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Sample records for cell carcinoma gene

  1. Expression and function of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kiriyama, Kenji; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kubo, Terufumi; Tamura, Yasuaki; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Takahashi, Akari; Nakazawa, Emiri; Saka, Eri; Ragnarsson, Charlotte; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Inoda, Satoko; Asanuma, Hiroko; Takasu, Hideo; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Yasoshima, Takahiro; Hirata, Koichi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Invasion into the matrix is one of hallmarks of malignant diseases and is the first step for tumor metastasis. Thus, analysis of the molecular mechanisms of invasion is essential to overcome tumor cell invasion. In the present study, we screened for colon carcinoma-specific genes using a cDNA microarray database of colon carcinoma tissues and normal colon tissues, and we found that fermitin family member-1 (FERMT1) is overexpressed in colon carcinoma cells. FRRMT1, FERMT2 and FERMT3 expression was investigated in colon carcinoma cells. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that only FERMT1 had cancer cell-specific expression. Protein expression of FERMT1 was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. To address the molecular functions of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells, we established FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing colon carcinoma cells. FERMT1-overexpressing cells exhibited greater invasive ability than did FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells. On the other hand, FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells exhibited enhancement of cell growth. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that FERMT1 is expressed specifically in colon carcinoma cells, and has roles in matrix invasion and cell growth. These findings indicate that FERMT1 is a potential molecular target for cancer therapy.

  2. TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in small cell carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Charles C; Dancer, Jane Y; Wang, Yan; Aparicio, Ana; Navone, Nora M; Troncoso, Patricia; Czerniak, Bogdan A

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that most prostate cancers carry the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Here we evaluated the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in small cell carcinoma of the prostate (n = 12) in comparison with small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (n = 12) and lung (n = 11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated rearrangement of the ERG gene in 8 cases of prostatic small cell carcinoma (67%), and the rearrangement was associated with deletion of the 5' ERG gene in 7 cases, but rearrangement of the ERG gene was not present in any small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder or lung. Next we evaluated the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in nude mouse xenografts that were derived from 2 prostatic small cell carcinomas carrying the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Two transcripts encoded by the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing demonstrated that the 2 transcripts were composed of fusions of exon 1 of the TMPRSS2 gene to exon 4 or 5 of the ERG gene. Our study demonstrates the specific presence of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in prostatic small cell carcinoma, which may be helpful in distinguishing small cell carcinoma of prostatic origin from nonprostatic origins. The high prevalence of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in prostatic small cell carcinoma as well as adenocarcinoma implies that small cell carcinoma may share a common pathogenic pathway with adenocarcinoma in the prostate.

  3. Deregulation of lipid metabolism pathway genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    DAKER, MAELINDA; BHUVANENDRAN, SAATHEEYAVAANE; AHMAD, MUNIRAH; TAKADA, KENZO; KHOO, ALAN SOO-BENG

    2012-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a unique tumour of epithelial origin with a distinct geographical distribution, closely associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) are small non-polyadenylated RNAs that are abundantly expressed in latent EBV-infected NPC cells. To study the role of EBERs in NPC, we established stable expression of EBERs in HK1, an EBV-negative NPC cell line. Cells expressing EBERs consistently exhibited an increased growth rate. However, EBERs did not confer resistance towards cisplatin-induced apoptosis or promote migration or invasion ability in the cells tested. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified potential candidate genes that were deregulated in NPC cells expressing EBERs. Gene Ontology analysis of the data set revealed that EBERs upregulate the cellular lipid metabolic process. Upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) was observed in EBER-expressing cells. NPC cells exhibited LDL-dependent cell proliferation. In addition, a polyphenolic flavonoid compound, quercetin, known to inhibit FASN, was found to inhibit proliferation of NPC cells. PMID:23292678

  4. Identification and Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma Gene Markers

    PubMed Central

    Dalgin, Gul S.; Holloway, Dustin T.; Liou, Louis S.; DeLisi, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling has been used to distinguish histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and consequently to identify specific tumor markers. The analytical procedures currently in use find sets of genes whose average differential expression across the two categories differ significantly. In general each of the markers thus identified does not distinguish tumor from normal with 100% accuracy, although the group as a whole might be able to do so. For the purpose of developing a widely used economically viable diagnostic signature, however, large groups of genes are not likely to be useful. Here we use two different methods, one a support vector machine variant, and the other an exhaustive search, to reanalyze data previously generated in our Lab (Lenburg et al. 2003). We identify 158 genes, each having an expression level that is higher (lower) in every tumor sample than in any normal sample, and each having a minimum differential expression across the two categories at a significance of 0.01. The set is highly enriched in cancer related genes (p = 1.6 × 10−12), containing 43 genes previously associated with either RCC or other types of cancer. Many of the biomarkers appear to be associated with the central alterations known to be required for cancer transformation. These include the oncogenes JAZF1, AXL, ABL2; tumor suppressors RASD1, PTPRO, TFAP2A, CDKN1C; and genes involved in proteolysis or cell-adhesion such as WASF2, and PAPPA. PMID:19455236

  5. Genetic alterations of HER genes in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WENG, WEN HUI; CHEN, YING TZU; YU, KAI JIE; CHANG, YING HSU; CHUANG, CHENG KENG; PANG, SEE TONG

    2016-01-01

    Chromophobe (ch) renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the 3rd most common subtype of RCC and occurs in 5% of all RCCs. Although chRCC generally demonstrates more favorable outcomes compared with other subtypes of RCC, there is a 6–7% probability of tumor progression and metastasis in this disease. The subclassification of a more aggressive subtype of chRCC may be useful for the management of this cancer. The Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 [also known as human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2] gene has been reported to be important in chRCC. The present study aimed to further investigate the abnormalities of the HER family genes and their potential association with chRCC. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on 11 chRCC tissue specimens, and the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analysis was used to assess the results. The loss of one copy of the HER2 and HER4 genes was observed to be the major alteration of the tumor cells in all chRCC cases. Statistical data indicated that loss of the HER2 gene was strongly correlated with loss of the HER4 gene (P=0.019). The findings of previous studies were also combined for analysis, and were consistent with those of the present study. In addition, the amplification of HER1 was also strongly correlated with the amplification of HER4 (P=0.004). Furthermore, a high percentage of genetic structural rearrangements was observed in HER3 genes, which was significantly associated with amplification of HER2 (P=0.005). Certain alterations in the HER gene family were also noted as a phenomenom in chRCC. Therefore, the characterization of the underlying aberrant functions of HER genes may be of interest for additional studies in the context of using HER genes to distinguish between RCC subtypes in order to establish improved treatment guidelines. PMID:26998131

  6. Gene profiling analysis for patients with oral verrucous carcinoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue-Hong; Tian, Xin; Liu, Ou-Sheng; Fang, Xiao-Dan; Quan, Hong-Zhi; Xie, Shang; Gao, Shan; Tang, Zhan-Gui

    2014-01-01

    Oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC) is one malignant tumor which was carved out from the oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the clinical and pathological features as well as the treatment strategies of OVC are different from OSCC. Here, global transcript abundance of tumor tissues from five patients with primary OVC and six patients with primary OSCC including their matched adjacently normal oral mucosa were profiled using the Affymetrix HGU133 Plus 2.0. Ingenuity Systems IPA software was used to analyse the gene function and biological pathways. There were 109 differentially expressed genes (more than 2-fold) between OVC and the adjacently normal tissue, among them 66 were up-regulated and 43 were down-regulated; 1172 differentially expressed genes (more than 2-fold) between OSCC and the adjacently normal tissue, among them 608 were up-regulated and 564 were down-regulated. There were 39 common differentially expressed genes in OVC and OSCC compared with their matched normal oral mucosa, among them 22 up-regulated and 17 down-regulated, and 8 of them different between OVC and OSCC. In addition, the gene expression profile was further validated by quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR) analysis for four of those 39 selected genes. PMID:25126189

  7. New mutation of the PTCH gene in nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tachi, Nobutada; Fujii, Katsunori; Kimura, Mitsugu; Seki, Kouhei; Hirakai, Masahisa; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2007-11-01

    Neurologic involvement in nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome includes intracranial calcification, congenital hydrocephalus, intracranial neoplasms, and mental retardation. A few cases of epilepsy with nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome were reported. We report on a patient with nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome and West syndrome. The patient had a heterozygous mutation (insertion of TGGC) in the PTCH gene. This mutation causes a shift of the reading frame, and creates a stop codon predicting the truncation of the PTCH protein. This mutation was not found in previously described patients with nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome.

  8. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic condition. The gene linked to the syndrome is known as PTCH (" ...

  9. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Basal cell carcinoma Overview Basal cell carcinoma: This skin cancer ... that has received years of sun exposure. Basal cell carcinoma: Overview Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the ...

  10. Expression of insulin-like growth factor family genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Białożyt, Michał; Plato, Marta; Mazurek, Urszula; Braczkowska, Bogumiła

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Despite significant progress in the pathology of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), diagnostic and predictive factors of major importance have not been discovered. Some hopes are associated with insulin-like growth factors. The aim of the study was to compare the expression of genes for insulin-like growth factor family in tumours and in tissue of kidneys without cancer. Material and methods Fifty-two patients years with clear cell renal cell cancer were qualified to the study group; patients nephrectomised because of hydronephrosis were included in the control group. Expression of genes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Results Expression of IGFR-1 gene in tumour accounts for about 60% of cases. The incidence is higher than in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues and higher (but with no statistical significance) than in kidney without cancer. Expression of IGFR-2 gene in tumours has not been established. The incidence of the expression in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues is small. Expression of this gene has been present in all specimens from kidneys without cancer. Expression of IGFBP-3 gene ascertained in all (except four) cases of ccRCC and in the majority of clippings from adjacent tissue. It was not found in kidneys from the control group. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGFR-1 mRNA copy numbers in ccRCC were higher than in the material from the control group PMID:27358591

  11. Gene expression profiling identifies genes predictive of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chu; Méndez, Eduardo; Houck, John; Fan, Wenhong; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Doody, Dave; Yueh, Bevan; Futran, Neal D; Upton, Melissa; Farwell, D Gregory; Schwartz, Stephen M; Zhao, Lue Ping

    2008-08-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. To identify potential biomarkers for the early detection of invasive OSCC, we compared the gene expressions of incident primary OSCC, oral dysplasia, and clinically normal oral tissue from surgical patients without head and neck cancer or preneoplastic oral lesions (controls), using Affymetrix U133 2.0 Plus arrays. We identified 131 differentially expressed probe sets using a training set of 119 OSCC patients and 35 controls. Forward and stepwise logistic regression analyses identified 10 successive combinations of genes which expression differentiated OSCC from controls. The best model included LAMC2, encoding laminin-gamma2 chain, and COL4A1, encoding collagen, type IV alpha1 chain. Subsequent modeling without these two markers showed that COL1A1, encoding collagen, type I alpha1 chain, and PADI1, encoding peptidyl arginine deiminase, type 1, could also distinguish OSCC from controls. We validated these two models using an internal independent testing set of 48 invasive OSCC and 10 controls and an external testing set of 42 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cases and 14 controls (GEO GSE6791), with sensitivity and specificity above 95%. These two models were also able to distinguish dysplasia (n = 17) from control (n = 35) tissue. Differential expression of these four genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. If confirmed in larger studies, the proposed models may hold promise for monitoring local recurrence at surgical margins and the development of second primary oral cancer in patients with OSCC.

  12. Profiling of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Cycle Regulating Genes Targeted by Calycosin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongqing; Wang, Shufang; Zhu, Liguo; Tian, Yaping; Wang, Haibao; Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yu; Wang, Deqing

    2013-01-01

    We cocultured calycosin with human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (BEL-7402) to investigate the effect on cell proliferation. Calycosin can markedly block the cell growth in G1 phase (P < 0.01) on the IC50 concentration. There were seventeen genes involved in cell-cycle regulation showing differentially expressed in treated cells detected by gene chip. Eight genes were upregulated and nine genes were downregulated. Downregulated TFDP-1, CDKN2D, and SPK2 and upregulated CDC2 and CCNB1 might affect cell cycle of tumor cells. Furthermore, we checked the transcription pattern using 2D gel method to find different expression of proteins in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells after exposure to calycosin. Fourteen proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Twelve proteins expression were increased such as transgelin 2, pyridoxine 5′-phosphate, stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1, peroxiredoxin 1, endoplasmic reticulum protein 29, and phosphoglycerate mutase 1. Only thioredoxin peroxidase and high-mobility group box1 proteins' expression decreased. Both genes and proteins changes might be relate to the mechanism of antitumor effect under treatment of calycosin. In conclusion, calycosin has a potential effect to inhibit the BEL-7402 cell growth by inhibiting some oncogene expression and increasing anticancer genes expression, what is more, by blocking cell cycle. PMID:24455688

  13. Germline mutations of the PTCH gene in Japanese patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Minami, M; Urano, Y; Ishigami, T; Tsuda, H; Kusaka, J; Arase, S

    2001-09-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by developmental and skeletal anomalies, palmo-plantar pits, odontogenic keratocysts, ectopic calcification, and occurrence of various types of tumors including basal cell carcinoma. Recent evidence has indicated that the human homologue of a Drosophila segment polarity gene, PTCH, is a NBCCS susceptibility gene. In the study presented here, we detected two novel mutations of the PTCH gene, I805X/2395delC and Y93X/C297A, in two unrelated Japanese patients. Early protection of the skin from the sunlight is important to the prevention of BCC development in NBCCS patients. Genetic analysis of the PTCH gene is essential for the early, definitive diagnosis of NBCCS, especially before the expression of clinical manifestations is complete.

  14. Expression of Von Hippel – Lindau (VHL) gene mutation in diagnosed cases of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Humera; Kehar, Shahnaz Imdad; Ali, Shahzad; Tariq, Naila

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the expression of Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene in diagnosed cases of renal cell carcinoma. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in department of Pathology, Basic Medical Sciences Institute, JPMC, Karachi, from January 2007 to December 2012. Paraffin embedded blocks of 30 cases of radical nephrectomy specimens diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma including CCRCC 21 (70%) CCPRCC, 3 (10%), PRCC 2 (6.79%), hybrid tumor 4 (13.3%), chromophobe tumor (0%) processed for VHL gene expression on Polymerase Chain Reaction. Results: All the 30 cases previously diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma were processed on PCR, VHL gene mutations were seen in 20 (95.23%) of CCRCC while a single case was negative for VHL mutations. All CCPRCC were negative for VHL mutation. Among the hybrid tumor 03 cases with foci of clear cells show VHL mutation while a single case showing combination of clear cells and chromophobe cells was negative for mutation. Both the cases of PRCC were positive for mutation. Exon 3 mutation at base pair 194 seen in 8 (32%) cases and Exon 2 mutation at base pair 150-159 seen in 17 (68%) cases. None of the cases showed Exon 1 mutation. Conclusion: The present study shows that majority of CCRCC showed VHL mutation including the hybrid tumor with clear cell component in our population. PMID:25097537

  15. HNdb: an integrated database of gene and protein information on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Henrique, Tiago; José Freitas da Silveira, Nelson; Henrique Cunha Volpato, Arthur; Mioto, Mayra Mataruco; Carolina Buzzo Stefanini, Ana; Bachir Fares, Adil; Gustavo da Silva Castro Andrade, João; Masson, Carolina; Verónica Mendoza López, Rossana; Daumas Nunes, Fabio; Paulo Kowalski, Luis; Severino, Patricia; Tajara, Eloiza Helena

    2016-01-01

    The total amount of scientific literature has grown rapidly in recent years. Specifically, there are several million citations in the field of cancer. This makes it difficult, if not impossible, to manually retrieve relevant information on the mechanisms that govern tumor behavior or the neoplastic process. Furthermore, cancer is a complex disease or, more accurately, a set of diseases. The heterogeneity that permeates many tumors is particularly evident in head and neck (HN) cancer, one of the most common types of cancer worldwide. In this study, we present HNdb, a free database that aims to provide a unified and comprehensive resource of information on genes and proteins involved in HN squamous cell carcinoma, covering data on genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, literature citations and also cross-references of external databases. Different literature searches of MEDLINE abstracts were performed using specific Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms) for oral, oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal and laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. A curated gene-to-publication assignment yielded a total of 1370 genes related to HN cancer. The diversity of results allowed identifying novel and mostly unexplored gene associations, revealing, for example, that processes linked to response to steroid hormone stimulus are significantly enriched in genes related to HN carcinomas. Thus, our database expands the possibilities for gene networks investigation, providing potential hypothesis to be tested. Database URL: http://www.gencapo.famerp.br/hndb PMID:27013077

  16. Gene expression profiling allows distinction between primary and metastatic squamous cell carcinomas in the lung.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Simon G; Estilo, Cherry; Maghami, Ellie; Sarkaria, Inderpal S; Pham, Duy Khanh; O-charoenrat, Pornchai; Socci, Nicholas D; Ngai, Ivan; Carlson, Diane; Ghossein, Ronald; Viale, Agnes; Park, Bernard J; Rusch, Valerie W; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2005-04-15

    Lung neoplasms commonly develop in patients previously treated for head and neck carcinomas. The derivation of these tumors, either as new primary lung cancers or as metastatic head and neck cancers, is difficult to establish based on clinical or histopathologic criteria since both are squamous cell carcinomas and have identical features under light microscopy. However, this distinction has significant treatment and prognostic implications. Gene expression profiling was performed on a panel of 52 sequentially collected patients with either primary lung (n = 21) or primary head and neck (n = 31) carcinomas using the Affymetrix HG_U95Av2 high-density oligonucleotide microarray. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering with Ward linkage and the Pearson correlation metric was performed. To assess robustness, bootstrap resampling was performed with 1,000 iterations. A t test of the normalized values for each gene was used to determine the genes responsible for segregating head and neck from lung primary carcinomas, and those with the most differential expression were used for later analyses. In the absence of a large "test" set of tumors, we used a supervised leave-one-out cross-validation to test how well we could predict the tumor origin. Once a gene expression profile was established, 12 lung lesions taken from patients with previously treated head and neck cancers were similarly analyzed by gene expression profiling to determine their sites of origin. Unsupervised clustering analysis separated the study cohort into two distinct groups which reliably remained segregated with bootstrap resampling. Group 1 consisted of 30 tongue carcinomas. Group 2 consisted of 21 lung cancers and 1 tongue carcinoma. The clustering was not changed even when normal lung or tongue profiles were subtracted from the corresponding carcinomatous lesions, and a leave-one-out cross-validation showed a 98% correct prediction (see Supplementary Data 1). A minimum set of 500 genes required to

  17. SOX18 Is a Novel Target Gene of Hedgehog Signaling in Cervical Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Jelena; Schwirtlich, Marija; Rankovic, Branislava; Stevanovic, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Although there is much evidence showing functional relationship between Hedgehog pathway, in particular Sonic hedgehog, and SOX transcription factors during embryonic development, scarce data are available regarding their crosstalk in cancer cells. SOX18 protein plays an important role in promoting tumor angiogenesis and therefore emerged as a promising potential target in antiangiogenic tumor therapy. Recently it became evident that expression of SOX18 gene in tumors is not restricted to endothelium of accompanying blood and lymphatic vessels, but in tumor cells as well.In this paper we have identified human SOX18 gene as a novel target gene of Hedgehog signaling in cervical carcinoma cell lines. We have presented data showing that expression of SOX18 gene is regulated by GLI1 and GLI2 transcription factors, final effectors of Hedgehog signaling, and that modulation of Hedgehog signaling activity in considerably influence SOX18 expression. We consider important that Hedgehog pathway inhibitors reduced SOX18 expression, thus showing, for the first time, possibility for manipulationwith SOX18 gene expression. In addition, we analyzed the role of SOX18 in malignant potential of cervical carcinoma cell line, and showed that its overexpression has no influence on cells proliferation and viability, but substantially promotes migration and invasion of cells in vitro. Pro-migratory effect of SOX18 suggests its role in promoting malignant spreading, possibly in response to Hedgehog activation. PMID:26588701

  18. Adenovirus with p16 gene exerts antitumor effect on laryngeal carcinoma Hep2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengang; Hu, Jingxia; Li, Dajun; Pan, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Laryngeal cancer is an uncommon form of cancer. The tumor suppressor P16, known to be mutated or deleted in various types of human tumor, including laryngeal carcinoma, is involved in the formation and development of laryngeal carcinoma. It has been previously reported that the inactivation or loss of P16 is associated with the acquisition of malignant characteristics. The current study hypothesized that restoring wild‑type P16 activity into P16‑null malignant Hep2 cells may exert an antitumor effect. A recombinant adenovirus carrying the P16 gene (Ad‑P16) was used to infect and express high levels of P16 protein in P16‑null Hep2 cells. Cell proliferation and invasion assays and polymerase chain reaction were performed to evaluate the effects of the P16 gene on cell proliferation and the antitumor effect on Hep2 cells. The results demonstrated that the Hep2 cells infected with Ad‑P16 exhibited significantly reduced cell proliferation, invasion and tumor volume compared with untreated or control adenovirus cells. Furthermore, the expression of laryngeal carcinoma‑associated genes, EGFR, survivin and cyclin D1, were measured in Ad‑P16‑infected cells and were significantly reduced compared with control groups. The results of the current study demonstrate that restoring wild‑type P16 activity into P16-null Hep2 cells exerts an antitumor effect.

  19. HOX genes: potential candidates for the progression of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Barros E Lima Bueno, Rafaela; Ramão, Anelisa; Pinheiro, Daniel Guariz; Alves, Cleidson Padua; Kannen, Vinicius; Jungbluth, Achim A; de Araújo, Luiza Ferreira; Muys, Bruna Rodrigues; Fonseca, Aline Simoneti; Plaça, Jessica Rodrigues; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Neder, Luciano; Saggioro, Fabiano P; Mamede, Rui Celso M; Figueiredo, David Livingstone Alves; Silva, Wilson Araújo

    2016-11-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is a very aggressive cancer, considered to be a subtype of the head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Despite significant advances in the understanding and treatment of cancer, prognosis of patients with LSCC has not improved recently. In the present study, we sought to understand better the genetic mechanisms underlying LSCC development. Thirty-two tumor samples were collected from patients undergoing surgical resection of LSCC. The samples were submitted to whole-genome cDNA microarray analysis aiming to identify genetic targets in LSCC. We also employed bioinformatic approaches to expand our findings using the TCGA database and further performed functional assays, using human HNSCC cell lines, to evaluate viability, cell proliferation, and cell migration after silencing of selected genes. Eight members of the homeobox gene family (HOX) were identified to be overexpressed in LSCC samples when compared to normal larynx tissue. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis validated the overexpression of HOX gene family members in LSCC. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) statistical method curve showed that the expression level of seven members of HOX gene family can distinguish tumor from nontumor tissue. Correlation analysis of clinical and gene expression data revealed that HOXC8 and HOXD11 genes were associated with the differentiation degree of tumors and regional lymph node metastases, respectively. Additionally, siRNA assays confirmed that HOXC8, HOXD10, and HOXD11 genes might be critical for cell colony proliferation and cell migration. According to our findings, several members of the HOX genes were overexpressed in LSCC samples and seem to be required in biological processes involved in tumor development. This suggests that HOX genes might play a critical role in the physiopathology of LSCC tumors.

  20. Multiple promoter elements govern expression of the human ornithine decarboxylase gene in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moshier, J A; Osborne, D L; Skunca, M; Dosescu, J; Gilbert, J D; Fitzgerald, M C; Polidori, G; Wagner, R L; Friezner Degen, S J; Luk, G D

    1992-01-01

    Overexpression of the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene may be important to the development and maintenance of colonic neoplasms, as well as tumors in general. In this study, we examined the promoter elements governing constitutive expression of the human ODC gene in HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells and, for comparison, K562 human erythro-leukemia cells. It was determined by functional analysis that the promoter elements responsible reside within the 378 bp immediately upstream from the transcription start site. Within this sequence, there are at least three regions that modulate the efficiency of the ODC promoter cooperatively. Both DNA bandshift and footprint assays demonstrated all three regions to be rich in sites that bind to nuclear proteins isolated from HCT 116 and K562 cells; the protein binding pattern of non-transformed, diploid fibroblasts was found to be much less complex. Several of the protein binding sequences have little or no homology to common regulatory elements. We suggest that the constitutive activity of the ODC gene in HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells, and perhaps transformed cells in general, involves a complex interaction of multiple regulatory sequences and their associated nuclear proteins. Finally, the saturation of the promoter in these transformed cell lines suggests that high levels of protein binding in the ODC promoter may contribute to elevated constitutive expression of this gene. Images PMID:1598217

  1. Association between FBP1 and hypoxia-related gene expression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    NING, XIANG-HUI; LI, TENG; GONG, YAN-QING; HE, QUN; SHEN, QI; PENG, SHUANG-HE; WANG, JIANG-YI; CHEN, JIN-CHAO; GUO, YING-LU; GONG, KAN

    2016-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase 1 (FBP1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis. Recently, the catalytic activity-independent function of FBP1, hypoxia-induced factor (HIF) repression in the nucleus, was identified. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between FBP1 and hypoxia-related gene expression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The protein expression levels of FBP1, HIF-1α, HIF-2α, erythropoietin (EPO) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9) were assessed by immunohistochemical staining of ccRCC paraffin blocks from 123 patients using the tissue microarray technique. The expression level of FBP1 was then correlated with various clinicopathological factors, and the protein expression levels of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, EPO and CA9. Clinicopathological factors, including age, gender, T stage and Fuhrman grade, were not significantly different between patients with low and high FBP1 expression in ccRCC (P>0.05). FBP1 protein expression level was significantly correlated with the expression levels of HIF-1α (P=0.005) and EPO (P=0.010), but not significantly correlated with the expression levels of HIF-2α (P=0.123) and CA9 (P=0.513) in ccRCC tissues. The current findings confirm the association between FBP1 and hypoxia-related gene expression, and may facilitate understanding of the mechanisms of ccRCC tumorigenesis. PMID:27313747

  2. Comparative Gene Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Stem Cell-Like Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Anna M.; Lewicki, Sławomir; Helbrecht, Igor; Brodaczewska, Klaudia; Koch, Irena; Zdanowski, Robert; Król, Magdalena; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent advancement in cancer research has shown that tumors are highly heterogeneous, and multiple phenotypically different cell populations are found in a single tumor. Cancer development and tumor growth are driven by specific types of cells—stem cell-like cancer cells (SCLCCs)—which are also responsible for metastatic spread and drug resistance. This research was designed to verify the presence of SCLCCs in renal cell cancer cell lines. Subsequently, we aimed to characterize phenotype and cell biology of CD105+ cells, defined previously as renal cell carcinoma tumor-initiating cells. The main goal of the project was to describe the gene-expression profile of stem cell-like cancer cells of primary tumor and metastatic origin. Materials and Methods Real-time PCR analysis of stemness genes (Oct-4, Nanog and Ncam) and soft agar colony formation assay were conducted to check the stemness properties of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines. FACS analysis of CD105+ and CD133+ cells was performed on RCC cells. Isolated CD105+ cells were verified for expression of mesenchymal markers—CD24, CD146, CD90, CD73, CD44, CD11b, CD19, CD34, CD45, HLA-DR and alkaline phosphatase. Hanging drop assay was used to investigate CD105+ cell-cell cohesion. Analysis of free-floating 3D spheres formed by isolated CD105+ was verified, as spheres have been hypothesized to contain undifferentiated multipotent progenitor cells. Finally, CD105+ cells were sorted from primary (Caki-2) and metastatic (ACHN) renal cell cancer cell lines. Gene-expression profiling of sorted CD105+ cells was performed with Agilent’s human GE 4x44K v2 microarrays. Differentially expressed genes were further categorized into canonical pathways. Network analysis and downstream analysis were performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Results Metastatic RCC cell lines (ACHN and Caki-1) demonstrated higher colony-forming ability in comparison to primary RCC cell lines. Metastatic RCC cell lines harbor

  3. Genome-wide detection of allelic gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells using a human exome SNP chip.

    PubMed

    Park, Yon Mi; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2014-11-10

    Allelic variations in gene expression influence many biological responses and cause phenotypic variations in humans. In this study, Illumina Human Exome BeadChips containing more than 240,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to identify changes in allelic gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. We found 17 monoallelically expressed genes, 58 allelic imbalanced genes, and 7 genes showing allele substitution. In addition, we also detected 33 differentially expressed genes following LPS treatment in vitro using these human exome SNP chips. However, alterations in allelic gene expression following LPS treatment were detected in only three genes (MLXIPL, TNC, and MX2), which were observed in one cell line sample only, indicating that changes in allelic gene expression following LPS stimulation of liver cells are rare events. Among a total of 75 genes showing allelic expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells, either monoallelic or imbalanced, 43 genes (57.33%) had expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data, indicating that high-density exome SNP chips are useful and reliable for studying allelic gene expression. Furthermore, most genes showing allelic expression were regulated by cis-acting mechanisms and were also significantly associated with several human diseases. Overall, our study provides a better understanding of allele-specific gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with and without LPS stimulation and potential clues for the cause of human disease due to alterations in allelic gene expression.

  4. Gene expression analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma survival and recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xu; Lamperska, Katarzyna; Golusinski, Paweł; Schork, Nicholas J.; Luczewski, Lukasz; Kolenda, Tomasz; Golusinski, Wojciech; Masternak, Michal M.

    2015-01-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas represent about 90 % of all head and neck cancers, ranking the sixth most common human cancer. Approximately 450,000 of new cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are diagnosed every year. Unfortunately, because of diagnosis at the advanced stages and early metastasis to the lymph nodes, the HNSCC is associated with very high death rate. Identification of signature biomarkers and molecularly targeted therapies could provide more effective and specific cancer treatment, prevent recurrence, and increase survival rate. We used paired tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples to screen with RT² Profiler™ PCR Array Human Cancer PathwayFinderTM. Total of 20 up-regulated genes and two down-regulated genes were screened out. Out of 22 genes, 12 genes were subsequently validated to be significantly altered in the HNSCC; the samples were from all 41 patients. Five year survival and recurrence selected genes that could represent the biomarkers of survival and recurrence of the disease. We believe that comprehensive understanding of the unique genetic characteristics of HNSCC could provide novel diagnostic biomarkers and meet the requirement for molecular-targeted therapy for the HNSCC. PMID:25575813

  5. Gene expression analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma survival and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xu; Lamperska, Katarzyna; Golusinski, Paweł; Schork, Nicholas J; Luczewski, Lukasz; Kolenda, Tomasz; Golusinski, Wojciech; Masternak, Michal M

    2015-01-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas represent about 90 % of all head and neck cancers, ranking the sixth most common human cancer. Approximately 450,000 of new cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are diagnosed every year. Unfortunately, because of diagnosis at the advanced stages and early metastasis to the lymph nodes, the HNSCC is associated with very high death rate. Identification of signature biomarkers and molecularly targeted therapies could provide more effective and specific cancer treatment, prevent recurrence, and increase survival rate. We used paired tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples to screen with RT² Profiler™ PCR Array Human Cancer PathwayFinderTM . Total of 20 up-regulated genes and two down-regulated genes were screened out. Out of 22 genes, 12 genes were subsequently validated to be significantly altered in the HNSCC; the samples were from all 41 patients. Five year survival and recurrence selected genes that could represent the biomarkers of survival and recurrence of the disease. We believe that comprehensive understanding of the unique genetic characteristics of HNSCC could provide novel diagnostic biomarkers and meet the requirement for molecular-targeted therapy for the HNSCC.

  6. Gene expression profiles of epithelial cells microscopically isolated from a breast-invasive ductal carcinoma and a nodal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zucchi, I.; Mento, E.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Scotti, M.; Valsecchi, V.; Simionati, B.; Vicinanza, E.; Valle, G.; Pilotti, S.; Reinbold, R.; Vezzoni, P.; Albertini, A.; Dulbecco, R.

    2004-01-01

    Expression profiles of breast carcinomas are difficult to interpret when they are obtained from tissue in toto, which may contain a large proportion of non-cancer cells. To avoid this problem, we microscopically isolated cells from a primary invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and from an axillary node harboring a metastatic breast carcinoma, to obtain pure populations of carcinoma cells (≈500) and used them for serial analysis of gene expression. The expression profiles generated from both populations of cells were compared with the profile of a disease-free mammary epithelium. We showed that the expression profiles obtained are exclusive of carcinoma cells with no contribution of non-epithelial cells. From a total of 16,939 unique tags analyzed, we detected 559 statistically significant changes in gene expression; some of these genes have not been previously associated with breast cancer. We observed that many of the down-regulated genes are the same in both cancers, whereas the up-regulated genes are completely different, suggesting that the down-regulation of a set of genes may be the basic mechanism of cancer formation, while the up-regulation may characterize and possibly control the state of evolution of individual cancers. The results obtained may help in characterizing the neoplastic process of breast cancer. PMID:15608061

  7. MicroRNAs and their target gene networks in renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Redova, Martina; Svoboda, Marek; Slaby, Ondrej

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} MiRNAs are related to the processes of cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis in RCC. {yields} MiRNAs expression profiles are associated with several RCC-specific genetic alterations. {yields} It has been well documented that several miRNAs are downstream effector molecules of the HIF-induced hypoxia response. {yields} MiR-200 family is linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition which is one of the most significant pathogenetic mechanism in RCC. {yields} Mechanistic studies in RCC have provided the rationale of using miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-protein-coding short single stranded RNAs in the size range 19-25 nucleotides that are associated with gene regulation at the transcriptional and translational level. Recent studies have proved that miRNAs play important roles in a large number of biological processes, including cellular differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, etc. Changes in their expression were found in a variety of human cancers, including renal cell carcinoma pathogenesis. Specific miRNA alterations were associated with key pathogenetic mechanisms of renal cell carcinoma like hypoxia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in renal cell carcinoma with an emphasis on miRNAs potential to serve as a powerful biomarker of disease and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  8. Relation between sonic hedgehog pathway gene polymorphisms and basal cell carcinoma development in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Lesiak, Aleksandra; Sobolewska-Sztychny, Dorota; Majak, Paweł; Sobjanek, Michał; Wodz, Karolina; Sygut, Karolina Przybyłowska-; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Wozniacka, Anna; Narbutt, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, increases have been observed in the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma. BCC is the most common neoplasm in Caucasian populations. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway impairment plays a key role in BCC pathogenesis, and there is evidence that Shh pathway genetic variations may predispose to BCC development. We genotyped 22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4 Shh pathway genes: SHH, GLI, SMO, and PTCH. The study group consisted of 142 BCC patients and 142 age-matched, sex-matched healthy subjects (controls). SNPs were assessed using the PCR-RFLP method. The genotype distribution for the polymorphisms in the rs104894049 331 A/T SHH, rs104894040 349 T/C SHH, and rs41303402 385 G/A SMO genes differed significantly between the BCC patients and the controls. The presence of CC genotype in the SHH rs104894040 349 T/C polymorphism was linked to the highest risk of BCC development (OR 87.9, p < 0.001). Other genotypes, such as the TT in SHH rs104894049 331 A/T and the GG in SMO rs41303402 385 G/A also statistically raised the risk of BCC, but these associations were weaker. Other investigated polymorphisms showed no statistical differences between patients and controls. The results obtained testify to the importance of the SHH and SMO gene polymorphisms in skin cancerogenesis. These results mainly underline the potential role of SHH3 rs104894040 349 T/C gene polymorphism in the development of skin basal cell carcinomas in patients of Polish origin.

  9. Frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Yaoting; Guo, Guangwu; Huang, Yi; Hu, Xueda; Tang, Aifa; Gao, Shengjie; Wu, Renhua; Chen, Chao; Li, Xianxin; Zhou, Liang; He, Minghui; Li, Zesong; Sun, Xiaojuan; Jia, Wenlong; Chen, Jinnong; Yang, Shangming; Zhou, Fangjian; Zhao, Xiaokun; Wan, Shengqing; Ye, Rui; Liang, Chaozhao; Liu, Zhisheng; Huang, Peide; Liu, Chunxiao; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Hancheng; Sun, Liang; Liu, Xingwang; Jiang, Zhimao; Feng, Dafei; Chen, Jing; Wu, Song; Zou, Jing; Zhang, Zhongfu; Yang, Ruilin; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Congjie; Yin, Weihua; Guan, Zhichen; Ye, Jiongxian; Zhang, Hong; Li, Jingxiang; Kristiansen, Karsten; Nickerson, Michael L; Theodorescu, Dan; Li, Yingrui; Zhang, Xiuqing; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Cai, Zhiming

    2017-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer. Here we sequenced the exomes of nine individuals with TCC and screened all the somatically mutated genes in a prevalence set of 88 additional individuals with TCC with different tumor stages and grades. In our study, we discovered a variety of genes previously unknown to be mutated in TCC. Notably, we identified genetic aberrations of the chromatin remodeling genes (UTX, MLL-MLL3, CREBBP-EP300, NCOR1, ARID1A and CHD6) in 59% of our 97 subjects with TCC. Of these genes, we showed UTX to be altered substantially more frequently in tumors of low stages and grades, highlighting its potential role in the classification and diagnosis of bladder cancer. Our results provide an overview of the genetic basis of TCC and suggest that aberration of chromatin regulation might be a hallmark of bladder cancer. PMID:21822268

  10. The retinoblastoma gene functions as a growth and tumor suppressor in human bladder carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Rei; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Hongji Xu; Shixu Hu; Bigo-Marshall, H.; Benedict, W.F. ); Matsui, Toshimitsu Kobe Univ. School of Medicine ); Miki, Toru; Aaronson, S.A. )

    1991-06-15

    The product of the human retinoblastoma gene (RB) is a nuclear phosphoprotein that is thought to function as a tumor suppressor. Mutations of RB frequently occur in human bladder carcinoma. To investigate the significance of the functional loss of this gene in bladder cancer, an RB expression plasmid (pBARB) under control of the human {beta}-actin promoter was transfected into the bladder carcinoma cell line HTB9, which lacks RB expression. Marker-selected transfectants that expressed RB protein were identified by immunoblotting and immunohistochemical staining. In selected clones, stable RB expression has persisted over 1 yr under standard culture conditions with 10% serum. However, RB expression caused major alterations of HTB9 growth properties both in vitro and in vivo. RB{sup +} tranfectants lacked the ability to form colonies in semi-solid medium, and their growth rate was significantly decreased in 3% serum. In addition, the tumorigenicity of these transfectants was markedly decreased. Tumors that formed in nude mice were much smaller and had a longer latency period but were indistinguishable microscopically from those produced by parental cells. Slower growing tumors were RB{sup +}, as measured by nuclear staining of their RB protein and by a normal RB protein pattern on immunoblots. These findings support the concept that the RB gene acts as both a growth and tumor suppressor in bladder cancer cells.

  11. Expression of c-myc gene in human ovary carcinoma cells treated with vanadate

    SciTech Connect

    Itkes, A.V.; Imamova, L.R.; Alexandrova, N.M.; Favorova, O.O.; Kisselev, L.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The widely accepted hypothesis of vanadate action on cells postulates that this ion inhibits protein phosphatase(s) that dephosphorylates protein phosphotyrosine residues. This inhibition causes tyrosine hyperphosphorylation of cell proteins followed by changes in physiological action of phosphoproteins resulting in stimulation of cell proliferation, expression of protooncogenes, and transient cell transformation. The authors have found that treatment of human ovary carcinoma (CaOv) cells with vanadate causes the increase in total protein phosphorylation from 1.5- to 2.0-fold whereas the ratio between phosphoserine, phosphothreonine, and phosphotyrosine content remains unchanged. At the same time, enhancement of c-myc gene expression (not c-fos) was observed. Hence, the increase in the ratio of phosphotyrosine to phosphoserine and phosphothreonine is not an obligatory intermediate stage before vanadate-dependent activation of c-myc expression.

  12. Oral Rigosertib for Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  13. Specific CEA-producing colorectal carcinoma cell killing with recombinant adenoviral vector containing cytosine deaminase gene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Zong; Wu, Wen-Xi; Xu, De-Hua; Zheng, Zhong-Cheng; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Ding, Qiang; Hua, Yi-Bing; Yao, Kun

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To kill CEA positive colorectal carcinoma cells specifically using the E coli cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene, a new replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector was constructed in which CD gene was controlled under CEA promoter and its in vitro cytotoxic effects were evaluated. METHODS: Shuttle plasmid containing CD gene and regulatory sequence of the CEA gene was constructed and recombined with the right arm of adenovirus genome DNA in 293 cell strain. Dot blotting and PCR were used to identify positive plaques. The purification of adenovirus was performed with ultra-concentration in CsCl step gradients and the titration was measured with plaque formation assay. Cytotoxic effects were assayed with MTT method, The fifty percent inhibition concentration (IC50) of 5-FC was calculated using a curve-fitting parameter. The human colorectal carcinoma cell line, which was CEA-producing, and the CEA-nonproducing Hela cell line were applied in cytological tests. An established recombinant adenovirus vector AdCMVCD, in which the CD gene was controlled under CMV promoter, was used as virus control. Quantitative results were expressed as the mean ± SD of the mean. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. RESULTS: The desired recombinant adenovirus vector was named AdCEACD. The results of dot blotting and PCR showed that the recombinant adenovirus contained CEA promoter and CD gene. Virus titer was about 5.0 × 1014 pfu/L-1 after purification. The CEA-producing Lovo cells were sensitive to 5-FC and had the same cytotoxic effect after infection with AdCEACD and AdCMVCD (The IC50 values of 5-FC in parent Lovo cells, Lovo cells infected with 100 M.O.I AdCEACD and Lovo cells infected with 10 M.O.I AdCMVCD were > 15000, 216.5 ± 38.1 and 128.8 ± 25.4 μmol•L⁻¹, P < 0.001, respectively), and the cytotoxicity of 5-FC increased accordingly when the M.O.I of adenoviruses were enhanced (The value of IC50 of 5-FC was reduced to 27.9 ± 4.2 μmol•L-1

  14. Expression of the WT1 gene -KTS domain isoforms suppresses the invasive ability of human lung squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Shogo; Takiguchi, Masaki; Seki, Naohiko

    2008-02-01

    Although the WT1 gene was originally isolated as a tumor suppressor gene from Wilms' tumor, oncogenic roles for WT1 have been reported in several tumors. Here, we present new findings of high levels of WT1 expression associated with the suppression of lymph node metastasis in patients with human lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We investigated the effect of down-regulated WT1 gene expression on the invasive phenotype of the SCC cell line RERF-LC-AI. Invasive ability was enhanced in WT1-specific siRNA-transfected cells, and a WT1 target gene p21(Waf1/Cip1) was isolated by comprehensive gene expression analysis. As several isoforms are produced from the WT1 gene, we isolated eight major WT1 isoforms from a cDNA library and cloned each variant into an expression vector. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression was enhanced only by the WT1 cDNA variants that included a three-amino acid deletion (-KTS). Our results suggested that the -KTS-containing variants of WT1 are directly involved in the regulation of p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression and the subsequent suppression of lymph node metastasis in human lung squamous cell carcinoma.

  15. Molecular classification of basal cell carcinoma of skin by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Jee, Byul A; Lim, Hyoseob; Kwon, So Mee; Jo, Yuna; Park, Myong Chul; Lee, Il Jae; Woo, Hyun Goo

    2015-12-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are more common kinds of skin cancer. Although these tumors share common pathological and clinical features, their similarity and heterogeneity at molecular levels are not fully elaborated yet. Here, by performing comparative analysis of gene expression profiling of BCC, SCC, and normal skin tissues, we could classify the BCC into three subtypes of classical, SCC-like, and normal-like BCCs. Functional enrichment and pathway analyses revealed the molecular characteristics of each subtype. The classical BCC showed the enriched expression and transcription signature with the activation of Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways, which were well known key features of BCC. By contrast, the SCC-like BCC was enriched with immune-response genes and oxidative stress-related genes. Network analysis revealed the PLAU/PLAUR as a key regulator of SCC-like BCC. The normal-like BCC showed prominent activation of metabolic processes particularly the fatty acid metabolism. The existence of these molecular subtypes could be validated in an independent dataset, which demonstrated the three subgroups of BCC with distinct functional enrichment. In conclusion, we suggest a novel molecular classification of BCC providing insights on the heterogeneous progression of BCC.

  16. [Study of testicular cancer gene expression in samples of oral leukoplakia and squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth].

    PubMed

    Skorodumova, L O; Muraev, A A; Zakharova, E S; Shepelev, M V; Korobko, I V; Zaderenko, I A; Ivanov, S Iu; Gnuchev, N V; Georgiev, G P; Larin, S S

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are normally expressed mostly in human germ cells, there is also an aberrant expression in some tumor cells. This expression profile makes them potential tumor growth biomarkers and a promising target for tumor immunotherapy. Specificity of CT genes expression in oral malignant and potentially malignant diseases, e.g. oral leukoplakia, is not yet studied. Data on CT genes expression profile in leukoplakia would allow developing new diagnostic methods with potential value for immunotherapy and prophylaxis of leukoplakia malignization. In our study we compared CT genes expression in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma. We are the first to describe CT genes expression in oral leukoplakia without dysplasia. This findings make impossible differential diagnosis of oral leukoplakia and squamous cell carcinoma on the basis of CT genes expression. The prognostic value of CT genes expression is still unclear, therefore the longitudinal studies are necessary.

  17. Functional genomics identifies novel genes essential for clear cell renal cell carcinoma tumor cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    von Roemeling, Christina A.; Marlow, Laura A.; Radisky, Derek C.; Rohl, Austin; Larsen, Hege E.; Wei, Johnny; Sasinowska, Heather; Zhu, Heng; Drake, Richard; Sasinowski, Maciek; Tun, Han W.; Copland, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Currently there is a lack of targeted therapies that lead to long-term attenuation or regression of disease in patients with advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Our group has implemented a high-throughput genetic analysis coupled with a high-throughput proliferative screen in order to investigate the genetic contributions of a large cohort of overexpressed genes at the functional level in an effort to better understand factors involved in tumor initiation and progression. Patient gene array analysis identified transcripts that are consistently elevated in patient ccRCC as compared to matched normal renal tissues. This was followed by a high-throughput lentivirus screen, independently targeting 195 overexpressed transcripts identified in the gene array in four ccRCC cell lines. This revealed 31 ‘hits’ that contribute to ccRCC cell proliferation. Many of the hits identified are not only presented in the context of ccRCC for the first time, but several have not been previously linked to cancer. We further characterize the function of a group of hits in tumor cell invasion. Taken together these findings reveal pathways that may be critical in ccRCC tumorigenicity, and identifies novel candidate factors that could serve as targets for therapeutic intervention or diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for patients with advanced ccRCC. PMID:24979721

  18. Identification of differentially expressed genes in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma by microarray expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Nindl, Ingo; Dang, Chantip; Forschner, Tobias; Kuban, Ralf J; Meyer, Thomas; Sterry, Wolfram; Stockfleth, Eggert

    2006-01-01

    Background Carcinogenesis is a multi-step process indicated by several genes up- or down-regulated during tumor progression. This study examined and identified differentially expressed genes in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Results Three different biopsies of 5 immunosuppressed organ-transplanted recipients each normal skin (all were pooled), actinic keratosis (AK) (two were pooled), and invasive SCC and additionally 5 normal skin tissues from immunocompetent patients were analyzed. Thus, total RNA of 15 specimens were used for hybridization with Affymetrix HG-U133A microarray technology containing 22,283 genes. Data analyses were performed by prediction analysis of microarrays using nearest shrunken centroids with the threshold 3.5 and ANOVA analysis was independently performed in order to identify differentially expressed genes (p < 0.05). Verification of 13 up- or down-regulated genes was performed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and genes were additionally confirmed by sequencing. Broad coherent patterns in normal skin vs. AK and SCC were observed for 118 genes. Conclusion The majority of identified differentially expressed genes in cutaneous SCC were previously not described. PMID:16893473

  19. ARID1A gene silencing reduces the sensitivity of ovarian clear cell carcinoma to cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Changshuai; Zhang, Yinglan; Zhou, Xingnan; Lang, Jinghe

    2016-01-01

    In ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC), the mutation rate of the AT-rich interaction domain 1A (ARID1A) gene is 46–57%. However, the effects of ARID1A gene silencing by small interfering RNA (siRNA) on the sensitivity of OCCC to cisplatin have not been investigated. Thus, this study aimed to elucidate the association between ARID1A gene silencing and drug resistance in OCCC. Three pairs of ARID1A gene siRNA fragments (siRNA-1, siRNA-2 and siRNA-3) were designed and transiently transfected into ES2 OCCC cells using RNAi Max reagent. Western blotting results demonstrated that the transfection reduced ARID1A protein expression levels, with the siRNA-3 group having the lowest levels. The IC50 value, determined using a Cell Counting kit-8 assay, was significantly increased by siRNA-3 transfection compared with that in blank control and negative control groups. The cell survival rate following treatment with 50 µM cisplatin for 48 h was significantly increased in the siRNA-3 group compared with the blank control and negative control groups. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the apoptosis rate for cisplatin-treated cells was significantly lower in cells with siRNA-3 transfection than in those without, and the apoptosis rate in siRNA-3-transfected cells was lower than that in the negative control group. Western blot analysis showed that the expression level of AKT in cisplatin-treated cells was significantly decreased compared with that in the negative control group, and the AKT expression level in cisplatin-treated cells was significantly higher with siRNA-3 transfection than without. Therefore, the results demonstrated that ARID1A siRNA efficiently decreased ARID1A expression, which reduced cisplatin chemosensitivity and cell apoptosis in ES2 OCCC cells via the regulation of AKT expression. PMID:28105136

  20. Identification of Primary Gene Targets of TFAP2C in Hormone Responsive Breast Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Woodfield, George W.; Chen, Yizhen; Bair, Thomas B.; Domann, Frederick E.; Weigel, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The TFAP2C transcription factor is involved in mammary development, differentiation and oncogenesis. Previous studies established a role for TFAP2C in the regulation of ESR1 (ERα) and ERBB2 (Her2) in breast carcinomas. However, the role of TFAP2C in different breast cancer phenotypes has not been examined in detail. To develop a more complete characterization of TFAP2C target genes, ChIP-seq with anti-TFAP2C antibody and expression arrays with TFAP2C knock down were analyzed in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. Genomic sequences common to the ChIP-seq data set defined the consensus sequence for TFAP2C chromatin binding as the nine base sequence SCCTSRGGS (S=G/C, R=A/G), which closely matches the previously defined optimal in vitro binding site. Comparing expression arrays before and after knock down of TFAP2C with ChIP-seq data demonstrated a conservative estimate that 8% of genes altered by TFAP2C expression are primary target genes and includes genes that are both induced and repressed by TFAP2C. A set of 447 primary target genes of TFAP2C was identified, which included ESR1 (ERα), FREM2, RET, FOXA1, WWOX, GREB1, MYC and members of the retinoic acid response pathway. The identification of ESR1, WWOX, GREB1 and FOXA1 as primary targets confirmed the role of TFAP2C in hormone response. TFAP2C plays a critical role in gene regulation in hormone responsive breast cancer and its target genes are different than for the Her2 breast cancer phenotype. PMID:20629094

  1. Analysis of the TSC1and TSC2genes in sporadic renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Parry, L; Maynard, J H; Patel, A; Clifford, S C; Morrissey, C; Maher, E R; Cheadle, J P; Sampson, J R

    2001-01-01

    The genetic events involved in the aetiology of non-clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and a proportion of clear cell RCC remain to be defined. Germline mutations of the TSC1and TSC2genes cause tuberous sclerosis (TSC), a multi-system hamartoma syndrome that is also associated with RCC. We assessed 17 sporadic clear cell RCCs with a previously identified VHLmutation, 15 clear-cell RCCs without an identified VHLmutation and 15 non-clear-cell RCCs for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at chromosomes 9q34 and 16p13.3, the chromosomal locations of TSC1and TSC2. LOH was detected in 4/9, 1/11 and 3/13 cases informative at both loci. SSCP analysis of the whole coding region of the retained allele did not reveal any cases with a detectable intragenic second somatic mutation. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis of TSC1and TSC2on total RNA from 8 clear-cell RCC cell lines confirmed expression of both TSC genes. These data indicate that biallelic inactivation of TSC1or TSC2is not frequent in sporadic RCC and suggests that the molecular mechanisms of renal carcinogenesis in TSC are likely to be distinct. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaignhttp://www.bjcancer.com  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11710839

  2. Effects of AFP gene silencing on apoptosis and proliferation of a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; He, Tao; Cui, Hong; Wang, Yunjian; Huang, Changshan; Han, Feng

    2012-08-01

    Alpha fetoprotein (AFP) is an oncoembryonal protein that is highly expressed in the majority of hepatocellular carcinomas. Previous studies have shown that AFP may be involved in multiple cell growth regulating, differentiating, and immunosuppressive activities. We investigated the effects of AFP gene silencing by siRNA on apoptosis and proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cell line EGHC-9901, which highly expresses AFP and may serve as an ideal model for investigation of AFP functions. siRNA expressing plasmid targeting the AFP gene was first established and subsequently transfected into hepatocellular carcinoma cell line EGHC-9901; cells were then divided into three groups: siRNA-afp, transfected with AFP-siRNA; siRNA-beta-actin, transfected with siRNA-beta-actin as the positive group; and vector control, transfected with empty vector as the blank control group. After G418 positive clone selection for a couple of weeks, Western blot and RT (reverse transcription)-PCR assay demonstrated that AFP expression was almost completely inhibited by siRNA-afp, which indicates that siRNA expressing plasmid targeting the AFP gene has been successfully established. Furthermore, MTT (methyl thiazolyl tetrazelium) assay showed that cells transfected with siRNA-afp proliferated at a significantly lower speed than the other two groups and flat plate clone formation assay also witnessed less clones with diameters of more than 75 μm in siRNA-afp immunofluorescence indicating that the apoptosis rate of cells transfected with siRNA-afp was significantly higher than the other two groups. Furthermore, flow cytometry manifested approximately 20% more cells of siRNA-afp within G1 phase than those of the negative group, indicating that inhibition of AFP expression may cause G1 phase arrest. Finally, Western blot and RT-PCR assay demonstrated that siRNA-afp induced a higher expression of caspase-3 than the other two groups whereas there was no difference in expression of caspase-8

  3. Identification of genes associated with tumorigenesis of meibomian cell carcinoma by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Kumar Dorairaj, Syril; Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C; Prakash, D Ravi; Chakraborty, Sanjukta

    2007-11-01

    Meibomian cell carcinoma (MCC) is a malignant tumor of the meibomian glands located in the eyelids. No information exists on the cytogenetic and genetic aspects of MCC. There is no report on the gene expression profile of MCC. Thus there is a need, for both scientific and clinical reasons, to identify genes and pathways that are involved in the development and progression of MCC. We analyzed the gene expression profile of MCC by the microarray technique. Forty-four genes were upregulated and 149 genes were downregulated in MCC. Differential expression data were confirmed for 5 genes by semiquantitative RT-PCR in MCC tumors: GTF2H4, RBM12, UBE2D3, DDX17, and LZTS1. We found dysregulation of two major pathways in MCC: MAPK and JAK/STAT. Clusters of genes on chromosomes 1, 12, and 19 were dysregulated in MCC. The data presented here will facilitate the identification of specific markers and therapeutic targets for the treatment of MCC patients.

  4. The state of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes in human cervical carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffner, M.; Muenger, K.; Byrne, J.C.; Howley, P.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Human cervical carcinoma cell lines that were either positive or negative for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences were analyzed for evidence of mutation of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes. Each of five HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines expressed normal pRB and low levels of wild-type p53 proteins, which are presumed to be altered in function as a consequence of association with HPV E7 and E6 oncoproteins, respectively. In contrast, mutations were identified in the p53 and RB genes expressed in the C-33A and HT-3 cervical cancer cell lines, which lack HPV DNA sequences. Mutations in the p53 genes mapped to codon 273 and codon 245 in the C33-A and HT-3 cell lines, respectively, located in the highly conserved regions of p53, where mutations appear in a variety of human cancers. Mutations in RB occurred at splice junctions, resulting in in-frame deletions, affecting exons 13 and 20 in the HT-3 and C-33A cell lines, respectively. These mutations resulted in aberrant proteins that were not phosphorylated and were unable to complex with the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein. These results support the hypothesis that the inactivation of the normal functions of the tumor-suppressor proteins pRB and p53 are important steps in human cervical carcinogenesis, either by mutation or from complex formation with the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins.

  5. PBRM1 Regulates the Expression of Genes Involved in Metabolism and Cell Adhesion in Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Basudev; Porter, Elizabeth G.; Stewart, Jane C.; Ferreira, Christina R.; Schipma, Matthew J.; Dykhuizen, Emily C.

    2016-01-01

    Polybromo-1 (PBRM1) is a component of the PBAF (Polybromo-associated-BRG1- or BRM-associated factors) chromatin remodeling complex and is the second most frequently mutated gene in clear-cell renal cell Carcinoma (ccRCC). Mutation of PBRM1 is believed to be an early event in carcinogenesis, however its function as a tumor suppressor is not understood. In this study, we have employed Next Generation Sequencing to profile the differentially expressed genes upon PBRM1 re-expression in a cellular model of ccRCC. PBRM1 re-expression led to upregulation of genes involved in cellular adhesion, carbohydrate metabolism, apoptotic process and response to hypoxia, and a downregulation of genes involved in different stages of cell division. The decrease in cellular proliferation upon PBRM1 re-expression was confirmed, validating the functional role of PBRM1 as a tumor suppressor in a cell-based model. In addition, we identified a role for PBRM1 in regulating metabolic pathways known to be important for driving ccRCC, including the regulation of hypoxia response genes, PI3K signaling, glucose uptake, and cholesterol homeostasis. Of particular novelty is the identification of cell adhesion as a major downstream process uniquely regulated by PBRM1 expression. Cytoskeletal reorganization was induced upon PBRM1 reexpression as evidenced from the increase in the number of cells displaying cortical actin, a hallmark of epithelial cells. Genes involved in cell adhesion featured prominently in our transcriptional dataset and overlapped with genes uniquely regulated by PBRM1 in clinical specimens of ccRCC. Genes involved in cell adhesion serve as tumor suppressor and maybe involved in inhibiting cell migration. Here we report for the first time genes linked to cell adhesion serve as downstream targets of PBRM1, and hope to lay the foundation of future studies focusing on the role of chromatin remodelers in bringing about these alterations during malignancies. PMID:27100670

  6. Rat hepatic stellate cells alter the gene expression profile and promote the growth, migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Ming; Zhou, Le-Yuan; Liu, Bin-Bin; Jia, Qin-An; Dong, Yin-Ying; Xia, Yun-Hong; Ye, Sheng-Long

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and their paracrine secretions, on hepatocellular cancer cell growth and gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Differentially expressed genes in McA-RH7777 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells following non-contact co-culture with activated stellate cells, were identified by a cDNA microarray. The effect of the co-injection of HCC cells and activated HSCs on tumor size in rats was also investigated. Non-contact co-culture altered the expression of 573 HCC genes by >2-fold of the control levels. Among the six selected genes, ELISA revealed increased protein levels of hepatic growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9). Incubation of HCC cells with medium conditioned by activated HSCs significantly increased the proliferation rate (P<0.001), migration rate and the number of invasive HCC cells (P=0.001). Co-injection of HCC cells and activated HSCs into rats significantly increased the weight of the resulting HCC tumors (P<0.01). The paracrine activity of activated HSCs markedly altered the gene expression profile of HCC cells and affected their growth, migration and invasiveness. The results from the present study indicate that the interaction between the activated HSCs and HCC has an important role in the development of HCC.

  7. DLC-1 operates as a tumor suppressor gene in human non-small cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bao-Zhu; Jefferson, Amy M; Baldwin, Kimberly T; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Popescu, Nicholas C; Reynolds, Steven H

    2004-02-19

    The deleted in liver cancer (DLC-1) gene at chromosome 8p21-22 is altered mainly by genomic deletion or aberrant promoter methylation in a large number of human cancers such as breast, liver, colon and prostate and is known to have an inhibitory effect on breast and liver tumor cell growth. Given the high frequency of deletion involving region 8p21-22 in human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), we examined alterations of DLC-1 in a series of primary tumors and tumor cell lines and tested effects of DLC-1 on tumor cell growth. A significant decrease or absence of the DLC-1 mRNA expression was found in 95% of primary NSCLC (20/21) and 58% of NSCLC cell lines (11/19). Transcriptional silencing of DLC-1 was primarily associated with aberrant DNA methylation, rather than genomic deletion as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine induced reactivation of DLC-1 expression in 82% (9/11) NSCLC cell lines showing downregulated DLC-1. It was further evidenced by an aberrant DLC-1 promoter methylation pattern, which was detected by Southern blotting in 73% (8/11) of NSCLC cell lines with downregulation of the gene. The transfer of DLC-1 into three DLC-1 negative cell lines caused a significant inhibition in cell proliferation and/or a decrease in colony formation. Furthermore, stable transfer of DLC-1 abolished tumorigenicity in nude mice of two cell lines, suggesting that DLC-1 plays a role in NSCLC by acting as a bona fide new tumor suppressor gene.

  8. Clinical Implications of FADD Gene Amplification and Protein Overexpression in Taiwanese Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Huei-Tzu; Cheng, Sou-De; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Wang, Hung-Ming; Huang, Shiang-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of 11q13.3 is a frequent event in human cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. This chromosome region contains several genes that are potentially cancer drivers, including FADD (Fas associated via death domain), an apoptotic effector that was previously identified as a novel oncogene in laryngeal/pharyngeal cancer. This study was designed to explore the role of FADD in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) samples from Taiwanese patients, by assessing copy number variations (CNVs) and protein expression and the clinical implications of these factors in 339 male OSCCs. The intensity of FADD protein expression, as determined by immunohistochemistry, was strongly correlated with gene copy number amplification, as analyzed using a TaqMan CNV assay. Both FADD gene copy number amplification and high protein expression were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). Patients with both FADD copy number amplification and high protein expression had the shortest disease-free survival (DFS; P = 0.074 and P = 0.002) and overall survival (OS; P = 0.011 and P = 0.027). After adjusting for primary tumor status, tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis and age at diagnosis, DFS was still significantly lower in patients with either copy number amplification or high protein expression (hazard ratio [H.R.] = 1.483; 95% confidence interval [C.I.], 1.044–2.106). In conclusion, our data reveal that FADD gene copy number and protein expression can be considered potential prognostic markers and are closely associated with lymph node metastasis in patients with OSCC in Taiwan. PMID:27764170

  9. Impact of thawing on reference gene expression stability in renal cell carcinoma samples.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Dai, HuiLi; Kong, XianMing; Wang, LiMin

    2012-09-01

    More and more samples are obtained from biobanks for biomedical research; however, some of these samples may undergo thawing before processing. We aim to evaluate the reference gene expression stability in thawed renal cell carcinoma samples. Sixteen matched malignant and nonmalignant renal tissue samples were obtained and each sample was divided into 4 aliquots before being snap frozen and stored at -80°C. By quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, a time-course study was conducted on the thawed tissue to evaluate the expression stability of a panel of the 10 most frequently used reference genes in renal cell carcinom samples: ACTB, ALAS1, B2M, GAPDH, HMBS, HPRT, PPIA, RPLP0,TBP, and TUBB. As shown by geNorm M values, PPIA was the most stable gene at the 0-, 15-, and 30-minute time points (M=0.82, 0.85, and 0.76, respectively), whereas GAPDH was ranked last at the 5-, 15-, and 30-minute time points (M=1.38, 1.44, and 1.39, respectively). A positive correlation was found by linear regression between the thawing time and 2 to the power of crossing point values of all candidate reference genes (P<0.05). The mean coefficient of variance of all reference genes increased significantly at time points 5, 15, and 30 minutes compared with 0 minutes (P<0.01). In conclusion, using the geNorm algorithm, PPIA was identified as the most stably expressed gene between malignant and nonmalignant renal tissue samples that were thawed for similar time periods. All the reference genes showed high variations along with the thawing time; it should be recommended to use a combination of several candidate reference genes when comparing samples thawed for different time periods.

