Science.gov

Sample records for cell clone retaining

  1. Immortalization of human myogenic progenitor cell clone retaining multipotentiality

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Naohiro . E-mail: nao@nils.go.jp; Kiyono, Tohru; Wada, Michiko R.; Shimizu, Shirabe; Yasumoto, Shigeru; Inagawa, Masayo

    2006-10-06

    Human myogenic cells have limited ability to proliferate in culture. Although forced expression of telomerase can immortalize some cell types, telomerase alone delays senescence of human primary cultured myogenic cells, but fails to immortalize them. In contrast, constitutive expression of both telomerase and the E7 gene from human papillomavirus type 16 immortalizes primary human myogenic cells. We have established an immortalized primary human myogenic cell line preserving multipotentiality by ectopic expression of telomerase and E7. The immortalized human myogenic cells exhibit the phenotypic characteristics of their primary parent, including an ability to undergo myogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic terminal differentiation under appropriate culture conditions. The immortalized cells will be useful for both basic and applied studies aimed at human muscle disorders. Furthermore, immortalization by transduction of telomerase and E7 represents a useful method by which to expand human myogenic cells in vitro without compromising their ability to differentiate.

  2. Divergent members of a single autoreactive B cell clone retain specificity for apoptotic blebs.

    PubMed

    Neeli, Indira; Richardson, Mekel M; Khan, Salar N; Nicolo, Danielle; Monestier, Marc; Radic, Marko Z

    2007-03-01

    Specificity for double-stranded DNA can arise due to somatic mutations within one of the branches of an autoreactive B cell clone. However, it is not known whether a different autospecificity predates anti-dsDNA and whether separate offshoots of an expanding B cell clone retain or evolve alternative specificities. We compared 3H9, an anti-dsDNA IgG, to 4H8 and 1A11, antibodies produced by hybridomas representing an alternative branch of the 3H9 B cell clone. All three IgG bound chromatin in ELISA and apoptotic cells in confocal microscopy, yet only 3H9 bound dsDNA, as measured by plasmon resonance. Moreover, we demonstrate that despite the unique specificity of 3H9 for dsDNA, all three clone members exhibited indistinguishable binding to chromatin. The binding to chromatin and apoptotic cells was unaffected by N-linked glycosylation in L chain CDR1, a modification that results from a replacement of serine 26 with asparagine in 4H8 and 1A11. These data provide the first evidence that specificity for nucleosome epitopes on apoptotic cells provides the initial positive stimulus for somatic variants that comprise a B cell clone, including those that subsequently acquire specificity for dsDNA. Conversely, selection of autoreactive B cells for binding to apoptotic cells leads to clonal expansion, antibody diversification, and the development of linked sets of anti-nuclear autoantibodies.

  3. Telomerase-immortalized non-malignant human prostate epithelial cells retain the properties of multipotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongzhen; Zhou Jianjun; Miki, Jun; Furusato, Bungo; Gu Yongpeng; Srivastava, Shiv; McLeod, David G.; Vogel, Jonathan C.; Rhim, Johng S.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding prostate stem cells may provide insight into the origin of prostate cancer. Primary cells have been cultured from human prostate tissue but they usually survive only 15-20 population doublings before undergoing senescence. We report here that RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells, a clonal cell line from hTERT-immortalized primary non-malignant tissue-derived human prostate epithelial cell line (RC170N/h), retain multipotent stem cell properties. The RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells expressed a human embryonic stem cell marker, Oct-4, and potential prostate epithelial stem cell markers, CD133, integrin {alpha}2{beta}1{sup hi} and CD44. The RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells proliferated in KGM and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum and 5 {mu}g/ml insulin (DMEM + 10% FBS + Ins.) medium, and differentiated into epithelial stem cells that expressed epithelial cell markers, including CK5/14, CD44, p63 and cytokeratin 18 (CK18); as well as the mesenchymal cell markers, vimentin, desmin; the neuron and neuroendocrine cell marker, chromogranin A. Furthermore the RC170 N/h/clone 7 cells differentiated into multi tissues when transplanted into the sub-renal capsule and subcutaneously of NOD-SCID mice. The results indicate that RC170N/h/clone 7 cells retain the properties of multipotent stem cells and will be useful as a novel cell model for studying the mechanisms of human prostate stem cell differentiation and transformation.

  4. Establishment of bipotent progenitor cell clone from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yousuke; Yada, Erica; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Hosoyama, Tohru; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2011-12-01

    The present study describes the isolation, cloning and characterization of adipogenic progenitor cells from rat skeletal muscle. Among the obtained 10 clones, the most highly adipogenic progenitor, 2G11 cells, were further characterized. In addition to their adipogenicity, 2G11 cells retain myogenic potential as revealed by formation of multinucleated myotubes when co-cultured with myoblasts. 2G11 cells were resistant to an inhibitory effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on adipogenesis, while adipogenesis of widely used preadipogenic cell line, 3T3-L1 cells, was suppressed almost completely by the same treatment. In vivo transplantation experiments revealed that 2G11 cells are able to possess both adipogenicity and myogenicity in vivo. These results indicate the presence of bipotent progenitor cells in rat skeletal muscle, and suggest that such cells may contribute to ectopic fat formation in skeletal muscle.

  5. Automated Cell-Cutting for Cell Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Akihiko; Tanikawa, Tamio; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Takahashi, Seiya; Ohba, Kohtaro

    We develop an automated cell-cutting technique for cell cloning. Animal cells softened by the cytochalasin treatment are injected into a microfluidic chip. The microfluidic chip contains two orthogonal channels: one microchannel is wide, used to transport cells, and generates the cutting flow; the other is thin and used for aspiration, fixing, and stretching of the cell. The injected cell is aspirated and stretched in the thin microchannel. Simultaneously, the volumes of the cell before and after aspiration are calculated; the volumes are used to calculate the fluid flow required to aspirate half the volume of the cell into the thin microchannel. Finally, we apply a high-speed flow in the orthogonal microchannel to bisect the cell. This paper reports the cutting process, the cutting system, and the results of the experiment.

  6. Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Fulka, J; First, N L; Loi, P; Moor, R M

    1998-10-01

    The birth of the first cloned mammals, produced by the introduction of somatic cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes, was an impressive and surprising development. Although the ethical debate has been intense, the important scientific questions raised by this work have been inadequately discussed and are still unresolved. In this essay we address three questions about nuclear transplantation in the eggs of mice and domestic animals. First, why were the recent experiments on somatic cell cloning successful, when so many others have failed? Second, were these exceptional cases, or is somatic cloning now open to all? Third, what are the future possibilities for increasing the efficiency and wider applicability of the cloning process?

  7. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... copies of whole animals Therapeutic cloning, which creates embryonic stem cells. Researchers hope to use these cells to grow healthy tissue to replace injured or diseased tissues in the human body. NIH: National Human Genome Research Institute

  8. Stem cell programs are retained in human leukemic lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Fan, D; Zhou, X; Li, Z; Li, Z-Q; Duan, C; Liu, T; Zhang, F; Huang, Y; Zhang, Y; Gao, F; Guo, Y; Gupta, R; Chen, G; Enver, T; Tang, J; Hong, D

    2015-04-16

    Leukemic lymphoblasts within different immunophenotypic populations possess stem cell properties. However, whether or not the self-renewal program is retained from stem cells or conferred on progenitors by leukemogenic molecules remains unknown. We have addressed the issue in the context of TEL-AML1-associated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by profiling a refined program edited from genes essential for self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells and B-cell development. Bioinformatic analysis shows that ALL populations are loosely clustered and close to the normal population that contains stem and primitive progenitor cells. This finding indicates that immunophenotypes do not reflect maturation stages in ALL and that the self-renewal program may be retained from stem cells. Results of assessing 'first hit' function of TEL-AML1 in different populations of normal cells demonstrate the molecular model. Therefore, the current study shows a leukemogenic scenario of human ALL in which programs of stem cells are sustained in distinct fractions by leukemogenic mutations.

  9. Cloned mice derived from somatic cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, K; Ohi, S; Ando, A; Kobayashi, M; Sato, K

    2000-12-01

    In 1997, a cloned sheep "Dolly" was produced by nuclear transfer of somatic cell. The first birth of cloned mice derived from some somatic cells were succeeded in 1998. At present, it is shown that somatic cells, cumulus cells, fibroblasts and Sertoli cells can be used to the study of cloned animal as nuclear donor. In this study investigation was designed to compare with efficiency on the production of cloned embryos by using the microinjection and the electrofusion methods for nuclear transfer. Oocyte enucleation was performed with a micromanipulator. The oocyte was held by holding pipette, and was enucleated using a beveled pipette. Microinjection method: Cell's nucleus injection was carried out by piezo-micromanipulator. Cytochalasin B treated cumulus cell was aspirated into a injection pipette, and was broken its plasma membrane using the injection pipette. Then, the cumulus cell was injected into the enucleated ooplasm directly. Electrofusion method: The cell was aspirated into a beveled pipette, and then an aspirated cell was inserted into perivitelline space. Then, the pair of enucleated oocyte and cell was fused using electrical cell fusion apparatus. The reconstituted embryos were activated after nuclear transfer using St2+. Reconstituted embryos had been produced by the microinjection showed the embryonic development to over 8-cell stages. But, the rate of fragmentation of reconstituted embryos by the microinjection showed a little high rate in comparison with the electrofusion. When some reconstituted embryos by the microinjection were transplanted to pseudopregnant females' oviduct, 9 fetuses were observed at 14 days post coitum. PMID:11329940

  10. Porous electrolyte retainer for molten carbonate fuel cell. [lithium aluminate

    DOEpatents

    Singh, R.N.; Dusek, J.T.

    1979-12-27

    A porous tile for retaining molten electrolyte within a fuel cell is prepared by sintering particles of lithium aluminate into a stable structure. The tile is assembled between two porous metal plates which serve as electrodes with fuels gases such as H/sub 2/ and CO opposite to oxidant gases such as O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/. The tile is prepared with a porosity of 55 to 65% and a pore size distribution selected to permit release of sufficient molten electrolyte to wet but not to flood the adjacent electrodes.

  11. Porous electrolyte retainer for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Raj N.; Dusek, Joseph T.

    1983-06-21

    A porous tile for retaining molten electrolyte within a fuel cell is prepared by sintering particles of lithium aluminate into a stable structure. The tile is assembled between two porous metal plates which serve as electrodes with fuels gases such as H.sub.2 and CO opposite to oxidant gases such as O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2. The tile is prepared with a porosity of 55-65% and a pore size distribution selected to permit release of sufficient molten electrolyte to wet but not to flood the adjacent electrodes.

  12. Cloning mice and ES cells by nuclear transfer from somatic stem cells and fully differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongde

    2011-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer (NT) has been successful in several mammalian species. In addition to cloning live animals (reproductive cloning), this technique has also been used in several species to establish cloned embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines from somatic cells. It is the latter application of this technique that has been heralded as being the potential means to produce isogenic embryonic stem cells from patients for cell therapy (therapeutic cloning). These two types of cloning differ only in the steps after cloned embryos are produced: for reproductive cloning the cloned embryos are transferred to surrogate mothers to allow them to develop to full term and for therapeutic cloning the cloned embryos are used to derive ntES cells. In this chapter, a detailed NT protocol in mouse by using somatic stem cells (neuron and skin stem cells) and fully differentiated somatic cells (cumulus cells and fibroblast cells) as nuclear donors is described.

  13. Keith's MAGIC: Cloning and the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Wells, D N

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Professor Keith Campbell's critical contribution to the discovery that a somatic cell from an adult animal can be fully reprogrammed by oocyte factors to form a cloned individual following nuclear transfer (NT)(Wilmut et al., 1997 ) overturned a dogma concerning the reversibility of cell fate that many scientists had considered to be biologically impossible. This seminal experiment proved the totipotency of adult somatic nuclei and finally confirmed that adult cells could differentiate without irreversible changes to the genetic material.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned cattle produced by fetal and adult cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, R; Schinogl, P; Zakhartchenko, V; Achmann, R; Schernthaner, W; Stojkovic, M; Wolf, E; Müller, M; Brem, G

    2000-07-01

    Mammals have been cloned from adult donor cells. Here we report the first cases of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy in adult mammalian clones generated from fetal and adult donor cells. The heteroplasmic clones included a healthy cattle equivalent of the sheep Dolly, for which a lack of heteroplasmy was reported.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned cattle produced by fetal and adult cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, R; Schinogl, P; Zakhartchenko, V; Achmann, R; Schernthaner, W; Stojkovic, M; Wolf, E; Müller, M; Brem, G

    2000-07-01

    Mammals have been cloned from adult donor cells. Here we report the first cases of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy in adult mammalian clones generated from fetal and adult donor cells. The heteroplasmic clones included a healthy cattle equivalent of the sheep Dolly, for which a lack of heteroplasmy was reported. PMID:10888867

  16. Differentiated cells are more efficient than adult stem cells for cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Sung, Li-Ying; Gao, Shaorong; Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Song, Yifang; Smith, Sadie L; Chang, Ching-Chien; Inoue, Kimiko; Kuo, Lynn; Lian, Jin; Li, Ao; Tian, X Cindy; Tuck, David P; Weissman, Sherman M; Yang, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Tao

    2006-11-01

    Since the creation of Dolly via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), more than a dozen species of mammals have been cloned using this technology. One hypothesis for the limited success of cloning via SCNT (1%-5%) is that the clones are likely to be derived from adult stem cells. Support for this hypothesis comes from the findings that the reproductive cloning efficiency for embryonic stem cells is five to ten times higher than that for somatic cells as donors and that cloned pups cannot be produced directly from cloned embryos derived from differentiated B and T cells or neuronal cells. The question remains as to whether SCNT-derived animal clones can be derived from truly differentiated somatic cells. We tested this hypothesis with mouse hematopoietic cells at different differentiation stages: hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells and granulocytes. We found that cloning efficiency increases over the differentiation hierarchy, and terminally differentiated postmitotic granulocytes yield cloned pups with the greatest cloning efficiency.

  17. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6.

  18. Expression cloning of human B cell immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Wardemann, Hedda; Kofer, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas originate from B cells at the germinal center stage or beyond. Preferential selection of B cell clones by a limited set of antigens has been suggested to drive lymphoma development. However, little is known about the specificity of the antibodies expressed by lymphoma cells, and the role of antibody-specificity in lymphomagenesis remains elusive. Here, we describe a strategy to characterize the antibody reactivity of human B cells. The approach allows the unbiased characterization of the human antibody repertoire on a single cell level through the generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single primary human B cells of defined origin. This protocol offers a detailed description of the method starting from the flow cytometric isolation of single human B cells, to the RT-PCR-based amplification of the expressed Igh, Igκ, and Igλ chain genes, and Ig gene expression vector cloning for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies. The strategy may be used to obtain information on the clonal evolution of B cell lymphomas by single cell Ig gene sequencing and on the antibody reactivity of human lymphoma B cells.

  19. Handmade somatic cell cloning in cattle.

    PubMed

    Vajta, Gàbor; Lewis, Ian M; Tecirlioglu, R Tayfur

    2006-01-01

    Apart from the biological and ethical problems, technical difficulties also hamper the improvement and widespread application of somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT). Recently introduced zona-free procedures may offer a solution for the latter problem. The most radical approach of these techniques is the so-called handmade cloning (HMC). It does not require micromanipulators because the manipulations required for both enucleation and nucleus transfer are performed by hand. The HMC technique includes manual bisection of zona-free oocytes, selection of cytoplasts by staining, and the simultaneous fusion of the somatic cell with two cytoplasts to produce a cloned embryo. HMC is a rapid and efficient technique that suits large-scale NT programs. It requires less expertise and time than traditional NT methods and the cost of equipment is significantly less. Production efficiency is high and embryo quality, in terms of pregnancy rates and live births, is not compromised. Although HMC has been developed particularly for bovine NT, the technique is applicable to other species. The method may become a useful tool for both experimental and commercial somatic cell cloning because it allows for standardization of procedures and provides the possibility of automation.

  20. Serial cloning of pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer: restoration of phenotypic normality during serial cloning.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong-Keun; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Jong-Yi; Choi, Yun-Jung; Bang, Jae-Il; Hwang, Kyu-Chan; Cho, Eun-Jeong; Sohn, Sea-Hwan; Uhm, Sang Jun; Koo, Deog-Bon; Lee, Kyung-Kwang; Kim, Teoan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2007-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (scNT) is a useful way to create cloned animals. However, scNT clones exhibit high levels of phenotypic instability. This instability may be due to epigenetic reprogramming and/or genomic damage in the donor cells. To test this, we produced transgenic pig fibroblasts harboring the truncated human thrombopoietin (hTPO) gene and used them as donor cells in scNT to produce first-generation (G1) cloned piglets. In this study, 2,818 scNT embryos were transferred to 11 recipients and five G1 piglets were obtained. Among them, a clone had a dimorphic facial appearance with severe hypertelorism and a broad prominent nasal bridge. The other clones looked normal. Second-generation (G2) scNT piglets were then produced using ear cells from a G1 piglet that had an abnormal nose phenotype. We reasoned that, if the phenotypic abnormality of the G1 clone was not present in the G2 and third-generation (G3) clones, or was absent in the G2 clones but reappeared in the G3 clones, the phenotypic instability of the G1 clone could be attributed to faulty epigenetic reprogramming rather than to inherent/accidental genomic damage to the donor cells. Blastocyst rates, cell numbers in blastocyst, pregnancy rates, term placenta weight and ponderal index, and birth weight between G1 and G2 clones did not differ, but were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than control age- and sex-matched piglets. Next, we analyzed global methylation changes during development of the preimplantation embryos reconstructed by donor cells used for the production of G1 and G2 clones and could not find any significant differences in the methylation patterns between G1 and G2 clones. Indeed, we failed to detect the phenotypic abnormality in the G2 and G3 clones. Thus, the phenotypic abnormality of the G1 clone is likely to be due to epigenetic dysregulation. Additional observations then suggested that expression of the hTPO gene in the transgenic clones did not appear to be the cause of the

  1. Optofluidic realization and retaining of cell–cell contact using an abrupt tapered optical fibre

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hongbao; Zhang, Yao; Lei, Hongxiang; Li, Yayi; Zhang, Huixian; Li, Baojun

    2013-01-01

    Studies reveal that there exists much interaction and communication between bacterial cells, with parts of these social behaviors depending on cell–cell contacts. The cell–cell contact has proved to be crucial for determining various biochemical processes. However, for cell culture with relatively low cell concentration, it is difficult to precisely control and retain the contact of a small group of cells. Particularly, the retaining of cell–cell contact is difficult when flows occur in the medium. Here, we report an optofluidic method for realization and retaining of Escherichia coli cell–cell contact in a microfluidic channel using an abrupt tapered optical fibre. The contact process is based on launching a 980-nm wavelength laser into the fibre, E. coli cells were trapped onto the fibre tip one after another, retaining cell–cell contact and forming a highly organized cell chain. The formed chains further show the ability as bio-optical waveguides. PMID:23771190

  2. Shashkov`s method retaining cell-edge unknowns

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.M.

    1996-01-05

    Shashkov`s method for scalar cell-edge and cell-center variables is derived. Dot products for cell-edge vectors are computed for a corner of the cell. Next, the divergence and gradient are discretized. The diffusion equation is solved with cell-edge continuity and boundary conditions. A symmetric positive definite solution matrix is proven.

  3. Cloning mice and men: prohibiting the use of iPS cells for human reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cedars, Marcelle; Conklin, Bruce; Fisher, Susan; Gates, Elena; Giudice, Linda; Halme, Dina Gould; Hershon, William; Kriegstein, Arnold; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Wagner, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The use of iPSCs and tetraploid complementation for human reproductive cloning would raise profound ethical objections. Professional standards and laws that ban human reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer should be revised to also forbid it by other methods, such as iPSCs via tetraploid complementation.

  4. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  5. Functional heterogeneity among cytotoxic clones derived from natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Moore, M

    1987-01-01

    Clones were obtained from highly purified populations of human peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells propagated in the presence of interleukin-2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Almost all clones were cytotoxic against standard NK targets and many were also able to kill the B lymphoblastoid cell line BSM. This latter property was not necessarily a result of the incorporation of this cell line into the feeder mixture used to derive the clones. In most cloning experiments there was a high degree of concordance between the killing of the NK targets K562 and Molt 4 by panels of clones. In some cases this extended to the killing of BSM targets but in other instances there was no relationship or even an inverse correlation between killing of BSM and other targets. In a single cloning experiment there was no relationship between killing of BSM and Raji targets. In some cases a panel of clones could be divided into two or more distinct groups based on their differential activity towards BSM and K562. Such differences were not solely due to inter-donor variation. These findings were extended by cold target inhibition experiments in which at least three types of clone were identified. In one group of clones, which was nonreactive towards BSM, cold BSM significantly enhanced the killing of K562 in a dose-dependent fashion. These experiments provide evidence for a limited degree of functional heterogeneity among clones derived from human peripheral blood NK cells.

  6. [Product safety analysis of somatic cell cloned bovine].

    PubMed

    Hua, Song; Lan, Jie; Song, Yongli; Lu, Chenglong; Zhang, Yong

    2010-05-01

    Somatic cell cloning (nuclear transfer) is a technique through which the nucleus (DNA) of a somatic cell is transferred into an enucleated oocyte for the generation of a new individual, genetically identical to the somatic cell donor. It could be applied for the enhancement of reproduction rate and the improvement of food products involving quality, yield and nutrition. In recent years, the United States, Japan and Europe as well as other countries announced that meat and milk products made from cloned cattle are safe for human consumption. Yet, cloned animals are faced with a wide range of health problems, with a high death rate and a high incidence of disease. The precise causal mechanisms for the low efficiency of cloning remain unclear. Is it safe that any products from cloned animals were allowed into the food supply? This review focuses on the security of meat, milk and products from cloned cattle based on the available data.

  7. Satellite cells from dystrophic muscle retain regenerative capacity.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Luisa; Zammit, Peter S; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited disorder that is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, with a failure of muscle maintenance/repair mediated by satellite cells (muscle stem cells). The function of skeletal muscle stem cells resident in dystrophic muscle may be perturbed by being in an increasing pathogenic environment, coupled with constant demands for repairing muscle. To investigate the contribution of satellite cell exhaustion to this process, we tested the functionality of satellite cells isolated from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that satellite cells derived from young mdx mice contributed efficiently to muscle regeneration within our in vivo mouse model. To then test the effects of long-term residence in a dystrophic environment, satellite cells were isolated from aged mdx muscle. Surprisingly, they were as functional as those derived from young or aged wild type donors. Removing satellite cells from a dystrophic milieu reveals that their regenerative capacity remains both intact and similar to satellite cells derived from healthy muscle, indicating that the host environment is critical for controlling satellite cell function.

  8. Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum by single-cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jun; Li, Xiaolian; Cui, Liwang

    2010-10-01

    Malaria parasite cloning is traditionally carried out mainly by using the limiting dilution method, which is laborious, imprecise, and unable to distinguish multiply-infected RBCs. In this study, we used a parasite engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) to evaluate a single-cell sorting method for rapidly cloning Plasmodium falciparum. By dividing a two-dimensional scattergram from a cell sorter into 17 gates, we determined the parameters for isolating singly-infected erythrocytes and sorted them into individual cultures. Pre-gating of the engineered parasites for GFP allowed the isolation of almost 100% GFP-positive clones. Compared with the limiting dilution method, the number of parasite clones obtained by single-cell sorting was much higher. Molecular analyses showed that parasite isolates obtained by single-cell sorting were highly homogenous. This highly efficient single-cell sorting method should prove very useful for cloning both P. falciparum laboratory populations from genetic manipulation experiments and clinical samples.

  9. Cloning animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer--biological factors.

    PubMed

    Tian, X Cindy; Kubota, Chikara; Enright, Brian; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2003-11-13

    Cloning by nuclear transfer using mammalian somatic cells has enormous potential application. However, somatic cloning has been inefficient in all species in which live clones have been produced. High abortion and fetal mortality rates are commonly observed. These developmental defects have been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei by the cloning process. Various strategies have been used to improve the efficiency of nuclear transfer, however, significant breakthroughs are yet to happen. In this review we will discuss studies conducted, in our laboratories and those of others, to gain a better understanding of nuclear reprogramming. Because cattle are a species widely used for nuclear transfer studies, and more laboratories have succeeded in cloning cattle than any other species, this review will be focused on somatic cell cloning of cattle.

  10. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  11. Pre-weaning performance and health of pigs born to cloned (fetal cell derived) swine versus non-cloned swine.

    PubMed

    Martin, M; Adams, C; Wiseman, B

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the pre-weaning performance of pigs derived from cloned versus non-cloned parents. Five cloned gilts and one cloned boar were used to produce five litters of pigs. One of five cloned females and the cloned boar were derived from two genetically unmanipulated fetal fibroblast cell lines. The remaining female clones were derived from a fetal fibroblast cell line in which random insertion of a alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase gene targeting construct had occurred. Fetal cell lines had similar genetic backgrounds and were derived from three different fetuses in three different litters. Five litters of pigs were also generated from matings between two non-cloned boars and five non-cloned gilts. The mean gestation length, mean litter size, mean birth and weaning weights for male and female pigs were similar for litters derived from cloned parents versus non-cloned parents. The proportions of pigs born live and pigs that survived to weaning were also similar for pigs born to cloned as compared to non-cloned parents. In summary, matings between cloned swine derived from fetal fibroblast cell lines yielded litters of pigs that were similar in the number born, piglet birth weight and perinatal and pre-weaning mortality to litters produced by non-cloned swine.

  12. Derivation and characterization of putative embryonic stem cells from cloned rabbit embryos.

    PubMed

    Intawicha, Payungsuk; Siriboon, Chawalit; Chen, Chien-Hong; Chiu, Yung-Tsung; Lin, Tzu-An; Kere, Michel; Lo, Neng-Wen; Lee, Kun-Hsiung; Chang, Li-Yung; Chiang, Hsing-I; Ju, Jyh-Cherng

    2016-10-15

    The present study aimed to establish embryonic stem (ES) cell lines, i.e., ntES cells, using rabbit blastocyst stage embryos cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer. First, we investigated the development of cloned rabbit embryos reconstructed with normal fibroblasts and fibroblasts transfected with enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP). Blastocyst rates were 27.4% and 23.9%, respectively, for the embryos reconstructed with normal fibroblasts and fibroblasts transfected with eGFP compared with that from the parthenogenetic group (43.1%). One ntES cell line was established from embryos reconstructed with eGFP-transfected fibroblasts (1 of 17, 5.9%), and three ntES cell lines were derived from those with normal fibroblasts (3 of 17, 17.6%). All the ntES cell lines retained alkaline phosphatase activity and expressed ES cell-specific markers SSEA-4, Oct-4, TRA-1-60, and TRA-1-81. The pluripotency was further confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses of Oct-4, Nanog, and Sox-2 expressions in ntES cell lines. The differentiation capacity of ntES cells was also examined in vitro and in vivo, by which these ntES cell lines were able to differentiate into all three germ layers through embryoid bodies and teratomas. In conclusion, it is apparent that the efficiency of ntES cells derived using eGFP-transfected donor cells is lower than that with nontransfected, normal fibroblasts donor cells. Similar to those from parthenogenetic embryos, all ntES cell lines derived from cloned rabbit embryos are able to express pluripotency markers and retain their capability to differentiate into various cell lineages both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27395085

  13. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina; Kaufmann, Andreas M.

    2011-04-15

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  14. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model. PMID:23166393

  15. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model.

  16. DQw3 variants defined by cloned alloreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, E M; Nepom, G T; Nisperos, B; Hansen, J A

    1988-01-01

    The polymorphism of HLA class II molecules expressing the serologically defined alloantigen DQw3 was studied using cloned proliferative T lymphocytes. Two clones, IG9 and IC3, were selectively primed against DQw3-associated determinants and tested against a panel of 92 HLA-D homozygous cells. Both clones were specific for DQw3, but each showed a distinct response pattern. Clone IG9 recognized a DQw3-associated determinant expressed on a subset of DR4 and DR5 haplotypes and on all DRw6, 7, w8, and w9 haplotypes tested. In contrast, clone IC3 recognized a distinct DQw3-associated determinant expressed only on a subset of DR4 haplotypes. In monoclonal antibody inhibition experiments, anti-DQ, but not anti-DR or anti-DP antibodies, blocked reactivity of both clones IG9 and IC3, further demonstrating that the determinants defined by these clones are associated with DQ molecules. In DNA hybridization studies using a DQ beta probe, a correlation was observed between restriction site polymorphisms in the DQ beta gene, designated DQw"3.1" and "3.2," and the expression of the T-cell-defined IG9 and IC3 determinants. It is, thus, possible to demonstrate by cloned T-cell reactivity functionally relevant recognition sites on DQw3+ molecules that are associated with structural polymorphisms defined by molecular and genomic analysis. PMID:2452816

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines retain the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of primary human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhixin; Zou, Keke; Zhuang, Liping; Qin, Jianjie; Li, Hong; Li, Chao; Zhang, Zhengtao; Chen, Xiaotao; Cen, Jin; Meng, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Haibin; Li, Yixue; Hui, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines are useful in vitro models for the study of primary HCCs. Because cell lines acquire additional mutations in culture, it is important to understand to what extent HCC cell lines retain the genetic landscapes of primary HCCs. Most HCC cell lines were established during the last century, precluding comparison between cell lines and primary cancers. In this study, 9 Chinese HCC cell lines with matched patient-derived cells at low passages (PDCs) were established in the defined culture condition. Whole genome analyses of 4 HCC cell lines showed that genomic mutation landscapes, including mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs) and HBV integrations, were highly stable during cell line establishment. Importantly, genetic alterations in cancer drivers and druggable genes were reserved in cell lines. HCC cell lines also retained gene expression patterns of primary HCCs during in vitro culture. Finally, sequential analysis of HCC cell lines and PDCs at different passages revealed their comparable and stable genomic and transcriptomic levels if maintained within proper passages. These results show that HCC cell lines largely retain the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of primary HCCs, thus laying the rationale for testing HCC cell lines as preclinical models in precision medicine. PMID:27273737

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines retain the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of primary human cancers.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhixin; Zou, Keke; Zhuang, Liping; Qin, Jianjie; Li, Hong; Li, Chao; Zhang, Zhengtao; Chen, Xiaotao; Cen, Jin; Meng, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Haibin; Li, Yixue; Hui, Lijian

    2016-06-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines are useful in vitro models for the study of primary HCCs. Because cell lines acquire additional mutations in culture, it is important to understand to what extent HCC cell lines retain the genetic landscapes of primary HCCs. Most HCC cell lines were established during the last century, precluding comparison between cell lines and primary cancers. In this study, 9 Chinese HCC cell lines with matched patient-derived cells at low passages (PDCs) were established in the defined culture condition. Whole genome analyses of 4 HCC cell lines showed that genomic mutation landscapes, including mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs) and HBV integrations, were highly stable during cell line establishment. Importantly, genetic alterations in cancer drivers and druggable genes were reserved in cell lines. HCC cell lines also retained gene expression patterns of primary HCCs during in vitro culture. Finally, sequential analysis of HCC cell lines and PDCs at different passages revealed their comparable and stable genomic and transcriptomic levels if maintained within proper passages. These results show that HCC cell lines largely retain the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of primary HCCs, thus laying the rationale for testing HCC cell lines as preclinical models in precision medicine.

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolay, Nils H.; Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute; Trinh, Thuy; Sisombath, Sonevisay; Debus, Jürgen; Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer; Huber, Peter E.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

  20. Rubber and alumina gaskets retain vacuum seal in high temperature EMF cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesson, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Silicone rubber gasket and an alumina gasket retain a vacuum inside a high temperature EMF cell in which higher and lower density liquid metal electrodes are separated by an intermediate density fused salt electrolyte. This innovation is in use on a sodium bismuth regenerable EMF cell in which the fused salts and metals are at about 500 deg to 600 deg C.

  1. Cloning from stem cells: different lineages, different species, same story.

    PubMed

    Oback, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Following nuclear transfer (NT), the most stringent measure of extensive donor cell reprogramming is development into viable offspring. This is referred to as cloning efficiency and quantified as the proportion of cloned embryos transferred into surrogate mothers that survive into adulthood. Cloning efficiency depends on the ability of the enucleated recipient cell to carry out the reprogramming reactions ('reprogramming ability') and the ability of the nuclear donor cell to be reprogrammed ('reprogrammability'). It has been postulated that reprogrammability of the somatic donor cell epigenome is inversely proportional to its differentiation status. In order to test this hypothesis, reprogrammability was compared between undifferentiated stem cells and their differentiated isogenic progeny. In the mouse, cells of divergent differentiation status from the neuronal, haematopoietic and skin epithelial lineage were tested. In cattle and deer, skeletal muscle and antler cells, respectively, were used as donors. No conclusive correlation between differentiation status and cloning efficiency was found, indicating that somatic donor cell type may not be the limiting factor for cloning success. This may reflect technical limitations of the NT-induced reprogramming assay. Alternatively, differentiation status and reprogrammability may be unrelated, making all cells equally difficult to reprogramme once they have left the ground state of pluripotency.

  2. Attempt at cloning high-quality goldfish breed 'Ranchu' by fin-cultured cell nuclear transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Daisuke; Takahashi, Akito; Takai, Akinori; Ohta, Hiromi; Ueno, Koichi

    2012-02-01

    The viability of ornamental fish culture relies on the maintenance of high-quality breeds. To improve the profitability of culture operations we attempted to produce cloned fish from the somatic nucleus of the high-quality Japanese goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) breed 'Ranchu'. We transplanted the nucleus of a cultured fin-cell from an adult Ranchu into the non-enucleated egg of the original goldfish breed 'Wakin'. Of the 2323 eggs we treated, 802 underwent cleavage, 321 reached the blastula stage, and 51 reached the gastrula stage. Two of the gastrulas developed until the hatching stage. A considerable number of nuclear transplants retained only the donor nucleus. Some of these had only a 2n nucleus derived from the same donor fish. Our results provide insights into the process of somatic cell nuclear transplantation in teleosts, and the cloning of Ranchu.

