay), cell survival curves for this quick fluorescence assay were in reasonable agreement with those from a clonogenic assay for cisplatin and X-ray-induced cell killing. The assay can span 1.5-2 decades of cell survival and is suitable for any cell line which grows as a monolayer. Radiobiological applications were tested using agents or conditions which modified radiation damage. Firstly, sublethal damage repair could be demonstrated in RIF1 mouse tumor cells by comparing the survival curve for a single X-ray dose with that for two fractions separated by 4 h. Secondly, incorporation of 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine into cellular DNA was shown to radiosensitize Chinese Hamster cells, with similar enhancement ratios obtained from the fluorescence and clonogenic assays. Thirdly, radiosensitization by cisplatin and radioprotection by cysteamine could be readily measured using the quick fluorescence assay. The ability to have multiple dose groups per plate makes it an efficient assay for both radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity testing.

  2. The Unreliability of MTT Assay in the Cytotoxic Test of Primary Cultured Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hwa Yeon; Kim, Yona; Park, Hyung Woo; Moon, Hyo Eun; Bae, Seongtae; Kim, JinWook; Kim, Dong Gyu; Paek, Sun Ha

    2015-09-01

    MTT assay is commonly used to assess the cellular cytotoxicity caused by anticancer drugs in glioblastomas. However, there have been some reports insisting that MTT assay exhibited non-specific intracellular reduction of tetrazolium which led to underestimated results of cytotoxicity. Here, we examine whether or not MTT assay can lead to incorrect information regarding alcohol-induced cytotoxicity on immortalized and primary glioblastoma cells. MTT assay was applied to assess the ethanol-induced cytotoxicity at various ethanol concentrations. The cellular cytotoxicity induced by different doses of ethanol was analyzed and compared through several cytotoxic assays. Ethanol-induced cytotoxicity observed through MTT assay on both cell types was shown to be ethanol dose-dependent below a 3% concentration. However, the cytotoxicity was shown to be markedly underestimated only in primary cells at a 5% concentration. RT-PCR and Western Blot showed increased expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins and decreased expressions of anti-apoptotic proteins in an ethanol dose-dependent manner in both cell types. Furthermore, we present a possible mechanism for the unreliable result of MTT assay. A high concentration of ethanol induces more severe membrane damage and increased intracellular concentration of NADH in primary cells which enhances the nonspecific reduction of tetrazolium salt. Together, our findings demonstrate that the cytotoxicity on primary cells could inaccurately be assessed when detected through MTT assay. Therefore, a careful interpretation is needed when one would analyze the cytotoxic results of MTT assay, and it is suggested that other assays must be accompanied to produce more reliable and accurate cytotoxic results on primary glioblastoma cells.

  3. Bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cell adhesion assay for studying Escherichia coli O157 adherence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An adherence assay, using recto-anal junction squamous epithelial cells (RSEC), was developed for Escherichia coli O157 and related organisms. The assay was standardized in comparison with the routinely used HEp-2 cell adherence assay, in this “proof of concept” study. The novel RSEC adhesion assay ...

  4. Comparison of the Roche Cobas(®) 4800 HPV assay to Digene Hybrid Capture 2, Roche Linear Array and Roche Amplicor for Detection of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Women undergoing treatment for cervical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Samuel; Garland, Suzanne M; Tan, Jeffery H; Quinn, Michael A; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2015-01-01

    The recently FDA (U.S. food and drug administration) approved Roche Cobas(®) 4800 (Cobas) human papillomavirus (HPV) has limited performance data compared to current HPV detection methods for test of cure in women undergoing treatment for high grade lesions. Evaluation of Cobas HPV assay using historical samples from women undergoing treatment for cervical dysplasia. A selection of 407 samples was tested on the Cobas assay and compared to previous results from Hybrid Capture 2, HPV Amplicor and Roche Linear Array. Overall, a correlation between high-risk HPV positivity and high grade histological diagnosis was 90.6% by the Cobas, 86.1% by Hybrid Capture 2, 92.9% by HPV Amplicor and 91.8% by Roche Linear Array. The Cobas HPV assay is comparative to both the HPV Amplicor and Roche Linear Array assays and better than Hybrid capture 2 assay in the detection of High-Risk HPV in women undergoing treatment for cervical dysplasia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    PubMed