  10. A Gene Encoding Antigenic Peptides of Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shichijo, Shigeki; Nakao, Masanobu; Imai, Yasuhisa; Takasu, Hideo; Kawamoto, Mayumi; Niiya, Fumihiko; Yang, Damu; Toh, Yuji; Yamana, Hideaki; Itoh, Kyogo

    1998-01-01

    Except for melanomas, tumor antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are yet unidentified. We have identified a gene encoding antigenic peptides of human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) recognized by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)- A2601–restricted CTLs. This gene showed no similarity to known sequences, and encoded two (125- and 43-kilodalton [kD]) proteins. The 125-kD protein with the leucine zipper motif was expressed in the nucleus of the majority of proliferating cells tested, including normal and malignant cells. The 43-kD protein was expressed in the cytosol of most SCCs from various organs and half of lung adenocarcinomas, but was not expressed in other cancers nor in a panel of normal tissues. The three nonapeptides shared by the two proteins were recognized by the KE4 CTLs, and one of the peptides induced in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) the CTLs restricted to the autologous tumor cells. The 43-kD protein and this nonapeptide (KGSGKMKTE) may be useful for the specific immunotherapy of HLA-A2601+ epithelial cancer patients. PMID:9449708

  11. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  12. Renal cell carcinoma risk is associated with the interactions of APOE, VHL and MTHFR gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Cai; Bai, Zhiming; Liu, Zhenxiang; Luo, Pengcheng; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study was designed to explore the association of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with VHL (rs779805), MTHFR (rs1801133) and APOE (rs8106822 and rs405509) polymorphisms, investigate the interactions among the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and explore roles of the interactions in the pathogenesis of RCC in Chinese Han population. Methods: 81 RCC patients and 80 healthy controls were included in the study. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing methods were used in the analysis on the genotypes of APOE, VHL and MTHFR gene polymorphisms. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method was adopted to conduct gene-gene interaction analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were utilized to evaluate the correlation between gene-gene interactions and RCC risk. Results: Significant correlations were found between RCC risk and 3 SNPs (rs8106822, rs779805 and rs1801133). Genotype AA and allele A of APOE rs8106822 were significantly associated with RCC susceptibility (OR=2.65, 95% CI=1.05-6.69). Meanwhile, we found that the frequencies of genotype GG and allele G were much higher in case group, compared with controls (P<0.05 for both) and they appeared to be risk factors for RCC (OR=2.90, 95% CI=1.22-6.87; OR=1.78, 95% CI=1.14-2.27). While, allele T of MTHFR rs1801133 could decrease the risk of RCC (OR=0.62, 95% CI=0.40-0.97). MDR analysis showed that gene-gene interactions among APOE, VHL and MTHFR SNPs were closely related with RCC susceptibility. Conclusion: APOE, VHL and MTHFR gene polymorphisms were related to the risk of RCC. The interactions among APOE, VHL and MTHFR genes could increase the risk of RCC. PMID:26191297

  13. The role of HOX genes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Platais, Christopher; Hakami, Fahad; Darda, Lav; Lambert, Daniel W; Morgan, Richard; Hunter, Keith D

    2016-04-01

    Recent decades have witnessed the publication of numerous studies reporting alterations in the genome and transcriptome of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Currently, the utilisation of these alterations as biomarkers and targets for therapy is limited and new, useful molecular characteristics are being sought. Many of the published HNSCC gene expression profiles demonstrate alterations in the expression of HOX genes. These are a family of Homeobox-containing genes which are involved in developmental patterning and morphogenesis in the embryo, and which are often aberrantly expressed in cancer. The 39 HOX genes found in the human genome are arranged in four paralogous groups at different chromosomal loci. These control a wide range of cellular processes, including proliferation and migration, which are relevant in the context of cancer development. In this review article, we will outline the biology of HOX genes in relation to cancer and summarise the accumulating evidence for their role in the development of HNSCC and the possibility that they could be a therapeutic target in this malignancy. We will also identify areas where our current understanding is weak to focus future work and appraise the ongoing strategies for pharmacological intervention.

  14. Differential regulation of papilloma virus early gene expression in transformed fibroblasts and carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, E; Dietrich, W; Pfister, H

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of bovine papilloma virus (BPV) 1-transformed mouse fibroblasts with cycloheximide led to a 10-fold increase in the amount of viral transcripts, after as little as 1 h of protein synthesis inhibition. Northern blots revealed no qualitative changes in the RNA pattern. Nuclear run-on experiments showed about a 7-fold increase in specific transcriptional activity after cycloheximide treatment. The half-life of BPV1 mRNA was twice as long as in untreated controls. These results indicate that both RNA synthesis and degradation of viral RNA are controlled by labile proteins. Cycloheximide stimulation turned out to be independent of the BPV1 E2 gene activity which enhances viral transcription. Cycloheximide treatment had no effect on the amount of human papilloma virus (HPV) 18 transcripts in cervical carcinoma derived HeLa and C4-1 cells. Transcription of HPV16 in the cervical carcinoma line SiHa was likewise unaffected. The differential regulation of transcription in transformed fibroblasts and cancer-derived cells, and the significance for malignant conversion are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3019673

  15. Gene and miRNA expression changes in squamous cell carcinoma of larynx and hypopharynx

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Jayalakshmi; Jain, Prachi; Chandola, Udita; Palve, Vinayak; Vardhan, N R. Harsha; Reddy, Ram Bhupal; Kekatpure, Vikram D.; Suresh, Amritha; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham; Panda, Binay

    2015-01-01

    Laryngo-pharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas are one of the most common head and neck cancers. Despite the presence of a large body of information, molecular biomarkers are not currently used in the diagnosis, treatment and management of patients for this group of cancer. Here, we have profiled expression of genes and microRNAs of larynx and hypopharynx tumors using high-throughput sequencing experiments. We found that matrix metalloproteinases along with SCEL, CRNN, KRT4, SPINK5, and TGM3 among others have significantly altered expression in these tumors. Alongside gene expression, the microRNAs hsa-miR-139, hsa-miR-203 and the hsa-miR-424/503 cluster have aberrant expression in these cancers. Using target genes for these microRNAs, we found the involvement of pathways linked to cell cycle, p53 signaling, and viral carcinogenesis significant (P-values 10−13, 10−9 and 10−7 respectively). Finally, using an ensemble machine-learning tool, we discovered a unique 8-gene signature for this group of cancers that differentiates the group from the other tumor subsites of head and neck region. We investigated the role of promoter methylation in one of these genes, WIF1, and found no correlation between DNA methylation and down-regulation of WIF1. We validated our findings of gene expression, 8-gene signature and promoter methylation using q-PCR, data from TCGA and q-MSP respectively. Data presented in this manuscript has been submitted to the NCBI Geo database with the accession number GSE67994. PMID:26413216

  16. Induction of carcinoma cell migration on vitronectin by NF-kappa B-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Yebra, M; Filardo, E J; Bayna, E M; Kawahara, E; Becker, J C; Cheresh, D A

    1995-01-01

    Integrin alpha v beta 5 promotes FG carcinoma cell adhesion to vitronectin yet requires protein kinase C (PKC) activation for migration on this ligand. Here we report that this PKC-dependent cell motility event requires NF-kappaB-dependent transcription. Specifically, a component within nuclear extracts prepared from PKC-stimulated FG cells exhibited a significant increase in binding activity to a synthetic oligonucleotide containing a consensus kappa B sequence. These nuclear DNA-binding complexes were shown to be comprised of p65 and p50 NF-kappaB/rel family members and appeared functionally active because they promoted transcription of a reporter construct containing a kappa B site. The NF-kappa B activation event was directly linked to the alpha v beta 5 motility response because the NF-kappa B-binding oligonucleotide, when introduced into FG cells, inhibited cell migration on vitronectin but not on collagen and had no effect on cell adhesion to either ligand. These results suggest that the detected DNA-binding complexes interact with kappa B transcriptional elements to regulate gene expression required for alpha v beta 5-dependent cell motility on vitronectin. Images PMID:7579698

  17. Double stranded-RNA-mediated activation of P21 gene induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Whitson, Jared M; Noonan, Emily J; Pookot, Deepa; Place, Robert F; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2014-01-01

    Small double stranded RNAs (dsRNA) are a new class of molecules which regulate gene expression. Accumulating data suggest that some dsRNA can function as tumor suppressors. Here we report further evidence on the potential of dsRNA mediated p21 induction. Using the human renal cell carcinoma cell line A498, we found that dsRNA targeting the p21 promoter significantly induced the expression of p21 mRNA and protein levels. As a result, dsP21 transfected cells had a significant decrease in cell viability with a concomitant G1 arrest. We also observed a significant increase in apoptosis. These findings were associated with a significant decrease in survivin mRNA and protein levels. This is the first report that demonstrates dsRNA mediated gene activation in renal cell carcinoma and suggests that forced over-expression of p21 may lead to an increase in apoptosis through a survivin dependent mechanism. PMID:19384944

  18. Double stranded-RNA-mediated activation of P21 gene induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Whitson, Jared M; Noonan, Emily J; Pookot, Deepa; Place, Robert F; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2009-07-15

    Small double stranded RNAs (dsRNA) are a new class of molecules which regulate gene expression. Accumulating data suggest that some dsRNA can function as tumor suppressors. Here, we report further evidence on the potential of dsRNA mediated p21 induction. Using the human renal cell carcinoma cell line A498, we found that dsRNA targeting the p21 promoter significantly induced the expression of p21 mRNA and protein levels. As a result, dsP21 transfected cells had a significant decrease in cell viability with a concomitant G1 arrest. We also observed a significant increase in apoptosis. These findings were associated with a significant decrease in survivin mRNA and protein levels. This is the first report that demonstrates dsRNA mediated gene activation in renal cell carcinoma and suggests that forced over-expression of p21 may lead to an increase in apoptosis through a survivin dependent mechanism.

  19. The network of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SONG, CHENGLU; XU, ZHIWEN; JIN, YUE; ZHU, MINGHUI; WANG, KUNHAO; WANG, NING

    2015-01-01

    At present, scientists have performed numerous studies investigating the morbidity of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the genetic and microRNA (miRNA) fields, obtaining a substantial amount of knowledge. However, the experimentally validated data of genes, miRNA and transcription factors (TFs) cannot be found in a unified form, which makes it challenging to decipher the regulatory mechanisms. In the present study, the genes, miRNAs and TFs involved in RCC are regarded as elements in the regulatory network, and the present study therefore focuses on the association between each entity. Three regulatory networks were constructed hierarchically to indicate the regulatory association between the genes, miRNAs and TFs clearly, including the differentially expressed, associated and global networks. All the elements were macroscopically investigated in these networks, instead of only investigating one or several of them. The present study not only compared and analyzed the similarities and the differences between the three networks, but also systematically expounded the pathogenesis of RCC and supplied theoretical foundations for future gene therapy investigations. Following the construction of the three networks, certain important pathways were highlighted. The upstream and downstream element table of differentially expressed genes and miRNAs was listed, in which self-adaption associations and circle-regulations were identified. In future studies, the identified genes and miRNAs should be granted more attention. PMID:25436016

  20. Identification of differentially expressed genes in HPV-positive and HPV-negative oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ivan; Wang, Jun; Hobson, Kenosha F.; Ferris, Robert L.; Khan, Saleem A.

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a subset of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The goal of this study was to compare the cellular gene expression profiles of HPV-positive and HPV-negative oropharyngeal carcinomas with those of the normal oral epithelium. Using Affymetrix Human U133A GeneChip, our results showed that 397 genes were differentially expressed in HPV-positive SCCHN compared to the normal oral epithelium. The up-regulated genes included those involved in cell cycle regulation (CDKN2A), cell differentiation (SFRP4) and DNA repair (RAD51AP1), while the down-regulated genes included those involved in proteolysis (PRSS3). We also found 162 differentially expressed genes in HPV-negative SCCHN compared to the normal oral mucosa. The up-regulated genes included those involved in cell proliferation (AKR1C3) and transcription regulation (SNAPC1), while down-regulated genes included those involved in apoptosis (CLU) and RNA processing (RBM3). Our studies also identified a subgroup of 59 differentially expressed genes in HPV-positive SCCHN as compared to both HPV-negative SCCHN and normal oral tissues. Such up-regulated genes included those involved in nuclear structure and meiosis (SYCP2), DNA repair (RFC5), and transcription regulation (ZNF238). Genes involved in proteolysis (KLK8) and signal transduction (CRABP2) were found to be down-regulated in HPV-positive SCCHN. The results of GeneChip experiments were validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis of a few representative genes. Our results reveal specific gene expression patterns in HPV-positive and HPV-negative oropharyngeal squamous carcinomas that may serve as potential biomarkers for the development of SCCHN. PMID:17079134

  1. Cell-specific expression of artificial microRNAs targeting essential genes exhibit potent antitumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chenyu; Liu, Hao; Chen, Ping; Ye, Jingjia; Teng, Lisong; Jia, Zhenyu; Cao, Jiang

    2015-03-20

    To achieve specific and potent antitumor effect of hepatocyte carcinoma cells, replication defective adenoviral vectors, namely rAd/AFP-amiRG, rAd/AFP-amiRE and rAd/AFP-amiRP, were constructed which were armed with artificial microRNAs (amiRs) targeting essential functional genes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E and DNA polymerase α respectively under the control of a recombinant promoter comprised of human α-fetoprotein enhancer and basal promoter. The AFP enhancer/promoter showed specific high transcription activity in AFP-positive HCC cells Hep3B, HepG2 and SMMC7721, while low in AFP-negative cell Bcap37. All artificial microRNAs exhibited efficient knockdown of target genes. Decreased ATP production and protein synthesis was observed in rAd/AFP-amiRG and rAd/AFP-amiRE treated HCC cells. All three recombinant adenoviruses showed efficient blockage of cell cycle progression and significant suppression of HCC cells in vitro. In nude mice model bearing Hep3B xenograft, administration of rAd/AFP-amiRG showed potent antitumor effect. The strategy of tumor-specific knockdown of genes essential for cell survival and proliferation may suggest a novel promising approach for HCC gene therapy.

  2. Immunotherapy for Lewis lung carcinoma utilizing dendritic cells infected with CK19 gene recombinant adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Q.F.; ZHAO, X.N.; PENG, C.L.; HAO, Y.T.; ZHAO, Y.P.; JIANG, N.; XUE, H.; GUO, J.Z.; YUN, C.H.; CONG, B.; ZHAO, X.G.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) as 'professional' antigen-presenting cells (APCs) initiate and regulate immune responses to various antigens. DC-based vaccines have become a promising modality in cancer immunotherapy. Cytokeratin 19 (CK19) protein is expressed at high levels in lung cancer and many other tumor cells, suggesting CK19 as a potential tumor-specific target for cancer immune therapy. We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CK19 gene (rAd-CK19). DCs transfected with rAd-CK19 were used to vaccinate C57BL/6 mice bearing xenografts derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. The transfected DCs gave rise to potent CK19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) capable of lysing LLC cells. Mice immunized with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited significantly attenuated tumor growth (including tumor volume and weight) when compared to the tumor growth of mice immunized with rAd-c DCs or DCs during the 24-day observation period (P<0.05). The results revealed that the mice vaccinated with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited a potent protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity to LLC cells in the subcutaneous model along with an inhibitive effect on tumor growth compared to the mice vaccinated with the rAd-c DCs or DCs alone. The present study proposes a meaningful mode of action utilizing rAd-CK19 DCs in lung cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26323510

  3. Tyrosine kinase domain mutations of EGFR gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vatte, Chittibabu; Al Amri, Ali M; Cyrus, Cyril; Chathoth, Shahanas; Acharya, Sadananda; Hashim, Tariq Mohammad; Al Ali, Zhara; Alshreadah, Saleh Tawfeeq; Alsayyah, Ahmed; Al-Ali, Amein K

    2017-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a commonly altered gene that is identified in various cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Therefore, EGFR is a promising molecular marker targeted by monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the tyrosine kinase (TK) domain. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the spectrum of mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene in HNSCC patients. Materials and methods This retrospective study included 47 confirmed HNSCC cases. Mutations in the TK domain, exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene, were detected by Scorpion® chemistry and ARMS® technologies on Rotor-Gene Q real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The tumors exhibited EGFR-TK domain mutations in 57% of cases. Four cases of T790M mutations were reported for the first time among HNSCC patients. Out of the total mutations, L861Q (exon 21), exon 20 insertions and deletions of exon 19 accounted for the majority of mutations (21%, 19%, and 17%, respectively). EGFR mutation status was correlated with the higher grade (P=0.026) and advanced stage (P=0.034) of HNSCC tumors. Conclusion Higher frequency of EGFR-TK domain mutations together with the presence of the T790M mutation suggests that identification of these mutations might streamline the therapy and provide a better prognosis in HNSCC cases. PMID:28352186

  4. Role of PTCH and p53 genes in early-onset basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Ping, X L; Lee, P K; Wu, X L; Yao, Y J; Zhang, M J; Silvers, D N; Ratner, D; Malhotra, R; Peacocke, M; Tsou, H C

    2001-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer in the Western world. Ultraviolet (UV) exposure, race, age, gender, and decreased DNA repair capacity are known risk factors for the development of BCC. Of these, UVB irradiation from sunlight is the most significant risk factor. The incidence of sporadic BCC increases in individuals older than age 55, with the greatest incidence reported in individuals who are older than 70, and is rare in individuals who are younger than 30. In this study, we analyzed 24 BCC samples from individuals who had BCC diagnosed by the age of 30. Fifteen single-stranded conformation polymorphism variants in the PTCH gene were identified in 13 BCC samples. Sequence analysis of these single-stranded conformation polymorphism variants revealed 13 single nucleotide changes, one AT insertion, and one 15-bp deletion. Most of these nucleotide changes (nine of 15) were predicted to result in truncated PTCH proteins. Fifteen p53 mutations were also found in 11 of the 24 BCC samples. Thirty-three percent (five of 15) and 60% (nine of 15) of the nucleotide changes in the PTCH and p53 genes, respectively, were UV-specific C-->T and CC-->TT nucleotide changes. Our data demonstrate that the p53 and PTCH genes are both implicated in the development of early-onset BCC. The identification of UV-specific nucleotide changes in both tumor suppressor genes suggests that UV exposure is an important risk factor in early onset of BCC.

  5. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2013-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. PMID:24076275

  6. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes.

  7. Differentially methylated genes and androgen receptor re-expression in small cell prostate carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kleb, Brittany; Estécio, Marcos R H; Zhang, Jiexin; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Chung, Woonbok; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Navone, Nora M; Tahir, Salahaldin; Marquez, Victor E; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Maity, Sankar; Aparicio, Ana

    2016-03-03

    Small cell prostate carcinoma (SCPC) morphology is rare at initial diagnosis but often emerges during prostate cancer progression and portends a dismal prognosis. It does not express androgen receptor (AR) or respond to hormonal therapies. Clinically applicable markers for its early detection and treatment with effective chemotherapy are needed. Our studies in patient tumor-derived xenografts (PDX) revealed that AR-negative SCPC (AR(-)SCPC) expresses neural development genes instead of the prostate luminal epithelial genes characteristic of AR-positive castration-resistant adenocarcinomas (AR(+)ADENO). We hypothesized that the differences in cellular lineage programs are reflected in distinct epigenetic profiles. To address this hypothesis, we compared the DNA methylation profiles of AR(-) and AR(+) PDX using methylated CpG island amplification and microarray (MCAM) analysis and identified a set of differentially methylated promoters, validated in PDX and corresponding donor patient samples. We used the Illumina 450K platform to examine additional regions of the genome and the correlation between the DNA methylation profiles of the PDX and their corresponding patient tumors. Struck by the low frequency of AR promoter methylation in the AR(-)SCPC, we investigated this region's specific histone modification patterns by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We found that the AR promoter was enriched in silencing histone modifications (H3K27me3 and H3K9me2) and that EZH2 inhibition with 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) resulted in AR expression and growth inhibition in AR(-)SCPC cell lines. We conclude that the epigenome of AR(-) is distinct from that of AR(+) castration-resistant prostate carcinomas, and that the AR(-) phenotype can be reversed with epigenetic drugs.

  8. Growth differentiation factor-15: a p53- and demethylation-upregulating gene represses cell proliferation, invasion, and tumorigenesis in bladder carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Ke-Hung; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Chung, Li-Chuan; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Lee, Tzu-Yi; Chang, Phei-Lang; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2015-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF15), a member of the TGF-β superfamily, affects tumor biology of certain cancers, but remains poorly understood in bladder cancer cells. This study determined the expression, regulation, function, and potential downstream target genes of GDF15 in bladder carcinoma cells. The transitional papilloma carcionoma cells (RT4) expressed higher levels of GDF15 as compared with the bladder carcinoma cells (HT1376 and T24). Treatments of recombinant human GDF15 (rhGDF15) reduced the proliferations of HT1376 and T24 cells. Expression of GDF15 was upregulated via DNA demethylation and p53. The cell proliferation, invasion, and tumorigenesis were reduced in ectopic overexpression of GDF15, while enhanced in GDF15 knockdown. The expressions of mammary serine protease inhibitor (MASPIN) and N-myc downstream-regulated family genes (NDRG1, NDRG2, and NDRG3) were upregulated by GDF15 overexpressions and rhGDF15 treatments in bladder carcinoma cells. GDF15 knockdown induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and F-actin polarization in HT1376 cells. Our results suggest that enhanced expressions of MASPIN and N-myc downstream-regulated family genes and the modulation of EMT may account for the inhibitory functions of GDF15 in the cell proliferation, invasion, and tumorigenesis of bladder carcinoma cells. The GDF15 should be considered as a tumor suppressor in human bladder carcinoma cells. PMID:26249737

  9. Celastrol blocks interleukin-6 gene expression via downregulation of NF-κB in prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chung, Li-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chen, Wen-Tsung; Chang, Phei-Lang; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a multifunctional cytokine, contributes to proliferation or differentiation of prostate carcinoma cells in a highly cell type-specific manner. Celastrol (3-hydroxy-24-nor-2oxo-1(10),3,5,7-friedelatetrane-29-oic acid), also named as tripterine, is extracted from root of Chinese traditional herb Tripterygiumwilfordii Hook f with potent anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. In this study, we evaluated the molecular mechanisms of celastrol on cell proliferation and IL-6 gene expression in prostate carcinoma cells. 3H-thymidine incorporation and flow cytometric analysis indicated that celastrol treatments arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, thus attenuating cell proliferation in prostate carcinoma PC-3 cells; moreover, celastrol induced cell apoptosis at higher dosage. Knockdown of IL-6 attenuated the anti-proliferative effect of celastrol on PC-3 cells. Results from ELISA and 5'-deletion transient gene expression assays indicated that celastrol treatment decreased IL-6 secretion and gene expression, and this effect is dependent on the NF-κB response element within IL-6 promoter area since mutation of the NF-κB response element from AAATGTCCCATTTTCCC to AAATGTTACATTTTCCC by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the inhibition of celastrol on the IL-6 promoter activity. Celastrol also attenuated the activation of PMA and TNFα on the gene expression and secretion of IL-6 in PC-3 cells. Immunoblot assays revealed that celastrol treatment downregulated the expressions of IKKα, p50 and p65, supporting the 5'-deletion transient gene expression assay result that celastrol blocked IL-6 expression through the NF-κB pathway in PC-3 cells. For the first time, our results concluded that celastrol attenuates PC-3 cell proliferation via downregulation of IL-6 gene expression through the NF-κB-dependent pathway.

  10. Screening and identification of distant metastasis-related differentially expressed genes in human squamous cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Zhou, Fachen; Xiong, Hai; Du, Sha; Ma, Jianwei; Okai, Issac; Wang, Jian; Suo, Jing; Hao, Lihong; Song, Yang; Hu, Jun; Shao, Shujuan

    2012-05-01

    Distant metastasis is one of the leading causes of lung cancer death. Detecting the early-stage molecular alternations in primary tumors, such as gene expression differences, provides a "prognostic" value to the precaution of tumor metastasis. The aim of this article is to screen and identify the metastasis-related genes in human squamous cell lung carcinoma. Primary tumor tissues of nine patients with subsequent metastasis and eight patients without metastasis were selected to perform the gene microarray experiment. GO and pathway analyses were used to determine the differentially expressed genes. Two identified genes were further validated by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (real-time qRT-PCR). Two hundred and thirty-eight differentially expressed genes were detected in gene chip experiment, including 51 up-regulated genes and 187 down-regulated genes. These genes were involved in several cellular processes, including cell adhesion, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis. GO analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes participated in a wide ranging of metastasis-related processes, including extracellular region and regulation of liquid surface tension. In addition, pathway analysis demonstrated that the differentially expressed genes were enriched in pathways related to cell cycle and Wnt signaling. Real-time qRT-PCR validation experiment of LCN2 and PDZK1IP1 showed a consistent up-regulation in the metastasis group. The metastasis of human squamous cell lung carcinoma is a complex process that is regulated by multiple gene alternations on the expression levels. The 238 differentially expressed genes identified in this study presumably contain a core set of genes involved in tumor metastasis. The real-time qRT-PCR results of PDZK1IP1 and LCN2 validated the reliability of this gene microarray experiment.

  11. Altered expression of SIRT gene family in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chi-Chih; Lin, Pai-Mei; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Hsu, Cheng-Hsien; Lin, Hsin-Ching; Hu, Ming-Luen; Hsu, Cheng-Ming; Yang, Ming-Yu

    2013-06-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) include a group of malignant neoplasms that arise from the upper aerodigestive tract and represent the seventh most common cause of cancer-related death. The overall 5-year survival rates have not significantly improved for decades in spite of the advances in the field of oncology and surgery, encouraging further research on factors that might modify disease prognosis. The silent information regulator (SIR) genes (Sirtuins) play key roles in cellular stress and are associated with aging-related diseases including cancer. Currently, seven human sirtuin (SIRT1-7) genes have been identified, but the roles of SIRT genes in HNSCC are still uncertain. Therefore, in this study, we used real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to investigate the expressions of the seven SIRT genes in human HNSCC tissues to assess the changes in cancerous and noncancerous parts and the correlation with different tumor behaviors. Our results demonstrated that the expression levels of SIRT1, SIRT2, SIRT3, SIRT5, SIRT6, and SIRT7 were significantly downregulated in cancerous tissues compared with noncancerous tissues (all p<0.01). The expression levels of SIRT1, SIRT2, SIRT3, SIRT5, and SIRT7 showed downregulation in advanced stages in respect to early stages (p<0.05). These results indicate that the downregulation of SIRT genes expression may contribute to the development of cancer and trigger the neoplastic disease to more advanced stages. Our study indicates that SIRT genes expression could help in the diagnosis and represent a prognostic biomarker in HNSCC.

  12. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  13. Identification of differentially expressed genes in salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma cells associated with metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing-Yao; Zhang, Xiang; Zhao, Xiao-Ge; Cao, Gang; Dong, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) is a frequent type of salivary gland cancer which is characterized by slow growth but high incidence of distant metastasis. We aimed to identify therapeutic targets which are associated with metastasis of SACC. Material and methods Total RNA was isolated from a low metastatic SACC cell line (ACC-2) and a highly metastatic SACC cell line (ACC-M), which was screened from ACC-2 by combination of in vivo selection and cloning in vitro. Then the total RNA was subjected to microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened from ACC-M compared with ACC-2, followed by Gene Ontology function and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. Function annotation for DEGs also was performed. A protein-protein interaction network (PPI) was constructed for DEGs. Results A total of 1128 DEGs were identified from ACC-M cells compared with ACC-2 cells. Both up- and down-regulated DEGs were enriched in different functions in biological process (BP), cellular component (CC) and molecular function (MF). Additionally, down-regulated DEGs were mainly enriched in “Apoptosis” and “Cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction” pathways which involved IFN-α1, NTRK1 and TGF-β1. In the PPI network, PIK3CA, PTPN11 and PIK3R1 had a number of nodes greater than 10. Conclusions Transforming growth factor β1 might play a pivotal role during lung metastasis of SACC and be selected as a candidate target for treatment of metastatic SACC. IFNA1, NTRK1 and PIK3CA were also associated with tumor metastasis. PMID:27478471

  14. Correlation analysis of VHL and Jade-1 gene expression in human renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiao-fen, Wu; Ting, Chen; Jie, Li; Deng-yang, Ma; Qing-feng, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL) mRNA expression and jade family PHD finger 1 (Jade-1) gene expression in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Another aim of this study was to analyze the relationship of these two genes with clinicalpathological features of the RCC patients. Methods A total of 75 RCC patients who received surgically therapy in our hospital were included. All patients had complete pathological data. The expression of VHL/Jade-1 was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results VHL and Jade-1 were both obviously downregulated in RCC tissues than that of the matched normal tissues, and both negatively correlated with tumor size as well as tumor grade. And we found a fine association of VHL gene expression with Jade-1. Conclusion VHL/Jade-1 exhibited significantly decreased expression in RCC tissues and was closely related to the clinical prognosis of patients. The finding of VHL expression positively correlated with Jade-1 expression shed light and provided crucial evidence on the connection of VHL protein with Wnt/b-catenin pathway. PMID:28352799

  15. Functional effect of point mutations in the alpha-folate receptor gene of CABA I ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, F; Miotti, S; Galmozzi, E; Mazzi, M; Sforzini, S; Canevari, S; Tomassetti, A

    2001-01-01

    The alpha-folate receptor (alpha FR) is overexpressed in 90% of nonmucinous ovarian carcinomas. In addition to the known role of alpha FR binding and mediating the internalization of folates, functional interaction of alpha FR with signaling molecules was recently shown. To identify a model to study the role of alpha FR in ovarian carcinoma, we characterized the alpha FR gene in the ovarian carcinoma cell line CABA I in comparison to a reference line, IGROV1. In CABA I cells, Northern blot analysis revealed an alpha FR transcript of the expected length and FACS analysis indicated receptor expression on the cell membrane; however, RNase protection assay revealed no specific signals. Southern blot and genomic PCR analysis suggested the presence of a rearrangement(s) involving the 5' region of the gene in CABA I cells as compared to IGROV1 cells. Cloning and sequencing of CABA I alpha FR cDNA revealed several point mutations. The partitioning of alpha FR in membrane microdomains from CABA I cells and its association with regulatory molecules was comparable to that of IGROV1 cells. By contrast, the alpha FR expressed on the CABA I cell membrane bound folic acid with lower affinity, and ectopic expression of the corresponding cDNA in CHO cells confirmed impaired folic acid binding. Thus, CABA I cells may provide a tool to delineate functional domains of the alpha FR.

  16. Polymorphisms in cell cycle regulatory genes, urinary arsenic profile and urothelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.-J.; Huang, C.-J.; Pu, Y.-S.; Su, C.-T.; Huang, Y.-K.; Chen, Y.-T.; Hsueh, Y.-M.

    2008-10-15

    Introduction: Polymorphisms in p53, p21 and CCND1 could regulate the progression of the cell cycle and might increase the susceptibility to inorganic arsenic-related cancer risk. The goal of our study was to evaluate the roles of cell cycle regulatory gene polymorphisms in the carcinogenesis of arsenic-related urothelial carcinoma (UC). Methods: A hospital-based case-controlled study was conducted to explore the relationships among the urinary arsenic profile, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, p53 codon 72, p21 codon 31 and CCND1 G870A polymorphisms and UC risk. The urinary arsenic profile was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). 8-OHdG levels were measured by high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Genotyping was conducted using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymerase (PCR-RFLP). Results: Subjects carrying the p21 Arg/Arg genotype had an increased UC risk (age and gender adjusted OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.02-2.29). However, there was no association of p53 or CCND1 polymorphisms with UC risk. Significant effects were observed in terms of a combination of the three gene polymorphisms and a cumulative exposure of cigarette smoking, along with the urinary arsenic profile on the UC risk. The higher total arsenic concentration, monomethylarsonic acid percentage (MMA%) and lower dimethylarsinic acid percentage (DMA%), possessed greater gene variant numbers, had a higher UC risk and revealed significant dose-response relationships. However, effects of urinary 8-OHdG levels combined with three gene polymorphisms did not seem to be important for UC risk. Conclusions: The results showed that the variant genotype of p21 might be a predictor of inorganic arsenic-related UC risk.

  17. Genetic variants in sex hormone metabolic pathway genes and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Paula L.

    2013-01-01

    In China, esophageal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death where essentially all cases are histologically esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), in contrast to esophageal adenocarcinoma in the West. Globally, ESCC is 2.4 times more common among men than women and recently it has been suggested that sex hormones may be associated with the risk of ESCC. We examined the association between genetic variants in sex hormone metabolic genes and ESCC risk in a population from north central China with high-incidence rates. A total of 1026 ESCC cases and 1452 controls were genotyped for 797 unique tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 51 sex hormone metabolic genes. SNP-, gene- and pathway-based associations with ESCC risk were evaluated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and geographical location and the adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) method. Statistical significance was determined through use of permutation for pathway- and gene-based associations. No associations were observed for the overall sex hormone metabolic pathway (P = 0.14) or subpathways (androgen synthesis: P = 0.30, estrogen synthesis: P = 0.15 and estrogen removal: P = 0.19) with risk of ESCC. However, six individual genes (including SULT2B1, CYP1B1, CYP3A7, CYP3A5, SHBG and CYP11A1) were significantly associated with ESCC risk (P < 0.05). Our examination of genetic variation in the sex hormone metabolic pathway is consistent with a potential association with risk of ESCC. These positive findings warrant further evaluation in relation to ESCC risk and replication in other populations. PMID:23358850

  18. Protein and gene expression characteristics of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu-Lin; Liu, Fei; Liu, Fang; Zhao, Xiao-Hang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression characteristics of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRNPH1) mRNA and protein in cell lines and tissues of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS Western blotting was used to assess the expression of HNRNPH1 protein in seven ESCC cell lines and 30 paired fresh tissue specimens. The subcellular localization of HNRNPH1 was determined by immunofluorescence in ESCC cells. The RNA sequencing data from 87 patients with ESCC were obtained from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA), and the expression and clinical characteristics analysis of different transcript variants of HNRNPH1 were evaluated in this dataset. In addition, immunohistochemistry was carried out to detect the expression of HNRNPH1 protein in 125 patients. RESULTS The expression of HNRNPH1 protein varied across different ESCC cell lines. It was exclusively restricted to the nucleus of the ESCC cells. There are two transcript variants of the HNRNPH1 gene. Variant 1 was constitutively expressed, and its expression did not change during tumorigenesis. In contrast, levels of variant 2 were low in non-tumorous tissues and were dramatically increased in ESCC (P = 0.0026). The high levels of variant 2 were associated with poorer differentiated tumors (P = 0.0287). Furthermore, in paired fresh tissue specimens, HNRNPH1 protein was overexpressed in 73.3% (22/30) of neoplastic tissues. HNRNPH1 was significantly upregulated in ESCC, with strong staining in 43.2% (54/125) of tumor tissues and 22.4% (28/125) of matched non-cancerous tissues (P = 0.0005). Positive HNRNPH1 expression was significantly associated with poor tumor differentiation degree (P = 0.0337). CONCLUSION The different alternative transcript variants of HNRNPH1 exhibited different expression changes during tumorigenesis. Its mRNA and protein were overexpressed in ESCC and associated with poorer differentiation of tumor cells. These findings highlight the potential of HNRNPH1 in the therapy and diagnosis

  19. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Ryne C.; Cooper, Sara J.; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S.; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L.; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation. PMID:27574806

  20. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Ghatalia, Pooja; Yang, Eddy S; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Ramaker, Ryne C; Cooper, Sara J; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation.

  1. Increased expression of the PRL-3 gene in human oral squamous cell carcinoma and dysplasia tissues.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Nur Mohammad Monsur; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Kameyama, Takeshi; Tada, Mitsuhiro; Nakagawa, Koji; Yoshida, Shoko; Kashiwazaki, Haruhiko; Yamazaki, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yukiko; Sasaki, Akira; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Inoue, Nobuo; Moriuchi, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) belongs to a class of the protein tyrosine phosphatase family, which is known so far to consist of 3 members, PRL-1, PRL-2, and PRL-3. The aim of this study was to uncover the role of PRL genes in development of oral malignancy. We analyzed expression levels of the 3 PRL genes in 50 human oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs), 11 dysplasia and 12 normal mucosa tissues by a real-time RT-PCR method. PRL-3 but not PRL-1 or PRL-2 expressions were significantly higher in OSCC and dysplasia than in normal mucosa tissues. Additionally, PRL-3 expressions were significantly higher in OSCC tissues harboring dominant-negative p53 or recessive p53 mutation than in those harboring wild-type p53. These results suggest that PRL-3 plays a role in oral cancer development and can be useful as a marker of pre-malignant and malignant lesion of oral mucosa.

  2. Germline mutations of the PTCH gene in Japanese patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tanioka, Miki; Takahashi, Katsu; Kawabata, Tomohiro; Kosugi, Shinji; Murakami, Kenichiro; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Nishigori, Chikako; Iizuka, Tadahiko

    2005-01-01

    We identified seven novel germline mutations of the PTCH gene in eight unrelated Japanese patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). In order to ensure genetic diagnosis, all 23 coding exons of the PTCH gene were amplified from genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced. Mutations were found in all eight patients with NBCCS. The mutations detected in this study include one insertion/deletion mutation, one 1-bp insertion, two 1-bp deletions, one nonsense mutation and two missense mutations. None of the mutations have been previously reported. Five mutations caused premature stop codons that are predicted to result in a truncated protein. In the two missense mutations, the strong basic residue arginine was substituted by serine or glycine in highly conserved components of the putative transmembrane domain of PTCH, and these mutations may therefore affect the conformation and function of the PTCH protein. No phenotype-genotype relationships were found in the Japanese NBCCS patients, consistent with results of previous studies on NBCCS in African-American and Caucasian patients.

  3. Gene Expression and Proteome Analysis as Sources of Biomarkers in Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghita, Mihaela Adriana; Voiculescu, Suzana; Rosca, Adrian E.; Moraru, Liliana; Greabu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the world's leading skin cancer in terms of frequency at the moment and its incidence continues to rise each year, leading to profound negative psychosocial and economic consequences. UV exposure is the most important environmental factor in the development of BCC in genetically predisposed individuals, this being reflected by the anatomical distribution of lesions mainly on sun-exposed skin areas. Early diagnosis and prompt management are of crucial importance in order to prevent local tissue destruction and subsequent disfigurement. Although various noninvasive or minimal invasive techniques have demonstrated their utility in increasing diagnostic accuracy of BCC and progress has been made in its treatment options, recurrent, aggressive, and metastatic variants of BCC still pose significant challenge for the healthcare system. Analysis of gene expression and proteomic profiling of tumor cells and of tumoral microenvironment in various tissues strongly suggests that certain molecules involved in skin cancer pathogenic pathways might represent novel predictive and prognostic biomarkers in BCC. PMID:27578920

  4. SETD6 controls the expression of estrogen-responsive genes and proliferation of breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Daniel J; Williamson, Stuart Charles; Alkharaif, Dhuha; Monteiro, Isabella Christina Mazzaro; Goudreault, Marilyn; Gaughan, Luke; Robson, Craig N; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Binda, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The lysine methyltransferase SETD6 modifies the histone variant H2AZ, a key component of nuclear receptor-dependent transcription. Herein, we report the identification of several factors that associate with SETD6 and are implicated in nuclear hormone receptor signaling. Specifically, SETD6 associates with the estrogen receptor α (ERα), histone deacetylase HDAC1, metastasis protein MTA2, and the transcriptional co-activator TRRAP. Luciferase reporter assays identify SETD6 as a transcriptional repressor, in agreement with its association with HDAC1 and MTA2. However, SETD6 behaves as a co-activator of several estrogen-responsive genes, such as PGR and TFF1. Consistent with these results, silencing of SETD6 in several breast carcinoma cell lines induced cellular proliferation defects accompanied by enhanced expression of the cell cycle inhibitor CDKN1A and induction of apoptosis. Herein, we have identified several chromatin proteins that associate with SETD6 and described SETD6 as an essential factor for nuclear receptor signaling and cellular proliferation. PMID:24751716

  5. FGFR gene alterations in lung squamous cell carcinoma are potential targets for the multikinase inhibitor nintedanib.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Masaaki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Tanizaki, Junko; Sakai, Kazuko; Togashi, Yosuke; Terashima, Masato; De Velasco, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Banno, Eri; Nakamura, Yu; Takeda, Masayuki; Ito, Akihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Okamoto, Isamu; Nishio, Kazuto

    2016-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) gene alterations are relatively frequent in lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and are a potential targets for therapy with FGFR inhibitors. However, little is known regarding the clinicopathologic features associated with FGFR alterations. The angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib has shown promising activity in clinical trials for non-small cell lung cancer. We have now applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) to characterize FGFR alterations in LSCC patients as well as examined the antitumor activity of nintedanib in LSCC cell lines positive for FGFR1 copy number gain (CNG). The effects of nintedanib on the proliferation of and FGFR signaling in LSCC cell lines were examined in vitro, and its effects on tumor formation were examined in vivo. A total of 75 clinical LSCC specimens were screened for FGFR alterations by NGS. Nintedanib inhibited the proliferation of FGFR1 CNG-positive LSCC cell lines in association with attenuation of the FGFR1-ERK signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. FGFR1 CNG (10.7%), FGFR1 mutation (2.7%), FGFR2 mutation (2.7%), FGFR4 mutation (5.3%), and FGFR3 fusion (1.3%) were detected in LSCC specimens by NGS. Clinicopathologic features did not differ between LSCC patients positive or negative for FGFR alterations. However, among the 36 patients with disease recurrence after surgery, prognosis was significantly worse for those harboring FGFR alterations. Screening for FGFR alterations by NGS warrants further study as a means to identify patients with LSCC recurrence after surgery who might benefit from nintedanib therapy.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of microRNA-machinery genes modify the risk of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Horikawa, Yohei; Wood, Christopher G.; Yang, Hushan; Zhao, Hua; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Lin, Jie; Habuchi, Tomonori; Wu, Xifeng

    2008-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that have been implicated in a wide diversity of basic cellular functions through post-transcriptional regulations on their target genes. Compelling evidence has shown that miRNAs are involved in cancer initiation and progression. We hypothesized that genetic variations of the miRNA-machinery genes could be associated with the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Experimental Design We genotyped 40 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 11 miRNA processing genes (DROSHA, DGCR8, XPO5, RAN, DICER1, TARBP2, EIF2C1, AGO2, GEMIN3, GEMIN4, HIWI) and 15 miRNA genes in 279 Caucasian patients with RCC and 278 matched controls. Results We found that two SNPs in the GEMIN4 gene were significantly associated with altered RCC risks. The variant containing genotypes of the Asn929Asp and Cys1033Arg exhibited a significantly reduced risk with an odds ratio [OR] of 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47–0.96) and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.47–0.98), respectively. Haplotype analysis showed that a common haplotype of the GEMIN4 was associated with a significant reduce in risk of RCC (OR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.45–0.97). We also conducted a combined unfavorable genotype analysis including five promising SNPs showing at least a borderline significant risk association. Compared with the low-risk reference group within one unfavorable genotype, the median-risk and high-risk group exhibited a 1.55-fold (95% CI, 0.96–2.50) and a 2.49-fold (95% CI, 1.58–3.91) increased risk of RCC, respectively (P for trend <0.001). Conclusion Our results suggested that genetic polymorphisms of the miRNA-machinery genes may impact RCC susceptibility individually and jointly. PMID:19047128

  7. DNA methylation and histone modifications cause silencing of Wnt antagonist gene in human renal cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Ken; Hirata, Hiroshi; Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2008-08-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2) is a negative modulator of the Wingless-type (Wnt) signaling pathway, and shown to be inactivated in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the molecular mechanism of silencing of sFRP2 is not fully understood. Our study was designed to elucidate the silencing mechanism of sFRP2 in RCC. Expression of sFRP2 was examined in 20 pairs of primary cancers by immunohistochemistry. Kidney cell lines (HK-2, Caki-1, Caki-2, A-498 and ACHN) were analyzed for sFRP2 expression using real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The methylation status at 46 CpG sites of the 2 CpG islands in the sFRP2 promoter was characterized by bisulfite DNA sequencing. Histone modifications were assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using antibodies against AcH3, AcH4, H3K4 and H3K9. sFRP2 was frequently repressed in primary cancers and in RCC cells. The majority of sFRP2 negative cells had a methylated promoter. Meanwhile, sFRP2 expression was repressed by a hypomethylated promoter in Caki-1 cells, and these cells had a repressive histone modification at the promoter. In Caki-1 cells, sFRP2 was reactivated by trichostatin A (TSA). Repressive histone modifications were also observed in RCC cells with hypermethylated promoters, but sFRP2 was reactivated only by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) and not by TSA. However, the activation of the silenced sFRP2 gene could be achieved in all cells using a combination of DAC and TSA. This is the first report indicating that aberrant DNA methylation and histone modifications work together to silence the sFRP2 gene in RCC cells.

  8. Upregulation of B-cell translocation gene 2 by epigallocatechin-3-gallate via p38 and ERK signaling blocks cell proliferation in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jehn-Chuan; Chung, Li-Chuan; Chen, Yu-Jen; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Chen, Wen-Tsung; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2015-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a well-known malignancy that accounts for the majority of oral cancers. B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is an important regulator of cell cycle dynamics in cancer cells. However, the role of BTG2 in OSCC cells and the influences of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on BTG2 gene expressions have not been well evaluated. The objectives of this study were to examine the effect of EGCG-induced BTG2 expression and the potential signal pathways involved. The (3)H-thymidine incorporation and Western-blot assays revealed cell proliferation was attenuated by EGCG via upregulation of BTG2 expression causing cell cycle G1 phase arrest in OSCC cells. BTG2 overexpression decreased tumor cell growth, while BTG2 knockdown illuminated the opposite effect in xenograft animal studies. Overexpressed BTG2 arrested the cell cycle at the G1 phase and downregulated protein expressions of cyclin A, cyclin D, and cyclin E. Western-blot assays indicated that EGCG induced phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK. However, pretreatments with selective mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors, SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) and PD0325901 (ERK1/2 inhibitor), significantly suppressed the activation of EGCG on BTG2 expression. Our results indicate that EGCG attenuates cell proliferation of OSCC cells by upregulating BTG2 expression via p38 and ERK pathways.

  9. Characterization of p53 gene mutations in a Brazilian population with oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Anna C M; Cherubini, Karen; Herter, Nilton; Furian, Roque; Santos, Diogenes S; Squier, Christopher; Domann, Frederick E

    2004-02-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are present in approximately 50% of all human cancers. We sought to determine the frequency and type of p53 mutations in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the oral cavity in a Brazilian population. To identify p53 mutations we used PCR-SSCP in tumor tissue microdissected from paraffin- embedded and from fresh-frozen sections followed by direct sequencing of SSCP bands with altered electrophoretic mobility. We identified p53 mutations in 40% of the human SCC analyzed. The mutations were of a broad spectrum, with a preponderance of G --> A and A --> G transitions with an apparent hotspot at the CpG dinucleotide at codon 290. Patient samples were stratified according to tobacco and alcohol consumption as well as by anatomic location of the tumor, and although trends did emerge, no statistically significant associations were obtained between the occurance of TP53 mutations and these lifestyle habits. We conclude that p53 mutations are common among oral cavity cancers in this population, and stress the significance of this study since it is the first analysis of p53 mutation in oral cancer in a southern Brazilian population.

  10. Analysis and interpretation of transcriptomic data obtained from extended Warburg effect genes in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Edward; Diehl, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    Background Many cancers adopt a metabolism that is characterized by the well-known Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis). Recently, numerous attempts have been made to treat cancer by targeting one or more gene products involved in this pathway without notable success. This work outlines a transcriptomic approach to identify genes that are highly perturbed in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC). Methods We developed a model of the extended Warburg effect and outlined the model using Cytoscape. Following this, gene expression fold changes (FCs) for tumor and adjacent normal tissue from patients with CCRCC (GSE6344) were mapped on to the network. Gene expression values with FCs of greater than two were considered as potential targets for treatment of CCRCC. Results The Cytoscape network includes glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), the TCA cycle, the serine/glycine pathway, and partial glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis pathways. Gene expression FCs for nine of the 10 CCRCC patients in the GSE6344 data set were consistent with a shift to aerobic glycolysis. Genes involved in glycolysis and the synthesis and transport of lactate were over-expressed, as was the gene that codes for the kinase that inhibits the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. Interestingly, genes that code for unique proteins involved in gluconeogenesis were strongly under-expressed as was also the case for the serine/glycine pathway. These latter two results suggest that the role attributed to the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2), frequently the principal isoform of PK present in cancer: i.e. causing a buildup of glucose metabolites that are shunted into branch pathways for synthesis of key biomolecules, may not be operative in CCRCC. The fact that there was no increase in the expression FC of any gene in the PPP is consistent with this hypothesis. Literature protein data generally support the transcriptomic findings. Conclusions A number of key genes have

  11. Analysis of gene expression profiles of microdissected cell populations indicates that testicular carcinoma in situ is an arrested gonocyte.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Si Brask; Almstrup, Kristian; Dalgaard, Marlene; Juncker, Agnieszka Sierakowska; Edsgard, Daniel; Ruban, Ludmila; Harrison, Neil J; Schwager, Christian; Abdollahi, Amir; Huber, Peter E; Brunak, Søren; Gjerdrum, Lise Mette; Moore, Harry D; Andrews, Peter W; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Leffers, Henrik

    2009-06-15

    Testicular germ cell cancers in young adult men derive from a precursor lesion called carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the testis. CIS cells were suggested to arise from primordial germ cells or gonocytes. However, direct studies on purified samples of CIS cells are lacking. To overcome this problem, we performed laser microdissection of CIS cells. Highly enriched cell populations were obtained and subjected to gene expression analysis. The expression profile of CIS cells was compared with microdissected gonocytes, oogonia, and cultured embryonic stem cells with and without genomic aberrations. Three samples of each tissue type were used for the analyses. Unique expression patterns for these developmentally very related cell types revealed that CIS cells were very similar to gonocytes because only five genes distinguished these two cell types. We did not find indications that CIS was derived from a meiotic cell, and the similarity to embryonic stem cells was modest compared with gonocytes. Thus, we provide new evidence that the molecular phenotype of CIS cells is similar to that of gonocytes. Our data are in line with the idea that CIS cells may be gonocytes that survived in the postnatal testis. We speculate that disturbed development of somatic cells in the fetal testis may play a role in allowing undifferentiated cells to survive in the postnatal testes. The further development of CIS into invasive germ cell tumors may depend on signals from their postpubertal niche of somatic cells, including hormones and growth factors from Leydig and Sertoli cells.

  12. Target genes of microsatellite sequences in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: mononucleotide repeats are not detected.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Liu, Xuejuan; Li, Yulin

    2012-09-10

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is detected in a wide variety of tumors. It is thought that mismatch repair gene mutation or inactivation is the major cause of MSI. Microsatellite sequences are predominantly distributed in intergenic or intronic DNA. However, MSI is found in the exonic sequences of some genes, causing their inactivation. In this report, we searched GenBank for candidate genes containing potential MSI sequences in exonic regions. Twenty seven target genes were selected for MSI analysis. Instability was found in 70% of these genes (14/20) with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Interestingly, no instability was detected in mononucleotide repeats in genes or in intergenic sequences. We conclude that instability of mononucleotide repeats is a rare event in HNSCC. High MSI phenotype in young HNSCC patients is limited to noncoding regions only. MSI percentage in HNSCC tumor is closely related to the repeat type, repeat location and patient's age.

  13. Genomic Analyses Reveal Mutational Signatures and Frequently Altered Genes in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Yong; Cheng, Caixia; Cui, Heyang; Cheng, Le; Kong, Pengzhou; Wang, Jiaqian; Li, Yin; Chen, Wenliang; Song, Bin; Wang, Fang; Jia, Zhiwu; Li, Lin; Li, Yaoping; Yang, Bin; Liu, Jing; Shi, Ruyi; Bi, Yanghui; Zhang, Yanyan; Wang, Juan; Zhao, Zhenxiang; Hu, Xiaoling; Yang, Jie; Li, Hongyi; Gao, Zhibo; Chen, Gang; Huang, Xuanlin; Yang, Xukui; Wan, Shengqing; Chen, Chao; Li, Bin; Tan, Yongkai; Chen, Longyun; He, Minghui; Xie, Sha; Li, Xiangchun; Zhuang, Xuehan; Wang, Mengyao; Xia, Zhi; Luo, Longhai; Ma, Jie; Dong, Bing; Zhao, Jiuzhou; Song, Yongmei; Ou, Yunwei; Li, Enming; Xu, Liyan; Wang, Jinfen; Xi, Yanfeng; Li, Guodong; Xu, Enwei; Liang, Jianfang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Guo, Jiansheng; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Yanbo; Li, Qingshan; Liu, Lixin; Li, Yingrui; Zhang, Xiuqing; Yang, Huanming; Lin, Dongxin; Cheng, Xiaolong; Guo, Yongjun; Wang, Jun; Zhan, Qimin; Cui, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide and the fourth most lethal cancer in China. However, although genomic studies have identified some mutations associated with ESCC, we know little of the mutational processes responsible. To identify genome-wide mutational signatures, we performed either whole-genome sequencing (WGS) or whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 104 ESCC individuals and combined our data with those of 88 previously reported samples. An APOBEC-mediated mutational signature in 47% of 192 tumors suggests that APOBEC-catalyzed deamination provides a source of DNA damage in ESCC. Moreover, PIK3CA hotspot mutations (c.1624G>A [p.Glu542Lys] and c.1633G>A [p.Glu545Lys]) were enriched in APOBEC-signature tumors, and no smoking-associated signature was observed in ESCC. In the samples analyzed by WGS, we identified focal (<100 kb) amplifications of CBX4 and CBX8. In our combined cohort, we identified frequent inactivating mutations in AJUBA, ZNF750, and PTCH1 and the chromatin-remodeling genes CREBBP and BAP1, in addition to known mutations. Functional analyses suggest roles for several genes (CBX4, CBX8, AJUBA, and ZNF750) in ESCC. Notably, high activity of hedgehog signaling and the PI3K pathway in approximately 60% of 104 ESCC tumors indicates that therapies targeting these pathways might be particularly promising strategies for ESCC. Collectively, our data provide comprehensive insights into the mutational signatures of ESCC and identify markers for early diagnosis and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25839328

  14. Effect of DAPK1 gene on proliferation, migration, and invasion of carcinoma of pancreas BxPC-3 cell line.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yong; Ye, Guan-Xiong; Wu, Cheng-Jun; Wang, Shi; Pan, De-Biao; Jiang, Jin-Yan; Fu, Jing; Xu, Sheng-Qian

    2014-01-01

    DAPK1 can induce apoptosis in several cells; to determine the effect of DAPK1 would provide a new potential therapeutic strategy for treating pancreatic cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of DAPK1 gene on proliferation, migration, and invasion of carcinoma of pancreas BxPC-3 cell line and explore the possible mechanisms. In our study, DAPK1 over-expressed cells were established by using the lentiviral transfection method, and DAPK1 obviously increased in BxPC-3 cells after transient transfection. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to determine the BxPC-3 cells proliferation after transfection. Apoptosis of the BxPC-3 cells was determined by using flow cytometry analysis. In addition, cell adhesion assay and in vitro invasion assay were performed. Western blotting was used to determine the protein expressions of caspase-3, DAPK1, VEGF, PEDF, MMP2, AKT, P-AKT, P-ERK, Bcl2, and Bax. Our results demonstrated that DAPK1 gene over-expression can suppress the proliferation, migration, and invasion of carcinoma of pancreas BxPC-3 cell line, and the possible mechanisms may be correlated to induction of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, down-regulations of MMP-2 and VEGF, up-regulations of PEDF, through the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathways.

  15. Epithelial cells captured from ductal carcinoma in situ reveal a gene expression signature associated with progression to invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abuázar, Carolina Sens; de Toledo Osorio, Cynthia Aparecida Bueno; Pinilla, Mabel Gigliola; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; Silva, Wilson Araujo; e Ferreira, Elisa Napolitano; Brentani, Helena Paula; Carraro, Dirce Maria

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer biomarkers that can precisely predict the risk of progression of non-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions to invasive disease are lacking. The identification of molecular alterations that occur during the invasion process is crucial for the discovery of drivers of transition to invasive disease and, consequently, biomarkers with clinical utility. In this study, we explored differences in gene expression in mammary epithelial cells before and after the morphological manifestation of invasion, i.e., early and late stages, respectively. In the early stage, epithelial cells were captured from both pre-invasive lesions with distinct malignant potential [pure DCIS as well as the in situ component that co-exists with invasive breast carcinoma lesions (DCIS-IBC)]; in the late stage, epithelial cells were captured from the two distinct morphological components of the same sample (in situ and invasive components). Candidate genes were identified using cDNA microarray and rapid subtractive hybridization (RaSH) cDNA libraries and validated by RT-qPCR assay using new samples from each group. These analyses revealed 26 genes, including 20 from the early and 6 from the late stage. The expression profile based on the 20 genes, marked by a preferential decrease in expression level towards invasive phenotype, discriminated the majority of DCIS samples. Thus, this study revealed a gene expression signature with the potential to predict DCIS progression and, consequently, provides opportunities to tailor treatments for DCIS patients. PMID:27708222

  16. The expression and clinical significance of metastasis suppressor gene and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in esophageal squamous cell of carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Qi; Li, Xing-Ya

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the expression and clinical significance of metastasis suppressor gene and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in esophageal squamous cell of carcinoma. choose 30 cases of specimens of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma which are removed in surgery and confirmed by pathology and 30 cases of specimens of normal esophageal mucosa. Use immunohistochemistry SP method to detect the expression of nm23-H1, MMP-2 protein in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and normal esophageal mucosal. The positive rate of nm23-H1 protein in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was 43.3% (13/30), while that in normal esophageal mucosa was 100% (30/30), which has a significant difference between them (χ2=22. 083, P<0.05). The positive rate of MMP-2 protein in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was 90.0% (27/30), while that in normal esophageal mucosa was 33.3% (10/30), and there is a significant difference between them (χ2=28. 370, P<0.05); For the expression of nm23-H1 and MMP-2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, there was nothing to do with sex, age and tumor size (P>0.05), but it was related to the degree of tumor differentiation, depth of invasion and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05); The expression of nm23-H1 is related to the cut end of residual cancer (P<0.05), while the expression of MMP-2 has nothing to do with the cut end of residual cancer (P>0.05); The expression of nm23-H1 and MMP-2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was negatively correlated. nm23-H1 and MMP-2 have played a role in the development of esophageal cancer, which can promote the occurence of distant metastasis; The loss of expression of nm23-H1 may be related to cut end residual cancer; nm23-H1 and MMP-2 may be as an indicator for esophageal cancer metastasis and prognosis.

  17. High therapeutic concentration of prazosin up-regulates angiogenic IL6 and CCL2 genes in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zu-Yau; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2012-12-01

    Alteration of the oxidative stress of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells can influence the expressions of genes favored angiogenesis. Quinone reductase 2 which can activate quinones leading to reactive oxygen species production is a melatonin receptor known as MT3. Prazosin prescribed for benign prostate hyperplasia and hypertension is a potent antagonist for MT3. This study was to investigate the influence of therapeutic concentrations of prazosin (0.01 and 0.1μM) on cell proliferation and differential expressions of CCL2, CCL20, CXCL6, CXCL10, IL8 and IL6 genes related to inflammation and/or oxidative stress in human HCC cell lines. Two HCC cell lines including one without susceptible to amphotericin B-induced oxidative stress (cell line A; HCC24/KMUH) and one with this effect (cell line B; HCC38/KMUH) were investigated by 0.01 and 0.1μM prazosin. The premixed WST-1 cell proliferation reagent was applied for proliferation assay. Differential expressions of genes were examined by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our results showed that both 0.01 and 0.1μM prazosin did not influence cell proliferation in both cell lines. Both 0.01 and 0.1μM prazosin in cell line A and 0.01μM prazosin in cell line B did not cause differential expressions of tested genes. However, 0.1μM prazosin caused remarkable up-regulation of IL6 gene and slightly up-regulation of CCL2 gene in cell line B. In conclusion, high therapeutic concentration of prazosin can up-regulate angiogenic IL6 and CCL2 genes in human HCC cells susceptible to amphotericin B-induced oxidative stress. Clinical application of prazosin in patients with HCC should consider this possibility.

  18. Mutational analysis of HRAS and KRAS genes in oral carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Maemoto, Sachiko; Yumoto, Megumi; Ibata, Masato; Torizuka, Sho; Ozawa, Naohumi; Tatsumi, Shunsuke; Hashido, Moeko; Morikawa, Masako; Maeda, Genta; Imai, Kazushi

    2012-07-01

    RAS overexpression and its active mutations are involved in malignant tumorigenesis. However, the mutation rates in oral carcinoma cells differ between populations. In the present study, genomic DNA of oral carcinoma cells (HOC313, TSU, HSC2, HSC3, KOSC2, KOSC3, SCCKN, OSC19, Ca9.22, and Ho1u1 cells) or normal gingival fibroblasts (GF12 cells) derived from a Japanese population were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primer sets, spanning HRAS and KRAS exons. Nucleotide substitutions were analyzed by single strand conformation polymorphism. In contrast to no substitutions in KRAS, nine different substitutions were detected in HRAS. Of the nine, six substitutions were located at intron 1 (HSC2 and HSC3 cells) or intron 2 (HSC3, SCCKN and Ca9.22 cells), and one each of exon 1 (all cells), exon 2 (HOC313, TSU, HSC2 and HSC3 cells) and the 5' upstream region (all cells). Substitutions at exons 1 and 2 did not affect the amino acid sequence; the exon 1 substitution was positioned at the 5' untranslated region, which may be a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sequence because all the cells were isolated from a Japanese population, and the mutations at exon 2 was a silent mutation. A substitution at the 5' upstream region was an SNP. These data demonstrate that SNPs and point mutations observed in HRAS do not change the amino acid sequence, and suggest that the mutations affecting the amino acid sequence may be a rare event in oral carcinomas of the Japanese population.

  19. Relationships between cell cycle pathway gene polymorphisms and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yue-Li; Hu, Yan-Ling; Liu, Zhi-Ke; Duan, Fang-Fang; Xu, Yang; Li, Shu; Li, Ting; Chen, Da-Fang; Zeng, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the associiations between the polymorphisms of cell cycle pathway genes and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: We enrolled 1127 cases newly diagnosed with HCC from the Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University and 1200 non-tumor patients from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University. General demographic characteristics, behavioral information, and hematological indices were collected by unified questionnaires. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral venous blood using Phenol-Chloroform. The genotyping was performed using the Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX genotyping method. The association between genetic polymorphisms and risk of HCC was shown by P-value and the odd ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using the unconditional logistic regression after adjusting for age, sex, nationality, smoking, drinking, family history of HCC, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Moreover, stratified analysis was conducted on the basis of the status of HBV infection, smoking, and alcohol drinking. RESULTS: The HCC risk was lower in patients with the MCM4 rs2305952 CC (OR = 0.22, 95%CI: 0.08-0.63, P = 0.01) and with the CHEK1 rs515255 TC, TT, TC/TT (OR = 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56-0.96, P = 0.02; OR = 0.67, 95%CI: 0.46-0.97, P = 0.04; OR = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.56-0.92, P = 0.01, respectively). Conversely, the HCC risk was higher in patients with the KAT2B rs17006625 GG (OR = 1.64, 95%CI: 1.01-2.64, P = 0.04). In addition, the risk was markedly lower for those who were carriers of MCM4 rs2305952 CC and were also HBsAg-positive and non-drinking and non-smoking (P < 0.05, respectively) and for those who were carriers of CHEK1 rs515255 TC, TT, TC/TT and were also HBsAg-negative and non-drinking (P < 0.05, respectively). Moreover, the risk was higher for those who were carriers of KAT2B rs17006625 GG and were also HBsAg-negative (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Of 12 cell cycle pathway genes, MCM4, CHEK1 and KAT2B polymorphisms may be

  20. The hereditary renal cell carcinoma 3;8 translocation fuses FHIT to a patched-related gene, TRC8.

    PubMed

    Gemmill, R M; West, J D; Boldog, F; Tanaka, N; Robinson, L J; Smith, D I; Li, F; Drabkin, H A

    1998-08-04

    The 3;8 chromosomal translocation, t(3;8)(p14.2;q24.1), was described in a family with classical features of hereditary renal cell carcinoma. Previous studies demonstrated that the 3p14.2 breakpoint interrupts the fragile histidine triad gene (FHIT) in its 5' noncoding region. However, evidence that FHIT is causally related to renal or other malignancies is controversial. We now show that the 8q24.1 breakpoint region encodes a 664-aa multiple membrane spanning protein, TRC8, with similarity to the hereditary basal cell carcinoma/segment polarity gene, patched. This similarity involves two regions of patched, the putative sterol-sensing domain and the second extracellular loop that participates in the binding of sonic hedgehog. In the 3;8 translocation, TRC8 is fused to FHIT and is disrupted within the sterol-sensing domain. In contrast, the FHIT coding region is maintained and expressed. In a series of sporadic renal carcinomas, an acquired TRC8 mutation was identified. By analogy to patched, TRC8 might function as a signaling receptor and other pathway members, to be defined, are mutation candidates in malignant diseases involving the kidney and thyroid.