  3. Attempt at cloning high-quality goldfish breed 'Ranchu' by fin-cultured cell nuclear transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Daisuke; Takahashi, Akito; Takai, Akinori; Ohta, Hiromi; Ueno, Koichi

    2012-02-01

    The viability of ornamental fish culture relies on the maintenance of high-quality breeds. To improve the profitability of culture operations we attempted to produce cloned fish from the somatic nucleus of the high-quality Japanese goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) breed 'Ranchu'. We transplanted the nucleus of a cultured fin-cell from an adult Ranchu into the non-enucleated egg of the original goldfish breed 'Wakin'. Of the 2323 eggs we treated, 802 underwent cleavage, 321 reached the blastula stage, and 51 reached the gastrula stage. Two of the gastrulas developed until the hatching stage. A considerable number of nuclear transplants retained only the donor nucleus. Some of these had only a 2n nucleus derived from the same donor fish. Our results provide insights into the process of somatic cell nuclear transplantation in teleosts, and the cloning of Ranchu. PMID:21106134

  4. Somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: practical applications and current legislation.

    PubMed

    Niemann, H; Lucas-Hahn, A

    2012-08-01

    Somatic cloning is emerging as a new biotechnology by which the opportunities arising from the advances in molecular genetics and genome analysis can be implemented in animal breeding. Significant improvements have been made in SCNT protocols in the past years which now allow to embarking on practical applications. The main areas of application of SCNT are: Reproductive cloning, therapeutic cloning and basic research. A great application potential of SCNT based cloning is the production of genetically modified (transgenic) animals. Somatic cell nuclear transfer based transgenic animal production has significant advances over the previously employed microinjection of foreign DNA into pronuclei of zygotes. This cell based transgenesis is compatible with gene targeting and allows both, the addition of a specific gene and the deletion of an endogenous gene. Efficient transgenic animal production provides numerous opportunities for agriculture and biomedicine. Regulatory agencies around the world have agreed that food derived from cloned animals and their offspring is safe and there is no scientific basis for questioning this. Commercial application of somatic cloning within the EU is via the Novel Food regulation EC No. 258/97. Somatic cloning raises novel questions regarding the ethical and moral status of animals and their welfare which has prompted a controversial discussion in Europe which has not yet been resolved.

  5. Mouse cloning and somatic cell reprogramming using electrofused blastomeres.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Amjad; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Dai, Xiangpeng; Li, Wei; Liu, Lei; Wan, Haifeng; Yu, Yang; Wang, Liu; Zhou, Qi

    2011-05-01

    Mouse cloning from fertilized eggs can assist development of approaches for the production of "genetically tailored" human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines that are not constrained by the limitations of oocyte availability. However, to date only zygotes have been successfully used as recipients of nuclei from terminally differentiated somatic cell donors leading to ES cell lines. In fertility clinics, embryos of advanced embryonic stages are usually stored for future use, but their ability to support the derivation of ES cell lines via somatic nuclear transfer has not yet been proved. Here, we report that two-cell stage electrofused mouse embryos, arrested in mitosis, can support developmental reprogramming of nuclei from donor cells ranging from blastomeres to somatic cells. Live, full-term cloned pups from embryonic donors, as well as pluripotent ES cell lines from embryonic or somatic donors, were successfully generated from these reconstructed embryos. Advanced stage pre-implantation embryos were unable to develop normally to term after electrofusion and transfer of a somatic cell nucleus, indicating that discarded pre-implantation human embryos could be an important resource for research that minimizes the ethical concerns for human therapeutic cloning. Our approach provides an attractive and practical alternative to therapeutic cloning using donated oocytes for the generation of patient-specific human ES cell lines.

  6. Selective degradation of T cell antigen receptor chains retained in a pre-Golgi compartment

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the fate of newly synthesized T cell antigen receptor (TCR) subunits in a T cell hybridoma deficient in expression of the clonotypic beta chain. Synthesis and assembly of the remaining chains proceed normally but surface expression of TCR chains is undetectable in these cells. A variety of biochemical and morphological techniques has been used to show that the TCR chains in these cells fail to be transported to any of the Golgi cisternae. Instead, they are retained in a pre-Golgi compartment which is either part of or closely related to the endoplasmic reticulum. The CD3-delta chain is degraded by a non- lysosomal process that is inhibited at temperatures at or below 27 degrees C. By contrast, the remaining chains (CD3-epsilon, CD3-gamma, and zeta) are very stable over 7 h. We propose possible mechanisms that may explain the differential fate of TCR chains retained in a pre-Golgi compartment. PMID:2974039

  7. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before…

  8. Production of Cloned Mice by Nuclear Transfer of Cumulus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurd, Soleiman; Zarei, Mohammad Ali; Fathi, Fardin; Ghadimi, Tayyeb; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Saeed; Jalili, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the past several years, mammals have been successfully cloned by either the splitting of an early stage embryo or nuclear transfer of adult somatic cells (NT) into oocytes. Although it has been 15 years since the generation of the first cloned mammals from somatic cells by NT, the success rate for producing live offspring by this technique is low regardless of the cell type and animal species used. However, these techniques have the potential to be important tools for future research in basic biology. In the present study, we described our experiences in producing successfully cloned mouse using NT method and piezo-actuated micromanipulator. Methods B6D2F1 mice, 8-12 weeks old, were superovulated with injections of 5 IU of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and 5 IU of human chorionic gonadotropin administered 48 hr apart. Enucleation and donor nuclei cumulus cell injection were performed with a piezo-actuated micromanipulator after which activation and trichostatin A treatment were used for reconstructed oocytes. Two-cell stage cloned embryos that developed in the mWM medium were transferred into the oviducts of pseudopregnant NMRI mice. Results Of 367 oocytes collected, 131 (69%) developed into 2-cell stage embryos. Of these, 5 (1%) live pups were successfully delivered. We used NMRI foster mother to raise the pups by lactation. One adult cloned mouse was mated, after which she delivered and raised normal offspring. Conclusion For mouse cloning, the present study also successfully tested the capability of somatic cell nuclear transfer SCNT using a piezo unit. PMID:23919122

  9. Cloning Endangered Felids by Interspecies Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, the first wild felid was produced by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer. Since then other wild felid clone offspring have been produced by using the same technique with minor modifications. This chapter describes detailed protocols used in our laboratory for (1) the isolation, culture, and preparation of fibroblast cells as donor nucleus, and (2) embryo reconstruction with domestic cat enucleated oocytes to produce cloned embryos that develop to the blastocyst stage in vitro and, after transfer into synchronized recipients, establish successful pregnancies.

  10. Effects of donor fibroblast cell type and transferred cloned embryo number on the efficiency of pig cloning.

    PubMed

    Li, Zicong; Shi, Junsong; Liu, Dewu; Zhou, Rong; Zeng, Haiyu; Zhou, Xiu; Mai, Ranbiao; Zeng, Shaofen; Luo, Lvhua; Yu, Wanxian; Zhang, Shouquan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2013-02-01

    Currently, cloning efficiency in pigs is very low. Donor cell type and number of cloned embryos transferred to an individual surrogate are two major factors that affect the successful rate of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pigs. This study aimed to compare the influence of different donor fibroblast cell types and different transferred embryo numbers on recipients' pregnancy rate and delivery rate, the average number of total clones born, clones born alive and clones born healthy per litter, and the birth rate of healthy clones (=total number of healthy cloned piglets born /total number of transferred cloned embryos). Three types of donor fibroblasts were tested in large-scale production of cloned pigs, including fetal fibroblasts (FFBs) from four genetically similar Western swine breeds of Pietrain (P), Duroc (D), Landrace (L), and Yorkshire (Y), which are referred to as P,D,LY-FFBs, adult fibroblasts (AFBs) from the same four breeds, which are designated P,D,L,Y-AFBs, and AFBs from a Chinese pig breed of Laiwu (LW), which is referred to as LW-AFBs. Within each donor fibroblast cell type group, five transferred cloned embryo number groups were tested. In each embryo number group, 150-199, 200-249, 250-299, 300-349, or 350-450 cloned embryos were transferred to each individual recipient sow. For the entire experiment, 92,005 cloned embryos were generated from nearly 115,000 matured oocytes and transferred to 328 recipients; in total, 488 cloned piglets were produced. The results showed that the mean clones born healthy per litter resulted from transfer of embryos cloned from LW-AFBs (2.53 ± 0.34) was similar with that associated with P,D,L,Y-FFBs (2.72 ± 0.29), but was significantly higher than that resulted from P,D,L,Y-AFBs (1.47 ± 0.18). Use of LW-AFBs as donor cells for SCNT resulted in a significantly higher pregnancy rate (72.00% vs. 59.30% and 48.11%) and delivery rate (60.00% vs. 45.93% and 35.85%) for cloned embryo recipients, and a

  11. Cloning and Variation of Ground State Intestinal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Wilson, Lane H.; Zhang, Ting; Howitt, Brooke; Farrow, Melissa A.; Kern, Florian; Ning, Gang; Hong, Yue; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Chevalier, Benoit; Bertrand, Denis; Wu, Lingyan; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Sylvester, Francisco A.; Hyams, Jeffrey S.; Devers, Thomas; Bronson, Roderick; Lacy, D. Borden; Ho, Khek Yu; Crum, Christopher P.; McKeon, Frank; Xian, Wa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Stem cells of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, liver, and other columnar epithelia collectively resist cloning in their elemental states. Here we demonstrate the cloning and propagation of highly clonogenic, “ground state” stem cells of the human intestine and colon. We show that derived stem cell pedigrees sustain limited copy number and sequence variation despite extensive serial passaging and display exquisitely precise, cell-autonomous commitment to epithelial differentiation consistent with their origins along the intestinal tract. This developmentally patterned and epigenetically maintained commitment of stem cells likely enforces the functional specificity of the adult intestinal tract. Using clonally-derived colonic epithelia, we show that toxins A or B of the enteric pathogen C. difficile recapitulate the salient features of pseudomembranous colitis. The stability of the epigenetic commitment programs of these stem cells, coupled with their unlimited replicative expansion and maintained clonogenicity, suggests certain advantages for their use in disease modeling and regenerative medicine. PMID:26040716

  12. Human cloning, stem cell research. An Islamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Al-Aqeel, Aida I

    2009-12-01

    The rapidly changing technologies that involve human subjects raise complex ethical, legal, social, and religious issues. Recent advances in the field of cloning and stem cell research have introduced new hopes for the treatment of serious diseases. But this promise has raised many complex questions. This field causes debate and challenge, not only among scientists but also among ethicists, religious scholars, governments, and politicians. There is no consensus on the morality of human cloning, even within specific religious traditions. In countries in which religion has a strong influence on political decision making, the moral status of the human embryo is at the center of the debate. Because of the inevitable consequences of reproductive cloning, it is prohibited in Islam. However, stem cell research for therapeutic purposes is permissible with full consideration, and all possible precautions in the pre-ensoulment stages of early fetus development, if the source is legitimate.

  13. cDNA expression cloning in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, B J

    2001-05-01

    This unit contains protocols for expression cloning in mammalian cells. Either calcium phosphate- or liposome-mediated transfection of mammalian cells, or virus infection and liposome-mediated transfection are used to screen pools derived from a cDNA library. cDNA pools are prepared for cloning from library-transformed E. coli grown in liquid culture medium or on antibiotic-containing selection plates. Results of screening assays for expression can be detected using autoradiography of dishes of cultured cells to identify clones, direct visualization of radiolabeled cells on emulsion-coated and developed chamber slides, detection and quantification of gene activity by a functional (transport) assay with scintillation counting, or detection using a filter-based assay for binding of radioligand to membranes or whole cells. The most critical step of any cDNA cloning project is the establishment of the screening protocol. Therefore, the bioassay for the gene product must be established prior to executing any of these protocols, including construction of the cDNA library. PMID:18428491

  14. Label-retaining assay enriches tumor-initiating cells in glioblastoma spheres cultivated in serum-free medium

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lingcheng; Zhao, Yiqing; Ouyang, Taohui; Zhao, Tianyuan; Zhang, Suojun; Chen, Jian; Yu, Jiasheng; Lei, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Label-retaining cells, which are characterized by dormancy or slow cycling, may be identified in a number of human normal and cancer tissues, and these cells demonstrate stem cell potential. In glioblastoma, label-retaining assays to enrich glioma stem cells remain to be fully investigated. In the present study, glioblastoma sphere cells cultured in serum-free medium were initially stained with the cell membrane fluorescent marker DiI. The fluorescence intensity during cell proliferation and sphere reformation was observed. At 2 weeks, the DiI-retaining cells were screened by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and compared phenotypically with the DiI-negative cells in terms of in vitro proliferation, clonogenicity and multipotency and for in vivo tumorigenicity, as well as sensitivity to irradiation and temozolomide treatment. It was observed that DiI-retaining cells accounted for a small proportion, <10%, within the glioblastoma spheres and that DiI-retaining cells proliferated significantly more slowly compared with DiI-negative cells (P=0.011, P=0.035 and P=0.023 in the of NCH421k, NCH441 and NCH644 glioblastoma sphere cell lines). Significantly increased clonogenicity (P=0.002, P=0.034 and P=0.016 in the NCH441, NCH644 and NCH421k glioblastoma sphere cell lines) and three-lineage multipotency were observed in DiI-retaining cells in vitro compared with DiI-negative cells. As few as 100 DiI-retaining cells were able to effectively generate tumors in the immunocompromised mouse brain, whereas the same number of DiI-negative cells possessed no such ability, indicating the increased tumorigenicity of DiI-retaining cells compared with DiI-negative cells. Furthermore, DiI-retaining cells demonstrated significant resistance following irradiation (P=0.012, P=0.024 and P=0.036) and temozolomide (P=0.003, P=0.005 and P=0.029) compared with DiI-negative cells in the NCH421k, NCH441 and NCH644 glioblastoma sphere cell lines, respectively. It was concluded that label-retaining

  15. Cloned Hemoglobin Genes Enhance Growth Of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khosla, Chaitan; Bailey, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show that portable deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences incorporated into host cells make them produce hemoglobins - oxygen-binding proteins essential to function of red blood cells. Method useful in several biotechnological applications. One, enhancement of growth of cells at higher densities. Another, production of hemoglobin to enhance supplies of oxygen in cells, for use in chemical reactions requiring oxygen, as additive to serum to increase transport of oxygen, and for binding and separating oxygen from mixtures of gases.

  16. Label-Retaining Cells in the Adult Murine Salivary Glands Possess Characteristics of Adult Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chibly, Alejandro M.; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction. PMID:25238060

  17. Label-retaining cells in the adult murine salivary glands possess characteristics of adult progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chibly, Alejandro M; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction.

  18. In vitro differentiation of a cloned bovine mammary epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Rose, Michael T; Aso, Hisashi; Yonekura, Shinichi; Komatsu, Tokushi; Hagino, Akihiko; Ozutsumi, Kyouhei; Obara, Yoshiaki

    2002-08-01

    The aim of the study was to establish in vitro a bovine mammary epithelial cell (MEC) clone, able to respond to mitogenic growth factors and to lactogenic hormones. Mammary tissue from a 200-d pregnant Holstein cow was used as a source of MEC, from which a clone was established through a process of limiting dilution. When plated on plastic, the cells assumed a monolayer, cobblestone, epithelial-like morphology, with close contact between cells. Inclusion of IGF-1 and EGF in the media significantly increased the number of cells 5 d after plating. All cells stained strongly for cytokeratin and moderately for vimentin at young and old passage stages, indicating the epithelial nature of this cell clone. When the cells were plated at a high density on a thin layer of a commercial extracellular matrix preparation (Matrigel), lobular, alveoli-like structures developed within approximately 5 d, with a clearly visible lumen. When cells were plated onto Matrigel in differentiation media (containing lactogenic hormones), detectable quantities of alpha-casein were present in the media and particularly on the lumen side of the structures. Omission of one of the lactogenic hormones (insulin, prolactin or hydrocortisone) reduced alpha-casein release to the limit of detection of the assay used. Lactoferrin was also produced when the cells were plated on Matrigel, again principally on the lumen side of the lobules, though this was independent of the lactogenic hormones. By passage 40, the cells had senesced, and it was not possible to induce alpha-casein or lactoferrin production. This study notes the establishment of a functional bovine mammary epithelial cell clone, which is responsive to mitogenic and lactogenic hormones and an extracellular matrix.

  19. Cloning of ES cells and mice by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Sayaka; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2009-01-01

    We have been able to develop a stable nuclear transfer (NT) method in the mouse, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. Although the piezo unit is a complex tool, once mastered it is of great help not only in NT experiments, but also in almost all other forms of micromanipulation. Using this technique, embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines established from somatic cell nuclei can be generated relatively easily from a variety of mouse genotypes and cell types. Such ntES cells can be used not only for experimental models of human therapeutic cloning but also as a means of preserving mouse genomes instead of preserving germ cells. Here, we describe our most recent protocols for mouse cloning.

  20. Breaking the In Vitro Alveolar Type II Cell Proliferation Barrier while Retaining Ion Transport Properties

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Hong; Cheluvaraju, Chaitra; Jones, Lisa C.; Liu, Xuefeng; O’Neal, Wanda K.; Randell, Scott H.; Schlegel, Richard; Boucher, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar type (AT)I and ATII cells are central to maintaining normal alveolar fluid homeostasis. When disrupted, they contribute to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Research on ATII cells has been limited by the inability to propagate primary cells in vitro to study their specific functional properties. Moreover, primary ATII cells in vitro quickly transdifferentiate into nonproliferative “ATI-like” cells under traditional culture conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that normal and tumor cells grown in culture with a combination of fibroblast (feeder cells) and a pharmacological Rho kinase inhibitor (Y-27632) exhibit indefinite cell proliferation that resembled a “conditionally reprogrammed cell” phenotype. Using this coculture system, we found that primary human ATII cells (1) proliferated at an exponential rate, (2) established epithelial colonies expressing ATII-specific and “ATI-like” mRNA and proteins after serial passage, (3) up-regulated genes important in cell proliferation and migration, and (4) on removal of feeder cells and Rho kinase inhibitor under air–liquid interface conditions, exhibited bioelectric and volume transport characteristics similar to freshly cultured ATII cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that this novel coculture technique breaks the in vitro ATII cell proliferation barrier while retaining cell-specific functional properties. This work will allow for a significant increase in studies designed to elucidate ATII cell function with the goal of accelerating the development of novel therapies for alveolar diseases. PMID:24191670

  1. Cloned ferrets produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ziyi; Sun, Xingshen; Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiaoming; Wisely, Samantha M.; Zhou, Qi; Renard, Jean-Paul; Leno, Gregory H.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) offers great potential for developing better animal models of human disease. The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) is an ideal animal model for influenza infections and potentially other human respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis, where mouse models have failed to reproduce the human disease phenotype. Here, we report the successful production of live cloned, reproductively competent, ferrets using species-specific SCNT methodologies. Critical to developing a successful SCNT protocol for the ferret was the finding that hormonal treatment, normally used for superovulation, adversely affected the developmental potential of recipient oocytes. The onset of Oct4 expression was delayed and incomplete in parthenogenetically activated oocytes collected from hormone-treated females relative to oocytes collected from females naturally mated with vasectomized males. Stimulation induced by mating and in vitro oocyte maturation produced the optimal oocyte recipient for SCNT. Although nuclear injection and cell fusion produced mid-term fetuses at equivalent rates (~3–4%), only cell fusion gave rise to healthy surviving clones. Single cell fusion rates and the efficiency of SCNT were also enhanced by placing two somatic cells into the perivitelline space. These species-specific modifications facilitated the birth of live, healthy, and fertile cloned ferrets. The development of microsatellite genotyping for domestic ferrets confirmed that ferret clones were genetically derived from their respective somatic cells and unrelated to their surrogate mother. With this technology, it is now feasible to begin generating genetically defined ferrets for studying transmissible and inherited human lung diseases. Cloning of the domestic ferret may also aid in recovery and conservation of the endangered black-footed ferret and European mink. PMID:16584722

  2. First cloned swamp buffalo produced from adult ear fibroblast cell.

    PubMed

    Tasripoo, K; Suthikrai, W; Sophon, S; Jintana, R; Nualchuen, W; Usawang, S; Bintvihok, A; Techakumphu, M; Srisakwattana, K

    2014-07-01

    The world's first cloned swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) derived from adult ear skin fibroblast has been reported. Donor fibroblast cells were produced from biopsies taken from adult male ear skin and in vitro matured oocytes obtained from a slaughterhouse were used as cytoplasts. A total of 39 blastocysts and 19 morulae fresh embryos were transferred into 12 recipient buffaloes. Progesterone assays indicated establishment of pregnancy in 10 of the 12 buffaloes (83.3%) after 45 days, with six animals still pregnant at 3 months. One recipient maintained pregnancy to term and naturally delivered a 40 kg male calf after 326 days of gestation. DNA analysis showed that the cloned calf was genetically identical to the donor cells. Genotype analyses, using 12 buffalo microsatellite markers, confirmed that the cloned calf was derived from the donor cell lines. In conclusion, the present study reports, for the first time, the establishment of pregnancy and birth of the first cloned Thai swamp buffalo derived from adult ear skin fibroblast cells.

  3. Single cell-derived clones from human adipose stem cells present different immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Sempere, J M; Martinez-Peinado, P; Arribas, M I; Reig, J A; De La Sen, M L; Zubcoff, J J; Fraga, M F; Fernández, A F; Santana, A; Roche, E

    2014-05-01

    Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells are a heterogeneous population, where cell cultures derived from single-cell-expanded clones present varying degrees of differential plasticity. This work focuses on the immunomodulatory/anti-inflammatory properties of these cells. To this end, five single-cell clones were isolated (generally called 1.X and 3.X) from two volunteers. Regarding the expression level of the lineage-characteristic surface antigens, clones 1·10 and 1·22 expressed the lowest amounts, while clones 3·10 and 3·5 expressed more CD105 than the rest and clone 1·7 expressed higher amounts of CD73 and CD44. Regarding cytokine secretion, all clones were capable of spontaneously releasing high levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and low to moderate levels of IL-8. These differences can be explained in part by the distinct methylation profile exhibited by the clones. Furthermore, and after lipopolysaccharide stimulation, clone 3.X produced the highest amounts of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, while clones 1·10 and 1·22 highly expressed IL-4 and IL-5. In co-culture experiments, clones 1.X are, together, more potent inhibitors than clones 3.X for proliferation of total, CD3(+) T, CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. The results of this work indicate that the adipose stem cell population is heterogeneous in cytokine production profile, and that isolation, characterization and selection of the appropriate cell clone is a more exact method for the possible treatment of different patients or pathologies.

  4. Single cell-derived clones from human adipose stem cells present different immunomodulatory properties

    PubMed Central

    Sempere, J M; Martinez-Peinado, P; Arribas, M I; Reig, J A; De La Sen, M L; Zubcoff, J J; Fraga, M F; Fernández, A F; Santana, A; Roche, E

    2014-01-01

    Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells are a heterogeneous population, where cell cultures derived from single-cell-expanded clones present varying degrees of differential plasticity. This work focuses on the immunomodulatory/anti-inflammatory properties of these cells. To this end, five single-cell clones were isolated (generally called 1.X and 3.X) from two volunteers. Regarding the expression level of the lineage-characteristic surface antigens, clones 1·10 and 1·22 expressed the lowest amounts, while clones 3·10 and 3·5 expressed more CD105 than the rest and clone 1·7 expressed higher amounts of CD73 and CD44. Regarding cytokine secretion, all clones were capable of spontaneously releasing high levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and low to moderate levels of IL-8. These differences can be explained in part by the distinct methylation profile exhibited by the clones. Furthermore, and after lipopolysaccharide stimulation, clone 3.X produced the highest amounts of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, while clones 1·10 and 1·22 highly expressed IL-4 and IL-5. In co-culture experiments, clones 1.X are, together, more potent inhibitors than clones 3.X for proliferation of total, CD3+T, CD4+T and CD8+T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. The results of this work indicate that the adipose stem cell population is heterogeneous in cytokine production profile, and that isolation, characterization and selection of the appropriate cell clone is a more exact method for the possible treatment of different patients or pathologies. PMID:24666184

  5. International policy failures: cloning and stem-cell research.

    PubMed

    Tauer, Carol A

    In late 2003, two international bodies were unable to resolve disagreements that involved bioethical issues. First, the United Nations General Assembly failed to pass a treaty on reproductive cloning because of insistence by some countries that the treaty include a ban on cloning for research. In view of the importance of enacting prohibition of reproductive cloning, the two issues should be separated and each argued on its own merits. Relevant objections to separation of the two issues can be refuted. Second, the European Union (EU) failed to agree on conditions for funding stem-cell research because of the diversity of views and policies of the countries of the EU. Because a stalemate was reached, funding decisions in the next programme cycle will be made on an ad hoc basis. Scientists will not have information they need to plan research programmes, suggesting that clear guidelines, even if restrictive, are preferable to vague unpublicised criteria.

  6. [Stem cells--cloning, plasticity, bioethic].

    PubMed

    Pflegerl, Pamina; Keller, Thomas; Hantusch, Brigitte; Hoffmann, Thomas Sören; Kenner, Lukas

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells with certain characteristics have become promising tools for molecular medicine. They have the potential to self-regenerate and to differentiate into specific tissues. Besides their great potential, embryonic stem cells (ESC) run the risk of enhanced tumorigenesis. The use of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is ethically problematic because their isolation involves the destruction of human embryos. Recently developed methods generate are able to pluripotent stem cells from fibroblasts. Alternatives for ESC are adult stem cells (ASC) derived from bone marrow, cord blood, amniotic fluid and other tissues. The following article is on the basis of testimony of Lukas Kenner for the German Bundestag about the use of ESC for research, therapy and drug development. Ethical aspects are taken into consideration.

  7. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning): implications for the medical practitioner.

    PubMed

    Tong, W F; Ng, Y F; Ng, S C

    2002-07-01

    The current century will bring tremendous changes to the science and the practice of medicine. This century will be acknowledged as the century of Biology as the fusion of molecular genetics and experimental embryology pushes the barriers of science beyond perimeters that we have thought existed, as much as the past century was the century of Physics, with all the exact scientific calculations and predictions, resulting in electricity, nuclear power and quantum physics. The first major breakthrough has been the pioneering work of Wilmut and Campbell, first with the birth of Megan and Moran in 1995 (1), followed by the birth of Dolly the sheep, the first reported mammalian clone from a fully differentiated adult cell, reported in July 1996 (2). However, current cloning techniques are an extension of over 40 years of research using nuclei derived from non-human embryonic and fetal cells. However, following the birth of Dolly, the prospects of cloning technology have extended to ethically hazier areas of human cloning and embryonic stem cell research. This review hopes to bring the reader closer to the science and the ethics of this new technology, and what the implications are for the medical practitioner.

  8. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning): implications for the medical practitioner.

    PubMed

    Tong, W F; Ng, Y F; Ng, S C

    2002-07-01

    The current century will bring tremendous changes to the science and the practice of medicine. This century will be acknowledged as the century of Biology as the fusion of molecular genetics and experimental embryology pushes the barriers of science beyond perimeters that we have thought existed, as much as the past century was the century of Physics, with all the exact scientific calculations and predictions, resulting in electricity, nuclear power and quantum physics. The first major breakthrough has been the pioneering work of Wilmut and Campbell, first with the birth of Megan and Moran in 1995 (1), followed by the birth of Dolly the sheep, the first reported mammalian clone from a fully differentiated adult cell, reported in July 1996 (2). However, current cloning techniques are an extension of over 40 years of research using nuclei derived from non-human embryonic and fetal cells. However, following the birth of Dolly, the prospects of cloning technology have extended to ethically hazier areas of human cloning and embryonic stem cell research. This review hopes to bring the reader closer to the science and the ethics of this new technology, and what the implications are for the medical practitioner. PMID:12437047

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are an attractive donor cell type for production of cloned pigs as well as genetically modified cloned pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zicong; He, Xiaoyan; Chen, Liwen; Shi, Junsong; Zhou, Rong; Xu, Weihua; Liu, Dewu; Wu, Zhenfang

    2013-10-01

    The somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technique has been widely applied to clone pigs or to produce genetically modified pigs. Currently, this technique relies mainly on using terminally differentiated fibroblasts as donor cells. To improve cloning efficiency, only partially differentiated multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), thought to be more easily reprogrammed to a pluripotent state, have been used as nuclear donors in pig SCNT. Although in vitro-cultured embryos cloned from porcine MSCs (MSCs-embryos) were shown to have higher preimplantation developmental ability than cloned embryos reconstructed from fibroblasts (Fs-embryos), the difference in in vivo full-term developmental rate between porcine MSCs-embryos and Fs-embryos has not been investigated so far. In this study, we demonstrated that blastocyst total cell number and full-term survival abilities of MSCs-embryos were significantly higher than those of Fs-embryos cloned from the same donor pig. The enhanced developmental potential of MSCs-embryos may be associated with their nuclear donors' DNA methylation profile, because we found that the methylation level of imprinting genes and repeat sequences differed between MSCs and fibroblasts. In addition, we showed that use of transgenic porcine MSCs generated from transgene plasmid transfection as donor cells for SCNT can produce live transgenic cloned pigs. These results strongly suggest that porcine bone marrow MSCs are a desirable donor cell type for production of cloned pigs and genetically modified cloned pigs via SCNT.

  10. Epithelial Label-Retaining Cells Are Absent during Tooth Cycling in Salmo salar and Polypterus senegalus.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Sam; Willems, Maxime; Witten, P Eckhard; Hansen, Tom; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Huysseune, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and African bichir (Polypterus senegalus) are both actinopterygian fish species that continuously replace their teeth without the involvement of a successional dental lamina. Instead, they share the presence of a middle dental epithelium: an epithelial tier enclosed by inner and outer dental epithelium. It has been hypothesized that this tier could functionally substitute for a successional dental lamina and might be a potential niche to house epithelial stem cells involved in tooth cycling. Therefore, in this study we performed a BrdU pulse chase experiment on both species to (1) determine the localization and extent of proliferating cells in the dental epithelial layers, (2) describe cell dynamics and (3) investigate if label-retaining cells are present, suggestive for the putative presence of stem cells. Cells proliferate in the middle dental epithelium, outer dental epithelium and cervical loop at the lingual side of the dental organ to form a new tooth germ. Using long chase times, both in S. salar (eight weeks) and P. senegalus (eight weeks and twelve weeks), we could not reveal the presence of label-retaining cells in the dental organ. Immunostaining of P. senegalus dental organs for the transcription factor Sox2, often used as a stem cell marker, labelled cells in the zone of outer dental epithelium which grades into the oral epithelium (ODE transition zone) and the inner dental epithelium of a successor only. The location of Sox2 distribution does not provide evidence for epithelial stem cells in the dental organ and, more specifically, in the middle dental epithelium. Comparison of S. salar and P. senegalus reveals shared traits in tooth cycling and thus advances our understanding of the developmental mechanism that ensures lifelong replacement. PMID:27049953

  11. Epithelial Label-Retaining Cells Are Absent during Tooth Cycling in Salmo salar and Polypterus senegalus

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, Sam; Willems, Maxime; Witten, P. Eckhard; Hansen, Tom; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Huysseune, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and African bichir (Polypterus senegalus) are both actinopterygian fish species that continuously replace their teeth without the involvement of a successional dental lamina. Instead, they share the presence of a middle dental epithelium: an epithelial tier enclosed by inner and outer dental epithelium. It has been hypothesized that this tier could functionally substitute for a successional dental lamina and might be a potential niche to house epithelial stem cells involved in tooth cycling. Therefore, in this study we performed a BrdU pulse chase experiment on both species to (1) determine the localization and extent of proliferating cells in the dental epithelial layers, (2) describe cell dynamics and (3) investigate if label-retaining cells are present, suggestive for the putative presence of stem cells. Cells proliferate in the middle dental epithelium, outer dental epithelium and cervical loop at the lingual side of the dental organ to form a new tooth germ. Using long chase times, both in S. salar (eight weeks) and P. senegalus (eight weeks and twelve weeks), we could not reveal the presence of label-retaining cells in the dental organ. Immunostaining of P. senegalus dental organs for the transcription factor Sox2, often used as a stem cell marker, labelled cells in the zone of outer dental epithelium which grades into the oral epithelium (ODE transition zone) and the inner dental epithelium of a successor only. The location of Sox2 distribution does not provide evidence for epithelial stem cells in the dental organ and, more specifically, in the middle dental epithelium. Comparison of S. salar and P. senegalus reveals shared traits in tooth cycling and thus advances our understanding of the developmental mechanism that ensures lifelong replacement. PMID:27049953

  12. Bone marrow long label-retaining cells reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Yoshiaki; Takubo, Keiyo; Suda, Toshio

    2008-02-08

    In response to changing signals, quiescent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be induced to an activated cycling state and provide multi-lineage hematopoietic cells to the whole body via blood vessels. However, the precise localization of quiescent HSCs in bone marrow microenvironment is not fully characterized. Here, we performed whole-mount immunostaining of bone marrow and found that BrdU label-retaining cells (LRCs) definitively reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic zone distant from the 'vascular niche'. Although LRCs expressed very low level of a well-known HSC marker, c-kit in normal circumstances, myeloablation by 5-FU treatment caused LRCs to abundantly express c-kit and proliferate actively. These results demonstrate that bone marrow LRCs reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche, and function as a regenerative cell pool of HSCs.

  13. Rabbit somatic cell cloning: effects of donor cell type, histone acetylation status and chimeric embryo complementation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feikun; Hao, Ru; Kessler, Barbara; Brem, Gottfried; Wolf, Eckhard; Zakhartchenko, Valeri

    2007-01-01

    The epigenetic status of a donor nucleus has an important effect on the developmental potential of embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, we transferred cultured rabbit cumulus cells (RCC) and fetal fibroblasts (RFF) from genetically marked rabbits (Alicia/Basilea) into metaphase II oocytes and analyzed the levels of histone H3-lysine 9-lysine 14 acetylation (acH3K9/14) in donor cells and cloned embryos. We also assessed the correlation between the histone acetylation status of donor cells and cloned embryos and their developmental potential. To test whether alteration of the histone acetylation status affects development of cloned embryos, we treated donor cells with sodium butyrate (NaBu), a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Further, we tried to improve cloning efficiency by chimeric complementation of cloned embryos with blastomeres from in vivo fertilized or parthenogenetic embryos. The levels of acH3K9/14 were higher in RCCs than in RFFs (P<0.05). Although the type of donor cells did not affect development to blastocyst, after transfer into recipients, RCC cloned embryos induced a higher initial pregnancy rate as compared to RFF cloned embryos (40 vs 20%). However, almost all pregnancies with either type of cloned embryos were lost by the middle of gestation and only one fully developed, live RCC-derived rabbit was obtained. Treatment of RFFs with NaBu significantly increased the level of acH3K9/14 and the proportion of nuclear transfer embryos developing to blastocyst (49 vs 33% with non-treated RFF, P<0.05). The distribution of acH3K9/14 in either group of cloned embryos did not resemble that in in vivo fertilized embryos suggesting that reprogramming of this epigenetic mark is aberrant in cloned rabbit embryos and cannot be corrected by treatment of donor cells with NaBu. Aggregation of embryos cloned from NaBu-treated RFFs with blastomeres from in vivo derived embryos improved development to blastocyst, but no cloned

  14. Putative porcine embryonic stem cell lines derived from aggregated four-celled cloned embryos produced by oocyte bisection cloning.