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub-population of

  6. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  7. "Salt tolerant" anion exchange chromatography for direct capture of an acidic protein from CHO cell culture.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Jérôme; Balluet, Guillaume; Gantier, René; Toueille, Magali

    2013-06-01

    The present study describes the use of the new HyperCel STAR AX "salt tolerant" anion exchange sorbent for the capture from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell culture supernatant (CCS) of an acidic model protein (α-amylase). HyperCel STAR AX sorbent and other conventional anion exchangers were evaluated to purify biologically-active enzyme. Salt tolerance of the sorbent allowed reaching 5-fold higher dynamic binding capacity than conventional anion exchange during capture of the enzyme from neat (undiluted) CCS. After optimization of operating conditions, HyperCel STAR AX turned out to be the only sorbent allowing efficient protein capture directly from both neat and diluted CCS with consistent and satisfying purity, yield and productivity. Therefore implementation of the salt tolerant sorbent in industrial purification processes should allow avoiding time and cost consuming steps such as dilution or UF/DF that exclusively aim at establishing suitable conditions for ion exchange step without bringing any added value to the purification process performance. Altogether this study highlights the flexibility and cost-reduction potential brought in process design by the HyperCel STAR AX salt tolerant sorbent.

  8. Bioluminescent, Nonlytic, Real-Time Cell Viability Assay and Use in Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Cali, James J.; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Real-time continuous monitoring of cellular processes offers distinct advantages over traditional endpoint assays. A comprehensive representation of the changes occurring in live cells over the entire length of an experiment provides information about the biological status of the cell and informs decisions about the timing of treatments or the use of other functional endpoint assays. We describe a homogeneous, nonlytic, bioluminescent assay that measures cell viability in real time. This time-dependent measurement allowed us to monitor cell health for 72 h from the same test samples, distinguish differential cell growth, and investigate drug mechanism of action by analyzing time- and dose-dependent drug effects. The real-time measurements also allowed us to detect cell death immediately (>75% signal decrease within 15 min of digitonin addition), analyze drug potency versus efficacy, and identify cytostatic versus toxic drug effects. We screened an oncology compound library (Z′ = 0.7) and identified compounds with varying activity at different time points (1.6% of the library showed activity within 3 h, whereas 35.4% showed a response by 47 h). The assay compared well with orthogonal endpoint cell viability assays and additionally provided data at multiple time points and the opportunity to multiplex assays on the same cells. To test the advantage of time-dependent measurements to direct optimal timing of downstream applications, we used the real-time cell viability assay to determine the ideal time to measure caspase activity by monitoring the onset of cell death and multiplexing a luminescent caspase activation assay on the same test samples. PMID:26383544

  9. Bioluminescent, Nonlytic, Real-Time Cell Viability Assay and Use in Inhibitor Screening.

    PubMed

    Duellman, Sarah J; Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Cali, James J; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2015-10-01

    Real-time continuous monitoring of cellular processes offers distinct advantages over traditional endpoint assays. A comprehensive representation of the changes occurring in live cells over the entire length of an experiment provides information about the biological status of the cell and informs decisions about the timing of treatments or the use of other functional endpoint assays. We describe a homogeneous, nonlytic, bioluminescent assay that measures cell viability in real time. This time-dependent measurement allowed us to monitor cell health for 72 h from the same test samples, distinguish differential cell growth, and investigate drug mechanism of action by analyzing time- and dose-dependent drug effects. The real-time measurements also allowed us to detect cell death immediately (>75% signal decrease within 15 min of digitonin addition), analyze drug potency versus efficacy, and identify cytostatic versus toxic drug effects. We screened an oncology compound library (Z' = 0.7) and identified compounds with varying activity at different time points (1.6% of the library showed activity within 3 h, whereas 35.4% showed a response by 47 h). The assay compared well with orthogonal endpoint cell viability assays and additionally provided data at multiple time points and the opportunity to multiplex assays on the same cells. To test the advantage of time-dependent measurements to direct optimal timing of downstream applications, we used the real-time cell viability assay to determine the ideal time to measure caspase activity by monitoring the onset of cell death and multiplexing a luminescent caspase activation assay on the same test samples.