  1. Differential transcription of the human spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) gene in human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, L; Casero, R A

    1996-01-01

    The expression of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT), the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of polyamines, is highly regulated by a number of factors including the natural polyamines and their analogues. The phenotype-specific cytotoxicity that occurs in response to a class of polyamine analogues, the diethylpolyamines, is associated with a phenotype-specific superinduction of SSAT in human non-small-cell lung carcinomas, whereas in non-responding cell types, including the small-cell lung carcinomas, the superinduction of SSAT does not occur. In this study, we have investigated the molecular basis of this phenotype-specific SSAT induction in human lung carcinoma cells in response to N1,N12-diethylspermine (BESpm). To facilitate the study of transcriptional regulation, we have cloned and characterized 11 kb of the human SSAT locus, including 3500 bp of the 5' promoter region. Nuclear run-on transcription studies suggest that the initial induction of SSAT results from an increase in the rate of gene transcription. Results from Northern blot analysis and ribonuclease protection assays indicate a differential expression of SSAT mRNA between the analogue-responsive H157 and non-responsive H82 cells. There is no detectable SSAT mRNA in H82 cells, even after a 24-h analogue treatment, whereas SSAT mRNA in H157 cells was detectable by Northern blot analysis and increased more than 100-fold following drug exposure. Furthermore, nuclear run-on transcription assays do not detect any active transcription of SSAT gene in either treated or untreated H82 cells. These results indicate that at least one component of the phenotype-specific induction of SSAT appears to be due to differences in transcriptional regulation of the gene. In addition, mapping of DNase I-hypersensitive sites of the SSAT gene suggest that the cell type-specific promoter/enhancer utilization may control the expression of the SSAT gene in differentially sensitive cell types in vivo. PMID

  2. Gene Expression Changes in Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma After Initiation of Chemoradiation and Correlation With Clinical Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Klopp, Ann H.; Jhingran, Anuja Ramdas, Latha; Story, Michael D.; Broadus, Russell R.; Lu, Karen H.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate early gene expression changes after chemoradiation in a human solid tumor, allowing identification of chemoradiation-induced gene expression changes in the tumor as well as the tumor microenvironment. In addition we aimed to identify a gene expression profile that was associated with clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: Microarray experiments were performed on cervical cancer specimens obtained before and 48 h after chemoradiation from 12 patients with Stage IB2 to IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated between April 2001 and August 2002. Results: A total of 262 genes were identified that were significantly changed after chemoradiation. Genes involved in DNA repair were identified including DDB2, ERCC4, GADD45A, and XPC. In addition, significantly regulated cell-to-cell signaling pathways included insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), interferon, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. At a median follow-up of 41 months, 5 of 12 patients had experienced either local or distant failure. Supervised clustering analysis identified a 58-gene set from the pretreatment samples that were differentially expressed between patients with and without recurrence. Genes involved in integrin signaling and apoptosis pathways were identified in this gene set. Immortalization-upregulated protein (IMUP), IGF-2, and ARHD had particularly marked differences in expression between patients with and without recurrence. Conclusions: Genetic profiling identified genes regulated by chemoradiation including DNA damage and cell-to-cell signaling pathways. Genes associated with recurrence were identified that will require validation in an independent patient data set to determine whether the 58-gene set associated with clinical outcome could be useful as a prognostic assay.

  3. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lanoue, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly occurring cancer in the world and overall incidence is still on the rise. While typically a slow-growing tumor for which metastases is rare, basal cell carcinoma can be locally destructive and disfiguring. Given the vast prevalence of this disease, there is a significant overall burden on patient well-being and quality of life. The current mainstay of basal cell carcinoma treatment involves surgical modalities, such as electrodessication and curettage, excision, cryosurgery, and Mohs micrographic surgery. Such methods are typically reserved for localized basal cell carcinoma and offer high five-year cure rates, but come with the risk of functional impairment, disfigurement, and scarring. Here, the authors review the evidence and indications for nonsurgical treatment modalities in cases where surgery is impractical, contraindicated, or simply not desired by the patient. PMID:27386043

  4. [Imaging renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Bazan, F; Busto, M

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the eighth most common malignancy in adults and the most common malignancy in the kidney. It is thus a very common disease for radiologists. This review aims to provide a general overview of the imaging techniques used to diagnose, characterize, and help plan the treatment of renal cell carcinoma as well as to review basic aspects related to staging, imaging-guided percutaneous treatment, and follow-up in the most common clinical scenarios.

  5. A new germline mutation of the PTCH gene in a Japanese patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with meningioma.

    PubMed

    Tate, Genshu; Li, Min; Suzuki, Takao; Mitsuya, Toshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    We employed polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing analysis to characterize the PTCH gene in a Japanese nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) patient suffering from meningioma, multiple basal cell carcinoma and epidermal cysts. Direct sequence analyses revealed a novel single base deletion at nucleotide 2613 in exon 16 (2613delC) in one PTCH allele, resulting in the frame shift and the introduction of a premature termination codon in this mutated allele.

  6. VHL and HIF-1α: gene variations and prognosis in early-stage clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lessi, Francesca; Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Tomei, Sara; Di Cristofano, Claudio; Minervini, Andrea; Menicagli, Michele; Apollo, Alessandro; Masieri, Lorenzo; Collecchi, Paola; Minervini, Riccardo; Carini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2014-03-01

    Von Hipple-Lindau gene (VHL) inactivation represents the most frequent abnormality in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression is regulated by O2 level. In normal O2 conditions, VHL binds HIF-1α and allows HIF-1α proteasomal degradation. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been found located in the oxygen-dependent degradation domain at codon 582 (C1772T, rs11549465, Pro582Ser). In hypoxia, VHL/HIF-1α interaction is abolished and HIF-1α activates target genes in the nucleus. This study analyzes the impact of genetic alterations and protein expression of VHL and the C1772T SNP of HIF-1α gene (HIF-1α) on prognosis in early-stage ccRCC (pT1a, pT1b, and pT2). Mutational analysis of the entire VHL sequence and the genotyping of HIF-1α C1772T SNP were performed together with VHL promoter methylation analysis and loss of heterozygosis (LOH) analysis at (3p25) locus. Data obtained were correlated with VHL and HIF-1α protein expression and with tumor-specific survival (TSS). VHL mutations, methylation status, and LOH were detected in 51, 11, and 12% of cases, respectively. Our results support the association between biallelic alterations and/or VHL silencing with a worse TSS. Moreover, we found a significant association between the HIF-1α C1772C genotype and a worse TSS. The same association was found when testing the presence of HIF-1α protein in the nucleus. Our results highlight the role of VHL/HIF-1α pathway in RCC and support the molecular heterogeneity of early-stage ccRCC. More important, we show the involvement of HIF-1α C1772T SNP in ccRCC progression.

  7. Germline mutations in the VHL tumor suppresssor gene are similar to somatic VHL aberrations in sporadic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, J.M.; Naglich, J.; Gelbert, L.

    1994-09-01

    A candidate gene for von Hippel Lindau disease was recently identified that led to the isolation of a partial cDNA clone with extended open reading frame without significant homology to known genes or obvious functional motifs, except for an acidic pentamer repeat domain. To further characterize the functional domains of the VHL gene and assess its involvement in hereditary and non-hereditary tumors, we performed mutation analyses and studied its expresssion in normal and tumor tissue. We identified germline mutations in 39% of VHL disease families. Moreover, 33% of sporadic RCCs, and all (6/6) sporadic RCC cell lines analyzed, showed mutations within the VHL gene. Both germline and somatic mutations included deletions, insertions, splice site mutations, missense and nonsense mutations, all of which clustered at the 3{prime} end of the corresponding partial VHL cDNA open reading frame including an alternatively-spliced exon of 123 nucleotides in length, suggesting functionally important domains encoded by the VHL gene in this region. Over 180 sporadic tumors of other types have shown no detectable base changes within the presumed coding sequence of the VHL gene to date. We conclude that the gene causing VHL has an important and specific role in the etiology of sporadic renal cell carcinomas, acts as a recessive tumor suppressor gene, and appears to encode important functional domains within the 3{prime} end of the known open reading frame.

  8. ABCG2/BCRP gene expression is related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition inducer genes in a papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line (TPC-1).

    PubMed

    Mato, E; González, C; Moral, A; Pérez, J I; Bell, O; Lerma, E; de Leiva, A

    2014-06-01

    Tumor malignancy is associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process and resistance to chemotherapy. However, little is known about the relationship between the EMT and the multidrug-resistance gene in thyroid tumor progression. We investigated whether the expression of the ABCG2/BCRP gene is associated with ZEB1 and other EMT inducer genes involved in tumor dedifferentiation. We established a subpopulation of cells that express the ABCG2/BCRP gene derived from the thyroid papillary carcinoma cell line (TPC-1), the so-called TPC-1 MITO-resistant subline. The most relevant findings in these TPC-1 selected cells were a statistically significant upregulation of ZEB1 and TWIST1 (35- and 15-fold change respectively), no changes in the relative expression of vimentin and SNAIL1, and no expression of E-cadherin. The TPC-1 MITO-resistant subline displayed a faster migration and greater invasive ability than parental cells in correlation with a significant upregulation of the survivin (BIRC5) gene (twofold change, P<0.05). The knockdown of ZEB1 promoted nuclear re-expression of E-cadherin, reduced expression of vimentin, N-cadherin, and BIRC5 genes, and reduced cell migration (P<0.05). Analysis of human thyroid carcinoma showed a slight overexpression of the ABCG2/BCRP at stages I and II (P<0.01), and a higher overexpression at stages III and IV (P<0.01). SNAIL1, TWIST1, and ZEB1 genes showed higher expression at stages III and IV than at stages I and II. E- and N-cadherin genes were upregulated at stages I and II of the disease (ninefold and tenfold change, respectively, P<0.01) but downregulated at stages III and IV (fourfold lower, P<0.01). These results could be a promising starting point for further study of the role of the ABCG2/BCRP gene in the progression of thyroid tumor.

  9. Effects of 5-azacytidine on RUNX3 gene expression and the biological behavior of esophageal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhou; Chen, Hua-Xia

    2014-04-01

    The present study investigated the effects of 5-azacytidine (5-azaC) on the expression level of the human runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) gene and the biological behavior of esophageal carcinoma Eca109 cells. The effect of the demethylation reagent 5-azaC on the viability of Eca109 cells was detected by the MTT assay, which demonstrated that 5-azaC inhibited the viability of Eca109 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Although demethylation of other genes may occur following treatment with 5-azaC, we focused on the RUNX3 gene. When treated with 5-azaC at hypoxic levels, the expression of RUNX3 increased and the methylation degree of the RUNX3 gene was decreased significantly in Eca109 cells. 5-azaC at 50 µM demonstrated the highest RUNX3-induction activity, inducing RUNX3 mRNA and protein expression, and decreasing the degree of methylation of the RUNX3 gene. Methylation specific PCR indicated that 5-azaC induced RUNX3 expression through demethylation. The abilities of migration and invasion of Eca109 cells were inhibited by 5-azaC. The growth of Eca109 cells treated with 5-azaC in vivo was detected by a tumorigenesis experiment. 5-azaC inhibited the growth of Eca109 xenografts in nude mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that the RUNX3 gene is hypermethylated in Eca109 cells and that 5-azaC induces the expression of the RUNX3 gene by demethylation, which inhibits the proliferation, migration and invasion of Eca109 cells.

  10. Increase in gene dosage is a mechanism of HIF-1alpha constitutive expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Secades, Pablo; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; Hermsen, Mario; Alvarez, Cesar; Suarez, Carlos; Chiara, María-Dolores

    2009-05-01

    The HIF-1alpha protein plays a key role in the cellular response to hypoxia via transcriptional regulation of genes involved in erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, and metabolism. Overexpression of HIF-1alpha is commonly found in solid tumors in significant association with increased patient mortality and resistance to therapy. The predominant mode of HIF-1alpha regulation by hypoxia occurs at the level of protein stability. In addition to hypoxia, HIF-1alpha protein stability and synthesis is regulated by nonhypoxic signals such as inactivation of tumor suppressors and activation of oncogenes. Here, we show that an increase in gene dosage may contribute to HIF-1alpha mRNA and protein overexpression in a nonhypoxic environment in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Increased HIF-1alpha gene dosage was found in one out of five HNSCC-derived cell lines and three out of 27 HNSCC primary tumors. Significantly, increased gene dosage in those samples was associated with high HIF-1alpha mRNA and protein levels. Normoxic overexpression of HIF-1alpha protein in HNSCC-derived cell lines was also paralleled by higher expression levels of HIF-1alpha target genes. Array CGH analysis confirmed the copy number increase of HIF-1alpha gene and revealed that the gene is contained within a region of amplification at 14q23-q24.2 both in the cell line and primary tumors. In addition, FISH analysis revealed the presence of 11-13 copies on a tetraploid background in SCC2 cells. These data suggest that increased HIF-1alpha gene dosage is a mechanism of HIF-1alpha protein overexpression in HNSCC that possibly prepares the cells for a higher activity in an intratumoral hypoxic environment.

  11. Cisplatin modulates B-cell translocation gene 2 to attenuate cell proliferation of prostate carcinoma cells in both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chung, Li-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Chen, Wen-Tsung; Chang, Phei-Lang; Chiang, Hou-Yu; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2014-07-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used anti-cancer drug. The B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is involved in the cell cycle transition regulation. We evaluated the cisplatin effects on prostate cancer cell proliferation and the expressions of BTG2, p53, androgen receptor (AR) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) in prostate carcinoma, p53 wild-type LNCaP or p53-null PC-3, cells. Cisplatin treatments attenuated cell prostate cancer cell growth through inducing Go/G1 cell cycle arrest in lower concentration and apoptosis at higher dosage. Cisplatin treatments enhanced p53 and BTG2 expression, repressed AR and PSA expression, and blocked the activation of androgen on the PSA secretion in LNCaP cells. BTG2 knockdown in LNCaP cells attenuated cisplatin-mediated growth inhibition. Cisplatin enhanced BTG2 gene expression dependent on the DNA fragment located within -173 to -82 upstream of BTG2 translation initiation site in prostate cancer cells. Mutation of the p53 response element from GGGCAGAGCCC to GGGCACC or mutation of the NFκB response element from GGAAAGTCC to GGAAAGGAA by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the stimulation of cisplatin on the BTG2 promoter activity in LNCaP or PC-3 cells, respectively. Our results indicated that cisplatin attenuates prostate cancer cell proliferation partly mediated by upregulation of BTG2 through the p53-dependent pathway or p53-independent NFκB pathway.

  12. Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma of the head and face.

    PubMed

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Kramer, B; Altini, M; Lemmer, J

    2016-02-05

    Ultraviolet light (UV) is an important risk factor for cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma of the skin. These cancers most commonly affect persons with fair skin and blue eyes who sunburn rather than suntan. However, each of these cancers appears to be associated with a different pattern of UV exposure and to be mediated by different intracellular molecular pathways.Some melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants play a direct role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma apart from their role in determining a cancer-prone pigmentory phenotype (fair skin, red hair, blue eyes) through their interactions with other genes regulating immuno-inflammatory responses, DNA repair or apoptosis.In this short review we focus on the aetiological role of UV in cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma of the skin, and on some associated biopathological events.

  13. One-Carbon Metabolism Pathway Gene Variants and Risk of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hongzhou; Li, Pu; Cao, Qiang; Shao, Pengfei; Qin, Chao; Yin, Changjun

    2013-01-01

    Background One-carbon metabolism is the basement of nucleotide synthesis and the methylation of DNA linked to cancer risk. Variations in one-carbon metabolism genes are reported to affect the risk of many cancers, including renal cancer, but little knowledge about this mechanism is known in Chinese population. Methods Each subject donated 5 mL venous blood after signing the agreement. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. 18 SNPs in six one-carbon metabolism-related genes (CBS, MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, SHMT1, and TYMS) were genotyped in 859 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients and 1005 cancer-free controls by the Snapshot. Results Strong associations with ccRCC risk were observed for rs706209 (P = 0.006) in CBS and rs9332 (P = 0.027) in MTRR. Compared with those carrying none variant allele, individuals carrying one or more variant alleles in these two genes had a statistically significantly decreased risk of ccRCC [P = 0.001, adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.06–0.90]. In addition, patients carrying one or more variant alleles were more likely to develop localized stage disease (P = 0.002, adjusted OR = 1.37, 95%CI = 1.11–1.69) and well-differentiated ccRCC (P<0.001, adjusted OR = 1.42, 95%CI = 0.87–1.68). In the subgroup analysis, individuals carrying none variant allele in older group (P = 0.007, adjusted OR = 0.67, 95%CI = 0.49–0.91), male group (P = 0.007, adjusted OR = 0.71, 95%CI = 0.55–0.92), never smoking group (P = 0.002, adjusted OR = 0.68, 95%CI = 0.53–0.88) and never drinking group (P<0.001, adjusted OR = 0.68, 95%CI = 0.53–0.88) had an increased ccRCC risk. Conclusions Our results suggest that the polymorphisms of the one-carbon metabolism-related genes are associated with ccRCC risk in Chinese population. Future population-based prospective studies

  14. Improving gene transfer in human renal carcinoma cells: Utilization of adenovirus vectors containing chimeric type 5 and type 35 fiber proteins

    PubMed Central

    ACHARYA, BISHNU; TERAO, SHUJI; SUZUKI, TORU; NAOE, MICHIO; HAMADA, KATSUYUKI; MIZUGUCHI, HIROYUKI; GOTOH, AKINOBU

    2010-01-01

    The transduction efficacy of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector in human renal carcinoma cells is generally low due to the down-regulated expression of Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in target cells. By contrast, the infectivity of adenovirus serotype 35 vectors depends on the binding rate to CD46 receptor, independent of CAR. In this study, we examined whether an adenovirus vector containing chimeric type 5 and type 35 fiber proteins (Ad5/F35) increases transduction efficiency compared to Ad5 vector in human renal carcinoma cells in vitro. The expression of CAR was much lower in the human renal carcinoma cells than in control HEK293 cells. By contrast, the expression of CD46 was similar and perhaps at a higher level in the human renal carcinoma cells than in the HEK293 cells. The transduction efficacy of Ad5/F35 vector was dramatically higher compared to that of Ad5 in human renal carcinoma cells, and was correlated to the expression of CD46. Thus, Ad5/35 vector may be useful for the development of novel gene therapy approaches to renal cell carcinoma. PMID:22993573

  15. Antimetastatic effect of fluvastatin on breast and hepatocellular carcinoma cells in relation to SGK1 and NDRG1 genes.

    PubMed

    Salis, Osman; Okuyucu, Ali; Bedir, Abdulkerim; Gör, Ufuk; Kulcu, Canan; Yenen, Eser; Kılıç, Nermin

    2016-03-01

    Metastasis occurs due to migration of the cells from primary tumor toward other tissues by gaining invasive properties. Since metastatic invasion shows a strong resistance against conventional cancer treatments, the studies on this issue have been focused. Within this context, inhibition of migration and determination of the relationships at the gene level will contribute to treatment of metastatic cancer cases. We have aimed to demonstrate the impact of TGF-β1 and fluvastatin on human breast cancer (MCF-7) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep3B) cell cultures via Real-Time Cell Analyzer (RTCA) and to test the expression levels of some genes (NDRG1, SGK1, TWIST1, AMPKA2) and to compare their gene expression levels according to RTCA results. Both of cell series were applied TGF-β1 and combinations of TGF-β1/fluvastatin. Primer and probes were synthesized using Universal Probe Library (UPL, Roche) software, and expression levels of genes were tested via qPCR using the device LightCycler 480 II (Roche). Consequently, fluvastatin dose-dependently inhibited migration induced by TGF-β1 in both groups. This inhibition was accompanied by low level of SGK1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and high levels of NDRG1 and AMPKA2 mRNA. Thus, we conclude that fluvastatin plays an important role in reducing resistance to chemotherapeutics and preventing metastasis.

  16. Prognostic and predictive value of VHL gene alteration in renal cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis and review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Jun; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Hyeong Su; Zang, Dae Young

    2017-01-17

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene is often inactivated in sporadic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) by mutation or promoter hypermethylation. The prognostic or predictive value of VHL gene alteration is not well established. We conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the association between the VHL alteration and clinical outcomes in patients with RCC. We searched PUBMED, MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles including following terms in their titles, abstracts, or keywords: 'kidney or renal', 'carcinoma or cancer or neoplasm or malignancy', 'von Hippel-Lindau or VHL', 'alteration or mutation or methylation', and 'prognostic or predictive'. There were six studies fulfilling inclusion criteria and a total of 633 patients with clear cell RCC were included in the study: 244 patients who received anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy in the predictive value analysis and 419 in the prognostic value analysis. Out of 663 patients, 410 (61.8%) had VHL alteration. The meta-analysis showed no association between the VHL gene alteration and overall response rate (relative risk = 1.47 [95% CI, 0.81-2.67], P = 0.20) or progression free survival (hazard ratio = 1.02 [95% CI, 0.72-1.44], P = 0.91) in patients with RCC who received VEGF-targeted therapy. There was also no correlation between the VHL alteration and overall survival (HR = 0.80 [95% CI, 0.56-1.14], P = 0.21). In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicates that VHL gene alteration has no prognostic or predictive value in patients with clear cell RCC.

  17. Differential expression of store-operated calcium- and proliferation-related genes in hepatocellular carcinoma cells following TRPC1 ion channel silencing.

    PubMed

    Selli, Cigdem; Pearce, Dominic A; Sims, Andrew H; Tosun, Metiner

    2016-09-01

    TRPC1 and store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) entry have previously been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation. The aim of the study was to determine genes and processes associated with TRPC1 down-regulation and the resulting increase of SOC entry and decrease in hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation. For this purpose, transcriptome analysis was performed to determine differentially expressed genes in TRPC1-silenced Huh7 cells. SOC entry- and proliferation-related genes correlated with TRPC1 down-regulation were also examined. Changes in SOC entry and cell proliferation were monitored in the TRPC1-silenced and parental cells and found to be significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in TRPC1-silenced cells. A total of 71 genes were significantly differentially expressed (40 up- and 31 down-regulated), including four mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling-associated genes. STIM1 levels were significantly up-regulated and negatively correlated with TRPC1 levels. In addition, expression of two cell cycle regulation genes, CDK11A/11B and URGCP, was observed to decrease, whereas ERBB3 and FGFR4, pro-survival genes, increased significantly in TRPC1-silenced cells. In conclusion, these results suggest reciprocal alterations in TRPC1 and STIM1 levels and a role for STIM1 in the regulation of SOC entry in TRPC1-silenced Huh7 cells. In addition to TRPC1, STIM1 may participate in Huh7 cell proliferation by regulating SOC entry. Alterations in MAPK signalling genes may be involved in diminished cell proliferation in TRPC1-silenced Huh7 cells. Similarly, changes in cell cycle regulating genes in TRPC1-silenced cells indicate possible cell cycle arrest along with compensatory up-regulation of ERBB3 growth factor receptor-amongst others-to maintain hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation.

  18. Mutational landscape of gingivo-buccal oral squamous cell carcinoma reveals new recurrently-mutated genes and molecular subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Arindam; Biswas, Nidhan K.; Amin, Kishore; Kowtal, Pradnya; Kumar, Shantanu; Das, Subrata; Sarin, Rajiv; Majumder, Partha P.; Bagchi, I; Bairagya, B. B.; Basu, A.; Bhan, M. K.; Chaturvedi, P.; Das, D.; D'Cruz, A.; Dhar, R.; Dutta, D.; Ganguli, D.; Gera, P.; Gupta, T.; Mahapatra, S.; Mujawar, M. H. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Nair, S.; Nikam, S.; Nobre, M.; Patil, A.; Patra, S.; Rama-Gowtham, M.; Rao, T. S.; Roy, B.; Roychowdhury, B.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar-Roy, N.; Sutradhar, D.

    2013-01-01

    Gingivo-buccal oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC-GB), an anatomical and clinical subtype of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is prevalent in regions where tobacco-chewing is common. Exome sequencing (n=50) and recurrence testing (n=60) reveals that some significantly and frequently altered genes are specific to OSCC-GB (USP9X, MLL4, ARID2, UNC13C and TRPM3), while some others are shared with HNSCC (for example, TP53, FAT1, CASP8, HRAS and NOTCH1). We also find new genes with recurrent amplifications (for example, DROSHA, YAP1) or homozygous deletions (for example, DDX3X) in OSCC-GB. We find a high proportion of C>G transversions among tobacco users with high numbers of mutations. Many pathways that are enriched for genomic alterations are specific to OSCC-GB. Our work reveals molecular subtypes with distinctive mutational profiles such as patients predominantly harbouring mutations in CASP8 with or without mutations in FAT1. Mean duration of disease-free survival is significantly elevated in some molecular subgroups. These findings open new avenues for biological characterization and exploration of therapies. PMID:24292195

  19. Subungual squamous cell carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Padilha, Carolina Barbosa de Sousa; Balassiano, Laila Klotz de Almeida; Pinto, Julyana Calegari; de Souza, Flávia Crespo Schueler; Kac, Bernard Kawa; Treu, Curt Mafra

    2016-01-01

    Although subungual squamous cell carcinoma is rare, it is the most common primary malignant neoplasms in this location. The higher incidence occurs in the fingernails, but involvement of the toenails is also possible. Subungual squamous cell carcinoma often looks like other more common benign lesions, such as fungal infection, onychomycosis, or viral wart. These factors, together with a general lack of awareness of this disease among physicians, often result in delayed diagnosis. Therefore, it is underdiagnosed, with few reports in the literature. The authors present a case of a man with a diagnosis of subungual squamous cell carcinoma in the hallux, without bone involvement, which was submitted to the appropriate surgical treatment. PMID:28099608

  20. Profiling Analysis of Histone Modifications and Gene Expression in Lewis Lung Carcinoma Murine Cells Resistant to Anti-VEGF Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yanhua; Chen, Kaiming; Liu, Zhenping; Li, Bing; Li, Jie; Tao, Fei; Gu, Hua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells become resistant after long-term use of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents. Our previous study shows that treatment with a VEGF inhibitor (VEGF-Trap) facilitates to develop tumor resistance through regulating angiogenesis-related genes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Histone modifications as a key epigenetic factor play a critical role in regulation of gene expression. Here, we explore the potential epigenetic gene regulatory functions of key histone modifications during tumor resistance in a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell line. We generated high resolution genome-wide maps of key histone modifications in sensitive tumor sample (LLC-NR) and resistant tumor sample (LLC-R) after VEGF-Trap treatment. Profiling analysis of histone modifications shows that histone modification levels are effectively predictive for gene expression. Composition of promoters classified by histone modification state is different between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines regardless of CpG content. Histone modification state change between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines shows different patterns in CpG-rich and CpG-poor promoters. As a consequence, genes with different level of CpG content whose gene expression level are altered are enriched in distinct functions. Notably, histone modification state change in promoters of angiogenesis-related genes consists with their expression alteration. Taken together, our findings suggest that treatment with anti-VEGF therapy results in extensive histone modification state change in promoters with multiple functions, particularly, biological processes related to angiogenesis, likely contributing to tumor resistance development. PMID:27362259

  1. Deletion and methylation of the tumour suppressor gene p16/CDKN2 in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    González, M V; Pello, M F; López-Larrea, C; Suárez, C; Menéndez, M J; Coto, E

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To study the homozygous deletion and methylation status of the 5' CpG island of the p16 and p15 genes (9p21) in a set of primary advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and to test whether inactivation of these genes by these mechanisms contributes to head and neck SCC development. METHODS: DNA was extracted from fresh tumours. Homozygous deletion was determined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by hybridisation with the corresponding probe, radioactively labelled by the random priming method. Methylation status of the CpG island of the 5' region of these genes was assessed by digestion with the appropriate restriction enzymes followed by PCR and subsequent hybridisation with the corresponding probe. The presence of point mutations was determined by PCR-SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism). RESULTS: The p16 and p15 genes were homozygously deleted in 20% and 10% of the tumours, respectively. No point mutations were found at p16 and p15. The 5' CpG island at the p16 gene was methylated in 20% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS: The tumour suppressor gene p16 is inactivated through homozygous deletion or methylation in a significant proportion of cases of head and neck SCC. Images PMID:9378820

  2. Further localization of the gene for nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) in 15 Australasian families: Linkage and loss of heterozygosity

    SciTech Connect

    Chenevix-Trench, G.; Wicking, C.; Berkman, J.; Sharpe, H.; Hockey, A.; Haan, E.; Oley, C.; Ravine, D.; Turner, A.; Searle, J.

    1993-09-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS; basal cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin syndrome) is a cancer-predisposition syndrome characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and diverse developmental defects. The gene for NBCCS has been mapped to 9q23.1-q31 in North Americal and European families. In addition, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for genetic markers in this region has been detected in sporadic BCCs, indicating that the NBCCs gene is probably a tumor-suppressor gene. In this study the authors have determined that the NBCCS gene is also linked to this region in Australasian pedigrees and that there is no significant evidence of heterogeneity. They have defined the localization of the gene by multipoint and haplotype analysis of 15 families, using four microsatellite markers. LOH at these loci was detected in 50% of sporadic BCCs, a rate that is significantly higher than that in other skin lesions used as controls. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Aberrant Cosmc genes result in Tn antigen expression in human colorectal carcinoma cell line HT-29

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Du, Zhenzhen; Sun, Xuhong; Shi, Chuanqin; Zhang, Huaixiang; Hu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Tn antigen, which arises from mutation in the Cosmc gene is one of the most common tumor associated carbohydrate antigens. Cosmc resides in X24 encoded by a single gene and functions as a specific molecular chaperone for T-synthase. While the Tn antigen cannot be detected in normal cells, Cosmc mutations inactivate T-synthase and consequently result in Tn antigen expression within certain cancers. In addition to this Cosmc mutation-induced expression, the Tn antigen is also expressed in such cell lines as Jurkat T, LSC and LS174T. Whether the Cosmc mutation is present in the colon cancer cell line HT-29 is still unclear. Here, we isolate HT-29-Tn+ cells from HT-29 cells derived from a female colon cancer patient. These HT-29-Tn+ cells show a loss of the Cosmc gene coding sequence (CDS) leading to an absence of T-synthase activity and Tn antigen expression. Additionally, almost no methylation of Cosmc CpG islands was detected in HT-29-Tn+ as well as in HT-29-Tn- and Tn- tumor cells from male patients. In contrast, the methylation frequency of CpG island of Cosmc in normal female cells was ~50%. Only one active allele of Cosmc existed in HT-29-Tn+ and HT-29-Tn- cells as based upon detection of SNP sites. These results indicate that Tn antigens expression and T-synthase inactivity in HT-29-Tn+ cells can be related to the absence of CDS in Cosmc active alleles, while an inactive allele deletion of Cosmc in HT-29 cells has no influence on Cosmc function. PMID:26045765

  4. Knockdown of the differentially expressed gene TNFRSF12A inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and migration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Ma, Sicong; Qi, Xingxing; Tang, Xiaoyin; Cui, Dan; Wang, Zhi; Chi, Jiachang; Li, Ping; Zhai, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been reported to be highly insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. In the current study, the Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray (4×44 K) was used in order to identify the differentially expressed genes between HCC and adjacent tissues, and the top 22 differentially expressed genes were confirmed through reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Among the identified differences in gene expression, expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 12A (TNFRSF12A) was markedly higher in HCC tissue than in adjacent tissue. Previous studies have suggested that TNFRSF12A may serve a role in tumor growth and metastasis, thus in the current study, TNFRSF12A was knocked down in the SMMC7721 cell line through siRNA. This demonstrated that cells exhibited reduced reproductive and metastatic capacity ex vivo. Thus, the results of the current study suggest that TNFRSF12A may be a candidate therapeutic target for cancer including HCC, and additional genes that exhibited significantly different expression from normal adjacent tissues require further study. PMID:28138696

  5. Distinct von Hippel-Lindau gene and hypoxia-regulated alterations in gene and protein expression patterns of renal cell carcinoma and their effects on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Leisz, Sandra; Schulz, Kristin; Erb, Susanne; Oefner, Peter; Dettmer, Katja; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Stehle, Franziska; Seliger, Barbara

    2015-05-10

    During the last decade the knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of the cellular adaption to hypoxia and the function of the "von Hippel Lindau" (VHL) protein in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has increased, but there exists little information about the overlap and differences in gene/protein expression of both processes. Therefore the aim of this study was to dissect VHL- and hypoxia-regulated alterations in the metabolism of human RCC using ome-based strategies. The effect of the VHL- and hypoxia-regulated altered gene/protein expression pattern on the cellular metabolism was analyzed by determination of glucose uptake, lactate secretion, extracellular pH, lactate dehydrogenase activity, amino acid content and ATP levels. By employing VHL-/VHL(+) RCC cells cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, VHL-dependent, HIF-dependent as well as VHL-/HIF-independent alterations in the gene and protein expression patterns were identified and further validated in other RCC cell lines. The genes/proteins differentially expressed under these distinct conditions were mainly involved in the cellular metabolism, which was accompanied by an altered metabolism as well as changes in the abundance of amino acids in VHL-deficient cells. In conclusion, the study reveals similarities, but also differences in the genes and proteins controlled by VHL functionality and hypoxia thereby demonstrating differences in the metabolic switch of RCC under these conditions.

  6. Prevalence of von Hippel-Lindau gene mutations in sporadic renal cell carcinoma: results from the Netherlands cohort study

    PubMed Central

    van Houwelingen, Kjeld P; van Dijk, Boukje AC; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Schouten, Leo J; Gorissen, Hanneke JM; Schalken, Jack A; van den Brandt, Piet A; Oosterwijk, Egbert

    2005-01-01

    Background Biallelic von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene defects, a rate-limiting event in the carcinogenesis, occur in approximately 75% of sporadic clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC). We studied the VHL mutation status in a large population-based case group. Methods Cases were identified within the Netherlands cohort study on diet and cancer, which includes 120,852 men and women. After 11.3 years of follow-up, 337 incident cases with histologically confirmed epithelial cancers were identified. DNA was isolated from paraffin material collected from 51 pathology laboratories and revised by one pathologist, leaving material from 235 cases. VHL mutational status was assessed by SSCP followed by direct sequencing, after testing SSCP as a screening tool in a subsample. Results The number of mutations was significantly higher for clear-cell RCC compared to other histological types. We observed 131 mutations in 114 out of 187 patients (61%) with clear-cell RCC. The majority of mutations were truncating mutations (47%). The mean tumor size was 72.7 mm for mutated tumors compared to 65.3 mm for wildtype tumors (p = 0.06). No statistically significant differences were observed for nuclear grade, TNM distribution or stage. In other histological types, we observed 8 mutations in 7 out of 48 patients (15%), 1 mutation in 1 of 6 oncocytoma, 3 mutations in 2 of 7 chromophobe RCC, 2 mutations in 2 of 30 papillary RCC, no mutations in 1 collecting duct carcinoma and 2 mutations in 2 of 4 unclassified RCC. Conclusion VHL mutations were detected in 61% of sporadic clear-cell RCC. VHL mutated and wildtype clear-cell RCC did not differ with respect to most parameters. PMID:15932632

  7. PTEN and p16 genes as epigenetic biomarkers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC): a study on south Indian population.

    PubMed

    Sushma, P S; Jamil, Kaiser; Kumar, P Uday; Satyanarayana, U; Ramakrishna, M; Triveni, B

    2016-06-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and p16INK4a (p16) genes are tumor suppressor genes, associated with epigenetic alterations. PTEN and p16 promoter hypermethylation is a major epigenetic silencing mechanism leading to cancer. The cooperation between PTEN and p16 in pathogenesis of cancers suggest that their combination might be considered as potential molecular marker for specific subgroups of patients. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate whether PTEN and p16 promoter methylations were involved in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in south Indian subjects. DNA methylation quantitative analyses of the two candidate tumor suppressor genes PTEN and p16 were performed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). Fifty OSCC biopsy samples and their corresponding non-malignant portions as controls were studied comparatively. The methylation status was correlated with the clinical manifestations. Twelve out of 50 patients (24 %) were found to be methylated for PTEN gene, whereas methylation of the p16 gene occurred in 19 out of 50 cases (38 %). A statistically significant result was obtained (P = <0.0001 and 0.017) for both PTEN and p16 genes. PTEN and p16 promoter methylation may be the main mechanism leading to the low expression of PTEN and p16 genes indicating the progress of tumor development. Our data suggest that a low PTEN and p16 expression due to methylation may contribute to the cancer progression and could be useful for prognosis of OSCC. Therefore, analysis of promoter methylation in such genes may provide a biomarker valuable for early detection of oral cancer.

  8. An oncolytic adenovirus that expresses the HAb18 and interleukin 24 genes exhibits enhanced antitumor activity in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sujing; Fang, Xianlong; Xu, Yanni; Ni, Aimin; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Chu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by alterations in multiple genes. High expression of CD147 on the surface of HCC cells promotes proliferation. The monoclonal antibody HAb18 recognizes CD147. We constructed an oncolytic adenoviral vector to express HAb18 (ZD55-HAb18) in HCC cells. Interleukin 24 (IL24) was co-expressed through the use of an F2A linker. ZD55-HAb18-IL24 decreased HCC cell viability to a greater degree than either ZD55-HAb18 or ZD55-IL24 alone. ZD55-HAb18-IL24 also induced apoptosis and autophagy in PLC/PRF/5 HCC cells. Intratumoral injection of ZD55-HAb18-IL24 repressed tumor growth in a PLC/PRF/5 xenograft model. Our results suggest that antibody-antitumor gene conjugation elicited a stronger antitumor effect than the antibody alone, and that this strategy could broaden the applications of antibody-based therapies in HCC. PMID:27528029

  9. Evaluation of EGFR, KRAS and BRAF gene mutations in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Haluk; Bulut, Ersan; Cengiz, Beyhan; Karakok, Metin; Erturhan, Sakip; Seckiner, Ilker

    2014-01-01

    A subset of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients has been shown to respond to anti-EGFR therapy. As KRAS and BRAF mutations are associated with poor response to anti-EGFR therapy in some cancers, it has been suggested that screening for KRAS and BRAF mutations in RCC may be a promising strategy to identify patients who might respond to EGFR-targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the mutation status of EGFR, KRAS and BRAF in RCC patients. Renal tumors and normal renal samples from forty-eight patients who underwent radical or partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer were used in this study. Histological classification of the tumors was performed according to International Union against Cancer (UICC) / American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) classification. Seventeen patients (48%) had clear-cell RCC, 7 (20%) had chromophobe RCC, and 11 patients (32%) had papillary RCC. DNA isolated from the samples was subjected to melting curve mutation analysis for EGFR, BRAF and KRAS using ABI-3130 DNA sequencer. DNA sequencing analysis of RCC samples, when compared with morphologically normal matched regions, did not show any exon mutations. Our results do not support the notion that EGFR, KRAS and BRAF might be mutated in RCC.

  10. PROFILING GENE EXPRESSION IN HUMAN H295R ADRENOCORTICAL CARCINOMA CELLS AND RAT TESTES TO IDENTIFY PATHWAYS OF TOXICITY FOR CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Profiling Gene Expression in Human H295R Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells and Rat Testes to Identify Pathways of Toxicity for Conazole Fungicides
    Ren1, H., Schmid1, J., Retief2, J., Turpaz2, Y.,Zhang3, X.,Jones3, P., Newsted3, J.,Giesy3, J., Wolf1, D.,Wood1, C., Bao1, W., Dix1, ...

  11. Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinoma with NONO-TFE3 gene fusion: morphology, prognosis, and potential pitfall in detecting TFE3 gene rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiu-Yuan; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Ni; Gan, Hua-Lei; Teng, Xiao-Dong; Shi, Shan-Shan; Wang, Xuan; Wei, Xue; Ye, Sheng-Bing; Li, Rui; Ma, Heng-Hui; Lu, Zhen-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Rao, Qiu

    2017-03-01

    Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinomas are characterized by several different translocations involving the TFE3 gene. Tumors with different specific gene fusions may have different clinicopathological manifestations. Fewer than 10 renal cell carcinoma cases with NONO-TFE3 have been described. Here we examined eight additional cases of this rare tumor using clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular analyses. The male-to-female ratio of our study cohort was 1:1, and the median age was 30 years. The most distinctive feature of the tumors was that they exhibited glandular/tubular or papillary architecture that was lined with small-to-medium cuboidal to high columnar cells with indistinct cell borders and an abundantly clear or flocculent eosinophilic cytoplasm. The nuclei were oriented toward the luminal surface and were round and uniform in shape, which resulted in the appearance of secretory endometrioid subnuclear vacuolization. The distinct glandular/tubular or papillary architecture was often accompanied by sheets of epithelial cells that presented a biphasic pattern. Immunohistochemically, all eight cases demonstrated moderate (2+) or strong (3+) positive staining for TFE3, CD10, RCC marker, and PAX-8. None of the tumors were immunoreactive for CK7, Cathepsin K, Melan-A, HMB45, Ksp-cadherin, Vimentin, CA9, 34βE12 or CD117. NONO-TFE3 fusion transcripts were identified in six cases by RT-PCR. All eight cases showed equivocal split signals with a distance of nearly 2 signal diameters and sometimes had false-negative results. Furthermore, we developed a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay to serve as an adjunct diagnostic tool for the detection of the NONO-TFE3 fusion gene and used this method to detect the fusion gene in all eight cases. Long-term follow-up (range, 10-102 months) was available for 7 patients. All 7 patients were alive with no evidence of recurrent disease or disease progression after their initial resection. This report

  12. E2F-1 gene therapy induces apoptosis and increases chemosensitivity in human pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mary Jane; Farmer, Michael R; Atienza, Cesar; Stilwell, Ariel; Dong, Yan Bin; Yang, Hai Liang; Wong, Sandra L; McMasters, Kelly M

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is often resistant to conventional chemotherapy. In this study, we examined the role of adenovirus-mediated overexpression of E2F-1 in inducing apoptosis and increasing the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic head exocrine adenocarcinoma cells (mutant p53) were treated by mock infection or adenoviruses expressing beta-galactosidase or E2F-1 (Ad-E2F-1) alone or in combination with sublethal concentrations of each chemotherapeutic drug. Cell growth and viability were assessed at selected time points. Apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry, characteristic changes in cell morphology and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of E2F-1 and Bcl-2 family member proteins and PARP cleavage. Western blot analysis revealed marked overexpression of E2F-1 at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 20 and 70. By 3 days after infection, Ad-E2F-1 treatment at an MOI of 70 resulted in approximately a 20-fold reduction in cell growth and 60% reduction in cell viability as compared to mock-infected cells. Cell cycle analysis, PARP cleavage and changes in cell morphology supported apoptosis as the mechanism of cell death in response to E2F-1. In order to test the efficacy of treatment with a combination of gene therapy and chemotherapy, we utilized concentrations of Ad-E2F-1 which reduced viability to 50% in combination with each chemotherapeutic agent. Cotreatment of the cells with E2F-1 virus and roscovitine (ROS) or etoposide resulted in an additive effect on cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, 5-fluorouracil did not cooperate with Ad-E2F-1 in the mediation of tumor death or inhibition of cell growth. Immunoblotting for Bcl-2 family members revealed no significant changes in the expression levels of Bcl-2, Bcl X(L), Bax or Bak following gene or 'chemogene' therapy with E2F-1. However, a Bax cleavage product was noted

  13. Inactivation of the PBRM1 tumor suppressor gene amplifies the HIF-response in VHL-/- clear cell renal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenhua; Li, Wei; Xiao, Tengfei; Liu, Xiaole Shirley; Kaelin, William G

    2017-01-31

    Most clear cell renal carcinomas (ccRCCs) are initiated by somatic inactivation of the VHL tumor suppressor gene. The VHL gene product, pVHL, is the substrate recognition unit of an ubiquitin ligase that targets the HIF transcription factor for proteasomal degradation; inappropriate expression of HIF target genes drives renal carcinogenesis. Loss of pVHL is not sufficient, however, to cause ccRCC. Additional cooperating genetic events, including intragenic mutations and copy number alterations, are required. Common examples of the former are loss-of-function mutations of the PBRM1 and BAP1 tumor suppressor genes, which occur in a mutually exclusive manner in ccRCC and define biologically distinct subsets of ccRCC. PBRM1 encodes the Polybromo- and BRG1-associated factors-containing complex (PBAF) chromatin remodeling complex component BRG1-associated factor 180 (BAF180). Here we identified ccRCC lines whose ability to proliferate in vitro and in vivo is sensitive to wild-type BAF180, but not a tumor-associated BAF180 mutant. Biochemical and functional studies linked growth suppression by BAF180 to its ability to form a canonical PBAF complex containing BRG1 that dampens the HIF transcriptional signature.

  14. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome with cleft lip and palate associated with the novel PTCH gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ryo; Saito, Kayoko; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Takayama, Yoshinaga; Fujii, Katsunori; Agawa, Kaori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Ando, Tomohiro; Akizuki, Tanetaka

    2009-07-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to cancers. Two unrelated patients, 21- and 16-year-old males, with cleft lip and palate and multiple jaw cysts, were diagnosed according to clinical criteria. To confirm a diagnosis of NBCCS, we undertook a molecular genetic analysis of the PTCH gene. Their PTCH genes were analyzed by direct sequencing of the PCR product from their DNA, and previously unreported mutations were identified. A heterozygous duplication at the nucleotide position between 3325 and 3328 of the PTCH gene (c.3325_3328dupGGCG) was detected in the 21-year-old patient. It caused a frameshift mutation, resulting in a premature termination of the PTCH protein. A point mutation (G to C) in intron 7 of the PTCH gene (c.1067+1G>C) was detected in the 16-year-old patient. This caused an aberrant splicing of PTCH. It is interesting to note that the non-canonical cryptic splice-donor site was activated, which did not conform to the GT-AG rule.

  15. Integrative Genomics in Combination with RNA Interference Identifies Prognostic and Functionally Relevant Gene Targets for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang; Wang, Pei; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yuzheng; Fan, Wenhong; Upton, Melissa P.; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R.; Doody, David R.; Futran, Neal D.; Zhao, Lue Ping; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Chen, Chu; Méndez, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    In oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), metastasis to lymph nodes is associated with a 50% reduction in 5-year survival. To identify a metastatic gene set based on DNA copy number abnormalities (CNAs) of differentially expressed genes, we compared DNA and RNA of OSCC cells laser-microdissected from non-metastatic primary tumors (n = 17) with those from lymph node metastases (n = 20), using Affymetrix 250K Nsp single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and U133 Plus 2.0 arrays, respectively. With a false discovery rate (FDR)<5%, 1988 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed between primary and metastatic OSCC. Of these, 114 were found to have a significant correlation between DNA copy number and gene expression (FDR<0.01). Among these 114 correlated transcripts, the corresponding genomic regions of each of 95 transcripts had CNAs differences between primary and metastatic OSCC (FDR<0.01). Using an independent dataset of 133 patients, multivariable analysis showed that the OSCC–specific and overall mortality hazards ratio (HR) for patients carrying the 95-transcript signature were 4.75 (95% CI: 2.03–11.11) and 3.45 (95% CI: 1.84–6.50), respectively. To determine the degree by which these genes impact cell survival, we compared the growth of five OSCC cell lines before and after knockdown of over-amplified transcripts via a high-throughput siRNA–mediated screen. The expression-knockdown of 18 of the 26 genes tested showed a growth suppression ≥30% in at least one cell line (P<0.01). In particular, cell lines derived from late-stage OSCC were more sensitive to the knockdown of G3BP1 than cell lines derived from early-stage OSCC, and the growth suppression was likely caused by increase in apoptosis. Further investigation is warranted to examine the biological role of these genes in OSCC progression and their therapeutic potentials. PMID:23341773

  16. PTCH gene mutations in invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, T W; Maruta, Y; Tomaszewski, J E; Linnenbach, A J; Malkowicz, S B

    1998-09-03

    LOH analysis suggests that multiple tumor suppressor genes play a role in the development of human TCC. The human homolog of the Drosophila PTCH was recently cloned and mapped to the BCNS locus on 9q22.3, a chromosomal region commonly deleted in TCCs. We first examined the steady state mRNA transcription of the PTCH, SMOH and GLI3 genes of the HH signal transduction pathway in TCC cell lines and normal urothelium. Normal urothelium and TCC cell lines express these three genes within the PTCH signal transduction pathway. We then screened for PTCH mutations in 'hot spot' exons 6, 8, 13 and 16 by PCR/SSCP analysis of genomic DNAs from 54 TCC tumor samples and control autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes. DNA sequence analysis confirmed TCC-specific mutations in two of 54 patients (3.7%). These mutations resulted a single amino acid substitution and two frame shifts. One tumor had PTCH mutations in exon 16 as well as exon 13 and one tumor had a mutation in exon 13 alone. Both TCC tumors that contained PTCH mutations had a loss of heterozygosity at 9q. Although the PTCH protein has an unknown function in urothelial cells, the detection of the PTCH, SMOH and GLI3 transcripts in normal urothelium and TCC cell lines and rare PTCH mutations in tumor samples suggest that the HH pathway may have a role in controlling the proliferation of urothelial cells and that PTCH mutations may contribute to the development of a subset of TCCs.

  17. Role of the WWOX gene, encompassing fragile region FRA16D, in suppression of pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shunji; Semba, Shuho; Maeda, Naoko; Aqeilan, Rami I; Huebner, Kay; Yokozaki, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    The WW-domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene spans the common chromosomal fragile site FRA16D (16q23.2) and is believed to be a tumor suppressor in various human malignancies. We have previously shown frequent down-modulation of Wwox expression in pancreatic carcinoma (PC); however, biological function of Wwox in pancreatic duct carcinogenesis remains unknown. In PANC-1 (Wwox-negative) PC-derived cells, restoration of recombinant WWOX gene expression with adenoviral gene delivery (Ad-WWOX) effectively increased the number of cells with subG(1) DNA contents in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manners: Ad-WWOX infection up-regulated caspase-3 activity and reduced procaspase-3 and procaspase-8 levels. We also confirmed that restoration of WWOX gene suppressed cell growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. In addition, transduction of wild-type WWOX-expressing vector inhibited PANC-1 colony formation; however, substitution of Y33 of Wwox with arginine did not lead to inhibition of colony formation, suggesting the biological significance of the WW1 domain of Wwox for its tumor-suppressing activity. In PC tissue samples, abundant cytoplasmic Wwox expression was detected in the normal pancreatic duct epithelium, whereas Wwox expression was frequently reduced not only in a large fraction of PC but also in precancerous lesions in accord with the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) grade, which was closely correlated with patients' poorer outcome. Interestingly, the existence of Wwox expression was associated with elevated mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (Smad4) protein levels in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that down-modulation of Wwox expression is an early event and may be associated with the down-regulation of Smad4 protein levels during pancreatic duct carcinogenesis.

  18. Expression Microarray Analysis Reveals Alternative Splicing of LAMA3 and DST Genes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ryan; Ochs, Michael F.; Ahn, Sun Mi; Hennessey, Patrick; Tan, Marietta; Soudry, Ethan; Gaykalova, Daria A.; Uemura, Mamoru; Brait, Mariana; Shao, Chunbo; Westra, William; Bishop, Justin; Fertig, Elana J.; Califano, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Prior studies have demonstrated tumor-specific alternative splicing events in various solid tumor types. The role of alternative splicing in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is unclear. Our study queried exon-level expression to implicate splice variants in HNSCC tumors. Experimental Design We performed a comparative genome-wide analysis of 44 HNSCC tumors and 25 uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) tissue samples at an exon expression level. In our comparison we ranked genes based upon a novel score—the Maximum-Minimum Exon Score (MMES) – designed to predict the likelihood of an alternative splicing event occurring. We validated predicted alternative splicing events using quantitative RT-PCR on an independent cohort. Results After MMES scoring of 17,422 genes, the top 900 genes with the highest scores underwent additional manual inspection of expression patterns in a graphical analysis. The genes LAMA3, DST, VEGFC, SDHA, RASIP1, and TP63 were selected for further validation studies because of a high frequency of alternative splicing suggested in our graphical analysis, and literature review showing their biological relevance and known splicing patterns. We confirmed TP63 as having dominant expression of the short DeltaNp63 isoform in HNSCC tumor samples, consistent with prior reports. Two of the six genes (LAMA3 and DST) validated by quantitative RT-PCR for tumor-specific alternative splicing events (Student's t test, P<0.001). Conclusion Alternative splicing events of oncologically relevant proteins occur in HNSCC. The number of genes expressing tumor-specific splice variants needs further elucidation, as does the functional significance of selective isoform expression. PMID:24675808

  19. Deregulation of paralogous 13 HOX genes in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Gabriella; Franco, Renato; Sabatino, Rocco; Mantia, Elvira La; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; Collina, Francesca; Longo, Francesco; Ionna, Franco; Losito, Nunzia S; Liguori, Giuseppina; Botti, Gerardo; Cantile, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Many oncogenic drivers related to the pathogenesis of OSCC have identified, but the discovery of new molecular markers for early detection of this cancer, remains one the main goals of clinical research. HOX genes regulate normal embryonic development, cell differentiation and other critical processes in eukaryotic cell life. Several studies have demonstrated that the deregulation of HOX genes play a significant role in cancer development and progression. In this study, we built a prognostic TMA with 119 OSCC samples, representative of deep and superficial part of the tumour, to investigate, the paralogous 13 HOX proteins expression, correlating them with clinicpathological parameters, outcomes and therapy information. Our results show an aberrant expression of HOX A13 and HOX D13 in OSCC pathogenesis and tumour progression. HOX A13 overexpression is related to an OSCC better prognosis (P=0.029) and better therapy response in patients treated with both radiotherapy and chemotherapy (P=0.015). HOX D13 overexpression is inversely related to an overall survival (P=0.004). These data highlight the potential prognostic role of HOX paralogous group 13 genes in OSCC.

  20. Identification of new candidate therapeutic target genes in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Klijanienko, Jerzy; Vacher, Sophie; Ouafi, Lamia; Chemlali, Walid; Caly, Martial; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Lappartient, Emmanuelle; Mariani, Odette; Rodriguez, José; Jouffroy, Thomas; Girod, Angélique; Calugaru, Valentin; Hoffmann, Caroline; Lidereau, Rosette; Berger, Frédérique; Kamal, Maud; Bieche, Ivan; Le Tourneau, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed at identifying druggable molecular alterations at the RNA level from untreated HNSCC patients, and assessing their prognostic significance. Methods We retrieved 96 HNSCC patients who underwent primary surgery. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR was used to analyze a panel of 42 genes coding for major druggable proteins. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the prognostic significance of overexpressed genes. Results Median age was 56 years [35–78]. Most of patients were men (80%) with a history of alcohol (70.4%) and/or tobacco consumption (72.5%). Twelve patients (12%) were HPV-positive. Most significantly overexpressed genes involved cell cycle regulation (CCND1 [27%], CDK6 [21%]), tyrosine kinase receptors (MET [18%], EGFR [14%]), angiogenesis (PGF [301%], VEGFA [14%]), and immune system (PDL1/CD274 [28%]). PIK3CA expression was an independent prognostic marker, associated with shorter disease-free survival. Conclusions We identified druggable overexpressed genes associated with a poor outcome that might be of interest for personalizing treatment of HNSCC patients. PMID:27329726

  1. Overexpression and amplification of glutathione S-transferase pi gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Pavelic, Z P; Li, Y; Gleich, L; Gartside, P S; Pavelic, L; Gluckman, J L; Stambrook, P J

    1997-01-01

    Human glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) may serve as a useful tumor marker because of the high frequency with which it is found in elevated levels in several tumor types. To determine whether GST-pi is useful as an indicator for cancers of the head and neck, expression of GST-pi mRNA was investigated by Northern analysis in this tumor type. Overexpression of GST-pi mRNA was detected in 9 of 36 (25%) primary head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). When Southern blot analysis was used to examine the relationship between overexpression and amplification of the GST-pi gene, only 3 of 36 tumors (8%) showed GST-pi gene amplification. Thus, gene amplification is not critical to GST-pi mRNA overexpression in HNSCCs. Moderately and poorly differentiated HNSCCs tended to manifest elevated GST-pi mRNA compared with well differentiated tumors (30% for moderately and poorly differentiated tumors versus none of the well differentiated tumors examined). However, there was no significant correlation between GST-% mRNA overexpression and clinical stage, T stage (tumor size), N stage (neck nodal status), pathological nodes, or patient survival.

  2. Mutations of the p53 and PTCH gene in basal cell carcinomas: UV mutation signature and strand bias.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Yeon; Park, Hyun Jeong; Baek, Seung-Cheol; Byun, Dae Gyoo; Houh, Dong

    2002-05-01

    Mutations of p53 and PTCH gene, two candidate tumor suppressor genes for basal cell carcinoma (BCC), were screened in 15 cases of sporadic BCCs that developed in sun-exposed skin region in a Korean population. p53 and PTCH mutations were detected at a frequency of 33 and 40%, respectively, and the mutations were predominantly UV-signature transition, C-->T transitions at dipyrimidine sites and CC-->TT tandem mutations. In both genes, the most common mutations were missense mutations resulting in amino acid substitution, which is different than the results from Caucasian BCCs where mutations are frequently predicted to make truncated or absent proteins. All mutations, except for one, occurred on the nontranscribed strand where is little efficient removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers relative to the transcribed strand. Loss of heterozygocity (LOH) of 9q22 for PTCH loci was found in eight of 15 informative cases of BCCs (53%), but none of the cases were informative for LOH of 17p13 for p53 loci. Not only do our data indicate the key role played by p53 and PTCH in the development of BCCs, these findings also suggest that UVB may significantly contribute to BCC tumorigenesis. Moreover, molecular epidemiology composed of incidence of p53 and PTCH mutations, difference in the type of mutation and repair bias of UV-induced DNA lesions might affect the distinct features of BCCs between different racial population.

  3. RNA-binding protein CELF1 promotes tumor growth and alters gene expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    House, Reniqua P; Talwar, Sudha; Hazard, E Starr; Hill, Elizabeth G; Palanisamy, Viswanathan

    2015-12-22

    The RNA binding protein CELF1 (also known as CUGBP1) is emerging as a critical regulator of cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, to provide a global prospective of CELF1 regulation of oral squamous cell carcinoma, we performed RNA-sequencing in oral cancer cells and CELF1 overexpression analysis in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes. Our approaches identified 1283 mRNAs differentially regulated as a function of CELF1 expression and more importantly CELF1 promoted alternative splicing of several target pre-mRNAs, which are known to be involved in various cancer biological processes. Overexpression of CELF1 in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes protected cells against oxidative damage and altered gene expression patterns. Finally, we provide evidence that reduction of CELF1 protein using a xenograft tumorigenesis mouse model decreased tumor growth. Altogether, these data provided a comprehensive view of the CELF1 mRNA regulatory network in oral cancer and suggests that CELF1 and/or its target mRNAs are viable candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  4. RNA-binding protein CELF1 promotes tumor growth and alters gene expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    House, Reniqua P.; Talwar, Sudha; Hazard, E. Starr; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Palanisamy, Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    The RNA binding protein CELF1 (also known as CUGBP1) is emerging as a critical regulator of cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, to provide a global prospective of CELF1 regulation of oral squamous cell carcinoma, we performed RNA-sequencing in oral cancer cells and CELF1 overexpression analysis in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes. Our approaches identified 1283 mRNAs differentially regulated as a function of CELF1 expression and more importantly CELF1 promoted alternative splicing of several target pre-mRNAs, which are known to be involved in various cancer biological processes. Overexpression of CELF1 in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes protected cells against oxidative damage and altered gene expression patterns. Finally, we provide evidence that reduction of CELF1 protein using a xenograft tumorigenesis mouse model decreased tumor growth. Altogether, these data provided a comprehensive view of the CELF1 mRNA regulatory network in oral cancer and suggests that CELF1 and/or its target mRNAs are viable candidates for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26498364

  5. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis in identification of metastasis-related genes of lung squamous cell carcinoma based on the Cancer Genome Atlas database

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng; Zhao, Jinlong; Kang, Zhenxing

    2017-01-01

    Background Lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SCC) is a common type of malignancy. Its pathogenesis mechanism of tumor development is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify key genes for diagnosis biomarkers in lung SCC metastasis. Methods We searched and downloaded mRNA expression data and clinical data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database to identify differences in mRNA expression of primary tumor tissues from lung SCC with and without metastasis. Gene co-expression network analysis, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCR) were used to explore the biological functions of the identified dysregulated genes. Results Four hundred and eighty-two differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between lung SCC with and without metastasis. Nineteen modules were identified in lung SCC through weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Twenty-three DEGs and 26 DEGs were significantly enriched in the respective pink and black module. KEGG pathway analysis displayed that 26 DEGs in the black module were significantly enriched in bile secretion pathway. Forty-nine DEGs in the two gene co-expression module were used to construct PPI network. CFTR in the black module was the hub protein, had the connectivity with 182 genes. The results of qRT-PCR displayed that FIGF, SFTPD, DYNLRB2 were significantly down-regulated in the tumor samples of lung SCC with metastasis and CFTR, SCGB3A2, SSTR1, SCTR, ROPN1L had the down-regulation tendency in lung SCC with metastasis compared to lung SCC without metastasis. Conclusions The dysregulated genes including CFTR, SCTR and FIGF might be involved in the pathology of lung SCC metastasis and could be used as potential diagnosis biomarkers or therapeutic targets for lung SCC. PMID:28203405

  6. Gene promoter methylation signature predicts survival of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Kostareli, Efterpi; Hielscher, Thomas; Zucknick, Manuela; Baboci, Lorena; Wichmann, Gunnar; Holzinger, Dana; Mücke, Oliver; Pawlita, Michael; Del Mistro, Annarosa; Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Da Mosto, Maria Cristina; Tirelli, Giancarlo; Plinkert, Peter; Dietz, Andreas; Plass, Christoph; Weichenhan, Dieter; Hess, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infection with high-risk types of human papilloma virus (HPV) is currently the best-established prognostic marker for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), one of the most common and lethal human malignancies worldwide. Clinical trials have been launched to address the concept of treatment de-escalation for HPV-positive HNSCC with the final aim to reduce treatment related toxicity and debilitating long-term impacts on the quality of life. However, HPV-related tumors are mainly restricted to oropharyngeal SCC (OPSCC) and there is an urgent need to establish reliable biomarkers for all patients at high risk for treatment failure. A patient cohort (n = 295) with mainly non-OPSCC (72.9%) and a low prevalence of HPV16-related tumors (8.8%) was analyzed by MassARRAY to determine a previously established prognostic methylation score (MS). Kaplan-Meier revealed a highly significant correlation between a high MS and a favorable survival for OPSCC (P = 0.0004) and for non-OPSCC (P<0.0001), which was confirmed for all HNSCC by multivariate Cox regression models (HR: 9.67, 95% CI [4.61–20.30], P<0.0001). Next, we established a minimal methylation signature score (MMSS), which consists of ten most informative of the originally 62 CpG units used for the MS. The prognostic value of the MMSS was confirmed by Kaplan-Meier analysis for all HNSCC (P<0.0001) and non-OPSCC (P = 0.0002), and was supported by multivariate Cox regression models for all HNSCC (HR: 2.15, 95% CI [1.36–3.41], P = 0.001). In summary, the MS and the MMSS exhibit an excellent performance as prognosticators for survival, which is not limited by the anatomical site, and both could be implemented in future clinical trials. PMID:26786582

  7. MC1R and PTCH gene polymorphism in French patients with basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Liboutet, Muriel; Portela, Marc; Delestaing, Gisèle; Vilmer, Catherine; Dupin, Nicolas; Gorin, Isabelle; Saiag, Philippe; Lebbé, Céleste; Kerob, Delphine; Dubertret, Louis; Grandchamp, Bernard; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Soufir, Nadem

    2006-07-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) variants and of two patched (PTCH) polymorphisms (c.3944C>T (P1315L), insertion 18 bp IVS1-83) as risk factors for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in the French population. The population investigated comprised 126 BCC patients who were enrolled on the basis of specific criteria (multiple and/or familial BCC and/or onset before the age of 40 years and/or association with another tumor)--and 151 controls matched for ethnicity, age, and sex. MC1R variants appeared as a moderate risk factor for BCC (odds ratio (OR) for one and two variants, 2.17 [1.28-3.68] and 7.72 [3.42-17.38], respectively), independently of pigmentation characteristics (OR = 2.53 [1.34-4.8]). Interestingly, in addition to the predictable red hair color (RHC) alleles, two non-RHC alleles (V60L and V92M) were also closely associated with BCC risk (OR 3.21 [1.91-5.38] and 2.87 [1.5-5.48], respectively), which differs from the situation in the Celtic population. In addition, the PTCH c.3944C/C genotype was also associated with BCC risk (OR 1.94 [1.2-3.1]), especially in the subgroup of patients with multiple tumors (OR 2.16 [1.3-3.6]). Thus, our data show that MC1R and PTCH variants are associated with BCC risk in the French population. We further suggest that assessing MC1R and PTCH status could be useful, combined with the assessment of clinical risk factors, in identifying high-risk patients to be targeted for prevention or more rigorous surveillance.