    PubMed

    Siriboon, Chawalit; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Kere, Michel; Chen, Chun-Da; Chen, Lih-Ren; Chen, Chien-Hong; Tu, Ching-Fu; Lo, Neng-Wen; Ju, Jyh-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    We attempted to isolate ES cell lines using inner cell masses from high-quality cloned porcine blastocysts. After being seeded onto feeders, embryos had better (P < 0.05) attachment, outgrowth formation and primary colonization in both 2× and 3× aggregated cloned embryos (62.8, 42.6 and 12.8% vs. 76.2, 55.2 and 26.2%, respectively) compared to the non-aggregated group (41.6, 23.4 and 3.9%). Effects of feeder types (STO vs. MEF) and serum sources (FBS vs. KSR) on extraction of cloned embryo-derived porcine ES cells were examined. More (17.1%) ntES cell lines over Passage 3 were generated in the MEF/KSR group. However, ntES cells cultured in KSR-supplemented medium had a low proliferation rate with defective morphology, and eventually underwent differentiation or apoptosis subsequently. Approximately 26.1, 22.7 and 35.7% of primary colonies were formed after plating embryos in DMEM, DMEM/F12 and α-MEM media, respectively. Survival rates of ntES cells cultured in α-MEM, DMEM and DMEM/F12 were 16.7, 4.3 and 6.8%, respectively (P > 0.05). We further examined the beneficial effect of TSA treatment of 3× aggregated cloned embryos on establishment of ntES cell lines. Primary colony numbers and survival rates of ntES cells beyond passage 3 were higher (P < 0.05) in those derived from TSA-treated 3× blastocysts (36.7 and 26.7%) than from the non-treated aggregated group (23.1 and 11.5%). These cells, remaining undifferentiated over 25 passages, had alkaline phosphatase activity and expressed ES specific markers Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Rex01. Moreover, these ntES cells successfully differentiated into embryoid bodies (EBs) that expressed specific genes of all three germ layers after being cultured in LIF-free medium. In conclusion, we have successfully derived putative porcine ntES cells with high efficiency from quality cloned embryos produced by embryo aggregation, and optimized the ES cell culture system suitable for establishing and maintaining ntES cell lines in

  15. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... mammals. These twins are produced when a fertilized egg splits, creating two or more embryos that carry ... of the donor animal's somatic cell into an egg cell, or oocyte, that has had its own ...

  16. Label-Retaining, Quiescent Globose Basal Cells Are Found in the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Woochan; Chen, Xueyan; Flis, Daniel; Harris, Margaret; Schwob, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate olfactory epithelium (OE) is known for its ability to renew itself throughout life as well as to reconstitute after injury. Although this remarkable capacity demonstrates the persistence of stem cells and multipotent progenitor cells, their nature in the OE remains undefined and controversial, as both horizontal basal cells (HBCs) and globose basal cells (GBCs) have features in common with each other and with stem cells in other tissues. Here, we investigate whether some among the population of GBCs satisfy a key feature of stem cells, i.e., mitotic quiescence with retention of thymidine analogue label and activation by injury. Accordingly, we demonstrate that some GBCs express p27Kip1, a member of the Kip/Cip family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. In addition, some GBCs retain bromodeoxyuridine or ethynyldeoxyuridine for an extended period when the pulse is administered in neonates followed by a 1-month chase. Their identity as GBCs was confirmed by electron microscopy. All spared GBCs express Ki-67 in the methyl bromide (MeBr)-lesioned OE initially after lesion, indicating that the label-retaining (LR) GBCs are activated in response to injury. LR-GBCs reappear during the acute recovery period following MeBr exposure, as demonstrated with 2- or 4-week chase periods after labeling. Taken together, our data demonstrate the existence of LR-GBCs that are seemingly activated in response to epithelial injury and then re-established after the initial phase of recovery is completed. In this regard, some among the GBCs satisfy a common criterion for functioning like stem cells. PMID:24122672

  17. Label-Retaining Stromal Cells in Mouse Endometrium Awaken for Expansion and Repair After Parturition

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mingzhu; Yeung, William S.B.

    2015-01-01

    Human and mouse endometrium undergo dramatic cellular reorganization during pregnancy and postpartum. Somatic stem cells maintain homeostasis of the tissue by providing a cell reservoir for regeneration. We hypothesized that endometrial cells with quiescent properties (stem/progenitor cells) were involved in the regeneration of the endometrial tissue. Given that stem cells divide infrequently, they can retain the DNA synthesis label [bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] after a prolonged chase period. In this study, prepubertal mice were pulsed with BrdU and after a 6-week chase a small population of label-retaining stromal cells (LRSC) was located primarily beneath the luminal epithelium, adjacent to blood vessels, and near the endometrial–myometrial junction. Marker analyses suggested that they were of mesenchymal origin expressing CD44+, CD90+, CD140b+, CD146+, and Sca-1+. During pregnancy, nonproliferating LRSC predominately resided at the interimplantation/placental loci of the gestational endometrium. Immediately after parturition, a significant portion of the LRSC underwent proliferation (BrdU+/Ki-67+) and expressed total and active β-catenin. The β-catenin expression in the LRSC was transiently elevated at postpartum day (PPD) 1. The proliferation of LRSC resulted in a significant decline in the proportion of LRSC in the postpartum uterus. The LRSC returned to dormancy at PPD7, and the percentage of LRSC remained stable thereafter until 11 weeks. This study demonstrated that LRSC can respond efficiently to physiological stimuli upon initiation of uterine involution and return to its quiescent state after postpartum repair. PMID:25386902

  18. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38–77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  19. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38-77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  20. Promethean medicine: spirituality, stem cells, and cloning.

    PubMed

    Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2006-12-01

    Every ethos implies a mythos. That is, every ethical system depends upon some fundamental story disclosing its assumptions about human nature, freedom, good and evil, and the workings of the universe. A romanticized version of the myth of Prometheus, who stole fire from the gods and was punished by being chained to a rock and having his liver plucked out by vultures, seems to under-gird much of contemporary healthcare. Christianity offers a different view--one in which the universe is not a zero sum game and human beings do not need to steal fire because God has already freely given them all the fire they need in Christ and in his spirit. A critical virtue for physicians, taught by Christianity, is sagacious engagement--the ability to engage the world practically, discerning what can and should be changed and what should be accepted as unchangeable and given. The illusory quest for immortality through the practice of regenerative medicine using stem cells is a gross violation of that virtue. PMID:17233215

  1. Stem cells expanded from the human embryonic hindbrain stably retain regional specification and high neurogenic potency.

    PubMed

    Tailor, Jignesh; Kittappa, Raja; Leto, Ketty; Gates, Monte; Borel, Melodie; Paulsen, Ole; Spitzer, Sonia; Karadottir, Ragnhildur Thora; Rossi, Ferdinando; Falk, Anna; Smith, Austin

    2013-07-24

    Stem cell lines that faithfully maintain the regional identity and developmental potency of progenitors in the human brain would create new opportunities in developmental neurobiology and provide a resource for generating specialized human neurons. However, to date, neural progenitor cultures derived from the human brain have either been short-lived or exhibit restricted, predominantly glial, differentiation capacity. Pluripotent stem cells are an alternative source, but to ascertain definitively the identity and fidelity of cell types generated solely in vitro is problematic. Here, we show that hindbrain neuroepithelial stem (hbNES) cells can be derived and massively expanded from early human embryos (week 5-7, Carnegie stage 15-17). These cell lines are propagated in adherent culture in the presence of EGF and FGF2 and retain progenitor characteristics, including SOX1 expression, formation of rosette-like structures, and high neurogenic capacity. They generate GABAergic, glutamatergic and, at lower frequency, serotonergic neurons. Importantly, hbNES cells stably maintain hindbrain specification and generate upper rhombic lip derivatives on exposure to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). When grafted into neonatal rat brain, they show potential for integration into cerebellar development and produce cerebellar granule-like cells, albeit at low frequency. hbNES cells offer a new system to study human cerebellar specification and development and to model diseases of the hindbrain. They also provide a benchmark for the production of similar long-term neuroepithelial-like stem cells (lt-NES) from pluripotent cell lines. To our knowledge, hbNES cells are the first demonstration of highly expandable neuroepithelial stem cells derived from the human embryo without genetic immortalization.

  2. Twist1-positive epithelial cells retain adhesive and proliferative capacity throughout dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Eliah R.; Coutinho, Kester; Georgess, Dan; Auer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dissemination is the process by which cells detach and migrate away from a multicellular tissue. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) conceptualizes dissemination in a stepwise fashion, with downregulation of E-cadherin leading to loss of intercellular junctions, induction of motility, and then escape from the epithelium. This gain of migratory activity is proposed to be mutually exclusive with proliferation. We previously developed a dissemination assay based on inducible expression of the transcription factor Twist1 and here utilize it to characterize the timing and dynamics of intercellular adhesion, proliferation and migration during dissemination. Surprisingly, Twist1+ epithelium displayed extensive intercellular junctions, and Twist1– luminal epithelial cells could still adhere to disseminating Twist1+ cells. Although proteolysis and proliferation were both observed throughout dissemination, neither was absolutely required. Finally, Twist1+ cells exhibited a hybrid migration mode; their morphology and nuclear deformation were characteristic of amoeboid cells, whereas their dynamic protrusive activity, pericellular proteolysis and migration speeds were more typical of mesenchymal cells. Our data reveal that epithelial cells can disseminate while retaining competence to adhere and proliferate. PMID:27402962

  3. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot-based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan-cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF-7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot-based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology. PMID:27572664

  4. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  5. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology. PMID:27572664

  6. [SPREADING OF NCTC CLONE 929 CELLS AFTER RESEEDING].

    PubMed

    Petrov, Yu P; Negulyaev, Yu A; Tsupkina, N V

    2015-01-01

    The period (1 h after reseeding) of behaviour of mouse NCTC clone 929 cells to the conditions of artificial cultivation was studied. The time-lapse imaging followed the processing of the cells with ImageJ program was applied. To characterize the parametres cell status we used the cell area (projection of the cell on substrate) and Rp/Ra ratio introduced earlier as a spreading coefficient (Kuz'minykh, Petrov, 2004). After attaching a substratum, cells have a form of sphere (the phase "sphere") as the daughter cells after a mitosis. We revealed however that after this phase the reseeded cells do not start usual spreading and migration along substratum. They pass a phase of equally spreading in all directions and shaping their area as a circle (phase "circle"). This phase is absent of the daughter cells spreading after mitosis. We assume that the phase "circle" is a result of adaptation of the cells to reseedings at artificial cultivation. It is necessary for formation of a substrate composed of own extracellular matrix components (ECM) of the cells. Own ECM facilitates transition of the cells to their usual spreading and migration along substratum.

  7. Skeletal muscle stem cells adopt a dormant cell state post mortem and retain regenerative capacity.

    PubMed

    Latil, Mathilde; Rocheteau, Pierre; Châtre, Laurent; Sanulli, Serena; Mémet, Sylvie; Ricchetti, Miria; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Chrétien, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    The accessibility to stem cells from healthy or diseased individuals, and the maintenance of their potency are challenging issues for stem cell biology. Here we report the isolation of viable and functional skeletal myogenic cells from humans up to 17 days, and mice up to 14 days post mortem, much longer beyond previous reports. Muscle stem cells are enriched in post mortem tissue, suggesting a selective survival advantage compared with other cell types. Transplantation of mouse muscle and haematopoietic stem cells regenerates tissues robustly. Cellular quiescence contributes to this cell viability where cells adopt a reversible dormant state characterized by reduced metabolic activity, a prolonged lag phase before the first cell division, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and a transcriptional status less primed for commitment. Finally, severe hypoxia, or anoxia is critical for maintaining stem cell viability and regenerative capacity. Thus, these cells provide a useful resource for studying stem cell biology.

  8. Amphibian and mammal somatic-cell cloning: different species, common results?

    PubMed

    Loi, Pasqualino; Fulka, Josef; Ptak, Grazyna

    2003-11-01

    Since the production of Dolly the sheep cloning methods for somatic cells have been thoroughly described and are becoming routine. However, the rate at which live clones are produced remains low in all mammalian species tested so far. Remarkably, irrespective of the cloning protocol or the donor-cell type, all clones display common abnormalities, particularly in the placenta. The process is also complicated by early mortality of somatic-cell clones and the founder mammalian clone, Dolly the sheep, died in February 2003 aged six years. Based on published data and on our own experience, our view is that mammalian somatic-cell cloning and the pioneer nuclear-transfer data from amphibians have much in common. We suggest that the only way to improve nuclear reprogramming is to modify the chromatin structure of somatic cells before nuclear transfer, to provide the oocyte with a chromosomal structure that is more compatible with the natural reprogramming machinery of the oocyte.

  9. Amphibian and mammal somatic-cell cloning: different species, common results?

    PubMed

    Loi, Pasqualino; Fulka, Josef; Ptak, Grazyna

    2003-11-01

    Since the production of Dolly the sheep cloning methods for somatic cells have been thoroughly described and are becoming routine. However, the rate at which live clones are produced remains low in all mammalian species tested so far. Remarkably, irrespective of the cloning protocol or the donor-cell type, all clones display common abnormalities, particularly in the placenta. The process is also complicated by early mortality of somatic-cell clones and the founder mammalian clone, Dolly the sheep, died in February 2003 aged six years. Based on published data and on our own experience, our view is that mammalian somatic-cell cloning and the pioneer nuclear-transfer data from amphibians have much in common. We suggest that the only way to improve nuclear reprogramming is to modify the chromatin structure of somatic cells before nuclear transfer, to provide the oocyte with a chromosomal structure that is more compatible with the natural reprogramming machinery of the oocyte. PMID:14573358

  10. Sockeye Salmon Retain Immunoglobulin-Secreting Plasma Cells Throughout Their Spawning Journey And Post-spawning

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Jonathan; Clister, Terri; Bruce, Amber; Epp, Lidia; Zwollo, Patty

    2013-01-01

    Antibody-producing plasma cells are a major source of protective immunity in vertebrates, including salmon. During the spawning phase, salmon undergo drastic, hormonally driven changes in their physiology, including elevated levels of cortisol, which are known to suppress the immune system. As adult fish need to survive their long journey to the spawning grounds, we hypothesized that humoral immunity, in the form of IgM-secreting plasma cells, remains functional until post-spawning. This was investigated by measuring changes in membrane and secreted immunoglobulin heavy chain mu and Pax5 transcripts in spleen and kidney from migrating sockeye salmon, using real-time qPCR. As an additional measurement, the abundance of developing B, mature B, and plasma cells was determined in spawning fish, using flow cytometry. Immune tissue samples were collected from fish from the Kenai River drainage and Main Bay, Prince William Sound. Our results reveal that spawning fish express high levels of secreted heavy chain mu transcripts in their spleen and anterior kidney throughout the spawning journey. Furthermore, we show that IgM-secreting PCs (HCmu++/Pax5−) remain abundant in anterior kidney and spleen of post-spawning sockeye salmon, with a concomitant loss in developing B cells (HCmu−/Pax5+). This suggests that successful spawners retain their PCs throughout the spawning journey and post-spawning. PMID:23434463

  11. Sockeye salmon retain immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells throughout their spawning journey and post-spawning.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Jonathan; Clister, Terri; Bruce, Amber; Epp, Lidia; Zwollo, Patty

    2013-06-01

    Antibody-producing plasma cells are a major source of protective immunity in vertebrates, including salmon. During the spawning phase, salmon undergo drastic, hormonally driven changes in their physiology, including elevated levels of cortisol, which are known to suppress the immune system. As adult fish need to survive their long journey to the spawning grounds, we hypothesized that humoral immunity, in the form of IgM-secreting plasma cells, remains functional until post-spawning. This was investigated by measuring changes in membrane and secreted immunoglobulin heavy chain mu and Pax5 transcripts in spleen and kidney from migrating sockeye salmon, using real-time qPCR. As an additional measurement, the abundance of developing B, mature B, and plasma cells was determined in spawning fish, using flow cytometry. Immune tissue samples were collected from fish from the Kenai River drainage and Main Bay, Prince William Sound. Our results reveal that spawning fish express high levels of secreted heavy chain mu transcripts in their spleen and anterior kidney throughout the spawning journey. Furthermore, we show that IgM-secreting PCs (HCmu++/Pax5-) remain abundant in anterior kidney and spleen of post-spawning sockeye salmon, with a concomitant loss in developing B cells (HCmu-/Pax5+). This suggests that successful spawners retain their PCs throughout the spawning journey and post-spawning. PMID:23434463

  12. Cloning higher plants from aseptically cultured tissues and cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    A review of aseptic culture methods for higher plants is presented, which focuses on the existing problems that limit or prevent the full realization of cloning plants from free cells. It is shown that substantial progress in clonal multiplication has been made with explanted stem tips or lateral buds which can be stimulated to produce numerous precocious axillary branches. These branches can then be separated or subdivided and induced to root in order to yield populations of genetically and phenotypically uniorm plantlets. Similarly, undifferentiated calluses can sometimes be induced to form shoots and/or roots adventitiously. Although the cell culture techniques required to produce somatic embryos are presently rudimentary, steady advances are being made in learning how to stimulate formation of somatic or adventive embryos from totipotent cells grown in suspension cultures. It is concluded that many problems exist in the producing and growing of totipotent or morphogenetically competent cell suspensions, but the potential benefits are great.

  13. BrdU-label-retaining cells in rat eccrine sweat glands over time.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Mingjun; Li, Xuexue; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Bingna; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    Cell proliferation and turnover are fueled by stem cells. In a previous study, we demonstrated that rat eccrine sweat glands contained abundant bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-label-retaining cells (LRCs). However, morphological observations showed that eccrine sweat glands usually show little or no signs of homeostatic change. In this study, we account for why the homeostatic change is rare in eccrine sweat glands based on cytokinetic changes in BrdU-LRC turnover, and also determine the BrdU-labeled cell type. Thirty-six newborn SD rats, were injected intraperitoneally with 50mg/kg BrdU twice daily at a 2h interval for 4 consecutive days. After a chase period of 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 and 32 weeks, rats were euthanized, and the hind footpads were removed and processed for BrdU immunostaining, and BrdU/α-SMA and BrdU/K14 double-immunostaining. BrdU-LRCs were observed in the ducts, secretory coils and mesenchymal cells at all survival time points. The percentage of BrdU(+) cells in rat eccrine sweat glands averaged 4.2±1.2% after 4 weeks of chase, increased slightly by the 6th week, averaging 4.4±0.9%, and peaked at 8 weeks, averaging 5.3±1.0%. Subsequently, the average percentage of BrdU(+) cells declined to 3.2±0.8% by the 32nd week. There was no difference in the percentage of BrdU-LRCs among the different survival time points except that a significant difference in the percentage of BrdU-LRCs detected at 24 weeks versus 8 weeks, and 32 weeks versus 8 weeks, was observed. We concluded that the BrdU-LRCs turnover is slow in eccrine sweat glands. PMID:26657518

  14. Noncytotoxic T cell clones obtained from a human mixed leukocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Chu, M H; Wee, S L; Bach, F H

    1990-02-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a DQW-1 homozygous individual were cocultured with irradiated lymphoblastoid cell line from a DQW-1 homozygous unrelated donor bearing BW35-DW1 haplotype. From T cell cloning of primary and twice-stimulated mixed leukocyte cultures (MLC), 7 and 11 T cell clones were obtained respectively. None of the 18 clones showed specific cytotoxic activity against the alloantigen of the stimulator cell as well as natural killer (NK)-like activity against K562 cells. However, most T cell clones from both primary and re-stimulated MLC demonstrated moderate cytotoxic activity in lectin-dependent cell-mediated cytolysis (LDCC) assay. Screening assay for cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) performed on growing microcultures obtained from restimulated MLC cloning confirmed the non-cytotoxic status of these T cell clones by showing that 41 out of 44 growing microcultures were not cytotoxic against the stimulator cell; the other 3 clones lyzed the target cell mildly. The cells from all 5 T cell clones detected for indirect fluorescence expressed CD3 and CD4 surface markers. Taken together, the results suggested that proliferation-regulating T cell subsets or factor(s) may be generated during the course of MLCs under the present responder-stimulator combination, and may suppress the development of alloreactive cytotoxic T cells and NK-like cells. PMID:2144231

  15. Effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-J; Peng, H; Hu, C-C; Li, X-Y; Zhang, J-L; Zheng, Z; Zhang, W-C

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere length of cloned goats from adult skin fibroblast cells. The telomere length of somatic cell cloned goats and their offspring was determined by measuring their mean terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length. The result showed that (i) reconstructed embryos with fibroblast cells from males Boer goats obtained significantly higher kids rate and rate of live kids than those of female embryos and (ii) the telomere lengths of four female cloned goats were shorter compared to their donor cells, but five male cloned goats had the same telomere length with their donor cells, mainly due to great variation existed among them. The offspring from female cloned goats had the same telomere length with their age-matched counterparts. In conclusion, the donor cells' sex had significant effects on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats.

  16. Effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-J; Peng, H; Hu, C-C; Li, X-Y; Zhang, J-L; Zheng, Z; Zhang, W-C

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere length of cloned goats from adult skin fibroblast cells. The telomere length of somatic cell cloned goats and their offspring was determined by measuring their mean terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length. The result showed that (i) reconstructed embryos with fibroblast cells from males Boer goats obtained significantly higher kids rate and rate of live kids than those of female embryos and (ii) the telomere lengths of four female cloned goats were shorter compared to their donor cells, but five male cloned goats had the same telomere length with their donor cells, mainly due to great variation existed among them. The offspring from female cloned goats had the same telomere length with their age-matched counterparts. In conclusion, the donor cells' sex had significant effects on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats. PMID:27558653

  17. "Mouse Clone Model" for evaluating the immunogenicity and tumorigenicity of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the immune-rejection and tumor-formation potentials of induced pluripotent stem cells and other stem cells, we devised a model-designated the "Mouse Clone Model"-which combined the theory of somatic animal cloning, tetraploid complementation, and induced pluripotent stem cells to demonstrate the applicability of stem cells for transplantation therapy. PMID:26687081

  18. "Mouse Clone Model" for evaluating the immunogenicity and tumorigenicity of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-18

    To investigate the immune-rejection and tumor-formation potentials of induced pluripotent stem cells and other stem cells, we devised a model-designated the "Mouse Clone Model"-which combined the theory of somatic animal cloning, tetraploid complementation, and induced pluripotent stem cells to demonstrate the applicability of stem cells for transplantation therapy.

  19. Phenotypic abnormalities observed in aged cloned mice from embryonic stem cells after long-term maintenance.

    PubMed

    Shimozawa, Nobuhiro; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Eguchi, Natsuko; Suzuki, Shuzo; Hioki, Kyoji; Usui, Toshimi; Kono, Tomohiro; Ito, Mamoru

    2006-09-01

    Somatic/embryonic stem cell cloning has made it possible to produce an individual genomically identical to another individual. However, the cloned animals have a variety of abnormalities caused by the aberrant gene modification, with insufficient reprogramming in cloning. We previously reported abnormalities in cloned mice at birth. In this study, we examined what abnormalities could be seen in cloned mice after long-term maintenance. The aged cloned mice showed multiple abnormalities: increase of body weight, some phenotypic abnormalities in the kidneys, testes and thymus, and lower urea nitrogen in their serum biochemical values. The kidneys of all cloned mice were hypertrophied, with a metamorphic or whitish appearance. The multiple lesions, including the enlarged renal pelvis and distension of the renal veins in histology, might be the result of urine accumulation by urinary tract obstruction. The testes of the cloned mice were atrophied, and showed no sperm formation in histology. In contrast, the thymus was rather hypertrophied, and a comparably increased number of lymphocytes were observed in the medulla, consisting mainly of T cells. By conducting a progeny test between the cloned mice, it was confirmed that these abnormalities in the aged cloned mice were not transmitted to their offspring, indicating that the incomplete reprogramming in clones might be in part responsible for the abnormalities detected in aged clones. These results indicate that the postnatal abnormalities observed in aged cloned mice are varied and can be restored through the germ line. PMID:16940284

  20. Interpretation of reprogramming to predict the success of somatic cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Sigrid; McLaughlin, K John

    2004-07-01

    In the context of mammalian somatic cell cloning, the term reprogramming refers to the processes that enable a somatic cell nucleus to adopt the role of a zygotic nucleus. Gene re-expression is one measure of reprogramming if correlated with subsequent developmental potential. This paper describes several experiments utilizing pre-implantation gene expression to evaluate reprogramming and clone viability. We have established a direct correlation between Oct4 expression in mouse clones at the blastocyst stage and their potential to maintain pluripotent embryonic cells essential for post-implantation development. Furthermore, the quality of gene expression in clones dramatically improves when genetically identical clones are combined in clone-clone aggregate chimeras. Clone--clone aggregates exhibit a higher developmental potential than single clones both in vitro and in vivo. This could be mediated by complementation between blastomeres from epigenetically different clones within the aggregate rather than by the increase in cell number resulting from aggregation. We also discuss the use of tetraploid embryos as a model to evaluate reprogramming using gene expression and demonstrate that somatic cell nuclei can be reprogrammed by blastomeres to re-express embryonic specific genes but not to contribute to post-implantation development.

  1. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  2. Caveolae, fenestrae and transendothelial channels retain PV1 on the surface of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Eugene; Tse, Dan; Sideleva, Olga; Deharvengt, Sophie J; Luciano, Marcus R; Xu, Yan; McGarry, Caitlin L; Chidlow, John; Pilch, Paul F; Sessa, William C; Toomre, Derek K; Stan, Radu V

    2012-01-01

    PV1 protein is an essential component of stomatal and fenestral diaphragms, which are formed at the plasma membrane of endothelial cells (ECs), on structures such as caveolae, fenestrae and transendothelial channels. Knockout of PV1 in mice results in in utero and perinatal mortality. To be able to interpret the complex PV1 knockout phenotype, it is critical to determine whether the formation of diaphragms is the only cellular role of PV1. We addressed this question by measuring the effect of complete and partial removal of structures capable of forming diaphragms on PV1 protein level. Removal of caveolae in mice by knocking out caveolin-1 or cavin-1 resulted in a dramatic reduction of PV1 protein level in lungs but not kidneys. The magnitude of PV1 reduction correlated with the abundance of structures capable of forming diaphragms in the microvasculature of these organs. The absence of caveolae in the lung ECs did not affect the transcription or translation of PV1, but it caused a sharp increase in PV1 protein internalization rate via a clathrin- and dynamin-independent pathway followed by degradation in lysosomes. Thus, PV1 is retained on the cell surface of ECs by structures capable of forming diaphragms, but undergoes rapid internalization and degradation in the absence of these structures, suggesting that formation of diaphragms is the only role of PV1.

  3. Frequent occurrence of highly expanded but unrelated B-cell clones in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah N; Debes Marun, Carina S; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Gibson, Spencer B; Venner, Christopher P; Johnston, James B; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2013-01-01

    Clonal diversity in multiple myeloma (MM) includes both MM-related and MM-unrelated clonal expansions which are subject to dominance exerted by the MM clone. Here we show evidence for the existence of minor but highly expanded unrelated B-cell clones in patients with MM defined by their complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) peak. We further characterize these clones over the disease and subsequent treatment. Second clones were identified by their specific IgH-VDJ sequences that are distinct from those of dominant MM clones. Clonal frequencies were determined through semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative PCR and single-cell polymerase chain reaction of the clone-specific sequence. In 13/74 MM patients, more than one dominant CDR3 peak was identified with 12 patients (16%) being truly biclonal. Second clones had different frequencies, were found in different locations and were found in different cell types from the dominant MM clone. Where analysis was possible, they were shown to have chromosomal characteristic distinct from those of the MM clone. The frequency of the second clone also changed over the course of the disease and often persisted despite treatment. Molecularly-defined second clones are infrequent in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 1/43 individuals or 2%), suggesting that they may arise at relatively late stages of myelomagenesis. In further support of our findings, biclonal gammopathy and concomitant MM and CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) were confirmed to originate from two unrelated clones. Our data supports the idea that the clone giving rise to symptomatic myeloma exerts clonal dominance to prevent expansion of other clones. MM and second clones may arise from an underlying niche permissive of clonal expansion. The clinical significance of these highly expanded but unrelated clones remains to be confirmed. Overall, our findings add new dimensions to evaluating related and unrelated clonal expansions in MM and the

  4. Lysis of cells infected with typhus group rickettsiae by a human cytotoxic T cell clone

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, M.; Robbins, F.; Hartzman, R.J.; Dasch, G.A.

    1987-12-15

    Cytolytic human T cells clones generated in response to the intracellular bacterium Rickettsia typhi were characterized. Growing clones were tested for their ability to proliferate specifically in response to antigens derived from typhus group rickettsiae or to lyse targets infected with R. typhi or Rickettsia prowazekii, as measured by /sup 51/Cr-release from target cells. Two clones were able to lyse targets infected with typhus group rickettsiae. One of these clones was more fully characterized because of its rapid growth characteristics. This cytolytic clone was capable of lysing an autologous infected target as well as a target matched for class I and II histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA). It was not capable, however, of lysing either a target mismatched for both class I and II HLA or a target partially matched for class I HLA. In addition, the clone exhibited specificity in that it was able to lyse an autologous target infected with typhus group rickettsiae, but did not lyse an autologous target infected with an antigenically distinct rickettsial species, Rickettsia tsutsugamushi. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that cells infected with intracellular bacteria can be lysed by human cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

  5. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared (NIR) ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of-cavity pulse- stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two-photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two- photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond layers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  6. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular, we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond(s) pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of- cavity pulse-stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two- photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two-photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond lasers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  7. Nuclear EGFR characterize still controlled proliferation retained in better differentiated clear cell RCC.

    PubMed

    Ahel, J; Dordevic, G; Markic, D; Mozetic, V; Spanjol, J; Grahovac, B; Stifter, S

    2015-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common solid kidney tumor representing 2-3% of all cancers, with the highest frequency occurring in Western countries. There was a worldwide and European annual increase in incidence of approximately 2% although incidence has been stabilized in last few years. One third of the patients already have metastases in the time of the diagnosis with poor prognosis because RCC are radio and chemoresistant. The prognostic value of EGFR over-expression in RCC is a controversial issue that could be explained by different histological types of study tumors and non-standardized criteria for evaluation of expression. Recent evidences points to a new mode of EGFR signaling pathway in which activated EGFR undergoes nuclear translocalization and then, as transcription factor, mediates gene expression and other cellular events required for highly proliferating activities. According to our observations, the membranous expression of EGFR associates with high nuclear grade and poor differentiated tumors. On the other hand, nuclear EGFR expression was high in low nuclear graded and well differentiated tumors with good prognosis. We hypothesize that this mode of EGFR signaling characterizes still controlled proliferation retained in well differentiated RCC with Furhman nuclear grade I or II.

  8. Identification of epithelial label-retaining cells at the transition between the anal canal and the rectum in mice

    PubMed Central

    Runck, Laura A; Kramer, Megan; Ciraolo, Georgianne; Lewis, Alfor G

    2010-01-01

    In certain regions of the body, transition zones exist where stratified squamous epithelia directly abut against other types of epithelia. Certain transition zones are especially prone to tumorigenesis an example being the anorectal junction, although the reason for this is not known. One possibility is that the abrupt transition of the simple columnar epithelium of the colon to the stratified squamous epithelium of the proximal portion of the anal canal may contain a unique stem cell niche. We investigated whether the anorectal region contained cells with stem cell properties relative to the adjacent epithelium. We utilized a tetracycline-regulatable histone H2B-GFP transgenic mice model, previously used to identify hair follicle stem cells, to fluorescently label slow-cycling anal epithelial cells (e.g., prospective stem cells) in combination with a panel of putative stem cell markers. We identified a population of long-term GFP label-retaining cells concentrated at the junction between the anal canal and the rectum. These cells are BrdU-retaining cells and expressed the stem cell marker CD34. Moreover, tracking the fate of the anal label-retaining cells in vivo revealed that the slow-cycling cells only gave rise to progeny of the anal epithelium. In conclusion, we identified a unique population of cells at the anorectal junction which can be separated from the other basal anal epithelial cells based upon the expression of the stem cell marker CD34 and integrin α6, and thus represent a putative anal stem cell population. PMID:20647777

  9. Telomere elongation facilitated by trichostatin a in cloned embryos and pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qingran; Ji, Guangzhen; Xie, Bingteng; Li, Jingyu; Mao, Jian; Wang, Juan; Liu, Shichao; Liu, Lin; Liu, Zhonghua

    2014-06-01

    Telomere attrition and genomic instability are associated with organism aging. Concerns still exist regarding telomere length resetting in cloned embryos and ntES cells, and possibilities of premature aging of cloned animals achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, effectively improves the developmental competence of cloned embryos and animals, and recently contributes to successful generation of human ntES cells by SCNT. To test the function of TSA on resetting telomere length, we analyzed telomeres in cloned blastocysts and pigs following treatment of SCNT embryos with TSA. Here, we show that telomeres of cloned pigs generated by standard SCNT methods are not effectively restored, compared with those of donor cells, however TSA significantly increases telomere lengths in cloned pigs. Telomeres elongate in cloned porcine embryos during early cleavage from one-cell to four-cell stages. Notably, TSA facilitates telomere lengthening of cloned embryos mainly at morula-blastocyst stages. Knockdown of pTert by shRNA in donor cells reduces telomerase activity in cloned blastocysts but does not abrogate telomere elongation in the TSA-treated embryos (p > 0.05). However, genes associated with recombination or telomerase-independent mechanism of alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) Rad50 and BLM show increased expression in TSA-treated embryos. These data suggest that TSA may promote telomere elongation of cloned porcine embryos by ALT. Together, TSA can elongate telomeres in cloned embryos and piglets, and this could be one of the mechanisms underlying improved development of cloned embryos and animals treated with TSA. PMID:24510582

  10. Images of cloning and stem cell research in editorial cartoons in the United States.

    PubMed

    Giarelli, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Through semiotic analysis of manifest and latent meanings in editorial cartoons, the author uncovers how cloning and stem cell research are represented in a popular mass medium. She identified 86 editorial cartoons published in the United States between 2001 and 2004 that referred to cloning and 20 that referred to stem cell research. Cartoonists portrayed people individually 224 times and 4 times in groups of more than 10. Men were portrayed in 64% of cartoons. Stem cell research was depicted as having a potential positive value, and cloning was depicted negatively. Some major messages are that cloning will lead to the mass production of evil, cloning creates monsters, and politics will influence who or what will be cloned. Analyzing popular images can allow access to public understanding about genetic technology and evaluation of public beliefs, preconceptions, and expectations as the public is educated on the use and value of services.