  10. Rapid mycobacterial liquid culture-screening method for Mycobacterium avium complex based on secreted antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung Jae; Anklam, Kelly; Manning, Elizabeth J B; Collins, Michael T

    2009-05-01

    Sensors in automated liquid culture systems for mycobacteria, such as MGIT, BacT/Alert 3D, and Trek ESP II, flag growth of any type of bacteria; a positive signal does not mean that the target mycobacteria are present. All signal-positive cultures thus require additional and often laborious testing. An immunoassay was developed to screen liquid mycobacterial cultures for evidence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). The method, called the MAC-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), relies on detection of MAC-specific secreted antigens in liquid culture. Secreted MAC antigens were captured by the MAC-ELISA with polyclonal anti- Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis chicken immunoglobulin Y (IgY), detected using rabbit anti-MAC IgG, and then revealed using horseradish peroxidase-conjugated goat anti-rabbit IgG. When the MAC-ELISA was evaluated using pure cultures of known mycobacterial (n = 75) and nonmycobacterial (n = 17) organisms, no false-positive or false-negative MAC-ELISA results were found. By receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis of 1,275 previously identified clinical isolates, at the assay optimal cutoff the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the MAC-ELISA were 92.6% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 90.3 to 94.5) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.2 to 100), respectively, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.992. Prospective evaluation of the MAC-ELISA with an additional 652 clinical samples inoculated into MGIT ParaTB medium and signaling positive per the manufacturer's instructions found that the MAC-ELISA was effective in determining those cultures that actually contained MAC species and warranting the resources required to identify the organism by PCR. Of these 652 MGIT-positive cultures, the MAC-ELISA correctly identified 96.8% (of 219 MAC-ELISA-positive cultures) as truly containing MAC mycobacteria, based on PCR or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as reference tests. Only 6 of 433 MGIT signal-positive cultures (1

  11. Toxcast Profiling in a Human Stem Cell Assay for Developmental Toxicity (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We correlated the ToxCast library in a metabolic biomarker-based in vitro assay (Stemina devTOXqP) utilizing human embryonic stem (hES) cells (H9 line). This assay identifies the concentration of a chemical that disrupts cellular metabolism in a manner indicative of teratogenic...

  12. Exploiting native forces to capture chromosome conformation in mammalian cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Brant, Lilija; Georgomanolis, Theodore; Nikolic, Milos; Brackley, Chris A; Kolovos, Petros; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Grosveld, Frank G; Marenduzzo, Davide; Papantonis, Argyris

    2016-12-09

    Mammalian interphase chromosomes fold into a multitude of loops to fit the confines of cell nuclei, and looping is tightly linked to regulated function. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology has significantly advanced our understanding of this structure-to-function relationship. However, all 3C-based methods rely on chemical cross-linking to stabilize spatial interactions. This step remains a "black box" as regards the biases it may introduce, and some discrepancies between microscopy and 3C studies have now been reported. To address these concerns, we developed "i3C", a novel approach for capturing spatial interactions without a need for cross-linking. We apply i3C to intact nuclei of living cells and exploit native forces that stabilize chromatin folding. Using different cell types and loci, computational modeling, and a methylation-based orthogonal validation method, "TALE-iD", we show that native interactions resemble cross-linked ones, but display improved signal-to-noise ratios and are more focal on regulatory elements and CTCF sites, while strictly abiding to topologically associating domain restrictions.