  8. Gene promoter methylation signature predicts survival of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Kostareli, Efterpi; Hielscher, Thomas; Zucknick, Manuela; Baboci, Lorena; Wichmann, Gunnar; Holzinger, Dana; Mücke, Oliver; Pawlita, Michael; Del Mistro, Annarosa; Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Da Mosto, Maria Cristina; Tirelli, Giancarlo; Plinkert, Peter; Dietz, Andreas; Plass, Christoph; Weichenhan, Dieter; Hess, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Infection with high-risk types of human papilloma virus (HPV) is currently the best-established prognostic marker for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), one of the most common and lethal human malignancies worldwide. Clinical trials have been launched to address the concept of treatment de-escalation for HPV-positive HNSCC with the final aim to reduce treatment related toxicity and debilitating long-term impacts on the quality of life. However, HPV-related tumors are mainly restricted to oropharyngeal SCC (OPSCC) and there is an urgent need to establish reliable biomarkers for all patients at high risk for treatment failure. A patient cohort (n = 295) with mainly non-OPSCC (72.9%) and a low prevalence of HPV16-related tumors (8.8%) was analyzed by MassARRAY to determine a previously established prognostic methylation score (MS). Kaplan-Meier revealed a highly significant correlation between a high MS and a favorable survival for OPSCC (P = 0.0004) and for non-OPSCC (P<0.0001), which was confirmed for all HNSCC by multivariate Cox regression models (HR: 9.67, 95% CI [4.61-20.30], P<0.0001). Next, we established a minimal methylation signature score (MMSS), which consists of ten most informative of the originally 62 CpG units used for the MS. The prognostic value of the MMSS was confirmed by Kaplan-Meier analysis for all HNSCC (P<0.0001) and non-OPSCC (P = 0.0002), and was supported by multivariate Cox regression models for all HNSCC (HR: 2.15, 95% CI [1.36-3.41], P = 0.001). In summary, the MS and the MMSS exhibit an excellent performance as prognosticators for survival, which is not limited by the anatomical site, and both could be implemented in future clinical trials.

  9. Enhanced specific antitumor immunity of dendritic cells transduced with the glypican 3 gene and co-cultured with cytokine-induced killer cells against hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YULIANG; WANG, YINLONG; MU, HONG; LIU, TAO; CHEN, XIAOBO; SHEN, ZHONGYANG

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy requires an immunogenic tumor-associated antigen and an effective therapeutic strategy. Glypican 3 (GPC3) is a valuable diagnostic marker and a potential therapeutic target in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The present study investigated whether DCs transduced with the GPC3 gene (DCs-GPC3) and co-cultured with autologous cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) may induce a marked specific immune response against GPC3-expressing HCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Human DCs were transfected with a green fluorescent protein plasmid with GPC3 by nucleofection and then co-cultured with autologous CIKs. Flow cytometry was used to measure the phenotypes of DCs and CIKs. The co-cultured cells were harvested and incubated with HCC cells and the cytotoxicity of the CIKs was assessed by nonradioactive cytotoxicity assay. The anti-tumor activity of these effector cells was further evaluated using a nude mouse tumor model. The results demonstrated that DCs-GPC3 significantly promoted the autologous CIKs differentiation, as well as anti-tumor cytokine interferon-γ secretion. In addition, DCs-GPC3-CIKs significantly enhanced the cytotoxic activity against GPC3-expressing HepG2 cells, indicating a GPC3-specific marked immune response against HCC cells. The in vivo data indicated that DCs-GPC3-CIKs exhibited significant HepG2 cell-induced tumor growth inhibition in nude mice. The results of the present study provided a new insight into the design of personalizing adoptive immunotherapy for GPC3-expressing HCC cells. PMID:25625609

  10. Endomandibular acinic cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bondi, R; Nardi, P; Urso, C

    1989-01-01

    A rare case of endomandibular acinic cell carcinoma (ACC) in a white woman aged 79 is reported. Radiologic examination revealed an osteolytic area within the jaw, extending from the left molar region to the ascending branch. The tumor was located within a cavity of the mandible and did not seem to infiltrate the bone. Histologically, it was composed of large epithelial cells with granular cytoplasm, arranged in solid nests, sometimes displaying microcystic spaces. ACC generally occurs in salivary glands. In the reported case, the tumor was considered to arise from ectopic salivary tissue enclosed in the jaw, as no lesion was found in minor salivary glands.

  11. Fallacious Carcinoma- Spindle Cell Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M; Govinda, Girish; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Venugopal, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a unique, rare and peculiar biphasic tumour of head and neck which is not frequently observed in the oral cavity. This variant of squamous cell carcinoma although of monophasic epithelial origin, simulates a sarcoma and is an aggressive carcinoma with high frequency of recurrence and metastasis. A correct and timely diagnosis is of paramount importance. Most of the tumours require an Immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel for confirmation or diagnosis. We report a case of spindle cell carcinoma with varied histopathological morphology and clinical presentation in a middle aged female with a brief review of literature. PMID:27630965

  12. Vismodegib in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Amaria, R N; Bowles, D W; Lewis, K D; Jimeno, A

    2012-07-01

    Vismodegib is a novel, small-molecule inhibitor of smoothened, a key component of the hedgehog signaling pathway. Increased hedgehog pathway signaling is critical in the development of hereditary and spontaneous basal cell carcinomas of the skin, and has been implicated in the development of a number of other tumors. In preclinical models, vismodegib demonstrated potent antitumor activity in hedgehog-dependent tumors, particularly basal cell carcinomas. Clinically, phase I and II studies showed dramatic anticancer activity in patients with advanced basal cell carcinomas. In January 2012, vismodegib was approved by the FDA for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic basal cell carcinomas of the skin.

  13. Influence of chromosomal integration on glucocorticoid-regulated transcription of growth-stimulating papillomavirus genes E6 and E7 in cervical carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Von Knebel Doeberitz, M.; Bauknecht, T.; Bartsch, D.; Zur Hausen, H. )

    1991-02-15

    In most cervical carcinoma cells the E6 and E7 genes of specific human papillomaviruses are transcribed from viral sequences integrated into host cell chromosomes. Glucocorticoids activate the promoter elements of various human papillomaviruses in transient-expression assays. The authors have analyzed the effect of dexamethasone on the transcription rate of human papillomaviruses 18 E6 and E7 genes integrated at different chromosomal sites in four cervical cancer cell lines. Dexamethasone led to an increase in the transcription rate of the integrated E6-E7 sequences in C4-1 and C4-2 cells but led to a decrease in SW 756 cells and did not affect the transcription rate in HeLa cells. It thus appears that dominant regulatory mechanisms presumably depending on the chromosomal integration site are able to override the response of the viral promoter to steroid hormones. The growth rate of all dexamethasone-treated cell lines correlated consistently with the expression of the papillomavirus E6 and E7 genes, supporting their role in the maintenance of the proliferative phenotype of cervical carcinoma cells. Since human papillomaviruses are integrated into the host cell genome at variable, presumably randomly selected chromosomal loci, regulatory mechanisms that influence viral gene expression, and hence cell growth, may differ among cancers of independent clonal origin.

  14. Stages of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Version General Information About Merkel Cell Carcinoma Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Merkel cell carcinoma is a very rare disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the skin. Sun exposure and having a weak immune system can ...

  15. TUMORAL TISSUE SPECIFIC PROMOTER HYPERMETHYLATION OF DISTINCT TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES IN A CASE WITH NONSMALL CELL LUNG CARCINOMA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sulhattin; Dogan, Tamer; Koksal, Binnur; Yildirim, Malik Ejder; Gumus, Cesur; Elagoz, Sahenda; Akkurt, Ibrahim; Ozdemir, Oztürk

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is an aggressive phenomenon and the epigenetical alterations of some tumor supressor genes have been reported for the different tumor types. Case Presentation: It is presented a case report concerning a 43 years old male with NSCLC on the lower segment of the right lung. The patient underwent a diag-nostic excisional thin-needle biopsy and after the histological confirmation. We examined the promoter methylation status of some distinct tumor supressor genes in tumoral and blood tissues of the case after sodium bisulfite conversion and DNA amplification with methylation specific multiplex PCR technique. Both tissues were also searched for G to A transitions in codons 12 and 13 of the K-ras proto-oncogene. Results: Tumor specimen showed fully methyl pattern profiles for the SFRP2, p16, DAPK1 and partially hyper-methylated profile for the p53 and MGMT genes in this case with non-small lung carci-noma. Blood speicemen showed normal hypomethylated profiles for all studied TS genes. The K-ras proto-oncogene was in normal structure both in blood and tumoral spiecemens that examined. Conclusion: Results indicate that genes exhibit tumor suppressor activi-ties in blood, but exhibit epigenetic inactivation in carcinoma cell. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms may play an important role in the non-small cell lung carcinogenesis in human. PMID:21264081

  16. The synergy of tobacco and alcohol and glutathione S-transferase θ 1 gene deletion and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    D’ Mello, Sarah; Bavle, Radhika Manoj; Paremala, K; Makarla, Soumya; Sudhakara, M; Bhatt, Madhura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the leading cancer among males in India. It is related to tobacco habits and alcohol consumption as well as the individual susceptibility for xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme polymorphisms. Glutathione S-transferase θ 1 (GSTT1) is a Phase II metabolic enzyme which is directly involved in catalyzing chemicals to mutagenic intermediates. This gene is characterized by genetic polymorphism resulting in complete gene deletion and subsequent absence of the enzyme, which ultimately dictates the risk of cancer development. Scraping buccal mucosa to obtain DNA from the cells is a simple, readily acceptable and rapid method to detect and assess the gene. Aim: To assess GSTT1 gene deletion in individuals giving a history of tobacco smoking and/or chewing and alcohol consumption and absence of clinically detectable lesions; and in OSCC cases to gauge if GSTT1 gene deletion confers protection to an individual and whether it can be used as a “single” marker to arrive at this conclusion. To validate the use of buccal scrape for determining the genotype of an individual by assessing the polymorphism at GSTT1 gene locus (22q11.2). Materials and Methods: Fifty-two cases were evaluated using buccal mucosal scrapes of tobacco habituates for 8 or more years, without clinically evident lesion (Group I) and from mucosa of tobacco habituates with clinically evident and histopathologically confirmed OSCC (Group II). DNA extraction and genotype at GSTT1 gene locus was determined by polymerase chain reaction assay. Statistical Analysis: The results were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: 90.66% of subjects had GSTT1 null genotype in Group I subjects. In Group II, subjects with both clinically and histopathologically diagnosed oral cancer, about 76.96% had GSTT1 null genotype. Conclusion: GSTT1 null genotype confers protection to individuals with tobacco habits and alcohol consumption, predominantly to those who used

  17. Effects of Cx43 gene modification on the proliferation and migration of the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226.

    PubMed

    Zang, J-P; Wei, R

    2015-10-27

    In this study, the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226 was transfected with the recombinant plasmid pBudCE4.1_Cx43 to explore the role of the Cx43 gene in cell growth, cell cycle, and tumor migration. pBudCE4.1-Cx43 was transfected into human lung squamous carcinoma NCI-H226 cells using Lipofectamine TM2000. The mRNA and protein expressions of Cx43 in the transfected cells were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The cell-cell communication was detected using the scratch dye tracer method and the cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. The CCK-8 proliferation, scratch healing, and cell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the effect of the Cx43 gene transfection on the proliferation, migration, and invasive abilities of NCI-H226 cells. Cx43 mRNA and protein expressions and the fluorescence intensity in the scratch healing test were significantly higher in the experimental group than those in the control and blank groups (P < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively). The CCK-8 proliferation assay and the scratch healing experiment revealed significantly inhibited NCI-H226 cell proliferation (especially 72 h after incubation) and cell migration, respectively, in the experimental group, compared to the control and blank groups (P < 0.001 and <0.05, respectively). The transwell chamber test showed a statistically significant decrease in the invasive ability of NCI-H226 cells in the experimental group (P < 0.05). Therefore, Cx43 gene transfection could inhibit the migration of human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226, thereby inhibiting tumor cell proliferation.

  18. Merkel cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Koljonen, Virve

    2006-01-01

    Background Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an unusual primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. MCC is a fatal disease, and patients have a poor chance of survival. Moreover, MCC lacks distinguishing clinical features, and thus by the time the diagnosis is made, the tumour usually have metastasized. MCC mainly affects sun-exposed areas of elderly persons. Half of the tumours are located in the head and neck region. Methods MCC was first described in 1972. Since then, most of the cases reported, have been in small series of patients. Most of the reports concern single cases or epidemiological studies. The present study reviews the world literature on MCC. The purpose of this article is to shed light on this unknown neuroendocrine carcinoma and provide the latest information on prognostic markers and treatment options. Results The epidemiological studies have revealed that large tumour size, male sex, truncal site, nodal/distant disease at presentation, and duration of disease before presentation, are poor prognostic factors. The recommended initial treatment is extensive local excision. Adjuvant radiation therapy has recently been shown to improve survival. Thus far, no chemotherapy protocol have achieved the same objective. Conclusion Although rare, the fatality of this malignancy makes is important to understand the etiology and pathophysiology. During the last few years, the research on MCC has produced prognostic markers, which can be translated into clinical patient care. PMID:16466578

  19. Differential role of gene hypermethylation in adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and cervical intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Guarch, Rosa; Ojer, Amaya; Pérez-Janices, Noemí; Martín-Sánchez, Esperanza; Maria-Ruiz, Sergio; Monreal-Santesteban, Iñaki; Blanco-Fernandez, Laura; Pernaut-Leza, Eduardo; Escors, David; Guerrero-Setas, David

    2015-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide. The hypermethylation of P16, TSLC-1 and TSP-1 genes was analyzed in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), cervical intraepithelial lesions (CIN) and adenocarcinomas (ADC) of the uterine cervix (total 181 lesions). Additionally human papillomavirus (HPV) type, EPB41L3, RASSF1 and RASSF2 hypermethylation were tested in ADC and the results were compared with those obtained previously by our group in SCC. P16, TSLC-1 and TSP-1 hypermethylation was more frequent in SCCs than in CINs. These percentages and the corresponding ones for EPB41L3, RASSF1 and RASSF2 genes were also higher in SCCs than in ADCs, except for P16. The presence of HPV in ADCs was lower than reported previously in SCC and CIN. Patients with RASSF1A hypermethylation showed significantly longer disease-free survival (P = 0.015) and overall survival periods (P = 0.009) in ADC patients. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the EPB41L3 and RASSF2 hypermethylation in ADCs. These results suggest that the involvement of DNA hypermethylation in cervical cancer varies depending on the histological type, which might contribute to explaining the different prognosis of patients with these types of tumors.

  20. Integrating pathway analysis and genetics of gene expression for genome-wide association study of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingfeng; Liang, Liming; Morar, Nilesh; Dixon, Anna L; Lathrop, G Mark; Ding, Jun; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O C; Kraft, Peter; Qureshi, Abrar A; Han, Jiali

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have primarily focused on marginal effects for individual markers and have incorporated external functional information only after identifying robust statistical associations. We applied a new approach combining the genetics of gene expression and functional classification of genes to the GWAS of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) to identify potential biological pathways associated with BCC. We first identified 322,324 expression-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (eSNPs) from two existing GWASs of global gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (n = 955), and evaluated the association of these functionally annotated SNPs with BCC among 2,045 BCC cases and 6,013 controls in Caucasians. We then grouped them into 99 KEGG pathways for pathway analysis and identified two pathways associated with BCC with p value <0.05 and false discovery rate (FDR) <0.5: the autoimmune thyroid disease pathway (mainly HLA class I and II antigens, p < 0.001, FDR = 0.24) and Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway (p = 0.02, FDR = 0.49). Seventy-nine (25.7%) out of 307 significant eSNPs in the JAK-STAT pathway were associated with BCC risk (p < 0.05) in an independent replication set of 278 BCC cases and 1,262 controls. In addition, the association of JAK-STAT signaling pathway was marginally validated using 16,691 eSNPs identified from 110 normal skin samples (p = 0.08). Based on the evidence of biological functions of the JAK-STAT pathway on oncogenesis, it is plausible that this pathway is involved in BCC pathogenesis.

  1. Comparative SRY incorporation on the regulatory regions of pluripotency/differentiation genes in human embryonic carcinoma cells after retinoic acid induction.

    PubMed

    Kakhki, Sara Ashrafi; Shahhoseini, Maryam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2013-04-01

    Members of the SOX (SRY box) family proteins play critical roles in multiple aspects of development. SRY, as a founder member of SOX family, has been long believed to be involved in the development of sexual gonads by triggering signaling cascades which lead to the formation of testis or ovary from bipotential gonads. However, less is known about other potential regulatory roles of SRY in the development and differentiation. In order to gain further insight into the possible roles of SRY during development, we looked into possible SRY-regulated genes and their levels of expression in a human embryonic carcinoma cell line, named NTera2, before and after induction of differentiation. For this respect, SRY incorporation on the regulatory regions of two groups of genes including OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 as pluripotency marker genes, and NESTIN and PAX6 as differentiation marker genes were evaluated quantitatively. Chromatin immunoprecipitation using SRY antibody was performed on chromatin extract of a human embryonic carcinoma cell line, NT2/NTERA-2, before and after onset of differentiation. The results showed that incorporation of SRY in both groups of genes was increased after induction of differentiation. Besides, lower expression of OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG and higher expression of PAX6 and NESTIN genes in differentiated cells suggest that SRY may act as a transcription repressor for pluripotency-associated genes and as a transcription activator for differentiation-related genes.

  2. Lack of a Functional VHL Gene Product Sensitizes Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells to the Apoptotic Effects of the Protein Synthesis Inhibitor Verrucarin A12

    PubMed Central

    Woldemichael, Girma M; Turbyville, Thomas J; Vasselli, James R; Linehan, W Marston; McMahon, James B

    2012-01-01

    Verrucarin A (VA) is a small molecule derived from the fungal plant pathogen Myrothecium verrucaria and was identified as a selective inhibitor of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) cell proliferation in a high-throughput screen of a library of naturally occurring small molecules. CCRCC arises as a result of loss-of-function mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene. Here we show that VA inhibits protein translation initiation culminating in apoptosis through the extrinsic signaling pathway. Reintroduction of the VHL gene in CCRCC cells afforded resistance to VA's apoptotic effects. This resistance is mediated in part by the formation of stress granules that entrap signaling molecules that initiate the apoptotic signaling cascade. The VHL gene product was found to be a component of stress granules that develop as result of VA treatment. These findings reveal an important role for the VHL gene product in cytotoxic stress response and have important implications for the rational development of VA-related compounds in chemotherapeutic targeting of CCRCC. PMID:22952429

  3. Metastatic Basal cell carcinoma accompanying gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bilir, Yeliz; Gokce, Erkan; Ozturk, Banu; Deresoy, Faik Alev; Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Yaman, Emel

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts), the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  4. Squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Webb, Julie L; Burns, Rachel E; Brown, Holly M; LeRoy, Bruce E; Kosarek, Carrie E

    2009-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a relatively common, malignant neoplasm of dogs and cats that can arise in a variety of locations. The gross appearance of SCC can be variable and nonspecific, so definitive diagnosis requires microscopic examination of the tissue (cytology or histology). Several treatment modalities exist, but surgical excision, if possible, is regarded as the best treatment option. Early diagnosis and treatment of SCC are key because small, early-stage tumors are the most amenable to treatment and carry the best prognosis.

  5. Fusion of splicing factor genes PSF and NonO (p54nrb) to the TFE3 gene in papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Clark, J; Lu, Y J; Sidhar, S K; Parker, C; Gill, S; Smedley, D; Hamoudi, R; Linehan, W M; Shipley, J; Cooper, C S

    1997-10-01

    We demonstrate that the cytogenetically defined translocation t(X;1)(p11.2;p34) observed in papillary renal cell carcinomas results in the fusion of the splicing factor gene PSF located at 1p34 to the TFE3 helix-loop-helix transcription factor gene at Xp11.2. In addition we define an X chromosome inversion inv(X)(p11.2;q12) that results in the fusion of the NonO (p54nrb) gene to TFE3. NonO (p54nrb), the human homologue of the Drosophila gene NonAdiss which controls the male courtship song, is closely related to PSF and also believed to be involved in RNA splicing. In each case the rearrangement results in the fusion of almost the entire splicing factor protein to the TFE3 DNA-binding domain. These observations suggest the possibility of intriguing links between the processes of RNA splicing, DNA transcription and oncogenesis.

  6. Overexpression of astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) is associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) progression and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunping; Chen, Kun; Zheng, Haiqing; Guo, Xianzhi; Jia, Weihua; Li, Manzhi; Zeng, Musheng; Li, Jun; Song, Libing

    2009-05-01

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), upregulated in various types of human cancers, has been reported to be associated with the carcinogenesis of human cancer. However, the functional significance of AEG-1 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains unknown. In the present study, we showed the expression of AEG-1 was markedly upregulated in esophageal cancer cell lines and surgical ESCC specimens at both transcriptional and translational levels. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that 80 of 168 (47.6%) paraffin-embedded archival ESCC specimens exhibited high levels of AEG-1 expression. Statistical analysis suggested the upregulation of AEG-1 was significantly correlated with the clinical staging of the ESCC patients (P = 0.001), T classification (P = 0.002), N classification (P = 0.034), M classification (P = 0.021) and histological differentiation (P = 0.035) and those patients with high AEG-1 levels exhibited shorter survival time (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that AEG-1 expression might be an independent prognostic indicator of the survival of patients with ESCC. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of AEG-1 in ESCC cells could significantly enhance cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth ability. Conversely, silencing AEG-1 by short hairpin RNAi caused an inhibition of cell growth and anchorage-independent growth ability on soft agar. Moreover, we demonstrated that the upregulation of AEG-1 could reduce the expression of p27(Kip1) and induce the expression of cyclin D1 through the AKT/FOXO3a pathway. Our findings suggest that the AEG-1 protein is a valuable marker of ESCC progression and that the upregulation of AEG-1 plays an important role in the development and pathogenesis of human ESCC.

  7. Identification of reliable reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in oral squamous cell carcinomas compared to adjacent normal tissues in the F344 rat model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinjian; McCormick, David L

    2016-08-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) induced in F344 rats by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) demonstrate considerable phenotypic similarity to human oral cancers and the model has been widely used for carcinogenesis and chemoprevention studies. Molecular characterization of this model needs reliable reference genes (RGs) to avoid false- positive and -negative results for proper interpretation of gene expression data between tumor and adjacent normal tissues. Microarray analysis of 11 pairs of OSCC and site-matched phenotypically normal oral tissues from 4-NQO-treated rats identified 10 stably expressed genes in OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues (p>0.5, CV<15%) that could serve as potential RGs in this model. The commonly used 27 RGs in the rat were also analyzed based on microarray data and most of them were found unsuitable for RGs in this model. Traditional RGs such as ACTB and GAPDH were significantly altered in OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues (p<0.01, n=11); however, the Hsp90ab1 was ranked as the best RG candidate and the combination of Hsp90ab1 and HPRT1 was identified by NormFinder to be a superior reference for gene normalization among the commonly used RGs. This result was also validated by RT-PCR based on the selected top RG candidate pool. These data suggest that there are no common RGs suitable for different models and RG(s) should be identified before gene expression analysis. We successfully identified Hsp90ab1 as a stable RG in 4-NQO-induced OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues in F344 rats. The combination of two stably expressed genes may be a better option for gene normalization in tissue samples.

  8. Effects of targeted silencing of FOXC1 gene on proliferation and in vitro migration of human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sumei; Jiao, Shunchang; Jia, Youchao; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of targeted silencing of forkhead box C1 (FOXC1) gene with small interfering RNA (siRNA) on the proliferation and in vitro migration of human non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) A549 and NCIH460 cells, and to explore the molecular mechanism. Methods: These cells were divided into FOXC1 siRNA groups and negative control groups. Results: Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) showed that compared with normal cells and paracancerous tissues, FOXC1 mRNA expressions in NSCLC cells and tissues were significantly higher (P<0.05). qRT-PCR and Western blot showed that FOXC1 siRNA effectively silenced FOXC1 gene expression in NSCLC cells. EdU labeling assay revealed that the proliferative capacity significantly decreased compared with that of normal control group after FOXC1 silencing (P<0.05). Significantly fewer cells in the transfected group migrated than those in negative control group did. After FOXC1 silencing, NSCLC cells were arrested in the G0/G1 phase, which were significantly different from those in negative control group (P<0.05). Compared with negative control group, the expression of cyclin D1 decreased and that of E-cadherin increased. Meanwhile, vimentin and MMP-2 expressions significantly reduced (P<0.05). FOXC1 siRNA effectively silenced FOXC1 gene expressions in NSCLC cells, inhibited their proliferation and invasion, and arrested them in the G0/G1 phase, suggesting that FOXC1 affected proliferation probably by regulating the expression of cell cycle-related protein cyclin D1. Conclusion: Silencing FOXC1 may evidently inhibit the migration of these cells by reversing the EMT process through suppressing cadherin, being associated with the expressions of extracellular MMPs. PMID:27648121

  9. p53 gene product expression in resected non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, with studies of concurrent cytological preparations and microwave antigen retrieval.

    PubMed Central

    Binks, S; Clelland, C A; Ronan, J; Bell, J

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To document the frequency and extent of p53 gene product expression in paraffin sections of resected non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and in cytological preparations of the same tumours; to determine the effect of microwave antigen retrieval on antigen detection. METHODS: Representative paraffin sections of 50 non-small cell carcinomas were stained with an antibody to p53 gene product (DO-7) both with and without prior microwave antigen retrieval. Cytoblocks and cell smears obtained from 19 cases were similarly stained. RESULTS: Using a histochemical scoring system (0-300) which takes into account staining intensity and extent, 78% (n = 39) of microwave pretreated paraffin sections and 52% (n = 26) of non-pretreated sections scored between 5 and 300; p = 0.001; 56% (n = 28) of microwave pretreated sections and only 2% (n = 1) of non-pretreated sections scored between 100 and 300 (p = 0.0001); 75% of direct smears of tumours and 80% of cytoblocks stained similarly to the paraffin sections of the resected specimens. No smears or cytoblocks stained positively when the sections of the resected specimen were negative. CONCLUSIONS: As up to 78% of non-small cell lung carcinomas overexpress p53 gene product, this may prove to be a valuable diagnostic method in biopsy or cytological material when the morphological diagnosis is uncertain. Microwave antigen retrieval is effective on formalin fixed tissue. Images PMID:9215149

  10. Spindle cell carcinoma in maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Soumi; Sreelatha, S V; Hegde, Nidarsh; Nair, Preeti P

    2013-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinomas (sarcomatoid carcinomas) are rare tumours. It is a variant of squamous cell carcinoma which has spindled tumour cells, which simulate a true sarcoma, but are epithelial in origin. They are extremely uncommon in the head and neck region. Only five cases with maxillary origin have been discussed in the literature. As compared to squamous cell carcinoma of maxilla, this variant is associated with poor diagnosis and advanced disease at presentation, as is demonstrated in the case presented. There are no standard recommendations for management owing to the rarity of this histology. Surgery and radiotherapy form the mainstays of treatment. We report a rare case of spindle cell carcinoma involving the maxilla. PMID:23632620

  11. FUT11 as a potential biomarker of clear cell renal cell carcinoma progression based on meta-analysis of gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Zodro, Elżbieta; Jaroszewski, Marcin; Ida, Agnieszka; Wrzesiński, Tomasz; Kwias, Zbigniew; Bluyssen, Hans; Wesoly, Joanna

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we provide a comprehensive summary of available clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) microarray data in the form of meta-analysis of genes differentially regulated in tumors as compared to healthy tissue, using effect size to measure the strength of a relationship between the disease and gene expression. We identified 725 differentially regulated genes, with a number of interesting targets, such as TMEM213, SMIM5, or ATPases: ATP6V0A4 and ATP6V1G3, of which limited or no information is available in terms of their function in ccRCC pathology. Downregulated genes tended to represent pathways related to tissue remodeling, blood clotting, vasodilation, and energy metabolism, while upregulated genes were classified into pathways generally deregulated in cancers: immune system response, inflammatory response, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. One hundred fifteen deregulated genes were included in network analysis, with EGLN3, AP-2, NR3C1, HIF1A, and EPAS1 (gene encoding HIF2-α) as points of functional convergence, but, interestingly, 610 genes failed to join previously identified molecular networks. Furthermore, we validated the expression of 14 top deregulated genes in independent sample set of 32 ccRCC tumors by qPCR and tested if it could serve as a marker of disease progression. We found a correlation of high fucosyltransferase 11 (FUT11) expression with non-symptomatic course of the disease, which suggests that FUT11's expression might be potentially used as a biomarker of disease progression.

  12. E6 and E7 gene silencing results in decreased methylation of tumor suppressor genes and induces phenotype transformation of human cervical carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Liming; Xu, Cui; Long, Jia; Shen, Danbei; Zhou, Wuqing; Zhou, Qiyan; Yang, Jia; Jiang, Mingjun

    2015-09-15

    In SiHa and CaSki cells, E6 and E7-targeting shRNA specifically and effectively knocked down human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 and E7 at the transcriptional level, reduced the E6 and E7 mRNA levels by more than 80% compared with control cells that expressed a scrambled-sequence shRNA. E6 and E7 repression resulted in down-regulation of DNA methyltransferase mRNA and protein expression, decreased DNA methylation and increased mRNA expression levels of tumor suppressor genes, induced a certain apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in E6 and E7 shRNA-infected SiHa and CaSki cells compared with the uninfected cells. Repression of E6 and E7 oncogenes resulted in restoration of DNA methyltransferase suppressor pathways and induced apoptosis in HPV16-positive cervical carcinoma cell lines. Our findings suggest that the potential carcinogenic mechanism of HPV16 through influencing DNA methylation pathway to activate the development of cervical cancer exist, and maybe as a candidate therapeutic strategy for cervical and other HPV-associated cancers.

  13. Chromosome 3p loss of heterozygosity and mutation analysis of the FHIT and beta-cat genes in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    González, M V; Pello, M F; Ablanedo, P; Suárez, C; Alvarez, V; Coto, E

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To study the loss of heterozygosity at the short arm of chromosome 3 in primary tumours from patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck; to determine whether the FHIT gene, mapped to 3p14.2 and the CTNNB1 (beta-cat) gene, mapped to 3p21, are deleted or mutated in these tumours. METHODS: DNA was extracted from fresh tumours. Loss of heterozygosity was assessed by microsatellite analysis of the following markers: D3S1283 and D3S1286 (3p24), D3S966 (3p21), and D3S1300 (3P14.2). Homozygous deletion was determined by radioactive multiplex polymerase chain reaction of exons 5 and 6 of the FHIT gene. The presence of mutations in FHIT exon 5 and beta-cat exon 3 was studied by single strand conformation polymorphism. RESULTS: 50% of informative cases (25/50) showed loss of heterozygosity for at least one of the 3p markers. 3p21 was the region with the highest rate of allelic deletion (63%). No point mutation was found in FHIT exon 5 or beta-cat exon 3. No case showed homozygous deletion for the FHIT (exons 5 and 6) or the beta-cat exon 3. CONCLUSIONS: The short arm of chromosome 3 is often deleted in the head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. In the remaining alleles of the FHIT or beta-cat genes, no evidence was found for point mutations or deletions, documented in other common carcinomas. Inactivation could occur by different mechanisms such as methylation, or other genes (not studied here) could be target of allelic losses in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Images PMID:9797729

  14. Expression of cancer stem markers could be influenced by silencing of p16 gene in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Zhang, J; Shi, H

    2016-01-01

    Effect of the tumor suppression gene p16 on the biological characteristics of HeLa cervical carcinoma cells was explored. The expression of p16 protein was increased in HeLa tumor sphere cells, and no significant difference in tumor spheres from the first to the fourth passages. Compared with those of parental HeLa cells, the proportion of CD44+/CD24- and ABCG2+ cells increased significantly in tumor spheres. However after the cells were silenced by the p16-sh289 vector, expression of P16 protein and the cell number of CD44+/CD24- and ABCG2+ decreased. Moreover, HeLa cells with p16 gene silencing showed decreased abilities of sphere formation and matrigel invasion. More HeLa cells with p16 gene silence were needed for tumor formation in nude mice. Tumor size and weight in mouse model established with p16 gene silenced HeLa cells were less than those with HeLa parental cell model. The present results indicate that silencing of the p16 gene inhibits expression of cancer stem cell markers and tumorigenic ability of HeLa cells.

  15. Frequent mutations of p53 gene in oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas with and without human papillomavirus (HPV) involvement suggest the dominant role of environmental carcinogens in oesophageal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, F.; Syrjänen, S.; Tervahauta, A.; Kurvinen, K.; Wang, L.; Syrjänen, K.

    1994-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that alcohol intake, use of tobacco, ingestion of mycotoxins and nitrosamines and nutritional deficiencies are high-risk factors for the development of oesophageal cancer. Similarly, viral infections have been postulated to play a role in some tumours. However, the molecular events underlying the development of oesophageal carcinoma are poorly understood as yet. Loss of p53 tumour-suppressor gene function has been found in different human malignancies, and it can occur in a variety of ways, including gene mutation and interaction with the E6 protein of oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Because the oesophageal mucosa is potentially exposed to mutagens and HPVs, we studied DNA samples derived from nine HPV-positive squamous cell carcinomas and 12 HPV-negative tumours. Exons 5-9 of the p53 gene containing phylogenetically conserved domains were examined using the polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique. HPV detection was done using DNA in situ hybridisation with biotin-labelled HPV DNA probes. Mutations were detected in eight (38%) out of the 21 cases. Three mutations were found in exons 5/6, three in exon 7 and two in exon 8/9. Six (50%) of the 12 HPV-negative carcinomas showed p53 mutations. Two (22.2%) of the nine HPV-positive carcinomas were found to contain p53 mutations as well; one contained HPV 16 DNA sequences and showed p53 mutation in exon 8/9, and the other was HPV 6/11 positive with the mutation in exon 5/6. Although mutations were more common in HPV-negative tumours (50.0% vs 22.2%), the difference in p53 mutations in HPV-positive and -negative tumours did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.1946). These data indicate that inactivation of the p53 gene is a frequent event in oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas and such an inactivation might be an important molecular pathway for the development of oesophageal cancer. The findings of p53 mutations in HPV

  16. p16INK4A and p14ARF Gene Promoter Hypermethylation as Prognostic Biomarker in Oral and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kaabi, A.; van Bockel, L. W.; Pothen, A. J.; Willems, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is a heterogeneous group of tumors with each subtype having a distinct histopathological and molecular profile. Most tumors share, to some extent, the same multistep carcinogenic pathways, which include a wide variety of genetic and epigenetic changes. Epigenetic alterations represent all changes in gene expression patterns that do not alter the actual DNA sequence. Recently, it has become clear that silencing of cancer related genes is not exclusively a result of genetic changes such as mutations or deletions, but it can also be regulated on epigenetic level, mostly by means of gene promoter hypermethylation. Results from recent studies have demonstrated that DNA methylation patterns contain tumor-type-specific signatures, which could serve as biomarkers for clinical outcome in the near future. The topic of this review discusses gene promoter hypermethylation in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The main objective is to analyse the available data on gene promoter hypermethylation of the cell cycle regulatory proteins p16INK4A and p14ARF and to investigate their clinical significance as novel biomarkers in OSCC. Hypermethylation of both genes seems to possess predictive properties for several clinicopathological outcomes. We conclude that the methylation status of p16INK4A is definitely a promising candidate biomarker for predicting clinical outcome of OSCC, especially for recurrence-free survival. PMID:24803719

  17. Mutations in the Mitochondrial ND1 Gene Are Associated with Postoperative Prognosis of Localized Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hakushi; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Inomoto, Chie; Kamiguchi, Hiroshi; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Naoya; Terachi, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed mutations in the mitochondrial ND1 gene to determine their association with clinicopathological parameters and postoperative recurrence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in Japanese patients. Among 62 RCC cases for which tumor pathology was confirmed by histopathology, ND1 sequencing revealed the presence of 30 mutation sites in 19 cases. Most mutations were heteroplasmic, with 16 of 19 cases harboring one or more heteroplasmic sites. Additionally, 12 sites had amino acid mutations, which were frequent in 10 of the cases. The 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) rate was significantly worse in patients with tumors >40 mm in diameter (p = 0.0091), pathological T (pT) stage ≥3 (p = 0.0122), Fuhrman nuclear atypia grade ≥III (p = 0.0070), and ND1 mutations (p = 0.0006). Multivariate analysis using these factors revealed that mutations in ND1 were significantly associated with the 5-year RFS rate (p = 0.0044). These results suggest a strong correlation between the presence of ND1 mutations in cancer tissue and postoperative recurrence of localized RCC in Japanese patients. PMID:27941608

  18. Genetic Variants in MTHFR Gene Predict ≥ 2 Radiation Pneumonitis in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Thoracic Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Hongsheng; Qiao, Yumei; Huang, Chengsuo; Li, Baosheng

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), formed as an indirect production of radiotherapy (RT), could cause DNA damage of normal tissues. Meanwhile, our body possesses the ability to restore the damage by DNA repair pathways. The imbalance between the two systems could finally result in radiation injury. Therefore, in this prospective cohort study, we explored the association of genetic variants in ROS metabolism and DNA repair pathway-related genes with radiation pneumonitis (RP). A total of 265 locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients receiving RT in Chinese Han population were enrolled. Five functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs1695 in GSTP1; rs4880 in SOD2; rs3957356 in GSTA1; and rs1801131, rs1801133 in MTHFR) were genotyped using the MassArray system, and rs1801131 was found to be a predictor of ≥ 2 RP. Our results showed that, compared with TT genotype, patients with GG/GT genotypes of rs1801131 had a notably lower risk of developing ≥ 2 RP (HR = 0.339, 95% CI = 0.137–0.839, P = 0.019). Further independent studies are required to confirm this findings. PMID:28046029

  19. Renal Cell Carcinoma Associated with Xp11.2 Translocation/TFE3 Gene Fusions: Clinical Features, Treatments and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Weidong; Xiong, Lei; Miao, Baolei; Chen, Xiancheng; Guo, Hongqian; Li, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics, treatments and prognosis of renal cell carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE3 gene fusions (Xp11.2 tRCC), the epidemiological features and treatment results of 34 cases of Xp11.2 tRCC, which were diagnosed by immunohistochemistry staining of TFE3 and fluorescence in situ hybridization at our center, were retrospectively reviewed. The 34 patients included 21 females and 13 males aged 3 to 64 years (median age: 27 years). Four patients were children or adolescents (<18 years of age), and 26 patients were young or middle-aged adults (18–45 years). Radical nephrectomy was performed on 25 patients. Laparoscopic nephron-sparing surgery was performed on 9 patients who presented with an isolated mass with a small diameter (<7 cm) and well-defined boundary on computed tomography imaging. Postoperative staging showed that 25 cases (73.53%) were at stage I/II, while 9 cases (26.47%) were at stage III/IV. All stage I/II patients received a favorable prognosis with a three-year overall survival rate of 100%, including the patients who underwent laparoscopic nephron-sparing surgery. With the exception of 2 children, the other 7 stage III/IV patients died or developed recurrence with a median follow-up of 29 months. On univariate analysis, maximum diameter, adjuvant treatment, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis, inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis and tumor boundary were identified as statistically significant factors impacting survival (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that TNM stage and inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis were independent prognostic factors (P<0.05). In conclusion, Xp11.2 tRCC is a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma that mainly occurs in young females. Nephron-sparing surgery was confirmed effective preliminarily in the treatment of small Xp11.2 tRCCs with clear rims. Advanced TNM stage and inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis were associated with poor prognosis. PMID:27893792

  20. The gene expression profiles of canine mammary cancer cells grown with carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) as a co-culture in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is supposed that fibroblasts present in tumour microenvironment increase cancer invasiveness and its ability to metastasize but the mechanisms have not been clearly defined yet. Thus, the current study was designed to assess changes in gene expression in five various cancer cell lines grown as a co-culture with the carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in vitro. Results A carcinoma-associated fibroblast cell line was isolated from a canine mammary cancer. Then, a co-culture of cancer cells with the CAFs was established and maintained for 72 hrs. Having sorted the cells, a global gene expression in cancer cells using DNA microarrays was examined. The analysis revealed an up-regulation of 100 genes and a down-regulation of 106 genes in the cancer cells grown as a co-culture with the CAFs in comparison to control conditions. The PANTHER binomial statistics tool was applied to determine statistically over-manifested pathways (p < 0.05). Bulk of the up-regulated genes are involved in the adhesion, the angiogenesis, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and generally take part in the developmental processes. These results were further confirmed using real-time qPCR. Moreover, a wound-healing assay and growth characteristics on Matrigel matrix showed that CAFs increase cancer cell migration and matrix invasion. Conclusion The results of the current study showed that the co-culturing of cancer cells and the CAFs caused significant changes to the cancer gene expression. The presence of the CAFs in a microenvironment of cancer cells promotes adhesion, angiogenesis and EMT. PMID:22453032

  1. HPV-16 E2 gene disruption and sequence variation in CIN 3 lesions and invasive squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix: relation to numerical chromosome abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Graham, D A; Herrington, C S

    2000-01-01

    Aim—To test the hypothesis that, because the human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein represses viral early gene transcription, E2 gene sequence variation or disruption could play a part in the induction of the numerical chromosome abnormalities that have been described in squamous cervical lesions. Methods—The integrity and sequence of the E2 gene from 11 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 lesions and 14 invasive squamous cell carcinomas, all of which contained HPV-16, were analysed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The E2 gene was amplified in three overlapping fragments and PCR products sequenced directly. Chromosome abnormalities were identified by interphase cytogenetics using chromosome specific probes for chromosomes 1, 3, 11, 17, 18, and X. Results—E2 gene disruption was present in significantly more invasive carcinomas (eight of 14) than CIN 3 lesions (one of 11) (p = 0.03). No association was found between E2 disruption and the presence of a numerical chromosome abnormality. The E2 gene from the non-disrupted isolates was sequenced and wild-type (n = 5) and variant (n = 11) sequences identified. Variant sequences belonged to European and African classes and contained from one to 15 amino acid substitutions. Although numerical chromosome abnormalities were significantly more frequent in invasive squamous cell carcinoma than CIN 3 (p = 0.04), there was no significant relation between the presence of sequence variation and either histological diagnosis or chromosome abnormality. Conclusions—These data do not support the hypothesis that E2 gene disruption or variation is important in the induction of chromosome imbalance in these lesions. However, there is a relation between E2 gene disruption and the presence of invasive disease. PMID:11040943

  2. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus genome and latent infection gene expression in normal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; de Rivera, Michelle Wendoline Garcia-Niño; Hoshino, Miyako; Sakashita, Hideaki; Yamada, Tsutomu; Inoue, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Nozaki, Tadashige; González-López, Blanca Silvia; Ide, Fumio; Kusama, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    A relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and cancer of lymphoid and epithelial tissues such as Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma, and oral cancer has been reported. EBV is transmitted orally and infects B cells and epithelial cells. However, it has remained uncertain whether EBV plays a role in carcinogenesis of oral mucosal tissue. In the present study, we detected the EBV genome and latent EBV gene expression in normal mucosal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to clarify whether EBV is involved in carcinogenesis of the oral cavity. We examined 333 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples (morphologically normal oral mucosa 30 samples, gingivitis 32, tonsillitis 17, oral epithelial dysplasia 83, OSCC 150, and NPC 21). EBV latent infection genes (EBNA-2, LMP-1) were detected not only in OSCC (50.2 %, 10.7 %) but also in severe epithelial dysplasia (66.7 %, 44.4 %), mild to moderate epithelial dysplasia (43.1 %, 18.5 %), gingivitis (78.1 %, 21.9 %), and normal mucosa (83.3 %, 23.3 %). Furthermore, the intensity of EBV latent infection gene expression (EBER, LMP-1) was significantly higher in severe epithelial dysplasia (94.4 %, 72.2 %) than in OSCC (34.7 %, 38.7 %). These results suggest that EBV latent infection genes and their increased expression in severe epithelial dysplasia might play an important role in the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in the oral cavity.

  3. A serine proteinase inhibitor locus at 18q21.3 contains a tandem duplication of the human squamous cell carcinoma antigen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, S S; Schick, C; Fish, K E; Miller, E; Pena, J C; Treter, S D; Hui, S M; Silverman, G A

    1995-01-01

    The squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) is a member of the ovalbumin family of serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins). A neutral form of the protein is found in normal and some malignant squamous cells, whereas an acidic form is detected exclusively in tumor cells and in the circulation of patients with squamous cell tumors. In this report, we describe the cloning of the SCCA gene from normal genomic DNA. Surprisingly, two genes were found. They were tandemly arrayed and flanked by two other closely related serpins, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI2) and maspin at 18q21.3. The genomic structure of the two genes, SCCA1 and SCCA2, was highly conserved. The predicted amino acid sequences were 92% identical and suggested that the neutral form of the protein was encoded by SCCA1 and the acidic form was encoded by SCCA2. Further characterization of the region should determine whether the differential expression of the SCCA genes plays a causal role in development of more aggressive squamous cell carcinomas. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7724531

  4. Chemokine gene expression in the murine renal cell carcinoma, RENCA, following treatment in vivo with interferon-alpha and interleukin-2.

    PubMed Central

    Sonouchi, K.; Hamilton, T. A.; Tannenbaum, C. S.; Tubbs, R. R.; Bukowski, R.; Finke, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The expression of three chemoattractant cytokine (chemokine) messenger (m)RNAs in the murine renal cell carcinoma (RENCA) from mice treated with a combination of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and interleukin-2 was examined and related to tumor infiltration by inflammatory leukocytes. Using a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay, mRNAs encoding the KC, JE, and IP-10 genes were all elevated in tumor tissue from mice treated systemically with IFN-alpha/interleukin-2 for 4 days. Similarly, the mRNA for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was also increased in tumors from treated as compared to control animals. The same tumors showed a significant increase in Mac-1+ leukocytes, which correlated well with the increase in chemokine and TNF-alpha gene expression. The renal cell carcinoma tumor itself may be responsible for the expression of chemokine genes in the tumor bed following cytokine therapy. Cultures of freshly explanted RENCA cells expressed significant levels of chemokine mRNAs when stimulated in vitro with IFN alpha, IFN gamma, and/or interleukin-2, demonstrating that this tumor cell has potential for expression of these genes in vivo. In contrast, TNF-alpha expression was not detected in cultured tumor cells. Thus TNF-alpha may be expressed by infiltrating monocytes following exposure to recombinant cytokine therapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8160774

  5. RNA interference-mediated targeting of DKK1 gene expression in Ishikawa endometrial carcinoma cells causes increased tumor cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Yi, Nuo; Liao, Qin-Ping; Li, Zhen-Hua; Xie, Bao-Jiang; Hu, Yu-Hong; Yi, Wei; Liu, Min

    2013-09-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays an essential role in tumor invasion and migration. DKK1 functions as an important inhibitor of the pathway and represents a promising target for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of DKK1 in endometrial carcinoma (EC) cell invasion and migration using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Ishikawa EC cells were transfected at high efficiency with specific DKK1 siRNA. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to determine the mRNA and protein levels of DKK1, β-catenin and metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) in siRNA-treated and -untreated cells. In addition, the invasion and migration of the EC cells were detected by invasion and migration assays. Transient transfection of DKK1 siRNA significantly inhibited the mRNA and protein levels of DKK1. Markedly increased cell invasion and migration was observed following treatment with DKK1 siRNA when compared with the negative control siRNA-treated and siRNA-untreated cells. The knockdown of DKK1 also elevated the mRNA and protein levels of β-catenin and MMP14 involved in the Wnt signaling pathway, indicating that targeting this gene may promote intracellular Wnt signal transduction and thus, accelerate EC cell invasion and migration in vitro. The RNAi-mediated targeting of DKK1 gene expression in Ishikawa EC cells resulted in increased tumor cell invasion and migration. DKK1 was identified as an inhibitor of EC cell invasion and migration via its novel role in the Wnt signaling pathway. Targeting DKK1 may therefore represent an effective anti-invasion and -migration strategy for the treatment of EC.

  6. Silencing of the metastasis-linked gene, AEG-1, using siRNA-loaded cholamine surface-modified gelatin nanoparticles in the breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7.

    PubMed

    Abozeid, Salma M; Hathout, Rania M; Abou-Aisha, Khaled

    2016-09-01

    Cholamine surface-modified gelatin nanoparticles prepared by the double desolvation method using acetone as a dehydrating agent were selected and potentially evaluated as non viral vectors of siRNA targeting a metastatic gene AEG-1 in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. The ability of modified gelatin nanoparticle to complex and deliver siRNA for gene silencing was investigated. Hence, Particle size, surface charge (zeta potential) and morphology of siRNA/Gelatin nanoparticles (siGNPs) were characterized via dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Moreover, the nanoparticles cytotoxicity, loading efficiency and interaction with MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells were evaluated. Cationized GNPs of mean size range of 174nm and PDI of 0.101 were produced. The loading efficiency of siGNPs at a Nitrogen/Phosphate (N/P) ratio (w/w) of 200:1 was approximately 96%. Cellular uptake was evaluated after FITC conjugation where the particles produced high transfection efficiency. Finally, ELISA analysis of AEG-1/MTDH expression demonstrated the gene silencing effect of siGNPs, as more than 75% MTDH protein were inhibited. Our data indicate that cholamine modified GNPs pose a promising non-viral siRNA carrier for altering gene expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells with many advantages such as relatively high gene transfection efficiency and efficient silencing ability.

  7. The candidate tumor suppressor CST6 alters the gene expression profile of human breast carcinoma cells: Down-regulation of the potent mitogenic, motogenic, and angiogenic factor autotaxin

    SciTech Connect

    Song Jin; Jie Chunfa; Polk, Paula; Shridhar, Ravi; Clair, Timothy; Zhang, Jun; Yin, Lijia; Keppler, Daniel . E-mail: dkeppl@lsuhsc.edu

    2006-02-03

    We recently coined CST6 as a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene for breast cancer. CST6 indeed is expressed in the normal human breast epithelium, but little or not at all in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, ectopic expression of CST6 in human breast cancer cells suppressed cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and orthotopic tumor growth. To obtain insights into the molecular mechanism by which CST6 exhibits its pleiotropic effects on tumor cells, we compared global gene expression profiles in mock- and CST6-transfected human MDA-MB-435S cells. Out of 12,625 transcript species, 61 showed altered expression. These included genes for extracellular matrix components, cytokines, kinases, and phosphatases, as well as several key transcription factors. TaqMan PCR assays were used to confirm the microarray data for 7 out of 11 genes. One down-regulated gene product, secreted autotaxin/lyso-phospholipase D, was of particular interest because its down-regulation by CST6 could explain most of CST6's effect on the breast cancer cells. This study thus provides First evidence that CST6 plays a role in the modulation of genes, particularly, genes that are highly relevant to breast cancer progression.

  8. Global effects of anchorage on gene expression during mammary carcinoma cell growth reveal role of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in anoikis.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, G S; Jin, Z; Ichikawa, H; Naito, A; Ohki, M; El-Deiry, W S; Tsuda, H

    2001-02-15

    Anchorage-independent growth is a hallmark of tumor cells. We compared gene expression profiles of anchored and nonanchored human mammary carcinoma cells to study this phenomenon. In this study, we show that anchorage had striking effects on cell growth and morphology but altered transcript levels from a limited number of genes. Only about 1% of mRNA transcripts detected in these cells was altered by anchorage. These include genes related to amino acid and polyamine metabolism, apoptosis, ion channels, cytoskeletal and stress proteins, transcription factors, and growth factors. Some of these may be crucial for the survival of transformed cells. For example, clusterin and the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) were suppressed by anchorage, which could help prevent programmed cell death of these tumor cells. In addition to suppressing TRAIL expression, anchorage also decreased the susceptibility of these tumor cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis as determined by poly(ADP-ribose) phosphorylase cleavage, annexin-V binding (P < 0.01), and cell cycle analysis (P < 0.0001). These data may help explain mechanisms by which anchorage prevents apoptosis of cells that would otherwise experience anoikis. Thus, genes found to be altered by this analysis could serve as potential targets for anticancer therapy. These findings suggest that TRAIL may be used as a means to target circulating epithelial tumor cells before their attachment and colonization at new sites.

  9. Metastasis-suppressing NID2, an epigenetically-silenced gene, in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Annie Wai Yeeng; Cheung, Arthur Kwok Leung; Dai, Wei; Ko, Josephine Mun Yee; Ip, Joseph Chok Yan; Chan, Kwok Wah; Kwong, Dora Lai-Wan; Ng, Wai Tong; Lee, Anne Wing Mui; Ngan, Roger Kai Cheong; Yau, Chun Chung; Tung, Stewart Yuk; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Lam, Alfred King-Yin; Pillai, Suja; Law, Simon; Lung, Maria Li

    2016-01-01

    Nidogen-2 (NID2) is a key component of the basement membrane that stabilizes the extracellular matrix (ECM) network. The aim of the study is to analyze the functional roles of NID2 in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We performed genome-wide methylation profiling of NPC and ESCC and validated our findings using the methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM) assay. Results showed that promoter methylation of NID2 was significantly higher in NPC and ESCC samples than in their adjacent non-cancer counterparts. Consistently, down-regulation of NID2 was observed in the clinical samples and cell lines of both NPC and ESCC. Re-expression of NID2 suppresses clonogenic survival and migration abilities of transduced NPC and ESCC cells. We showed that NID2 significantly inhibits liver metastasis. Mechanistic studies of signaling pathways also confirm that NID2 suppresses the EGFR/Akt and integrin/FAK/PLCγ metastasis-related pathways. This study provides novel insights into the crucial tumor metastasis suppression roles of NID2 in cancers. PMID:27793011

  10. Effect and mechanism of RUNX3 gene on biological characteristics of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaxia; Wang, Zhou; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhiping; Shi, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RUNX3 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells biological behavior and the relationship between the expression of RUNX3 and MMP-9, TIMP-1, ICAM-1. RUNX3 levels in 90 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma specimens using immunohistochemical staining to examine the correlation between RUNX3 expression and clinical stage of ESCC. Furthermore, the role of RUNX3 in ESCC progression was evaluated in vitro by siRNA-mediated knockdown of RUNX3 or lentivirus-mediated over-expression of RUNX3 in ESCC cell lines. The expression and activities of MMP-9, TIMP-1, and ICAM-1 were analyzed. We found decreased expression of RUNX3 in ESCC tissue to be significantly related to T stage of tumor (p < 0.01). In vitro, knockdown of RUNX3 in Eca9706 cells resulted in promoting cell growth, migration, and invasion. Additionally, MMP-9 and ICAM-1 were upregulated in RUNX3-knockdown cells. Notably, RUNX3 over-expression in Kyse150 cells could significantly decrease MMP-9 and ICAM-1. Tumorigenesis in vivo was significantly determined. The study indicates that low expression of RUNX3 in human ESCC tissue is significantly correlated with progression. Restoration of RUNX3 expression significantly inhibits ESCC cells migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis, which may be caused by RUNX3's interaction with MMP-9 and ICAM-1; RUNX3 may be a potential therapeutic target for ESCC.

  11. Genomic Integration of High-Risk HPV Alters Gene Expression in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Walline, Heather M; Komarck, Christine M; McHugh, Jonathan B; Bellile, Emily L; Brenner, J Chad; Prince, Mark E; McKean, Erin L; Chepeha, Douglas B; Wolf, Gregory T; Worden, Francis P; Bradford, Carol R; Carey, Thomas E

    2016-10-01

    High-risk HPV (hrHPV) is the leading etiologic factor in oropharyngeal cancer. HPV-positive oropharyngeal tumors generally respond well to therapy, with complete recovery in approximately 80% of patients. However, it remains unclear why some patients are nonresponsive to treatment, with 20% of patients recurring within 5 years. In this study, viral factors were examined for possible clues to differences in tumor behavior. Oropharynx tumors that responded well to therapy were compared with those that persisted and recurred. Viral oncogene alternate transcripts were assessed, and cellular sites of viral integration were mapped and sequenced. Effects of integration on gene expression were assessed by transcript analysis at the integration sites. All of the tumors demonstrated active viral oncogenesis, indicated by expression of HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes and alternate E6 splicing. In the responsive tumors, HPV integration occurred exclusively in intergenic chromosome regions, except for one tumor with viral integration into TP63. Each recurrent tumor exhibited complex HPV integration patterns into cancer-associated genes, including TNFRSF13B, SCN2A, SH2B1, UBE2V2, SMOC1, NFIA, and SEMA6D Disrupted cellular transcripts were identified in the region of integration in four of the seven affected genes.

  12. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira; Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena; and others

    2016-01-15

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants. - Highlights: • Amino acid changes in HPV16 E6 variants modulate the transciption of specific genes. • This is the first comparison of global gene expression profile of HPV 16 E6 variants. • Each HPV 16 E6 variant appears to have its own molecular signature.

  13. Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms of the RASSF3 gene and susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongguang; Liu, Hongliang; Wei, Jianhua; Li, Yangkai; Yu, Hongping; Guan, Xiaoxiang; Li-E, Wang; Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M.; Wei, Qingyi; Liu, Zhensheng

    2014-01-01

    Background RASSF3 suppresses tumour formation through uncertain mechanisms, but it is an important gene of p53-dependent apoptosis. RASSF3 depletion impairs DNA repair after DNA damage, leading to polyploidy. The authors hypothesised that potential functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of RASSF3 are associated with risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods The authors used a functional SNP approach to evaluate the associations between common (minor allele frequency ≥0.05), putative functional variants in RASSF3 and risk of SCCHN. Four selected such functional SNPs (rs6581580 T>G, rs7313765 G>A, rs12311754 G>C and rs1147098 T>C) in RASSF3 were identified and genotyped in 1087 patients and 1090 cancer-free controls in a non-Hispanic white population. Results The authors found that two SNPs were significantly associated with SCCHN risk. Carriers of the variant rs6581580G and rs7313765A alleles were at a reduced SCCHN risk, compared with the corresponding common homozygotes [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.75 and 0.73 and 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.62–0.91 and 0.60–0.88, respectively, for dominant models; and Ptrend = 0.012 and 0.041, respectively, for additive models], particularly for non-oropharyngeal tumours (adjusted OR = 0.68 and 0.60 and 95% CI = 0.53–0.86 and 0.47– 0.77, respectively, for dominant models). In the genotype–phenotype correlation analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 102 cancer-free controls, the rs6581580 GG genotype was associated with significantly increased expression levels of RASSF3 mRNA (P = 0.038), compared with the TT genotype. Additional functional experiments further showed that variant G allele of rs6581580 had a significantly stronger binding affinity to the nuclear protein extracts than the T allele. Conclusion Taken together, these findings indicate that the RASSF3 promoter rs6581580 T>G SNP is potentially functional, modulating susceptibility to SCCHN among non

  14. Promoter methylation of MGMT, MLH1 and RASSF1A tumor suppressor genes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: pharmacological genome demethylation reduces proliferation of head and neck squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koutsimpelas, Dimitrios; Pongsapich, Warut; Heinrich, Ulf; Mann, Sylvia; Mann, Wolf J; Brieger, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    Promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) is a common feature of primary cancer cells. However, to date the somatic epigenetic events that occur in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumorigenesis have not been well-defined. In the present study, we analyzed the promoter methylation status of the genes mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), Ras-association domain family member 1 (RASSF1A) and O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) in 23 HNSCC samples, three control tissues and one HNSCC cell line (UM-SCC 33) using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). The expression of the three proteins was quantified by semi-quantitative immunohistochemical analysis. The cell line was treated with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-Aza) and the methylation status after 5-Aza treatment was analyzed by MSP and DNA sequencing. Proliferation was determined by Alamar blue staining. We found that the MGMT promoter in 57% of the analyzed primary tumor samples and in the cell line was hypermethylated. The MLH promoter was found to be methylated in one out of 23 (4%) tumor samples while in the examined cell line the MLH promoter was unmethylated. The RASSF1A promoter showed methylation in 13% of the tumor samples and in the cell line. MGMT expression in the group of tumor samples with a hypermethylated promoter was statistically significantly lower compared to the group of tumors with no measured hypermethylation of the MGMT promoter. After treatment of the cell line with the demethylating agent 5-Aza no demethylation of the methylated MGMT and RASSF1A genes were determined by MSP. DNA sequencing verified the MSP results, however, increased numbers of unmethylated CpG islands in the promoter region of MGMT and RASSF1A were observed. Proliferation was significantly (p<0.05) reduced after treatment with 5-Aza. In summary, we have shown promoter hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor genes MGMT and RASSF1A in HNSCC, suggesting that this epigenetic inactivation of TSGs

  15. Gene expression patterns through oral squamous cell carcinoma development: PD-L1 expression in primary tumor and circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Costa, Joao Paulo; de Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; da Silveira, Giorgia Gobbi; Amaya, Peter; Wu, Yongqi; Park, Kyoung-Joo Jenny; Gigliola, Mabel Pinilla; Lustberg, Maryam; Buim, Marcilei Eliza Cavicchioli; Ferreira, Elisa Napolitano; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common tumor of the oral cavity and has been associated with poor prognosis. Scarce prognostic markers are available for guiding treatment and/or sub-classifying patients. This study aims to identify biomarkers by searching for genes whose expression is increased or decreased during tumor progression (through T1 to T4 stages). Thirty-six samples from all tumor size stages (from T1 to T4) were analyzed using cDNA microarrays. Selected targets were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and in circulating tumor cells by immunofluorescence and Nanostring. Correlation was shown between PD-L1 and tumor size and lymph node metastasis, HOXB9 and tumor size, BLNK and perineural invasion, and between ZNF813 and perineural invasion. PD-L1 positivity was an independent prognostic factor in this cohort (p = 0.044, HH = 0.426). In CTCs from patients with locally advanced OSCC, we found a strong cytoplasmatic expression of PD-L1. PD-L1 is a ligand of PD-1 and is believed to limit T cell activity in inflammatory responses and limit autoimmune diseases. We demonstrated an important role for PD-L1 in primary tumors according to tumor size, and in disease specific survival. Therefore, we could further determine individuals with PD-L1+ CTCs, and possibly follow treatment using CTCs. PMID:26041877

  16. Gene expression patterns through oral squamous cell carcinoma development: PD-L1 expression in primary tumor and circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Costa, Joao Paulo; de Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; da Silveira, da Giorgia Gobbi; Amaya, Peter; Wu, Yongqi; Park, Kyoung-Joo Jenny; Gigliola, Mabel Pinilla; Lustberg, Maryam; Buim, Marcilei Eliza Cavicchioli; Ferreira, Elisa Napolitano; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo

    2015-08-28

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common tumor of the oral cavity and has been associated with poor prognosis. Scarce prognostic markers are available for guiding treatment and/or sub-classifying patients. This study aims to identify biomarkers by searching for genes whose expression is increased or decreased during tumor progression (through T1 to T4 stages). Thirty-six samples from all tumor size stages (from T1 to T4) were analyzed using cDNA microarrays. Selected targets were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and in circulating tumor cells by immunofluorescence and Nanostring. Correlation was shown between PD-L1 and tumor size and lymph node metastasis, HOXB9 and tumor size, BLNK and perineural invasion, and between ZNF813 and perineural invasion. PD-L1 positivity was an independent prognostic factor in this cohort (p = 0.044, HH = 0.426). In CTCs from patients with locally advanced OSCC, we found a strong cytoplasmatic expression of PD-L1. PD-L1 is a ligand of PD-1 and is believed to limit T cell activity in inflammatory responses and limit autoimmune diseases. We demonstrated an important role for PD-L1 in primary tumors according to tumor size, and in disease specific survival. Therefore, we could further determine individuals with PD-L1+ CTCs, and possibly follow treatment using CTCs.