  11. Human Endothelial Cells: Use of Heparin in Cloning and Long-Term Serial Cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Susan C.; Mueller, Stephen N.; Levine, Elliot M.

    1983-11-01

    Endothelial cells from human blood vessels were cultured in vitro, with doubling times of 17 to 21 hours for 42 to 79 population doublings. Cloned human endothelial cell strains were established for the first time and had similar proliferative capacities. This vigorous cell growth was achieved by addition of heparin to culture medium containing reduced concentrations of endothelial cell growth factor. The routine cloning and long-term culture of human endothelial cells will facilitate studying the human endothelium in vitro.

  12. Recombinant human albumin supports single cell cloning of CHO cells in chemically defined media.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Wooh, Jong Wei; Hou, Jeff Jia Cheng; Hughes, Benjamin S; Gray, Peter P; Munro, Trent P

    2012-01-01

    Biologic drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies, are commonly made using mammalian cells in culture. The cell lines used for manufacturing should ideally be clonal, meaning derived from a single cell, which represents a technically challenging process. Fetal bovine serum is often used to support low cell density cultures, however, from a regulatory perspective, it is preferable to avoid animal-derived components to increase process consistency and reduce the risk of contamination from adventitious agents. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most widely used cell line in industry and a large number of serum-free, protein-free, and fully chemically defined growth media are commercially available, although these media alone do not readily support efficient single cell cloning. In this work, we have developed a simple, fully defined, single-cell cloning media, specifically for CHO cells, using commercially available reagents. Our results show that a 1:1 mixture of CD-CHO™ and DMEM/F12 supplemented with 1.5 g/L of recombinant albumin (Albucult®) supports single cell cloning. This formulation can support recovery of single cells in 43% of cultures compared to 62% in the presence of serum.

  13. Telomere-to-centromere ratio of bovine clones, embryos, gametes, fetal cells, and adult cells.

    PubMed

    Meerdo, Lora N; Reed, William A; White, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    In 1997, Dolly, the first animal cloned from an adult cell, was born. It was announced in 1999 that Dolly might be aging faster than normal because her telomeres were shorter than age-matched control sheep. Telomeres, a repeated DNA sequence located at the ends of linear chromosomes, allow for base pair loss during DNA replication. Telomere shortening acts as a "mitotic clock," leading to replicative senescence. By using whole cell lysate and slot-blot analysis, we determined the telomere-to-centromere ratio (T/C) for bovine gametes, embryos, fetal tissues (brain, heart, lung, kidney, uterus, ovary, and skin), adult donor cells, and cloned embryos. Our data indicates a consistency in T/C among the various fetal tissues. The T/C of sperm is significantly lower than in oocytes. The T/C decreases from the oocyte to the 2-8-cell stage embryo, increases dramatically at the morula stage, and decreases at the blastocyst stage. Our data shows no significant difference in T/C between cloned embryos and in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos, but there is a significant difference between cloned embryos and adult donor cells. In conclusion, the enucleated bovine oocyte has the ability to reestablish the telomere length of adult somatic cell donor nuclei. PMID:15996118

  14. Characterization of cloned cells from an immortalized fetal pulmonary type II cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.F.; Waide, J.J.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    A cultured cell line that maintained expression of pulmonary type II cell markers of differentiation would be advantageous to generate a large number of homogenous cells in which to study the biochemical functions of type II cells. Type II epithelial cells are the source of pulmonary surfactant and a cell of origin for pulmonary adenomas. Last year our laboratory reported the induction of expression of two phenotypic markers of pulmonary type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and surfactant lipid synthesis) in cultured fetal rat lung epithelial (FRLE) cells, a spontaneously immortalized cell line of fetal rat lung type II cell origin. Subsequently, the induction of the ability to synthesize surfactant lipid became difficult to repeat. We hypothesized that the cell line was heterogenuous and some cells were more like type II cells than others. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis and to obtain a cultured cell line with type II cell phenotypic markers by cloning several FRLE cells and characterizing them for phenotypic markers of type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and presence of surfactant lipids). Thirty cloned cell lines were analyzed for induced alkaline phosphatase activity (on x-axis) and for percent of phospholipids that were disaturated (i.e., surfactant).

  15. Coordination between donor cell type and cell cycle stage improves nuclear cloning efficiency in cattle.

    PubMed

    Wells, D N; Laible, G; Tucker, F C; Miller, A L; Oliver, J E; Xiang, T; Forsyth, J T; Berg, M C; Cockrem, K; L'Huillier, P J; Tervit, H R; Oback, B

    2003-01-01

    Several studies have shown that both quiescent and proliferating somatic donor cells can be fully reprogrammed after nuclear transfer (NT) and result in viable offspring. So far, however, no comparative study has conclusively demonstrated the relative importance of donor cell cycle stage on nuclear cloning efficiency. Here, we compare two different types of bovine fetal fibroblasts (BFFs) that were synchronized in G(0), G(1), and different phases within G(1). We show that for non-transgenic (non-TG) fibroblasts, serum starvation into G(0) results in a significantly higher percentage of viable calves at term than synchronization in early G(1) or late G(1). For transgenic fibroblasts, however, cells selected in G(1) show significantly higher development to calves at term and higher post-natal survival to weaning than cells in G(0). This suggests that it may be necessary to coordinate donor cell type and cell cycle stage to maximize overall cloning efficiency.

  16. Cloned kids derived from caprine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y-G; Cheng, Y; Guo, L; Ding, G-L; Bai, Y-J; Miao, M-X; An, L-Y; Zhao, J-H; Cao, Y-J

    2009-09-01

    The use of nucleus transfer techniques to generate transgenic dairy goats capable of producing recombinant therapeutic proteins in milk could have a major impact on the pharmaceutical industry. However, transfection or gene targeting of nucleus transfer donor cells requires a long in vitro culture period and the selection of marker genes. In the current study, we evaluated the potential for using caprine mammary gland epithelial cells (CMGECs), isolated from udders of lactating F1 hybrid goats (Capra hircus) and cryopreserved at Passages 24 to 26, for nucleus transfer into enucleated in vivo-matured oocytes. Pronuclear-stage reconstructed embryos were transferred into the oviducts of 31 recipient goats. Twenty-three (74%), 21 (72%), and 14 (48%) recipients were confirmed pregnant by ultrasonography on Days 30, 60, and 90, respectively. Four recipients aborted between 35 and 137 d of gestation. Five recipients carried the pregnancies to term and delivered one goat kid each, one of which subsequently died due to respiratory difficulties. The remaining four goat kids were healthy and well. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis confirmed that all kids were clones of the donor cells. In conclusion, the CMGECs remained totipotent for nucleus transfer.

  17. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis of somatic cells primary cultures established for bovine cloning.

    PubMed

    Katska, L; Bochenek, M; Kania, G; Ryñska, B; Smorag, Z

    2002-12-01

    An important factor governing developmental rates of somatic cloned embryos is the phase of the cell cycle of donor nuclei. The aim of this experiment was to investigate the distribution of cell cycle phases in bovine cumulus and fibroblast cells cultured using routine treatment, and under cell cycle-arresting treatments. The highest percentages of cumulus cells in the G0 + G1 stage were observed in uncultured, frozen/thawed cells originating from immature oocytes (79.8 +/- 2.2%), fresh and frozen/thawed cells from in vitro matured oocytes (84.1 +/- 6.2 and 77.8 +/- 5.7%, respectively), and in cycling cells (72.7 +/- 16.3 and 78.4 +/- 11.2%, respectively for cumulus cells from immature and in vitro matured oocytes). Serum starvation of cumulus cultures markedly decreased percentages of cells in G0 + G1, and prolonged starvation significantly increased (P < 0.05) percentages of cells in G2 + M phase. Culture of cumulus cells to confluency did not increase percentages of cells in G0 + G1. Contrary to findings in cumulus cells, significantly higher percentages of cells in G0 + G1 were apparent when fibroblast cells were cultured to confluency or serum starved, and significantly increased (P < 0.01) as the starvation period was prolonged. It is concluded that for particular cell types specific strategies should be used to attain improvements in the efficiency of cloning procedures.

  18. T-cell receptor heterogeneity of gamma delta T-cell clones from human female reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Deniz, G; Taylor, J J

    1993-03-01

    gamma delta T cells were isolated from human decidua parietalis, decidua basalis and cervix and cloned in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). T-cell receptor (TcR) expression was then analysed and compared with that of a panel of gamma delta T-cell clones from peripheral blood. Only 17/40 (42.5%) clones from decidua parietalis were V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ as compared to 68/94 (72%) of peripheral blood clones (P < 0.005). Conversely, 50% of clones from decidua parietalis but only 15% of clones from peripheral blood were V delta 1+ (P < 0.001). At least seven distinct TcR types were identified among the panel of clones from decidua parietalis and at least six different types were expressed by the panel of 17 clones from cervix. This receptor heterogeneity was not a result of interdonor variation as in all instances where more than one clone was obtained from a single sample, individual clones having between two and five receptor types were identified. However, 23/24 (95.8%) of clones from decidua basalis were V gamma 9+/V delta 2+. Most clones from decidua parietalis and cervix, whether V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ or V delta 1+, were positive for the mucosal lymphocyte marker, HML-1, but expression was often heterogeneous within a single clone. In contrast, almost all gamma delta T-cell clones from peripheral blood were HML-1-. Thus, unlike the mouse, gamma delta T cells within these human female reproductive tissues have a diverse TcR repertoire which, in decidua parietalis, is distinct from that of peripheral blood.

  19. Bicruciate retaining

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is a procedure used to treat knee arthropathy. Patients’ dissatisfaction is still relevant (literature reports dissatisfaction rates as high as 40%). The anterior cruciate ligament is usually removed while performing a total knee arthroplasty, thus changing knee biomechanics. As patients’ mean age to surgery is decreasing, bicruciate retaining models, which preserve normal biomechanics, may be useful in increasing patients’ outcomes. Limited data concerning bicruciate retaining arthroplasty is available; although clinical results are encouraging, there are concerns regarding surgical exposure, anterior cruciate integrity evaluation, and implant fixation. PMID:27162778

  20. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before and after instruction. Two goals of the instruction were to: (1) help students construct accurate scientific ideas, and (2) enhance their reasoning about socioscientific issues. The course structure included interactive lectures, case discussions, hands-on activities, and independent projects. Overall, students' understandings of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning increased from pre-test to post-test. For example, on the post-test, students gained knowledge concerning the age of an organism related to the type of stem cell it possesses. However, we found that some incorrect ideas that were evident on the pre-test persisted after instruction. For example, before and after instruction several students maintained the idea that stem cells can currently be used to produce organs.

  1. Optimization of procedures for cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer in mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Young Gie; Gao, Shaorong; Latham, Keith E

    2006-01-01

    Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer is a complex procedure that is dependent on correct interactions between oocyte and donor cell genome. These interactions require minimal insult to either the oocyte or the transplanted nucleus. Available data also indicate that reprogramming the donor cell genome may be slow, so that the cloned embryo expresses genes typical of the donor cell, and thus has different characteristics from normal embryos. Procedures that minimize damage to the donor genome and that address the unique characteristics of the cloned construct should enhance the efficacy of the method.

  2. Successful cloning of coyotes through interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer using domestic dog oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Insung; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kang, Mina; Park, Kang Bae; Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yeun Wook; Kim, Woo Tae; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2013-01-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is an emerging assisted reproductive technology (ART) for preserving Nature's diversity. The scarcity of oocytes from some species makes utilisation of readily available oocytes inevitable. In the present study, we describe the successful cloning of coyotes (Canis latrans) through iSCNT using oocytes from domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris or dingo). Transfer of 320 interspecies-reconstructed embryos into 22 domestic dog recipients resulted in six pregnancies, from which eight viable offspring were delivered. Fusion rate and cloning efficiency during iSCNT cloning of coyotes were not significantly different from those observed during intraspecies cloning of domestic dogs. Using neonatal fibroblasts as donor cells significantly improved the cloning efficiency compared with cloning using adult fibroblast donor cells (P<0.05). The use of domestic dog oocytes in the cloning of coyotes in the present study holds promise for cloning other endangered species in the Canidae family using similar techniques. However, there are still limitations of the iSCNT technology, as demonstrated by births of morphologically abnormal coyotes and the clones' inheritance of maternal domestic dog mitochondrial DNA.

  3. Successful cloning of coyotes through interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer using domestic dog oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Insung; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kang, Mina; Park, Kang Bae; Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yeun Wook; Kim, Woo Tae; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2013-01-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is an emerging assisted reproductive technology (ART) for preserving Nature's diversity. The scarcity of oocytes from some species makes utilisation of readily available oocytes inevitable. In the present study, we describe the successful cloning of coyotes (Canis latrans) through iSCNT using oocytes from domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris or dingo). Transfer of 320 interspecies-reconstructed embryos into 22 domestic dog recipients resulted in six pregnancies, from which eight viable offspring were delivered. Fusion rate and cloning efficiency during iSCNT cloning of coyotes were not significantly different from those observed during intraspecies cloning of domestic dogs. Using neonatal fibroblasts as donor cells significantly improved the cloning efficiency compared with cloning using adult fibroblast donor cells (P<0.05). The use of domestic dog oocytes in the cloning of coyotes in the present study holds promise for cloning other endangered species in the Canidae family using similar techniques. However, there are still limitations of the iSCNT technology, as demonstrated by births of morphologically abnormal coyotes and the clones' inheritance of maternal domestic dog mitochondrial DNA. PMID:23217630

  4. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  5. Effective donor cell fusion conditions for production of cloned dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, JungEun; Oh, HyunJu; Hong, SoGun; Kim, MinJung; Kim, GeonA; Koo, OkJae; Kang, SungKeun; Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2011-03-01

    As shown by the birth of the first cloned dog 'Snuppy', a protocol to produce viable cloned dogs has been reported. In order to evaluate optimum fusion conditions for improving dog cloning efficiency, in vivo matured oocytes were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a female Pekingese using different fusion conditions. Fusion with needle vs chamber methods, and with low vs high pulse strength was compared by evaluating fusion rate and in vivo development of canine cloned embryos. The fusion rates in the high voltage groups were significantly higher than in the low voltage groups regardless of fusion method (83.5 vs 66.1% for the needle fusion method, 67.4 vs 37.9% for the fusion chamber method). After embryo transfer, one each pregnancy was detected after using the needle fusion method with high and low voltage and in the chamber fusion method with high voltage, whereas no pregnancy was detected using the chamber method with low voltage. However, only the pregnancy from the needle fusion method with high voltage was maintained to term and one healthy puppy was delivered. The results of the present study demonstrated that two DC pulses of 3.8 to 4.0 kV/cm for 15 μsec using the needle fusion method were the most effective method for the production of cloned dogs under the conditions of this experiment.

  6. Establishment and Analysis of Cancer Stem-Like and Non-Cancer Stem-Like Clone Cells from the Human Colon Cancer Cell Line SW480.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Akari; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Murai, Aiko; Morita, Rena; Saijo, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Eri; Kubo, Terufumi; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Tamura, Yasuaki; Takemasa, Ichiro; Kondo, Toru; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Human cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) can be isolated as side population (SP) cells, aldehyde dehydrogenase high (ALDHhigh) cells or cell surface marker-positive cells including CD44+ cells and CD133+ cells. CSCs/CICs and non-CSCs/CICs are unstable in in vitro culture, and CSCs/CICs can differentiate into non-CSCs/CICs and some non-CSCs/CICs can dedifferentiate into CSCs/CICs. Therefore, experiments using a large amount of CSCs/CICs are technically very difficult. In this study, we isolated single cell clones from SP cells and main population (MP) cells derived from the human colon cancer cell line SW480. SP analysis revealed that SP clone cells had relatively high percentages of SP cells, whereas MP clone cells showed very few SP cells, and the phenotypes were sustainable for more than 2 months of in vitro culture. Xenograft transplantation revealed that SP clone cells have higher tumor-initiating ability than that of MP clone cells and SP clone cell showed higher chemo-resistance compared with MP clone cells. These results indicate that SP clone cells derived from SW480 cells are enriched with CSCs/CICs, whereas MP clone cells are pure non-CSCs/CICs. SP clone cells and MP clone cells are a very stable in vitro CSC/CIC-enriched and non-CSC/CIC model for further analysis.

  7. Establishment and Analysis of Cancer Stem-Like and Non-Cancer Stem-Like Clone Cells from the Human Colon Cancer Cell Line SW480

    PubMed Central

    Takaya, Akari; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Murai, Aiko; Morita, Rena; Saijo, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Eri; Kubo, Terufumi; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Tamura, Yasuaki; Takemasa, Ichiro; Kondo, Toru; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Human cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) can be isolated as side population (SP) cells, aldehyde dehydrogenase high (ALDHhigh) cells or cell surface marker-positive cells including CD44+ cells and CD133+ cells. CSCs/CICs and non-CSCs/CICs are unstable in in vitro culture, and CSCs/CICs can differentiate into non-CSCs/CICs and some non-CSCs/CICs can dedifferentiate into CSCs/CICs. Therefore, experiments using a large amount of CSCs/CICs are technically very difficult. In this study, we isolated single cell clones from SP cells and main population (MP) cells derived from the human colon cancer cell line SW480. SP analysis revealed that SP clone cells had relatively high percentages of SP cells, whereas MP clone cells showed very few SP cells, and the phenotypes were sustainable for more than 2 months of in vitro culture. Xenograft transplantation revealed that SP clone cells have higher tumor-initiating ability than that of MP clone cells and SP clone cell showed higher chemo-resistance compared with MP clone cells. These results indicate that SP clone cells derived from SW480 cells are enriched with CSCs/CICs, whereas MP clone cells are pure non-CSCs/CICs. SP clone cells and MP clone cells are a very stable in vitro CSC/CIC-enriched and non-CSC/CIC model for further analysis. PMID:27415781

  8. Glimpse of natural selection of long-lived T-cell clones in healthy life.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baojun; Jia, Qingzhu; Bock, Cheryl; Chen, Gang; Yu, Haili; Ni, Qingshan; Wan, Ying; Li, Qijing; Zhuang, Yuan

    2016-08-30

    Homeostatic maintenance of T cells with broad clonal diversity is influenced by both continuing output of young T cells from the thymus and ongoing turnover of preexisting clones in the periphery. In the absence of infection, self and commensal antigens are thought to play important roles in selection and homeostatic maintenance of the T-cell pool. Most naïve T cells are short-lived due to lack of antigen encounter, whereas antigen-experienced T cells may survive and persist as long-lived clones. Thus far, little is known about the homeostasis, antigenic specificity, and clonal diversity of long-lived T-cell clones in peripheral lymphoid organs under healthy living conditions. To identify long-lived T-cell clones in mice, we designed a lineage-tracing method to label a wave of T cells produced in the thymus of young mice. After aging the mice for 1.5 y, we found that lineage-tracked T cells consisted of primarily memory-like T cells and T regulatory cells. T-cell receptor repertoire analysis revealed that the lineage-tracked CD4 memory-like T cells and T regulatory cells exhibited age-dependent enrichment of shared clonotypes. Furthermore, these shared clonotypes were found across different mice maintained in the same housing condition. These findings suggest that nonrandom and shared antigens are involved in controlling selection, retention, and immune tolerance of long-lived T-cell clones under healthy living conditions. PMID:27535935

  9. Receptor editing can lead to allelic inclusion and development of B cells that retain antibodies reacting with high avidity autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sucai; Velez, Maria-Gabriela; Humann, Jessica; Rowland, Sarah; Conrad, Frank J; Halverson, Regina; Torres, Raul M; Pelanda, Roberta

    2005-10-15

    Receptor editing is a major B cell tolerance mechanism that operates by secondary Ig gene rearrangements to change the specificity of autoreactive developing B cells. In the 3-83Igi mouse model, receptor editing operates in every autoreactive anti-H-2K(b) B cell, providing a novel receptor without additional cell loss. Despite the efficiency of receptor editing in generating nonautoreactive Ag receptors, we show in this study that this process does not inactivate the autoantibody-encoding gene(s) in every autoreactive B cell. In fact, receptor editing can generate allelically and isotypically included B cells that simultaneously express the original autoreactive and a novel nonautoreactive Ag receptors. Such dual Ab-expressing B cells differentiate into transitional and mature B cells retaining the expression of the autoantibody despite the high avidity interaction between the autoantibody and the self-Ag in this system. Moreover, we find that these high avidity autoreactive B cells retain the autoreactive Ag receptor within the cell as a consequence of autoantigen engagement and through a Src family kinase-dependent process. Finally, anti-H-2K(b) IgM autoantibodies are found in the sera of older 3-83Igi mice, indicating that dual Ab-expressing autoreactive B cells are potentially functional and capable of differentiating into IgM autoantibody-secreting plasma cells under certain circumstances. These results demonstrate that autoreactive B cells reacting with ubiquitous membrane bound autoantigens can bypass mechanisms of central tolerance by coexpressing nonautoreactive Abs. These dual Ab-expressing autoreactive B cells conceal their autoantibodies within the cell manifesting a superficially tolerant phenotype that can be partially overcome to secrete IgM autoantibodies.

  10. Entamoeba Clone-Recognition Experiments: Morphometrics, Aggregative Behavior, and Cell-Signaling Characterization.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Avelina; Paz-Y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Hackey, Meagan; Rutherford, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Studies on clone- and kin-discrimination in protists have proliferated during the past decade. We report clone-recognition experiments in seven Entamoeba lineages (E. invadens IP-1, E. invadens VK-1:NS, E. terrapinae, E. moshkovskii Laredo, E. moshkovskii Snake, E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS and E. dispar). First, we characterized morphometrically each clone (length, width, and cell-surface area) and documented how they differed statistically from one another (as per single-variable or canonical-discriminant analyses). Second, we demonstrated that amebas themselves could discriminate self (clone) from different (themselves vs. other clones). In mix-cell-line cultures between closely-related (E. invadens IP-1 vs. E. invadens VK-1:NS) or distant-phylogenetic clones (E. terrapinae vs. E. moshkovskii Laredo), amebas consistently aggregated with same-clone members. Third, we identified six putative cell-signals secreted by the amebas (RasGap/Ankyrin, coronin-WD40, actin, protein kinases, heat shock 70, and ubiquitin) and which known functions in Entamoeba spp. included: cell proliferation, cell adhesion, cell movement, and stress-induced encystation. To our knowledge, this is the first multi-clone characterization of Entamoeba spp. morphometrics, aggregative behavior, and cell-signaling secretion in the context of clone-recognition. Protists allow us to study cell-cell recognition from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Modern protistan lineages can be central to studies about the origins and evolution of multicellularity.

  11. Entamoeba Clone-Recognition Experiments: Morphometrics, Aggregative Behavior, and Cell-Signaling Characterization.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Avelina; Paz-Y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Hackey, Meagan; Rutherford, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Studies on clone- and kin-discrimination in protists have proliferated during the past decade. We report clone-recognition experiments in seven Entamoeba lineages (E. invadens IP-1, E. invadens VK-1:NS, E. terrapinae, E. moshkovskii Laredo, E. moshkovskii Snake, E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS and E. dispar). First, we characterized morphometrically each clone (length, width, and cell-surface area) and documented how they differed statistically from one another (as per single-variable or canonical-discriminant analyses). Second, we demonstrated that amebas themselves could discriminate self (clone) from different (themselves vs. other clones). In mix-cell-line cultures between closely-related (E. invadens IP-1 vs. E. invadens VK-1:NS) or distant-phylogenetic clones (E. terrapinae vs. E. moshkovskii Laredo), amebas consistently aggregated with same-clone members. Third, we identified six putative cell-signals secreted by the amebas (RasGap/Ankyrin, coronin-WD40, actin, protein kinases, heat shock 70, and ubiquitin) and which known functions in Entamoeba spp. included: cell proliferation, cell adhesion, cell movement, and stress-induced encystation. To our knowledge, this is the first multi-clone characterization of Entamoeba spp. morphometrics, aggregative behavior, and cell-signaling secretion in the context of clone-recognition. Protists allow us to study cell-cell recognition from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Modern protistan lineages can be central to studies about the origins and evolution of multicellularity. PMID:26990199

  12. [Construction of cDNA infectious clones of EV71 highly-pathogenic and cell-culture-adapted strains].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-xin; Li, Xiao-yu; Huang, Yu-ming; Zhou, Yong-dong; Bi, Sheng-li; Cen, Shan

    2014-11-01

    The highly-pathogenic EV71 strain is the primary cause of mortality in hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) associated with neurological symptoms, for which no clinically effective drugs or vaccines exist. This study aimed to construct infectious cDNA clones of the EV71 highly-pathogenic strain and the cell-culture adapted strain using a reverse genetics approach. The genomic RNAs of EV71 parent strains were used as the templates for RT-PCR amplification, and then the PCR products that overlapped the full-length genome were connected into the pBR322 vector to produce infectious clones of pEV71 (HP) and pEV71 (CCA), respectively. The results showed that the HP strain propagated much more quickly than the CCA strain. The rescued viruses derived from the infectious clones not only maintained their consistency with their parent strains in terms of genomic sequences, but also retained their respective biological phenotypes. This research will contribute to our understanding of EV71 pathogenesis and the development of novel vaccines against HFMD.

  13. Cloned natural suppressor cell lines derived from the spleens of neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The establishment and characterization of cloned natural suppressor (NS) cell lines derived from the spleen of neonatal BALB/c mice are described. Cloned NS cells suppress the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) between normal adult responder and stimulator spleen cells with a 50- fold greater efficiency than fresh neonatal cells. Suppressive activity of both cells did not depend on the haplotype of the responder or stimulator cells, and was radioresistant. Cloned NS cells did not inhibit the uptake of [3H]thymidine by HT-2 cells proliferating in response to interleukin 2 (IL-2), nor the in vitro secretion of IL-1 by macrophages in response to lipopolysaccharide. Several experiments indicated that absorption of IL-2 could not explain the suppression of the MLR by the NS cells in the range of cell numbers tested. The results suggest that NS cells may suppress the MLR by interfering with early stages of T cell activation. The cell surface of a cloned NS cell line was examined using immunofluorescence staining, and was strongly positive for the Thy-1.2, Ly-5, and asialo-GM1 antigens. However, Lyt- 1, Lyt-2, surface Ig, IE, MAC-1, and Fc and C3 receptor markers were not detected. In addition, NS cells showed no cytolytic activity against the YAC-1 target cell line. On the basis of these findings, cloned NS cells do not appear to be mature T cells, B cells, macrophages, or NK cells. The development of cloned NS cells may be useful in determining the identity and mechanism of action of nonspecific suppressor cells in the neonatal spleen, and their role in neonatal tolerance and maternal-fetal relationships. PMID:3159827

  14. Heterogeneity in histone 2B-green fluorescent protein-retaining putative small intestinal stem cells at cell position 4 and their absence in the colon.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Kevin R; Gândara, Ricardo M C; Javkar, Tanvi; Sablitzky, Fred; Hock, Hanno; Potten, Christopher S; Mahida, Yashwant R

    2012-12-01

    Stem cells have been identified in two locations in small intestinal crypts; those intercalated between Paneth cells and another population (which retains DNA label) are located above the Paneth cell zone, at cell position 4. Because of disadvantages associated with the use of DNA label, doxycycline-induced transient transgenic expression of histone 2B (H2B)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) was investigated. H2B-GFP-retaining putative stem cells were consistently seen, with a peak at cell position 4, over chase periods of up to 112 days. After a 28-day chase, a subpopulation of the H2B-GFP-retaining cells was cycling, but the slow cycling status of the majority was illustrated by lack of expression of pHistone H3 and Ki67. Although some H2B-GFP-retaining cells were sensitive to low-dose radiation, the majority was resistant to low- and high-dose radiation-induced cell death, and a proportion of the surviving cells proliferated during subsequent epithelial regeneration. Long-term retention of H2B-GFP in a subpopulation of small intestinal Paneth cells was also seen, implying that they are long lived. In contrast to the small intestine, H2B-GFP-retaining epithelial cells were not seen in the colon from 28-day chase onward. This implies important differences in stem cell function between these two regions of the gastrointestinal tract, which may have implications for region-specific susceptibility to diseases (such as cancer and ulcerative colitis), in which epithelial stem cells and their progeny are involved.

  15. Responses of BrdU label-retaining dental pulp cells to allogenic tooth transplantation into mouse maxilla.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Noriko; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Nakagawa, Eizo; Tani-Ishii, Nobuyuki; Ohshima, Hayato

    2011-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that a pulse of BrdU given to prenatal animals reveals the existence of slow-cycling long-term label-retaining cells (LRCs), putative adult stem or progenitor cells, which reside in the dental pulp. This study aims to clarify responses of LRCs to allogenic tooth transplantation into mouse maxilla using prenatal BrdU-labeling, in situ hybridization for osteopontin and periostin, and immunohistochemistry for BrdU, nestin, and osteopontin. The upper-right first molars were allografted in the original socket between BrdU-labeled and non-labeled mice or between GFP transgenic and wild-type mice. Tooth transplantation caused degeneration of the odontoblast layer, resulting in the disappearance of nestin-positive reactions in the dental pulp. On postoperative days 5-7, tertiary dentin formation commenced next to the preexisting dentin where nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged in the successful cases. In BrdU-labeled transplanted teeth, dense LRCs were maintained in the center of the dental pulp beneath the odontoblast-like cells including LRCs, whereas LRCs disappeared in the area surrounding the bone-like tissue. In contrast, LRCs were not recognized in the pulp chamber of non-labeled transplants through the experimental period. Tooth transplantation using GFP mice demonstrated that the donor cells constituted the dental pulp of the transplant except for endothelial cells and some migrated cells, and the periodontal tissue was replaced by host-derived cells except for epithelial cell rests of Malassez. These results suggest that the maintenance of BrdU label-retaining dental pulp cells play a role in the regeneration of odontoblast-like cells in the process of pulpal healing following tooth transplantation. PMID:21986880

  16. Cloning of the fish cell line SSN-1 for piscine nodaviruses.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, T; Nakai, T; Mori, K; Arimoto, M; Furusawa, I

    2000-11-14

    Six cell clones were derived from the SSN-1 cell line, which is composed of a mixed cell population and persistently infected with a C-type retrovirus (SnRV). These clones were susceptible to 4 piscine nodavirus strains belonging to different genotypes (SJNNV, RGNNV, TPNNV and *BFNNV [striped jack, redspotted grouper, tiger puffer and barfin flounder nervous necrosis viruses]). Three clones, designated A-6, E-9, and E-11, were highly permissive to nodavirus infection and production. The virus-induced cytopathic effects appeared as cytoplasmic vacuoles and intensive disintegration at 3 to 5 d post-incubation. These observations were highly reproducible and formed the basis for a successful virus titration system. Quantitative analysis using the cloned E-11 cell line clearly revealed differences in the optimal growth temperatures among the 4 genotypic variants: 25 to 30 degrees C for strain SGWak97 (RGNNV), 20 to 25 degrees C for strain SJNag93 (SJNNV), 20 degrees C for strain TPKag93 (TPNNV), and 15 to 20 degrees C for strain JFIwa98 (BFNNV). Electron microscopy demonstrated SnRV retrovirus particles only in A-6 and E-9 cells, but PCR amplification for the pol gene and LTR region of the proviral DNA indicated the presence of the retrovirus in the other clones, including E-11. The cell clones obtained in the present study will be more useful for qualitative and quantitative analyses of piscine nodaviruses than the SSN-1 cell line.

  17. Health status and productive performance of somatic cell cloned cattle and their offspring produced in Japan.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Nagai, Takashi

    2008-02-01

    Since the first somatic cell cloned calves were born in Japan in 1998, more than 500 cloned cattle have been produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer and many studies concerning cloned cattle and their offspring have been conducted in this country. However, most of the results have been published in Japanese; thus, the data produced in this country is not well utilized by researchers throughout the world. This article reviews the 65 reports produced by Japanese researchers (62 written in Japanese and 3 written in English), which employed 171 clones and 32 offspring, and categorizes them according to the following 7 categories: (1) genetic similarities and muzzle prints, (2) hematology and clinical chemistry findings, (3) pathology, (4) growth performance, (5) reproductive performance, (6) meat production performance and (7) milk production performance. No remarkable differences in health status or reproductive performance were found among conventionally bred cattle, somatic cell cloned cattle surviving to adulthood and offspring of somatic cell cloned cattle. Similarities in growth performance and meat quality were observed between nuclear donor cattle and their clones. The growth curves of the offspring resembled those of their full siblings.