  13. Selective particle and cell capture in a continuous flow using micro-vortex acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Khoo, Bee Luan; Ma, Zhichao; Winkler, Andreas; Weser, Robert; Schmidt, Hagen; Han, Jongyoon; Ai, Ye

    2017-04-10

    Acoustic streaming has emerged as a promising technique for refined microscale manipulation, where strong rotational flow can give rise to particle and cell capture. In contrast to hydrodynamically generated vortices, acoustic streaming is rapidly tunable, highly scalable and requires no external pressure source. Though streaming is typically ignored or minimized in most acoustofluidic systems that utilize other acoustofluidic effects, we maximize the effect of acoustic streaming in a continuous flow using a high-frequency (381 MHz), narrow-beam focused surface acoustic wave. This results in rapid fluid streaming, with velocities orders of magnitude greater than that of the lateral flow, to generate fluid vortices that extend the entire width of a 400 μm wide microfluidic channel. We characterize the forces relevant for vortex formation in a combined streaming/lateral flow system, and use these acoustic streaming vortices to selectively capture 2 μm from a mixed suspension with 1 μm particles and human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MDA-231) from red blood cells.

  14. Functional screening with a live cell imaging-based random cell migration assay.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Zovko, Sandra; de Bont, Hans; van de Water, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration, essential in cancer progression, is a complex process comprising a number of spatiotemporally regulated and well-coordinated mechanisms. In order to study (random) cell migration in the context of responses to various external cues (such as growth factors) or intrinsic cell signaling, a number of different tools and approaches have been developed. In order to unravel the key pathways and players involved in the regulation of (cancer) cell migration, a systematical mapping of the players/pathways is required. For this purpose, we developed a cell migration assay based on automatic high-throughput microscopy screen. This approach allows for screening of hundreds of genes, e.g., those encoding various kinases and phosphatases but can also be used for screening of drugs libraries. Moreover, we have developed an automatic analysis pipeline comprising of (a) automatic data acquisition (movie) and (b) automatic analysis of the acquired movies of the migrating cells. Here, we describe various facets of this approach. Since cell migration is essential in progression of cancer metastasis, we describe two examples of experiments performed on highly motile (metastatic) cancer cells.

  15. A three dimensional thermoplastic microfluidic chip for robust cell capture and high resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mottet, Guillaume; Perez-Toralla, Karla; Tulukcuoglu, Ezgi; Bidard, Francois-Clement; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Draskovic, Irena; Londono-Vallejo, Arturo; Descroix, Stephanie; Malaquin, Laurent; Louis Viovy, Jean

    2014-01-01

    We present a low cost microfluidic chip integrating 3D micro-chambers for the capture and the analysis of cells. This device has a simple design and a small footprint. It allows the implementation of standard biological protocols in a chip format with low volume consumption. The manufacturing process relies on hot-embossing of cyclo olefin copolymer, allowing the development of a low cost and robust device. A 3D design of microchannels was used to induce high flow velocity contrasts in the device and provide a selective immobilization. In narrow distribution channels, the liquid velocity induces a shear stress that overcomes adhesion forces and prevents cell immobilization or clogging. In large 3D chambers, the liquid velocity drops down below the threshold for cell attachment. The devices can be operated in a large range of input pressures and can even be handled manually using simple syringe or micropipette. Even at high flow injection rates, the 3D structures protect the captured cell from shear stress. To validate the performances of our device, we implemented immuno-fluorescence labeling and Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH) analysis on cancer cell lines and on a patient pleural effusion sample. FISH is a Food and Drug Administration approved cancer diagnostic technique that provides quantitative information about gene and chromosome aberration at the single cell level. It is usually considered as a long and fastidious test in medical diagnosis. This process can be easily implanted in our platform, and high resolution fluorescence imaging can be performed with reduced time and computer intensiveness. These results demonstrate the potential of this chip as a low cost, robust, and versatile tool adapted to complex and demanding protocols for medical diagnosis. PMID:25352942

  16. Psychoneuroimmunology and natural killer cells: the chromium release whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mary Ann; Barnes, Zachary; Broderick, Gordon; Klimas, Nancy G

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity. These lymphocytes are also sensitive barometers of the effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the immune system. This chapter will describe a chromium ((51)Cr) release bioassay designed to measure the target cell killing capacity of NK cells (NKCC). Key features of the cytotoxicity assay are that it is done with whole blood and that numbers of effector cells are determined for each sample by flow cytometry and lymphocyte count. Effector cells are defined as CD3-CD56+ lymphocytes. Target cells are the K562 eyrthroleukemia cell line. Killing capacity is defined as number of target cells killed per effector cell, at an effector cell/target cell ratio of 1:1 during a 4 h in vitro assay.