  17. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-Restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F; Hui, Edwin P; Chan, Anthony T C; Lee, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplant lymphomas, and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favor outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV(+) lymphomas, but not in NPC. Here, we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable because 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms, we have optimized expression of the TCR and demonstrated high-avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine release) in both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2(+) epithelial tumor growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high-avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens.

  18. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H.; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F.; Hui, Edwin P.; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Lee, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated post-transplant lymphomas and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favour outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV+ lymphomas but not in NPC. Here we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a HLA A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable since 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms we have optimised expression of the TCR and demonstrated high avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, cytokine release) in both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2+ epithelial tumour growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens. PMID:25711537

  19. Carcinomas of ovary and lung with clear cell features: can immunohistochemistry help in differential diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Howell, Nicole R; Zheng, Wenxin; Cheng, Liang; Tornos, Carmen; Kane, Philip; Pearl, Michael; Chalas, Eva; Liang, Sharon X

    2007-04-01

    Metastatic lung carcinomas with clear cell morphology can be confused with primary ovarian clear cell carcinomas. We performed immunohistochemical stains in 14 cases of non-small cell lung carcinomas with clear cell features and 14 cases of ovarian clear cell carcinomas using a panel of markers, including thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), Wilms tumor gene 1, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT-4), cancer antigen 125 (CA-125), estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor. Among non-small cell lung carcinomas with clear cell features, 87.5% of adenocarcinomas (or 50% overall frequency in lung carcinomas) were positive for TTF-1, whereas none of the ovarian clear cell carcinomas were positive (P = 0.002). All 14 ovarian clear cell carcinomas stained for CA-125 as compared with 1 non-small cell lung carcinoma (P < 0.001). On the other hand, 85% of non-small cell lung carcinomas stained for CEA, whereas none of the ovarian clear cell carcinomas did (P < 0.001). Interestingly, 4 ovarian clear cell carcinomas (28%) showed positive staining for the germ cell marker OCT-4. Either lung or ovarian carcinomas stained for Wilms tumor gene 1, estrogen receptor, or progesterone receptor very infrequently; and the difference between the 2 groups was not statistically significant. Our results suggest that an immunohistochemical panel consisting of TTF-1, CEA, CA-125, and OCT-4 is helpful in distinguishing most pulmonary and ovarian carcinomas with clear cell features.

  20. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells.

    PubMed

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira; Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena; Beltrán-Anaya, Fredy Omar; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Alarcón-Romero, Luz Del Carmen; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2016-01-15

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants.

  1. A Novel Function for the nm23-Hl Gene: Overexpression in Human Breast Carcinoma Cells Leads to the Formation of Basement Membrane and Growth Arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Howlett, Anthony R; Petersen, Ole W; Steeg, Patricia S; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a culture system using reconstituted basement membrane components in which normal human mammary epithelial cells exhibit several aspects of the development and differentiation process, including formation of acinar-like structures, production and basal deposition of basement membrane components, and production and apical secretion of sialomucins. Cell lines and cultures from human breast carcinomas failed to recapitulate this process. The data indicate the importance of cellular interactions with the basement membrane in the regulation of normal breast differentiation and, potentially, its loss in neoplasia. Our purpose was to use this assay to investigate the role of the putative metastasis suppressor gene nm23-H1 in mammary development and differentiation. The metastatic human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-435, clones transfected with a control pCMVBamneo vector, and clones transfected with pCMVBamneo vector containing nm23-H1 complementary DNA (the latter of which exhibited a substantial reduction in spontaneous metastatic potential in vivo) were cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane. Clones were examined for formation of acinus-like spheres, deposition of basement membrane components, production of sialomucin, polarization, and growth arrest. In contrast to the parental cell line and control transfectants, MDA-MB-435 breast carcinoma cells overexpressing Nm23-H1 protein regained several aspects of the normal phenotype within reconstituted basement membrane. Nm23-H1 protein-positive cells formed organized acinus-like spheres, deposited the basement membrane components type IV collagen and, to some extent, laminin to the outside of the spheres, expressed sialomucin, and growth arrested. Growth arrest of Nm23-H1 protein-positive cells was preceded by and correlated with formation of a basement membrane, suggesting a causal relationship. The data indicate a previously unidentified cause-and-effect relationship between nm23-H1 gene

  2. Biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas are molecularly similar to each other, but distinct from, non-sarcomatoid renal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Kanishka; Yoo, Suk-Young; Majewski, Tadeusz; Wani, Khalida; Patel, Lalit R; Voicu, Horatiu; Torres-Garcia, Wandaliz; Verhaak, Roel G W; Tannir, Nizar; Karam, Jose A; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G; Tamboli, Pheroze; Baggerly, Keith A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2015-10-01

    Sarcomatoid transformation, wherein an epithelioid carcinomatous tumour component coexists with a sarcomatoid histology, is a predictor of poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Our understanding of sarcomatoid change has been hindered by the lack of molecular examination. Thus, we sought to characterize molecularly the biphasic epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and compare them to non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We examined the transcriptome of the epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of advanced stage sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=43) and non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=37) from independent discovery and validation cohorts using the cDNA microarray and RNA-seq platforms. We analyzed DNA copy number profiles, generated using SNP arrays, from patients with sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=10) and advanced non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=155). The epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma had similar gene expression and DNA copy number signatures that were, however, distinct from those of high-grade, high-stage non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Prognostic clear cell renal cell carcinoma gene expression profiles were shared by the biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and the sarcomatoid component showed a partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition signature. Our genome-scale microarray-based transcript data were validated in an independent set of sarcomatoid and non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas using RNA-seq. Sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma is molecularly distinct from non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma, with its genetic programming largely shared by its biphasic morphological components. These data explain why a low percentage of sarcomatoid histology augurs a poor prognosis; suggest the

  3. Biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas are molecularly similar to each other, but distinct from, non‐sarcomatoid renal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Kanishka; Yoo, Suk‐Young; Majewski, Tadeusz; Wani, Khalida; Patel, Lalit R.; Voicu, Horatiu; Torres‐Garcia, Wandaliz; Verhaak, Roel G. W.; Tannir, Nizar; Karam, Jose A.; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Baggerly, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sarcomatoid transformation, wherein an epithelioid carcinomatous tumour component coexists with a sarcomatoid histology, is a predictor of poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Our understanding of sarcomatoid change has been hindered by the lack of molecular examination. Thus, we sought to characterize molecularly the biphasic epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and compare them to non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We examined the transcriptome of the epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of advanced stage sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=43) and non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=37) from independent discovery and validation cohorts using the cDNA microarray and RNA‐seq platforms. We analyzed DNA copy number profiles, generated using SNP arrays, from patients with sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=10) and advanced non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=155). The epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma had similar gene expression and DNA copy number signatures that were, however, distinct from those of high‐grade, high‐stage non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Prognostic clear cell renal cell carcinoma gene expression profiles were shared by the biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and the sarcomatoid component showed a partial epithelial‐to‐mesenchymal transition signature. Our genome‐scale microarray‐based transcript data were validated in an independent set of sarcomatoid and non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas using RNA‐seq. Sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma is molecularly distinct from non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma, with its genetic programming largely shared by its biphasic morphological components. These data explain why a low percentage of sarcomatoid histology

  4. Identification of FGF19 as a prognostic marker and potential driver gene of lung squamous cell carcinomas in Chinese smoking patients.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qiang; Li, Fan; Wang, Guan; Xia, Weiliang; Li, Ziming; Niu, Xiaomin; Ji, Wenxiang; Yuan, Hong; Xu, Qiang; Luo, Qingquan; Zhang, Jie; Lu, Shun

    2016-04-05

    Comprehensive genomic characterizations of lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) have been performed, but the differences between smokers (S-LSCC) and never smokers (NS-LSCC) are not clear, as NS-LSCC could be considered as a different disease from S-LSCC. In this study we delineated genomic alterations in a cohort of 21 NS-LSCC and 16 S-LSCC patients, and identified common gene mutations and amplifications as previously reported. Inclusion of more NS-LSCC patients enabled us to identify unreported S-LSCC- or NS-LSCC-specific alterations. Importantly, an amplification region containing FGF19, FGF3, FGF4 and CCND1 was found five-times more frequent in S-LSCC than in NS-LSCC. Amplification of FGF19 was validated in independent LSCC samples. Furthermore, FGF19 stimulated LSCC cell growth in vitro. These data implicate FGF19 as a potential driver gene in LSCC with clinic characteristics as smoking.

  5. Increased expression of prion protein gene is accompanied by demethylation of CpG sites in a mouse embryonal carcinoma cell line, P19C6

    PubMed Central

    DALAI, Wuyun; MATSUO, Eiko; TAKEYAMA, Natsumi; KAWANO, Junichi; SAEKI, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    Elucidation of the processes regulating the prion protein gene (Prnp) is an important key to understanding the development of prion disorders. In this study, we explored the involvement of DNA methylation in Prnp transcriptional regulation during neuronal differentiation of embryonic carcinoma P19C6 cells. When P19C6 cells were differentiated into neuronal cells, the expression of Prnp was markedly increased, while CpG methylation was significantly demethylated at the nucleotide region between −599 and −238 from the transcription start site. In addition, when P19C6 cells were applied in a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, RG108, Prnp transcripts were also significantly increased in relation to the decreased methylation statuses. These findings helped to elucidate the DNA methylation-mediated regulation of Prnp expression during neuronal differentiation. PMID:28132962

  6. Inactivation of the human papillomavirus E6 or E7 gene in cervical carcinoma cells by using a bacterial CRISPR/Cas RNA-guided endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Edward M; Kornepati, Anand V R; Goldstein, Michael; Bogerd, Hal P; Poling, Brigid C; Whisnant, Adam W; Kastan, Michael B; Cullen, Bryan R

    2014-10-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), including HPV-16 and HPV-18, are the causative agents of cervical carcinomas and are linked to several other tumors of the anogenital and oropharyngeal regions. The majority of HPV-induced tumors contain integrated copies of the normally episomal HPV genome that invariably retain intact forms of the two HPV oncogenes E6 and E7. E6 induces degradation of the cellular tumor suppressor p53, while E7 destabilizes the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Previous work has shown that loss of E6 function in cervical cancer cells induces p53 expression as well as downstream effectors that induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Similarly, loss of E7 allows increased Rb expression, leading to cell cycle arrest and senescence. Here, we demonstrate that expression of a bacterial Cas9 RNA-guided endonuclease, together with single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) specific for E6 or E7, is able to induce cleavage of the HPV genome, resulting in the introduction of inactivating deletion and insertion mutations into the E6 or E7 gene. This results in the induction of p53 or Rb, leading to cell cycle arrest and eventual cell death. Both HPV-16- and HPV-18-transformed cells were found to be responsive to targeted HPV genome-specific DNA cleavage. These data provide a proof of principle for the idea that vector-delivered Cas9/sgRNA combinations could represent effective treatment modalities for HPV-induced cancers. Importance: Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of almost all cervical carcinomas and many other tumors, including many head and neck cancers. In these cancer cells, the HPV DNA genome is integrated into the cellular genome, where it expresses high levels of two viral oncogenes, called E6 and E7, that are required for cancer cell growth and viability. Here, we demonstrate that the recently described bacterial CRISPR/Cas RNA-guided endonuclease can be reprogrammed to target and destroy the E6 or E7 gene in cervical carcinoma cells

  7. Sorafenib in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Davoudi, Ehsan Taghizadeh; bin-Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim; Javar, Hamid Akbari; Kadivar, Ali; Sabeti, Bahare

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is among most important causes of death in recent decades. Whoever the renal cell carcinoma incidence is low but it seems it is more complicated than the other cancers in terms of pathophysiology and treatments. The purpose of this work is to provide an overview and also deeper insight to renal cell carcinoma and the steps which have been taken to reach more specific treatment and target therapy, in this type of cancer by developing most effective agents such as Sorafenib. To achieve this goal hundreds of research paper and published work has been overviewed and due to limitation of space in a paper just focus in most important points on renal cell carcinoma, treatment of RCC and clinical development of Sorafenib. The information presented this paper shows the advanced of human knowledge to provide more efficient drug in treatment of some complicated cancer such as RCC in promising much better future to fight killing disease.

  8. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  9. Functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes in Hurthle cell thyroid neoplasm - an association of GPX1 polymorphism and recurrent Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goricar, Katja; Gazic, Barbara; Dolzan, Vita; Besic, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Hurthle cells of the thyroid gland are very rich in mitochondria and oxidative enzymes. As a high level oxidative metabolism may lead to higher level of oxidative stress and can be associated with an increased risk for cancer, we investigated whether common functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1) are associated with the development or clinical course of Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC). Methods A retrospective study was performed in 139 patients treated by thyroid surgery for a Hurthle cell neoplasm. HCTC, Hurthle cell thyroid adenoma (HCTA) or Hurthle cell thyroid nodule (HCTN) were diagnosed by pathomorphology. DNA was extracted from cores of histologically confirmed normal tissue obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens and genotyped for investigated polymorphisms. Logistic regression was used to compare genotype distributions between patient groups. Results HCTC, HCTA and HCTN were diagnosed in 53, 47 and 21 patients, respectively. Metastatic disease and recurrence of HCTC were diagnosed in 20 and 16 HCTC patients, respectively. Genotypes and allele frequencies of investigated polymorphisms did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in patients with HCTC, HCTA and HCTN. Under the dominant genetic model we observed no differences in the genotype frequency distribution of the investigated polymorphisms when the HCTA and HCTN group was compared to the HCTC group for diagnosis of HCTC or for the presence of metastatic disease. However, GPX1 polymorphism was associated with the occurrence of recurrent disease (p = 0.040). Conclusions GPX1 polymorphism may influence the risk for recurrent disease in HCTC. PMID:27679545

  10. A novel ankyrin repeat-containing gene (Kank) located at 9p24 is a growth suppressor of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shubhashish; Roy, Badal Chandra; Hatano, Naoya; Aoyagi, Teiichiro; Gohji, Kazuo; Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2002-09-27

    By a combination of genome subtraction and comprehensive analysis of loss of heterozygosity based on mapping hemizygous deletions for a potential tumor-related locus, a minimum overlapping region of deletions at 9p24 the size of 165 kb was identified and found to harbor a new potential tumor suppressor gene for renal cell carcinoma, the Kank gene. Kank (for kidney ankyrin repeat-containing protein) contains four ankyrin repeats at its C terminus. Expression of the gene was suppressed in 6 of 8 or 6 of 10 cancer tissues examined by reverse transcription-PCR or Western blotting, respectively, and in several kidney tumor cell lines due to methylation at CpG sites in the gene. Epigenetic methylation or imprinting seemed to be the first hit, which was followed by a second hit of deletion, resulting in loss of function in many of these deletion cases. Expression of this gene in expression-negative HEK293 cells induced growth retardation at G(0)/G(1) as well as morphological changes.

  11. [Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Campos Arbulú, Ana L; Sadava, Emmanuel E; Sánchez Ruiz, Alejandro; Fernández Vila, Juan M; Dillon, Horacio S; Mezzadri, Norberto A

    2017-01-01

    Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma is a rare entity. There is little published literature. We report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the orbital soft tissues. Surgical resection offered the best treatment for the patient. Complete resection of the lesion was achieved. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy due to the proximity of the lesion to the surgical margins. Surgical treatment is feasible and should be considered as part of the surgeon's arsenal. However, therapeutic decisions must be made on a case-by-case basis.

  12. MicroRNA-93-5p increases multidrug resistance in human colorectal carcinoma cells by downregulating cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor 1A gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi-Jun; Cao, Yun-Fei; Yang, Zu-Qing; Jiang, Zhi-Yuan; Cai, Bin; Guo, Jiao; Zhang, Sen; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) impedes successful chemotherapy in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and emerging evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRs) are involved in the development of MDR. In the present study, the role of miR-93-5p in the modulation of drug resistance in CRC was investigated using HCT-8 and MDR HCT-8/vincristine (VCR) cell lines. The results demonstrated upregulated expression of miR-93-5p and MDR protein 1 (MDR1) in HCT-8/VCR cells, compared with the parental HCT-8 cells. Furthermore, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) was identified as a potential target of miR-93-5p using miR target analysis tools, including PicTar, TargetScan and miRanda. In addition, inhibition of miR-93-5p expression in HCT-8/VCR cells markedly downregulated MDR1 gene expression, upregulated CDKN1A gene expression and induced cell cycle arrest in G1. Conversely, the overexpression of miR-93-5p in HCT-8/VCR cells upregulated MDR1 gene expression, downregulated CDKN1A gene expression and promoted G1/S transition. Furthermore, the in vitro drug sensitivity assay performed suggested that downregulation of miR-93-5p enhanced the sensitivity of HCT-8/VCR cells to VCR, while the upregulation of miR-93-5p decreased the sensitivity of HCT-8 cells to VCR. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that miR-93-5p serves a role in the development of MDR through downregulating CDKN1A gene expression in CRC.

  13. Induction and repression of mammalian achaete-scute homologue (MASH) gene expression during neuronal differentiation of P19 embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J E; Zimmerman, K; Saito, T; Anderson, D J

    1992-01-01

    MASH1 and MASH2, mammalian homologues of the Drosophila neural determination genes achaete-scute, are members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors. We show here that murine P19 embryonal carcinoma cells can be used as a model system to study the regulation and function of these genes. MASH1 and MASH2 display complementary patterns of expression during the retinoic-acid-induced neuronal differentiation of P19 cells. MASH1 mRNA is undetectable in undifferentiated P19 cells but is induced to high levels by retinoic acid coincident with neuronal differentiation. In contrast, MASH2 mRNA is expressed in undifferentiated P19 cells and is repressed by retinoic acid treatment. These complementary expression patterns suggest distinct functions for MASH1 and MASH2 in development, despite their sequence homology. In retinoic-acid-treated P19 cells, MASH1 protein expression precedes and then overlaps expression of neuronal markers. However, MASH1 is expressed by a smaller proportion of cells than expresses such markers. MASH1 immunoreactivity is not detected in differentiated cells displaying a neuronal morphology, suggesting that its expression is transient. These features of MASH1 expression are similar to those observed in vivo, and suggest that P19 cells represent a good model system in which to study the regulation of this gene. Forced expression of MASH1 was achieved in undifferentiated P19 cells by transfection of a cDNA expression construct. The transfected cells expressing exogenous MASH1 protein contained E-box-binding activity that could be super-shifted by an anti-MASH1 antibody, but exhibited no detectable phenotypic changes. Thus, unlike myogenic bHLH genes, such as MyoD, which are sufficient to induce muscle differentiation, expression of MASH1 appears insufficient to promote neurogenesis.

  14. Dendritic cells pulsed with alpha-fetoprotein and mutant P53 fused gene induce bi-targeted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response against hepatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Jia, Jun; Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Liwang; Ma, Bo; Jiang, Hanfang; Di, Lijun; Song, Guohong; Yu, Jing

    2008-07-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is rapidly emerging as a promising treatment in cancer therapy. We had previously shown that DC pulsed with either defined mRNA of tumor antigen (Ag) such as alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), or total RNA of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) could elicit Ag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. Therefore, we suggested a novel DC-based therapeutic method, in which DCs derived from CD34(+) cells enriched peripheral blood mononuclear cells were pulsed with liposome-coated AFP and mutant P53 (mtP53) fused gene pEGFP-C3/AFP-mtP53 to induce bi-targeted specific CTL responses against HCC. Three different genotype HCC cell lines, HepG2 (human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA) A2 positive, AFP expressing positive, P53 expressing negative), SMMC7721 (HLA A2 positive, neither AFP nor P53 expressing positive), and HMCC97 (HLA A2 positive, both AFP and P53 expressing positive) were selected as targets for CTL responses. An important finding was that DCs pulsed with the liposome-coated fused gene could evoke more intensive bi-targeted Ag-specific CTL responses against HMCC97 than DCs pulsed with either AFP or P53 single gene (P < 0.05). This experimental therapeutic model provides a new promising cytotherapeutic approach, in that DCs pulsed with the fused gene of different Ags might induce more extensive multitargeted antitumor immunity.

  15. Tuberous sclerosis complex protein 1 expression is affected by VHL Gene alterations and HIF-1α production in sporadic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damjanovic, Svetozar S; Ilic, Bojana B; Beleslin Cokic, Bojana B; Antic, Jadranka A; Bankovic, Jovana Z; Milicevic, Ivana T; Rodic, Gordana S; Ilic, Dusan S; Todorovic, Vera N; Puskas, Nela; Tulic, Cane D

    2016-12-01

    Alterations in von Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL) do not determine deregulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in clear-cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC). Their effects on tuberous sclerosis proteins (TSC1/2) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) expressions in sporadic ccRCC are unknown. Therefore, we analyze the impact of VHL alterations and HIF-α production on the expression of TSC proteins and Hsp90 in these tumors. Alterations in VHL gene region exhibited 37/47 (78.7%) tumors. Monoallelic inactivation (intragenic mutation or LOH) was found in 10 (21.3%) and biallelic inactivation (intragenic mutation plus LOH) in 27 (57.4%) ccRCCs. Tumorous expression of HIF-α mRNAs, HIF-α, Hsp90 and TSC2 were VHL independent; TSC2 was underexpressed in all tumors by immunostaining (P<0.001). Immunoblotting revealed that TSC1 production was lower in tumors with monoallelic VHL inactivation than in control (P=0.01) and tissues with biallelic VHL inactivation (P=0.019), while tumors lacking HIF-1α (16/47) concurrently overexpressed HIF-2α and underexpressed TSC1 in comparison to controls (P=0.01 for both) and HIF-1α positive tumors (P=0.015 and P=0.050). Significant portion of variability (56.4%) in tumor diameter was explained by oscillations in nuclear grade, and TSC1 and HIF-2α expression in VHL altered tumors. In conclusion, while TSC2 is broadly downregulated in sporadic ccRCC, TSC1 expression is reduced in two subsets of these tumors, those with monoallelic VHL gene inactivation and those with concurrent low HIF-1α and high HIF-2α expression. Hence, the involvement of nuclear grade, TSC1 and HIF-2α in the progression of VHL altered tumors, implies the interplay between pVHL and TSC1.

  16. Gene microarray analysis of lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles in patients with hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jieyu; Li, Wenming; Jin, Tong; Xiang, Xuan; Li, Maocai; Wang, Juan; Li, Guojun; Pan, Xinliang; Lei, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in the development and progression of many types of cancer. However, the mechanisms by which lncRNAs influence development and progression of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC) are unclear. Method: We investigated differences in lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles between 3 pairs of HSCC tissues and adjacent nontumor tissues by microarray analysis. Results: In HSCC tissues, 1299 lncRNAs were significantly upregulated (n=669) or downregulated (n=630) compared to levels in adjacent nontumor tissues. Moreover, 1432 mRNAs were significantly upregulated (n=684) or downregulated (n=748) in HSCC tissues. We randomly selected 2 differentially expressed lncRNAs (AB209630, AB019562) and 2 differentially expressed mRNAs (SPP1, TJP2) for confirmation of microarray results using qRT-PCR. The qRT-PCR results matched well with the microarray data. The differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs were distributed on each of the chromosomes, including the X and Y chromosomes. Pathway analysis indicated that the biological functions of differentially expressed mRNAs were related to 48 cellular pathways that may be associated with HSCC development. GO analysis revealed that 593 mRNAs involved in biological processes, 50 mRNAs involved in cellular components, and 46 mRNAs involved in molecular functions were upregulated in the carcinomas; 280 mRNAs involved in biological processes, 58 mRNAs involved in cellular components, and 71 mRNAs involved in molecular functions were downregulated in the carcinomas. In addition, 8 enhancer-like lncRNAs and 21 intergenic lncRNAs with their adjacent mRNA pairs were identified as coregulated transcripts. Conclusion: These findings provide insight into the mechanisms underlying HSCC tumorigenesis and will facilitate identification of new therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers for this disease. PMID:26131061

  17. A human pluripotent carcinoma stem cell-based model for in vitro developmental neurotoxicity testing: effects of methylmercury, lead and aluminum evaluated by gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Laurenza, Incoronata; Pallocca, Giorgia; Mennecozzi, Milena; Scelfo, Bibiana; Pamies, David; Bal-Price, Anna

    2013-11-01

    The major advantage of the neuronal cell culture models derived from human stem cells is their ability to replicate the crucial stages of neurodevelopment such as the commitment of human stem cells to the neuronal lineage and their subsequent stages of differentiation into neuronal and glial-like cell. In these studies we used mixed neuronal/glial culture derived from the NTERA-2 (NT-2) cell line, which has been established from human pluripotent testicular embryonal carcinoma cells. After characterization of the different stages of cell differentiation into neuronal- and glial-like phenotype toxicity studies were performed to evaluate whether this model would be suitable for developmental neurotoxicity studies. The cells were exposed during the differentiation process to non-cytotoxic concentrations of methylmercury chloride, lead chloride and aluminum nitrate for two weeks. The toxicity was then evaluated by measuring the mRNA levels of cell specific markers (neuronal and glial). The results obtained suggest that lead chloride and aluminum nitrate at low concentrations were toxic primarily to astrocytes and at the higher concentrations it also induced neurotoxicity. In contrast, MetHgCl was toxic for both cell types, neuronal and glial, as mRNA specific for astrocytes and neuronal markers were affected. The results obtained suggest that a neuronal mixed culture derived from human NT2 precursor cells is a suitable model for developmental neurotoxicity studies and gene expression could be used as a sensitive endpoint for initial screening of potential neurotoxic compounds.

  18. Complementation of non-tumorigenicity of HPV18-positive cervical carcinoma cells involves differential mRNA expression of cellular genes including potential tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 11q13.

    PubMed

    Kehrmann, Angela; Truong, Ha; Repenning, Antje; Boger, Regina; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Pascheberg, Ulrich; Beckmann, Alf; Opalka, Bertram; Kleine-Lowinski, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The fusion between human tumorigenic cells and normal human diploid fibroblasts results in non-tumorigenic hybrid cells, suggesting a dominant role for tumor suppressor genes in the generated hybrid cells. After long-term cultivation in vitro, tumorigenic segregants may arise. The loss of tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 11q13 has been postulated to be involved in the induction of the tumorigenic phenotype of human papillomavirus (HPV)18-positive cervical carcinoma cells and their derived tumorigenic hybrid cells after subcutaneous injection in immunocompromised mice. The aim of this study was the identification of novel cellular genes that may contribute to the suppression of the tumorigenic phenotype of non-tumorigenic hybrid cells in vivo. We used cDNA microarray technology to identify differentially expressed cellular genes in tumorigenic HPV18-positive hybrid and parental HeLa cells compared to non-tumorigenic HPV18-positive hybrid cells. We detected several as yet unknown cellular genes that play a role in cell differentiation, cell cycle progression, cell-cell communication, metastasis formation, angiogenesis, antigen presentation, and immune response. Apart from the known differentially expressed genes on 11q13 (e.g., phosphofurin acidic cluster sorting protein 1 (PACS1) and FOS ligand 1 (FOSL1 or Fra-1)), we detected novel differentially expressed cellular genes located within the tumor suppressor gene region (e.g., EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 2 (EFEMP2) and leucine rich repeat containing 32 (LRRC32) (also known as glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP)) that may have potential tumor suppressor functions in this model system of non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic HeLa x fibroblast hybrid cells.

  19. Pb2+ induces gastrin gene expression by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and transcription factor activator protein 1 in human gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chien-Pin; Tsai, Yao-Ting; Chen, Yao-Li; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Joseph T; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Shiurba, Robert; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2015-02-01

    Divalent lead ions (Pb(2+) ) are toxic environmental pollutants known to cause serious health problems in humans and animals. Absorption of Pb(2+) from air, water, and food takes place in the respiratory and digestive tracts. The ways in which absorbed Pb(2+) affects cell physiology are just beginning to be understood at the molecular level. Here, we used reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting to analyze cultures of human gastric carcinoma cells exposed to 10 μM lead nitrate. We found that Pb(2+) induces gastrin hormone gene transcription and translation in a time-dependent manner. Promoter deletion analysis revealed that activator protein 1 (AP1) was necessary for gastrin gene transcription in cells exposed to Pb(2+) . MitogIen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059 suppressed the Pb(2+) -induced increase in messenger RNA. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors AG1478 and PD153035 reduced both transcription and phosphorylation by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). Cells exposed to Pb(2+) also increased production of c-Jun protein, a component of AP1, and over-expression of c-Jun enhanced activation of the gastrin promoter. In sum, the findings suggest the EGFR-ERK1/2-AP1 pathway mediates the effects of Pb(2+) on gastrin gene activity in cell culture.

  20. Mutant Thyroid Hormone Receptors (TRs) Isolated from Distinct Cancer Types Display Distinct Target Gene Specificities: a Unique Regulatory Repertoire Associated with Two Renal Clear Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Meghan D.; Chan, Ivan H.

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are hormone-regulated transcription factors that regulate a diverse array of biological activities, including metabolism, homeostasis, and development. TRs also serve as tumor suppressors, and aberrant TR function (via mutation, deletion, or altered expression) is associated with a spectrum of both neoplastic and endocrine diseases. A particularly high frequency of TR mutations has been reported in renal clear cell carcinoma (RCCC) and in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We have shown that HCC-TR mutants regulate only a fraction of the genes targeted by wild-type TRs but have gained the ability to regulate other, unique, targets. We have suggested that this altered gene recognition may contribute to the neoplastic phenotype. Here, to determine the generality of this phenomenon, we examined a distinct set of TR mutants associated with RCCC. We report that two different TR mutants, isolated from independent RCCC tumors, possess greatly expanded target gene specificities that extensively overlap one another, but only minimally overlap that of the wild-type TRs, or those of two HCC-TR mutants. Many of the genes targeted by either or both RCCC-TR mutants have been previously implicated in RCCC and include a series of metallothioneins, solute carriers, and genes involved in glycolysis and energy metabolism. We propose as a hypothesis that TR mutations from RCCC and HCC may play tissue-specific roles in carcinogenesis, and that the divergent target gene recognition patterns of TR mutants isolated from the two different types of tumors may arise from different selective pressures during development of RCCC vs. HCC. PMID:21622534

  1. Effect of proton and gamma irradiation on human lung carcinoma cells: Gene expression, cell cycle, cell death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer-stem cell trait as biological end points.

    PubMed

    Narang, Himanshi; Kumar, Amit; Bhat, Nagesh; Pandey, Badri N; Ghosh, Anu

    2015-10-01

    Proton beam therapy is a cutting edge modality over conventional gamma radiotherapy because of its physical dose deposition advantage. However, not much is known about its biological effects vis-a-vis gamma irradiation. Here we investigated the effect of proton- and gamma- irradiation on cell cycle, death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and "stemness" in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549). Proton beam (3MeV) was two times more cytotoxic than gamma radiation and induced higher and longer cell cycle arrest. At equivalent doses, numbers of genes responsive to proton irradiation were ten times higher than those responsive to gamma irradiation. At equitoxic doses, the proton-irradiated cells had reduced cell adhesion and migration ability as compared to the gamma-irradiated cells. It was also more effective in reducing population of Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) like cells as revealed by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and surface phenotyping by CD44(+), a CSC marker. These results can have significant implications for proton therapy in the context of suppression of molecular and cellular processes that are fundamental to tumor expansion.

  2. Oncolytic Adenoviral Mutants with E1B19K Gene Deletions Enhance Gemcitabine-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells and Anti-Tumor Efficacy In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Sweeney, Katrina; Öberg, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Miranda, Enrique; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a rapidly progressive malignancy that is highly resistant to current chemotherapeutic modalities and almost uniformly fatal.We show that a novel targeting strategy combining oncolytic adenoviral mutants with the standard cytotoxic treatment, gemcitabine, can markedly improve the anticancer potency. Experimental Design Adenoviral mutants with the E1B19K gene deleted with and without E3B gene expression (AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, respectively) were assessed for synergistic interactions in combination with gemcitabine. Cell viability, mechanism of cell death, and antitumor efficacy in vivo were determined in the pancreatic carcinoma cells PT45 and Suit2, normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and in PT45 xenografts. Results The ΔE1B19K-deleted mutants synergized with gemcitabine to selectively kill cultured pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts in vivo with no effect in normal cells. The corresponding wild-type virus (Ad5) stimulated drug-induced cell killing to a lesser degree. Gemcitabine blocked replication of all viruses despite the enhanced cell killing activity due to gemcitabine-induced delay in G1/S-cell cycle progression, with repression of cyclin E and cdc25A, which was not abrogated by viral E1A-expression. Synergistic cell death occurred through enhancement of gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in the presence of both AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, shown by increased cell membrane fragmentation, caspase-3 activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that oncolytic mutants lacking the antiapoptotic E1B19K gene can improve efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs such as gemcitabine through convergence on cellular apoptosis pathways.These findings imply that less toxic doses than currently practicedin the clinic could efficiently target pancreatic adenocarcinomas when combined with adenoviral mutants. PMID:19223497

  3. PT2385 for the Treatment of Von Hippel-Lindau Disease-Associated Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    VHL Gene Mutation; VHL; VHL Syndrome; VHL Gene Inactivation; Von Hippel; Von Hippel-Lindau Disease; Von Hippel's Disease; Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome, Modifiers of; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Clear Cell RCC; ccRCC

  4. Down-Regulatory Effects of miR-211 on Long Non-Coding RNA SOX2OT and SOX2 Genes in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee, Mohammad; Aleyasin, Seyed Ahmad; Vasei, Mohammad; Semnani, Shahriar Semnani; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objective MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that tran- scriptionally or post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression through degradation of their mRNA targets and/or translational suppression. However, there are a few reports on miRNA-mediated expression regulation of long ncRNAs (lncRNAs). We have previ- ously reported a significant upregulation of the lncRNA SOX2OT and its intronic cod- ing gene, SOX2, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissue samples. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of induced overexpression of miR-211 on SOX2OT and SOX2 expression in vitro. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we performed both bioinformatic and experimental analyses to examine whether these transcripts are regulated by miRNAs. From the list of potential candidate miRNAs, miR-211 was found to have complementary sequences to SOX2OT and SOX2 transcripts. To validate our finding experimentally, we transfected the NT-2 pluripotent cell line (an embryonal carcinoma stem cell) with an expression vector overexpressing miR-211. The expression chang- es of miR-211, SOX2OT, and SOX2 were then quantified by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approach. Results Compared with mock-transfected cells, overexpression of miR-211 caused a significant down-regulation of both genes (P<0.05). Furthermore, flow-cytometry analysis revealed a significant elevation in sub-G1 cell population following ectopic expression of miR-211 in NT-2 cells. Conclusion We report here, for the first time, the down-regulation of SOX2OT and SOX2 genes by an miRNA. Considering the vital role of SOX2OT and SOX2 genes in pluripotency and tumorigenesis, our data suggest an important and inhibitory role for miR-211 in the aforementioned processes. PMID:26862518

  5. Wnt antagonist DKK1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene that induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation in human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Nakajima, Koichi; Kawamoto, Ken; Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Ueno, Koji; Yamamura, Soichiro; Zaman, Mohd S; Khatri, Gaurav; Chen, Yi; Saini, Sharanjot; Majid, Shahana; Deng, Guoren; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2011-04-15

    The functional significance of Wnt antagonist DKK1 has not been investigated in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Therefore, we hypothesized that DKK1 may be a tumor suppressor gene and is epigenetically silenced, thus decreased DKK1 may cause progression of RCC. To assess the function of DKK1, we established stable DKK1 transfected cells and monitored them regarding cell viability, colony formation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and invasive capability. RCC cell lines had decreased levels of DKK1, which were increased after treatment with 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, the level of dimethyl H3K9 and trimethyl H3K27 was decreased after 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine/trichostatin A treatment in RCC cell lines. Increased methylation was also associated with higher pathological stages in primary RCC tissues. T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor activity and nuclear beta-catenin expression were not changed in DKK1 transfectants. Also the expression of cyclinD1 and c-Myc was not changed in DKK1 transfectants. These results suggest that DKK1 may not be involved in the beta-catenin dependent pathway. We also evaluated the expression of various related genes. Cleaved caspase3, p53, p21 and puma expression were significantly upregulated in the DKK1 transfected cells. The population of apoptotic cells was increased in stable DKK1 cells and tumor growth suppression was also observed in nude mice with DKK1 transfected cells. In conclusion, this is the first report to show that DKK1 expression is epigenetically silenced in kidney cancer and its reexpression induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in RCC.

  6. Oncogenic properties of a novel gene JK-1 located in chromosome 5p and its overexpression in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wing K; Chui, Chung H; Fatima, Sarwat; Kok, Stanton H L; Pak, Kai C; Ou, Tian M; Hui, Kin S; Wong, Mei M; Wong, John; Law, Simon; Tsao, S W; Lam, King Y; Beh, Philip S L; Srivastava, Gopesh; Chan, Albert S C; Ho, Kwok P; Tang, Johnny C O

    2007-06-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) shows high frequency and mortality in Asian regions, including China. Previous analysis of genomic DNA of ESCC using comparative genomic hybridization indicated that amplification of the chromosome 5p regions is a common event in ESCC cell lines and patient cases of Hong Kong Chinese origin, and the results suggested that the genes located in the chromosome 5p regions may play crucial roles in the molecular pathogenesis of ESCC. Our previous studies on ESCC confirmed the tumorigenic and overexpression properties of a novel gene JS-1 located in chromosome 5p15.2 upstream to delta-catenin. In the present study, another novel gene JK-1 which is located at 5p15.1 downstream to delta-catenin was characterized for its roles in the pathogenesis of ESCC. Thirteen ESCC cell lines and 30 surgical specimens of esophageal tumors were studied for the overexpression of JK-1 using multiplex RT-PCR analysis. The transforming capacity of overexpression of JK-1 was also investigated by transfecting NIH 3T3 and HEK 293 cells with the expression vector cloned with JK-1, followed by the soft agar and foci formation assays. JK-1 was overexpressed in 9/13 (69%) of the ESCC cell lines and 9/30 (30%) of the ESCC patient cases. Both NIH 3T3 and HEK 293 cells acquired the properties of anchorage-dependent and -independent growth when JK-1 was overexpressed. Most significantly, subcutaneous sarcomas were formed in all (3/3) the athymic nude mice after NIH 3T3 cells overexpressing JK-1 were injected subcutaneously. Our results thus indicated that JK-1 is commonly overexpressed in ESCC and has a prominent capacity to transform normal cells. Our overall results thus provide the first evidence that the overexpression of JK-1 and its transforming capacity in normal cells may play a critical role in the molecular pathogenesis of ESCC.

  7. Germ-line mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau tumor-suppressor gene are similar to somatic von Hippel-Lindau aberrations in sporadic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, J.M.; Naglich, J.; Gelbert, L.; Laidlaw, J.; Seizinger, B.R.; Kley, N.; Hsia, Y.E.; Lamiell, J.M.; Green, J.S.; Collins, D.

    1994-12-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary tumor syndrome predisposing to multifocal bilateral renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), pheochromocytomas, and pancreatic tumors, as well as angiomas and hemangioblastomas of the CNS. A candidate gene for VHL was recently identified, which led to the isolation of a partial cDNA clone with extended open reading frame, without significant homology to known genes or obvious functional motifs, except for an acidic pentamer repeat domain. To further characterize the functional domains of the VHL gene and assess its involvement in hereditary and nonhereditary tumors, we performed mutation analyses and studied its expression in normal and tumor tissue. The authors identified germline mutations in 39% of VHL disease families. Moreover, 33% of sporadic RCCs and all (6/6) sporadic RCC cell lines analyzed showed mutations within the VHL gene. Both germ-line and somatic mutations included deletions, insertions, splice-site mutations, and missense and nonsense mutations, all of which clustered at the 3{prime} end of the corresponding partial VHL cDNA open reading frame, including an alternatively spliced exon 123 nt in length, suggesting functionally important domains encoded by the VHL gene in this region. Over 180 sporadic tumors of other types have shown no detectable base changes within the presumed coding sequence of the VHL gene to date. We conclude that the gene causing VHL has an important and specific role in the etiology of sporadic RCCs, acts as a recessive tumor-suppressor gene, and appears to encode important functional domains within the 3{prime} end of the known open reading frame.

  8. Epigenetic inactivation of the candidate tumor suppressor gene ASC/TMS1 in human renal cell carcinoma and its role as a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qianling; Jin, Jie; Ying, Jianming; Cui, Yun; Sun, Mengkui; Zhang, Lian; Fan, Yu; Xu, Ben; Zhang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the epigenetic alteration and biological function of the pro-apoptotic gene ASC/TMS1 in renal cell carcinoma. ASC/TMS1 was downregulated in five out of six RCC cell lines. A significant downregulation was also detected in sixty-seven paired renal tumors compared with adjacent non-cancerous tissues. The downregulation of ASC/TMS1 was correlated with promoter hypermethylation and could be restored with demethylation treatment. Re-expression of ASC/TMS1 in silenced RCC cell lines inhibited cell viability, colony formation, arrested cell cycle, induced apoptosis, suppressed cell invasion and repressed tumorigenicity in SCID mice. The antitumorigenic function of ASC/TMS1 in renal cancer was partially regulated by activation of p53 and p21 signaling. In addition, restoration of ASC/TMS1 sensitizes RCC cells to DNA damaging agents. Knockdown of ASC/TMS1 reduced DNA damaging agents-induced p53 activation and cell apoptosis. Moreover, ASC/TMS1 hypermethylation was further detected in 41.1% (83/202) of RCC tumors, but only 12% in adjacent non-cancerous tissues. ASC/TMS1 methylation was significantly correlated with higher tumor nuclear grade. In conclusion, ASC/TMS1 is a novel functional tumor suppressor in renal carcinogenesis. ASC/TMS1 tumor specific methylation may be a useful biomarker for designing improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for RCC. PMID:26093088

  9. Clinical significance of Anoctamin-1 gene at 11q13 in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Juan P.; Menéndez, Sofía Tirados; Hermida-Prado, Francisco; Álvarez-Teijeiro, Saúl; Villaronga, M. Ángeles; Alonso-Durán, Laura; Vallina, Aitana; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Astudillo, Aurora; Suárez, Carlos; María García-Pedrero, Juana

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the clinical significance of Anoctamin-1 gene mapping at 11q13 amplicon in both the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). ANO1 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 372 surgically treated HNSCC patients and also in 35 laryngeal precancerous lesions. ANO1 gene amplification was determined by real-time PCR in all the laryngeal premalignancies and 60 of the HNSCCs, and molecular data correlated with clinical outcome. ANO1 gene amplification was frequently detected in both premalignant lesions (63%) and HNSCC tumours (58%), whereas concomitant ANO1 expression occurred at a much lower frequency (20 and 22%). Interestingly, laryngeal dysplasias harbouring ANO1 gene amplification showed a higher risk of malignant transformation (HR = 3.62; 95% CI 0.79–16.57; P = 0.097; Cox regression). ANO1 expression and gene amplification showed no significant associations with clinicopathological parameters in HNSCC. However, remarkably ANO1 expression differentially influenced patient survival depending on the tumour site. Collectively, this study provides original evidence demonstrating the distinctive impact of ANO1 expression on HNSCC prognosis depending on the tumour site. PMID:26498851

  10. Differential gene expression profiling in aggressive bladder transitional cell carcinoma compared to the adjacent microscopically normal urothelium by microdissection-SMART cDNA PCR-SSH.

    PubMed

    Wang, H T; Ma, F L; Ma, X B; Han, R F; Zhang, Y B; Chang, J W

    2006-01-01

    Identifying novel and known genes that are differentially expressed in aggressive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC) has important implications in understanding the biology of bladder tumorigenesis and developing new diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In this study we identified the differential gene expression profiles comparing tumor to the adjacent microscopically normal mucosa by manual microdissection on frozen sections. The RNAs extracted from microdissected tissues were amplified by SMART cDNA PCR technology to generate forward subtractive cDNA library by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH). We obtained 376 positive clones, one hundred clones of aggressive BTCC subtracted cDNA library were selected at random and inserts were reamplified by PCR. After differential screening by reverse dot blotting, 73 positive clones, that contend inserts putatively upregulated in aggressive BTCC, were further analysed by DNA sequencing, GenBank and EST database searching. Sequencing results showed that 66 clones stand for 23 known genes and 7 clones for three new EST (Genbank number: DN236875, DN236874 and DN236873). In conclusion, microdissection-SMART cDNA PCR-SSH allowed for an efficient way to identify aggressive BTCC-specific differential expressed genes that may potentially be involved in the carcinogenesis and/or progression of aggressive BTCC. These differentially expressed genes may be of potential utility as therapeutic and diagnostic targets for aggressive BTCC.

  11. Clinical significance of Anoctamin-1 gene at 11q13 in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Juan P; Menéndez, Sofía Tirados; Hermida-Prado, Francisco; Álvarez-Teijeiro, Saúl; Villaronga, M Ángeles; Alonso-Durán, Laura; Vallina, Aitana; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Astudillo, Aurora; Suárez, Carlos; María García-Pedrero, Juana

    2015-10-26

    This study investigates the clinical significance of Anoctamin-1 gene mapping at 11q13 amplicon in both the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). ANO1 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 372 surgically treated HNSCC patients and also in 35 laryngeal precancerous lesions. ANO1 gene amplification was determined by real-time PCR in all the laryngeal premalignancies and 60 of the HNSCCs, and molecular data correlated with clinical outcome. ANO1 gene amplification was frequently detected in both premalignant lesions (63%) and HNSCC tumours (58%), whereas concomitant ANO1 expression occurred at a much lower frequency (20 and 22%). Interestingly, laryngeal dysplasias harbouring ANO1 gene amplification showed a higher risk of malignant transformation (HR = 3.62; 95% CI 0.79-16.57; P = 0.097; Cox regression). ANO1 expression and gene amplification showed no significant associations with clinicopathological parameters in HNSCC. However, remarkably ANO1 expression differentially influenced patient survival depending on the tumour site. Collectively, this study provides original evidence demonstrating the distinctive impact of ANO1 expression on HNSCC prognosis depending on the tumour site.

  12. Recurrent rearrangements of the Myb/SANT-like DNA-binding domain containing 3 gene (MSANTD3) in salivary gland acinic cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barasch, Nicholas; Gong, Xue; Kwei, Kevin A.; Varma, Sushama; Biscocho, Jewison; Qu, Kunbin; Xiao, Nan; Lipsick, Joseph S.; Pelham, Robert J.; West, Robert B.; Pollack, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic gene fusions have been identified in several histologic types of salivary gland neoplasia, but not previously in acinic cell carcinoma (AcCC). To discover novel gene fusions, we performed whole-transcriptome sequencing surveys of three AcCC archival cases. In one specimen we identified a novel HTN3-MSANTD3 gene fusion, and in another a novel PRB3-ZNF217 gene fusion. The structure of both fusions was consistent with the promoter of the 5’ partner (HTN3 or PRB3), both highly expressed salivary gland genes, driving overexpression of full-length MSANTD3 or ZNF217. By fluorescence in situ hybridization of an expanded AcCC case series, we observed MSANTD3 rearrangements altogether in 3 of 20 evaluable cases (15%), but found no additional ZNF217 rearrangements. MSANTD3 encodes a previously uncharacterized Myb/SANT domain-containing protein. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated diffuse nuclear MSANTD3 expression in 8 of 27 AcCC cases (30%), including the three cases with MSANTD3 rearrangement. MSANTD3 displayed heterogeneous expression in normal salivary ductal epithelium, as well as among other histologic types of salivary gland cancer though without evidence of translocation. In a broader survey, MSANTD3 showed variable expression across a wide range of normal and neoplastic human tissue specimens. In preliminary functional studies, engineered MSANTD3 overexpression in rodent salivary gland epithelial cells did not enhance cell proliferation, but led to significant upregulation of gene sets involved in protein synthesis. Our findings newly identify MSANTD3 rearrangement as a recurrent event in salivary gland AcCC, providing new insight into disease pathogenesis, and identifying a putative novel human oncogene. PMID:28212443

  13. Effects of Japanese mistletoe lectin on cytokine gene expression in human colonic carcinoma cells and in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Monira, Pervin; Koyama, Yu; Fukutomi, Ryuuta; Yasui, Kensuke; Isemura, Mamoru; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2009-10-01

    Mistletoe lectins have various biological activities including anti-cancer and immunomodulatory effects. We previously isolated a lectin (ML-J) from Japanese mistletoe. In the present study, we examined the effects of ML-J on cytokine gene expression in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells and in the mouse intestine. The results of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that ML-J caused an upregulation of the gene expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-6 in Caco-2 cells and TNF-alpha and IL-6 in the duodenum. This study provides the first example to show that a perorally administered plant lectin affects gene expression in the duodenum.

  14. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome with medulloblastoma in an African-American boy: A rare case illustrating gene-environment interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Korczak, J.F.; Goldstein, A.M.; Kase, R.G.

    1997-03-31

    We present an 8-year-old African-American boy with medulloblastoma and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) who exhibited the radiosensitive response of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) formation in the area irradiated for medulloblastoma. Such a response is well-documented in Caucasian NBCCS patients with medulloblastoma. The propositus was diagnosed with medulloblastoma at the age of 2 years and underwent surgery, chemotherapy, and craniospinal irradiation. At the age of 6 years, he was diagnosed with NBCCS following his presentation with a large odontogenic keratocyst of the mandible, pits of the palms and soles and numerous BCCs in the area of the back and neck that had been irradiated previously for medulloblastoma. Examination of other relatives showed that the propositus mother also had NBCCS but was more mildly affected; in particular, she had no BCCs. This case illustrates complex gene-environment interaction, in that increased skin pigmentation in African-Americans is presumably protective against ultraviolet, but not ionizing, radiation. This case and other similar cases in the literature show the importance of considering NBCCS in the differential diagnosis of any patient who presents with a medulloblastoma, especially before the age of 5 years, and of examining other close relatives for signs of NBCCS to determine the patient`s at-risk status. Finally, for individuals who are radiosensitive, protocols that utilize chemotherapy in lieu of radiotherapy should be considered. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Expression of a tumor-associated gene, LASS2, in the human bladder carcinoma cell lines BIU-87, T24, EJ and EJ-M3

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, QINGHUA; WANG, HAIFENG; YANG, MINGYING; YANG, DELIN; ZUO, YIGANG; WANG, JIANSONG

    2013-01-01

    Homo sapiens longevity assurance homolog 2 of yeast LAG1 (LASS2), a metastasis suppressor gene of human cancer, is the most abundantly expressed member of the ceramide synthase gene family. Expression of LASS2 has been reported in carcinomas of the prostate, liver and breast. However, there has been no report on the expression of LASS2 in human bladder cancer cell lines. In order to investigate the expression and potential role of this new tumor metastasis supressor gene in human bladder cancer, we compared the proliferation, metastasis and invasion among the BIU-87, T24, EJ and EJ-M3 human bladder cancer cell lines. The mRNA expression levels of the LASS2 gene were examined using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The expression levels of LASS1 and LASS3 mRNA were used as references. The protein expression level of the LASS2 gene was detected using western blotting. The most aggressive of these four human cancer cell lines was observed to be EJ-M3. The expression of LASS2 mRNA was significantly correlated with diverse proliferation, metastasis and invasion. The expression levels of LASS1 and LASS3 mRNA were not correlated with these parameters. At the protein level, we observed that the more aggressive the cancer cell line, the lower the LASS2 protein expression level. Therefore, LASS2 expression may be correlated with the development and progression of human bladder cancer and may be a prognostic indicator for this cancer. PMID:23407876

  16. Effects of HAb18G/CD147 knockout on hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro using a novel zinc-finger nuclease-targeted gene knockout approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Wei; Yang, Xiang-Min; Tang, Juan; Wang, Shi-Jie; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2015-03-01

    HAb18G/CD147 belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily and predominantly functions as an inducer of matrix metalloproteinase secretion for tumor invasion and metastasis. This study was designed to investigate the effects of HAb18G/CD147 knockout on hepatocellular carcinoma cells using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFNs)-targeted gene knockout approach. The HCC cell line SMMC-7721 was used for ZFNs-targeted cleavage of the HAb18G/CD147 gene. RT-PCR and Western blot assays were used to detect HAb18G/CD147 expression. HAb18G phenotypic changes following HAb18G/CD147 knockout in SMMC-K7721 cells were assessed using tumor cell adhesion, invasion, migration and colony formation and flow cytometric assays. These data demonstrated that tumor cell adhesion, invasion, migration, and colony formation capabilities of SMMC-K7721 were significantly reduced compared to parental cells or SMMC-7721 with re-expression of HAb18G/CD147 protein transfected with HAb18G/CD147 cDNA. Moreover, knockout of HAb18G/CD147 expression also induced SMMC-K7721 cells to undergo apoptosis compared to SMMC-7721 and SMMC-R7721 (P < 0.01). Molecularly, protein expression of p53 was induced in these cells, but re-expression of HAb18G/CD147 reduced p53 levels in SMMC-R7721 cells, possibly through inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-MDM2 signaling pathway. The findings provide a novel insight into the mechanisms underlying HAb18G/CD147-induced progression of HCC cells.

  17. Enhanced antitumor effects of an engineered measles virus Edmonston strain expressing the wild-type N, P, L genes on human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xin; Nakamura, Takafumi; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Shohei; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Eto, Masatoshi; Naito, Seiji; Takeda, Makoto; Yanagi, Yusuke; Tani, Kenzaburo

    2010-03-01

    Measles virus Edmonston strain (MV-Edm) is thought to have remarkable oncolytic activity that selectively destroys human tumor cells. The P/V/C protein of wild-type MV was shown to resist the antiviral effects of interferon (IFN)-alpha. Here, we engineered new MVs by arming MV-Edm tag strain (a V-defective vaccine-lineage strain, MV-Etag) with the P or N, P, and L genes of wild-type MV (MV-P and MV-NPL, respectively). The oncolytic activities of the MVs were determined in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines and primary human RCC cells by the MTT assay. The antitumor efficacy of the MVs was evaluated in A-498 xenografts in nude mice. IFN-alpha effectively inhibited the replication of MV-Etag and MV-P, but not MV-NPL. MV-NPL more efficiently induced cytopathic effects (CPEs) in OS-RC-2 cells, even in the presence of human IFN-alpha. MV-NPL replicated more rapidly than MV-P and MV-Etag in A-498 cells. Apoptosis was induced earlier in A-498 cells by MV-NPL than MV-Etag and MV-P. MV-NPL showed more significant antitumoral effects and had prolonged replication compared to MV-Etag and MV-P. In this study, we demonstrated that the newly engineered MV-NPL has more effective oncolytic activity and may help establish an innovative cancer therapy.

  18. miR-9 modulates the expression of interferon-regulated genes and MHC class I molecules in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Zhao, Zun-Lan; Zhao, Wen-Tao; Fan, Quan-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Chun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Shi, Jun-Wen; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Rao-Ying; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Yong-Liang; Xu, Kang; Yao, Kai-Tai; Xiao, Dong

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► miR-9 can negatively or positively modulate interferon-induced gene expression. ► miR-9 can up-regulate major histocompatibility complex class I molecule expression. ► miR-9 can down-regulate the expression of interleukin-related genes. -- Abstract: The functions of miR-9 in some cancers are recently implicated in regulating proliferation, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion and metastasis, apoptosis, and tumor angiogenesis, etc. miR-9 is commonly down-regulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), but the exact roles of miR-9 dysregulation in the pathogenesis of NPC remains unclear. Therefore, we firstly used miR-9-expressing CNE2 cells to determine the effects of miR-9 overexpression on global gene expression profile by microarray analysis. Microarray-based gene expression data unexpectedly demonstrated a significant number of up- or down-regulated immune- and inflammation-related genes, including many well-known interferon (IFN)-induced genes (e.g., IFI44L, PSMB8, IRF5, PSMB10, IFI27, PSB9{sub H}UMAN, IFIT2, TRAIL, IFIT1, PSB8{sub H}UMAN, IRF1, B2M and GBP1), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules (e.g., HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-F and HLA-H) and interleukin (IL)-related genes (e.g., IL20RB, GALT, IL7, IL1B, IL11, IL1F8, IL1A, IL6 and IL7R), which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Moreover, the overexpression of miR-9 with the miRNA mimics significantly up- or down-regulated the expression of above-mentioned IFN-inducible genes, MHC class I molecules and IL-related genes; on the contrary, miR-9 inhibition by anti-miR-9 inhibitor in CNE2 and 5–8F cells correspondingly decreased or increased the aforementioned immune- and inflammation-related genes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that miR-9 can modulate the expression of IFN-induced genes and MHC class I molecules in human cancer cells, suggesting a novel role of miR-9 in linking inflammation and cancer, which remains to be fully characterized.

  19. Deletion/duplication mutation screening of TP53 gene in patients with transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    PubMed

    Bazrafshani, Mohammad Reza R; Nowshadi, Pouriaali A; Shirian, Sadegh; Daneshbod, Yahya; Nabipour, Fatemeh; Mokhtari, Maral; Hosseini, Fatemehsadat; Dehghan, Somayeh; Saeedzadeh, Abolfazl; Mosayebi, Ziba

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer is a molecular disease driven by the accumulation of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. The aim of this study was to detect the deletions/duplication mutations in TP53 gene exons using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) method in the patients with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). The achieved formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 60 patients with TCC of bladder were screened for exonal deletions or duplications of every 12 TP53 gene exons using MLPA. The pathological sections were examined by three pathologists and categorized according to the WHO scoring guideline as 18 (30%) grade I, 22 (37%) grade II, 13 (22%) grade III, and 7 (11%) grade IV cases of TCC. None mutation changes of TP53 gene were detected in 24 (40%) of the patients. Furthermore, mutation changes including, 15 (25%) deletion, 17 (28%) duplication, and 4 (7%) both deletion and duplication cases were observed among 60 samples. From 12 exons of TP53 gene, exon 1 was more subjected to exonal deletion. Deletion of exon 1 of TP53 gene has occurred in 11 (35.4%) patients with TCC. In general, most mutations of TP53, either deletion or duplication, were found in exon 1, which was statistically significant. In addition, no relation between the TCC tumor grade and any type of mutation were observed in this research. MLPA is a simple and efficient method to analyze genomic deletions and duplications of all 12 exons of TP53 gene. The finding of this report that most of the mutations of TP53 occur in exon 1 is in contrast to that of the other reports suggesting that exons 5-8 are the most (frequently) mutated exons of TP53 gene. The mutations of exon 1 of TP53 gene may play an important role in the tumorogenesis of TCC.

  20. Effect of CD44 gene polymorphisms on risk of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Weng, Wei-Chun; Huang, Yu-Hui; Yang, Shun-Fa; Wang, Shian-Shiang; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Hsueh, Chao-Wen; Huang, Ching-Hsuan; Chou, Ying-Erh

    2016-05-01

    The carcinogenesis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder involves etiological factors, such as ethnicity, the environment, genetics, and diet. Cluster of differentiation (CD44), a well-known tumor marker, plays a crucial role in regulating tumor cell differentiation and metastasis. This study investigated the effect of CD44 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on TCC risk and clinicopathological characteristics. Five SNPs of CD44 were analyzed through real-time polymerase chain reaction in 275 patients with TCC and 275 participants without cancer. In this study, we observed that CD44 rs187115 polymorphism carriers with the genotype of at least one G were associated with TCC risk. Furthermore, TCC patients who carried at least one G allele at CD44 rs187115 had a higher stage risk than did patients carrying the wild-type allele (p < 0.05). In addition, The AATAC or GACGC haplotype among the five CD44 sites was also associated with a reduced risk of TCC. In conclusion, our results suggest that CD44 SNPs influence the risk of TCC. Patients with CD44 rs187115 variant genotypes (AG + GG) exhibited a higher risk of TCC; these patients may possess chemoresistance to developing late-stage TCC compared with those with the wild-type genotype. The CD44 rs187115 SNP may predict poor prognosis in patients with TCC.