  18. Production efficiency and telomere length of the cloned pigs following serial somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kurome, Mayuko; Hisatomi, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Shirou; Tomii, Ryo; Ueno, Satoshi; Hiruma, Katsumi; Saito, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Okumura, Kenji; Matsumoto, Mitsuhito; Kaji, Yuji; Endo, Fumio; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the production efficiency of cloned pigs by serial somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and to ascertain any changes in the telomere lengths of multiple generations of pigs. Using fetal fibroblasts as the starting nuclear donor cells, porcine salivary gland progenitor cells were collected from the resultant first-generation cloned pigs to successively produce second- and third-generation clones, with no significant differences in production efficiency, which ranged from 1.4% (2/140) to 3.3% (13/391) among the 3 generations. The average telomere lengths (terminal restriction fragment values) for the first, second and third generation clones were 16.3, 18.1 and 20.5 kb, respectively, and were comparable to those in age-matched controls. These findings suggest that third-generation cloned pigs can be produced by serial somatic cell cloning without compromising production efficiency and that the telomere lengths of cloned pigs from the first to third generations are normal. PMID:18490858

  19. Cloning cattle.

    PubMed

    Oback, B; Wells, D N

    2003-01-01

    Over the past six years, hundreds of apparently normal calves have been cloned worldwide from bovine somatic donor cells. However, these surviving animals represent less than 5% of all cloned embryos transferred into recipient cows. Most of the remaining 95% die at various stages of development from a predictable pattern of placental and fetal abnormalities, collectively referred to as the "cloning-syndrome." The low efficiency seriously limits commercial applicability and ethical acceptance of somatic cloning and enforces the development of improved cloning methods. In this paper, we describe our current standard operating procedure (SOP) for cattle cloning using zona-free nuclear transfer. Following this SOP, the output of viable and healthy calves at weaning is about 9% of embryos transferred. Better standardization of cloning protocols across and within research groups is needed to separate technical from biological factors underlying low cloning efficiency.

  20. Towards high-throughput single cell/clone cultivation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Sara; Larsson, Rolf; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2008-03-01

    In order to better understand cellular processes and behavior, a controlled way of studying high numbers of single cells and their clone formation is greatly needed. Numerous ways of ordering single cells into arrays have previously been described, but platforms in which each cell/clone can be addressed to an exact position in the microplate, cultivated for weeks and treated separately in a high-throughput manner have until now been missing. Here, a novel microplate developed for high-throughput single cell/clone cultivation and analysis is presented. Rapid single cell seeding into microwells, using conventional flow cytometry, allows several thousands of single cells to be cultivated, short-term (72 h) or long-term (10-14 days), and analyzed individually. By controlled sorting of individual cells to predefined locations in the microplate, analysis of single cell heterogeneity and clonogenic properties related to drug sensitivity can be accomplished. Additionally, the platform requires remarkably low number of cells, a major advantage when screening limited amounts of patient cell samples. By seeding single cells into the microplate it is possible to analyze the cells for over 14 generations, ending up with more than 10 000 cells in each well. Described here is a proof-of-concept on compartmentalization and cultivation of thousands of individual cells enabling heterogeneity analysis of various cells/clones and their response to different drugs.

  1. Localization of Label-Retaining Cells in Murine Vocal Fold Epithelium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leydon, Ciara; Bartlett, Rebecca S.; Roenneburg, Drew A.; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Epithelial homeostasis is critical for vocal fold health, yet little is known about the cells that support epithelial self-renewal. As a known characteristic of stem cells is that they are slow-cycling in vivo, the purpose of this prospective controlled study was to identify and quantify slow-cycling cells or putative stem cells in murine…

  2. In vitro development of cloned bovine embryos produced by handmade cloning using somatic cells from distinct levels of cell culture confluence.

    PubMed

    Gerger, R P C; Ribeiro, E S; Forell, F; Bertolini, L R; Rodrigues, J L; Ambrósio, C E; Miglino, M A; Mezzalira, A; Bertolini, M

    2010-02-18

    The relationship between the level of cell confluence near the plateau phase of growth and blastocyst yield following somatic cell cloning is not well understood. We examined the effect of distinct cell culture confluence levels on in vitro development of cloned bovine embryos. In vitro-matured bovine oocytes were manually bisected and selected by DNA staining. One or two enucleated hemi-cytoplasts were paired and fused with an adult skin somatic cell. Cultured skin cells from an adult Nellore cow harvested at three distinct culture confluence levels (70-80, 80-90, and >95%) were used for construction of embryos and hemi-embryos. After activation, structures were cultured in vitro as one embryo (1 x 100%) or as aggregates of two hemi-embryos (2 x 50%) per microwell. Fusion, cleavage and blastocyst rates were compared using the chi(2) test. The fusion rate for hemi-embryos (51.4%) was lower than for embryos (67.6%), with no influence of degree of cell confluence. However, blastocyst rates improved linearly (7.0, 17.5, and 29.4%) with increases in cell confluence. We conclude that degree of cell culture confluence significantly influences subsequent embryo development; use of a cell population in high confluence (>90%) for nuclear transfer significantly improved blastocyst yield after cloning.

  3. Development and characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine T-cell lines and clones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepe, George S., Jr.; Smith, James G.; Denman, David; Bullock, Ward E.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Several Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine cloned T-cell lines (TCLs) were isolated from spleens of C57BL/6 mice immunized with viable H. capsulatum yeast cells, using the methodology of Kimoto and Fathman (1980). These T-cells were characterized phenotypically as Thy-1.2(+) Lyt-1(+) L3T4(+) Lyt-2(-), that is, as the helper/inducer phenotype. The cloned T cells proliferate in response to histoplasmin and, in some cases, to heterologous fungal anigens. Upon injection of mice with the antigen, the T-cells mediate local delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and, after stimulation, release regulatory lymphokines.

  4. HIG-82: an established cell line from rabbit periarticular soft tissue, which retains the "activatable" phenotype.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, H I; Mendelow, D; Evans, C H

    1988-10-01

    We have isolated a continuous cell line from soft tissue lining the knee joints of rabbits. Designated HIG-82, this line was produced by spontaneous establishment of an aging, late-passage culture of primary cells. Like unpassaged, primary cells, HIG-82 cells can be activated by a number of stimuli, including phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and the endocytosis of latex beads. Activated cells secrete collagenase, gelatinase, caseinase (stromelysin), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) into their culture medium. Pseudodiploid, HIG-82 cells combine a high plating efficiency with a doubling time of approximately 24 h. As primary tissue of this origin is difficult to obtain in large quantities and shows cellular heterogeneity, the HIG-82 cell line should facilitate research into the biology and biochemistry of the fibroblastic cells that line the diarthrodial joints of mammals. Such cells are likely to be important in the pathophysiology of various arthritides.

  5. Differentiation of human B lymphocyte subpopulations induced by an alloreactive helper T-cell clone

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.J.; Hummell, D.S.; Lawton, A.R.

    1988-07-01

    We have used cloned alloreactive helper T cells to determine if direct T cell-B cell interaction can induce differentiation of human peripheral blood B cells which do not respond to pokeweed mitogen (PWM). T-cell clone 2F8 was derived from a one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction. 2F8 cells are T3+T4+T8-IL-2R+ and proliferate in response to irradiated stimulator cells, but not autologous cells, in the absence of exogenous interleukin-2. 2F8 cells provide allospecific help for polyclonal proliferation and differentiation of B cells in the absence of any other stimulus. The magnitude of this response is comparable to that of the response of the same B cells to PWM and fresh autologous T cells. 2F8 cells could also provide nonspecific help for unrelated donor B cells in the presence of PWM, with no requirement for costimulation by irradiated stimulator cells. Allospecific stimulation of B cells was completely inhibited by antibodies to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) framework determinants and was abrogated by 1000-rad irradiation. Cloned 2F8 T cells stimulated differentiation of both small, high-density B cells and larger B cells, generating up to 30% plasma cells with either fraction. B cells forming rosettes with mouse erythrocytes were also induced to differentiate by the helper T cell clone. As found previously, neither small, high-density B cells nor mouse rosette+ B cells responded well to PWM. Direct interaction with allospecific T cells induces differentiation of a broader spectrum of B cells than soluble growth and differentiation factors in conjunction with polyclonal activators such as PWM and protein A containing staphylococci.

  6. Angiomotin promotes renal epithelial and carcinoma cell proliferation by retaining the nuclear YAP.

    PubMed

    Lv, Meng; Li, Shuting; Luo, Changqin; Zhang, Xiaoman; Shen, Yanwei; Sui, Yan Xia; Wang, Fan; Wang, Xin; Yang, Jiao; Liu, Peijun; Yang, Jin

    2016-03-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the common tumors in the urinary system without effective therapies. Angiomotin (Amot) can interact with Yes-associated protein (YAP) to either stimulate or inhibit YAP activity, playing a potential role in cell proliferation. However, the role of Amot in regulating the proliferation of renal epithelial and RCC cells is unknown. Here, we show that Amot is expressed predominantly in the nucleus of RCC cells and tissues, and in the cytoplasm and nucleus of renal epithelial cells and paracancerous tissues. Furthermore, Amot silencing inhibited proliferation of HK-2 and 786-O cells while Amot upregulation promoted proliferation of ACHN cells. Interestingly, the location of Amot and YAP in RCC clinical samples and cells was similar. Amot interacted with YAP in HK-2 and 786-O cells, particularly in the nucleus. Moreover, Amot silencing mitigated the levels of nuclear YAP in HK-2 and 786-O cells and reduced YAP-related CTGF and Cyr61 expression in 786-O cells. Amot upregulation slightly increased the nuclear YAP and YAP-related gene expression in ACHN cells. Finally, enhanced YAP expression restored proliferation of Amot-silencing 786-O cells. Together, these data indicate that Amot is crucial for the maintenance of nuclear YAP to promote renal epithelial and RCC proliferation.

  7. Human cDNA clones that modify radiomimetic sensitivity of Ataxia-telangiectasia (Group A) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziv, Y.; Bar-Shira, A.; Sartiel, A.

    1995-03-01

    Genes responsible for genetic diseases with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents can be identified using complementation cloning. This strategy is based on in vitro complementation of the cellular sensitivity by gene transfer. Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a multisystem autosomal recessive disorder involving cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation and radiomimetic drugs. A-T is genetically heterogeneous, with four complementation groups. We attempted to identify cDNA clones that modify the radiomimetic sensitivity of A-T cells assigned to complementation group [A-T(A)]. The cells were transfected with human cDNA libraries clones in episomal vectors, and various protocols by radiomimetic selection were applied. Thirteen cDNAs rescued from survivor cells were found to confer various degrees of radiomimetic resistance to A-T(A) cells upon repeated introduction, and one of them also partially influenced another feature of the A-T phenotype, radioresistant DNA synthesis. None of the clones mapped to the A-T locus on chromosome 11q22-23. Nine of the clones were derived from known genes, some of which are involved in cellular stress responses. We concluded that a number of different genes, not necessarily associated with A-T, can influence the response of A-T cells to radiomimetic drugs, and hence the complementation cloning approach may be less applicable to A-T than to other diseases involving abnormal processing of DNA damage. 57 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Cannabinoid receptor 2 positions and retains marginal zone B cells within the splenic marginal zone

    PubMed Central

    Muppidi, Jagan R.; Arnon, Tal I.; Bronevetsky, Yelena; Veerapen, Natacha; Tanaka, Masato; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2011-01-01

    Specialized B cells residing in the splenic marginal zone (MZ) continuously survey the blood for antigens and are important for immunity to systemic infections. However, the cues that uniquely attract cells to the MZ have not been defined. Previous work demonstrated that mice deficient in cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) have decreased numbers of MZ B cells but it has been unclear whether CB2 regulates MZ B cell development or positioning. We show that MZ B cells are highly responsive to the CB2 ligand 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and that CB2 antagonism rapidly displaces small numbers of MZ B cells to the blood. Antagonism for longer durations depletes MZ B cells from the spleen. In mice deficient in sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor function, CB2 antagonism causes MZ B cell displacement into follicles. Moreover, CB2 overexpression is sufficient to position B cells to the splenic MZ. These findings establish a role for CB2 in guiding B cells to the MZ and in preventing their loss to the blood. As a consequence of their MZ B cell deficiency, CB2-deficient mice have reduced numbers of CD1d-high B cells. We show that CB2 deficiency results in diminished humoral responses to a CD1d-restricted systemic antigen. PMID:21875957

  9. Statistical analysis of clone formation in cultures of human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bochkov, N P; Vinogradova, M S; Volkov, I K; Voronina, E S; Kuleshov, N P

    2011-08-01

    We performed a statistical analysis of clone formation from aneuploid cells (chromosomes 6, 8, 11, X) in cultures of bone marrow-derived human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells by spontaneous level of aneuploidy at different terms of culturing (from 2 to 19 cell cycles). It was found that the duration of cell cycle increased from 65.6 h at passages 2-3 to 164.5 h at passage 12. The expected ratio of aneuploid cells was calculated using modeled 5, 10, 20 and 30% selective preference in reproduction. The size of samples for detecting 10, 25, and 50% increased level of aneuploidy was calculated. The presented principles for evaluation of aneuploid clone formation may be used to distinguish clones of any abnormal cells.

  10. Mouse Ovarian Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells Resist Chemotherapy and Retain Ability to Initiate Oocyte-Specific Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sriraman, Kalpana; Anand, Sandhya; Bhutda, Smita

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate stem cells in adult mouse ovary, the effect of chemotherapy on them and their potential to differentiate into germ cells. Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) that were SCA-1+/Lin−/CD45−, positive for nuclear octamer-binding transforming factor 4 (OCT-4), Nanog, and cell surface stage-specific embryonic antigen 1, were identified in adult mouse ovary. Chemotherapy resulted in complete loss of follicular reserve and cytoplasmic OCT-4 positive progenitors (ovarian germ stem cells) but VSELs survived. In ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cell cultures from chemoablated ovary, proliferating germ cell clusters and mouse vasa homolog/growth differentiation factor 9-positive oocyte-like structure were observed by day 6, probably arising as a result of differentiation of the surviving VSELs. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) exerted a direct stimulatory action on the OSE and induced stem cells proliferation and differentiation into premeiotic germ cell clusters during intact chemoablated ovaries culture. The FSH analog pregnant mare serum gonadotropin treatment to chemoablated mice increased the percentage of surviving VSELs in ovary. The results of this study provide evidence for the presence of potential VSELs in mouse ovaries and show that they survive chemotherapy, are modulated by FSH, and retain the ability to undergo oocyte-specific differentiation. These results show relevance to women who undergo premature ovarian failure because of oncotherapy. PMID:25779995

  11. High ALDH Activity Identifies Chemotherapy-Resistant Ewing's Sarcoma Stem Cells That Retain Sensitivity to EWS-FLI1 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Naheed; Katuri, Varalakshmi; O'Neill, Alison; Kong, Yali; Brown, Milton L.; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Loeb, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells are a chemotherapy-resistant population capable of self-renewal and of regenerating the bulk tumor, thereby causing relapse and patient death. Ewing's sarcoma, the second most common form of bone tumor in adolescents and young adults, follows a clinical pattern consistent with the Cancer Stem Cell model – remission is easily achieved, even for patients with metastatic disease, but relapse remains frequent and is usually fatal. Methodology/Principal Findings We have isolated a subpopulation of Ewing's sarcoma cells, from both human cell lines and human xenografts grown in immune deficient mice, which express high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDHhigh) activity and are enriched for clonogenicity, sphere-formation, and tumor initiation. The ALDHhigh cells are resistant to chemotherapy in vitro, but this can be overcome by the ATP binding cassette transport protein inhibitor, verapamil. Importantly, these cells are not resistant to YK-4-279, a small molecule inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 that is selectively toxic to Ewing's sarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions/Significance Ewing's sarcoma contains an ALDHhigh stem-like population of chemotherapy-resistant cells that retain sensitivity to EWS-FLI1 inhibition. Inhibiting the EWS-FLI1 oncoprotein may prove to be an effective means of improving patient outcomes by targeting Ewing's sarcoma stem cells that survive standard chemotherapy. PMID:21085683

  12. Mouse Ovarian Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells Resist Chemotherapy and Retain Ability to Initiate Oocyte-Specific Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sriraman, Kalpana; Bhartiya, Deepa; Anand, Sandhya; Bhutda, Smita

    2015-07-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate stem cells in adult mouse ovary, the effect of chemotherapy on them and their potential to differentiate into germ cells. Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) that were SCA-1+/Lin-/CD45-, positive for nuclear octamer-binding transforming factor 4 (OCT-4), Nanog, and cell surface stage-specific embryonic antigen 1, were identified in adult mouse ovary. Chemotherapy resulted in complete loss of follicular reserve and cytoplasmic OCT-4 positive progenitors (ovarian germ stem cells) but VSELs survived. In ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cell cultures from chemoablated ovary, proliferating germ cell clusters and mouse vasa homolog/growth differentiation factor 9-positive oocyte-like structure were observed by day 6, probably arising as a result of differentiation of the surviving VSELs. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) exerted a direct stimulatory action on the OSE and induced stem cells proliferation and differentiation into premeiotic germ cell clusters during intact chemoablated ovaries culture. The FSH analog pregnant mare serum gonadotropin treatment to chemoablated mice increased the percentage of surviving VSELs in ovary. The results of this study provide evidence for the presence of potential VSELs in mouse ovaries and show that they survive chemotherapy, are modulated by FSH, and retain the ability to undergo oocyte-specific differentiation. These results show relevance to women who undergo premature ovarian failure because of oncotherapy.

  13. Ongoing research on mammalian cloning and embryo stem cell technologies: bioethics of their potential medical applications.

    PubMed

    Revel, M

    2000-07-01

    Reproduction by cloning has been achieved by transfer into enucleated oocytes of nuclei from embryonic cells and more recently from cells of adult animals. The efficiency at which embryos produced by such nuclear transfers will develop into healthy newborns is very low but has succeeded in producing some cloned bovines, ovines and mice. Since the first report of sheep cloning from an adult cell in 1997, the potential applications of reproductive cloning in human medicine have been envisaged amidst a flurry of moral debates. Although the technology is still far from being ready for any human use, it has been condemned up front. It has also led to irrational fantasies and fears, based mainly on the misconception that genetic identity means identical twin personalities. Scientific research is ongoing to refine the cloning technology for applications in the production of genetically homogeneous farm animals with useful nutritional or therapeutic genetic traits. A new area of research is non-reproductive therapeutic cloning for the purpose of producing autologous embryonic cells and tissues for transplantation.

  14. In vitro and in vivo genotoxic effects of somatic cell nuclear transfer cloned cattle meat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam-Jin; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Jung, Yu-Ri; Lee, Jung-Won; Im, Gi-Sun; Seong, Hwan-Hoo; Park, Jin-Ki; Kang, Jong-Koo; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2011-09-01

    Although the nutritional composition and health status after consumption of the meat and milk derived from both conventionally bred (normal) and somatic cell nuclear transferred (cloned) animals and their progeny are not different, little is known about their food safeties like genetic toxicity. This study is performed to examine both in vitro (bacterial mutation and chromosome aberration) and in vivo (micronucleus) genotoxicity studies of cloned cattle meat. The concentrations of both normal and cloned cattle meat extracts (0-10×) were tested to five strains of bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium: TA98, TA100, TA1535, and TA1537; Escherichia coli: WP2uvrA) for bacterial mutation and to Chinese hamster lung (CHL/IU) cells for chromosome aberration, respectively. For micronucleus test, ICR mice were divided into five dietary groups: commercial pellets (control), pellets containing 5% (N-5) and 10% (N-10) normal cattle meat, and pellets containing 5% (C-5) and 10% (C-10) cloned cattle meat. No test substance-related genotoxicity was noted in the five bacterial strains, CHL/IU cells, or mouse bone marrow cells, suggesting that the cloned cattle meat potentially may be safe in terms of mutagenic hazards. Thus, it can be postulated that the cloned cattle meat do not induce any harmful genotoxic effects in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Mouse embryos and chimera cloned from neural cells in the postnatal cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Makino, Hatsune; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Hirabayashi, Takahiro; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Hamada, Shun; Kawamura, Yoshimi; Osada, Tomoharu; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    Cloning of mice has been achieved by transferring nuclei of various types of somatic cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes. However, all attempts to produce live cloned offspring using the nuclei of neurons from adult cerebral cortex have failed. Previously we obtained cloned mice using the nuclei of neural cells collected from fetal cerebral cortex. Here, we attempted to generate cloned mice using differentiated neurons from the cerebral cortex of postnatal (day 0-4) mice. Although we were unable to obtain live cloned pups, many fetuses reached day 10.5 days of development. These fetuses showed various abnormalities such as spherical omission of the neuroepithelium, collapsed lumen of neural tube, and aberrant expressions of marker proteins of neurons. We produced chimeric mice in which some hair cells and kidney cells were originated from differentiated neurons. In chimeric fetuses, LacZ-positive donor cells were in all three germ cell layers. However, chimeras with large contribution of donor-derived cells were not obtained. These results indicate that nuclei of differentiated neurons have lost their developmental totipotency. In other words, the conventional nuclear transfer technique does not allow nuclei of differentiated neurons to undergo complete genomic reprogramming required for normal embryonic development.

  16. Restoration of Viral Immunity in Immunodeficient Humans by the Adoptive Transfer of T Cell Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Watanabe, Kathe S.; Goodrich, James M.; Li, Cheng R.; Agha, Mounzer E.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1992-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells to establish immunity is an effective therapy for viral infections and tumors in animal models. The application of this approach to human disease would require the isolation and in vitro expansion of human antigen-specific T cells and evidence that such T cells persist and function in vivo after transfer. Cytomegalovirus-specific CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) clones could be isolated from bone marrow donors, propagated in vitro, and adoptively transferred to immunodeficient bone marrow transplant recipients. No toxicity developed and the clones provided persistent reconstitution of CD8^+ cytomegalovirus-specific CTL responses.

  17. Irreversible barrier to the reprogramming of donor cells in cloning with mouse embryos and embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yukiko; Kono, Tomohiro

    2006-08-01

    Somatic cloning does not always result in ontogeny in mammals, and development is often associated with various abnormalities and embryo loss with a high frequency. This is considered to be due to aberrant gene expression resulting from epigenetic reprogramming errors. However, a fundamental question in this context is whether the developmental abnormalities reported to date are specific to somatic cloning. The aim of this study was to determine the stage of nuclear differentiation during development that leads to developmental abnormalities associated with embryo cloning. In order to address this issue, we reconstructed cloned embryos using four- and eight-cell embryos, morula embryos, inner cell mass (ICM) cells, and embryonic stem cells as donor nuclei and determined the occurrence of abnormalities such as developmental arrest and placentomegaly, which are common characteristics of all mouse somatic cell clones. The present analysis revealed that an acute decline in the full-term developmental competence of cloned embryos occurred with the use of four- and eight-cell donor nuclei (22.7% vs. 1.8%) in cases of standard embryo cloning and with morula and ICM donor nuclei (11.4% vs. 6.6%) in serial nuclear transfer. Histological observation showed abnormal differentiation and proliferation of trophoblastic giant cells in the placentae of cloned concepti derived from four-cell to ICM cell donor nuclei. Enlargement of placenta along with excessive proliferation of the spongiotrophoblast layer and glycogen cells was observed in the clones derived from morula embryos and ICM cells. These results revealed that irreversible epigenetic events had already started to occur at the four-cell stage. In addition, the expression of genes involved in placentomegaly is regulated at the blastocyst stage by irreversible epigenetic events, and it could not be reprogrammed by the fusion of nuclei with unfertilized oocytes. Hence, developmental abnormalities such as placentomegaly as

  18. Synthesis and cell-free cloning of DNA libraries using programmable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ben Yehezkel, Tuval; Rival, Arnaud; Raz, Ofir; Cohen, Rafael; Marx, Zipora; Camara, Miguel; Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Koch, Birgit; Heeb, Stephan; Krasnogor, Natalio; Delattre, Cyril; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-02-29

    Microfluidics may revolutionize our ability to write synthetic DNA by addressing several fundamental limitations associated with generating novel genetic constructs. Here we report the first de novo synthesis and cell-free cloning of custom DNA libraries in sub-microliter reaction droplets using programmable digital microfluidics. Specifically, we developed Programmable Order Polymerization (POP), Microfluidic Combinatorial Assembly of DNA (M-CAD) and Microfluidic In-vitro Cloning (MIC) and applied them to de novo synthesis, combinatorial assembly and cell-free cloning of genes, respectively. Proof-of-concept for these methods was demonstrated by programming an autonomous microfluidic system to construct and clone libraries of yeast ribosome binding sites and bacterial Azurine, which were then retrieved in individual droplets and validated. The ability to rapidly and robustly generate designer DNA molecules in an autonomous manner should have wide application in biological research and development. PMID:26481354

  19. Synthesis and cell-free cloning of DNA libraries using programmable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ben Yehezkel, Tuval; Rival, Arnaud; Raz, Ofir; Cohen, Rafael; Marx, Zipora; Camara, Miguel; Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Koch, Birgit; Heeb, Stephan; Krasnogor, Natalio; Delattre, Cyril; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-02-29

    Microfluidics may revolutionize our ability to write synthetic DNA by addressing several fundamental limitations associated with generating novel genetic constructs. Here we report the first de novo synthesis and cell-free cloning of custom DNA libraries in sub-microliter reaction droplets using programmable digital microfluidics. Specifically, we developed Programmable Order Polymerization (POP), Microfluidic Combinatorial Assembly of DNA (M-CAD) and Microfluidic In-vitro Cloning (MIC) and applied them to de novo synthesis, combinatorial assembly and cell-free cloning of genes, respectively. Proof-of-concept for these methods was demonstrated by programming an autonomous microfluidic system to construct and clone libraries of yeast ribosome binding sites and bacterial Azurine, which were then retrieved in individual droplets and validated. The ability to rapidly and robustly generate designer DNA molecules in an autonomous manner should have wide application in biological research and development.

  20. Construction and characterization of a human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 infectious molecular clone.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Sébastien Alain; Ko, Nga Ling; Calattini, Sara; Mallet, Adeline; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Kehn, Kylene; Brady, John N; Kashanchi, Fatah; Gessain, Antoine; Mahieux, Renaud

    2008-07-01

    We and others have uncovered the existence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 (HTLV-3). We have now generated an HTLV-3 proviral clone. We established that gag, env, pol, pro, and tax/rex as well as minus-strand mRNAs are present in cells transfected with the HTLV-3 clone. HTLV-3 p24(gag) protein is detected in the cell culture supernatant. Transfection of 293T-long terminal repeat (LTR)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells with the HTLV-3 clone promotes formation of syncytia, a hallmark of Env expression, together with the appearance of fluorescent cells, demonstrating that Tax is expressed. Viral particles are visible by electron microscopy. These particles are infectious, as demonstrated by infection experiments with purified virions.

  1. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in cell lines used for somatic cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Stringfellow, David A; Riddell, Kay P; Givens, M Daniel; Galik, Patricia K; Sullivan, Eddie; Dykstra, Christine C; Robl, James; Kasinathan, Poothapillai

    2005-03-01

    Culture of cell lines from fetuses or postnatal animals is an essential part of somatic cell cloning. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is commonly used in media for propagation of these cells. Unfortunately, bovine fetuses and postnatal animals as well as FBS are all possible sources of non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) which is widely distributed among cattle. This study was prompted when screening of samples sent to veterinary diagnostic labs revealed that 15 of 39 fetal fibroblast cell lines used in cloning research were positive for BVDV as determined by various assays including reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Goals of the research were to use both virus isolation and reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR) to confirm which of the cell lines were actually infected with BVDV and to assay samples of media, FBS and the earliest available passages of each cell line in an attempt to determine the source of the viral infections. Sequence analysis of amplified cDNA from all isolates was performed to provide a definitive link between possible sources of virus and infected cell lines. Only 5 of the 39 cell lines were actually infected with BVDV. Three of these five lines were not infected at the earliest cryopreserved passage, leading to the conclusion that they likely became infected after culture in media containing contaminated FBS. In fact, sequence comparison of the amplified cDNA from one lot of FBS confirmed that it was the source of infection for one of these cell lines. Since BVDV was isolated from the remaining two cell lines at the earliest available passage, the fetuses from which they were established could not be ruled out as the source of the virus.

  2. Differential Cell Tropism of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Molecular Clones In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Gregg A.; Himathongkham, Sunee; Sparger, Ellen E.

    1999-01-01

    Independent studies have demonstrated different cell tropisms for molecular clones of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). In this report, we examined three clones, FIV-pF34, FIV-14, and FIV-pPPR, for replication in Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells, feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and feline macrophage cultures. Importantly, cell tropism for these three clones was also examined in vivo. FIV-pF34 replication was efficient in CrFK cells but severely restricted in PBMC, whereas replication of FIV-pPPR was vigorous in PBMC but severely restricted in CrFK cells. FIV-14 replication was productive in both CrFK cells and PBMC. Interestingly, all three molecular clones replicated with similar efficiencies in primary feline monocyte-derived macrophages. In vivo, FIV-pF34 proved least efficient for establishing persistent infection, and proviral DNA when detectable, was localized predominately to nonlymphoid cell populations (macrophages). FIV-pPPR proved most efficient for induction of a persistent viremia in vivo, and proviral DNA was localized predominately in CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets. FIV-14 inoculation of cats resulted in an infection characterized by seroconversion and localization of proviral DNA in CD4+ lymphocytes only. Results of this study on diverse FIV molecular clones revealed that in vitro replication efficiency of an FIV isolate in PBMC directly correlated with replication efficiency in vivo, whereas proficiency for replication in macrophages in vitro was not predictive for replication potential in vivo. Also, infection of both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets was associated with higher virus load in vivo. Results of the studies on these three FIV clones, which exhibited differential cell tropism, indicated a correlation between in vitro and in vivo cell tropism and virus replication. PMID:10074104

  3. Antigen presentation by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: presentation of synthetic antigenic sites reveals clones that exhibit no specificity and clones that present only one epitope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, we reported the preparation and antigen-presenting properties of hybridoma B-cell clones obtained after fusing non-secreting, non-antigen presenting Balb/c 653-myeloma cells with non-immune SJL spleen cells. It was found that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific, depending on the particular B-cell clone. In the present work, one specific and one general presenter B-cell clones were tested for their epitope presentation ability to SJL T-cells that were specific to lysozyme or myoglobin. B-cell clone A1G12, a general presenter which presented both lysozyme and myoglobin to their respective T-cell lines, was found to present all five myoglobin epitopes while clone A1L16, a lysozyme specific presenter presented only one of the three epitopes of lysozyme. The latter reveals a hitherto unknown submolecular specificity (to a given epitope within a protein) for antigen presenting cells at the clonal level. Therefore, the specificity of T-cell recognition does not only derive from the T-cell but may also be dependent on the epitope specificity of the antigen-presenting B-cell.

  4. Chitosan Feasibility to Retain Retinal Stem Cell Phenotype and Slow Proliferation for Retinal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Girish K.; Rodriguez-Crespo, David; Singh, Amar K.; Casado-Coterillo, Clara; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria T.; Coronas, Joaquin; Pastor, J. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Retinal stem cells (RSCs) are promising in cell replacement strategies for retinal diseases. RSCs can migrate, differentiate, and integrate into retina. However, RSCs transplantation needs an adequate support; chitosan membrane (ChM) could be one, which can carry RSCs with high feasibility to support their integration into retina. RSCs were isolated, evaluated for phenotype, and subsequently grown on sterilized ChM and polystyrene surface for 8 hours, 1, 4, and 11 days for analysing cell adhesion, proliferation, viability, and phenotype. Isolated RSCs expressed GFAP, PKC, isolectin, recoverin, RPE65, PAX-6, cytokeratin 8/18, and nestin proteins. They adhered (28 ± 16%, 8 hours) and proliferated (40 ± 20 cells/field, day 1 and 244 ± 100 cells/field, day 4) significantly low (P < 0.05) on ChM. However, they maintained similar viability (>95%) and phenotype (cytokeratin 8/18, PAX6, and nestin proteins expression, day 11) on both surfaces (ChM and polystyrene). RSCs did not express alpha-SMA protein on both surfaces. RSCs express proteins belonging to epithelial, glial, and neural cells, confirming that they need further stimulus to reach a final destination of differentiation that could be provided in in vivo condition. ChM does not alternate RSCs behaviour and therefore can be used as a cell carrier so that slow proliferating RSCs can migrate and integrate into retina. PMID:24719852

  5. Chitosan feasibility to retain retinal stem cell phenotype and slow proliferation for retinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Girish K; Rodriguez-Crespo, David; Singh, Amar K; Casado-Coterillo, Clara; Fernandez-Bueno, Ivan; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria T; Coronas, Joaquin; Pastor, J Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Retinal stem cells (RSCs) are promising in cell replacement strategies for retinal diseases. RSCs can migrate, differentiate, and integrate into retina. However, RSCs transplantation needs an adequate support; chitosan membrane (ChM) could be one, which can carry RSCs with high feasibility to support their integration into retina. RSCs were isolated, evaluated for phenotype, and subsequently grown on sterilized ChM and polystyrene surface for 8 hours, 1, 4, and 11 days for analysing cell adhesion, proliferation, viability, and phenotype. Isolated RSCs expressed GFAP, PKC, isolectin, recoverin, RPE65, PAX-6, cytokeratin 8/18, and nestin proteins. They adhered (28 ± 16%, 8 hours) and proliferated (40 ± 20 cells/field, day 1 and 244 ± 100 cells/field, day 4) significantly low (P < 0.05) on ChM. However, they maintained similar viability (>95%) and phenotype (cytokeratin 8/18, PAX6, and nestin proteins expression, day 11) on both surfaces (ChM and polystyrene). RSCs did not express alpha-SMA protein on both surfaces. RSCs express proteins belonging to epithelial, glial, and neural cells, confirming that they need further stimulus to reach a final destination of differentiation that could be provided in in vivo condition. ChM does not alternate RSCs behaviour and therefore can be used as a cell carrier so that slow proliferating RSCs can migrate and integrate into retina.

  6. To clone or not to clone? Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated in bulk culture.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Charlotte A; Hemeda, Hatim; Pieper, Lisa A; Lenz, Michael; Qin, Jie; Joussen, Sylvia; Sontag, Stephanie; Wanek, Paul; Denecke, Bernd; Schüler, Herdit M; Zenke, Martin; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are usually clonally derived. The selection of fully reprogrammed cells generally involves picking of individual colonies with morphology similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Given that fully reprogrammed cells are highly proliferative and escape from cellular senescence, it is conceivable that they outgrow non-pluripotent and partially reprogrammed cells during culture expansion without the need of clonal selection. In this study, we have reprogrammed human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) with episomal plasmid vectors. Colony frequency was higher and size was larger when using murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as stromal support instead of HDFs or human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We have then compared iPSCs which were either clonally derived by manual selection of a single colony, or derived from bulk-cultures of all initial colonies. After few passages their morphology, expression of pluripotency markers, and gene expression profiles did not reveal any significant differences. Furthermore, clonally-derived and bulk-cultured iPSCs revealed similar in vitro differentiation potential towards the three germ layers. Therefore, manual selection of individual colonies does not appear to be necessary for the generation of iPSCs - this is of relevance for standardization and automation of cell culture procedures.