  17. Assessing the effect of sample handling on the performance of a commercial bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew C; O'Connor, Annette M; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Cooper, Vickie L

    2008-01-01

    Handling practices of specimens may affect the sensitivity or specificity of diagnostic tests. In this study, as part of the Voluntary Iowa Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Screening Project held in 2006, 2 sample-handling practices were evaluated to determine how they affect the sensitivity and specificity of the antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ACE) for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). The null hypotheses investigated were 1) that maintenance of samples at room temperature would not be associated with decreased sensitivity, and 2) that continued use of a single pair of ear notchers would not be associated with cross-contamination of virus from 1 notch to another and reduce specificity. These hypotheses were tested in 2 studies by collecting known positive and negative samples and giving groups of samples different treatments. The first study used ACE on 4 groups of skin samples, all from a known-positive animal. Each group was subjected to different lengths of time at room temperature, from 24 to 96 hours at 24-hour intervals. No difference in test results was found between specimens subjected to different lengths of time at room temperature. The second study tested the effects of giving 3 different treatments to an ear notcher in between sample collecting (water rinse, Nolvasan solution rinse, or no treatment) on ACE results. No effect on sensitivity or specificity of ACE was observed. No difference in test results was found between the 3 ear-notcher treatment groups. The sample handling practices evaluated appeared to have little impact on test sensitivity or specificity of ACE for BVDV.

  18. A rapid survival assay to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity and cell cycle effects.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, Chandni; McFaline, Jose L; Samson, Leona D

    2012-01-02

    We describe a rapid method to accurately measure the cytotoxicity of mammalian cells upon exposure to various drugs. Using this assay, we obtain survival data in a fraction of the time required to perform the traditional clonogenic survival assay, considered the gold standard. The dynamic range of the assay allows sensitivity measurements on a multi-log scale allowing better resolution of comparative sensitivities. Moreover, the results obtained contain additional information on cell cycle effects of the drug treatment. Cell survival is obtained from a quantitative comparison of proliferation between drug-treated and untreated cells. During the assay, cells are treated with a drug and, following a recovery period, allowed to proliferate in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Cells that synthesize DNA in the presence of BrdU exhibit quenched Hoechst fluorescence, easily detected by flow cytometry; quenching is used to determine relative proliferation in treated vs. untreated cells. Finally, this assay can be used in high-throughput format to simultaneously screen multiple cell lines and drugs for accurate measurements of cell survival and cell cycle effects after drug treatment.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells: revisiting history, concepts, and assays.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Paolo; Robey, Pamela Gehron; Simmons, Paul J

    2008-04-10

    The concept of mesenchymal stem cells has gained wide popularity. Despite the rapid growth of the field, uncertainties remain with respect to the defining characteristics of these cells, including their potency and self-renewal. These uncertainties are reflected in a growing tendency to question the very use of the term. This commentary revisits the experimental origin of the concept of the population(s) referred to as mesenchymal stem cells and the experimental framework required to assess their stemness and function.