  1. Intratumoral morphologic and molecular heterogeneity of rhabdoid renal cell carcinoma: challenges for personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajesh R; Murugan, Paari; Patel, Lalit R; Voicu, Horatiu; Yoo, Suk-Young; Majewski, Tadeusz; Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Wani, Khalida; Tannir, Nizar; Karam, Jose A; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G; Creighton, Chad J; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Broaddus, Russell R; Tamboli, Pheroze; Baggerly, Keith A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Czerniak, Bogdan; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Sircar, Kanishka

    2015-09-01

    Rhabdoid histology in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma is associated with a poor prognosis. The prognosis of patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma may also be influenced by molecular alterations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between histologic features and salient molecular changes in rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. We macrodissected the rhabdoid and clear-cell epithelioid components from 12 cases of rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. We assessed cancer-related mutations from eight cases using a clinical next-generation exome-sequencing platform. The transcriptome of rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (n=8) and non-rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (n=37) was assessed by RNA-seq and gene expression microarray. VHL (63%) showed identical mutations in all regions from the same tumor. BAP1 (38%) and PBRM1 (13%) mutations were identified in the rhabdoid but not in the epithelioid component and were mutually exclusive in 3/3 cases and 1 case, respectively. SETD2 (63%) mutations were discordant between different histologic regions in 2/5 cases, with mutations called only in the epithelioid and rhabdoid components, respectively. The transcriptome of rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma was distinct from advanced-stage and high-grade clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. The diverse histologic components of rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma, however, showed a similar transcriptomic program, including a similar prognostic gene expression signature. Rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma is transcriptomically distinct and shows a high rate of SETD2 and BAP1 mutations and a low rate of PBRM1 mutations. Driver mutations in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma are often discordant across different morphologic regions, whereas the gene expression program is relatively stable. Molecular profiling of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma may improve by assessing for gene expression and sampling tumor foci from different

  2. Intratumoral Morphologic and Molecular Heterogeneity of Rhabdoid Renal Cell Carcinoma: Challenges for Personalized Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh R.; Murugan, Paari; Patel, Lalit R.; Voicu, Horatiu; Yoo, Suk-Young; Majewski, Tadeusz; Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Wani, Khalida; Tannir, Nizar; Karam, Jose A.; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G.; Creighton, Chad J.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Broaddus, Russell R.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Baggerly, Keith A.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Czerniak, Bogdan; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Sircar, Kanishka

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdoid histology in clear cell renal cell carcinoma is associated with a poor prognosis. The prognosis of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma may also be influenced by molecular alterations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between histologic features and salient molecular changes in rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We macrodissected the rhabdoid and clear cell epithelioid components from 12 cases of rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We assessed cancer related mutations from 8 cases using a clinical next generation exome sequencing platform. The transcriptome of rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=8) and non-rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=37) was assessed by RNA-seq and gene expression microarray. VHL (63%) showed identical mutations in all regions from the same tumor. BAP1 (38%) and PBRM1 (13%) mutations were identified in the rhabdoid but not the epithelioid component and were mutually exclusive in 3/3 cases and 1 case, respectively. SETD2 (63%) mutations were discordant between different histologic regions in 2/5 cases, with mutations called only in the epithelioid and rhabdoid components, respectively. The transcriptome of rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma was distinct from advanced stage and high grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The diverse histologic components of rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma, however, showed a similar transcriptomic program, including a similar prognostic gene expression signature. Rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma is transcriptomically distinct and shows a high rate of SETD2 and BAP1 mutations and a low rate of PBRM1 mutations. Driver mutations in clear cell renal cell carcinoma are often discordant across different morphologic regions whereas the gene expression program is relatively stable. Molecular profiling of clear cell renal cell carcinoma may improve by assessing for gene expression and sampling tumor foci from different histologic

  3. Primary Microcephaly Gene MCPH1 Shows Signatures of Tumor Suppressors and Is Regulated by miR-27a in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Thejaswini; Nagashri, Mathighatta Nagaraj; Swamy, Shivananda S.; Mohiyuddin, S. M. Azeem; Gopinath, Kodaganur S.; Kumar, Arun

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the MCPH1 (microcephalin 1) gene, located at chromosome 8p23.1, result in two autosomal recessive disorders: primary microcephaly and premature chromosome condensation syndrome. MCPH1 has also been shown to be downregulated in breast, prostate and ovarian cancers, and mutated in 1/10 breast and 5/41 endometrial tumors, suggesting that it could also function as a tumor suppressor (TS) gene. To test the possibility of MCPH1 as a TS gene, we first performed LOH study in a panel of 81 matched normal oral tissues and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) samples, and observed that 14/71 (19.72%) informative samples showed LOH, a hallmark of TS genes. Three protein truncating mutations were identified in 1/15 OSCC samples and 2/5 cancer cell lines. MCPH1 was downregulated at both the transcript and protein levels in 21/41 (51.22%) and 19/25 (76%) OSCC samples respectively. A low level of MCPH1 promoter methylation was also observed in 4/40 (10%) tumor samples. We further observed that overexpression of MCPH1 decreased cellular proliferation, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, cell invasion and tumor size in nude mice, indicating its tumor suppressive function. Using bioinformatic approaches and luciferase assay, we showed that the 3′-UTR of MCPH1 harbors two non-overlapping functional seed regions for miR-27a which negatively regulated its level. The expression level of miR-27a negatively correlated with the MCPH1 protein level in OSCC. Our study indicates for the first time that, in addition to its role in brain development, MCPH1 also functions as a tumor suppressor gene and is regulated by miR-27a. PMID:23472065

  4. C-deletion in exon 4 codon 63 of p53 gene as a molecular marker for oral squamous cell carcinoma: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Sukhija, Hemani; Krishnan, Rajkumar; Balachander, N.; Raghavendhar, Karthik; Ramadoss, Ramya; Sen, Sukanta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exfoliated oral cancer cells in saliva samples from patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) can be used to determine the incidence and type of mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. The purpose of this study was to identify C-deletion mutation in exon 4 codon 63 of p53 gene in the saliva of OSCC patients by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: Saliva samples of 20 newly histopathologically diagnosed OSCC patients and 5 healthy volunteers were subjected to isolation of the total genomic DNA and PCR amplification for C-deletion on exon 4 of p53 gene. The resulting products were resolved by agarose gel electrophoresis, viewed and photographed on ultraviolet-transilluminator. Results: The relationship between the frequencies of genetic alterations was assessed by Chi-square test. Differences with values of P < 0.05 were statistically significant. Conclusion: The study concluded a 100% presence of C-deletion mutation in exon 4 codon 63 of p53 in the saliva of OSCC patients. This study suggests that detection of mutation in exon 4 codon 63 of p53 by PCR is a fast, reliable, accurate, and sensitive molecular method for OSCC diagnosis. PMID:26604578

  5. Methylation of RAD51B, XRCC3 and other homologous recombination genes is associated with expression of immune checkpoints and an inflammatory signature in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, lung and cervix

    PubMed Central

    Rieke, Damian T.; Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Klinghammer, Konrad; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Klauschen, Frederick; Tinhofer, Inge; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoints are emerging treatment targets, but mechanisms underlying checkpoint expression are poorly understood. Since alterations in DNA repair genes have been connected to the efficacy of checkpoint inhibitors, we investigated associations between methylation of DNA repair genes and CTLA4 and CD274 (PD-L1) expression. A list of DNA repair genes (179 genes) was selected from the literature, methylation status and expression of inflammation-associated genes (The Cancer Genome Atlas data) was correlated in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), cervical and lung squamous cell carcinoma. A significant positive correlation of the methylation status of 15, 3 and 2 genes with checkpoint expression was identified, respectively. RAD51B methylation was identified in all cancer subtypes. In HNSCC and cervical cancer, there was significant enrichment for homologous recombination genes. Methylation of the candidate genes was also associated with expression of other checkpoints, ligands, MHC- and T-cell associated genes as well as an interferon-inflammatory immune gene signature, predictive for the efficacy of PD-1 inhibition in HNSCC. Homologous recombination deficiency might therefore be mediated by DNA repair gene hypermethylation and linked to an immune-evasive phenotype in SCC. The methylation status of these genes could represent a new predictive biomarker for immune checkpoint inhibition. PMID:27683114

  6. Epigenetic role of CCAAT box-binding transcription factor NF-Y on ID gene family in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moeinvaziri, Farideh; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) is a histone substitute protein that specifically binds to the CCAAT box of the target genes and thereby promotes their regulation. NF-Y transcription factor, with defined CCAAT element-binding activities, target a gene family that encodes a group of basic helix-loop-helix ID factors (ID1-ID4), with or without CCAAT box at their promoter region. In this study, the expressions of NF-Y in mRNA and protein level were evaluated in a human embryonic carcinoma cell line, named NTera2, before and after 7 days induction of differentiation. We also looked into expression levels of ID genes in NTera2 cells during differentiation because of their critical role in development. By using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with real-time polymerase chain reaction, NF-Y incorporation and acetylation/dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9ac/me2) was quantitatively evaluated on the regulatory regions of considered genes to monitor the changes in epigenetic markers at ID gene promoters throughout differentiation. The results demonstrated a marked down-regulation of ID1, ID2, and ID3 genes, parallel to a loss of NF-Y binding to the promoters of these genes. The data show that although the genes encoding NF-Y complex remained expressed at mRNA level, NF-YC is lost at the protein level onset of differentiation. Additionally, the epigenetic marks of H3K9ac and H3K9me2 at the target gene promoters decreased and increased, respectively, after 1 day of differentiation. It is suggested that, in the absence of NF-Y binding, the corresponding regions adopt a heterochromatic nature, whereas when NF-Y comes back after 7 days of differentiation, the ID1-3 promoters become again converted into active chromatin. The ID4 gene, lacking a CCAAT box, behaves differently and does not show any incorporation. This experiment implies for the first time that the presence of NF-Y transcription factor plays a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation of ID genes in

  7. Genetic variants in DNA repair pathway genes and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and gastric adenocarcinoma in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Qing; Hu, Nan; Hyland, Paula L; Gao, Ying; Wang, Zhao-Ming; Yu, Kai; Su, Hua; Wang, Chao-Yu; Wang, Le-Min; Chanock, Stephen J; Burdett, Laurie; Ding, Ti; Qiao, You-Lin; Fan, Jin-Hu; Wang, Yuan; Xu, Yi; Shi, Jian-Xin; Gu, Fangyi; Wheeler, William; Xiong, Xiao-Qin; Giffen, Carol; Tucker, Margaret A; Dawsey, Sanford M; Freedman, Neal D; Abnet, Christian C; Goldstein, Alisa M; Taylor, Philip R

    2013-07-01

    The DNA repair pathways help to maintain genomic integrity and therefore genetic variation in the pathways could affect the propensity to develop cancer. Selected germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the pathways have been associated with esophageal cancer and gastric cancer (GC) but few studies have comprehensively examined the pathway genes. We aimed to investigate associations between DNA repair pathway genes and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and GC, using data from a genome-wide association study in a Han Chinese population where ESCC and GC are the predominant cancers. In sum, 1942 ESCC cases, 1758 GC cases and 2111 controls from the Shanxi Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer Genetics Project (discovery set) and the Linxian Nutrition Intervention Trials (replication set) were genotyped for 1675 SNPs in 170 DNA repair-related genes. Logistic regression models were applied to evaluate SNP-level associations. Gene- and pathway-level associations were determined using the resampling-based adaptive rank-truncated product approach. The DNA repair pathways overall were significantly associated with risk of ESCC (P = 6.37 × 10(-4)), but not with GC (P = 0.20). The most significant gene in ESCC was CHEK2 (P = 2.00 × 10(-6)) and in GC was CLK2 (P = 3.02 × 10(-4)). We observed several other genes significantly associated with either ESCC (SMUG1, TDG, TP53, GTF2H3, FEN1, POLQ, HEL308, RAD54B, MPG, FANCE and BRCA1) or GC risk (MRE11A, RAD54L and POLE) (P < 0.05). We provide evidence for an association between specific genes in the DNA repair pathways and the risk of ESCC and GC. Further studies are warranted to validate these associations and to investigate underlying mechanisms.

  8. Creation of a six-fingered artificial transcription factor that represses the hepatitis B virus HBx gene integrated into a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinghui; Zhao, Zhanzhong; Guo, Junwei; Huang, Peitang; Zhu, Xudong; Zhou, Xiaowei; Yang, Zhixin; Zhao, Lixia; Xu, Long; Xu, Junjie; Fu, Ling; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Dong, Yunzhu; Huang, Gang; Wang, Qianfei; Li, Bo; Song, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiuxu; Liu, Shuling; Yi, Shaoqiong; Yu, Ting; Yu, Changming; Hou, Lihua; Li, Jianmin; Chen, Wei

    2013-04-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is an independent risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV HBx gene is frequently identified as an integrant in the chromosomal DNA of patients with HCC. HBx encodes the X protein (HBx), a putative viral oncoprotein that affects transcriptional regulation of several cellular genes. Therefore, HBx may be an ideal target to impede the progression of HBV infection-related HCC. In this study, integrated HBx was transcriptionally downregulated using an artificial transcription factor (ATF). Two three-fingered Cys2-His2 zinc finger (ZF) motifs that specifically recognized two 9-bp DNA sequences regulating HBx expression were identified from a phage-display library. The ZF domains were linked into a six-fingered protein that specified an 18-bp DNA target in the Enhancer I region upstream of HBx. This DNA-binding domain was fused with a Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) transcriptional repression domain to produce an ATF designed to downregulate HBx integrated into the Hep3B HCC cell line. The ATF significantly repressed HBx in a luciferase reporter assay. Stably expressing the ATF in Hep3B cells resulted in significant growth arrest, whereas stably expressing the ATF in an HCC cell line lacking integrated HBx (HepG2) had virtually no effect. The targeted downregulation of integrated HBx is a promising novel approach to inhibiting the progression of HBV infection-related HCC.

  9. [The prognostic role of expression of p16 tumor suppressor gene in Hungarian patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Vánkos, Judit Borbála; Piurkó, Violetta; Suba, Zsuzsanna; Németh, Zsolt; Tímár, József; Kenessey, István

    2015-12-01

    Beside smoking and alcohol consumption, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common risk factor of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck region (HNSCC). The latter group of patients associates with better prognosis. During HPV infection, the level of p16 tumor suppressor elevates, which could give an additional opportunity for diagnosis: instead of molecular diagnostic tools, the application of immunohistochemistry is acceptable. However, the majority of the published studies focused on the whole head and neck region and did not separately handled cancers of the oral cavity. Our recent work analyzed the expression of p16 in 67 oral squamous cancers, and compared to routine clinicopathologic parameters. From surgical samples tissue microarray blocks were prepared and expression of p16 as well as other molecular markers (p53, Ki67, EGFR) were studied. In contrast to previous studies on HNSCC, with the exception of recurrence, the expression of p16 was not found associated to clinicopathologic parameters. Nuclear stabilization of p53 appeared mainly in younger patients. The expression of p53 and EGFR significantly correlated to each other. We concluded that traditional molecular categorization of HNSCC could not be completely adaptable to Hungarian samples. Potential coexposition of common etiological factors (e.g. HPV, smoking, alcohol) could blur borders between distinct categories.

  10. Fentanyl inhibits the progression of human gastric carcinoma MGC-803 cells by modulating NF-κB-dependent gene expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    HE, GUODONG; LI, LI; GUAN, ENJIAN; CHEN, JING; QIN, YI; XIE, YUBO

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is widely used to treat acute and chronic pain. Previous in vitro studies by the present authors demonstrated that fentanyl inhibits the progression of the MGC-803 human gastric carcinoma cell line by affecting apoptosis-related genes, including nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and phosphatase and tensin homolog. In the present study, the effects of fentanyl on NF-κB-dependent gene expression were investigated in vivo. Nude mice were inoculated with an MGC-803 cell suspension, and mice that developed subcutaneous tumors measuring >1.0×1.0 cm were selected for study. Mice were administered intraperitoneal injections of fentanyl (0.05 mg/kg, group F1; 0.1 mg/kg, group F2; 0.2 mg/kg, group F3; and 0.4 mg/kg, group F4) for 14 consecutive days. Non-fentanyl-treated mice (group C) and normal saline-treated mice (group N) served as the control groups. Tumor growth was monitored by calculating the time-shift of the growth curve. Morphological changes were also observed using microscopy. The expression of NF-κB, B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), B-cell associated X protein (Bax), vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in the subcutaneous tumor tissue was also analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, and confirmed using immunohistochemistry. The relative tumor volumes of groups F1, F2, F3 and F4 were significantly reduced compared with groups C and N. Furthermore, subcutaneous tumor cells exhibited nuclear swelling, chromatin condensation, reduced chromatin and nuclear fragmentation in the F1, F2, F3 and F4 groups. The number of NF-κB+, Bcl-2+, VEGF-A+ and MMP-9+ subcutaneous tumor cells was reduced, whereas the number of Bax+ cells was increased in the F1, F2, F3 and F4 groups. Additionally, in these groups, tumor expression of NF-κB, Bcl-2, VEGF-A and MMP-9 transcripts and proteins was downregulated, while Bax messenger RNA and protein expression levels were upregulated. The

  11. Expression of metadherin/AEG-1 gene is positively related to orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines of different metastatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Deng, Huan; Yan, Wei; Huang, Huanjun; Deng, Yueling; Li, Yuan; Tian, De'an

    2012-06-01

    Metastasis contributes to the poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the mechanism through which a primary HCC cell develops into a metastatic phenotype is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between metadherin (MTDH)/astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) expression in HCC cell lines of different metastatic potentials and such metastatic phenotypes as orientation chemotaxis and adhesion. MTDH/AEG-1 expression was detected by RT-PCR and western blotting in HCC cell lines (HepG2, Huh7, Sk-HEP-1, MHCC-97H). Distribution of MTDH/AEG-1 was observed by immunofluorescence staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion and the index of interaction between HCC cell lines and microvascular endothelial cell lines (MVECs, including HUVECs and HPMECs) were measured by chemotaxis assay and adhesion assay, respectively. The results showed that MTDH/AEG-1 protein expression was significantly higher in high metastatic potential cancer cell lines (Sk-HEP-1, MHCC-97H) than in low metastatic potential cell lines (HepG2, Huh7) (P<0.05). The MTDH/AEG-1 protein was localized in the perinuclear region of HCC cells. Furthermore, the abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of HCC cells to HPMECs were increased as compared with those of HCC cells to HUVECs (P<0.05). The abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion were much stronger in Sk-HEP-1 and MHCC-97H cells with MTDH/AEG-1 highly expressed than in HepG2 and Huh7 cells with MTDH/AEG-1 lowly expressed (P<0.05). These results suggested that the expression of MTDH/AEG-1 gene in HCC cell lines of different metastatic potentials was closely positively related to the abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of HCC cells. It was deduced that MTDH/AEG-1 might play a pivotal role in the lung-specific metastasis of HCC, which may be mediated through orientation chemotaxis and adhesion abilities of HCC cells. MTDH

  12. Biomarkers of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tin C; Wood, Christopher G; Karam, Jose A

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has increased steadily in past few decades and is partially attributable to the increased utilization of cross-sectional imaging. Many of these carcinomas are small incidental discoveries, although a subset leads to locally advanced or distant disease. Although its molecular pathophysiology is not completely understood, knowledge of hereditary RCCs has shed light on some of the pathways involved. More recently, the rapid advances in genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics have allowed for a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the genetic aberrations that lead up to and result from the transformation of a renal tubular epithelial cell into a carcinoma. These discoveries have allowed for the development of novel therapeutics that target these pathways. They have also led to the development of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers that could radically change the way RCC is diagnosed and treated. Although some of the current investigations are nascent and it remains to be seen which biomarkers will become clinically available, many candidate biomarkers show promise and require external validation. Ultimately, biomarkers may allow for cost-effective screening of high-risk patients, the identification of aggressive cancers among small renal masses, the identification of high-risk patients, the detection of recurrences postoperatively with minimal imaging, and the ability to choose appropriate targeted therapies for patients with metastatic disease.

  13. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Peris, Ketty

    2015-11-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy is an effective and safe noninvasive treatment for low-risk basal cell carcinoma, with the advantage of an excellent cosmetic outcome. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy in basal cell carcinoma is supported by substantial research and clinical trials. In this article, we review the procedure, indications and clinical evidences for the use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  14. Genetic immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma by endothelial progenitor cells armed with cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Yu, Hui; An, Yan-Li; Yu-Jia, Zhen; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) serve as cellular vehicles for targeting cancer cells and are a powerful tool for delivery of therapeutic genes. Cytosine deaminase (CD), a kind of frequent suicide gene which can kill carcinoma cells by converting a non-poisonous pro-drug 5-flucytosine (5-FC) into a poisonous cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We combined super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles labeled EPCs with CD gene to treat grafted liver carcinomas and tracked them with 7.0 T Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results showed that the therapeutic EPCs loaded with CD plus 5-Fc provided stronger carcinoma growth suppression compared with treatment using CD alone. The CD/5-Fc significantly inhibited the growth of endothelial cells and induced carcinoma cells apoptosis. These results indicate that EPCs transfected with anti-carcinoma genes can be used in carcinoma therapy as a novel therapeutic modality.

  15. Anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wallin, G; Lundell, G; Tennvall, J

    2004-01-01

    Anaplastic (giant cell) thyroid carcinoma (ATC), is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans with a median survival time after diagnosis of 3-6 months. Death from ATC was earlier seen because of local growth and suffocation. ATC is uncommon, accounting for less than 5 % of all thyroid carcinomas. The diagnosis can be established by means of multiple fine needle aspiration biopsies, which are neither harmful nor troublesome for the patient. The cytological diagnosis of this high-grade malignant tumour is usually not difficult for a well trained cytologist. The intention to treat patients with ATC is cure, although only few of them survive. The majority of the patients are older than 60 years and treatment must be influenced by their high age. We have by using a combined modality regimen succeeded in achieving local control in most patients. Every effort should be made to control the primary tumour and thereby improve the quality of remaining life and it is important for patients, relatives and the personnel to know that cure is not impossible. Different treatment combinations have been used since 30 years including radiotherapy, cytostatic drugs and surgery, when feasible. In our latest combined regimen, 22 patients were treated with hyper fractionated radiotherapy 1.6Gy x 2 to a total target dose of 46 Gy given preoperatively, 20 mg doxorubicin was administered intravenously once weekly and surgery was carried out 2-3 weeks after the radiotherapy. 17 of these 22 patients were operated upon and none of these 17 patients got a local recurrence. In the future we are awaiting the development of new therapeutic approaches to this aggressive type of carcinoma. Inhibitors of angiogenesis might be useful. Combretastatin has displayed cytotoxicity against ATC cell lines and has had a positive effect on ATC in a patient. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) genetherapy is also being currently considered for dedifferentiated thyroid carcinomas with the ultimate aim of

  16. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Bruno Nagel; Maron, Paulo Eduardo Goulart; Vedovato, Bruno César; Barrese, Tomas Zecchini; Fernandes, Roni de Carvalho; Perez, Marjo Deninson Cardenuto

    2015-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely aggressive and rare tumor. Even though small cell carcinoma most commonly arises from the lungs there are several reports of small cell carcinoma in extrapulmonary sites. Due to its low frequency there is no well-established management for this disease. We report the case of a 61 year-old man with small cell carcinoma of the bladder who underwent radical cystectomy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We also reviewed the literature for the optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25517085

  17. Aberrant promoter methylation of SH3GL2 gene in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma correlates with clinicopathological characteristics and HPV infection status

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; He, Yinghui; Han, Xue; Zhang, Shitai; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Yang; Song, Zixuan; Ouyang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study attempted to examine the methylation status of SH3GL2 gene in different types of human vulvar lesions and its correlation with clinicopathological parameters. Methods: Immunohistochemical analysis was used to identify the expression status of SH3GL2 in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (VSCC), vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) and benign vulvar squamous epithelium tissues. Bisulfite genomic sequencing method was used to detect methylation status of the SH3GL2 gene. Clinicopathological correlation of the alterations was analysed by the chi-square tests. Results: Immunohistochemical analysis showed expression of SH3GL2 in VSCC was significantly downregulated than that in VIN and normal vulvar tissues. In accordance with higher frequency of methylation status in SH3GL2, statistical analysis showed methylation status of SH3GL2 was closely related to tumor TNM stage (P=0.003), but not related to age, tumor volume, tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis and VIN grade. High-methylation status of SH3GL2 showed significant association with HPV infection status. Conclusions: Our results indicated that the methylation status of SH3GL2 gene was associated with the TNM staging and HPV infection status of VSCC, suggesting that it might play a synergistic role in the development of VSCC. PMID:26823912

  18. Multidrug Resistant Protein-Three Gene Regulation by the Transcription Factor Nrf2 in Human Bronchial Epithelial and Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahaffey, Christopher M.; Zhang, Hongqiao; Rinna, Alessandra; Holland, William; Mack, Philip C.; Forman, Henry Jay

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug Resistant Proteins (MRP) are members of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily that facilitate detoxification by transporting toxic compounds, including chemotherapeutic drugs, out of cells. Chemotherapy, radiation, and other xenobiotic stresses have been shown to increase levels of select MRPs, although, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Additionally, MRP3 is suspected of playing a role in the drug resistance of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Analysis of the MRP3 promoter revealed the presence of multiple putative electrophile responsive elements (EpRE), sequences that suggested possible regulation of this gene by Nrf2, the key transcription factor that binds to EpRE. The goal of this investigation was to determine whether MRP3 induction was dependent upon the transcription factor Nrf2. Keap1, a key regulator of Nrf2, sequesters Nrf2 in the cytoplasm, preventing entry into the nucleus. The electrophilic lipid peroxidation product, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) has been shown to modify Keap1 allowing Nrf2 to enter the nucleus. We found that HNE up-regulated MRP3 mRNA and protein levels in cell lines with wild type Keap1 (human bronchial epithelial cell line HBE1 and the NSCLC cell line H358), but not in the Keap1 mutant NSCLC cell lines (A549 and H460). Cell lines with mutant Keap1 had constitutively higher MRP3 that was not increased by HNE treatment. In HBE1 cells, silencing of Nrf2 with siRNA inhibited induction of MRP3 and by HNE. Finally, we found that silencing Nrf2 also increased the toxicity of cisplatin in H358 cells. The combined results therefore support the hypothesis that MRP3 induction by HNE involves Nrf2 activation. PMID:19345732

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Merkel Cell Carcinoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Version General Information About Merkel Cell Carcinoma Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Merkel cell carcinoma is a very rare disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the skin. Sun exposure and having a weak immune system can ...

  20. General Information about Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Version General Information About Merkel Cell Carcinoma Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Merkel cell carcinoma is a very rare disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the skin. Sun exposure and having a weak immune system can ...

  1. Treatment Options by Stage (Merkel Cell Carcinoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Version General Information About Merkel Cell Carcinoma Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Merkel cell carcinoma is a very rare disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the skin. Sun exposure and having a weak immune system can ...

  2. A receptor tyrosine kinase, UFO/Axl, and other genes isolated by a modified differential display PCR are overexpressed in metastatic prostatic carcinoma cell line DU145.

    PubMed

    Jacob, A N; Kalapurakal, J; Davidson, W R; Kandpal, G; Dunson, N; Prashar, Y; Kandpal, R P

    1999-01-01

    We have used a modified differential display PCR protocol for isolating 3' restriction fragments of cDNAs specifically expressed or overexpressed in metastatic prostate carcinoma cell line DU145. Several cDNA fragments were identified that matched to milk fat globule protein, UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, human homologue of a Xenopus maternal transcript, laminin and laminin receptor, human carcinoma-associated antigen, and some expressed sequence tags. The transcript for milk fat globule protein, a marker protein shown to be overexpressed in breast tumors, was elevated in DU145 cells. The expression of UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, was considerably higher in DU145 cells as compared to normal prostate cells and prostatic carcinoma cell line PC-3. The overexpression of UFO oncogene in DU145 cells is discussed in the context of prostate cancer metastasis.

  3. Cytotoxic effect of a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector with cytosine deaminase gene driven by L-plastin promoter in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kihwa; Kim, Sunja; Lee, Kyumhyang; Kim, Changmin; Chung, Injae

    2007-06-01

    Great expectations are set on gene therapy for the treatment of malignant hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) in East Asia. Recombinant adenoviral vectors (AV) have been developed in which the L-plastin promoter (LP) regulates the expression of transgenes, in a tumor cell specific manner, resulting in an increase in the therapeutic index. The development of the AdLPCD vector, a replication-incompetent AV, containing a transcription unit of LP and E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD), was reported in our previous work. In the present study, the AdLPCD vector combined with 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) administration was tested to see if it might have significant utility in the chemosensitization of L-plastin positive HCC. Four HCC cell lines (HepG2, Chang Liver, Huh-7 and SK-Hep-1 cells) were investigated for the expression of LacZ after infecting the cells with the AdLPLacZ vector containing a 2.4 kb fragment of LP and the LacZ gene. Relatively high levels of LP activity were detected in HepG2, followed by Chang Liver cells; whereas, no promoter activity was found in Huh-7 and SK-Hep-1 cells, as determined by AdLPLacZ infection followed by the beta-galactosidase assay. In addition, the results of RT-PCR assays for the detection of endogenous L-plastin mRNA in these cells lines correlated well with those of the beta-galactosidase activity after infection with AdLPLacZ. Based on these data, the cytotoxic effect of AdLPCD/5-FC was evaluated in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that the CD gene delivered by AV could sensitize HepG2 cells to the prodrug, 5-FC. However, the observed effects were insufficient to cause the death of most of cells. This suggests that the screening of patients for an AdLP/5-FC strategy based on AdLPLacZ data might not always guarantee a good therapeutic outcome.

  4. HBD-2 is downregulated in oral carcinoma cells by DNA hypermethylation, and increased expression of hBD-2 by DNA demethylation and gene transfection inhibits cell proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Yoshitaka; Kurashige, Yoshihito; Uehara, Osamu; Sato, Jun; Nishimura, Michiko; Yoshida, Koki; Arakawa, Toshiya; Nagayasu, Hiroki; Saitoh, Masato; Abiko, Yoshihiro

    2014-08-01

    Human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is a type of epithelial antimicrobial peptide. The expression level of hBD-2 mRNA is lower in oral carcinoma cells (OCCs) than in healthy oral epithelium. Yet, it is still unknown how hBD-2 expression is downregulated in OCCs. The present study investigated DNA hypermethylation of hBD-2 in OCCs and the effect of the demethylation and increased expression of hBD-2 on cell proliferation and invasion. Six different types of oral carcinoma cell lines (OSC-19, BSC-OF, SAS, HSC-2, HSC-4 and HSY) and normal oral keratinocytes (NOKs) were used. The expression levels of hBD-2 in all OCCs were significantly lower than that in the NOKs. Treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-dC, at the concentration of 50 µM significantly induced upregulation of expression of hBD-2 in the OCCs. Using methylation-specific PCR, DNA hypermethylation was observed in all OCCs. These results suggest that DNA hypermethylation is, at least in part, involved in the decreased expression of hBD-2 in OCCs. We examined the effect of 5-aza-dC on the cell proliferation and invasive ability of OCCs. The cell invasion assays showed that the number of OCCs treated with 5-aza-dC on the filters was significantly lower than that of the controls. We examined whether increased expression of hBD-2 generated by gene transfection inhibited the proliferation and invasion of SAS cells. The number of SAS cells exhibiting increased expression of hBD-2 on the filters in the invasion assay were significantly lower on day 7 when compared with the control. hBD-2 may function as a tumor suppressor. Increased expression of hBD-2 induced by demethylation or increased expression generated by gene transfection may be useful therapeutic methods for oral carcinoma.

  5. DNA repair genes XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3 are associated with risk and survival of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Farnebo, Lovisa; Stjernström, Annika; Fredrikson, Mats; Ansell, Anna; Garvin, Stina; Thunell, Lena K

    2015-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are a heterogenous group of tumors with a high rate of early recurrences, second primary tumors, and mortality. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment over the past decades, the overall 5-year survival rate remains around 50%. Since the head-and neck-region is continuously exposed to potentially DNA-damaging exogenous and endogenous factors, it is reasonable to expect that the DNA repair genes play a part in the development, progression, and outcome of HNSCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the SNPs XPC A499V, XPD K751Q, XRCC1 R399Q, and XRCC3 T241M as potential risk factors and indicators of survival among Caucasian patients. One-hundred-sixty-nine patients as well as 344 healthy controls were included and genotyped with PCR-RFLP. We showed that XPC A499V was associated with increased risk of HNSCC, especially laryngeal carcinoma. Among women, XPD K751Q was associated with increased risk of oral SCC. Furthermore, XPD homozygous mutant individuals had the shortest survival time, a survival time that increased however after full dose radiotherapy. Wild-type individuals of XRCC3 T241M demonstrated an earlier age of onset. HPV-positive never smokers had lower frequencies of p53 mutation. Among HNSCC patients, HPV-positivity was significantly associated with XRCC1 R399Q homozygous mutant genotype. Moreover, combinations of putative risk alleles seemed to act synergistically, increasing the risk of HNSCC. In conclusion, our results suggest that SNPs of the DNA repair genes XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3 may affect risk and survival of HNSCC.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions head and neck squamous cell carcinoma head and neck squamous cell carcinoma Enable Javascript to view the ... body cavities such as the airways and intestines. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) develops in the mucous ...

  7. Polymorphisms in the ERCC5 Gene and Risk of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (ESCC) in Eastern Chinese Populations

    PubMed Central

    He, Jing; Wang, Mengyun; Jin, Li; Yang, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Sun, Meng-Hong; Chen, Huan; Zhao, Kuai-Le; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Hai-Quan; Xiang, Jia-Qing; Wei, Qing-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background Excision repair cross complementing group 5 (ERCC5 or XPG) plays an important role in regulating DNA excision repair; its functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may alter DNA repair capacity and thus contribute to cancer risk. Methodology/Principal Findings In a hospital-based case-control study of 1115 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cases and 1117 cancer-free controls, we genotyped three potentially functional SNPs of ERCC5 (SNPs, rs2296147T>C, rs2094258C>T and rs873601G>A) and estimated crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for their associations with risk of ESCC using unconditional logistic regression models. We also calculated false-positive report probabilities (FPRPs) for significant findings. We found that compared with the TT genotype, ERCC5 rs2296147 C variant genotypes were associated with a significantly lower ESCC risk (CT: adjusted OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.63–0.93, CT/CC: adjusted OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.67–0.96); however, this risk was not observed for the other two SNPs (rs2094258C>T and rs873601 G>A), nor in further stratification and haplotype analysis. Conclusions/Significances These findings suggested that ERCC5 polymorphisms may contribute to risk of ESCC in Eastern Chinese populations, but the effect was weak and needs further validation by larger population-based case-control studies. PMID:22848513

  8. Down-regulation of tumor suppressor gene PTEN, overexpression of p53, plus high proliferating cell nuclear antigen index predict poor patient outcome of hepatocellular carcinoma after resection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tsung-Hui; Wang, Chih-Chi; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Chao-Long; Hung, Chao-Hung; Chen, Chien-Hung; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Lee, Chuan-Mo; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2007-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate the interaction of two tumor suppressor genes PTEN and p53 and their relationship with cell cycle protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 124 resected HCC paraffin specimens were collected from 1987 to 1999 for immunohistochemistry. Expression of PTEN, p53 and PCNA in HCC were analyzed for clinicopathologic correlation. The study revealed decreased or absent PTEN immunostaining (PTEN down-regulation) in 42.7% and positive p53 (p53+) immunostaining in 41.9% of HCC. There was a positive correlation between PTEN down-regulation and p53 (+) (P=0.001). PTEN down-regulation or p53 (+) correlated with increased HCC dedifferentiation, advanced pathologic stages and high PCNA labeling index (LI) of tumors (P<0.05). Patients with either PTEN down-regulation, p53 (+), or high PCNA LI had shorter survival and higher recurrence rates than patients with intact PTEN expression, p53 (-), or low PCNA LI respectively (P<0.05). By combining the three genes, patients with all PTEN down-regulation (+)/p53 (+)/high PCNA LI had the shortest overall survival (P<0.001) and the highest recurrence rates (P<0.001), followed by patients with two, one and none of three events accordingly. Combination of PTEN/p53/PCNA represented an independent prognostic factor for tumor recurrence and disease-specific survival (P<0.05). In conclusion, the down-regulated PTEN expression and p53 over-expression are involved in the pathogenesis of HCC. They correlate with high PCNA expression, HCC de-differentiation and advanced HCC stages. A combination of the three genes predicts patient outcome more powerfully than any of the individual genes.

  9. Regulation of amphiregulin gene expression by β-catenin signaling in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells: a novel crosstalk between FGF19 and the EGFR system.

    PubMed

    Latasa, Maria U; Salis, Fabiana; Urtasun, Raquel; Garcia-Irigoyen, Oihane; Elizalde, Maria; Uriarte, Iker; Santamaria, Monica; Feo, Francesco; Pascale, Rosa M; Prieto, Jesús; Berasain, Carmen; Avila, Matías A

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most prevalent liver tumor and a deadly disease with limited therapeutic options. Dysregulation of cell signaling pathways is a common denominator in tumorigenesis, including hepatocarcinogenesis. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling system is commonly activated in HCC, and is currently being evaluated as a therapeutic target in combination therapies. We and others have identified a central role for the EGFR ligand amphiregulin (AR) in the proliferation, survival and drug resistance of HCC cells. AR expression is frequently up-regulated in HCC tissues and cells through mechanisms not completely known. Here we identify the β-catenin signaling pathway as a novel mechanism leading to transcriptional activation of the AR gene in human HCC cells. Activation of β-catenin signaling, or expression of the T41A β-catenin active mutant, led to the induction of AR expression involving three specific β-catenin-Tcf responsive elements in its proximal promoter. We demonstrate that HCC cells expressing the T41A β-catenin active mutant show enhanced proliferation that is dependent in part on AR expression and EGFR signaling. We also demonstrate here a novel cross-talk of the EGFR system with fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19). FGF19 is a recently identified driver gene in hepatocarcinogenesis and an activator of β-catenin signaling in HCC and colon cancer cells. We show that FGF19 induced AR gene expression through the β-catenin pathway in human HCC cells. Importantly, AR up-regulation and EGFR signaling participated in the induction of cyclin D1 and cell proliferation elicited by FGF19. Finally, we demonstrate a positive correlation between FGF19 and AR expression in human HCC tissues, therefore supporting in clinical samples our experimental observations. These findings identify the AR/EGFR system as a key mediator of FGF19 responses in HCC cells involving β-catenin signaling, and suggest that combined targeting of

  10. Characterisation of the Nevoid basal cell carcinoma (Gorlin`s) syndrome (NBCCS) gene region on chromosome 9q22-q31

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.J.; Digweed, M.; Sperling, K.

    1994-09-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited malignancy-associated disease of unknown etiology. The gene has been mapped to chromosome 9q22-q31 by us and other groups, using linkage analysis and loss of heterozygosity studies. Subsequent linkage and haplotype analyses from 133 meioses in NBCCS families has refined the position of the gene between D9S12 and D9S287. Since the gene for Fanconi`s Anaemia type C (FAAC) has been assigned to the same 9q region, we have performed linkage analysis between FACC and NBCCCS in NBCCS families. No recombination has been observed between NBCCS and FACC and maximum lod scores of 34.98 and 11.94 occur for both diseases at the markers D9S196/D9S197. Southern blot analysis using an FACC cDNA probe has revealed no detectable rearrangements in our NBCCS patients. We have established a YAC contig spanning the region from D9S12 to D9S176 and STS content mapping in 22 YACs has allowed the ordering of 12 loci in the region, including the xeroderma pigmentosum type A (XPAC) gene, as follows: D9S151/D9S12P1 - D9S12P2 - D9S197 - D9S196 - D9S280 - FACC - D9S287/XPAC - D9S180 - D9S6 - D9S176. Using the contig we have been able to eliminate the {alpha}1 type XV collagen gene and the markers D9S119 and D9S297 from the NBCCS candidate region. Twelve YACs have been used to screen a chromosome 9 cosmid library and more than 1000 cosmids from the region have been identified to be used for the construction of a cosmid contig. A selection of these cosmids will be used for the isolation of coding sequencing from the region.

  11. Expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Almeida, Maria Carolina Leal; Costa, Alessandra Scorse; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Serrano, Rodrigo Lorenzetti; Machado Filho, Carlos D'Apparecida Santos

    2016-01-01

    Background Heparanase is an enzyme that cleaves heparan sulfate chains. Oligosaccharides generated by heparanase induce tumor progression. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma comprise types of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Objectives Evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and expression of heparanase in two human cell lines established in culture, immortalized skin keratinocyte (HaCaT) and squamous cell carcinoma (A431) and also investigate the expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and eyelid skin of individuals not affected by the disease (control). Methods Glycosaminoglycans were quantified by electrophoresis and indirect ELISA method. The heparanase expression was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRTPCR). Results The A431 strain showed significant increase in the sulfated glycosaminoglycans, increased heparanase expression and decreased hyaluronic acid, comparing to the HaCaT lineage. The mRNA expression of heparanase was significantly higher in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma compared with control skin samples. It was also observed increased heparanase expression in squamous cell carcinoma compared to the Basal cell carcinoma. Conclusion The glycosaminoglycans profile, as well as heparanase expression are different between HaCaT and A431 cell lines. The increased expression of heparanase in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma suggests that this enzyme could be a marker for the diagnosis of such types of non-melanoma cancers, and may be useful as a target molecule for future alternative treatment. PMID:27828631

  12. Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma and Tonsil Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Marcotullio, Dario; Iannella, Giannicola; Zelli, Melissa; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy. Postoperative histology showed nests of cells with highly hyperchromatic nuclei and clear cytoplasm. These features enabled us to make the diagnosis of renal clear cell carcinoma metastasis. Only few authors described metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in this specific site. PMID:24455373

  13. Renal clear cell carcinoma and tonsil metastasis.

    PubMed

    Marcotullio, Dario; Iannella, Giannicola; Macri, Gian Franco; Marinelli, Caterina; Zelli, Melissa; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy. Postoperative histology showed nests of cells with highly hyperchromatic nuclei and clear cytoplasm. These features enabled us to make the diagnosis of renal clear cell carcinoma metastasis. Only few authors described metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in this specific site.

  14. miR-29a/b Enhances Cell Migration and Invasion in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Progression by Regulating SPARC and COL3A1 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ning; Guo, Tianyu; Cao, Yange; Yu, Ying; Wang, Xuejun; Zou, Bingcheng; Zhang, Songmei; Jing, Tao; Ling, Tao; Xie, Jun; Zhang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignant tumor associated with a genetic predisposition, Epstein-Barr virus infection and chromosomal abnormalities. Recently, several miRNAs have been shown to target specific mRNAs to regulate NPC development and progression. However, the involvement of miRNAs in processes leading to NPC migration and invasion remains to be elucidated. We predicted that miR-29a/b are associated with dysregulated genes controlling NPC through an integrated interaction network of miRNAs and genes. miR-29a/b over-expression in NPC cell lines had no significant effect on proliferation, whereas miR-29b mildly increased the percentage of cells in the G1 phase with a concomitant decrease in the percentage of cells in S phase. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-29a/b might be responsible for increasing S18 cell migration and invasion, and only COL3A1 was identified as a direct target of miR-29b despite the fact that both SPARC and COL3A1 were inhibited by miR-29a/b over-expression. Meanwhile, SPARC proteins were increased in metastatic NPC tissue and are involved in NPC progression. Unexpectedly, we identified that miRNA-29b expression was elevated in the serum of NPC patients with a high risk of metastasis. The 5-year actuarial overall survival rates in NPC patients with high serum miR-29b expression was significantly shorter than those with low serum miR-29b expression; therefore, serum miR-29b expression could be a promising prognostic marker. PMID:25786138

  15. Giant metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bognet, Rachel; Thompson, Christina; Campanelli, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with a rapidly growing, asymptomatic mass on his left mid-back for the past 3 months. The patient's medical history revealed an intentional 60-pound weight loss over the previous 2 years along with smoking approximately 1 pack of cigarettes per day. On physical examination, a fungating, 11-cm red tumor with palpable broader underlying extension (23 cm total) was present on the left mid-back with distinct red dermal nodules in a dermatomal distribution. In close proximity were two ulcerated nodules, proven histologically to be basal cell carcinomas. In the left groin was massive, fixed lymphadenopathy. A punch biopsy of the tumor was performed, which showed a dense infiltrate of small, round hyperchromatic blue cells that stained positive for CD 56 and pancytokeratin in a perinuclear dot pattern. Tumor cells were negative for CK20, TTF, CK7, and LCA.

  16. Transitional cell bladder carcinoma with presentation mimicking ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Erickson, D R; Dabbs, D J; Olt, G J

    1996-05-01

    In the case described here, the patient's initial presentation suggested ovarian carcinoma. She had recurrent ascites, a pelvic mass, elevated CA-125, and extensive peritoneal carcinomatosis with transitional cell histology. The presence of hematuria prompted a cystoscopy, which revealed the true site of origin to be the urinary bladder rather than ovaries. This presentation is extremely rare for bladder cancer. Since transitional cell tumors from the bladder have a much worse prognosis than those of ovarian origin, it is important to identify the primary site correctly. Therefore, cystoscopy is essential for patients with hematuria, and should be considered in cases of apparent primary peritoneal carcinoma with transitional cell histology.

  17. Sequence and expression pattern of the Stra7 (Gbx-2) homeobox-containing gene induced by retinoic acid in P19 embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bouillet, P; Chazaud, C; Oulad-Abdelghani, M; Dollé, P; Chambon, P

    1995-12-01

    The cDNA sequence of Stra7, a retinoic acid (RA)-inducible gene in P19 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells, was determined. The deduced Stra7 protein contains a homeodomain highly similar to that of the previously described chicken CHox7 gene product, and is highly conserved during evolution, from hemichordates to vertebrates. The mouse Stra7 cDNA corresponds to the full-length form of the 77 bp homeodomain-encoding cDNA fragment which was previously cloned and termed MMoxA or Gbx-2. Reverse-transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed the presence of Stra7/Gbx-2 transcripts in the adult brain, spleen, and female genital tract, whereas no expression could be observed in heart, liver, lung, kidney, or testes. In situ hybridization analysis showed a restricted expression pattern of Stra7/Gbx-2 in the three primitive germ layers during gastrulation. Restricted expression was also detected in the pharyngeal arches. Subsequently, there were specific expression domains in the developing central nervous system, at the midbrain/hindbrain boundary and later in the cerebellum anlage, in certain rhombomeres, in dorsal regions of the spinal cord, and in the developing dorsal thalamus and corpus striatum.

  18. Amplification of the telomerase RNA component gene as a new genetic marker for disease progression and prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-D; Ma, J; Wang, F-Y; Peng, L-B; Wang, X; Shi, S-S; Ma, H-H; Lu, Z-F; Lu, G-M; Zhou, X-J

    2013-01-01

    Amplification of the human telomerase RNA component (TERC) gene was found in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, its roles in the progression and prognosis of ESCC have not been well understood. The amplification of TERC in normal mucosa, low-grade and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and invasive ESCC samples were evaluated using a fluorescence in situ hybridization assay. The amplification of TERC invariably occurred in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive ESCC, partially occurred in low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia specimens, and seldom occurred in normal mucosa. The average signal ratio of TERC to chromosome 3 centromere-specific probe (TERC/CSP3) was 1.00 ± 0.01 (average ± standard deviation) in normal mucosas, 1.01 ± 0.08 in low-grade intraepithelial neoplasias, 1.39 ± 0.26 in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasias, and 1.56 ± 0.41 in invasive ESCC. High TERC/CSP3 ratio was positively associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.005) and advanced tumor stage (P = 0.045). Patients with high amplification of TERC had poor survival (P = 0.01). The amplification of TERC could be used as a new genomic marker for disease progression and prognosis of ESCC. The amplified TERC gene may be a potential therapeutic target for ESCC.

  19. One-carbon metabolism-related gene polymorphisms and risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Hiraki, Akio; Wakai, Kenji; Hirose, Kaoru; Saito, Toshiko; Sato, Shigeki; Ueda, Ryuzo; Tajima, Kazuo

    2007-09-01

    Low consumption of vegetables and fruits, which leads to insufficient folate intake, is associated with increased risk of several types of cancer, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Functional polymorphisms in genes encoding one-carbon metabolism enzymes, such as methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C), methionine synthase (MTR A2756G), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR A66G) and thymidylate synthase (TS), influence folate metabolism and thus might impact on HNSCC risk. We conducted a case-control study with 237 HNSCC cases newly and histologically diagnosed and 711 age- and sex-matched non-cancer controls to clarify associations with these five polymorphisms. Gene-environment interactions between polymorphisms and smoking and drinking habit and folate consumption were also evaluated by logistic regression analysis. Dietary folate intake was inversely associated with HNSCC risk. None of the polymorphisms showed any significant impact on HNSCC risk by genotype alone, but we found interactions between drinking habit and MTHFR C667T (P = 0.04), MTR A2756G (P = 0.04) and MTRR A66G (P = 0.03) polymorphisms. The results suggest that there may be interactions between one-carbon metabolism-related polymorphisms and alcohol drinking for HNSCC risk.

  20. ELF5 in epithelial ovarian carcinoma tissues and biological behavior in ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongchao; Qiu, Linglin; Xie, Xiaolei; Yang, He; Liu, Yongli; Lin, Xiaoman; Huang, Hongxiang

    2017-03-01

    The expression of E74-like factor 5 (ELF5) in epithelial ovarian carcinoma tissues and its effects on biological behavior in ovarian carcinoma cells were assessed in search for a new approach for gene treatment of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. RT-PCR technology was applied to detect the expression of ELF5 mRNA in epithelial ovarian carcinoma (n=49), borderline ovarian epithelial tumor (n=19), benign ovarian epithelial tumor (n=31) and normal ovarian tissues (n=40). Then, we transfected recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1‑ELF5+EGFP into human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cells (recombinant plasmid group) in vitro and screened out stably transfected cells to conduct multiplication culture. Western blot analysis was performed to detect the expression of ELF5 protein in the different groups. Flow cytometry was employed to detect cell apoptosis and cycles. ELF5 mRNA in epithelial ovarian carcinoma and borderline ovarian epithelial tumor tissues were significantly lower (P<0.05) than those in benign ovarian epithelial tumor and normal ovarian tissues. ELF5 protein expression in the cells of recombinant plasmid group was significantly higher compared with empty plasmid and blank control groups. The capacity of cell reproductive recombinant plasmid group at each time point decreased (P<0.05). Flow cytometry detection showed that 67.03% of cells in recombinant plasmid group was blocked in G0/G1 phase (P<0.05), compared with empty plasmid group (37.17%) and blank control group (38.24%). Apoptotic rate of recombinant plasmid group was significantly lower (31.4±1.9%; P<0.05), compared with that of empty plasmid group (9.1±2.2%) and blank control group (8.7±1.5%), and the differences were statistically significant. In conclusion, ELF5 interfered with cell cycle of human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cells and promoted apoptosis of human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cells inhibiting their growth and invasive capacity; and thus providing a new approach to gene treatment of ovarian carcinoma.

  1. ELF5 in epithelial ovarian carcinoma tissues and biological behavior in ovarian carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hongchao; Qiu, Linglin; Xie, Xiaolei; Yang, He; Liu, Yongli; Lin, Xiaoman; Huang, Hongxiang

    2017-01-01

    The expression of E74-like factor 5 (ELF5) in epithelial ovarian carcinoma tissues and its effects on biological behavior in ovarian carcinoma cells were assessed in search for a new approach for gene treatment of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. RT-PCR technology was applied to detect the expression of ELF5 mRNA in epithelial ovarian carcinoma (n=49), borderline ovarian epithelial tumor (n=19), benign ovarian epithelial tumor (n=31) and normal ovarian tissues (n=40). Then, we transfected recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1-ELF5+EGFP into human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cells (recombinant plasmid group) in vitro and screened out stably transfected cells to conduct multiplication culture. Western blot analysis was performed to detect the expression of ELF5 protein in the different groups. Flow cytometry was employed to detect cell apoptosis and cycles. ELF5 mRNA in epithelial ovarian carcinoma and borderline ovarian epithelial tumor tissues were significantly lower (P<0.05) than those in benign ovarian epithelial tumor and normal ovarian tissues. ELF5 protein expression in the cells of recombinant plasmid group was significantly higher compared with empty plasmid and blank control groups. The capacity of cell reproductive recombinant plasmid group at each time point decreased (P<0.05). Flow cytometry detection showed that 67.03% of cells in recombinant plasmid group was blocked in G0/G1 phase (P<0.05), compared with empty plasmid group (37.17%) and blank control group (38.24%). Apoptotic rate of recombinant plasmid group was significantly lower (31.4±1.9%; P<0.05), compared with that of empty plasmid group (9.1±2.2%) and blank control group (8.7±1.5%), and the differences were statistically significant. In conclusion, ELF5 interfered with cell cycle of human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cells and promoted apoptosis of human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cells inhibiting their growth and invasive capacity; and thus providing a new approach to gene treatment of ovarian carcinoma. PMID

  2. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, W. Marston; Spellman, Paul T.; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Creighton, Chad J.; Fei, Suzanne S.; Davis, Caleb; Wheeler, David A.; Murray, Bradley A.; Schmidt, Laura; Vocke, Cathy D.; Peto, Myron; Al Mamun, Abu Amar M.; Shinbrot, Eve; Sethi, Anurag; Brooks, Samira; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Brooks, Angela N.; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Brooks, Denise; Bowlby, Reanne; Sadeghi, Sara; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Bootwalla, Moiz; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Saksena, Gordon; Haake, Scott; Li, Jun; Liang, Han; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Akbani, Rehan; Leiserson, Mark D.M.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Anur, Pavana; Bottaro, Donald; Albiges, Laurence; Barnabas, Nandita; Choueiri, Toni K.; Czerniak, Bogdan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Ho, Thai; Hsieh, James; Ittmann, Michael; Kim, William Y.; Krishnan, Bhavani; Merino, Maria J.; Mills Shaw, Kenna R.; Reuter, Victor E.; Reznik, Ed; Shelley, Carl Simon; Shuch, Brian; Signoretti, Sabina; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Tamboli, Pheroze; Thomas, George; Tickoo, Satish; Burnett, Kenneth; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph D.; Penny, Robert J.; Shelton, Candace; Shelton, W. Troy; Sherman, Mark; Thompson, Eric; Yena, Peggy; Avedon, Melissa T.; Bowen, Jay; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gerken, Mark; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Santos, Tracie; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Demchok, John A.; Felau, Ina; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean C.; Zhang, Jiashan (Julia); Ayala, Brenda; Baboud, Julien; Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia; Lolla, Laxmi; Naresh, Rashi; Pihl, Todd; Sun, Qiang; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buhay, Christian; Butterfield, Yaron S.N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott L.; Chao, Hsu; Chuah, Eric; Clarke, Amanda; Covington, Kyle R.; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Dewal, Ninad; Dhalla, Noreen; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Drummond, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Guin, Ranabir; Hale, Walker; Hawes, Alicia; Hayes, D. Neil; Holt, Robert A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Jones, Corbin D.; Kalra, Divya; Kovar, Christie; Lewis, Lora; Li, Jie; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Moore, Richard A.; Morton, Donna; Mose, Lisle E.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Muzny, Donna; Parker, Joel S.; Perou, Charles M.; Roach, Jeffrey; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Skelly, Tara; Soloway, Matthew G.; Sougnez, Carrie; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Thiessen, Nina; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Wang, Min; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wong, Tina; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Zhou, Jane; Bedford, Jason; Chen, Fengju; Fu, Yao; Gerstein, Mark; Haussler, David; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lai, Phillip; Ling, Shiyun; Radenbaugh, Amie; Van Den Berg, David; Weinstein, John N.; Zhu, Jingchun; Albert, Monique; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Andersen, Jeremiah J; Auman, J. Todd; Bartlett, John; Bastacky, Sheldon; Bergsten, Julie; Blute, Michael L.; Boice, Lori; Bollag, Roni J.; Boyd, Jeff; Castle, Erik; Chen, Ying-Bei; Cheville, John C.; Curley, Erin; Davies, Benjamin; DeVolk, April; Dhir, Rajiv; Dike, Laura; Eckman, John; Engel, Jay; Harr, Jodi; Hrebinko, Ronald; Huang, Mei; Huelsenbeck-Dill, Lori; Iacocca, Mary; Jacobs, Bruce; Lobis, Michael; Maranchie, Jodi K.; McMeekin, Scott; Myers, Jerome; Nelson, Joel; Parfitt, Jeremy; Parwani, Anil; Petrelli, Nicholas; Rabeno, Brenda; Roy, Somak; Salner, Andrew L.; Slaton, Joel; Stanton, Melissa; Thompson, R. Houston; Thorne, Leigh; Tucker, Kelinda; Weinberger, Paul M.; Winemiller, Cythnia; Zach, Leigh Anne; Zuna, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Background Papillary renal cell carcinoma, accounting for 15% of renal cell carcinoma, is a heterogeneous disease consisting of different types of renal cancer, including tumors with indolent, multifocal presentation and solitary tumors with an aggressive, highly lethal phenotype. Little is known about the genetic basis of sporadic papillary renal cell carcinoma; no effective forms of therapy for advanced disease exist. Methods We performed comprehensive molecular characterization utilizing whole-exome sequencing, copy number, mRNA, microRNA, methylation and proteomic analyses of 161 primary papillary renal cell carcinomas. Results Type 1 and Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas were found to be different types of renal cancer characterized by specific genetic alterations, with Type 2 further classified into three individual subgroups based on molecular differences that influenced patient survival. MET alterations were associated with Type 1 tumors, whereas Type 2 tumors were characterized by CDKN2A silencing, SETD2 mutations, TFE3 fusions, and increased expression of the NRF2-ARE pathway. A CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was found in a distinct subset of Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma characterized by poor survival and mutation of the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Conclusions Type 1 and Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas are clinically and biologically distinct. Alterations in the MET pathway are associated with Type 1 and activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway with Type 2; CDKN2A loss and CIMP in Type 2 convey a poor prognosis. Furthermore, Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma consists of at least 3 subtypes based upon molecular and phenotypic features. PMID:26536169

  3. Targeting HIF2 in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyejin; Kaelin, William G

    2016-12-08

    Inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor-suppressor protein (pVHL) is the signature "truncal" event in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which is the most common form of kidney cancer. pVHL is part of a ubiquitin ligase the targets the α subunit of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factor for destruction when oxygen is available. Preclinical studies strongly suggest that deregulation of HIF, and particularly HIF2, drives pVHL-defective renal carcinogenesis. Although HIF2α was classically considered undruggable, structural and chemical work by Rick Bruick and Kevin Gardner at University of Texas Southwestern laid the foundation for the development of small molecule direct HIF2α antagonists (PT2385 and the related tool compound PT2399) by Peloton Therapeutics that block the dimerization of HIF2α with its partner protein ARNT1. These compounds inhibit clear cell renal cell carcinoma growth in preclinical models, and PT2385 has now entered the clinic. Nonetheless, the availability of such compounds, together with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-based gene editing approaches, has revealed a previously unappreciated heterogeneity among clear cell renal carcinomas and patient-derived xenografts with respect to HIF2 dependence, suggesting that predictive biomarkers will be needed to optimize the use of such agents in the clinic.

  4. Extinction of Oct-3/4 gene expression in embryonal carcinoma [times] fibroblast somatic cell hybrids is accompanied by changes in the methylation status, chromatin structure, and transcriptional activity of the Oct-3/4 upstream region

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Shushan, E.; Pikarsky, E.; Klar, A.; Bergman, Y. )

    1993-02-01

    The OCT-3/4 gene provides an excellent model system with which to study the extinction phenomenon in somatic cell hybrids. The molecular mechanism that underlies the extinction of a tissue-specific transcription factor in somatic cell hybrides is evaluated and compared with its down-regulation in retinoic acid treated embryonal carcinoma cells. This study draws a connection between the shutdown of OCT-3/4 expression in retinoic acid (RA)-differentiated embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells and its extinction in hybrid cells. This repression of OCT-3/4 expression is achieved through changes in the methylation status, chromatin structure, and transcriptional activity of the OCT-3/4 upstream regulatory region. 59 refs.

  5. MicroRNA-151 and its hosting gene FAK (focal adhesion kinase) regulate tumor cell migration and spreading of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luedde, Tom

    2010-09-01

    Recurrent chromosomal aberrations are often observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about the functional non-coding sequences, particularly microRNAs (miRNAs), at the chromosomal breakpoints in HCC. Here we show that 22 miRNAs are often amplified or deleted in HCC. MicroRNA-151 (miR-151), a frequently amplified miRNA on 8q24.3, is correlated with intrahepatic metastasis of HCC. We further show that miR-151, which is often expressed together with its host gene FAK, encoding focal adhesion kinase, significantly increases HCC cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo, mainly through miR-151-5p, but not through miR-151-3p. Moreover, miR-151 exerts this function by directly targeting RhoGDIA, a putative metastasis suppressor in HCC, thus leading to the activation of Rac1, Cdc42 and Rho GTPases. In addition, miR-151 can function synergistically with FAK to enhance HCC cell motility and spreading. Thus, our findings indicate that chromosome gain of miR-151 is a crucial stimulus for tumour invasion and metastasis of HCC.

  6. Genetic inactivation of the Fanconi anemia gene FANCC identified in the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HuH-7 confers sensitivity towards DNA-interstrand crosslinking agents

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Inactivation of the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway through defects in one of 13 FA genes occurs at low frequency in various solid cancer entities among the general population. As FA pathway inactivation confers a distinct hypersensitivity towards DNA interstrand-crosslinking (ICL)-agents, FA defects represent rational targets for individualized therapeutic strategies. Except for pancreatic cancer, however, the prevalence of FA defects in gastrointestinal (GI) tumors has not yet been systematically explored. Results A panel of GI cancer cell lines was screened for FA pathway inactivation applying FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCD2/RAD51 nuclear focus formation and a newly identified FA pathway-deficient cell line was functionally characterized. The hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) line HuH-7 was defective in FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCD2 nuclear focus formation but proficient in RAD51 focus formation. Gene complementation studies revealed that this proximal FA pathway inactivation was attributable to defective FANCC function in HuH-7 cells. Accordingly, a homozygous inactivating FANCC nonsense mutation (c.553C > T, p.R185X) was identified in HuH-7, resulting in partial transcriptional skipping of exon 6 and leading to the classic cellular FA hypersensitivity phenotype; HuH-7 cells exhibited a strongly reduced proliferation rate and a pronounced G2 cell cycle arrest at distinctly lower concentrations of ICL-agents than a panel of non-isogenic, FA pathway-proficient HCC cell lines. Upon retroviral transduction of HuH-7 cells with FANCC cDNA, FA pathway functions were restored and ICL-hypersensitivity abrogated. Analyses of 18 surgical HCC specimens yielded no further examples for genetic or epigenetic inactivation of FANCC, FANCF, or FANCG in HCC, suggesting a low prevalence of proximal FA pathway inactivation in this tumor type. Conclusions As the majority of HCC are chemoresistant, assessment of FA pathway function in HCC could identify small

  7. Suicide gene-modified killer cells as an allogeneic alternative to autologous cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Leboeuf, Céline; Durand, Sarah; Su, Bin; Deschamps, Marina; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ferrand, Christophe; Pessaux, Patrick; Robinet, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using autologous cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells reduces the recurrence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in association with transarterial chemoembolization or radiofrequency. However, a large‑scale development of this immunotherapy remains difficult to consider in an autologous setting, considering the logistical hurdles associated with the production of this cell therapy product. A previous study has provided the in vitro and in vivo proof‑of‑concept that allogeneic suicide gene‑modified killer cells (aSGMKCs) from healthy blood donors (a cell therapy product previously demonstrated to provide anti‑leukemic effects to patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation) may exert a potent anti‑tumor effect towards HCC. Therefore, the development of a bank of 'ready‑for‑use' aSGMKCs was proposed as an approach allowing for the development of immunotherapies that are more convenient and on a broader scale than that of autologous therapies. In the present study, aSGMKCs were compared with CIK cells generated according to three different protocols. Similar to CIK cells, the cytotoxic activity of aSGMKCs toward the Huh‑7 HCC cell line was mediated by tumor necrosis factor‑related apoptosis‑inducing ligand, tumor necrosis factor‑α and interferon‑γ. Furthermore, the frequency of natural killer (NK), NK‑like T and T cells, and their in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity activities were similar between aSGMKCs and CIK cells. Thus, the present study demonstrated that aSGMKCs are similar to CIK cells, further suggesting the possibility for future use of aSGMKCs in the treatment of solid tumors, including HCC.

  8. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  9. [Basal cell carcinoma with matrical differentiation].

    PubMed

    Goldman-Lévy, Gabrielle; Frouin, Eric; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Maury, Géraldine; Guillot, Bernard; Costes, Valérie

    2015-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma with matrical differentiation is a very rare variant of basal cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, less than 30 cases have been reported. This tumor is composed of basaloid lobules showing a differentiation toward the pilar matrix cells. Recently, it has been demonstrated that beta-catenin would interfer with physiopathogenesis of matrical tumors, in particular pilomatricomas, but also basal cell carcinomas with matrical differentiation. This is a new case, with immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of beta-catenin, in order to explain its histogenesis.