  7. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer.

  8. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  9. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    PubMed Central

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  10. Gene expression analysis of the CD4+ T-cell clones derived from gingival tissues of periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Honda, T; Domon, H; Oda, T; Okui, T; Amanuma, R; Nakajima, T; Yamazaki, K

    2005-12-01

    The function of T cells infiltrating periodontitis lesions is complex and has not been fully elucidated. Here, we established T-cell clones from the gingival tissues of periodontitis patients and examined their gene expression. A total of 57 and 101 T-cell clones were established by means of immobilized anti-CD3 antibody and IL-2 from gingival tissues and peripheral blood, respectively. The gingival T-cell clones were derived from three patients, and the peripheral blood T-cell clones from two of these patients and a further patient whose gingival T-cell clones were not established. Gingival tissues were also obtained from a further 19 periodontitis patients. The expression of cytokines and molecules related to both regulatory function and tissue destruction were examined by means of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. All the gingival T-cell clones expressed mRNA for TGF-beta1, CTLA-4, and CD25, and all the T-cell clones from peripheral blood expressed IFN-gamma and TGF-beta1 mRNAs. Most but not all the T-cell clones from gingival tissues and peripheral blood expressed mRNA for IFN-gamma and, CD25 and CTLA-4, respectively. The frequency of T-cell clones and gingival tissues expressing FOXP3, a possible master gene for mouse CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, was very high (97%, 93%, and 100% for gingival T-cell clones, peripheral blood T-cell clones, and gingival tissues, respectively). Whereas the frequency of IL-4-expressing T-cell clones was lower for gingival T-cell clones (70% vs. 87%), the frequency of the gingival T-cell clones expressing IL-10 and IL-17 was higher than peripheral blood T-cell clones (75% vs. 62% for IL-10, 51% vs. 11% for IL-17). A similar expression profile was observed for gingival T-cell clones compared with gingival tissue samples with the exception of IL-4 expression, where the frequency of positive samples was lower in the gingival tissues (70% vs. 11%). These results suggest that the individual T cells infiltrating

  11. T-cell receptor beta gene rearrangements in clones derived from human CD4-8- cells expressing natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Moore, M

    1988-12-01

    Clones derived from highly purified human peripheral blood Leu 19+ cells in the presence of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) expressed cytotoxic activity against natural killer (NK)-resistant as well as NK-sensitive targets. All 66 clones analysed had a germ line configuration of T-cell receptor (TCR) beta genes and 38/40 also had unrearranged TCR gamma genes. The two exceptions were both CD3+ clones, but these did not have a cytotoxic repertoire noticeably different from CD3- clones without TCR gamma gene rearrangements. Clones were also obtained from highly purified CD4-8- cells, most of which were also cytotoxic for NK-resistant and NK-sensitive targets. About 90% of these clones were CD3+ but only around 50% remained negative for CD4 and CD8 while a significant number (12.7%) were positive for both CD4 and CD8. All clones analysed had rearranged TCR gamma genes and most had also rearranged TCR beta genes, including 20/25 of the clones which were CD3+4-8-. Many of the clones showed two rearrangements of TCR beta genes, and 3/4 CD3- clones had rearranged TCR beta as well as TCR gamma genes. There was no correlation between cytotoxic activity and TCR gene status or phenotype of these CD4-8- derived clones, except that clones which were Leu 19+ tended to have higher cytotoxic activity against NK-sensitive and NK-resistant targets than Leu 19-clones. The results strongly indicate that TCR beta and gamma gene products are not involved in the cytotoxicity mediated by these clones. They also suggest that some CD4-8- cells may be capable of limited differentiation in vitro.

  12. Adipose-derived stem cells retain their regenerative potential after methotrexate treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Olivia S.; Fonseca, Vera C.; Darling, Eric M.

    2014-10-01

    In musculoskeletal tissues like bone, chemotherapy can impair progenitor cell differentiation and proliferation, resulting in decreased bone growth and mineralization throughout a patient's lifetime. In the current study, we investigated the effects of chemotherapeutics on adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) function to determine whether this cell source could be a candidate for repairing, or even preventing, chemotherapy-induced tissue damage. Dose-dependent proliferation rates of ASCs and normal human fibroblasts (NHFs) were quantified after treatment with cytarabine (CY), etoposide (ETO), methotrexate (MTX), and vincristine (VIN) using a fluorescence-based assay. The influence of MTX on the multipotency of ASCs and freshly isolated stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells was also evaluated using lineage-specific stains and spectrophotometry. ASC and NHF proliferation were equally inhibited by exposure to CY and ETO; however, when treated with MTX and VIN, ASCs exhibited greater resistance. This was especially apparent for MTX-treated samples, with ASC proliferation showing no inhibition for clinically relevant MTX doses ranging from 0.1 to 50 μM. Additional experiments revealed that the differentiation potential of ASCs was not affected by MTX treatment and that upregulation of dihydrofolate reductase possibly contributed to this response. Moreover, SVF cells, which include ASCs, exhibited similar resistance to MTX impairment, with respect to cellular proliferation, clonogenicity, and differentiation capability. Therefore, we have shown that the regenerative properties of ASCs resist the cytotoxicity of MTX, identifying these cells as a potential key for repairing musculoskeletal damage in patients undergoing chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Long-term effects of chemotherapeutics can include musculoskeletal dysfunction. • A screen of common drugs showed disparate effects on ASCs and fibroblasts. • One drug, methotrexate, did not impair ASC growth characteristics

  13. Immortalized Mouse Floxed Fam20c Dental Papillar Mesenchymal and Osteoblast Cell Lines Retain Their Primary Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Hua; Xie, Xiaohua; Liu, Peihong; Liu, Ying; Jani, Priyam H.; Lu, Yongbo; Chen, Shuo; Qin, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Fam20c is essential for the normal mineralization of dentin and bone. The generation of odontoblast and osteoblast cell lines carrying floxed Fam20c allele can offer valuable tools for the study of the roles of Fam20c in the mineralization of dentin and bone. The limited capability of the primary odontoblasts and osteoblasts to proliferate necessitates the development of odontoblast and osteoblast cell lines serving as substitutes for the study of differentiation and mineralization of the odontoblasts and osteoblasts. In this study, we established and characterized immortalized mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. The isolated primary mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts were immortalized by the infection of lentivirus containing Simian Virus 40 T-antigen (SV40 T-Ag). The immortalization of floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts was verified by the long-term passages and genomic integration of SV40 T-Ag. The immortalized floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines not only proliferated at a high rate and retained the morphology of their primary counterparts, but also preserved the dentin and bone specific gene expression as the primary dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts did. Consistently, the capability of the primary floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts to mineralize was also inherited by the immortalized dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. Thus, we have successfully generated the immortalized mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. PMID:25833681

  14. Class II-restricted T cell receptor engineered in vitro for higher affinity retains peptide specificity and function

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. Scott; Donermeyer, David L.; Allen, Paul M.; Kranz, David M.

    2005-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) αβ heterodimer determines the peptide and MHC specificity of a T cell. It has been proposed that in vivo selection processes maintain low TCR affinities because T cells with higher-affinity TCRs would (i) have reduced functional capacity or (ii) cross-react with self-peptides resulting in clonal deletion. We used the class II-restricted T cell clone 3.L2, specific for murine hemoglobin (Hb/I-Ek), to explore these possibilities by engineering higher-affinity TCR mutants. A 3.L2 single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) was mutagenized and selected for thermal stability and surface expression in a yeast display system. Stabilized mutants were used to generate a library with CDR3 mutations that were selected with Hb/I-Ek to isolate a panel of affinity mutants with KD values as low as 25 nM. Kinetic analysis of soluble single-chain TCRs showed that increased affinities were the result of both faster on-rates and slower off-rates. T cells transfected with the mutant TCRs and wild-type TCR responded to similar concentrations of peptide, indicating that the increased affinity was not detrimental to T cell activation. T cell transfectants maintained exquisite hemoglobin peptide specificity, but an altered peptide ligand that acted as an antagonist for the wild-type TCR was converted to a strong agonist with higher-affinity TCRs. These results show that T cells with high-affinity class II reactive TCRs are functional, but there is an affinity threshold above which an increase in affinity does not result in significant enhancement of T cell activation. PMID:16365315

  15. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Julie A.; McGuire, Travis C. . E-mail: mcguiret@vetmed.wsu.edu

    2005-05-10

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAV{sub WSU5} infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with {sup 51}Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection.

  16. Perivascular Stem Cells Diminish Muscle Atrophy and Retain Viability in a Rotator Cuff Tear Model

    PubMed Central

    Eliasberg, Claire; Jensen, Andrew; Dar, Ayelet; Kowalski, Tomasz J.; Murray, Iain; Khan, Adam Z.; Natsuhara, Kyle; Garagozlo, Cameron; McAllister, David R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are a common cause of shoulder pain and often necessitate surgical repair. Muscle changes including atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty degeneration can develop after RCTs, which may compromise surgical repair and clinical outcomes. Lipoaspirate-derived human perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have demonstrated myogenic and angiogenic potential in other small animal models of muscle injury. We hypothesized that the administration of PSCs following massive RCTs may help to diminish these muscle changes in a small animal model. Methods: A total of 90 immunodeficient mice were used (15 groups, N=6). Each was assigned to one of three surgical groups: i) sham, ii) supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon transection (TT), or iii) TT and suprascapular nerve denervation (TT+DN). PSCs were harvested from human lipoaspirate and sorted using fluorescence-activated cell sorting into small blood vessel residing pericytes (CD146+ CD34- CD45- CD31-) and large blood perivascular adventitial cells (CD146- CD34+ CD45- CD31-). Mice received either a) no injection, b) saline injection, c) pericyte injection, or d) adventitial cell injection at the time of the index procedure or at two weeks following index surgery. The supraspinatus muscles were harvested six weeks after the index procedure. Muscle atrophy was assessed by measuring percent wet muscle weight change for each sample. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fibrosis, and fatty degeneration were analyzed using Image J™. Additionally, pericytes and adventitial cells were transduced with a luciferase-containing construct. Animals were given injections of luciferin and imaged using IVIS to track in vivo bioluminescence following injections to assess cell viability. Results: Treatment with PSC injection after TT resulted in less wet weight loss and greater muscle fiber CSA than control groups (P<0.05). The TT+DN groups treated with PSC injections two weeks post-op also had less muscle weight loss

  17. Plasticity of marrow mesenchymal stem cells from human first-trimester fetus: from single-cell clone to neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihua; Shen, Wenzheng; Sun, Bingjie; Lv, Changrong; Dou, Zhongying

    2011-02-01

    Recent results have shown that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from human first-trimester abortus (hfBMSCs) are closer to embryonic stem cells and perform greater telomerase activity and faster propagation than mid- and late-prophase fetal and adult BMSCs. However, no research has been done on the plasticity of hfBMSCs into neuronal cells using single-cell cloned strains without cell contamination. In this study, we isolated five single cells from hfBMSCs and obtained five single-cell cloned strains, and investigated their biological property and neuronal differentiation potential. We found that four of the five strains showed similar expression profile of surface antigen markers to hfBMSCs, and most of them differentiated into neuron-like cells expressing Nestin, Pax6, Sox1, β-III Tubulin, NF-L, and NSE under induction. One strain showed different expression profile of surface antigen markers from the four strains and hfBMSCs, and did not differentiate toward neuronal cells. We demonstrated for the first time that some of single-cell cloned strains from hfBMSCs can differentiate into nerve tissue-like cell clusters under induction in vitro, and that the plasticity of each single-cell cloned strain into neuronal cells is different.

  18. Generation and characterization of gp100 peptide-specific NK-T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Saeterdal, I; thor Straten, P; Myklebust, J H; Kirkin, A F; Gjertsen, M K; Gaudernack, G

    1998-03-01

    MHC-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for antigens expressed by malignant cells are important components of immune responses against human cancer. Peripheral blood monocytes of HLA-A2+ healthy donors were used to induce dendritic cells (DCs) by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 and loaded with a gp100 peptide (YLEPGPVTA). By applying these peptide-loaded DCs, a CTL line that displayed high cytotoxic reactivity with peptide-loaded target cells was generated. A total of 11 gp100 peptide-specific CTL clones were generated from this cell line. Several of these CTL clones were studied in detail. Of particular interest was clone CTL-45, which, contrary to the parental cell line, displayed strong NK activity and, by flow-cytometric analysis, revealed a CD3+, TCR BV17, CD8+ and CD56+ phenotype. This clone was strictly peptide-specific and effectively killed a panel of melanoma cells expressing HLA-A2 and gp100. Tumor-specific T cells with this kind of dual function are potentially of great clinical importance as they have a backup mechanism that may go into action when tumor cells escape specific killing by losing their HLA-class I molecules.

  19. Extraocular muscle satellite cells are high performance myo-engines retaining efficient regenerative capacity in dystrophin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stuelsatz, Pascal; Shearer, Andrew; Li, Yunfei; Muir, Lindsey A; Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Shen, Qingwu W; Kirillova, Irina; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora

    2015-01-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOMs) are highly specialized skeletal muscles that originate from the head mesoderm and control eye movements. EOMs are uniquely spared in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and animal models of dystrophin deficiency. Specific traits of myogenic progenitors may be determinants of this preferential sparing, but very little is known about the myogenic cells in this muscle group. While satellite cells (SCs) have long been recognized as the main source of myogenic cells in adult muscle, most of the knowledge about these cells comes from the prototypic limb muscles. In this study, we show that EOMs, regardless of their distinctive Pax3-negative lineage origin, harbor SCs that share a common signature (Pax7(+), Ki67(-), Nestin-GFP(+), Myf5(nLacZ+), MyoD-positive lineage origin) with their limb and diaphragm somite-derived counterparts, but are remarkably endowed with a high proliferative potential as revealed in cell culture assays. Specifically, we demonstrate that in adult as well as in aging mice, EOM SCs possess a superior expansion capacity, contributing significantly more proliferating, differentiating and renewal progeny than their limb and diaphragm counterparts. These robust growth and renewal properties are maintained by EOM SCs isolated from dystrophin-null (mdx) mice, while SCs from muscles affected by dystrophin deficiency (i.e., limb and diaphragm) expand poorly in vitro. EOM SCs also retain higher performance in cell transplantation assays in which donor cells were engrafted into host mdx limb muscle. Collectively, our study provides a comprehensive picture of EOM myogenic progenitors, showing that while these cells share common hallmarks with the prototypic SCs in somite-derived muscles, they distinctively feature robust growth and renewal capacities that warrant the title of high performance myo-engines and promote consideration of their properties for developing new approaches in cell-based therapy to combat skeletal muscle wasting.

  20. Female human iPS cells retain an inactive X-chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Tchieu, Jason; Kuoy, Edward; Chin, Mark H.; Trinh, Hung; Patterson, Michaela; Sherman, Sean P.; Aimiuwu, Otaren; Lindgren, Anne; Hakimian, Shahrad; Zack, Jerome A.; Clark, Amander T.; Pyle, April D.; Lowry, William E.; Plath, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    Generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) requires massive epigenome reorganization. It is unclear whether reprogramming of female human cells reactivates the inactive X chromosome (Xi), like in mouse. Here we establish that human (h)iPSCs derived from several female fibroblasts under standard culture conditions carry an Xi. Despite the lack of reactivation, the Xi undergoes defined chromatin changes, and expansion of hiPSCs can lead to partial loss of XIST RNA. These results indicate that hiPSCs are epigenetically dynamic and do not display a pristine state of X-inactivation with two active X’s as found in some female human embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, while fibroblasts are mosaic for the Xi, hiPSCs are clonal for the Xi. This non-random pattern of X chromosome inactivation in female hiPSCs, which is maintained upon differentiation, has critical implications for clinical applications and disease modeling, and could be exploited for a unique form of gene therapy for X-linked diseases. PMID:20727844

  1. Cloning the Gravity and Shear Stress Related Genes from MG-63 Cells by Subtracting Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu; Dai, Zhong-quan; Wang, Bing; Cao, Xin-sheng; Li, Ying-hui; Sun, Xi-qing

    2008-06-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to clone the gravity and shear stress related genes from osteoblast-like human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells by subtractive hybridization. Method MG-63 cells were divided into two groups (1G group and simulated microgravity group). After cultured for 60 h in two different gravitational environments, two groups of MG-63 cells were treated with 1.5Pa fluid shear stress (FSS) for 60 min, respectively. The total RNA in cells was isolated. The gravity and shear stress related genes were cloned by subtractive hybridization. Result 200 clones were gained. 30 positive clones were selected using PCR method based on the primers of vector and sequenced. The obtained sequences were analyzed by blast. changes of 17 sequences were confirmed by RT-PCR and these genes are related to cell proliferation, cell differentiation, protein synthesis, signal transduction and apoptosis. 5 unknown genes related to gravity and shear stress were found. Conclusion In this part of our study, our result indicates that simulated microgravity may change the activities of MG-63 cells by inducing the functional alterations of specific genes.

  2. Production of interferon and tumour necrosis factor by cloned human natural cytotoxic lymphocytes and T cells.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Meager, A; Moore, M

    1987-08-01

    Cell lines and clones, derived from natural killer (NK) cell-enriched (B73.1+) peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from several human donors, that expressed distinct surface phenotypes and were cytolytically active against K562 target cells were tested for their capacity to produce interferon (IFN) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IFN and TNF were measured firstly in biological assays and secondly in specific immunoassays for alpha-IFN, gamma-IFN and tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha). It was found that the majority of NK-derived lines and clones were highly cytotoxic towards K562, but generally produced relatively low or undetectable levels of gamma-IFN and TNF alpha following stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin. No alpha-IFN was detected in supernatants from these cells. In comparison, cell lines and clones, derived from T lymphocyte (B73.1-) enriched PBL from the same donors were poorly cytotoxic towards K562, but generally produced higher levels of gamma-IFN and TNF than NK-derived cells. Thus, neither gamma-IFN nor TNF production were shown to correlate well with the capacity of NK-derived or T cell clones to effect cytotoxic action towards K562 in vitro. These results suggest that the co-production of gamma-IFN and TNF is not indicative of cytotoxic potential.

  3. [Cloning and stem cells. Social, ethical and moral impact].

    PubMed

    Pérez Pérez, Félix

    2002-01-01

    Stem cells are non-specialised cells, but capable to develop into differenciated (or specialised) cells, that maintain a specific function until they die. Stem cells are obtained from blastocysts. Despite of their therapeutic potential, their origin has generated much controversy and confrontation because of ethical (and moral.) reasons. However, stem cells can also be supplied by adult cells, that are present in the tissue in a quiescient stage, waiting for the appropriate signals to develop into differenciated cells. This type cells is an alternative source for stem cells, and their utilization for medical treatment of degenerative diseases presents no ethical problems.

  4. Progenitor cells for regenerative medicine and consequences of ART and cloning-associated epimutations.

    PubMed

    Laprise, Shari L

    2010-06-01

    The "holy grail" of regenerative medicine is the identification of an undifferentiated progenitor cell that is pluripotent, patient specific, and ethically unambiguous. Such a progenitor cell must also be able to differentiate into functional, transplantable tissue, while avoiding the risks of immune rejection. With reports detailing aberrant genomic imprinting associated with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and reproductive cloning, the idea that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) derived from surplus in vitro fertilized embryos or nuclear transfer ESCs (ntESCs) harvested from cloned embryos may harbor dangerous epigenetic errors has gained attention. Various progenitor cell sources have been proposed for human therapy, from hESCs to ntESCs, and from adult stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS and piPS cells). This review highlights the advantages and disadvantages of each of these technologies, with particular emphasis on epigenetic stability. PMID:20162468

  5. Virus-induced polyclonal B cell activation improves protective CTL memory via retained CD27 expression on memory CTL.

    PubMed

    Matter, Matthias; Mumprecht, Sabine; Pinschewer, Daniel D; Pavelic, Viktor; Yagita, Hideo; Krautwald, Stefan; Borst, Jannie; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2005-11-01

    Different viruses elicit distinct phenotypes of memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). This is reflected in differential expression of homing receptors and costimulatory molecules like CD27. Memory CTL retained CD27 following lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, but not after immunization with recombinant vaccinia virus or tumor cells expressing LCMV glycoprotein. Stable CD27 expression on memory CTL required ligation by CD70 expressed on polyclonally activated B cells during the contraction phase. The functional consequence of CD27 expressed on virus-specific CTL was analyzed in CD27-deficient mice. LCMV infection of CD27(-/-) mice revealed that primary CTL activation and expansion as well as elimination of the virus were independent of CD27 expression. In contrast, ligation of CD27 on memory CTL upon secondary antigen encounter increased clonal expansion and improved protection against re-infection. This points to novel B cell-CTL interactions during viral infection and to a beneficial role of polyclonal B cell activation that represents a characteristic of murine LCMV, human immunodeficiency virus and human hepatitis B and C virus infection. PMID:16231287

  6. The search for truth and freedom: ethical issues surrounding human cloning and stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Alex

    2002-02-01

    The reality of cloning and stem cell research has provoked wonder, fear and anger. These developments have the potential fundamentally to alter humanity. But how well informed is the range of views being expressed? Is progress being threatened by understandable but uninformed fears? Or are scientists rushing toward an ethical abyss, so concerned with what they can do that they never stop to ask what they should do? This article identifies some of the fears and hopes surrounding cloning and stem cell research. It aims to provoke ethical debate in evaluating such research.

  7. Immunolocalization indicates that both original and regenerated lizard tail tissues contain populations of long retaining cells, putative stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    The regeneration of the tail in lizards is likely sustained by stem/progenitor cells located in the stump after amputation of the tail. This microscopic and ultrastructural study shows the localization of 5-bromo-deoxy-uridine (5BrdU)-long retaining labeled cells in different tissues of the tail stump. These putative stem/progenitor cells are sparsely detected in the epidermis of scales, adipose tissue, intermuscle connective septa, myosatellite cells, and perichondrion of the vertebrae. Most of 5BrdU-labeled cells are present in the bone marrow of vertebrae as hemocytoblasts and reticulate cells, whereas more numerous myelocytes and polychromatophilic erythroblasts show a variable level of nuclear labeling. 5BrdU and tritiated-thymidine labeled and unlabeled hemopoietic cells are seen in circulating vessels and in the blastema where their maturation is completed. This observation indicates that the entire differentiation span of both white and red blood cells, at least during tail regeneration, lasts longer than 4 weeks. Labeled polychromatophilic erythroblasts and heterophilic and basophilic myelocytes are present in the synusoidal vessels of the regenerating tail. This study indicates that extravasating blood cells involved in immunity make large part of the forming blastema cell population, but are replaced by mesenchymal cells of different origin. The presence of long retaining labeled cells in tissues of the tail stump is likely connected to the production of blastema mesenchymal cells. Although no direct cell-lineage study has been done, histological, immunocytochemical, and autoradiographic studies have indicated that it is from these tissues that proliferating cells appear mainly localized after tail amputation and blastema formation.

  8. GLUT3 is present in Clone 9 liver cells and translocates to the plasma membrane in response to insulin.

    PubMed

    Defries, Danielle M; Taylor, Carla G; Zahradka, Peter

    2016-08-26

    Clone 9 cells have been reported to express only the GLUT1 facilitative glucose transporter; however, previous studies have not examined Clone 9 cells for GLUT3 content. The current study sought to profile the presence of glucose transporters in Clone 9 cells, H4IIE hepatoma cells, and L6 myoblasts and myotubes. While the other cell types contained the expected complement of transporters, Clone 9 cells had GLUT3 which was previously not reported. Interestingly, both GLUT3 mRNA and protein were detected in Clone 9 cells, but only mRNA for GLUT1 was detected. Glucose transport in Clone 9 cells was insulin-sensitive in a concentration-dependent manner, concomitant with the presence of GLUT3 in the plasma membrane after insulin treatment. Although basal glucose uptake was unaffected, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was abolished with siRNA-mediated GLUT3 knockdown. These results contradict previous reports that Clone 9 cells exclusively express GLUT1 and suggest GLUT3 is a key insulin-sensitive glucose transporter required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by Clone 9 cells.

  9. Cloned transgenic farm animals produce a bispecific antibody for T cell-mediated tumor cell killing.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Müller, Sigrid; Minoia, Rosa; Wolf, Eckhard; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wenigerkind, Hendrik; Lassnig, Caroline; Besenfelder, Urban; Müller, Mathias; Lytton, Simon D; Jung, Gundram; Brem, Gottfried

    2004-05-01

    Complex recombinant antibody fragments for modulation of immune function such as tumor cell destruction have emerged at a rapid pace and diverse anticancer strategies are being developed to benefit patients. Despite improvements in molecule design and expression systems, the quantity and stability, e.g., of single-chain antibodies produced in cell culture, is often insufficient for treatment of human disease, and the costs of scale-up, labor, and fermentation facilities are prohibitive. The ability to yield mg/ml levels of recombinant antibodies and the scale-up flexibility make transgenic production in plants and livestock an attractive alternative to mammalian cell culture as a source of large quantities of biotherapeutics. Here, we report on the efficient production of a bispecific single-chain antibody in the serum of transgenic rabbits and a herd of nine cloned, transgenic cattle. The bispecific protein, designated r28M, is directed to a melanoma-associated proteoglycan and the human CD28 molecule on T cells. Purified from the serum of transgenic animals, the protein is stable and fully active in mediating target cell-restricted T cell stimulation and tumor cell killing.

  10. Microcup Arrays for the Efficient Isolation and Cloning of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Arrays of transparent, releasable micron-scale structures termed “microcups” were created for the purpose of patterning and isolating viable cells from small cell samples. Cells were captured by the microcups without the need for barriers or walls on the intervening substrate. Furthermore, in contrast to prior methods for creating cell arrays with releasable elements, no chemical modification of the substrate was required. Individual microcups were released from the array using a pulsed laser at very low energy. Improvements in microcup design enabled cells in suspension to be loaded into the microcups with greater than 90% efficiency. Cells cultured within the microcups displayed 100% viability and were cultured over 4 days yielding colonies that remained sequestered within the microcups to generate pure clonal populations. Standard microscopic imaging was used to identify cells or colonies of interest, and the microcups containing these cells were then released and collected. Individual target cells isolated in this manner remained viable as demonstrated by clonal expansion of 100% of collected cells. Direct comparisons with cell isolation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-bead-based isolation systems demonstrated that the microcup cell isolation procedure yielded higher purity, yield and viability than these standard technologies when separating samples with small numbers of cells. The power of this technique was demonstrated by the isolation of hematopoietic stem cells from a human bone marrow aspirate possessing only 4,000 total cells. PMID:20199088

  11. In vitro proliferation and cloning of CD3- CD16+ cells from human thymocyte precursors

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Purified CD3-4- thymocytes were obtained by depletion of CD3+ and CD4+ cells from fresh thymocyte suspensions. 5-15% of these cells were found to express CD16 antigen, while other natural killer (NK) cell markers were virtually absent. Double fluorescence analysis revealed that 20- 40% of thymic CD16+ cells coexpressed CD1, while approximately half were cyCD3+. When cultured in the presence of peripheral blood lymphocytes and H9 leukemia cell line as a source of irradiated feeder cells and interleukin 2 (IL-2), CD3-4- thymocytes underwent extensive proliferation. In addition, after 1-2 wk of culture, 30-50% of these cells were found to express CD16 surface antigen. Cloning under limiting dilution conditions of either CD3-4- or CD3-4-16- thymocytes in the presence of irradiated H9 cells resulted in large proportions (approximately 50%) of CD16+ clones. On the basis of the expression of surface CD16 and/or cyCD3 antigen, clones could be grouped in the following subsets: CD16+ cyCD3+; CD16+ cyCD3-; CD16- cyCD3+; and CD16- cyCD3-. All clones expressed CD56 surface antigen, displayed a strong cytolytic activity against NK sensitive (K562) and NK-resistant (M14) target cells, and produced IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor, but not IL-2. Similar to peripheral NK cells, thymic CD16+ cells expressed transcripts for CD16 and for CD3 epsilon (Biassoni, R., S. Ferrini, I. Prigione, A. Moretta, and E.O. Long, 1988. J. Immunol. 140:1685.) and zeta chains (Anderson, P., M. Caligiuri, J. Ritz, and S.F. Schlossman. 1989. Nature [Lond.]. 341:159). Therefore, it appears that cells that are phenotypically and functionally similar to CD3- CD16+ NK cells may arise from immature thymocytes. PMID:1711562

  12. Identification of T-cell stimulatory antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis using synovial fluid-derived T-cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, A B; Reynolds, D J; Deacon, M; Gaston, J S; Pearce, J H

    1993-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of sexually transmitted disease, infertility and reactive arthritis in the Western world, and of trachoma in the developing world. There is evidence that the chronic inflammatory reaction seen in diseases associated with chlamydiae represents a delayed-type hypersensitivity response to chlamydial antigens. Little is known about which chlamydial antigens elicit T-cell responses yet such information could have important implications in terms of both immunopathological understanding of these diseases and immunoprophylaxis design. In this study, 61 chlamydia-specific T-cell clones have been produced from the synovial fluid of an individual with sexually acquired reactive arthritis (SARA). Ten clones have been characterized in detail and used to identify T-cell stimulatory antigens of chlamydiae by means of T-cell immunoblotting. Two distinct antigenic fractions have been identified, one recognized by three of the clones (molecular weight 18,000), the other recognized by six of the clones (molecular weight 30,000). The fractions are distinct from the major outer membrane protein, the 57,000 MW stress protein and the 60,000 MW cysteine-rich membrane protein of chlamydiae. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction of the response to these antigens differed: clones recognizing the 18,000 MW antigen required antigen-presenting cells expressing DR1 subtype DRB1*0101 or DRB1*0102 which only differ at amino acids 85 and 86 on the DR beta-chain; by contrast clones recognizing the 30,000 MW antigen were presented to only by antigen-presenting cells from DRB1*0101 individuals, reflecting extreme sensitivity of these clones to the polymorphism at positions 85 and 86 on the DR beta-chain. Images Figure 4 PMID:7691730

  13. A fast and robust method to clone and functionally validate T-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Katrin; Hofmann, Christian; Hoyer, Stefanie; Schulz, Birgit; Harrer, Thomas; Kämpgen, Eckhart; Schuler, Gerold; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels

    2009-07-31

    Sequencing, cloning and functional testing of T-cell-receptor (TCR) alpha- and beta-chains from T-cell clones is often required in immunotherapy and in immunological research. However, the determination of the TCR chains by a simple PCR is not possible, since, in contrast to the 3' constant domain and untranslated region (UTR), no conserved sequences are present in the 5' region. Furthermore, subsequent functional testing of cloned TCRs requires laborious cell culture experiments, often involving primary human material and time-consuming viral transduction strategies. Here we present a universal PCR-based protocol, adapted from the capswitch technology, that allows for amplification of the TCR alpha- and beta-chain mRNAs without knowledge of the TCR variable domain subtype by attaching a designed sequence to the mRNA's 5' end. Two different MelanA/HLA-A2-specific and one HIVgag/HLA-A2-specific TCR were cloned that way, and were functionally tested by a newly developed easy, fast, and low-cost method: we electroporated Jurkat T cells simultaneously with TCR-encoding RNA and an NFAT-reporter construct, and measured the activation status of the cells upon specific stimulation. The results of this assay correlated with the cytokine release, functional avidity, proliferative activity, and the ability to recognize MelanA/HLA-A2-presenting tumor cells of bulk T cells electroporated with RNA encoding the same TCR. Together these two protocols represent a rapid and low-cost tool for the identification and functional testing of TCRs of T-cell clones, which can then be applied in immunotherapy or immunological research. PMID:19427315

  14. Clinical study report on milk production in the offspring of a somatic cell cloned Holstein cow.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Hideki; Hamano, Seizo; Inaba, Toshio; Kawate, Noritoshi; Tamada, Hiromichi

    2013-12-17

    This study examined two female offspring of a somatic cell cloned Holstein cow that had reproduction problems and milk production performance issues. The two offspring heifers, which showed healthy appearances and normal reproductive characteristics, calved on two separate occasions. The mean milk yields of the heifers in the first lactation period were 9,037 kg and 7,228 kg. The relative mean milk yields of these cows were 111.2% and 88.9%, respectively, when compared with that of the control group. No particular clinical abnormalities were revealed in milk yields and milk composition rate [e.g., fat, protein and solids-not-fat (SNF)], and reproductive characteristics of the offspring of the somatic cell cloned Holstein cow suggested that the cloned offspring had normal milk production.