  20. Assay of bovine interferons in cultures of the porcine cell line IB-RS-2.

    PubMed Central

    Ahl, R; Rump, A

    1976-01-01

    An assay for bovine interferons has been developed using the porcine cell line IB-RS-2 and a bovine enterovirus, CBV-D, as challenge virus. The method is based on estimation of cytopathic effect measured by uptake of neutral red. Teh assay is simple, sensitive, and reproducible. A comparative test of different viruses in IB-RS-2 cells and secondary calf kidney cells revealed that the sensitivity of a virus to interferon can vary up to 1,000-fold in the two cell systems. Vesicular stomatitis virus was found to be rather insensitive to interferon in IB-RS-2 cells. PMID:184049

  1. Determination of somatic and cancer stem cell self-renewing symmetric division rate using sphere assays.

    PubMed

    Deleyrolle, Loic P; Ericksson, Geoffery; Morrison, Brian J; Lopez, J Alejandro; Burrage, Kevin; Burrage, Pamela; Vescovi, Angelo; Rietze, Rodney L; Reynolds, Brent A

    2011-01-05

    Representing a renewable source for cell replacement, neural stem cells have received substantial attention in recent years. The neurosphere assay represents a method to detect the presence of neural stem cells, however owing to a deficiency of specific and definitive markers to identify them, their quantification and the rate they expand is still indefinite. Here we propose a mathematical interpretation of the neurosphere assay allowing actual measurement of neural stem cell symmetric division frequency. The algorithm of the modeling demonstrates a direct correlation between the overall cell fold expansion over time measured in the sphere assay and the rate stem cells expand via symmetric division. The model offers a methodology to evaluate specifically the effect of diseases and treatments on neural stem cell activity and function. Not only providing new insights in the evaluation of the kinetic features of neural stem cells, our modeling further contemplates cancer biology as cancer stem-like cells have been suggested to maintain tumor growth as somatic stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis. Indeed, tumor stem cell's resistance to therapy makes these cells a necessary target for effective treatment. The neurosphere assay mathematical model presented here allows the assessment of the rate malignant stem-like cells expand via symmetric division and the evaluation of the effects of therapeutics on the self-renewal and proliferative activity of this clinically relevant population that drive tumor growth and recurrence.

  2. Assays to examine endothelial cell migration, tube formation, and gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuzhen; Lok, Josephine; Liu, Yi; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Leung, Wendy; Xing, Changhong; Ji, Xunming; Lo, Eng H

    2014-01-01

    Common methods for studying angiogenesis in vitro include the tube formation assay, the migration assay, and the study of the endothelial genome. The formation of capillary-like tubes in vitro on basement membrane matrix mimics many steps of the angiogenesis process in vivo and is used widely as a screening test for angiogenic or antiangiogenic factors. Other assays related to the study of angiogenesis include the cell migration assay, the study of gene expression changes during the process of angiogenesis, and the study of endothelial-derived microparticles. Protocols for these procedures will be described here.

  3. High cell density attenuates reactive oxygen species: implications for in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dennis P; Yahav, Jonathan; Sperandeo, Michael; Maloney, Lauren; McTigue, Monica; Lin, Fubao; Clark, Richard A F

    2012-01-01

    In vitro cell-based assays are an essential and universally used step in elucidation of biological processes as well as in drug development. However, results obtained depend on the validity of protocols used. This statement certainly pertains to in vitro assays of oxidative stress. The holy grail of in vitro models is reliability and predictability of outcomes that relate to a single variable like addition of hydrogen peroxide or xanthine oxidase. Without such validated outcomes, comparison of results among different laboratories is not possible. Achieving this goal requires a thorough understanding of the complex interplay between the cells, their environment, and the experimental assays. Furthermore, as this knowledge is attained, it must be disseminated and used to update and standardize existing protocols. Here, we confirm and extend the effect of pyruvate and cell density on in vitro oxidative stress assays. Cell viability was assessed using a colorimetric assay measuring the reduction of a tetrazolium salt (XTT) into a colored formazan dye. Extracellular hydrogen peroxide concentrations were measured using the foxp3 assay. We confirmed a previously reported finding that pyruvate, a common ingredient in cell culture media, acts as an extracellular scavenger of reactive oxygen species. We also demonstrated that cell density directly correlates with resistance to oxidative stress in tissue culture. It is theorized that the protective effect due to cell density predominantly relates to intracellular factors such as reduced glutathione and extracellular factors such as catalase.