  10. Transforming capacity of two novel genes JS-1 and JS-2 located in chromosome 5p and their overexpression in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sarwat; Chui, Chung H; Tang, Wing K; Hui, Kin S; Au, Ho W; Li, Wing Y; Wong, Mei M; Cheung, Filly; Tsao, S W; Lam, King Y; Beh, Philip S L; Wong, John; Law, Simon; Srivastava, Gopesh; Ho, Kwok P; Chan, Albert S C; Tang, Johnny C O

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has a high mortality rate and geographic differences in incidence. Previous studies of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) showed that chromosomal 5p is frequently amplified in cell lines and primary ESCC of Hong Kong Chinese origin. In this report, attempt was made to study two novel genes, named as JS-1 and JS-2, which are located in chromosome 5p15.2 and are 5' upstream to delta catenin for their roles in molecular pathogenesis of ESCC. Eleven cell lines, 27 primary ESCC cases and multiple human tissue cDNA panels (MTC) of digestive system were studied for the expression level of JS-1 and JS-2 by RT-PCR. The full-length cDNA sequences of JS-1 and JS-2 were determined from a non-tumor esophageal epithelial cell line by 3' and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The transforming capacity of JS-1 and JS-2 was also investigated by transfecting NIH 3T3 cells with the expression vector pcDNA3.1(-) cloned with the full coding sequences and it was followed by the study of foci formation of the transfected cells under confluence growth and the anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Forty-five percent (5/11) and 18% (2/11) of the ESCC cell lines showed overexpression of JS-1 and JS-2 respectively, while 55% (15/27) and 14% (3/22) primary ESCC cases showed overexpression of JS-1 and JS-2 respectively. JS-1 overexpression was most common in patients with stage II ESCC (6/27; 22%) whereas JS-2 was only overexpressed in a dysplastic lesion (1/22; 4%) and stage III tumors (2/22; 9%). The expression levels of JS-1 and JS-2 are both low in normal esophageal tissues. Overexpression of JS-1 in NIH 3T3 cells caused foci formation in confluence growth and colony formation in soft agar but not for JS-2. A high grade sarcoma was formed in the athymic nude mice when NIH 3T3 cells overexpressing JS-1 were injected subcutaneously. Our results thus indicate that the frequent overexpression of JS-1 in ESCC and its transforming

  11. Association of GSTT1 non-null and NAT1 slow/rapid genotypes with von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor gene transversions in sporadic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gallou, C; Longuemaux, S; Deloménie, C; Méjean, A; Martin, N; Martinet, S; Palais, G; Bouvier, R; Droz, D; Krishnamoorthy, R; Junien, C; Béroud, C; Dupret, J M

    2001-08-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene is commonly mutated in renal cell carcinoma of clear cell type (CCRCC). We investigated the possible relationship between VHL mutations in sporadic CCRCC and polymorphism of genes encoding enzymes involved in carcinogen metabolism: two cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP1A1 and CYP2D6), one NAD[P]H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), three glutathione S-transferases (GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1) and two arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NAT1 and NAT2). We analysed DNA from tumour and nontumoural kidney tissue from 195 CCRCC patients. Single VHL mutations were identified in 88 patients and double mutations were present in two patients. Nine of 18 transversions were GC to TA, four were AT to TA, four were GC to CG and one was AT to CG. Ten of 19 transitions were GC to AT and nine were AT to GC. We also identified 53 frameshifts and two GC to AT at CpG. An excess of transversions was observed in a subset of patients with active GSTT1 [GSTT1 (+) genotype] and probably defective NAT1 (NAT1 S/R variant genotype). All 18 transversions were in GSTT1 (+) patients, whereas only 76% of transitions (P = 0.05) and 81% of the other mutations (P = 0.06) occurred in this genotype. We found that 28% of the transversions were in the NAT1 S/R genotype versus 12% of the transitions (P = 0.40) and 4% of the other mutations (P = 0.01). This suggests that pharmacogenetic polymorphisms may be associated with the type of acquired VHL mutation, which may modulate CCRCC development.

  12. Overexpression of N-terminal kinase like gene promotes tumorigenicity of hepatocellular carcinoma by regulating cell cycle progression and cell motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Liu, Ming; Chen, Leilei; Chan, Tim Hon Man; Jiang, Lingxi; Yuan, Yun-Fei; Guan, Xin-Yuan

    2015-01-30

    Amplification and overexpression of CHD1L is one of the most frequent genetic alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we found that one of CHD1L downstream targets, NTKL, was frequently upregulated in HCC, which was significantly correlated with vascular invasion (P = 0.012) and poor prognosis (P = 0.050) of HCC. ChIP assay demonstrated the binding of CHD1L to the promoter region of NTKL. QRT-PCR study showed that the expression of NTKL positively correlated with CHD1L expression in both clinical samples and cell lines. Functional study found that NTKL had strong oncogenic roles, including increased cell growth, colony formation in soft agar, and tumor formation in nude mice. Further study found that NTKL could promote G1/S transition by decreasing P53 and increasing CyclinD1 expressions. NTKL overexpression could accelerate the mitotic exit and chromosome segregation, which led to the cytokinesis failure and subsequently induced apoptosis. NTKL also regulated cell motility by facilitating philopodia and lamellipodia formation through regulating F-actin reorganization and the phosphorylation of small GTPase Rac1/cdc42. Using co-IP and mass spectrometry approach, we identified the large GTPase dynamin2 as an interacting protein of NTKL, which might be responsible for the phenotype alterations caused by NTKL overexpression, such as cytokinesis failure, increased cell motility and abnormal of cell division.

  13. Effect of Annexin A1 gene on the proliferation and invasion of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells and its regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Han, Gaohua; Lu, Kaijin; Huang, Junxing; Ye, Jun; Dai, Shengbin; Ye, Yunyao; Zhang, Lixin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Annexin A1 (ANXA1) on the proliferation, migration and invasion of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells and its possible mechanisms of action. After constructing the ANXA1 overexpression plasmid, we transfected this plasmid and/or microRNA (miRNA)‑196a mimic into ESCC cells (Eca109 cell line). Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and Transwell chamber assay were performed to determine cell proliferation, migration and invasion, respectively. Western blot analysis was used to examine the protein expression levels of ANXA1, Snail and E-cadherin. RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of miRNA-196a. Our results revealed that ANXA1 expression was upregulated in the cells transfected with the ANXA1 overexpression plasmid, and cell proliferation, migration and invasion were significantly increased (p=0.004, p<0.001 and p=0.011, respectively). In the cells transfected with the miRNA‑196a mimic, miRNA‑196a expression was significantly upregulated (p<0.001). However, miRNA-196a expression was downregulated in the cells transfected with the ANXA1 overexpression plasmid. In addition, in the cells transfected with the miRNA‑196a mimic, cell proliferation, migration and invasion were significantly decreased (p=0.027, p=0.009 and p=0.021, respectively). In the cells transfected with the ANXA1 overexpression plasmid, the expression of Snail was upregulated and that of E-cadherin was downregulated. However, the opposite was observed in the cells transfected with the miRNA‑196a mimic. Our findings thus demonstrate that ANXA1 promotes the proliferation of Eca109 cells, and increases the expression of Snail, whereas it inhibits that of E-cadherin, thus enhancing the migration and invasion of ESCC cells. miRNA-196a negatively regulates the expression of ANXA1, thereby inhibiting the proliferation, invasion and metastasis of ESCC cells.

  14. Effect of Annexin A1 gene on the proliferation and invasion of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells and its regulatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gaohua; Lu, Kaijin; Huang, Junxing; Ye, Jun; Dai, Shengbin; Ye, Yunyao; Zhang, Lixin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Annexin A1 (ANXA1) on the proliferation, migration and invasion of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells and its possible mechanisms of action. After constructing the ANXA1 overexpression plasmid, we transfected this plasmid and/or microRNA (miRNA)-196a mimic into ESCC cells (Eca109 cell line). Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and Transwell chamber assay were performed to determine cell proliferation, migration and invasion, respectively. Western blot analysis was used to examine the protein expression levels of ANXA1, Snail and E-cadherin. RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of miRNA-196a. Our results revealed that ANXA1 expression was upregulated in the cells transfected with the ANXA1 overexpression plasmid, and cell proliferation, migration and invasion were significantly increased (p=0.004, p<0.001 and p=0.011, respectively). In the cells transfected with the miRNA-196a mimic, miRNA-196a expression was significantly upregulated (p<0.001). However, miRNA-196a expression was downregulated in the cells transfected with the ANXA1 overexpression plasmid. In addition, in the cells transfected with the miRNA-196a mimic, cell proliferation, migration and invasion were significantly decreased (p=0.027, p=0.009 and p=0.021, respectively). In the cells transfected with the ANXA1 overexpression plasmid, the expression of Snail was upregulated and that of E-cadherin was downregulated. However, the opposite was observed in the cells transfected with the miRNA-196a mimic. Our findings thus demonstrate that ANXA1 promotes the proliferation of Eca109 cells, and increases the expression of Snail, whereas it inhibits that of E-cadherin, thus enhancing the migration and invasion of ESCC cells. miRNA-196a negatively regulates the expression of ANXA1, thereby inhibiting the proliferation, invasion and metastasis of ESCC cells. PMID:28035369

  15. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  16. Identification of differentially expressed genes associated with the enhancement of X-ray susceptibility by RITA in a hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (FaDu)

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Jinwei; Li, Xianglan; Guo, Rutao; Liu, Shanshan; Luo, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Next generation sequencing and bio-informatic analyses were conducted to investigate the mechanism of reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis (RITA)-enhancing X-ray susceptibility in FaDu cells. Materials and methods The cDNA was isolated from FaDu cells treated with 0 X-ray, 8 Gy X-ray, or 8 Gy X-ray + RITA. Then, cDNA libraries were created and sequenced using next generation sequencing, and each assay was repeated twice. Subsequently, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using Cuffdiff in Cufflinks and their functions were predicted by pathway enrichment analyses. Genes that were constantly up- or down-regulated in 8 Gy X-ray-treated FaDu cells and 8 Gy X-ray + RITA-treated FaDu cells were obtained as RITA genes. Afterward, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) relationships were obtained from the STRING database and a PPI network was constructed using Cytoscape. Furthermore, ClueGO was used for pathway enrichment analysis of genes in the PPI network. Results Total 2,040 and 297 DEGs were identified in FaDu cells treated with 8 Gy X-ray or 8 Gy X-ray + RITA, respectively. PARP3 and NEIL1 were enriched in base excision repair, and CDK1 was enriched in p53 signaling pathway. RFC2 and EZH2 were identified as RITA genes. In the PPI network, many interaction relationships were identified (e.g., RFC2-CDK1, EZH2-CDK1 and PARP3-EZH2). ClueGO analysis showed that RFC2 and EZH2 were related to cell cycle. Conclusions RFC2, EZH2, CDK1, PARP3 and NEIL1 may be associated, and together enhance the susceptibility of FaDu cells treated with RITA to the deleterious effects of X-ray. PMID:27247549

  17. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  18. Multiple mutations of lung squamous cell carcinoma shared common mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Gu, Biao; Shi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) is a subtype of non-small cell lung cancers which is the cause of 80% of all lung cancer deaths. The genes that highly mutated in patients with LUSC and their roles played in the tumorigenesis remains unknown. Data of patients with Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) were retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Differentially expressed genes were identified between control and cancer samples. Patients and controls can be separated by mRNA expression level showing that the between-group variance and totally 1265 genes were differentially expressed between controls and patients. Top genes whose mutations highly occurred in patients with LUSC were identified, most of these genes were shown to be related with tumorigenesis in previous studies. All of the genes mostly mutated were independently correlated with expression levels of all genes. These mutations did not show the trend of co-occurrence. However, the influenced gene of these mutations had overlaps. After studying the intersection of these genes, a group of shared genes were identified. The shared pathways enriched which played critical role in LUSC were identified based on these shared genes. Different mutations had contribution to the progression of LUSC. Though these genes involved different specific mechanisms, most of them may share a common mechanism which is critical for LUSC. The results may suggest a neglected mechanism and also indicate a potential target for therapies. PMID:27835590

  19. –2518 A/G MCP-1 but not –403 G/A RANTES gene polymorphism is associated with enhanced risk of basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zabłotna, Monika; Szczerkowska-Dobosz, Aneta; Ruckemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna; Sokolowska-Wojdylo, Malgorzata; Nowicki, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polymorphic variants of MCP-1 and RANTES genes and their protein serum levels have been implicated in the increased risk and severity of several malignancies. However, the subject has not been explored in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) patients so far. Aim To investigate the association between monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) (–2518 A/G) and RANTES (–403 G/A) polymorphism and risk and clinical course of BCC. Material and methods The study group consisted of 150 unrelated patients with BCC and 140 healthy, unrelated, age- and sex-matched volunteers. The polymorphisms were analysed using the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction method (ARMS-PCR) and single specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR). Serum cytokine levels were measured with ELISA. Results The presence of the MCP-1 –2518 GG genotype was statistically more frequent in BCC patients and it increased the risk of BCC (OR = 2.63, p = 0.003). Genotype –330 GG was statistically more common in patients with less advanced tumours (OR = 2.8, p = 0.017). Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 serum level was statistically higher with GG genotype. In the BCC group MCP-1 serum levels were decreased. Neither polymorphic variants of RANTES nor the chemokine serum concentration differed significantly between the study groups. Conclusions These findings suggest that –2518 A/G MCP-1 polymorphism may be involved in BCC pathogenesis. PMID:27881944

  20. Mapping Mammary Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    AD GRANT NUMBER DAMDI7-94-J-4040 TITLE: Mapping Mammary Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Gould, Ph.D...Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat DAMDI7-94-J-4040 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael Gould, Ph.D. Hong Lan, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  1. Loss of heterozygosity and mutation analysis of the p16 (9p21) and p53 (17p13) genes in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    González, M V; Pello, M F; López-Larrea, C; Suárez, C; Menéndez, M J; Coto, E

    1995-09-01

    We analyzed allelic loss at the p53 gene (17p13) and at chromosome region 9p21 in 35 primary head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at p53 and 9p21 was found in 50 and 75% of informative cases, respectively. LOH at the p53 gene did not increase significantly with tumor stage, but was more frequent in moderately and poorly differentiated tumors than in well-differentiated tumors. LOH plus mutation or homozygous deletion of p53 was limited to advanced stage and poorly differentiated tumors. Allelic loss at 9p21 is frequent in early stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and is not significantly associated with LOH at p53. The second exon of the p16/MTS1/CDKN2 gene was found to be homozygously deleted in 1 of 19 cases showing LOH at 9p21, but direct sequencing did not show mutations in the remaining 18 cases. This suggests that p16 plays a limited role in the development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  2. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid transformation.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Neil A; Ayala, Alberto G; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2003-10-01

    We present a rare case of a chromophobe renal cell carcinoma that progressed to a high-grade spindle cell sarcoma. The tumor affected a 50-year-old man who had presented with right upper quadrant discomfort and hematuria and subsequently underwent a right radical nephrectomy. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of two distinct components, a chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and a sarcomatoid component. The sarcomatoid component had exhibited aggressive behavior by spreading to a regional lymph node. This case report shows that chromophobe carcinoma can develop a sarcomatoid transformation with a high propensity for invasive growth and metastasis.

  3. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma: micro-RNA expression profiling and comparison with clear cell renal cell carcinoma and papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Munari, Enrico; Marchionni, Luigi; Chitre, Apurva; Hayashi, Masamichi; Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo; Gobbo, Stefano; Argani, Pedram; Allaf, Mohamad; Hoque, Mohammad O; Netto, George J

    2014-06-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) is a low-grade renal neoplasm with morphological characteristics mimicking both clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) and papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC). However, despite some overlapping features, their morphological, immunohistochemical, and molecular profiles are distinct. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression and are involved in various biological processes, including cancer development. To better understand the biology of this tumor, we aimed to analyze the miRNA expression profile of a set of CCPRCC using microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A total of 15 cases diagnosed as CCPRCC were used in this study. Among the most differentially expressed miRNA in CCPRCC, we found miR-210, miR-122, miR-34a, miR-21, miR-34b*, and miR-489 to be up-regulated, whereas miR-4284, miR-1202, miR-135a, miR-1973, and miR-204 were down-regulated compared with normal renal parenchyma. To identify consensus of differentially regulated miRNA between CCPRCC, CCRCC, and PRCC, we additionally determined differential miRNA expression using 2 publically available microarray data sets from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database (GSE41282 and GSE3798). This comparison revealed that the miRNA expression profile of CCPRCC shows some overlapping characteristics between CCRCC and PRCC. Moreover, CCPRCC lacks dysregulation of important miRNAs typically associated with aggressive behavior. In summary, we describe the miRNA expression profile of a relatively infrequent type of renal cancer. Our results may help in understanding the molecular underpinning of this newly recognized entity.

  4. An Ultra-Deep Targeted Sequencing Gene Panel Improves the Prognostic Stratification of Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, Shu-Jen; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Yang, Lan-Yan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Chen, I-How; Chang, Kai-Ping; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chen, Hua-Chien; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-02-01

    An improved prognostic stratification of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and pathologically positive (pN+) nodes is urgently needed. Here, we sought to examine whether an ultra-deep targeted sequencing (UDT-Seq) gene panel may improve the prognostic stratification in this patient group.A mutation-based signature affecting 10 genes (including genetic mutations in 6 oncogenes and 4 tumor suppressor genes) was devised to predict disease-free survival (DFS) in 345 primary tumor specimens obtained from pN+ OSCC patients. Of the 345 patients, 144 were extracapsular spread (ECS)-negative and 201 were ECS-positive. The 5-year locoregional control, distant metastases, disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival (OS) rates served as outcome measures.The UDT-Seq panel was an independent risk factor (RF) for 5-year locoregional control (P = 0.0067), distant metastases (P = 0.0001), DFS (P < 0.0001), disease-specific survival (DSS, P < 0.0001), and OS (P = 0.0003) in pN+ OSCC patients. The presence of ECS and pT3-4 disease were also independent RFs for DFS, DSS, and OS. A prognostic scoring system was formulated by summing up the significant covariates (UDT-Seq, ECS, pT3-4) separately for each survival endpoint. The presence of a positive UDT-Seq panel (n = 77) significantly improved risk stratification for all the survival endpoints as compared with traditional AJCC staging (P < 0.0001). Among ECS-negative patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 31) had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0005) and DSS (P = 0.0002). Among ECS-positive patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 46) also had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0032) and DSS (P = 0.0098).Our UDT-Seq gene panel consisting of clinically actionable genes was significantly associated with patient outcomes and provided better prognostic stratification than traditional AJCC staging. It was also able to predict prognosis in

  5. Effects of Cationic Microbubble Carrying CD/TK Double Suicide Gene and αVβ3 Integrin Antibody in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiale; Zhou, Ping; Li, Lan; Zhang, Yan; Shao, Yang; Tang, Li; Tian, Shuangming

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mostly derived from hepatitis or cirrhosisis, is one of the most common types of liver cancer. T-cell mediated immune response elicited by CD/TK double suicide gene has shown a substantial antitumor effect in HCC. Integrin αVβ3 over expresssion has been suggested to regulate the biology behavior of HCC. In this study, we investigated the strategy of incorporating CD/TK double suicide gene and anti-αVβ3 integrin monoclonal antibodies into cationic microbubbles (CMBsαvβ3), and evaluated its killing effect in HCC cells. Methods To improve the transfection efficiency of targeted CD/TK double suicide gene, we adopted cationic microbubbles (CMBs), a cationic delivery agent with enhanced DNA-carrying capacity. The ultrasound and high speed shearing method was used to prepare the non-targeting cationic microbubbles (CMBs). Using the biotin-avidin bridge method, αVβ3 integrin antibody was conjugated to CMBs, and CMBsαvβ3 was generated to specifically target to HepG2 cells. The morphology and physicochemical properties of the CMBsαvβ3 was detected by optical microscope and zeta detector. The conjugation of plasmid and the antibody in CMBsαvβ3 were examined by immunofluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. The binding capacities of CMBsαvβ3 and CMBs to HCC HepG2 and normal L-02 cells were compared using rosette formation assay. To detect EGFP fluorescence and examine the transfection efficiencies of CMBsαvβ3 and CMBs in HCC cells, fluorescence microscope and contrast-enhanced sonography were adopted. mRNA and protein level of CD/TK gene were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. To evaluate the anti-tumor effect of CMBsαvβ3, HCC cells with CMBsαvβ3 were exposed to 5-flurocytosine / ganciclovir (5-FC/GCV). Then, cell cycle distribution after treatment were detected by PI staining and flow cytometry. Apoptotic cells death were detected by optical microscope and assessed by MTT assay and TUNEL

  6. Analysis of Argonaute Complex Bound mRNAs in DU145 Prostate Carcinoma Cells Reveals New miRNA Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Volker; Beitzinger, Michaela; Nolte, Elke; Wach, Sven; Hart, Martin; Sapich, Sandra; Wiesehöfer, Marc; Wennemuth, Gunther; Eichner, Norbert; Stempfl, Thomas; Wullich, Bernd; Meister, Gunter

    2017-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) contributes to the induction and maintenance of prostate carcinoma (PCa). To identify mRNAs enriched or removed from Ago2-containing RISC complexes, these complexes were immunoprecipitated from normal prostate fibroblasts (PNFs) and the PCa line DU145 and the bound mRNAs were quantified by microarray. The analysis of Ago complexes derived from PNFs or DU145 confirmed the enrichment or depletion of a variety of mRNAs already known from the literature to be deregulated. Novel potential targets were analyzed by luciferase assays with miRNAs known to be deregulated in PCa. We demonstrate that the mRNAs of the death effector domain-containing protein (DEDD), the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 10b protein (TNFRSF10B), the tumor protein p53 inducible nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1), and the secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (SPARC; osteonectin) are regulated by miRNAs miR-148a, miR-20a, miR-24, and miR-29a/b, respectively. Therefore, these miRNAs represent potential targets for therapy. Surprisingly, overexpression of miR-24 induced focus formation and proliferation of DU145 cells, while miR-29b reduced proliferation. The study confirms genes deregulated in PCa by virtue of their presence/absence in the Ago2-complex. In conjunction with the already published miRNA profiles of PCa, the data can be used to identify miRNA-regulated mRNAs. PMID:28163933

  7. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies.

  8. Familial renal cell carcinoma: clinical and molecular genetic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Maher, E.R.; Yates, J.R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2% of all human cancer, but familial cases are infrequent. Riches (1963) and Griffin et al. (1984) in a population-based case-control study found a family history of renal cell carcinoma in 2.4% of affected patients compared to 1.4% of controls. Nevertheless the importance of inherited tumours in clinical practice and medical research is disproportionate to their frequency. In clinical practice recognition of familial RCC can provide opportunities to prevent morbidity and mortality by appropriate screening. In medical research recent advances in molecular genetics offer the prospect of isolating the genes involved in the pathogenesis of familial RCC and of the more common sporadic cases. In this article we review the clinical and molecular genetics of inherited renal cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma or hypernephroma). PMID:1997093

  9. Perioperative Considerations in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Flavin, Kate; Vasdev, Nikhil; Ashead, Jim; Lane, Tim; Hanbury, Damian; Nathan, Paul; Gowrie-Mohan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma are complex, with the potential for significant complications, and require extensive pre-, peri-, and postoperative management. This article discusses, in depth, the necessary considerations in the treatment of these patients. PMID:27833463

  10. Sunitinib benefits patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Findings from clinical trial patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, a common kidney cancer, show they did not have accelerated tumor growth after treatment with sunitinib, in contrast to some study results in animals.

  11. Paraneoplastic Cough and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A case of patient with intractable cough due to renal cell carcinoma is reported. The discussion reviews the literature regarding this unusual paraneoplastic manifestation of renal malignancy. PMID:27445553

  12. Introducing Cytology-Based Theranostics in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Pilot Program.

    PubMed

    Patrikidou, Anna; Valeri, Rosalia Maria; Kitikidou, Kyriaki; Destouni, Charikleia; Vahtsevanos, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and reliability of brush cytology in the biomarker expression profiling of oral squamous cell carcinomas within the concept of theranostics, and to correlate this biomarker profile with patient measurable outcomes. Markers representative of prognostic gene expression changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma was selected. These markers were also selected to involve pathways for which commercially available or investigational agents exist for clinical application. A set of 7 markers were analysed by immunocytochemistry on the archival primary tumour material of 99 oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. We confirmed the feasibility of the technique for the expression profiling of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Furthermore, our results affirm the prognostic significance of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family and the angiogenic pathway in oral squamous cell carcinoma, confirming their interest for targeted therapy. Brush cytology appears feasible and applicable for the expression profiling of oral squamous cell carcinoma within the concept of theranostics, according to sample availability.

  13. Resection of intraocular squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Char, D H; Crawford, J B; Howes, E L; Weinstein, A J

    1992-01-01

    A patient with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva was referred with 20/20 vision in an eye with obvious intraocular extension. A modified iridocyclochoroidectomy was performed and the tumour was removed. Three and a half years later the patient's vision is 20/30 and there is no recurrence. This is the first case in which an eye has been successfully salvaged with documented intraocular squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva. Images PMID:1739709

  14. Clear cell myoepithelial carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Rabade, Nikhil R; Goel, Naina A

    2014-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common epithelial neoplasm of lacrimal gland. A clear cell myoepithelial carcinoma arising in the background of pleomorphic adenoma is common in the salivary glands but very rare in the lacrimal glands. We report the case of a 27 year old man whose lacrimal gland pleomorphic adenoma recurred several times over a period of four years and ultimately evolved into a clear cell myoepithelial carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma.

  15. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastasized to Pagetic Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Ashley; Liu, Bo; Rop, Baiywo; Edison, Michelle; Valente, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Paget’s disease of the bone, historically known as osteitis deformans, is an uncommon disease typically affecting individuals of European descent. Patients with Paget’s disease of the bone are at increased risk for primary bone neoplasms, particularly osteosarcoma. Many cases of metastatic disease to pagetic bone have been reported. However, renal cell carcinoma metastasized to pagetic bone is extremely rare. A 94-year-old male presented to the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen demonstrated a large mass in the right kidney compatible with renal cell carcinoma. The patient was also noted to have Paget’s disease of the pelvic bones and sacrum. Within the pagetic bone of the sacrum, there was an enhancing mass compatible with renal cell carcinoma. A subsequent biopsy of the renal lesion confirmed renal cell carcinoma. Paget’s disease of the bone places the patient at an increased risk for bone neoplasms. The most commonly reported sites for malignant transformation are the femur, pelvis, and humerus. In cases of malignant transformation, osteosarcoma is the most common diagnosis. Breast, lung, and prostate carcinomas are the most common to metastasize to pagetic bone. Renal cell carcinoma associated with Paget’s disease of the bone is very rare, with only one prior reported case. Malignancy in Paget's disease of the bone is uncommon with metastatic disease to pagetic bone being extremely rare. We report a patient diagnosed with concomitant renal cell carcinoma and metastatic disease within Paget’s disease of the sacrum. Further research is needed to assess the true incidence of renal cell carcinoma associated with pagetic bone. PMID:27660736

  16. [Lichen sclerosus and squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Pascual, M; Vicente-Martín, F J; López-Estebaranz, J L

    2012-01-01

    Lichen sclerosus is a chronic inflammatory disease that can progress to malignancy. The literature indicates an association with anogenital squamous cell carcinoma and verrucous carcinoma. Two pathogenic pathways, differentiated vulvar and penile intraepithelial neoplasias, which have recently been described in relation to squamous cell carcinoma, are both highly associated with genital lichen sclerosus independently of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. Furthermore, tumor-promoting molecular changes unrelated to HPV infection have been demonstrated and may explain the malignant potential of lichen sclerosus. The possible relationship between HPV and genital lichen sclerosus currently remains open to discussion, and the prognostic importance of the overlapping of these 2 diseases is still unclear. This review considers the relationship between lichen sclerosus and squamous cell and verrucous carcinomas, the possible oncogenic mechanisms involved, and their possible association with HPV infection.

  17. Lichen sclerosus and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Pascual, M; Vicente-Martín, F J; López-Estebaranz, J L

    2012-01-01

    Lichen sclerosus is a chronic inflammatory disease that can progress to malignancy. The literature indicates an association with anogenital squamous cell carcinoma and verrucous carcinoma. Two pathogenic pathways, differentiated vulvar and penile intraepithelial neoplasias, which have recently been described in relation to squamous cell carcinoma, are both highly associated with genital lichen sclerosus independently of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. Furthermore, tumor-promoting molecular changes unrelated to HPV infection have been demonstrated and may explain the malignant potential of lichen sclerosus. The possible relationship between HPV and genital lichen sclerosus currently remains open to discussion, and the prognostic importance of the overlapping of these 2 diseases is still unclear. This review considers the relationship between lichen sclerosus and squamous cell and verrucous carcinomas, the possible oncogenic mechanisms involved, and their possible association with HPV infection.

  18. Diversified expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor dependent genes in human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines treated with β-naphthoflavone.

    PubMed

    Brauze, Damian; Fijalkiewicz, Katarzyna; Szaumkessel, Marcin; Kiwerska, Katarzyna; Bednarek, Kinga; Rydzanicz, Malgorzata; Richter, Julia; Grenman, Reidar; Jarmuz-Szymczak, Malgorzata

    2014-11-18

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates a variety of biological responses to ubiquitous environmental pollutants. In this study the effect of administration of β-naphthoflavone (BNF), potent AhR ligand, on the expression of AhR, AhRR, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, NQO1, GSTA1, ALDH3A1 and UGT1A genes encoding the enzymes controlled by AhR were examined in thirteen laryngeal tumor cell lines and in HepaRG cell line. The analyzed cell lines were derived from patients with squamous laryngeal cancer, with history of cigarette smoking and without signs of human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 infection in investigated cells. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed huge interindividual differences in expression of genes from AhR regulatory network. Our results strongly suggest predominant effect of DNA methylation on induction of CYP1A1 expression by AhR ligands as well. Our results indicate that differentiated HepaRG cell line appeared to be very good substitute for human liver in studies on xenobiotic metabolism by AhR regulated enzymes.

  19. Potential risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma due to nucleotide excision repair XPA and XPC gene variants and their interaction among themselves and with environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Rumaisa; Bhat, Gulzar Ahmad; Lone, Mohd Maqbool; Masood, Akbar; Dar, Nazir Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    The association of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene polymorphisms with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is inconclusive. The aim of the current study was to assess the association of repair gene xeroderma pigmentosum A (XPA) (rs-1800975) and xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) (rs-2228000) polymorphisms with ESCC risk as well as modifying effects of environmental factors. The genotyping was done in 450 confirmed ESCC cases and equal number of individually matched controls by the polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and direct sequencing methods. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess the genotypic associations and interactions. A high ESCC risk was found in subjects who carried the homozygous minor allele of XPA (odds ratio (OR) = 3.57; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.76-7.23), and the risk was higher when analysis was limited to participants who were ever smokers (OR = 4.22; 95 % CI = 2.01-8.88), lived in adobe houses (OR = 8.42; 95 % CI = 3.74-18.95), consumed large volumes of salt tea (OR = 7.42; 95 % CI = 3.30-16.69), or had a positive family history of cancer (FHC) (OR = 9.47; 95 % CI = 4.67-19.20). In case of XPC, a homozygous minor allele also showed strong association with ESCC risk (OR = 4.43; 95 % CI = 2.41-8.16). We again observed a very strong effect of the above environmental factors in elevating the risk of ESCC. Further, the variant genotypes of both genes in combination showed an increased risk towards ESCC (OR = 7.01; 95 % CI = 3.14-15.64) and such association was synergistically significant. Salt tea consumption showed an interaction with genotypes of XPA and XPC. However, an interaction with FHC was significant in the case of XPA genotype only. XPA and XPC genotypes are associated with an increased risk of ESCC, and such association was reasonably modulated by different exposures.

  20. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M’rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy. PMID:27795755

  1. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M'rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy.

  2. Actinic cheilitis and squamous cell carcinoma of the lip: clinical, histopathological and immunogenetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Renata Aparecida Martinez Antunes Ribeiro; Minicucci, Eliana Maria; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2012-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis is the main precancerous lesion of the lip. Squamous cell carcinoma of the lip is reported together with oral carcinomas in the Brazilian official statistics. Overall, they account for 40% of the head and neck carcinomas. In general, physicians and dentists know little about what causes oral tumor development and progression. Tumor suppressor genes and cell proliferation regulatory proteins play a role in the progression of actinic cheilitis to squamous cell carcinoma and in its biological behavior. Knowledge on prognostic and diagnostic markers has a positive impact on the follow-up of these patients.

  3. Synchronous Renal Neoplasm: Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma and Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma in the Same Kidney.

    PubMed

    Benavides-Huerto, Miguel Armando; Chávez-Valencia, Venice; Lagunas-Rangel, Francisco Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    Abdominal computed tomography in a 64 year-old male presenting hematuria showed two malignant tumors in the left kidney, thus radical nephrectomy was realized. In histological preparations a clear cell renal cell carcinoma and a papillary urothelial carcinoma were identified occurring synchronously, which is a rare occurrence having only about 50 cases reported in the literature.

  4. Caspase-3 activation downstream from reactive oxygen species in heat-induced apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells carrying a mutant p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, D; Sasaki, M; Watanabe, N

    2001-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the intracellular signaling pathway leading to p53-independent activation of caspase-3 during heat-induced apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells. Induction of mutant p53 protein, but not p21/WAF-1, was observed after heat treatment of both heat-resistant (PANC-1) and heat-sensitive (MIAPaCa-2) cells. A specific inhibitor of caspase-3 (Ac-DMQD-CHO) caused 84% and 92% inhibition of apoptosis in MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, respectively. Caspase-3 mRNA expression was increased in both cell lines after heat treatment. Further, heat-induced caspase-3 activity detected by fluorogenic assay in MIAPaCa-2 cells was almost completely inhibited by addition of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. In contrast, Ac-DMQD-CHO had no inhibitory effect on amounts of reactive oxygen species in heat-treated MIAPaCa-2 cells. These results suggest a possible pathway by which reactive oxygen species lead to caspase-3 activation to cause heat-induced death of pancreatic carcinoma cells carrying mutant p53.

  5. The epigenetic landscape of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kluzek, Katarzyna; Bluyssen, Hans A

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype of all kidney tumors. During the last few years, epigenetics has emerged as an important mechanism in ccRCC pathogenesis. Recent reports, involving large-scale methylation and sequencing analyses, have identified genes frequently inactivated by promoter methylation and recurrent mutations in genes encoding chromatin regulatory proteins. Interestingly, three of detected genes (PBRM1, SETD2 and BAP1) are located on chromosome 3p, near the VHL gene, inactivated in over 80% ccRCC cases. This suggests that 3p alterations are an essential part of ccRCC pathogenesis. Moreover, most of the proteins encoded by these genes cooperate in histone H3 modifications. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest discoveries shedding light on deregulation of chromatin machinery in ccRCC. Newly described ccRCC-specific epigenetic alterations could potentially serve as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and become an object of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28326264

  6. Specific-mutational patterns of p53 gene in bladder transitional cell carcinoma among a group of Iraqi patients exposed to war environmental hazards

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To unfold specific-mutational patterns in TP53 gene due to exposures to war environmental hazards and to detect the association of TP53 gene alteration with the depth of bladder cancer. Methods Twenty-nine bladder carcinomas were analyzed for TP53 alterations. PCR-single strand conformational polymorphism analysis, DNA sequencing and immunohistochemical analysis using monoclonal mouse anti-human p53 antibody (Clone DO-7) were employed. Results TP53 gene mutations occurred in 37.9% of the cases while TP53 overexpression occurred in 58.6%. Both of them were associated with deep invasive-tumors. Single mutations were seen in 63.6%, whereas only 27.3% have shown double mutations. Four mutations were frameshifted (30.8%); two of them showed insertion A after codon 244. There was no significant association between TP53 mutations and protein overexpression (P>0.05), while a significant association was observed between TP53 alterations and tumors progression (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusion The infrequent TP53mutations, especially insertion A and 196 hotspot codon, may represent the specific-mutational patterns in bladder carcinoma among the Iraqi patients who were exposed to war environmental hazards. TP53 alteration associated with bladder cancer progression should be analyzed by both mutational and protein expression analysis. PMID:22929185

  7. Depsipeptide in Unresectable Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-29

    Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  8. Expression of ZNF396 in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bai, Juncheng; Kito, Yusuke; Okubo, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Tamotsu

    2014-05-01

    Zfp191 represses differentiation and keeps various cells in the stem/progenitor stage. Here, we report that a Zfp191 homolog protein, ZNF396, is expressed in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and possibly represses the expression of a Notch system effector molecule, Hes1 (hairy and enhancer of split-1), and prevents BCC cells from undergoing Notch-mediated squamous cell differentiation. ZNF396 immunoreactivity was found in the nucleus of 35 of 38 cutaneous BCC and 4 of 74 squamous cell carcinoma tissue specimens. In non-tumorous epidermal tissues, ZNF396 immunoreactivity was restricted in basal cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of ZNF396 induced the expression of Notch2, Hes1, and involucrin in cultured BCC cells. Finally, we found that siRNA-mediated silencing of ZNF396 gene inhibited the proliferation of TE354.T basal cell carcinoma cells. ZNF396 might repress Notch-Hes1 signaling axis and prevent tumor cells from undergoing squamous differentiation in BCC.

  9. Clinicopathological analysis of basal cell carcinoma of the anal region and its distinction from basaloid squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Patil, Deepa T; Goldblum, John R; Billings, Steven D

    2013-10-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the anal region is rare and morphologically difficult to distinguish from basaloid squamous cell carcinoma, particularly on biopsies. This distinction has therapeutic and prognostic implications. We reviewed morphological features of 9 basal cell carcinomas and 15 basaloid squamous cell carcinomas from the anal region diagnosed during 1993-2011 and determined the utility of Ber-EP4, BCL2, TP63, CK5/6, CDKN2A, and SOX2 as diagnostic tools. Immunostains were scored in a semi-quantitative manner (1+-1-10%, 2+-11-50%, 3+->50%). All basal cell carcinomas were located in the perianal region, while all basaloid squamous cell carcinomas originated in the anal canal/anorectum. Nodular subtype of basal cell carcinoma was the most common subtype. Retraction artifact was the only significant distinguishing histological feature of basal cell carcinoma compared with basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (88% vs 26%; P=0.04). Atypical mitoses were more common in basaloid squamous cell carcinomas (71% vs 11%; P=0.05). An in situ component was only present in basaloid squamous cell carcinomas, and was noted in 6/15 cases. Basal cell carcinomas had 2-3+ Ber-EP4 (basal cell carcinoma 100% vs basaloid squamous cell carcinoma 40%; P<0.001) and BCL2 immunoreactivity (basal cell carcinomas 100% vs basaloid squamous cell carcinoma 33%; P<0.001). Diffuse CDKN2A and SOX2 expression was seen only in basaloid squamous cell carcinomas (basal cell carcinoma 0% vs basaloid squamous cell carcinoma 93%; P<0.001). There was no difference in TP63 and CK5/6 expression. Perianal location, retraction artifact, and lack of atypical mitoses are histological features that help distinguish basal cell carcinoma from basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. An in situ component, when present, supports the diagnosis of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. Immunostains are extremely helpful as diffuse Ber-EP4 and BCL2 expression is a feature of basal cell carcinoma and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma

  10. ZKSCAN1 gene and its related circular RNA (circZKSCAN1) both inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth, migration, and invasion but through different signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhicheng; Luo, Jingyan; Hu, Kunpeng; Lin, Jizong; Huang, He; Wang, Qiangliang; Zhang, Peng; Xiong, Zhiyong; He, Chonghua; Huang, Zejian; Liu, Bo; Yang, Yang

    2017-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that circular RNA (circRNA) are involved in cancer development, but the regulation and function of human circRNA remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that ZKSCAN1, a zinc finger family gene, is expressed in both linear and circular (circZKSCAN1) forms of RNA in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues and cell lines. Here, we analyzed a cohort of 102 patients and found that expression of both ZKSCAN1mRNA and circZKSCAN1 was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the HCC samples compared with that in matched adjacent nontumorous tissues by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The low expression level of ZKSCAN1 was only associated with tumor size (P = 0.032), while the cirZKSCAN1 levels varied in patients with different tumor numbers (P < 0.01), cirrhosis (P = 0.031), vascular invasion (P = 0.002), or microscopic vascular invasion (P = 0.002), as well as with the tumor grade (P < 0.001). Silencing both ZKSCAN1mRNA and circZKSCAN1 promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. In contrast, overexpression of both forms of RNA repressed HCC progression in vivo and in vitro. Silencing or overexpression of both forms of RNA did not interfere with each other. RNA-seq revealed a very different molecular basis for the observed effects; ZKSCAN1mRNA mainly regulated cellular metabolism, while circZKSCAN1 mediated several cancer-related signaling pathways, suggesting a nonredundant role for ZKSCAN1mRNA and circRNA. In conclusion, our results revealed two post-translational products (ZKSCAN1mRNA and circZKSCAN1) that cooperated closely with one another to inhibit growth, migration, and invasion of HCC. cirZKSCAN1 might be a useful marker for the diagnosis of HCC.

  11. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies). Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm) are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull) are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling). Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome). Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser ablation, photodynamic

  12. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome).

    PubMed

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-11-25

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies). Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm) are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull) are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5-10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling). Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome). Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser ablation, photodynamic

  13. Identification of Prognostic Biomarkers for Progression of Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-19

    Carcinoma, Squamous Cell; Carcinoma, Squamous; Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Lung Cancer; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms

  14. TERT promoter mutations are frequent in cutaneous basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Griewank, Klaus G; Murali, Rajmohan; Schilling, Bastian; Schimming, Tobias; Möller, Inga; Moll, Iris; Schwamborn, Marion; Sucker, Antje; Zimmer, Lisa; Schadendorf, Dirk; Hillen, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Activating mutations in the TERT promoter were recently identified in up to 71% of cutaneous melanoma. Subsequent studies found TERT promoter mutations in a wide array of other major human cancers. TERT promoter mutations lead to increased expression of telomerase, which maintains telomere length and genomic stability, thereby allowing cancer cells to continuously divide, avoiding senescence or apoptosis. TERT promoter mutations in cutaneous melanoma often show UV-signatures. Non-melanoma skin cancer, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are very frequent malignancies in individuals of European descent. We investigated the presence of TERT promoter mutations in 32 basal cell carcinomas and 34 cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas using conventional Sanger sequencing. TERT promoter mutations were identified in 18 (56%) basal cell carcinomas and in 17 (50%) cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas. The recurrent mutations identified in our cohort were identical to those previously described in cutaneous melanoma, and showed a UV-signature (C>T or CC>TT) in line with a causative role for UV exposure in these common cutaneous malignancies. Our study shows that TERT promoter mutations with UV-signatures are frequent in non-melanoma skin cancer, being present in around 50% of basal and squamous cell carcinomas and suggests that increased expression of telomerase plays an important role in the pathogenesis of these tumors.

  15. Undifferentiated sinonasal carcinoma in a patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sobota, Amy; Pena, Maria; Santi, Mariarita; Ali Ahmed, Atif

    2007-07-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder characterized by developmental anomalies and occurrence of multiple basal cell carcinomas and other tumors in early childhood. In this article, the authors report a case of a 19-year-old African American male with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome and a history of medulloblastoma at age 2, meningioma at age 14, thyroid follicular adenomas with papillary carcinoma at age 15, and 2 basal cell carcinomas at ages 16 and 18. Recently, he developed sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma (SNUC). The radiology and pathology of the sinonasal carcinoma are presented in this report. Review of the literature reveals that this is the first case of SNUC occurring in a patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

  16. Comprehensive molecular characterization of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    2013-07-04

    Genetic changes underlying clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) include alterations in genes controlling cellular oxygen sensing (for example, VHL) and the maintenance of chromatin states (for example, PBRM1). We surveyed more than 400 tumours using different genomic platforms and identified 19 significantly mutated genes. The PI(3)K/AKT pathway was recurrently mutated, suggesting this pathway as a potential therapeutic target. Widespread DNA hypomethylation was associated with mutation of the H3K36 methyltransferase SETD2, and integrative analysis suggested that mutations involving the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex (PBRM1, ARID1A, SMARCA4) could have far-reaching effects on other pathways. Aggressive cancers demonstrated evidence of a metabolic shift, involving downregulation of genes involved in the TCA cycle, decreased AMPK and PTEN protein levels, upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glutamine transporter genes, increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase protein, and altered promoter methylation of miR-21 (also known as MIR21) and GRB10. Remodelling cellular metabolism thus constitutes a recurrent pattern in ccRCC that correlates with tumour stage and severity and offers new views on the opportunities for disease treatment.

  17. COMPREHENSIVE MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF CLEAR CELL RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Genetic changes underlying clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) include alterations in genes controlling cellular oxygen sensing (e.g. VHL) and the maintenance of chromatin states (e.g. PBRM1). We surveyed more than 400 tumors using different genomic platforms and identified 19 significantly mutated genes. The PI3K/Akt pathway was recurrently mutated, suggesting this pathway as a potential therapeutic target. Widespread DNA hypomethylation was associated with mutation of the H3K36 methyltransferase SETD2, and integrative analysis suggested that mutations involving the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex (PBRM1, ARID1A, SMARCA4) could have far-reaching effects on other pathways. Aggressive cancers demonstrated evidence of a metabolic shift, involving down-regulation of genes involved in the TCA cycle, decreased AMPK and PTEN protein levels, up-regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glutamine transporter genes, increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase protein, and altered promoter methylation of miR-21 and GRB10. Remodeling cellular metabolism thus constitutes a recurrent pattern in ccRCC that correlates with tumor stage and severity and offers new views on the opportunities for disease treatment. PMID:23792563

  18. Wnt Signaling in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Krause, Mirja; Samoylenko, Anatoly; Vainio, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 90% of all kidney cancers. Due to poor diagnosis, high resistance to the systemic therapies and the fact that most RCC cases occur sporadically, current research switched its focus on studying the molecular mechanisms underlying RCC. The aim is the discovery of new effective and less toxic anti-cancer drugs and novel diagnostic markers. Besides the PI3K/Akt/mTOR, HGF/Met and VHL/hypoxia cellular signaling pathways, the involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in RCC is commonly studied. Wnt signaling and its targeted genes are known to actively participate in different biological processes during embryonic development and renal cancer. Recently, studies have shown that targeting this pathway by alternating/inhibiting its intracellular signal transduction can reduce cancer cells viability and inhibit their growth. The targets and drugs identified show promising potential to serve as novel RCC therapeutics and prognostic markers. This review aims to summarize the current status quo regarding recent research on RCC focusing on the involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and how its understanding could facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic targets, new drugs and diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:27322325

  19. Effects of a KiSS-1 peptide, a metastasis suppressor gene, on the invasive ability of renal cell carcinoma cells through a modulation of a matrix metalloproteinase 2 expression.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Kunihiko; Ohno, Yoshio; Horiguchi, Yutaka; Ozu, Choichiro; Namiki, Kazunori; Tachibana, Masaaki

    2008-08-29

    Although effects of a metastasis suppressor gene, KiSS-1, have been postulated to be mediated by its receptor, hOT7T175, the mechanism of such effects remains unknown. This study was designed to evaluate the mechanism of how KiSS-1 works and to assess effects of a synthesized truncated KiSS-1 protein on the invasive ability of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. Four RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KU19-20, RSP and RSM, were investigated to determine mRNA expressions of KiSS-1, its receptor, hOT7T175, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and MMP inhibitors. While all cell lines demonstrated hOT7T175 mRNA expressions, only Caki-1 had KiSS-1 transcripts. A synthesized truncated KiSS-1 peptide, metastin (45-54), produced a marked suppression of the invasive ability in KU19-20 cells, which were deficient for KiSS-1 transcripts, but not in Caki-1 cells. Metastin (45-54) also increased the ability of KU19-20 cells to attach to collagen 4. Both MMP-2 mRNA levels and protein production were significantly decreased only in KU19-20 cells by metastin (45-54). In conclusion, metastin (45-54) may have potential therapeutic use by suppressing the motility and invasive ability of RCC cells which possess hOT7T175 with either a negative expression or very low expression level of KiSS-1 through, at least in part, the down-regulation of MMP-2.

  20. New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Esfandiary, Ali; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2015-01-01

    New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma 1 (NY-ESO-1) is a known cancer testis gene with exceptional immunogenicity and prevalent expression in many cancer types. These characteristics have made it an appropriate vaccine candidate with the potential application against various malignancies. This article reviews recent knowledge about the NY-ESO-1 biology, function, immunogenicity and expression in cancers as well as and the results of clinical trials with this antigen.

  1. Quantitative expression of the homeobox and integrin genes in human gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rossi Degl'Innocenti, Duccio; Castiglione, Francesca; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Bechi, Paolo; Taddei, Gian Luigi; Freschi, Giancarlo; Taddei, Antonio

    2007-10-01

    The homeobox (HOX) genes are a large family of regulator genes involved in the control of developmental processes and cell differentiation. The HOX genes encode transcription factors, and an increasing number of studies have shown that these genes may be implicated in the growth and the progression of many types of tumours. The present study investigated the expression of the HOX and integrin genes and their relationships in gastric carcinoma. We analyzed the RNA expression of 13 HOX genes from HOXA, C and D clusters and alphaV, alpha5 and alpha8 integrin genes in 24 gastric cancer samples by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the HOXA2 gene and the alpha8 integrin gene had a lower expression in tumour samples than in normal gastric mucosas. The comparison between the HOX and integrin genes showed that HOXA2 and alphaV integrin expression presented the same trend in 83% of the samples. Moreover, in cancer samples that expressed the HOXD11 gene, the expression of alphaV integrin was lower with respect to normal mucosas. The different roles of HOX and integrin genes in gastric carcinoma remain to be fully elucidated. These findings suggest that the HOX genes may play a critical role in the genesis, maintenance and diffusion of gastric carcinoma.

  2. Basal cell carcinoma of the nail unit.

    PubMed

    Forman, Seth B; Ferringer, Tammie C; Garrett, Algin B

    2007-05-01

    We report a case of a 70-year-old white male with a basal cell carcinoma of the left thumb nail unit. Excision of the tumor via Mohs micrographic surgery was completed in 2 stages. The defect was repaired with a full thickness skin graft. Five months later the nail unit healed without complications. Prior to this report, 21 cases of basal cell carcinoma have been reported in the world literature. This case, as well as the prior reports, are reviewed with a focus on time to diagnosis, location, excisional technique, and method of repair.

  3. High prevalence of mutations of the p53 gene in poorly differentiated human thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Fagin, J A; Matsuo, K; Karmakar, A; Chen, D L; Tang, S H; Koeffler, H P

    1993-01-01

    The development and progression of thyroid tumors is signaled by phenotype-specific mutations of genes involved in growth control. Molecular events associated with undifferentiated thyroid cancer are not known. We examined normal, benign, and malignant thyroid tissue for structural abnormalities of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphisms of PCR-amplified DNA, using primers bracketing the known hot spots on either exons 5, 6, 7, or 8. The prevalence of mutations was as follows: normal thyroid 0/6; follicular adenomas 0/31; papillary carcinomas 0/37; medullary carcinomas 0/2; follicular carcinomas 1/11; anaplastic carcinomas 5/6; thyroid carcinoma cell lines 3/4. Positive cases were confirmed by direct sequencing of the PCR products. All five anaplastic carcinoma tissues and the anaplastic carcinoma cell line ARO had G:C to A:T transitions leading to an Arg to His substitution at codon 273. In both tumors and cell lines, examples of heterozygous and homozygous p53 mutations were identified. The only thyroid carcinoma cell line in which p53 mutations were not detected in exons 5-8 had markedly decreased p53 mRNA levels, suggesting the presence of a structural abnormality of either p53 itself or of some factor controlling its expression. The presence of p53 mutations almost exclusively in poorly differentiated thyroid tumors and thyroid cancer cell lines suggests that inactivation of p53 may confer these neoplasms with aggressive properties, and further loss of differentiated function. Images PMID:8423216

  4. Selective transgene expression for detection and elimination of contaminating carcinoma cells in hematopoietic stem cell sources.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Pulsipher, M; Chen, D; Sieff, C; Elias, A; Fine, H A; Kufe, D W

    1996-01-01

    Tumor contamination of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) may affect the outcome of patients receiving high dose chemotherapy with autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cell products. In this report, we demonstrate that replication defective adenoviral vectors containing the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or DF3/MUC1 carcinoma-selective promoter can be used to selectively transduce contaminating carcinoma cells. Adenoviral-mediated reporter gene expression in breast cancer cells was five orders of magnitude higher than that found in BM, PB, and CD34+ cells. Our results demonstrate that CD34+ cells have low to undetectable levels of integrins responsible for adenoviral internalization. We show that adenoviral-mediated transduction of a reporter gene can detect one breast cancer cell in 5 x 10(5) BM or PB cells with a vector containing the DF3/MUC1 promoter. We also show that transduction of the HSV-tk gene for selective killing by ganciclovir can be exploited for purging cancer cells from hematopoietic stem cell populations. The selective expression of TK followed by ganciclovir treatment resulted in the elimination of 6-logs of contaminating cancer cells. By contrast, there was little effect on CFU-GM and BFU-E formulation or on long term culture initiating cells. These results indicate that adenoviral vectors with a tumor-selective promoter provide a highly efficient and effective approach for the detection and purging of carcinoma cells in hematopoietic stem cell preparations. PMID:8958216

  5. ECRG4 is a candidate tumor suppressor gene frequently hypermethylated in colorectal carcinoma and glioma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancer cells display widespread changes in DNA methylation that may lead to genetic instability by global hypomethylation and aberrant silencing of tumor suppressor genes by focal hypermethylation. In turn, altered DNA methylation patterns have been used to identify putative tumor suppressor genes. Methods In a methylation screening approach, we identified ECRG4 as a differentially methylated gene. We analyzed different cancer cells for ECRG4 promoter methylation by COBRA and bisulfite sequencing. Gene expression analysis was carried out by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The ECRG4 coding region was cloned and transfected into colorectal carcinoma cells. Cell growth was assessed by MTT and BrdU assays. ECRG4 localization was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and Western blotting after transfection of an ECRG4-eGFP fusion gene. Results We found a high frequency of ECRG4 promoter methylation in various cancer cell lines. Remarkably, aberrant methylation of ECRG4 was also found in primary human tumor tissues, including samples from colorectal carcinoma and from malignant gliomas. ECRG4 hypermethylation associated strongly with transcriptional silencing and its expression could be re-activated in vitro by demethylating treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Overexpression of ECRG4 in colorectal carcinoma cells led to a significant decrease in cell growth. In transfected cells, ECRG4 protein was detectable within the Golgi secretion machinery as well as in the culture medium. Conclusions ECRG4 is silenced via promoter hypermethylation in different types of human cancer cells. Its gene product may act as inhibitor of cell proliferation in colorectal carcinoma cells and may play a role as extracellular signaling molecule. PMID:20017917

  6. Analysis of methylation and mRNA expression status ofFADD andFAS genes in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Eshaghali; Jamali, Sara; Rigi-Ladez, Mohammad A.; Augend, Arsalan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Apoptosis is an important mechanism that is responsible for the physiological deletion of harmful, damaged, or unwanted cells. Changed expression of apoptosis-related genes may lead to abnormal cell proliferation and finally to tumorigenesis. Our aims were to analyze the promoter methylation and gene expression profiles of FADD and FAS genes in risk of OSCC. Material and Methods: we analyze the promoter methylation status of FADD and FAS genes using Methylation - Specific PCR (MSP) in 86 OSCC tissues were kept in paraffin and 68 normal oral tissues applied as control. Also, FADD and FAS genes expression were analyzed in 19 cases and 20 normal specimens by Real-Time Reverse-Transcripts PCR. Results: Aberrant promoter methylation of FADD and FAS genes were detected in 12.79 % (11 of 86) and 60.46 % (52 of 86) of the OSCC cases, respectively, with a significant difference between cases and healthy controls for both FADD and FAS genes (P<0.001). The gene expression analysis showed statistically significant difference between cases and healthy controls for both FADD (p<0.02) and FAS (p<0.007) genes. Conclusions: To the best our knowledge, the data of this study are the first report regarding, the effect of promoter hypermethylation of the FADD and FAS genes in development of OSCC. To confirm the data, it is recommended doing further study in large sample sizes in various genetic populations. Key words:OSCC, FADD, FAS, DNA methylation, gene expression. PMID:25129245

  7. Cyclic AMP induces transforming growth factor beta 2 gene expression and growth arrest in the human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3.

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Y J; Kim, S J; Danielpour, D; O'Reilly, M A; Kim, K Y; Myers, C E; Trepel, J B

    1992-01-01

    The standard therapy for advanced prostate cancer is androgen ablation. Despite transitory responses, hormonally treated patients ultimately relapse with androgen-independent disease that is resistant to further hormonal manipulation and cytotoxic chemotherapy. To develop an additional approach to the treatment of advanced prostate cancer, we have been studying the signal transductions controlling the growth of human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell lines. We report here that elevation of intracellular cAMP markedly inhibits the growth of the hormone-refractory cell line PC-3. To examine the mechanism of cAMP action in PC-3 cells, we tested the effect of the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP (Bt2-cAMP) on the regulation of the potent negative growth factor transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). Bt2-cAMP selectively induced the secretion of TGF-beta 2 and not TGF-beta 1 by PC-3 cells. This TGF-beta 2 was shown to be bioactive by using the CCL-64 mink lung cell assay. TGF-beta 1 was not activated despite being present at 3-fold higher concentrations than TGF-beta 2. Northern analysis showed that Bt2-cAMP induced an increase in the five characteristic TGF-beta 2 transcripts and had no effect on the level of TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 3 transcripts. TGF-beta 2 induction was only weakly enhanced by cycloheximide and was completely inhibited by actinomycin D. These data show that Bt2-cAMP induces the expression of active TGF-beta 2 by PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells, suggesting a new approach to the treatment of prostate cancer and a new molecular mechanism of cAMP action. Images PMID:1373503

  8. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas.

  9. A Case of Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the External Auditory Canal Previously Treated for Verrucous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soo Jung; Yang, Chan Joo

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma in the external auditory canal (EAC) is a rare malignancy with an annual incidence of one per one million people, accounting for less than 0.2% of all head and neck cancers. The most common histopathological type of EAC cancer is squamous cell carcinoma. Verrucous carcinoma is a well-differentiated, low-grade variant of squamous cell carcinoma. It is a locally destructive, invasive, and slow growing tumor that rarely metastasizes. Verrucous carcinoma occurs predominantly in the oral cavity and larynx, and its occurrence in the EAC is extremely rare. In this report, we present a histologically confirmed case of verrucous carcinoma in the EAC and temporal bone, which for several years had been classified as epithelial hyperplasia. Two-and-a-half years after diagnosis of verrucous carcinoma, a recurrent mass was found and the lesion was then confirmed to be squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27942606

  10. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) is an autosomal-dominant hereditary syndrome, which is caused by germline mutations in the FH gene that encodes the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme fumarate hydratase (FH). HLRCC patients are predisposed to develop cutaneous leiomyomas, multiple, symptomatic uterine fibroids in young women resulting in early hysterectomies, and early onset renal tumors with a type 2 papillary morphology that can progress and metastasize, even when small. Since HLRCC-associated renal tumors can be more aggressive than renal tumors in other hereditary renal cancer syndromes, caution is warranted, and surgical intervention is recommended rather than active surveillance. At-risk members of an HLRCC family who test positive for the familial germline FH mutation should undergo surveillance by annual magnetic resonance imaging from the age of 8 years. Biochemical studies have shown that FH-deficient kidney cancer is characterized by a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis. It is hoped that through ongoing clinical trials evaluating targeted molecular therapies, an effective form of treatment for HLRCC-associated kidney cancer will be developed that will offer an improved prognosis for individuals affected with HLRCC-associated kidney cancer. PMID:25018647

  11. Presumed choroidal metastasis of Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Small, K.W.; Rosenwasser, G.O.; Alexander, E. III; Rossitch, G.; Dutton, J.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare skin tumor of neural crest origin and is part of the amine precursor uptake and decarboxylase system. It typically occurs on the face of elderly people. Distant metastasis is almost uniformly fatal. Choroidal metastasis, to our knowledge, has not been described. We report a patient with Merkel cell carcinoma who had a synchronous solid choroidal tumor and a biopsy-proven brain metastasis. Our 56-year-old patient presented with a rapidly growing, violaceous preauricular skin tumor. Computed tomography of the head disclosed incidental brain and choroidal tumors. Light and electron microscopy of biopsy specimens of both the skin and the brain lesions showed Merkel cell carcinoma. Ophthalmoscopy, fluorescein angiography, and A and B echography revealed a solid choroidal mass. The brain and skin tumors responded well to irradiation. A radioactive episcleral plaque was applied subsequently to the choroidal tumor. All tumors regressed, and the patient was doing well 28 months later. To our knowledge this is the first case of presumed choroidal metastasis of Merkel cell carcinoma.

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in a meningomyelocele.

    PubMed Central

    Saksun, J. M.; Fisher, B. K.

    1978-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma developed in the meningomyelocele of a 25-year-old man. This is the third such case reported. The possibility of malignant disease arising in this congenital defect must be taken into account when treatment is being considered. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:709475

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma associated with lupus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Gooptu, C; Marks, N; Thomas, J; James, M P

    1998-05-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas are known to arise in certain chronic, scarring dermatoses and also to be associated with exposure to ultraviolet radiation. We now report a case arising in a plaque of lupus vulgaris, the patient having received radiation from a Finsen lamp as a child for a tuberculous abscess in that region.

  14. Identification of TRPC6 as a possible candidate target gene within an amplicon at 11q21-q22.2 for migratory capacity in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytogenetic and gene expression analyses in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) have allowed identification of genomic aberrations that may contribute to cancer pathophysiology. Nevertheless, the molecular consequences of numerous genetic alterations still remain unclear. Methods To identify novel genes implicated in HNSCC pathogenesis, we analyzed the genomic alterations present in five HNSCC-derived cell lines by array CGH, and compared high level focal gene amplifications with gene expression levels to identify genes whose expression is directly impacted by these genetic events. Next, we knocked down TRPC6, one of the most highly amplified and over-expressed genes, to characterize the biological roles of TRPC6 in carcinogenesis. Finally, real time PCR was performed to determine TRPC6 gene dosage and mRNA levels in normal mucosa and human HNSCC tissues. Results The data showed that the HNSCC-derived cell lines carry most of the recurrent genomic abnormalities previously described in primary tumors. High-level genomic amplifications were found at four chromosomal sites (11q21-q22.2, 18p11.31-p11.21, 19p13.2-p13.13, and 21q11) with associated gene expression changes in selective candidate genes suggesting that they may play an important role in the malignant behavior of HNSCC. One of the most dramatic alterations of gene transcription involved the TRPC6 gene (located at 11q21-q22.2) which has been recently implicated in tumour invasiveness. siRNA-induced knockdown of TRPC6 expression in HNSCC-derived cells dramatically inhibited HNSCC-cell invasion but did not significantly alter cell proliferation. Importantly, amplification and concomitant overexpression of TRPC6 was also found in HNSCC tumour samples. Conclusions Altogether, these data show that TRPC6 is likely to be a target for 11q21–22.2 amplification that confers enhanced invasive behavior to HNSCC cells. Therefore, TRPC6 may be a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of HNSCC

  15. Urothelial carcinoma: Stem cells on the edge

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, William D.; Matsui, William; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; He, Xiaobing; Ling, Shizhang; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2010-01-01

    Tumors are heterogeneous collections of cells with highly variable abilities to survive, grow, and metastasize. This variability likely stems from epigenetic and genetic influences, either stochastic or hardwired by cell type-specific lineage programs. That differentiation underlies tumor cell heterogeneity was elegantly demonstrated in hematopoietic tumors, in which rare primitive cells (cancer stem cells (CSCs)) resembling normal hematopoietic stem cells are ultimately responsible for tumor growth and viability. Because of the compelling clinical implications CSCs pose—across the entire spectrum of cancers—investigators applied the CSC model to cancers arising in tissues with crudely understood differentiation programs. Instead of relying on differentiation, these studies used empirically selected markers and statistical arguments to identify CSCs. The empirical approach has stimulated important questions about “stemness” in cancer cells as well as the validity and stoichiometry of CSC assays. The recent identification of urothelial differentiation programs in urothelial carcinomas (UroCas) supports the idea that solid epithelial cancers (carcinomas) develop and differentiate analogously to normal epithelia and provides new insights about the spatial localization and molecular makeup of carcinoma CSCs. Importantly, CSCs from invasive UroCas (UroCSCs) appear well situated to exchange important signals with adjacent stroma, to escape immune surveillance, and to survive cytotoxic therapy. These signals have potential roles in treatment resistance and many participate in druggable cellular pathways. In this review, we discuss the implications of these findings in understanding CSCs and in better understanding how UroCas form, progress, and should be treated. PMID:20012172

  16. A Case of Acantholytic Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Yeon; Do, Mi Ok; Kim, Seong Hyun; Hahm, Jeong Hee

    2008-01-01

    Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma is a well-defined variant of squamous cell cancer in which significant portions of the neoplastic proliferation show a pseudoglandular or tubular microscopic pattern. It usually presents as a nodule with various colors, and it is accompanied by scaling, crusting, and ulceration on the sun-exposed areas of older aged individuals. Histologically, the tumor consists of a nodular, epidermal-derived proliferation that forms island-like structures. At least focally or sometimes extensively, the tumor cells shows a loss of cohesion within the central gland-like or tubular spaces. This tumor resembles the structure of eccrine neoplasms, but it is negative for dPAS, CEA and mucicarmine and it is only positive for EMA and cytokeratins. Herein we report a case of acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma that occurred on the face of an 82-year-old woman. PMID:27303210

  17. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma, renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor, and renal cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma relationship of 3 types of renal tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Hes, Ondrej; Compérat, Eva Maria; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor has been described in 2000, followed by description of clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma in 2006. Discussions about possible relationship of both tumors were published since their description. The main differential diagnostic feature was considered presence/absence of fibroleiomyomatous stroma-relationship of renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor in stroma-rich tumors. However, it was shown that stroma is reactive and nonneoplastic by its nature and that all other histologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular-genetic features of both entities are identical. In upcoming World Health Organization classification of renal tumors (2016), both lesions are considered as a single entity (clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma [CCPRCC]). Most published cases followed the benign/indolent clinical course. In addition, most tumors has normal status of VHL gene (methylation, LOH 3p, mutations); however, CCPRCC was referred in patients with VHL syndrome. Another issue covered by this review is possible relationship of CCPRCC and "renal cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma" (RCCLS). Renal cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma shows clear cell cytology and abundant leiomyomatous stroma. Some of RCCLS are positive for cytokeratin 7; some are negative. Similar situation exists for relation of RCCLS and VHL gene abnormalities. It is so far unclear whether any relation between CCPRCC and RCCLS exists. From all published studies, it seems that these tumors are less likely related to each other.