  15. Clinical Study Report on Milk Production in the Offspring of a Somatic Cell Cloned Holstein Cow

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Masahiro; TSUCHIYA, Hideki; HAMANO, Seizo; INABA, Toshio; KAWATE, Noritoshi; TAMADA, Hiromichi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study examined two female offspring of a somatic cell cloned Holstein cow that had reproduction problems and milk production performance issues. The two offspring heifers, which showed healthy appearances and normal reproductive characteristics, calved on two separate occasions. The mean milk yields of the heifers in the first lactation period were 9,037 kg and 7,228 kg. The relative mean milk yields of these cows were 111.2% and 88.9%, respectively, when compared with that of the control group. No particular clinical abnormalities were revealed in milk yields and milk composition rate [e.g., fat, protein and solids-not-fat (SNF)], and reproductive characteristics of the offspring of the somatic cell cloned Holstein cow suggested that the cloned offspring had normal milk production. PMID:23955271

  16. Treating Cloned Embryos, But Not Donor Cells, with 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine Enhances the Developmental Competence of Porcine Cloned Embryos

    PubMed Central

    HUAN, Yan Jun; ZHU, Jiang; XIE, Bing Teng; WANG, Jian Yu; LIU, Shi Chao; ZHOU, Yang; KONG, Qing Ran; HE, Hong Bin; LIU, Zhong Hua

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has remained low. In most cloned embryos, epigenetic reprogramming is incomplete, and usually the genome is hypermethylated. The DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) could improve the developmental competence of cow, pig, cat and human SCNT embryos in previous studies. However, the parameters of 5-aza-dC treatment among species are different, and whether 5-aza-dC could enhance the developmental competence of porcine cloned embryos has still not been well studied. Therefore, in this study, we treated porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFF) that then were used as donor nuclei for nuclear transfer or fibroblast-derived reconstructed embryos with 5-aza-dC, and the concentration- and time-dependent effects of 5-aza-dC on porcine cloned embryos were investigated by assessing pseudo-pronucleus formation, developmental potential and pluripotent gene expression of these reconstructed embryos. Our results showed that 5-aza-dC significantly reduced the DNA methylation level in PFF (0 nM vs. 10 nM vs. 25 nM vs. 50 nM, 58.70% vs. 37.37% vs. 45.43% vs. 39.53%, P<0.05), but did not improve the blastocyst rate of cloned embryos derived from these cells. Treating cloned embryos with 25 nM 5-aza-dC for 24 h significantly enhanced the blastocyst rate compared with that of the untreated group. Furthermore, treating cloned embryos, but not donor cells, significantly promoted pseudo-pronucleus formation at 4 h post activation (51% for cloned embryos treated, 34% for donor cells treated and 36% for control, respectively, P<0.05) and enhanced the expression levels of pluripotent genes (Oct4, Nanog and Sox2) up to those of in vitro fertilized embryos during embryo development. In conclusion, treating cloned embryos, but not donor cells, with 5-aza-dC enhanced the developmental competence of porcine cloned embryos by promotion of pseudo-pronucleus formation and improvement of pluripotent gene expression. PMID

  17. Borate-Rhamnogalacturonan II Bonding Reinforced by Ca2+ Retains Pectic Polysaccharides in Higher-Plant Cell Walls1

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Hironobu; Asaka, Tomoyuki; Matoh, Toru

    1999-01-01

    The extent of in vitro formation of the borate-dimeric-rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) complex was stimulated by Ca2+. The complex formed in the presence of Ca2+ was more stable than that without Ca2+. A naturally occurring boron (B)-RG-II complex isolated from radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv Aokubi-daikon) root contained equimolar amounts of Ca2+ and B. Removal of the Ca2+ by trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid induced cleavage of the complex into monomeric RG-II. These data suggest that Ca2+ is a normal component of the B-RG-II complex. Washing the crude cell walls of radish roots with a 1.5% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate solution, pH 6.5, released 98% of the tissue Ca2+ but only 13% of the B and 22% of the pectic polysaccharides. The remaining Ca2+ was associated with RG-II. Extraction of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-washed cell walls with 50 mm trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid, pH 6.5, removed the remaining Ca2+, 78% of B, and 49% of pectic polysaccharides. These results suggest that not only Ca2+ but also borate and Ca2+ cross-linking in the RG-II region retain so-called chelator-soluble pectic polysaccharides in cell walls. PMID:9880361

  18. N-alkylated isatins evade P-gp mediated efflux and retain potency in MDR cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vine, Kara L; Belfiore, Lisa; Jones, Luke; Locke, Julie M; Wade, Samantha; Minaei, Elahe; Ranson, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The search for novel anticancer therapeutics with the ability to overcome multi-drug resistance (MDR) mechanisms is of high priority. A class of molecules that show potential in overcoming MDR are the N-alkylated isatins. In particular 5,7-dibromo-N-alkylisatins are potent microtubule destabilizing agents that act to depolymerize microtubules, induce apoptosis and inhibit primary tumor growth in vivo. In this study we evaluated the ability of four dibrominated N-alkylisatin derivatives and the parent compound, 5,7-dibromoisatin, to circumvent MDR. All of the isatin-based compounds examined retained potency against the MDR cell lines; U937VbR and MES-SA/Dx5 and displayed bioequivalent dose-dependent cytotoxicity to that of the parental control cell lines. We show that one mechanism by which the isatin-based compounds overcome MDR is by circumventing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated drug efflux. Thus, as the isatin-based compounds are not susceptible to extrusion from P-gp overexpressing tumor cells, they represent a promising alternative strategy as a stand-alone or combination therapy for treating MDR cancer. PMID:27441242

  19. Exact, time-independent estimation of clone size distributions in normal and mutated cells.

    PubMed

    Roshan, A; Jones, P H; Greenman, C D

    2014-10-01

    Biological tools such as genetic lineage tracing, three-dimensional confocal microscopy and next-generation DNA sequencing are providing new ways to quantify the distribution of clones of normal and mutated cells. Understanding population-wide clone size distributions in vivo is complicated by multiple cell types within observed tissues, and overlapping birth and death processes. This has led to the increased need for mathematically informed models to understand their biological significance. Standard approaches usually require knowledge of clonal age. We show that modelling on clone size independent of time is an alternative method that offers certain analytical advantages; it can help parametrize these models, and obtain distributions for counts of mutated or proliferating cells, for example. When applied to a general birth-death process common in epithelial progenitors, this takes the form of a gambler's ruin problem, the solution of which relates to counting Motzkin lattice paths. Applying this approach to mutational processes, alternative, exact, formulations of classic Luria-Delbrück-type problems emerge. This approach can be extended beyond neutral models of mutant clonal evolution. Applications of these approaches are twofold. First, we resolve the probability of progenitor cells generating proliferating or differentiating progeny in clonal lineage tracing experiments in vivo or cell culture assays where clone age is not known. Second, we model mutation frequency distributions that deep sequencing of subclonal samples produce.

  20. Treatment of porcine donor cells and reconstructed embryos with the antioxidant melatonin enhances cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yun-Wei; An, Lei; Wang, Peng; Yu, Yong; Yin, Qiu-Dan; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Xin-Zhang; Qian-Zhang; Yang, Mei-Ling; Min-Guo; Wu, Zhong-Hong; Tian, Jian-Hui

    2013-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of melatonin during the culture of donor cells and cloned embryos on the in vitro developmental competence and quality of cloned porcine embryos. At concentrations of 10(-6 )M or 10(-8) M, melatonin significantly enhanced the proliferation of porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs), and the blastocyst rate was significantly increased in the 10(-10) M melatonin-treated donor cell group. Cloned embryo development was also improved in embryo culture medium that was supplemented with 10(-9) M or 10(-12) M melatonin. When both donor cells and cloned embryos were treated with melatonin, the cleavage rate and total cell number of blastocysts were not significantly affected; however, the blastocyst rate was increased significantly (20.0% versus 11.7%). TUNEL assays showed that combined melatonin treatment reduced the rate of apoptotic nuclei (3.6% versus 6.1%). Gene expression analysis of the apoptosis-related genes BAX, BCL2L1, and p53 showed that the expression of BCL2L1 was significantly elevated 2.7-fold relative to the control group, while the expression of BAX and p53 was significantly decreased by 3.7-fold and 23.2-fold, respectively. In addition, we detected the expression of two melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) in PFFs but not in porcine cloned embryos. We conclude that exogenous melatonin enhances the development of porcine cloned embryos and improves embryo quality by inhibiting p53-mediated apoptotic pathway. The proliferation of PFFs may be mediated by receptor binding, but the beneficial effects of melatonin on embryonic development may be receptor-independent, possibly through melatonin's ability to directly scavenge free radicals.

  1. Treatment of nuclear-donor cells or cloned zygotes with chromatin-modifying agents increases histone acetylation but does not improve full-term development of cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Sangalli, Juliano Rodrigues; De Bem, Tiago Henrique Camara; Perecin, Felipe; Chiaratti, Marcos Roberto; Oliveira, Lilian de Jesus; de Araújo, Reno Roldi; Valim Pimentel, José Rodrigo; Smith, Lawrence Charles; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira

    2012-06-01

    Although somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a promising tool, its potential use is hampered by the high mortality rates during the development to term of cloned offspring. Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming of donor nuclei after SCNT is thought to be the main cause of this low efficiency. We hypothesized that chromatin-modifying agents (CMAs) targeting chromatin acetylation and DNA methylation could alter the chromatin configuration and turn them more amenable to reprogramming. Thus, bovine fibroblasts were treated with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZA) plus trichostatin (TSA) or hydralazine (HH) plus valproic acid (VPA) whereas, in another trial, cloned bovine zygotes were treated with TSA. The treatment of fibroblasts with either AZA+TSA or HH+VPA increased histone acetylation, but did not affect the level of DNA methylation. However, treatment with HH+VPA decreased cellular viability and proliferation. The use of these cells as nuclear donors showed no positive effect on pre- and postimplantation development. Regarding the treatment of cloned zygotes with TSA, treated one-cell embryos showed an increase in the acetylation patterns, but not in the level of DNA methylation. Moreover, this treatment revealed no positive effect on pre- and postimplantation development. This work provides evidence the treatment of either nuclear donor cells or cloned zygotes with CMAs has no positive effect on pre- and postimplantation development of cloned cattle.

  2. Observation of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells retained inside the non-woven fiber matrix of the CellTank bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    This data article shows how the recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are located in the interstices of the matrix fibers of a CellTank bioreactor after completion of a perfusion culture, supporting the article entitled “Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor” by Zhang et al. [1]. It provides a visualization of the cell distribution in the non-woven fiber matrix in a deeper view. PMID:26958613

  3. Cloning, Stem Cells, and the Current National Debate: Incorporating Ethics into a Large Introductory Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Rachel D.

    2002-01-01

    Discussing the ethical issues involved in topics such as cloning and stem cell research in a large introductory biology course is often difficult. Teachers may be wary of presenting material biased by personal beliefs, and students often feel inhibited speaking about moral issues in a large group. Yet, to ignore what is happening "out there"…

  4. Future issues in transplantation ethics: ethical and legal controversies in xenotransplantation, stem cell, and cloning research.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Robyn S

    2008-07-01

    With little prospect of developing a sufficient supply of human transplantable organs to meet the large and growing demand, attention has turned to xenotransplantation, as well as stem cell and cloning research, as possible approaches for alleviating this allograft shortage. This article explores ethical and legal issues that surround developments in these fields.

  5. A B cell explanation for autoimmune disease: the forbidden clone returns.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Fiona

    2012-04-01

    More than 60 years ago, Burnet first proposed the 'forbidden clone' hypothesis postulating that autoimmune disease arises as a result of persistence of self-reactive clones of lymphocytes that should have been deleted via immune tolerance. These autoreactive clones could effect immune-mediated end-organ damage via peripheral self-antigen recognition. Recent evidence that stretches across the boundaries of many medical specialties supports this proposal, implicating a B cell precursor as the culprit. The success of B cell depleting therapy in rheumatoid arthritis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) associated vasculitis, polymyositis, lupus and autoimmune diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura supports this proposal. Clonality of B cells and plasma cells has been described in a number of autoimmune disorders and the presence of autoantibodies, which may arise years before the onset of clinical disease, supports the notion of autoreactivity within the B cell lineage. T cell activation within the end-organ would be predicted by cognate B-T cell interactions and resultant tissue inflammation and destruction could produce diverse clinical manifestations dictated by the original specificity of the autoimmune B cell.

  6. Detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus infected cells with cloned DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, E

    1992-01-01

    A genomic library of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) DNA BamH1 fragments was prepared and two cloned fragments were evaluated for their potential as probes for the detection of ILTV infected cells. The virus was purified by a modified sucrose density gradient procedure for the isolation of pure ILTV DNA. A genomic library was constructed using BamH1-digested ILTV DNA and pGEM7 as a vector. A 1.1 kb cloned BamH1 fragment of ILTV DNA was tested in a slot or dot blot assay for the detection of ILTV infected cells. The limit of detection for this probe was at least 0.12 ng of pure ILTV DNA. The probe was able to identify both chicken embryo liver (CELi) cells and choriallantoic membranes infected with ILTV. Chicken embryo liver cells infected with several field isolates and a vaccine strain of ILTV were positive by dot blot analysis using this probe. Some qualitative differences in the degree of hybridization to cells infected by different ILTV isolates were observed. Uninfected cells and cells infected with fowlpox virus, turkey herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus or Newcastle disease virus were negative by the same assay. Compared with the 1.1 kb fragment, a larger 6 kb cloned BamH1 fragment of ILTV DNA showed a stronger hybridization signal to DNA from ILTV infected cells. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1316798

  7. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single human B cells by single cell RT-PCR and expression vector cloning

    PubMed Central

    Tiller, Thomas; Meffre, Eric; Yurasov, Sergey; Tsuiji, Makoto; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Wardemann, Hedda

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an efficient strategy that combines immunoglobulin (Ig) gene repertoire analysis and Ig reactivity profiling at the single cell level. Based on surface marker expression individual cells at different stages of human B cell development are isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. For each cell Ig heavy and corresponding Ig light chain gene transcripts are amplified by nested RT-PCR and cloned into eukaryotic expression vectors to produce monoclonal human antibodies of the same specificity in vitro. All reactions are performed in 96-well plates and allow cloning of large numbers of Ig genes. The recombinant antibodies are tested for reactivity with diverse self-and non-self antigens and the reactivity profile can be directly linked to the complete Ig heavy and IgL chain gene sequence information that is obtained as part of the cloning strategy. In summary, our method to clone and express human monoclonal antibodies is unbiased, highly efficient, requires only small cell numbers and the recombinant antibodies allow direct conclusions on the frequency of specific human B cells in a diverse repertoire. PMID:17996249

  8. Cloning adult farm animals: a review of the possibilities and problems associated with somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J L; Schrick, F N; McCracken, M D; van Amstel, S R; Hopkins, F M; Welborn, M G; Davies, C J

    2003-08-01

    In 1997, Wilmut et al. announced the birth of Dolly, the first ever clone of an adult animal. To date, adult sheep, goats, cattle, mice, pigs, cats and rabbits have been cloned using somatic cell nuclear transfer. The ultimate challenge of cloning procedures is to reprogram the somatic cell nucleus for development of the early embryo. The cell type of choice for reprogramming the somatic nucleus is an enucleated oocyte. Given that somatic cells are easily obtained from adult animals, cultured in the laboratory and then genetically modified, cloning procedures are ideal for introducing specific genetic modifications in farm animals. Genetic modification of farm animals provides a means of studying genes involved in a variety of biological systems and disease processes. Moreover, genetically modified farm animals have created a new form of 'pharming' whereby farm animals serve as bioreactors for production of pharmaceuticals or organ donors. A major limitation of cloning procedures is the extreme inefficiency for producing live offspring. Dolly was the only live offspring produced after 277 attempts. Similar inefficiencies for cloning adult animals of other species have been described by others. Many factors related to cloning procedures and culture environment contribute to the death of clones, both in the embryonic and fetal periods as well as during neonatal life. Extreme inefficiencies of this magnitude, along with the fact that death of the surrogate may occur, continue to raise great concerns with cloning humans.

  9. Cloning adult farm animals: a review of the possibilities and problems associated with somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J L; Schrick, F N; McCracken, M D; van Amstel, S R; Hopkins, F M; Welborn, M G; Davies, C J

    2003-08-01

    In 1997, Wilmut et al. announced the birth of Dolly, the first ever clone of an adult animal. To date, adult sheep, goats, cattle, mice, pigs, cats and rabbits have been cloned using somatic cell nuclear transfer. The ultimate challenge of cloning procedures is to reprogram the somatic cell nucleus for development of the early embryo. The cell type of choice for reprogramming the somatic nucleus is an enucleated oocyte. Given that somatic cells are easily obtained from adult animals, cultured in the laboratory and then genetically modified, cloning procedures are ideal for introducing specific genetic modifications in farm animals. Genetic modification of farm animals provides a means of studying genes involved in a variety of biological systems and disease processes. Moreover, genetically modified farm animals have created a new form of 'pharming' whereby farm animals serve as bioreactors for production of pharmaceuticals or organ donors. A major limitation of cloning procedures is the extreme inefficiency for producing live offspring. Dolly was the only live offspring produced after 277 attempts. Similar inefficiencies for cloning adult animals of other species have been described by others. Many factors related to cloning procedures and culture environment contribute to the death of clones, both in the embryonic and fetal periods as well as during neonatal life. Extreme inefficiencies of this magnitude, along with the fact that death of the surrogate may occur, continue to raise great concerns with cloning humans. PMID:12846674

  10. Assessing cell fusion and cytokinesis failure as mechanisms of clone 9 hepatocyte multinucleation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simic, Damir; Euler, Catherine; Thurby, Christina; Peden, Mike; Tannehill-Gregg, Sarah; Bunch, Todd; Sanderson, Thomas; Van Vleet, Terry

    2012-08-01

    In this in vitro model of hepatocyte multinucleation, separate cultures of rat Clone 9 cells are labeled with either red or green cell tracker dyes (Red Cell Tracker CMPTX or Vybrant CFDA SE Cell Tracer), plated together in mixed-color colonies, and treated with positive or negative control agents for 4 days. The fluorescent dyes become cell-impermeant after entering cells and are not transferred to adjacent cells in a population, but are inherited by daughter cells after fusion. The mixed-color cultures are then evaluated microscopically for multinucleation and analysis of the underlying mechanism (cell fusion/cytokinesis). Multinucleated cells containing only one dye have undergone cytokinesis failure, whereas dual-labeled multinucleated cells have resulted from fusion.

  11. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  12. Longevity in space; experiment on the life span of Paramecium cell clone in space.

    PubMed

    Mogami, Y; Tokunaga, N; Baba, S A

    1999-01-01

    Life span is the most interesting and also the most important biologically relevant time to be investigated on the space station. As a model experiment, we proposed an investigation to assess the life span of clone generation of the ciliate Paramecium. In space, clone generation will be artificially started by conjugation or autogamy, and the life span of the cell populations in different gravitational fields (microgravity and onboard 1 x g control) will be precisely assessed in terms of fission age as compared with the clock time. In order to perform the space experiment including long-lasting culture and continuous measurement of cell division, we tested the methods of cell culture and of cell-density measurement, which will be available in closed environments under microgravity. The basic design of experimental hardware and a preliminary result of the cultivation procedure are described.

  13. Spontaneous aneuploidy and clone formation in adipose tissue stem cells during different periods of culturing.

    PubMed

    Buyanovskaya, O A; Kuleshov, N P; Nikitina, V A; Voronina, E S; Katosova, L D; Bochkov, N P

    2009-07-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of 13 mesenchymal stem cell cultures isolated from normal human adipose tissue was carried out at different stages of culturing. The incidence of chromosomes 6, 8, 11, and X aneuploidy and polyploidy was studied by fluorescent in situ hybridization. During the early passages, monosomal cells were more often detected than trisomal ones. A clone with chromosome 6 monosomy was detected in three cultures during late passages.

  14. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and reproductive cloning: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning," last published in Fertil Steril 2012;98:804-7. PMID:26746137

  15. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and reproductive cloning: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning," last published in Fertil Steril 2012;98:804-7.

  16. Interleukin-2 dependent cytotoxic T-cell clones

    SciTech Connect

    Palladino, M.

    1987-07-28

    A method is described of stimulating production of the lymphokines ..cap alpha..-interferon and ..beta..-interferon by interleukin-2 dependent cytotoxic cultured T-cell lines comprising administering to a T-cell line selected from the group consisting of T-cell lines CTLL-RP (CRL 8201), CTLL-R8 (CRL 8202), CTLL-R9 (CRL 8203), CTLL-R11 (CRL 8204), and CTLL-R12 (CRL 8205). An amount of an antigen selected from the group consists of Newcastle Disease Virus and Sendai Virus sufficient to cause stimulation of production of the lymphokines.

  17. Developments in stem cell research and therapeutic cloning: Islamic ethical positions, a review.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Hossam E

    2012-03-01

    Stem cell research is very promising. The use of human embryos has been confronted with objections based on ethical and religious positions. The recent production of reprogrammed adult (induced pluripotent) cells does not - in the opinion of scientists - reduce the need to continue human embryonic stem cell research. So the debate continues. Islam always encouraged scientific research, particularly research directed toward finding cures for human disease. Based on the expectation of potential benefits, Islamic teachings permit and support human embryonic stem cell research. The majority of Muslim scholars also support therapeutic cloning. This permissibility is conditional on the use of supernumerary early pre-embryos which are obtained during infertility treatment in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. The early pre-embryos are considered in Islamic jurisprudence as worthy of respect but do not have the full sanctity offered to the embryo after implantation in the uterus and especially after ensoulment. In this paper the Islamic positions regarding human embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning are reviewed in some detail, whereas positions in other religious traditions are mentioned only briefly. The status of human embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning in different countries, including the USA and especially in Muslim countries, is discussed.

  18. Related B cell clones populate the meninges and parenchyma of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lovato, Laura; Willis, Simon N; Rodig, Scott J; Caron, Tyler; Almendinger, Stefany E; Howell, Owain W; Reynolds, Richard; O'Connor, Kevin C; Hafler, David A

    2011-02-01

    In the central nervous system of patients with multiple sclerosis, B cell aggregates populate the meninges, raising the central question as to whether these structures relate to the B cell infiltrates found in parenchymal lesions or instead, represent a separate central nervous system immune compartment. We characterized the repertoires derived from meningeal B cell aggregates and the corresponding parenchymal infiltrates from brain tissue derived primarily from patients with progressive multiple sclerosis. The majority of expanded antigen-experienced B cell clones derived from meningeal aggregates were also present in the parenchyma. We extended this investigation to include 20 grey matter specimens containing meninges, 26 inflammatory plaques, 19 areas of normal appearing white matter and cerebral spinal fluid. Analysis of 1833 B cell receptor heavy chain variable region sequences demonstrated that antigen-experienced clones were consistently shared among these distinct compartments. This study establishes a relationship between extraparenchymal lymphoid tissue and parenchymal infiltrates and defines the arrangement of B cell clones that populate the central nervous system of patients with multiple sclerosis.

  19. Developments in stem cell research and therapeutic cloning: Islamic ethical positions, a review.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Hossam E

    2012-03-01

    Stem cell research is very promising. The use of human embryos has been confronted with objections based on ethical and religious positions. The recent production of reprogrammed adult (induced pluripotent) cells does not - in the opinion of scientists - reduce the need to continue human embryonic stem cell research. So the debate continues. Islam always encouraged scientific research, particularly research directed toward finding cures for human disease. Based on the expectation of potential benefits, Islamic teachings permit and support human embryonic stem cell research. The majority of Muslim scholars also support therapeutic cloning. This permissibility is conditional on the use of supernumerary early pre-embryos which are obtained during infertility treatment in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. The early pre-embryos are considered in Islamic jurisprudence as worthy of respect but do not have the full sanctity offered to the embryo after implantation in the uterus and especially after ensoulment. In this paper the Islamic positions regarding human embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning are reviewed in some detail, whereas positions in other religious traditions are mentioned only briefly. The status of human embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning in different countries, including the USA and especially in Muslim countries, is discussed. PMID:21039687

  20. Reproductive and growth performance in Jin Hua pigs cloned from somatic cell nuclei and the meat quality of their offspring.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masatoshi; Otake, Masayoshi; Tsuchiya, Seiko; Chikyu, Mikio; Horiuchi, Atsushi; Kawarasaki, Tatsuo

    2006-10-01

    Somatic cell cloning is expected to be a valuable method for conserving genetic resources in pigs. In this study, we compared the reproductive and growth performance of Jin Hua cloned pigs with that of naturally bred Jin Hua pigs. In addition, we generated offspring from the cloned sows and examined the productivity and quality of meat in the progeny. The birth weights and growth rates of somatic cell-cloned pigs were similar to those of Jin Hua pigs. The cloned pigs reached puberty very early, and this is typical of the Jin Hua breed. Furthermore, reproductive performance, in terms of traits such as gestation period, litter size, and raising rate in the cloned pigs were similar to Jin Hua pigs. Although the offspring of the cloned (OC) pigs had lower birth weights than the Jin Hua breed, the daily weight gain of the OC pigs was significantly higher, especially at the finishing stage. The carcass quality of the OC pigs had similar characteristics to the Jin Hua breed, namely thick back fat and a small loin area. Furthermore, the meat qualities of the OC pigs were similar to those of Jin Hua pigs in terms of intramuscular fat content and tenderness. These results demonstrate that cloned pigs and their offspring were similar to the Jin Hua breed in most of the growth, reproductive, and meat productive performances. This strongly suggests that pigs cloned from somatic cell nuclei have the potential to be a valuable genetic resource for breeding.

  1. Expansion of CD133+ colon cancer cultures retaining stem cell properties to enable cancer stem cell target discovery

    PubMed Central

    Fang, D D; Kim, Y J; Lee, C N; Aggarwal, S; McKinnon, K; Mesmer, D; Norton, J; Birse, C E; He, T; Ruben, S M; Moore, P A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Despite earlier studies demonstrating in vitro propagation of solid tumour cancer stem cells (CSCs) as non-adherent tumour spheres, it remains controversial as to whether CSCs can be maintained in vitro. Additional validation of the CSC properties of tumour spheres would support their use as CSC models and provide an opportunity to discover additional CSC cell surface markers to aid in CSC detection and potential elimination. Methods: Primary tumour cells isolated from 13 surgically resected colon tumour specimens were propagated using serum-free CSC-selective conditions. The CSC properties of long-term cultured tumour spheres were established and mass spectrometry-based proteomics performed. Results: Freshly isolated CD133+ colorectal cancer cells gave rise to long-term tumour sphere (or spheroids) cultures maintaining CD133 expression. These spheroid cells were able to self-renew and differentiate into adherent epithelial lineages and recapitulate the phenotype of the original tumour. Relative to their differentiated progeny, tumour spheroid cells were more resistant to the chemotherapeutic irinotecan. Finally, CD44, CD166, CD29, CEACAM5, cadherin 17, and biglycan were identified by mass spectrometry to be enriched in CD133+ tumour spheroid cells. Conclusion: Our data suggest that ex vivo-expanded colon CSCs isolated from clinical specimens can be maintained in culture enabling the identification of CSC cell surface-associated proteins. PMID:20332776

  2. Cloning mammary cell cDNAs from 17q12-q23 using interspecific somatic cell hybrids and subtractive hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Cerosaletti, K.M.; Shapero, M.H.; Fournier, R.E.K.

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned human genes that are encoded in the region 17q12-q23 and expressed in breast tissue using interspecific somatic cell hybrids and subtractive hybridization. Two mouse microcell hybrids containing fragments of human chromosome 17 with a nonoverlap region at 17q12-q23 were generated by microcell transfer. Radiolabeled cDNA was synthesized from the hybrid cell containing the 17q12-q23 interval and was subtracted with an excess of RNA from the hybrid cell lacking the interval. Resulting cDNA probes enriched for sequences from 17q12-q23 were used to screen a human premenopausal breast cDNA library, and 60 cDNAs were identified. Three of these cDNAs mapped to the hybrid cell nonoverlap region. These cDNAs were expressed in mammary epithelial cell hybrids, although none appeared to be breast-specific. Sequence analysis of the cDNAs revealed that clone 93A represents a previously unidentified gene, clone 98C has homology to an expressed sequence tag from goat mammary tissue, and clone 200A is identical to the human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene. These genes map outside a 1-cM region linked to early onset familial breast cancer but may be useful genetic markers in the 17q12-q23 region. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Induction of lytic pathways in T cell clones derived from wild-type or protein tyrosine kinase Fyn mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Lancki, D W; Fields, P; Qian, D; Fitch, F W

    1995-08-01

    The OVA-reactive CD4+ Th1 clones and alloreactive CD8+ clones derived from wild-type or fyn-/- mice serve as model systems which have allowed us to investigate several aspects of the molecular events associated with T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, including 1) the differential utilization of two distinct cytolytic pathways by CD4+ Th1 clones and CD8+ CTL, 2) a comparison of the pathways of lysis induced by stimulation of the TCR or by alternative stimuli, 3) the requirement of Fyn for derivation of antigen-specific T-cell clones having properties of CD4+ Th1 and CD8+ CTL cells 4) the differential requirement of Fyn in the induction of responses by TCR and the alternative stimuli. Stimulation through the TCR, either by APC bearing relevant antigen or by immobilized anti-CD3 mAb, resulted in comparable levels of target cell lysis by clones from both wild-type and fyn-/- mice. These clones also utilize the Fas pathway to lyse target cells. Thus, Fyn does not appear to be required for expression of the Fas pathway when triggered through the TCR. In contrast, lysis of target cells by T-cell clones lacking Fyn was deficient when stimulated through Thy-1 or Ly-6C (using mAb) or with Con A or phorbol ester as compared to clones derived from wild-type mice. The basis for the defect in response to stimulation through the GPI-linked molecules appears to be a signaling defect which affects all of the functional responses we measured, while the defect in response to Con A stimulation appears to affect lysis but not lymphokine production. Thus, Fyn expression is selectively required for efficient activation of the Fas pathway of lysis through Thy-1, Ly-6C, and by Con A or phorbol ester in these T-cell clones. CD8+ clones derived from fyn-/- mutant mice, like clones derived from wild-type mice, display antigen-specific lysis, and appear to express perforin message and perforin protein. A Ca(++)-dependent (presumably perforin/exocytosis) component and Fas component of lysis was

  4. Cloning of monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA integrated within cell DNA from a cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, T.; Kanda, T.; Furuno, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kawana, T.; Yoshiike, K.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have molecularly cloned and characterized monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA with flanking cell DNA sequences from a cervical carcinoma. Determination of nucleotide sequence around the junctions of human papillomavirus and cell DNAs revealed that at the site of integration within cell DNA the cloned viral DNA had a deletion between nucleotides 1284 and 4471 (numbering system from K. Seedorf, G. Kraemmer, M. Duerst, S. Suhai, and W.G. Roewkamp), which includes the greater part of E1 gene and the entire E2 gene. In the remaining part of the E1 gene, three guanines were found at the location where two guanines at nucleotides 1137 and 1138 have been recorded. This additional guanine shifted the reading frame and erased an interruption in the E1 gene. The data strongly suggest that, like other papillomaviruses, human papillomavirus type 16 has an uninterrupted E1 gene.

  5. Improved efficiency of bovine cloning by autologous somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Yu; Li, Hua; Ma, Qing-Wen; Yan, Jing-Bin; Zhao, Jiang-Guo; Li, Hua-Wei; Shen, Hai-Qing; Liu, Hai-Feng; Huang, Ying; Huang, Shu-Zhen; Zeng, Yi-Tao; Zeng, Fanyi

    2006-11-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been used for the cloning of various mammals. However, the rates of successful, healthy birth are generally poor. To improve cloning efficiency, we report the utilization of an 'autologous SCNT' cloning technique in which the somatic nucleus of a female bovine donor is transferred to its own enucleated oocyte recovered by ovum pick up, in contrast to the routine 'allogeneic SCNT' procedure using oocytes from unrelated females. Our results showed that embryos derived from autologous SCNThave significantly higher developmental competence than those derived from allogeneic SCNT, especiallyat the eight-cell (60 vs 44%), morula (45 vs 36%), and blastocyst (38 vs 23%) stages. The pregnancy and birth rates were also higher for the autologous (39 and 23%), compared to the allogeneic (22 and 6%) SCNT groups. Genome-wide histone3-lysine9 methylation profiles reveal that autologous SCNTembryos have less epigenetic defects than the allogeneic SCNTembryos. This study indicates that autologous SCNT can improve the efficiency of bovine cloning with less reprogramming deficiency.

  6. Human reproductive cloning, embryo stem cells and germline gene intervention: an Israeli perspective.

    PubMed

    Revel, Michel

    2003-01-01

    The perspectives of applying the cloning technology to human reproduction have generated much controversy. Israel was one of the first countries to adopt (in 1998) a Law that prohibits reproductive cloning. This is a moratorium for 5 years during which neither cloning of an entire human being nor genetic changes affecting human reproductive cells will be allowed. An aim of the Law is to allow the examination of the moral, legal, and social aspects of these technologies and their implications for human dignity. With the intention of not being an obstacle to the advancement of medical genetics, the Law provides for a yearly report to the Israel Health Minister on the state of scientific knowledge in these technologies. This article reflects the 2002-3 report, relating to scientific issues and bioethical opinions in Israel and in the world on human reproductive cloning, embryonic stem cell research and germline gene manipulation. In the Jewish tradition, the primary importance of saving lives and helping suffering patients can take precedence over the fears generated by modern genetic and reproductive research. Provided that new technologies are applied for medical indications and respecting human rights and human dignity, it is legitimate to explore their beneficial potential.

  7. Cell-free cloning using multiply-primed rolling circle amplification with modified RNA primers.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ohtani, Toshio; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2009-07-01

    The predominant method for DNA cloning is by propagation in biological hosts, but this method has limitations because certain sequences are difficult to clone using any combination of available hosts or vectors. Recently, multiply-primed rolling circle amplification (MPRCA) has been applied to overcome the problems of the DNA cloning via host cells. However, when MPRCA is used to amplify from minute quantities of DNA template, the products are mostly by-product DNA molecules generated by false priming and primer dimer formation. This study demonstrates that MPRCA using random RNA primers[#x02014]instead of DNA primers[#x02014]blocked the synthesis of by-products and succeeded in amplifying one copy of a circular DNA molecule more than 1012-fold to give microgram quantities of amplification product without using submicroliter reaction volumes. Furthermore, a ligation strategy was elaborated to circularize only the desired DNA sequence and eliminate undesired ligation-products. A combination of these methods was able to amplify and ligate a large construct without undesired DNA sequences and at microgram quantities within one day. Therefore, these methods have the possibility to improve DNA cloning techniques that have been restricted by the limitations of PCR methods or by the host cell.

  8. T cell receptor junctional regions of V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ T cell clones in relation to non-MHC restricted cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, B F; Wheatcroft, N J; Thornton, S M; Christmas, S E

    1993-05-01

    Human gamma delta T cell clones having V gamma 9JP and V delta 2DJ1 T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements were isolated form an individual donor and tested for non-MHC restricted cytotoxicity against the B lymphoblastoid cell line, BSM. Most clones were highly cytotoxic but 3/9 clones had very low activity, comparable to that of CD4+ alpha beta T cell clones. Although there was a tendency for clones with low cytotoxic function to produce high levels of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, this correlation was not complete. TCR gamma and delta junctional sequences were obtained and were found to be different for all clones. There were no consistent structural differences between gamma delta TCRs of cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic clones, but gamma or delta junctional regions of all three non-cytotoxic clones had unusual features. One clone had a particularly short gamma chain junctional sequence, one had a short delta chain junctional sequence and the third clone was the only one of the panel which failed to utilise the D delta 3 segment. If the gamma delta TCR is involved in target cell recognition in this model of non-MHC restricted killing, such variations in receptor structure may be sufficient to inhibit recognition and thereby reduce the cytotoxic capacity of a minority of V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ clones. Also, a panel of gamma delta T cell clones expressing V gamma 8/V delta 3 isolated from a different donor, were all highly cytotoxic against BSM, indicating that these target cells can be recognised by effector cells expressing a TCR other than the V gamma 9/V delta 2 receptor. The possible influence of other cell surface molecules on non-MHC restricted cytotoxic function is discussed.