  4. Dual Split Protein (DSP) Assay to Monitor Cell-Cell Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Shuhei; Matsuda, Zene

    2015-01-01

    Fusion between viral and cellular membranes is the essential first step in infection of enveloped viruses. This step is mediated by viral envelope glycoproteins (Env) that recognize cellular receptors. The membrane fusion between the effector cells expressing viral Env and the target cells expressing its receptors can be monitored by several methods. We have recently developed a pair of chimeric reporter protein composed of split Renilla luciferase (RL) and split GFP. We named this reporter dual split protein (DSP), since it recovers both RL and GFP activities upon self reassociation. By using DSP, pore formation and content mixing between the effector and target cells can be monitored upon the recovery of RL and GFP activities after the membrane fusion. This quick assay provides quantitative as well as spatial information about membrane fusion mediated by viral Env.

  5. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer.

  6. Multiplex High-Throughput Targeted Proteomic Assay To Identify Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Baud, Anna; Wessely, Frank; Mazzacuva, Francesca; McCormick, James; Camuzeaux, Stephane; Heywood, Wendy E; Little, Daniel; Vowles, Jane; Tuefferd, Marianne; Mosaku, Olukunbi; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle; Webber, Caleb; Cader, M Zameel; Peeters, Pieter; Gissen, Paul; Cowley, Sally A; Mills, Kevin

    2017-02-21

    Induced pluripotent stem cells have great potential as a human model system in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug screening. However, their use in medical research is hampered by laborious reprogramming procedures that yield low numbers of induced pluripotent stem cells. For further applications in research, only the best, competent clones should be used. The standard assays for pluripotency are based on genomic approaches, which take up to 1 week to perform and incur significant cost. Therefore, there is a need for a rapid and cost-effective assay able to distinguish between pluripotent and nonpluripotent cells. Here, we describe a novel multiplexed, high-throughput, and sensitive peptide-based multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assay, allowing for the identification and absolute quantitation of multiple core transcription factors and pluripotency markers. This assay provides simpler and high-throughput classification into either pluripotent or nonpluripotent cells in 7 min analysis while being more cost-effective than conventional genomic tests.

  7. Polyacrylamide gels for invadopodia and traction force assays on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jerrell, Rachel J; Parekh, Aron

    2015-01-04

    Rigid tumor tissues have been strongly implicated in regulating cancer cell migration and invasion. Invasive migration through cross-linked tissues is facilitated by actin-rich protrusions called invadopodia that proteolytically degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM). Invadopodia activity has been shown to be dependent on ECM rigidity and cancer cell contractile forces suggesting that rigidity signals can regulate these subcellular structures through actomyosin contractility. Invasive and contractile properties of cancer cells can be correlated in vitro using invadopodia and traction force assays based on polyacrylamide gels (PAAs) of different rigidities. Invasive and contractile properties of cancer cells can be correlated in vitro using invadopodia and traction force assays based on polyacrylamide gels (PAAs) of different rigidities. While some variations between the two assays exist, the protocol presented here provides a method for creating PAAs that can be used in both assays and are easily adaptable to the user's specific biological and technical needs.

  8. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared (NIR) ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of-cavity pulse- stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two-photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two- photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond layers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  9. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular, we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond(s) pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of- cavity pulse-stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two- photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two-photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond lasers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  10. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR.

  11. Convenient cell fusion assay for rapid screening for HIV entry inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibo; Radigan, Lin; Zhang, Li

    2000-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV)-induced cell fusion is a critical pathway of HIV spread from infected cells to uninfected cells. A rapid and simple assay was established to measure HIV-induce cell fusion. This study is particularly useful to rapid screen for HIV inhibitors that block HIV cell-to-cell transmission. Present study demonstrated that coculture of HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells at 37 degree(s)C for 2 hours resulted in the highest cell fusion rate. Using this cell fusion assay, we have identified several potent HIV inhibitors targeted to the HIV gp41 core. These antiviral agents can be potentially developed as antiviral drugs for chemotherapy and prophylaxis of HIV infection and AIDS.