  18. Hsp90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Receiving Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  19. Protease-activated receptor 2 modulates proliferation and invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Eryani, Kamal; Cheng, Jun; Abé, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Babkair, Hamzah; Essa, Ahmed; Saku, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Based on our previous finding that protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) regulates hemophagocytosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells, which induces their heme oxygenase 1-dependent keratinization, we have formulated a hypothesis that PAR-2 functions in wider activities of SCC cells. To confirm this hypothesis, we investigated immunohistochemical profiles of PAR-2 in oral SCC tissues and its functional roles in cell proliferation and invasion in SCC cells in culture. The PAR-2 expression modes were determined in 48 surgical tissue specimens of oral SCC. Using oral SCC-derived cell systems, we determined both gene and protein expression levels of PAR-2. SCC cell proliferation and invasive properties were also examined in conditions in which PAR-2 was activated by the synthetic peptide SLIGRL. PAR-2 was immunolocalized in oral SCC and carcinoma in situ cells, especially in those on the periphery of carcinoma cell foci (100% of cases), but not in normal oral epithelia. Its expression at both gene and protein levels was confirmed in 3 oral SCC cell lines including ZK-1. Activation of PAR-2 induced ZK-1 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. PAR-2-activated ZK-1 cells invaded faster than nonactivated ones. The expression of PAR-2 is specific to oral malignancies, and PAR-2 regulates the growth and invasion of oral SCC cells.

  20. Laryngeal Dysplasia, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, and Variants.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lester D R

    2017-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a malignant epithelial tumor showing evidence of squamous differentiation. It is the most common malignancy of the larynx, with several variants (verrucous, exophytic or papillary, spindle-cell, basaloid, acantholytic, adenosquamous) recognized, with well-established precursor lesions. Dysplasia is now separated into only low-grade and high-grade categories. Each SCC variant has unique cytomorphologic features and histologic differential diagnoses that are important to consider, as management and outcomes are different.

  1. [Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the breast: rare form carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Maksimović, Sinisa

    2009-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare form of breast carcinoma. Incidence is reported to be 0.1-3.6%. We report a case of a young woman, 37-year-old, with history of a lump in the upper outer quadrant of the left breast with ulceration of the skin surface. Menarche occurred at age of 12. The patient was married, had two deliveries and had her first child at age of 26. She did not use contraceptive pills. Diagnosis of the tumour of the breast was made at the Department of surgery in General Hospital in Bijeljina in September 2007. Clinical examination, mammography and ultrasonography were performed. Physical examination revealed a circumscribed and firm mass measuring 60 x 60 x 80 mm. Mammogram showed a round, high-density mass with almost regular but partially irregular margin. Ultrasonogram of the left breast tumor identified an irregularly shaped hypoechoic lesion. After clinical staging of the disease, we performed incision biopsy of the skin and tumour of the left breast with histopathology examination (standard hematoxylin and eosin). Patient had estrogen and progesteron receptors negative and was HER2/neu negative. After histopathology, patient's case was presented to the working group for breast tumors which decided to start with the neoadjuvant chemotherapy using platinum. After six cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, regression of breast tumor was confirmed. Working group decided that radical mastectomy of left breast should be performed.

  2. Somatic Activation of rasK Gene in a Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feig, L. A.; Bast, R. C.; Knapp, R. C.; Cooper, G. M.

    1984-02-01

    A tumor isolate from a patient with serous cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary contained an activated rasK gene detected by transfection of NIH/3T3 cells. In contrast, DNA from normal cells of the same patient lacked transforming activity, indicating that activation of this transforming gene was the consequence of somatic mutation in the neoplastic cells. The transforming gene product displayed an electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels that differed from the mobilities of rasK transforming proteins in other tumors, indicating that a previously undescribed mutation was responsible for activation of rasK in this ovarian carcinoma.

  3. Are primary renal cell carcinoma and metastases of renal cell carcinoma the same cancer?

    PubMed

    Semeniuk-Wojtaś, Aleksandra; Stec, Rafał; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a process consisting of cells spreading from the primary site of the cancer to distant parts of the body. Our understanding of this spread is limited and molecular mechanisms causing particular characteristics of metastasis are still unknown. There is some evidence that primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and metastases of RCC exhibit molecular differences that may effect on the biological characteristics of the tumor. Some authors have detected differences in clear cell and nonclear cell component between these 2 groups of tumors. Investigators have also determined that primary RCC and metastases of RCC diverge in their range of renal-specific markers and other protein expression, gene expression pattern, and microRNA expression. There are also certain proteins that are variously expressed in primary RCCs and their metastases and have effect on clinical outcome, e.g., endothelin receptor type B, phos-S6, and CD44. However, further studies are needed on large cohorts of patients to identify differences representing promising targets for prognostic purposes predicting disease-free survival and the metastatic burden of a patient as well as their suitability as potential therapeutic targets. To sum up, in this review we have attempted to summarize studies connected with differences between primary RCC and its metastases and their influence on the biological characteristics of renal cancer.

  4. ShRNA-mediated silencing of the ubiquitin-specific protease 22 gene restrained cell progression and affected the Akt pathway in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Ya-Jing; Liao, Zhi-Wei; Yu, Hong-wei; Song, Xian-Lu; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Xing-Yuan; Lin, Xiao-dan; Zhou, Tong-Chong

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin-specific protease 22 (USP22) is closely related with poor prognosis of cancer patients. However, the role of USP22 expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has not been determined. The main aim of this study was to determine the role of USP22 in the pathologic processes of NPC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blot (WB), and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to measure the expression of USP22 in cell lines and tissues of NPC in comparison with expression in non-cancerous cells and tissues. USP22-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to knock down USP22 expression in the NPC cell line CNE-1 and CNE-2. Furthermore, the impact of USP22 in cellular proliferation, growth, and cell cycle were detected respectively. WB was used to determine the role of USP22 in the AKT/GSK-3/Cyclin signaling pathway. The expression levels of USP22 were remarkably higher in NPC cell lines and tissues. With cell counting and the MTS assay, cellular growth and proliferation progression of USP22 knockdown cell line was shown to be effectively restrained. The USP22 silencing both in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells caused them to accumulate in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. USP22 knockdown was also found to modulate the AKT/GSK-3/Cyclin pathway, resulting in downregulation of p-AKT, p-GSK-3β, and cyclinD1. This study suggests that USP22 plays a critical regulatory role in the pathologic processes of NPC, and that it may be a potential biological treatment target in the future. PMID:25482932

  5. Cisplatin, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  6. Activating E17K mutation in the gene encoding the protein kinase AKT1 in a subset of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Donatella; Scrima, Marianna; De Marco, Carmela; Fabiani, Fernanda; De Rosa, Nicla; De Gisi, Silvia; Malara, Natalia; Savino, Rocco; Rocco, Gaetano; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Franco, Renato; Tirino, Virginia; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Somatic mutation (E17K) that constitutively activates the protein kinase AKT1 has been found in human cancer patients. We determined the role of the E17K mutation of AKT1 in lung cancer, through sequencing of AKT1 exon 4 in 105 resected, clinically annotated non-small cell lung cancer specimens. We detected a missense mutations G-->A transition at nucleotide 49 (that results in the E17K substitution) in two squamous cell carcinoma (2/36) but not in adenocarcinoma (0/53). The activity of the endogenous kinase carrying the E17K mutation immunoprecipitated by tumour tissue was significantly higher compared with the wild-type kinase immunoprecipitated by the adjacent normal tissue as determined both by in vitro kinase assay using a consensus peptide as substrate and by in vivo analysis of the phosphorylation status of AKT1 itself (pT308, pS473) or of known downstream substrates such as GSK3 (pS9/S22) and p27 (T198). Immunostaining or immunoblot analysis on membrane-enriched extracts indicated that the enhanced membrane localization exhibited by the endogenous E17K-AKT1 may account for the observed increased activity of mutant E17K kinase in comparison with the wild-type AKT1 from adjacent normal tissue. In conclusion, this is the first report of AKT1 mutation in lung cancer. Our data provide evidence that, although AKT1 mutations are apparently rare in lung cancer (1.9%), the oncogenic properties of E17K-AKT1 may contribute to the development of a fraction of lung carcinoma with squamous histotype (5.5%).

  7. Real-time observation of micrometastasis formation in the living mouse liver using a green fluorescent protein gene-tagged rat tongue carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Nakanishi, H; Ikehara, Y; Kato, T; Kasai, Y; Ito, K; Akiyama, S; Nakao, A; Tatematsu, M

    2001-07-15

    Initial arrest, attachment, extravasation and subsequent extravascular growth of tumor cells in the secondary organs are believed to be crucial events for hematogenous metastasis, but the actual processes in living animals remain unclear. For the present study, we established green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing rat tongue carcinoma cell lines (RSC3) that permit real-time analysis of micrometastasis formation in combination with intravital video microscopy (IVVM). With this system, GFP-expressing metastatic (LM-EGFP) and non-metastatic (E2-EGFP) cell lines could be visualized at the cellular level in live mice for more than 1 month. Real-time IVVM analysis of liver metastases after intraportal injection of cells via a mesenteric vein revealed that both LM-EGFP and E2-EGFP tumor cells arrest similarly in sinusoidal vessels near terminal portal venules within 0.4 sec, during which time no evidence of a "rolling"-like movement along endothelial cell surfaces was observed. Quantitative analysis of GFP-positive foci showed that E2-EGFP cells were completely sheared from the liver sinusoid within 3 days, with no solitary dormant cells, whereas a substantial number of LM-EGFP cells remained in the liver, probably due to stable attachment to the sinusoidal wall. Confocal laser scanning microscopic study in combination with laminin immunohistochemistry revealed that only LM-EGFP cells started growth at 3 to 4 days after inoculation and that most of the growing foci were surrounded by subsinusoidal basement membrane. Our results suggest that micrometastasis formation by LM-EGFP cells consists of initial tumor cell arrest due to size constraints of the vessel, stable attachment to subsinusoidal basement membrane and subsequent intravascular growth before extravasation. The difference in metastatic potential between the 2 lines may reside in their capacity to attach stably to the vessel wall rather than their potential for initial cell arrest or subsequent growth. The

  8. Oncogenic RAS alters the global and gene-specific histone modification pattern during epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Ignacio Mazón; Kalogeropoulou, Margarita; Ferraro, Angelo; Voulgari, Angeliki; Pankotai, Tibor; Boros, Imre; Pintzas, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    The presence of different forms of histone covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation in localized promoter regions are markers for chromatin packing and transcription. Activation of RAS signalling pathways through oncogenic RAS mutations is a hallmark of colorectal cancer. Overexpression of Harvey-Ras oncogene induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in Caco-2 cells. We focused on the role of epigenetic modifications of histone H3 and its dependence on RAS signal transduction pathways and oncogenic transformation. Using cell lines stably overexpressing oncogenic Harvey-RAS with EMT phenotype, we studied the acquired changes in the H3 histone modification patterns. Two genes show inverse protein expression patterns after Ha-RAS overexpression: Cyclin D1, a cell cycle-related gene, and the EMT marker-gene E-cadherin. We report that these two genes demonstrate matching inverse histone repression patterns on their promoter, while histone markers associated with an active state of genes were affected by the RAS-activated signalling pathway MEK-ERK-MSK1. Furthermore, we show that though the level of methyltransferases enzymes was increased, the status of H3 three-methylation at lysine 27 (H3K27me(3)), associated with gene repression on the promoter of Cyclin D1, was lower. Together, these results suggest that histone covalent modifications can be affected by oncogenic RAS pathways to regulate the expression of target genes like Cyclin D1 or E-cadherin and that the dynamic balance of opposing histone-modifying enzymes is critical for the regulation of cell proliferation.

  9. Genomics and epigenomics of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maher, Eamonn R

    2013-02-01

    Kidney cancer accounts for about 2% of all cancers and worldwide >250,000 new cases of kidney cancer are diagnosed each year. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common form of adult kidney cancer and this review describes our current knowledge of the genetic and epigenetic basis of sporadic RCC. Though to date major advances in understanding the underlying the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have often been derived from studies of rare familial forms of renal cell carcinoma, large-scale genomic and epigenomic studies of sporadic tumours are beginning to provide clearer pictures of the genomic and epigenomic landscape of RCC and the key pathways implicated in the initiation and progression of the disease. Although current knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of RCC is incomplete, and mostly relates to clear cell (conventional) RCC, the next five years will see an unprecedented flood of genomic and epigenomic data and the key future challenges will relate to the utilisation of this data to develop novel genetic and epigenetic markers for diagnosis and prognosis and to develop novel targeted therapies in order to enable an age of personalised medicine.

  10. Cell survival curve for primary hepatic carcinoma cells and relationship between SF2 of hepatic carcinoma cells and radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Zhong; Huang, Wen-Ying; Lin, Ju-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Sheng; Lan, Xiao; Cai, Xiao-Kun; Liang, Kuo-Huan; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish the cell survival curve for primary hepatic carcinoma cells and to study the relationship between SF2 of primary hepatic carcinoma cells and radiosensitivity. METHODS: Hepatic carcinoma cells were cultured in vitro using 39 samples of hepatic carcinoma at stages II-IV. Twenty-nine samples were cultured successfully in the fifth generation cells. After these cells were radiated with different dosages, the cell survival ratio and SF2 were calculated by clonogenic assay and SF2 model respectively. The relationship between SF2 and the clinical pathological feature was analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty-nine of thirty-nine samples were successfully cultured. After X-ray radiation of the fifth generation cells with 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 Gy, the cell survival rate was 41%, 36.5%, 31.0%, 26.8%, and 19%, respectively. There was a negative correlation between cell survival and irradiation dosage (r = -0.973, P<0.05). SF2 ranged 0.28-0.78 and correlated with the clinical stage and pathological grade of hepatic carcinoma (P<0.05). There was a positive correlation between SF2 and D0.5 (r = 0.773, P<0.05). CONCLUSION: SF2 correlates with the clinical stage and pathological grade of hepatic carcinoma and is a marker for predicting the radiosensitivity of hepatic carcinomas. PMID:16437614

  11. The role of miR-21 in proliferation and invasion capacity of human tongue squamous cell carcinoma in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Zhu, Yu; Lv, Pin; Li, Longjiang

    2015-01-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common cancers, which has the highest incidence in oral maxillofacial malignant tumors. MiR-21 may promote tumorigeness by down-regulating tumor suppressing genes and/or controlling the genes for cell differentiation and apoptosis, and it has been identified as the most expressive and unusual in a number of profiling experiments. The study shows there are high expressions of miR-21 in tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (Tca8113 and its high metastatic lines), especially in high metastatic lines. miR-21 silencing could suppress the capacity of proliferation, migration and invasion, arrest the cell cycle and induce apoptosis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (Tca8113 and its high metastatic lines). All the results indicate that miR-21 will probably open a new path to the gene therapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26191145

  12. Promoter region hypermethylation and mRNA expression of MGMT and p16 genes in tissue and blood samples of human premalignant oral lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Vikram; Goel, Madhu Mati; Makker, Annu; Tewari, Shikha; Yadu, Alka; Shilpi, Priyanka; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, S P; Goel, Sudhir K

    2014-01-01

    Promoter methylation and relative gene expression of O(6)-methyguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) and p16 genes were examined in tissue and blood samples of patients with premalignant oral lesions (PMOLs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methylation-specific PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR were performed in 146 tissue and blood samples from controls and patients with PMOLs and OSCC. In PMOL group, significant promoter methylation of MGMT and p16 genes was observed in 59% (P = 0.0010) and 57% (P = 0.0016) of tissue samples, respectively, and 39% (P = 0.0135) and 33% (P = 0.0074) of blood samples, respectively. Promoter methylation of both genes was more frequent in patients with OSCC, that is, 76% (P = 0.0001) and 82% (P = 0.0001) in tissue and 57% (P = 0.0002) and 70% (P = 0.0001) in blood, respectively. Significant downregulation of MGMT and p16 mRNA expression was observed in both tissue and blood samples from patients with PMOLs and OSCC. Hypermethylation-induced transcriptional silencing of MGMT and p16 genes in both precancer and cancer suggests important role of these changes in progression of premalignant state to malignancy. Results support use of blood as potential surrogate to tissue samples for screening or diagnosing PMOLs and early OSCC.

  13. Promoter Region Hypermethylation and mRNA Expression of MGMT and p16 Genes in Tissue and Blood Samples of Human Premalignant Oral Lesions and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Vikram; Makker, Annu; Tewari, Shikha; Yadu, Alka; Shilpi, Priyanka; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, S. P.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2014-01-01

    Promoter methylation and relative gene expression of O6-methyguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) and p16 genes were examined in tissue and blood samples of patients with premalignant oral lesions (PMOLs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methylation-specific PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR were performed in 146 tissue and blood samples from controls and patients with PMOLs and OSCC. In PMOL group, significant promoter methylation of MGMT and p16 genes was observed in 59% (P = 0.0010) and 57% (P = 0.0016) of tissue samples, respectively, and 39% (P = 0.0135) and 33% (P = 0.0074) of blood samples, respectively. Promoter methylation of both genes was more frequent in patients with OSCC, that is, 76% (P = 0.0001) and 82% (P = 0.0001) in tissue and 57% (P = 0.0002) and 70% (P = 0.0001) in blood, respectively. Significant downregulation of MGMT and p16 mRNA expression was observed in both tissue and blood samples from patients with PMOLs and OSCC. Hypermethylation-induced transcriptional silencing of MGMT and p16 genes in both precancer and cancer suggests important role of these changes in progression of premalignant state to malignancy. Results support use of blood as potential surrogate to tissue samples for screening or diagnosing PMOLs and early OSCC. PMID:24991542

  14. Laryngeal acinic cell carcinoma following thyroid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reibel, J.F.; McLean, W.C.; Cantrell, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Only three examples of acinic cell carcinoma of the larynx or trachea are found in the recent literature. A case of acinic cell carcinoma of the subglottic larynx and trachea was diagnosed and treated at the University of Virginia Medical Center. To our knowledge this is the first such case with a prior history of radiation to the neck. The patient is a 56-year-old woman who was irradiated for hyperthyroidism 46 years ago. When seen she also had parathyroid hyperplasia and multiple thyroid adenomas, conditions that frequently follow irradiation of the thyroid in children. These findings in this case support the concept that radiation may be responsible for inducing this tumor, which otherwise rarely occurs in this location. The use of electron microscopy was extremely useful in the diagnosis of this tumor. She was treated with total laryngectomy and right neck dissection and is now free of disease one year after surgery.

  15. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma with 'monster' cells: a mimic of pleomorphic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Defty, Clare L; Segen, Joseph; Carter, Jonathan J; Ahmed, Imtiaz; Carr, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    Pleomorphic giant or 'monster' cells represent a well-recognized yet uncommon finding associated with basal cell carcinoma (BCC), usually of nodular type. We present a case of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (basaloid SCC) with 'monster' cells that closely mimicked those described in pleomorphic nodular BCC. Clinically, the lesion presented as a fleshy, hyperkeratotic nodule in an 82-year-old woman. Histopathology revealed a basaloid lesion with lobulated borders and focal retraction artifact but a lack of prominent palisading or stromal mucin. There were areas of necrosis and small foci of keratinization. Striking bizarre monstrous pleomorphic nuclei were widely scattered throughout the lesion. Ber-EP4 immunohistochemistry proved to be negative and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) expression was moderate to strong in 70% of the basaloid epithelium. Monster cells have not previously been highlighted in cutaneous SCC or in its uncommon cutaneous basaloid variant. The prognostic significance of monster cells is unknown but, given the relative paucity of keratinization in basaloid SCC, these lesions should probably be regarded as poorly differentiated. We have not previously encountered an SCC that so closely resembles nodular BCC with pleomorphic monster cells and believe that this is the first such report in the literature.

  16. [Squamous cell carcinoma in lupus vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Kimmritz, Jens; Hermes, Barbara; Schewe, Christiane; Haas, Norbert

    2004-02-01

    Lupus vulgaris and carcinoma in lupo have become rare events that take place in the developed countries only under special circumstances. A 53-year-old woman developed such a carcinoma. She suffered from alcoholism, a well known risk factor for tuberculosis. The diagnosis of lupus vulgaris was confirmed by biopsy when an erythematous lesion on her arm that had been present for 25 years enlarged and subsequently ulcerated. Chemotherapy was discontinued because of lack of compliance and the ulcer grew markedly over the following 16 months. Therefore the entire lesion was excised. Histology showed a squamous cell carcinoma within the ulcer. Neither further systemic manifestations of tuberculosis nor metastases of the carcinoma were found. Under continuous combined antituberculous therapy, the patient remained free of symptoms. This case underlines the problems associated with a disease that has been nearly forgotten in the western countries. It also shows that alcoholism is a risk factor for tuberculosis, along with debilitating diseases such as lymphoma and AIDS as well as immunosuppressive therapy.

  17. Gastric metastasis by lung small cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Bella, Camillo Di; Cambareri, Antonino Roberto; Buda, Carmelo Antonio; Corti, Gianluigi; Magri, Filippo; Crippa, Stefano; Baldini, Vittorio

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. We describe a case of gastric metastasis due to primary lung cancer, revealed by an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE). Haematogenous metastases to the stomach are a rare event. To our knowledge, only 55 cases have been described in the international literature. In these patients, the prognosis is very poor. We report herein a case of gastric metastasis by lung small cell carcinoma, with a review of the literature about this rare entity. PMID:16810769

  18. Nursing Management of Advanced Merkel Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Pamela A; Freeman, Morganna L; Russell, Jeffery S

    2016-11-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and lethal skin cancer with few known treatment options. Management of this disease is challenging, and oncology nurses must understand the medical, physical, and psychosocial burden that MCC places on the patient and family caregivers. Patients must navigate a complex medical and insurance network that often fails to support patients with rare cancers. Nurses must advocate for these patients to ensure quality comprehensive cancer care.

  19. [Radiotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Pourel, N

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma has known significant improvements over the past 10 years especially through routine use of PET-CT in the initial work-up and contouring before treatment. Prophylactic cranial irradiation remains a standard of care for locally advanced disease and is a subject of controversy for metastatic disease. A new indication for thoracic radiotherapy may soon arise for metastatic disease, still confirmation studies are ongoing.

  20. Tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney: clinicopathologic analysis of 31 cases of a distinctive rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Amin, Mahul B; MacLennan, Gregory T; Gupta, Ruta; Grignon, David; Paraf, Francois; Vieillefond, Annick; Paner, Gladell P; Stovsky, Mark; Young, Andrew N; Srigley, John R; Cheville, John C

    2009-03-01

    A distinctive tumor described under the terms Bellini duct carcinoma and low-grade collecting duct carcinoma has been referred to by us and others as tubulocystic carcinoma. This renal cell carcinoma subtype is not recognized in the World Health Organization 2004 classification. Herein, we present a detailed study of 31 cases to further characterize this rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma. The tumor occurred in adults (mean age, 54 years) with a strong male predominance (7:1). Grossly, the tumors ranged from 0.7 to 17 cm, and exhibited a spongy or "bubble wrap" appearance reflecting the microscopic presence of variably sized cystically dilated tubules lined by a single layer of epithelium. The lining varied with a cuboidal, flat, and hobnail cell appearance, and the neoplastic cells had abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm and enlarged nuclei with prominent nucleoli. The cysts were closely spaced with an intervening variably fibrotic stroma. Immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural examination showed features of proximal convoluted tubules (Pax 2 immunoreactivity and short microvilli with brush border organization) and distal nephron (kidney-specific cadherin immunoreactivity and cytoplasmic interdigitation). Gene expression profiling showed that tubulocystic carcinoma displayed a unique molecular signature. Twenty-four tumors were stage pT1, 4 stage pT2, and 3 stage pT3. Disease progression (median follow-up of 56 months) occurred in 3 patients; 1 with local recurrence, and 2 with distant metastasis to bone and liver. In light of the distinctive clinicopathologic features and a low but definite metastatic potential, this unique subtype of renal cell carcinoma deserves formal recognition in the contemporary classification of renal neoplasms.

  1. Bilateral ovarian carcinomas differ in the expression of metastasis-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Smebye, Marianne Lislerud; Haugom, Lisbeth; Davidson, Ben; Trope, Claes Göran; Heim, Sverre; Skotheim, Rolf Inge; Micci, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms behind bilaterality of ovarian carcinomas are not fully understood, as the two tumors could possibly represent two primary tumors, a primary tumor and a metastasis, or two metastases. The gene expression profiles from bilateral high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs) and clear cell carcinomas (CCCs) of the ovary were compared to study the association between the tumors of the two sides. A separate analysis of genes from chromosome 19 was also performed, since this chromosome is frequently rearranged in ovarian carcinomas. Tumors from four patients were included (three pairs of HGSC and one pair of CCC). The gene expression was analyzed at the exon level, and bilateral tumors were compared to identify within-pair differences. Gene expression data were also compared with genomic information on the same tumors. Similarities in gene expression were observed between the tumors within each pair, as expected if the two tumors were clonally related. However, certain genes exhibited differences in expression between the two sides, indicating metastasis involvement. Among the most differently expressed genes, one gene was common to all four pairs: Immunoglobulin J. In all HGSC pairs, serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade B (ovalbumin), member 2, serpin family E member 1 and phospholipase A2, group IIA (platelets, synovial fluid) were also among the differentially expressed genes. The specific analysis of chromosome 19 highlighted expression differences in the zinc finger protein 36 gene. These results indicate that bilateral ovarian tumors represent different stages during progression of a single clonal process. Several of the genes observed to be differently expressed are known to be metastasis-related, and are likely to be also involved in spreading from one side to the other in the bilateral cancer cases examined. PMID:28123539

  2. Differential DNA sequence deletions from chromosomes 3, 11, 13, and 17 in squamous-cell carcinoma, large-cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma of the human lung

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, A.; Willey, J.C.; Modali, R.; Sugimura, H.; McDowell, E.M.; Resau, J.; Light, B.; Haugen, A.; Mann, D.L.; Trump, B.F.; Harris, C.C. )

    1989-07-01

    Activation of protooncogens and inactivation of putative tumor suppressor genes are genetic lesions considered to be important in lung carcinogenesis. Fifty-four cases of non-small-cell lung cancer (23 adenocarcinomas, 23 squamous-cell carcinomas, and 8 large-cell carcinomas) were examined for loss of DNA sequences at 13 polymorphic genetic loci. Loss of heterozygosity was seen more frequently in squamous-cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma. The loss of DNA sequences from the short arm of chromosome 17 (D17S1 locus) was detected in 8 of 9 heterozygous cases of squamous-cell carcinoma and in only 2 of 11 heterozygous cases of adenocarcinomas. Loss of DNA sequences from chromosome 3 was seen in 16 of 31 cases where the constitutive DNA was heterozygous-i.e., informative. Loss of heterozygosity at the chromosome 13q locus, D13S3, was seen in 9 of 21 informative cases, and in 2 cases, both adenocarcinomas, duplication of the intact DNA sequences suggested the possibility that mitotic recombination had occurred. Frequent DNA sequence deletions, including those from chromosome 17, in squamous-cell carcinomas may reflect the extensive mutagenic and clastogenic effects of tobacco smoke that may lead to inactivation of putative tumor-suppressor genes.

  3. CT features of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Eelkema, E.A.; Stephens, D.H.; Ward, E.M.; Sheedy, P.F. II

    1984-11-01

    To determine the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas, the CT scans of 27 patients with that disease were reviewed. The pancreatic tumor was identified as a mass in 26 patients (96%) Of the 25 tumors evaluated with contrast enhancement, 20 became partially diffusely hyperdense relative to nearby normal pancreatic tissue. Hepatic metastases were identified in 15 patients (56%), regional lymphadenopathy in 10 (37%), atrophy of the gland proximal to the tumor in six (22%), dilatation of the biliary ducts in five (19%), and dilatation of the pancreatic duct in four (15%). The CT appearances of the nonfunctioning islet cell tumors were compared with those of 100 ordinary (ductal) pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Although the two types of tumors were sometimes indistinguishable, features found to be more characteristic of islet cell carcinoma included a pancreatic mass of unusually large size, calcification within the tumor, and contrast enhancement of either the primary tumor or hepatic metastases. Involvement of the celiac axis or proximal superior mesenteric artery was limited to ductal carcinoma.

  4. Identification of key target genes and pathways in laryngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Du, Jintao; Liu, Jun; Wen, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to screen the key genes associated with laryngeal carcinoma and to investigate the molecular mechanism of laryngeal carcinoma progression. The gene expression profile of GSE10935 [Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) accession number], including 12 specimens from laryngeal papillomas and 12 specimens from normal laryngeal epithelia controls, was downloaded from the GEO database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened in laryngeal papillomas compared with normal controls using Limma package in R language, followed by Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and pathway enrichment analysis. Furthermore, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs was constructed using Cytoscape software and modules were analyzed using MCODE plugin from the PPI network. Furthermore, significant biological pathway regions (sub-pathway) were identified by using iSubpathwayMiner analysis. A total of 67 DEGs were identified, including 27 up-regulated genes and 40 down-regulated genes and they were involved in different GO terms and pathways. PPI network analysis revealed that Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6) domain family member 1 (RASSF1) was a hub protein. The sub-pathway analysis identified 9 significantly enriched sub-pathways, including glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and nitrogen metabolism. Genes such as phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), carbonic anhydrase II (CA2), and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA12) whose node degrees were >10 were identified in the disease risk sub-pathway. Genes in the sub-pathway, such as RASSF1, PGK1, CA2 and CA12 were presumed to serve critical roles in laryngeal carcinoma. The present study identified DEGs and their sub-pathways in the disease, which may serve as potential targets for treatment of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:27446427

  5. A pro-apoptotic 15-kDa protein from Bacopa monnieri activates caspase-3 and downregulates Bcl-2 gene expression in mouse mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, Manjula Ishwara; Lingaraju, Sheela Mysore; Salimath, Bharathi P

    2013-01-01

    In diseases such as cancer, induction of apoptosis has been a new target for mechanism-based drug discovery. The central component of the process of apoptosis is a proteolytic system involving a family of proteases called caspases. Apoptosis involves characteristic morphological and biochemical events ultimately leading to cell demise. Apoptotic induction is evidently central to the mechanism of action of plant-derived anticancer drugs. Extract of the medicinal plant, Bacopa monnieri, inhibits tumor cell proliferation and accumulation of malignant ascites fluid. The crude sample when subjected to Soxhlet extraction yielded different solvent extracts of which the aqueous extract showed biological activity of apoptosis in Ehrlich ascites tumor cell lines (EAT). Bacopa monnieri water extract (BMWE) treatment of EAT cells produced apoptotic morphological characteristics and in-vivo DNA fragmentation, which is due to the activity of an endogenous endonuclease. The endonuclease responsible for DNA fragmentation acts downstream of caspase-3 activity and is also referred to as caspase-activated DNase (CAD). The CAD constitutively expressed in the cell cytoplasm is translocated into the nucleus upon BMWE treatment, as verified by Western blotting, leading to DNA fragmentation and to programmed cell death. The expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Bax was increased and the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 was decreased by BMWE treatment. Considering the above results, BMWE was able induce apoptosis in EAT cells via Bax-related caspase-3 activation. This may provide experimental data for the further clinical use of BMWE in cancer.

  6. Case Report: Multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Jose Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    A multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma in a 68-year-old man is reported. Four different peripheral tumor nodules were identified on gross examination. A fifth central tumor corresponded to a conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that has been very recently characterized as a distinct histotype within the spectrum of papillary renal cell carcinoma. Immunostaining with cyclin D1 seems to be specific of this tumor subtype. This is the first reported case with multifocal presentation. PMID:27158455

  7. Anogenital squamous cell carcinoma in neglected patient.

    PubMed

    Svecova, D; Havrankova, M; Weismanova, E; Babal, P

    2012-01-01

    Skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) are arguably the second most common carcinoma of the skin and are responsible for the majority of non-melanoma skin cancer deaths. Gynecologist treated a Caucasian 56-years old female patient for genital wart with podophyllotoxin cream. She did not achieve complete response and therefore she has interrupted the therapy and the collaboration with the gynecologist. At the time of evaluation the lesion had a size of man's palm in anogenital region and showed characteristic features of neoplasm. The regional lymph nodes have produced infiltrated painful bubo. PCR analysis for HPV proved negative. Histopathology revealed well-differentiated squamous cell keratinizing carcinoma from the tumor as well as from the regional lymph node packet. Staging computed tomography scans proved negative and pelvis scans disclosed regional lymphadenopathy underlying the tumor. Palliative radiation therapy (by linear accelerator) was administered for the oversized tumor to the total TD 50.0Gy. The patient died 6 months after diagnostic assessment from cardio-respiratory failure. Staging computed tomography before her death did not disclose distinct metastases in her inner organs. Well-differentiated squamous cell keratinizing carcinoma could be growing endophytically affecting the underlying adipose tissue and musculature, with spreading into the regional lymph nodes. The rate of metastases into inner organs seems to vary according to the aggressiveness and metastatic behavior of each SCC. The case report calls for attention to the importance of collaboration among various specialists assisting in the diagnosis and management of skin neoplasm (Fig. 5, Ref. 12). Full Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  8. Isolation (from a basal cell carcinoma) of a functionally distinct fibroblast-like cell type that overexpresses Ptch.

    PubMed

    Dicker, Anthony J; Serewko, Magdalena M; Russell, Terry; Rothnagel, Joseph A; Strutton, Geoff M; Dahler, Alison L; Saunders, Nicholas A

    2002-05-01

    In this study we report on the isolation and characterization of a nonepithelial, nontumorigenic cell type (BCC1) derived from a basal cell carcinoma from a patient. The BCC1 cells share many characteristics with dermal fibroblasts, such as the expression of vimentin, lack of expression of cytokeratins, and insensitivity to agents that cause growth inhibition and differentiation of epithelial cells; however, significant differences between BCC1 cells and fibroblasts also exist. For example, BCC1 cells are stimulated to undergo DNA synthesis in response to interferon-gamma, whereas dermal fibroblasts are not. More over, BCC1 cells overexpress the basal cell carcinoma-specific genes ptch and ptch2. These data indicate that basal cell carcinomas are associated with a functionally distinct population of fibroblast-like cells that overexpress known tumor-specific markers (ptch and ptch2).

  9. Secretory Carcinoma of the Skin Harboring ETV6 Gene Fusions: A Cutaneous Analogue to Secretory Carcinomas of the Breast and Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Taube, Janis M; Su, Albert; Binder, Scott W; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Michal, Michal; Westra, William H

    2017-01-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma is a low-grade salivary gland carcinoma that exhibits analogous features to secretory carcinoma of the breast including the presence of a t(12;15) translocation resulting in the ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion. Rare cases of purported secretory carcinoma of the skin adnexa have been reported, but their relationship to true secretory carcinoma of the breast and salivary glands is unclear, as they generally do not harbor ETV6 rearrangements. Cases of cutaneous neoplasms with histologic features identical to secretory carcinoma of the breast and salivary glands were identified from the consultation files of 3 academic medical institutions. Immunohistochemistry was performed for S100 protein, mammaglobin and STAT5a. Break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization was used evaluate for disruption of the ETV6 gene. Six cases of cutaneous secretory carcinoma were identified. The tumors arose in 4 women and 2 men, ranging from 24 to 71 years in age (mean, 47 y). The carcinomas presented in the skin of the axilla (n=4), ventral neck (n=1), and cheek (n=1). The tumors arose in the superficial dermis in association with adnexal structures. None of the patients had a prior or concurrent breast or salivary gland tumor. They were histologically characterized by well-circumscribed but unencapsulated proliferations of bland, eosinophilic cells arranged in microcysts and follicles with intraluminal secretions. Ectopic breast or salivary gland tissue was not identified. The cases were diffusely positive for S100 protein (6 of 6), mammaglobin (6 of 6), and STAT5a (5 of 5). All 6 cases harbored rearrangements of ETV6. All tumors were treated by simple excision alone. No recurrences or metastases developed in the 2 cases with follow-up. Secretory carcinoma of the skin represents a phenotypic, immunohistochemical, and genetic counterpart to secretory carcinoma of the breast and salivary glands. This tumor entity is less anatomically restricted than previously

  10. Desmosomal defects in acantholytic squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Charlene; Fitzpatrick, James E.; Koch, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma (Acantholytic SCC) are epithelial tumors characterized by a loss of cell adhesion between neoplastic keratinocytes. The mechanism underlying loss of cell-cell adhesion in these tumors is not understood. Methods A retrospective analysis of acantholytic SCC (n=17) and conventional SCC (n=16, controls not showing acantholysis) was conducted using a set of desmosomal and adherens junction protein antibodies. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to identify tumors with loss of adhesion protein expression. Results The vast majority of acantholytic SCC (89%) showed focal loss of at least one desmosomal cell adhesion protein. Most interestingly, 65% of these tumors lost expression of two or more desmosomal proteins. Conclusions Loss of cell adhesion in acantholytic SCC is most likely linked to the focal loss of desmosomal protein expression, thus providing potential mechanistic insight into the patho-mechanism underlying this malignancy. PMID:25264142

  11. Hereditary Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed and fertilized in a laboratory. When the embryos reach a certain size, 1 cell is removed ... question. The parents can then choose to transfer embryos that do not have the mutation. PGD has ...

  12. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed and fertilized in a laboratory. When the embryos reach a certain size, 1 cell is removed ... question. The parents can then choose to transfer embryos which do not have the mutation. PGD has ...

  13. Inhibitory effects of Arhgap6 on cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Junping; Liu, Yang; Yin, Yihua

    2016-02-01

    Ras homology GTPase activation protein 6 (Arhgap6), as a member of the rhoGAP family of proteins, performs vital functions on the regulation of actin polymerization at the plasma membrane during several cellular processes. The role of Arhgap6 in the progression and development of cancer remains nearly unknown. This study aimed at exploring the effects of Arhgap6 on cervical carcinoma. Human cervical cancer cells HeLa and SiHa were transduced with a lentivirus targeting Arhgap6 (Arhgap6+), while CaSki and C4-1 cells were transfected with miRNA. Cell proliferation was identified by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). Cell cycle distribution and cell apoptosis were identified by flow cytometry. The capacity of cell migration, invasion, and adhesion were detected by Transwell assay. Further, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot were used to analyze the expression levels of Arhgap6 and several tumor-related genes. Co-immunoprecipitation assay was performed to validate the interaction between Arhgap6 and Rac3 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 3). Results showed that Arhgap6 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and adhesion of cervical carcinoma, induced cell apoptosis, and caused cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase (n = 3, p < 0.05). Expression of the tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes were up- and down-regulated respectively by Arhgap6, and Rac3 was proved to be the target of Arhgap6. Besides, in in vivo assays, tumor size and weight were destructed in Arhgap6+ athymic nude mouse. This study indicated that Arhgap6 may play a role in the treatment of cervical cancer as a tumor supressor.

  14. Primary oat cell carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, E.A. III; Robbins, K.T.; Stephens, J.; Dimery, I.W.; Batsakis, J.G.

    1987-02-01

    The aggressiveness of small (oat) cell carcinoma of the larynx presents a therapeutic challenge to the oncologist. Since the first description of this type of carcinoma in 1972, 52 patients have been reported in the literature and a variety of treatment regimens have been used. The purpose of this study was to report two new cases and review all previous reports to determine the disease's biological behavior, clinical manifestations, and optimum treatment. Thirty-five percent of the tumors were transglottic, and 27% were supraglottic. Fifty-four percent of patients had regional metastases at initial presentation and 17.6% had distant metastases. The median survival was 10 months for all patients. Patients who were treated with chemotherapy with or without other modalities had the best 2-year survival rates (52.2%). Forty-one percent of patients had regional recurrence only, 12.5% had regional recurrence and distant metastases, and 2% developed distant metastases only. We conclude that patients with oat cell carcinoma of the larynx should be treated with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Surgery is best reserved for persistent and recurrent disease at the primary site and neck.

  15. Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Cervix: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    V, Pavithra; Shalini, C.N. Sai; Priya, Shanmuga; Rani, Usha; Rajendiran, S; Joseph, Leena Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the cervix is a rare and a very aggressive tumour. Once being considered to be a rare type of squamous cell carcinoma, evidence has proven that most of the tumours express one or more markers of neuroendocrine differentiation. The behaviour of this rare malignancy is different from that of squamous cell carcinomas, with a high propensity for nodal and distant metastases. Hence, there is a need to highlight this histopathological entity. PMID:24701511

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sacs in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Mellett, S; Verganti, S; Murphy, S; Bowlt, K

    2015-03-01

    Anal sac squamous cell carcinoma is rare in dogs. Five cases have been previously reported, treatment of which involved surgery alone. This report describes three further cases of canine anal sac squamous cell carcinoma which underwent medical (meloxicam) management alone, resulting in survival of up to seven months. No metastases were identified. Squamous cell carcinoma, although extremely uncommon, should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis when a dog is presented for investigation of an anal sac mass.

  17. Cell and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rajesh C; Zacks, David N

    2014-01-01

    Replacement or repair of a dysfunctional gene combined with promoting cell survival is a two-pronged approach that addresses an unmet need in the therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. In this chapter, we discuss various strategies toward achieving both goals: transplantation of wild-type cells to replace degenerating cells and to rescue gene function, sequential gene and cell therapy, and in vivo reprogramming of rods to cones. These approaches highlight cutting-edge advances in cell and gene therapy, and cellular lineage conversion in order to devise new therapies for various retinal degenerative diseases.

  18. Single-cell analyses of transcriptional heterogeneity in squamous cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yong; Xu, Liqin; Li, Weidong; Zou, Zhihui; Liu, Chunxiao; Xu, Abai; Wu, Song

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell expression heterogeneity within a single tumor is a common phenotype among various cancer types including squamous cell carcinoma. To further study the fundamentals and importance of heterogeneity of cell functions and its potential mechanisms, we performed single-cell RNA-seq (scRNA-seq) on human squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB) and its corresponding physiologically normal epithelia. Extensive differentially expressed genes were uncovered by comparing cancer and normal single cells, which were preferentially enriched in cancer-correlated pathways, such as p53 signaling and bladder cancer pathway. Furthermore, the most diversely expressed genes were particularly enriched in MAPK signaling pathway, such as CACNG4, CACNA1E and CACNA1H, which involve in cancer evolution and heterogeneity formation. Co-expression network and hub-gene analyses revealed several remarkable “hub genes” of each regulatory module. Some of them are cancer related, such as POU2F3, NKD1 and CYP2C8, while LINC00189, GCC2 and OR9Q1 genes are rarely reported in human diseases. The genes within an interesting module are highly correlated with others, which could be treated as potential targets for SCCB patients. Our findings have fundamental implications for SCCB biology and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27602771

  19. Mixed primary squamous cell carcinoma, follicular carcinoma, and micropapillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland: A case report.

    PubMed

    Dong, Su; Song, Xue-Song; Chen, Guang; Liu, Jia

    2016-08-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland is rare, and mixed squamous cell and follicular carcinoma is even rarer still, with only a few cases reported in the literature. The simultaneous presentation of three primary cancers of the thyroid has not been reported previously. Here we report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid, follicular thyroid carcinoma, and micropapillary thyroid carcinoma. A 62-year-old female patient presented with complaints of pain and a 2-month history of progressively increased swelling in the anterior region of the neck. Fine-needle-aspiration cytology of both lobes indicated the possibility of the presence of a follicular neoplasm. Total thyroidectomy with left-sided modified radical neck dissection was performed. Postoperative pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of thyroid follicular carcinoma with squamous cell carcinoma and micropapillary carcinoma of the thyroid. Thyroid-stimulating hormone suppressive therapy with l-thyroxine was administered. Radioiodine and radiotherapy also were recommended, but the patient did not complete treatment as scheduled. The patient remained alive more than 9 months after operation. The present case report provides an example of the coexistence of multiple distinct malignancies in the thyroid.

  20. Multifocal aggressive squamous cell carcinomas induced by prolonged voriconazole therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Morice, C; Acher, A; Soufir, N; Michel, M; Comoz, F; Leroy, D; Verneuil, L

    2010-01-01

    Voriconazole is a treatment for severe fungal infections. Prolonged voriconazole therapy may induce skin reactions, with 1% of severe photosensitivity accidents. Recently the imputability of voriconazole in skin carcinogenesis has been suggested. This report concerns a 55-year-old man suffering from pulmonary aspergillosis who presented a phototoxic reaction a few months after introduction of voriconazole, followed by multiple squamous cell carcinomas of sun-exposed skin areas. After voriconazole discontinuation, no new carcinoma was observed. The detection of EBV and HPV in skin lesions was negative. Exploration of gene mutations involved in skin carcinogenesis showed two variants of the MICR gene. The occurrence of multiple, recurrent, aggressive squamous cell carcinomas is rare with voriconazole, but its imputability is strongly suggested. A plausible hypothesis is that several factors including voriconazole uptake, immunosuppression, and genetic background could explain the phenotype of fast-developing skin carcinomas. Voriconazole therapy should be accompanied by stringent photoprotection and skin monitoring.

  1. Photodynamic Therapy With HPPH in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  2. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma mimicking a superficial spreading melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hasbún Acuña, Paula; Cullen Aravena, Roberto; Maturana Donaire, César; Ares Mora, Raúl; Porras Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-20

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer, especially in elderly people. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a rare subtype and has been described in the literature as a nodular and hyperpigmented lesion; rarely, it can appear as an extensive pigmented plate, which may be clinically indistinguishable from superficial spreading melanoma and Bowen disease. Dermatoscopy has a high sensitivity in the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. When Menzies criteria are used; however, the final diagnosis is made by histopathology. The objective of the present report is to analyze the case of a patient with pigmented basal cell carcinoma simulating a superficial spreading melanoma.

  3. Treatment of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is characterized by various embryological deformities and carcinoma formation. It is caused by PTCHI gene mutations and is autosomal dominantly inherited. Some of the main symptoms of NBCCS are multiple basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) of the mandible, hyperkeratosis of the palmar and plantar, skeletal deformity, calcification of the falx cerebri, and facial defomity. Recurrent KCOT is the main symptom of NBCCS and is present in approximately 90% of patients. In NBCCS, KCOTs typically occur in multiples. KCOTs can be detected in patients under the age of 10, and new and recurring cysts develop until approximately the age of 30. The postoperation recurrence rate is approximately 60%. This case report presents a 14-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of a cyst found in the maxilla and mandible. The patient was diagnosed with NBCCS, and following treatment of marsupialization and enucleation, the clinical results were satisfactory. PMID:27847737

  4. Downregulation of missing in metastasis gene (MIM) is associated with the progression of bladder transitional carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jiali; Smith, Elizabeth; Zhou, Kang; Liao, Jie; Yang, Guang-Yu; Tan, Ming; Zhan, Xi

    2007-03-01

    Missing in metastasis (MIM) gene encodes a putative metastasis suppressor. However, the role of MIM in tumorigenesis and metastasis has not yet been established. Western blot analysis using a MIM specific antibody demonstrated that MIM protein is present at varying levels in a variety of normal cells as well as tumor cell lines. Immunohistochemical staining of adult mouse tissues revealed abundant MIM immunoreactivity in uroepithelial cells in the bladder, neuron Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, and megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and spleen in addition. MIM immunoreactivity also was found in human normal bladder transitional epithelial cells. However, the reactivity was not seen in 69 percent of human primary transitional cell carcinoma specimens. Over 51 percent of the tumors at low grade display MIM staining similarly to the normal cells, whereas only 16.7 percent of the tumors at high-grade with poor differentiation show faint or mild staining. Furthermore, full-length MIM protein is highly expressed in SV-HUC-L an immortalized normal transitional epithelial cell line, moderately expressed in T24 and poorly expressed in J82 and TCCSUP transitional cell carcinoma cells. This finding indicates that downegulation of MIM expression may correlate with the transition of tumor cells from distinct epithelium-like morphology to less differentiated carcinomas.

  5. Histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma in non-small cell lung carcinoma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Morales, José Manuel; Cano-García, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The use of targeted therapies, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), in specific groups of patients has dramatically improved the prognosis of this disease, although inevitably some patients will develop resistance to these drugs during active treatment. The most common cancer-associated acquired mutation is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Thr790Met (T790M) mutation. During active treatment with targeted therapies, histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) can occur in 3–15% of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors. By definition, SCLC is a high-grade tumor with specific histological and genetic characteristics. In the majority of cases, a good-quality hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is enough to establish a diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other neoplasia such as sarcomatoid carcinomas, large-cell carcinoma, basaloid squamous-cell carcinoma, chronic inflammation, malignant melanoma, metastatic carcinoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. A loss of the tumor-suppressor protein retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) is found in 100% of human SCLC tumors; therefore, it has an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Other genetic pathways probably involved in the histopathological transformation include neurogenic locus notch homolog (NOTCH) and achaete-scute homolog 1 (ASCL1). Histological transformation to SCLC can be suspected in NSCLC patients who clinically deteriorate during active treatment. Biopsy of any new lesion in this clinical setting is highly recommended to rule out a SCLC transformation. New studies are trying to assess this histological transformation by noninvasive measures such as measuring the concentration of serum neuron-specific enolase. PMID:27652204

  6. Immunotherapy With MK-3475 in Surgically Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Cancer of Head and Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck

  7. Effects of cyclooxygenase-2 on human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Yong-Dong; Li, Peng; Tu, Jun; Niu, Ying-Lin; Xu, Cai-Min; Zhang, Shu-Tian

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 gene and the proliferation and apoptosis of esophageal squamous carcinoma EC109 cells. METHODS: The techniques of RNA interference (RNAi) and cell transfection, as well as the levels of oncogenicity in nude mice, were used to study the role of COX-2 in the esophageal squamous carcinoma cell (ESCC) line EC109. Following RNAi and transfection, Western blotting analysis was used to determine the expression of the COX-2 protein. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay was used to evaluate cell growth, and flow cytometry was used to detect cell apoptosis. RESULTS: Western blotting analysis demonstrated that COX-2 expression was significantly reduced in EC109 cells treated with COX-2-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) but was increased in EC109 cells transfected with COX-2. Furthermore, COX-2 siRNA treatment inhibited cell proliferation (P < 0.01) and induced apoptosis in EC109 cells, as determined by an MTT assay and by flow cytometry, respectively. In contrast, transfected COX-2 led to increased cell proliferation (P < 0.05) and decreased apoptosis in EC109 cells. In addition, combination treatment of cells with COX-2 siRNA and aspirin had a synergistic effect (P < 0.01). For experiments measuring tumorigenicity, xenograft tumors of a greater volume and weight were found in the COX-2 group compared with other groups (P < 0.05). A large dose of aspirin inhibited tumor growth in nude mice effectively (P < 0.05), and the rate of tumor suppression was 51.8% in the high-dose aspirin group. CONCLUSION: COX-2 plays a very critical role in ESCC carcinogenesis, and COX-2 siRNA combined with aspirin has the potential to be an anticancer therapy for the treatment of ESCC. PMID:22147962

  8. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  9. Analysis of 133 meioses places the genes for nevoid basal cell carcinoma (gorlin) syndrome and fanconi anemia group C in a 2.6-cM interval and contributes to the fine map of 9q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Farndon, P.A.; Hardy, C.; Kilpatrick, M.W.

    1994-09-15

    Four disease genes (NBCCS, ESS1, XPAC, FACC) map to 9q22.3-q31. A fine map of this region was produced by linkage and haplotype analysis using 12 DNA markers. The gene for nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, Gorlin) has an important role in congenital malformations and carcinogenesis. Phase-known recombinants in a study of 133 meioses place NBCCS between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S176. Haplotype analysis in a two-generation family suggests that NBCCS lies in a smaller interval of 2.6 cM centromeric to D9S287. These flanking markers will be useful clinically for gene tracking. Recombinants also map FACC (Fanconi anemia, group C) to the same region, between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S287. The recombination rate between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S53 in males is 8.3% and 13.2% in females, giving a sex-specific male:female ratio of 1:1.6 and a sex-averaged map distance of 10.4 cM. No double recombinants were detected, in agreement with the apparently complete level of interference predicted from the male chiasmata map. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Great Imitator

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Indraneel; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Suresh; Talreja, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TCRC) is a rare renal tumor. Patients are usually asymptomatic; it is usually detected incidentally, during imaging studies for Bosniak type III and type IV renal cysts. These tumors rarely metastasize. The role of targeted therapy in such rare tumors is still controversial. We report a case of TCRC initially presented as a Bosniak type II renal cyst and was discovered ultimately to be a metastatic disease. This type of presentation might broaden our understanding of this rare disease. PMID:27601972

  11. Advanced treatment for basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Oro, Anthony E

    2014-07-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are very common epithelial cancers that depend on the Hedgehog pathway for tumor growth. Traditional therapies such as surgical excision are effective for most patients with sporadic BCC; however, better treatment options are needed for cosmetically sensitive or advanced and metastatic BCC. The first approved Hedgehog antagonist targeting the membrane receptor Smoothened, vismodegib, shows remarkable effectiveness on both syndromic and nonsyndromic BCCs. However, drug-resistant tumors frequently develop, illustrating the need for the development of next-generation Hedgehog antagonists targeting pathway components downstream from Smoothened. In this article, we will summarize available BCC treatment options and discuss the development of next-generation antagonists.

  12. Advanced Treatment for Basal Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Oro, Anthony E.

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are very common epithelial cancers that depend on the Hedgehog pathway for tumor growth. Traditional therapies such as surgical excision are effective for most patients with sporadic BCC; however, better treatment options are needed for cosmetically sensitive or advanced and metastatic BCC. The first approved Hedgehog antagonist targeting the membrane receptor Smoothened, vismodegib, shows remarkable effectiveness on both syndromic and nonsyndromic BCCs. However, drug-resistant tumors frequently develop, illustrating the need for the development of next-generation Hedgehog antagonists targeting pathway components downstream from Smoothened. In this article, we will summarize available BCC treatment options and discuss the development of next-generation antagonists. PMID:24985127

  13. Treatment of lung large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Pusceddu, Sara; Proto, Claudia; Macerelli, Marianna; Signorelli, Diego; Vitali, Milena; Ganzinelli, Monica; Gallucci, Rosaria; Zilembo, Nicoletta; Platania, Marco; Buzzoni, Roberto; de Braud, Filippo; Garassino, Marina Chiara

    2016-06-01

    Lung large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (L-LCNEC) is a rare, aggressive, and difficult-to-treat tumor. It is classified as a neuroendocrine subtype of large cell lung carcinoma (LCLC) belonging to the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) group, but it is also included in the neuroendocrine tumor (NET) group. Most of the available data related to its treatment derive from retrospective analyses or small case series. For patients with L-LCNEC, prognosis is generally very poor. In early stages (I-II-III), surgery is recommended but does not seem to be sufficient. Platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy may be useful while the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy is still not well defined. In patients with advanced L-LCNEC, the chemotherapy regimens used in SCLC still remain the standard of treatment, but results are not satisfactory. Due to their peculiar clinical and biological features and the lack of literature data, there is an emerging need for a consensus on the best treatment strategy for L-LCNEC and for the identification of new therapeutic options. In this review, we will discuss the key aspects of L-LCNEC management with the aim to clarify the most controversial issues.

  14. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  15. Percutaneous Cryoablation for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Georgiades, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults. Nephron sparing resection (partial nephrectomy) has been the “gold standard” for the treatment of resectable disease. With the widespread use of cross sectional imaging techniques, more cases of renal cell cancers are detected at an early stage, i.e. stage 1A or 1B. This has provided an impetus for expanding the nephron sparing options and especially, percutaneous ablative techniques. Percutaneous ablation for RCC is now performed as a standard therapeutic nephron-sparing option in patients who are poor candidates for resection or when there is a need to preserve renal function due to comorbid conditions, multiple renal cell carcinomas, and/or heritable renal cancer syndromes. During the last few years, percutaneous cryoablation has been gaining acceptance as a curative treatment option for small renal cancers. Clinical studies to date indicate that cryoablation is a safe and effective therapeutic method with acceptable short and long term outcomes and with a low risk, in the appropriate setting. In addition it seems to offer some advantages over radio frequency ablation (RFA) and other thermal ablation techniques for renal masses.

  16. Ameloblastic carcinoma with features of ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma in a patient with suspected Gardner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, S G; Hirsch, S A; Listinsky, C M; Lyu, D J-H; Baur, D A

    2015-04-01

    Ameloblastic carcinoma and ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma are rare malignancies arising in odontogenic epithelium within the jaws. Gardner syndrome is a multifaceted autosomal dominant condition, which results in multiple dentofacial anomalies along with premalignant colon polyp formation and tumor formation in the skin and other organs. We report a case of ameloblastic carcinoma with features of ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma and extensive clear cell change and melanin pigmentation in a patient with clinical features of Gardner syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, odontogenic carcinoma arising in a patient with features of Gardner syndrome has not been reported previously. The clinical, radiographic, and histologic features of the case are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature.

  17. Polymorphisms of the DNMT3B gene and risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhensheng; Wang, Luo; Wang, Li-E; Sturgis, Erich M; Wei, Qingyi

    2008-09-08

    DNA-methyltransferase-3B (DNMT3B) may play an oncogenic role during tumorigenesis, and its genetic variants have been reportedly to be associated with risk of several cancers, but few studies have investigated their roles in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck cancer (SCCHN). Here we report a hospital-based case-control study with 832 SCCHN patients and 843 cancer-free controls of non-Hispanic whites that evaluated the association between two DNMT3B single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) DNMT3B -149C>T (rs2424913) and DNMT3B -579G>T (rs2424909) in the promoter region and risk of SCCHN. We found that compared with C-allele carriers, the DNMT3B -149 TT genotype was statistically significantly associated with increased risk of SCCHN (adjusted OR, 1.35, 95% CI, 1.01-1.80, P=0.043), whereas the DNMT3B -579 TT genotype showed only a non-statistically significant risk compared with G-allele carriers. Further analysis of the effects of combined genotypes suggested that subjects with either DNMT3B -149 TT or DNMT3B -579 TT homozygous genotypes had statistically significantly increased risk of SCCHN (adjusted OR=1.36, 95% CI=1.07-1.73, P=0.013). Stratification analysis showed a more profound risk in the subgroups of the young (< or =57 years, the median age of the controls), males, current smokers, current drinkers, and patients with primary tumor sites of pharynx and larynx. This large study provides reliable risk estimates for associations between DNMT3B variants and SCCHN risk in non-Hispanic whites, and our findings are consistent with that of previously reported cancer case-control studies of other cancers. Further mechanistic studies are needed to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  18. Mechanism of enhanced responses after combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in carcinoma cells involves C/EBP-mediated transcriptional upregulation of the coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO) gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sanjay; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with aminolevulinate (ALA) is widely accepted as an effective treatment for superficial carcinomas and pre-cancers. However, PDT is still suboptimal for deeper tumors, mainly due to inadequate ALA penetration and subsequent conversion to PpIX. We are interested in improving the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for deep tumors, using a combination approach (cPDT) in which target protoporphyrin (PpIX) levels are significantly enhanced by differentiation caused by giving Vitamin D or methotrexate (MTX) for 3 days prior to ALAPDT. In LNCaP and MEL cells, a strong correlation between inducible differentiation and expression of C/EBP transcription factors, as well as between differentiation and mRNA levels of CPO (a key heme-synthetic enzyme), indicates the possibility of CPO transcriptional regulation by the C/EBPs. Sequence analysis of the first 1300 base pairs of the murine CPO upstream region revealed 15 consensus C/EBP binding sites. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSA) proved that these sites form specific complexes that have strong, moderate or weak affinities for C/EBPs. However, in the context of the full-length CPO promoter, inactivation of any type of site (strong or weak) reduced CPO promoter activity (luciferase assay) to nearly the same extent, suggesting cooperative interactions. A comparative analysis of murine and human CPO promoters revealed possible protein-protein interactions between C/EBPs and several neighboring transcription factors such as NFkB, Sp1, AP-1, CBP/p300 and CREB (an enhanceosome complex). Overall, these results confirm that C/EBP's are important for CPO expression via complex mechanisms which upregulate PpIX and enhance the outcome of cPDT.

  19. Expression Trend of Selected Ribosomal Protein Genes in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiang-Ru; Sim, Edmund Ui-Hang; Ling, Teck-Yee; Tiong, Thung-Sing; Subramaniam, Selva Kumar; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ribosomal proteins are traditionally associated with protein biosynthesis until recent studies that implicated their extraribosomal functions in human diseases and cancers. Our previous studies using GeneFishing™ DEG method and microarray revealed underexpression of three ribosomal protein genes, RPS26, RPS27, and RPL32 in cancer of the nasopharynx. Herein, we investigated the expression pattern and nucleotide sequence integrity of these genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma to further delineate their involvement in tumourigenesis. The relationship of expression level with clinicopathologic factors was also statistically studied. Methods: Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction was performed on nasopharyngeal carcinoma and their paired normal tissues. Expression and sequence of these three genes were analysed. Results: All three ribosomal protein genes showed no significant difference in transcript expressions and no association could be established with clinicopathologic factors studied. No nucleotide aberrancy was detected in the coding regions of these genes. Conclusion: There is no early evidence to substantiate possible involvement of RPS26, RPS27, and RPL32 genes in NPC tumourigenesis. PMID:23613646

  20. A case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma associated with long-term dialysis showing false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 as Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Michiko; Mitani, Keiko; Fukumura, Yuki; Nagashima, Yoji; Argani, Pedrum; Yao, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Renal carcinomas associated with Xp11.2 translocations/transcription factor 3 (TFE3) gene fusion (Xp11 translocation RCC) are a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma. A middle-aged Japanese man, who had a medical history of dialysis for more than 12 years, had bilateral renal cancers with a background of acquired cystic disease of the kidney and remarkable deposition of calcium oxalate in the tumorous area. The right renal tumor showed papillary architecture o