  12. Microinjection and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay for Studying mRNA Export in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Shi, Min; Cheng, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Microinjection and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) assay is a useful method for mRNA export studies, which can overcome the problems of traditional transfection in cells. Here, we describe the method of microinjection and FISH assay applied in investigation of mRNA export. By this method we can estimate the mRNA export kinetics, examining mRNA export in cells with low transfection efficiencies, and observing nuclear export of aberrant RNAs.

  13. Isolation, Culture, Functional Assays, and Immunofluorescence of Myofiber-Associated Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Thomas O; Gadek, Katherine E; Cadwallader, Adam B; Elston, Tiffany L; Olwin, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, regenerate and repair the functional contractile cells in adult skeletal muscle called myofibers. Satellite cells reside in a niche between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers. Isolating single myofibers and their associated satellite cells provides a culture system that partially mimics the in vivo environment. We describe methods for isolating and culturing intact individual myofibers and their associated satellite cells from the mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle. Following dissection and isolation of individual myofibers we provide protocols for myofiber transplantation, satellite cell transfection, immune detection of satellite cell antigens, and assays to examine satellite cell self-renewal and proliferation.

  14. Resazurin Live Cell Assay: Setup and Fine-Tuning for Reliable Cytotoxicity Results.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Corrales, José Á; Josan, Jatinder S

    2017-01-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity tests allow for fast and inexpensive screening of drug efficacy prior to in vivo studies. The resazurin assay (commercialized as Alamar Blue(®)) has been extensively utilized for this purpose in 2D and 3D cell cultures, and high-throughput screening. However, improper or lack of assay validation can generate unreliable results and limit reproducibility. Herein, we report a detailed protocol for the optimization of the resazurin assay to determine relevant analytical (limits of detection, quantification, and linear range) and biological (growth kinetics) parameters, and, thus, provide accurate cytotoxicity results. Fine-tuning of the resazurin assay will allow accurate and fast quantification of cytotoxicity for drug discovery. Unlike more complicated methods (e.g., mass spectrometry), this assay utilizes fluorescence spectroscopy and, thus, provides a less costly alternative to observe changes in the reductase proteome of the cells.

  15. Assay of Vitamins and Amino Acids With Cultured Tissue Cells and Antimetabolites

    PubMed Central

    Savchuck, W. B.; Merriman, M. E.; Lockhart, W. L.

    1964-01-01

    A survey of growth responses of tissue-culture cells to vitamins and amino acids was undertaken to explore the potentialities of tissue culture in the assay of growth factors. An antagonist of the nutrient was included in each test system to improve its sensitivity. Addition of an antimetabolite was advantageous in the thiamine and phenylalanine assays. Tissue-culture assays of tryptophan and of phenylalanine supplemented with β-2-thienylalanine compared favorably with microbial assays, and may serve as confirmatory or supplementary test systems. The sensitivity of cultured tissue cells to minute amounts of a variety of physiologically active substances suggests their employment in hormone and toxic compound assays. Images FIG. 7 PMID:14199020

  16. Two High Throughput Screen Assays for Measurement of TNF-α in THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leister, Kristin P; Huang, Ruili; Goodwin, Bonnie L; Chen, Andrew; Austin, Christopher P; Xia, Menghang

    2011-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), a secreted cytokine, plays an important role in inflammatory diseases and immune disorders, and is a potential target for drug development. The traditional assays for detecting TNF-α, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay, are not suitable for the large size compound screens. Both assays suffer from a complicated protocol, multiple plate wash steps and/or excessive radioactive waste. A simple and quick measurement of TNF-α production in a cell based assay is needed for high throughput screening to identify the lead compounds from the compound library. We have developed and optimized two homogeneous TNF-α assays using the HTRF (homogeneous time resolved fluorescence) and AlphaLISA assay formats. We have validated the HTRF based TNF-α assay in a 1536-well plate format by screening a library of 1280 pharmacologically active compounds