  9. Genetic heterogeneity of induced pluripotent stem cells: results from 24 clones derived from a single C57BL/6 mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Klco, Jeffery M; Helton, Nichole M; George, Daniel R; Mudd, Jacqueline L; Miller, Christopher A; Lu, Charles; Fulton, Robert; O'Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina; Wilson, Richard K; Ley, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have tremendous potential as a tool for disease modeling, drug testing, and other applications. Since the generation of iPSCs "captures" the genetic history of the individual cell that was reprogrammed, iPSC clones (even those derived from the same individual) would be expected to demonstrate genetic heterogeneity. To assess the degree of genetic heterogeneity, and to determine whether some cells are more genetically "fit" for reprogramming, we performed exome sequencing on 24 mouse iPSC clones derived from skin fibroblasts obtained from two different sites of the same 8-week-old C57BL/6J male mouse. While no differences in the coding regions were detected in the two parental fibroblast pools, each clone had a unique genetic signature with a wide range of heterogeneity observed among the individual clones: a total of 383 iPSC variants were validated for the 24 clones (mean 16.0/clone, range 0-45). Since these variants were all present in the vast majority of the cells in each clone (variant allele frequencies of 40-60% for heterozygous variants), they most likely preexisted in the individual cells that were reprogrammed, rather than being acquired during reprogramming or cell passaging. We then tested whether this genetic heterogeneity had functional consequences for hematopoietic development by generating hematopoietic progenitors in vitro and enumerating colony forming units (CFUs). While there was a range of hematopoietic potentials among the 24 clones, only one clone failed to differentiate into hematopoietic cells; however, it was able to form a teratoma, proving its pluripotent nature. Further, no specific association was found between the mutational spectrum and the hematopoietic potential of each iPSC clone. These data clearly highlight the genetic heterogeneity present within individual fibroblasts that is captured by iPSC generation, and suggest that most of the changes are random, and functionally benign.

  10. Genetic Heterogeneity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Results from 24 Clones Derived from a Single C57BL/6 Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Klco, Jeffery M.; Helton, Nichole M.; George, Daniel R.; Mudd, Jacqueline L.; Miller, Christopher A.; Lu, Charles; Fulton, Robert; O'Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have tremendous potential as a tool for disease modeling, drug testing, and other applications. Since the generation of iPSCs “captures” the genetic history of the individual cell that was reprogrammed, iPSC clones (even those derived from the same individual) would be expected to demonstrate genetic heterogeneity. To assess the degree of genetic heterogeneity, and to determine whether some cells are more genetically “fit” for reprogramming, we performed exome sequencing on 24 mouse iPSC clones derived from skin fibroblasts obtained from two different sites of the same 8-week-old C57BL/6J male mouse. While no differences in the coding regions were detected in the two parental fibroblast pools, each clone had a unique genetic signature with a wide range of heterogeneity observed among the individual clones: a total of 383 iPSC variants were validated for the 24 clones (mean 16.0/clone, range 0–45). Since these variants were all present in the vast majority of the cells in each clone (variant allele frequencies of 40–60% for heterozygous variants), they most likely preexisted in the individual cells that were reprogrammed, rather than being acquired during reprogramming or cell passaging. We then tested whether this genetic heterogeneity had functional consequences for hematopoietic development by generating hematopoietic progenitors in vitro and enumerating colony forming units (CFUs). While there was a range of hematopoietic potentials among the 24 clones, only one clone failed to differentiate into hematopoietic cells; however, it was able to form a teratoma, proving its pluripotent nature. Further, no specific association was found between the mutational spectrum and the hematopoietic potential of each iPSC clone. These data clearly highlight the genetic heterogeneity present within individual fibroblasts that is captured by iPSC generation, and suggest that most of the changes are random, and functionally benign

  11. Novel Cell Culture-Adapted Genotype 2a Hepatitis C Virus Infectious Clone

    PubMed Central

    Date, Tomoko; Kato, Takanobu; Kato, Junko; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Morikawa, Kenichi; Akazawa, Daisuke; Murayama, Asako; Tanaka-Kaneko, Keiko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    Although the recently developed infectious hepatitis C virus system that uses the JFH-1 clone enables the study of whole HCV viral life cycles, limited particular HCV strains have been available with the system. In this study, we isolated another genotype 2a HCV cDNA, the JFH-2 strain, from a patient with fulminant hepatitis. JFH-2 subgenomic replicons were constructed. HuH-7 cells transfected with in vitro transcribed replicon RNAs were cultured with G418, and selected colonies were isolated and expanded. From sequencing analysis of the replicon genome, several mutations were found. Some of the mutations enhanced JFH-2 replication; the 2217AS mutation in the NS5A interferon sensitivity-determining region exhibited the strongest adaptive effect. Interestingly, a full-length chimeric or wild-type JFH-2 genome with the adaptive mutation could replicate in Huh-7.5.1 cells and produce infectious virus after extensive passages of the virus genome-replicating cells. Virus infection efficiency was sufficient for autonomous virus propagation in cultured cells. Additional mutations were identified in the infectious virus genome. Interestingly, full-length viral RNA synthesized from the cDNA clone with these adaptive mutations was infectious for cultured cells. This approach may be applicable for the establishment of new infectious HCV clones. PMID:22787209

  12. BIX-01294 increases pig cloning efficiency by improving epigenetic reprogramming of somatic cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Hongyong; Yao, Jing; Qin, Guosong; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xianlong; Luo, Ailing; Zheng, Qiantao; Cao, Chunwei; Zhao, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that faulty epigenetic reprogramming leads to the abnormal development of cloned embryos and results in the low success rates observed in all mammals produced through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The aberrant methylation status of H3K9me and H3K9me2 has been reported in cloned mouse embryos. To explore the role of H3K9me2 and H3K9me in the porcine somatic cell nuclear reprogramming, BIX-01294, known as a specific inhibitor of G9A (histone-lysine methyltransferase of H3K9), was used to treat the nuclear-transferred (NT) oocytes for 14-16 h after activation. The results showed that the developmental competence of porcine SCNT embryos was significantly enhanced both in vitro (blastocyst rate 16.4% vs 23.2%, P<0.05) and in vivo (cloning rate 1.59% vs 2.96%) after 50 nm BIX-01294 treatment. BIX-01294 treatment significantly decreased the levels of H3K9me2 and H3K9me at the 2- and 4-cell stages, which are associated with embryo genetic activation, and increased the transcriptional expression of the pluripotency genes SOX2, NANOG and OCT4 in cloned blastocysts. Furthermore, the histone acetylation levels of H3K9, H4K8 and H4K12 in cloned embryos were decreased after BIX-01294 treatment. However, co-treatment of activated NT oocytes with BIX-01294 and Scriptaid rescued donor nuclear chromatin from decreased histone acetylation of H4K8 that resulted from exposure to BIX-01294 only and consequently improved the preimplantation development of SCNT embryos (blastocyst formation rates of 23.7% vs 21.5%). These results indicated that treatment with BIX-01294 enhanced the developmental competence of porcine SCNT embryos through improvements in epigenetic reprogramming and gene expression.

  13. [Cloning goat producing human lactoferrin with genetically modified donor cells selected by single or dual markers].

    PubMed

    An, Liyou; Yuan, Yuguo; Yu, Baoli; Yang, Tingjia; Cheng, Yong

    2012-12-01

    We compared the efficiency of cloning goat using human lactoferrin (hLF) with genetically modified donor cells marked by single (Neo(r)) or double (Neo(r)/GFP) markers. Single marker expression vector (pBLC14) or dual markers expression vector (pAPLM) was delivered to goat fetal fibroblasts (GFF), and then the transgenic GFF was used as donor cells to produce transgenic goats. Respectively, 58.8% (20/34) and 86.7% (26/30) resistant cell lines confirmed the transgenic integration by PCR. Moreover, pAPLM cells lines were subcultured with several passages, only 20% (6/30) cell lines was observed fluorescence from each cell during the cell passage. Somatic cell nuclear transfer using the donor cells harbouring pBLC14 or pAPLM construct, resulting in a total of 806 reconstructed embryos, a pregnancy rate at 35 d (53.8%, 39.1%) and 60 d (26.9%, 21.7%), and an offspring birth rate (1.9%, 1.4%) with 5 and 7 newborn cloned goats, respectively. Transgene was confirmed by PCR and southern-blot in all cloned offspring. There were no significant differences at the reconstructed embryo fusion rates, pregnancy rates and the birth rate (P > 0.05) between single and double markers groups. The Neo(r)/GFP double markers could improve the reliability for accurately and efficiently selecting the genetically modified donor cells. No adverse effect was observed on the efficiency of transgenic goat production by SCNT using somatic cells transfected with double (Neo(r)/GFP) markers vector.

  14. Production of the first cloned camel by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Wani, Nisar A; Wernery, U; Hassan, F A H; Wernery, R; Skidmore, J A

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer to produce the first cloned camelid, a dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) belonging to the family Camelidae. Donor karyoplasts were obtained from adult skin fibroblasts, cumulus cells, or fetal fibroblasts, and in vivo-matured oocytes, obtained from preovulatory follicles of superstimulated female camels by transvaginal ultrasound guided ovum pick-up, were used as cytoplasts. Reconstructed embryos were cultured in vitro for 7 days up to the hatching/hatched blastocyst stage before they were transferred to synchronized recipients on Day 6 after ovulation. Pregnancies were achieved from the embryos reconstructed from all cell types, and a healthy calf, named Injaz, was born from the pregnancy by an embryo reconstructed with cumulus cells. Genotype analyses, using 25 dromedary camel microsatellite markers, confirmed that the cloned calf was derived from the donor cell line and the ovarian tissue. In conclusion, the present study reports, for the first time, establishment of pregnancies and birth of the first cloned camelid, a dromedary camel (C. dromedarius), by use of somatic cell nuclear transfer. This has opened doors for the amelioration and preservation of genetically valuable animals like high milk producers, racing champions, and males of high genetic merit in camelids. We also demonstrated, for the first time, that adult and fetal fibroblasts can be cultured, expanded, and frozen without losing their ability to support the development of nuclear transfer embryos, a technology that may potentially be used to modify fibroblast genome by homologous recombination so as to generate genetically altered cloned animals.

  15. Generation of human lactoferrin transgenic cloned goats using donor cells with dual markers and a modified selection procedure.

    PubMed

    An, Li-You; Yuan, Yu-Guo; Yu, Bao-Li; Yang, Ting-Jia; Cheng, Yong

    2012-10-01

    The objective was to use dual markers to accurately select genetically modified donor cells and ensure that the resulting somatic cell nuclear transfer kids born were transgenic. Fetal fibroblast cells were transfected with dual marking gene vector (pCNLF-ng) that contained the red-shifted variant of the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (LGFP) and neomycin resistance (Neo) markers. Cell clones that were G418-resistant and polymerase chain reaction-positive were subcultured for several passages; individual cells of the clones were examined with fluorescence microscopy to confirm transgenic integration. Clones in which every cell had bright green fluorescence were used as donor cells for nuclear transfer. In total, 86.7% (26/30) cell clones were confirmed to have transgenic integration of the markers by polymerase chain reaction, 76.7% (23/30) exhibited fluorescence, but only 40% (12/30) of these fluorescent cell clones had fluorescence in all cell populations. Moreover, through several cell passages, only 20% (6/30) of the cell clones exhibited stable LGFP expression. Seven transgenic cloned offspring were produced from these cells by nuclear transfer. Overall, the reconstructed embryo fusion rate was 76.6%, pregnancy rates at 35 and 60 days were 39.1% and 21.7%, respectively, and the offspring birth rate was 1.4%. There were no significant differences between nuclear transfer with dual versus a single (Neo) marker (overall, 73.8% embryo fusion rate, 53.8% and 26.9% pregnancy rates, and 1.9% birth rate with five offspring). In conclusion, the use of LGFP/Neo dual markers and an optimized selection procedure reliably screened genetically modified donor cells, excluded pseudotransgenic cells, and led to production of human lactoferrin transgenic goats. Furthermore, the LGFP/Neo markers had no adverse effects on the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  16. Production of Cloned Korean Native Pig by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In-Sul; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Oh, Keun Bong; Ock, Sun-A; Chung, Hak-Jae; Cho, In-Cheol; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Im, Gi-Sun; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2015-01-01

    The Korean native pig (KNP) have been considered as animal models for animal biotechnology research because of their relatively small body size and their presumably highly inbred status due to the closed breeding program. However, little is reported about the use of KNP for animal biotechnology researches. This study was performed to establish the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) protocol for the production of swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) homotype-defined SCNT KNP. The ear fibroblast cells originated from KNP were cultured and used as donor cell. After thawing, the donor cells were cultured for 1 hour with 15 μM roscovitine prior to the nuclear transfer. The numbers of reconstructed and parthenogenetic embryos transferred were 98 ± 35.2 and 145 ± 11.2, respectively. The pregnancy and delivery rate were 3/5 (60%) and 2/5 (40%). One healthy SLA homotype-defined SCNT KNP was successfully generated. The recipient-based individual cloning efficiency ranged from 0.65 to 1.08%. Taken together, it can be postulated that the methodological establishment of the production of SLA homotype-defined cloned KNP can be applied to the generation of transgenic cloned KNP as model animals for human disease and xenotransplantation researches. PMID:27004264

  17. Production of Cloned Korean Native Pig by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Sul; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Oh, Keun Bong; Ock, Sun-A; Chung, Hak-Jae; Cho, In-Cheol; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Im, Gi-Sun; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2015-06-01

    The Korean native pig (KNP) have been considered as animal models for animal biotechnology research because of their relatively small body size and their presumably highly inbred status due to the closed breeding program. However, little is reported about the use of KNP for animal biotechnology researches. This study was performed to establish the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) protocol for the production of swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) homotype-defined SCNT KNP. The ear fibroblast cells originated from KNP were cultured and used as donor cell. After thawing, the donor cells were cultured for 1 hour with 15 μM roscovitine prior to the nuclear transfer. The numbers of reconstructed and parthenogenetic embryos transferred were 98 ± 35.2 and 145 ± 11.2, respectively. The pregnancy and delivery rate were 3/5 (60%) and 2/5 (40%). One healthy SLA homotype-defined SCNT KNP was successfully generated. The recipient-based individual cloning efficiency ranged from 0.65 to 1.08%. Taken together, it can be postulated that the methodological establishment of the production of SLA homotype-defined cloned KNP can be applied to the generation of transgenic cloned KNP as model animals for human disease and xenotransplantation researches.

  18. Cloning and expression of a cDNA for the T-cell-activating protein TAP.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Coligan, J; Palmer, E; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1988-01-01

    The T-cell-activating protein TAP is a murine phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein whose expression is controlled by the Ly-6 locus. Previous studies have suggested an important role for this protein in physiological T-cell activation. Using oligonucleotide probes, we have now isolated a cDNA clone whose predicted sequence would encode a protein with an NH2-terminal sequence identical to that of the TAP molecule. Further analysis of the predicted protein sequence revealed a cysteine-rich protein with a hydrophobic domain at the COOH terminus and without N-linked glycosylation sites--all features consistent with our previous analysis of the TAP protein. In Southern blot analysis, the Ly-6.2 cDNA clone detects a multigene family and a restriction fragment length polymorphism that maps precisely to the Ly-6 locus. Expression of the cDNA clone in COS cells demonstrates that it codes for TAP and clarifies the relationship between the epitopes recognized by various alpha Ly-6 monoclonal antibodies. Finally, we have studied the expression of Ly-6 mRNA in a variety of cell lineages. Ly-6 transcripts were detected in all organs examined, including spleen, kidney, lung, brain, and heart. This demonstrates that the Ly-6 locus is transcriptionally active in a wide range of organs and suggests that the role of TAP or TAP-like proteins might extend to other tissues. Images PMID:2895473

  19. Establishment of a vascular endothelial cell-reactive type II NKT cell clone from a rat model of autoimmune vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Chihiro; Waki, Masashi; Kawakami, Ai; Yamaguchi, Madoka; Tomaru, Utano; Sasaki, Naomi; Masuda, Sakiko; Matsui, Yuki; Iwasaki, Sari; Baba, Tomohisa; Kasahara, Masanori; Yoshiki, Takashi; Paletta, Daniel; Herrmann, Thomas; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2015-02-01

    We previously generated a rat model that spontaneously developed small vessel vasculitis (SVV). In this study, a T cell clone reactive with rat vascular endothelial cells (REC) was established and named VASC-1. Intravenous injection of VASC-1 induced SVV in normal recipients. VASC-1 was a TCRαβ/CD3-positive CD4/CD8 double-negative T cell clone with expression of NKG2D. The cytokine mRNA profile under unstimulated condition was positive for IL-4 and IFN-γ but negative for IL-2 and IL-10. After interaction with REC, the mRNA expression of IL-2, IL-5 and IL-6 was induced in VASC-1, which was inhibited by blocking of CD1d on the REC surface. Although the protein levels of these cytokines seemed to be lower than the detection limit in the culture medium, IFN-γ was detectable. The production of IFN-γ from the VASC-1 stimulated with LPS-pre-treated REC was inhibited by the CD1d blockade on the REC. These findings indicated VASC-1 as an NKT cell clone. The NKT cell pool includes two major subsets, namely types I and II. Type I NKT cells are characterized by expression of semi-invariant TCRs and the potential to bind to marine sponge-derived α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) loaded on CD1d; whereas, type II NKT cells do not manifest these characteristics. VASC-1 exhibited a usage of TCR other than the type I invariant TCR α chain and did not bind to α-GalCer-loaded CD1d; therefore, it was determined as a type II NKT cell clone. The collective evidence suggested that REC-reactive type II NKT cells could be involved in the pathogenesis of SVV in rats.

  20. [Out of natural order: nature in discourses about cloning and stem cell research in Brazilian newspapers].

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Flavia Natércia da Silva

    2013-11-30

    Different conceptions of nature influence media coverage and public opinion about biotechnology. This study reports on a discourse analysis of the ideas about nature and what is natural expressed in Brazilian media coverage of cloning and stem cell research. In the discourse against this research, the biotechnologies in question are placed outside the natural order of things and deemed immoral. In the discourse of those who defend it, nature is portrayed as indifferent to the fate of humans or even cruel, or else a barrier to be overcome, while cloning and embryonic stem cells are naturalized and Dolly the sheep is anthropomorphized. The mythifying or transcendental representations of nature do not just influence public opinion, but also have ethical and political implications.

  1. In silico cloning and B/T cell epitope prediction of triosephosphate isomerase from Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Ye, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Because the methods of diagnosis and treatment for cystic echinococcosis were limited, it is still necessary to screen target proteins for the development of new anti-hydatidosis vaccine. In this study, the triosephosphate isomerase gene of E. granulosus was in silico cloned. The B cell and T cell epitopes were predicted by bioinformatics methods. The cDNA sequence of EgTIM was composition of 1094 base pairs, with an open reading frame of 753 base pairs. The deduced amino acid sequences were composed of 250 amino acids. Five cross-reactive epitopes, locating on 21aa-35aa, 43aa-57aa, 94aa-107aa, 115-129aa, and 164aa-183aa, could be expected to serve as candidate epitopes in the development of vaccine against E. granulosus. These results could provide bases for gene cloning, recombinant expression, and the designation of anti-hydatidosis vaccine.

  2. [Out of natural order: nature in discourses about cloning and stem cell research in Brazilian newspapers].

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Flavia Natércia da Silva

    2013-11-30

    Different conceptions of nature influence media coverage and public opinion about biotechnology. This study reports on a discourse analysis of the ideas about nature and what is natural expressed in Brazilian media coverage of cloning and stem cell research. In the discourse against this research, the biotechnologies in question are placed outside the natural order of things and deemed immoral. In the discourse of those who defend it, nature is portrayed as indifferent to the fate of humans or even cruel, or else a barrier to be overcome, while cloning and embryonic stem cells are naturalized and Dolly the sheep is anthropomorphized. The mythifying or transcendental representations of nature do not just influence public opinion, but also have ethical and political implications. PMID:24346197

  3. Efficient production of a gene mutant cell line through integrating TALENs and high-throughput cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changhong; Fan, Yu; Li, Juan; Wang, Gancheng; Zhang, Hanshuo; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff

    2015-02-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are becoming powerful DNA-targeting tools in a variety of mammalian cells and model organisms. However, generating a stable cell line with specific gene mutations in a simple and rapid manner remains a challenging task. Here, we report a new method to efficiently produce monoclonal cells using integrated TALE nuclease technology and a series of high-throughput cell cloning approaches. Following this method, we obtained three mTOR mutant 293T cell lines within 2 months, which included one homozygous mutant line.

  4. Protective natural autoantibodies to apoptotic cells: evidence of convergent selection of recurrent innate-like clones.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Gregg J

    2015-12-01

    During murine immune development, recurrent B cell clones arise in a predictable fashion. Among these B cells, an archetypical clonotypic set that recognizes phosphorylcholine (PC) antigens and produces anti-PC IgM, first implicated for roles in microbial protection, was later found to become expanded in hyperlipidemic mice and in response to an increased in vivo burden of apoptotic cells. These IgM natural antibodies can enhance clearance of damaged cells and induce intracellular blockade of inflammatory signaling cascades. In clinical populations, raised levels of anti-PC IgM correlate with protection from atherosclerosis and may also downmodulate the severity of autoimmune disease. Human anti-PC-producing clones without hypermutation have been isolated that can similarly discriminate apoptotic from healthy cells. An independent report on unrelated adults has described anti-PC-producing B cells with IgM genes that have conserved CDR3 motifs, similar to stereotypic clonal sets of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Taken together, emerging evidence suggests that, despite the capacity to form an effectively limitless range of Ig receptors, the human immune system may often recurrently generate lymphocytes expressing structurally convergent B cell receptors with protective and homeostatic roles.

  5. Differential expression of alpha-subunits of G-proteins in human neuroblastoma-derived cell clones.

    PubMed

    Klinz, F J; Yu, V C; Sadée, W; Costa, T

    1987-11-16

    The distribution of alpha- and beta-subunits of G-proteins was analyzed in membranes of three cell clones which are derived from the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH. The neuroblast-like clone SH-SY5Y shows a pattern of G-proteins very similar to that of human brain cortex with high levels of Gi alpha and Go alpha but low levels of G40 alpha. The intermediate clone SH-IN contains high levels of Go alpha and Gi alpha and moderate levels of G40 alpha. The non-neuronal clone SH-EP shows high levels of G40 alpha but lacks Go alpha. Differentiation of the neuroblast-like clone SH-SY5Y by retinoic acid or nerve growth factor does not change the amount of Gi alpha or Go alpha in the membrane. PMID:3119368

  6. [Distribution of abnormal cell clone with deletion of chromosome 20q in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Qin, Ling; Wang, Chun; Qin, You-Wen; Xie, Kuang-Cheng; Yan, Shi-Ke; Gao, Yan-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Rui; Zhao, Chu-Xian

    2008-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of abnormal clone in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with deletion of chromosome 20q. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing myeloid precursors (CD15), erythroid precursors (GPA), T cells (CD3(+)CD56(-)CD16(-)), B cells (CD19), NK cells (CD3(-)CD56(+)CD16(+)) were used to sort bone marrow cells in a MDS patient with del (20q) by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Annexin V-FITC and PI were used to sort bone marrow Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells by FACS. The sorted positive cells were detected by interphase dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH) using a LSI D20S108 probe (Spectrum Orange) and a Telvysion TM 20p probe (Spectrum Green). FACS and FISH analysis were also performed on the samples from 4 cases with normal karyotype. The results showed that the proportions of MDS clone in the myeloid and erythroid precursors were 70.50% and 93.33% respectively, in the RAEB-1 patient with del (20q) and were obviously higher than that in control group (5.39% and 6.17%). The proportions of abnormal clone in T, B and NK cells were 3.23%, 4.32% and 5.77% respectively and were less than that in control group (5.76%, 4.85%, 6.36%). The percentage of apoptotic cells in the bone marrow nucleated cells was 16.09%. The proportions of MDS clone in Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells were 32.48% and 70.11%, respectively. It is concluded that most myeloid and erythroid precursors are originated from the abnormal clone in MDS with del (20q). A little part of apoptotic cells are derived from the abnormal clone.

  7. Improvement of mouse cloning using nuclear transfer-derived embryonic stem cells and/or histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Sayaka; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear transfer-derived ES (ntES) cell lines can be established from somatic cell nuclei with a relatively high success rate. Although ntES cells have been shown to be equivalent to ES cells, there are ethical objections concerning human cells, such as the use of fresh oocyte donation from young healthy woman. In contrast, the use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for cloning poses few ethical problems and is a relatively easy technique compared with nuclear transfer. Therefore, although there are several reports proposing the use of ntES cells as a model of regenerative medicine, the use of these cells in preliminary medical research is waning. However, in theory, 5 to 10 donor cells can establish one ntES cell line and, once established, these cells will propagate indefinitely. These cells can be used to generate cloned animals from ntES cell lines using a second round of NT. Even in infertile and "unclonable" strains of mice, we can generate offspring from somatic cells by combining cloning with ntES technology. Moreover, cloned offspring can be generated potentially even from the nuclei of dead bodies or freeze-dried cells via ntES cells, such as from an extinct frozen animal. Currently, only the ntES technology is available for this purpose, because all other techniques, including iPS cell derivation, require significant numbers of living donor cells. This review describes how to improve the efficiency of cloning, the establishment of clone-derived embryonic stem cells and further applications.

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitor significantly improved the cloning efficiency of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongye; Tang, Xiaochun; Xie, Wanhua; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dong; Yao, Chaogang; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Jianguo; Lai, Liangxue; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Pang, Daxin

    2011-12-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inbibitor, has been shown to generate inducible pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from mouse and human fibroblasts with a significant higher efficiency. Because successful cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) undergoes a full reprogramming process in which the epigenetic state of a differentiated donor nuclear is converted into an embryonic totipotent state, we speculated that VPA would be useful in promoting cloning efficiency. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether VPA can promote the developmental competence of SCNT embryos by improving the reprogramming state of donor nucleus. Here we report that 1 mM VPA for 14 to 16 h following activation significantly increased the rate of blastocyst formation of porcine SCNT embryos constructed from Landrace fetal fibroblast cells compared to the control (31.8 vs. 11.4%). However, we found that the acetylation level of Histone H3 lysine 14 and Histone H4 lysine 5 and expression level of Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 was not significantly changed between VPA-treated and -untreated groups at the blastocyst stage. The SCNT embryos were transferred to 38 surrogates, and the cloning efficiency in the treated group was significantly improved compared with the control group. Taken together, we have demonstrated that VPA can improve both in vitro and in vivo development competence of porcine SCNT embryos.

  9. Epigenetic reprogramming in embryonic and foetal development upon somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Heiner; Tian, X Cindy; King, W Allan; Lee, Rita S F

    2008-02-01

    The birth of 'Dolly', the first mammal cloned from an adult donor cell, has sparked a flurry of research activities to improve cloning technology and to understand the underlying mechanism of epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus. Especially in ruminants, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is frequently associated with pathological changes in the foetal and placental phenotype and has significant consequences for development both before and after birth. The most critical factor is epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus from its differentiated status into the totipotent state of the early embryo. This involves an erasure of the gene expression program of the respective donor cell and the establishment of the well-orchestrated sequence of expression of an estimated number of 10 000-12 000 genes regulating embryonic and foetal development. The following article reviews the present knowledge on the epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus, with emphasis on DNA methylation, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and telomere length restoration in bovine development. Additionally, we briefly discuss other approaches towards epigenetic nuclear reprogramming, including the fusion of somatic and embryonic stem cells and the overexpression of genes crucial in the formation and maintenance of the pluripotent status. Improvements in our understanding of this dramatic epigenetic reprogramming event will be instrumental in realising the great potential of SCNT for basic biological research and for various agricultural and biomedical applications.

  10. Regulation of Cl- transport in T84 cell clones expressing a mutant regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, K V; Goldman, P S; Frizzell, R A; McKnight, G S

    1990-01-01

    Cl- channels in the apical membranes of salt-secreting epithelia are activated by both cAMP and Ca2+ second-messenger systems, and dysfunctions in their hormonal regulation have been demonstrated in patients with cystic fibrosis. We have transfected the epithelial cell line T84 with an expression vector containing a mutant form of the regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Stable transformants that express this construct have reduced basal cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and do not increase kinase activity beyond the basal level of control cells in response to cAMP. Forskolin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and prostaglandin E2 each stimulate intracellular cAMP accumulation in both mutant and control clones; however, the activation of Cl- channels in response to elevated cAMP is blocked in mutant clones, indicating direct involvement of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In contrast, Ca2+ ionophores retain their ability to activate the Cl- channel in T84 cells expressing the mutant regulatory subunit, suggesting that activation of the channel by means of Ca2+ does not require the participation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity. These clones will be useful for further studies of the interactions between the cAMP- and Ca2(+)-dependent regulatory pathways in salt-secreting epithelial cells. They can also be used to identify the mediators of Ca2(+)-dependent Cl- channel activation in isolation from interactions with the cAMP second-messenger pathway. Images PMID:2174170

  11. Cloning of calves from various somatic cell types of male and female adult, newborn and fetal cows.

    PubMed

    Kato, Y; Tani, T; Tsunoda, Y

    2000-11-01

    Twenty-four calves were cloned from six somatic cell types of female and male adult, newborn and fetal cows. The clones were derived from female cumulus (n = 3), oviduct (n = 2) and uterine (n = 2) cells, female and male skin cells (n = 10), and male ear (n = 5) and liver (n = 2) cells. On the basis of the number of cloned embryos transferred (n = 172) to surrogate cows, the overall rate of success was 14%, but based on the number of surrogate mothers that became pregnant (n = 50), the success rate was 48%. Cell nuclei from uterus, ear and liver cells, which have not been tested previously, developed into newborn calves after nuclear transfer into enucleated oocytes. To date, seven female and six male calves have survived: six of the females were from adult cells (cumulus (n = 3), oviduct (n = 2) and skin (n = 1) cells) and one was from newborn skin cells, whereas the male calves were derived from adult ear cells (n = 3), newborn liver and skin cells (n = 2), and fetal cells (n = 1). Clones derived from adult cells frequently aborted in the later stages of pregnancy and calves developing to term showed a higher number of abnormalities than did those derived from newborn or fetal cells. The telomeric DNA lengths in the ear cells of three male calves cloned from the ear cells of a bull aged 10 years were similar to those of the original bull. However, the telomeric DNA lengths from the white blood cells of the clones, although similar to those in an age-matched control, were shorter than those of the original bull, which indicates that telomeric shortening varies among tissues.

  12. Re-Cloning the N27 Dopamine Cell Line to Improve a Cell Culture Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Symmes, Breanna; Freed, Curt R.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is characterized by the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. To understand the molecular mechanisms of the disease, an in vitro model is important. In the 1990s, we used the SV40 large T antigen to immortalize dopaminergic neurons derived from Embryonic Day 14 rat mesencephalon. We selected a clone for its high expression of dopaminergic neuron markers such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and we named it 1RB3AN27 (N27). Because the original N27 cell line has been passaged many times, the line has become a mixture of cell types with highly variable expression of TH. In the current study, we have performed multiple rounds of clonal cultures and have identified a dopaminergic cell clone expressing high levels of TH and the dopamine transporter (DAT). We have named this new clone N27-A. Nearly 100% of N27-A cells express TH, DAT and Tuj1. Western blots have confirmed that N27-A cells have three to four times the levels of TH and DAT compared to the previous mixed population in N27. Further analysis has shown that the new clone expresses the dopamine neuron transcription factors Nurr1, En1, FoxA2 and Pitx3. The N27-A cells express the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2), but do not express dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DβH), the enzyme responsible for converting dopamine to norepinephrine. Functional analysis has shown that N27-A cells are more sensitive than N27 cells to neurotoxins taken up by the dopamine transporter such as 6-hydroxydopamine and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+). The DAT inhibitor nomifensine can block MPP+ induced toxicity. The non-selective toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide were similar in both cell lines. The N27-A cells show dopamine release under basal and depolarization conditions. We conclude that the new N27-A clone of the immortalized rat dopaminergic cell line N27 should provide an improved in vitro model for Parkinson’s disease research. PMID:27512998

  13. Re-Cloning the N27 Dopamine Cell Line to Improve a Cell Culture Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lu; Zhou, Wenbo; Symmes, Breanna; Freed, Curt R

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. To understand the molecular mechanisms of the disease, an in vitro model is important. In the 1990s, we used the SV40 large T antigen to immortalize dopaminergic neurons derived from Embryonic Day 14 rat mesencephalon. We selected a clone for its high expression of dopaminergic neuron markers such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and we named it 1RB3AN27 (N27). Because the original N27 cell line has been passaged many times, the line has become a mixture of cell types with highly variable expression of TH. In the current study, we have performed multiple rounds of clonal cultures and have identified a dopaminergic cell clone expressing high levels of TH and the dopamine transporter (DAT). We have named this new clone N27-A. Nearly 100% of N27-A cells express TH, DAT and Tuj1. Western blots have confirmed that N27-A cells have three to four times the levels of TH and DAT compared to the previous mixed population in N27. Further analysis has shown that the new clone expresses the dopamine neuron transcription factors Nurr1, En1, FoxA2 and Pitx3. The N27-A cells express the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2), but do not express dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DβH), the enzyme responsible for converting dopamine to norepinephrine. Functional analysis has shown that N27-A cells are more sensitive than N27 cells to neurotoxins taken up by the dopamine transporter such as 6-hydroxydopamine and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+). The DAT inhibitor nomifensine can block MPP+ induced toxicity. The non-selective toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide were similar in both cell lines. The N27-A cells show dopamine release under basal and depolarization conditions. We conclude that the new N27-A clone of the immortalized rat dopaminergic cell line N27 should provide an improved in vitro model for Parkinson's disease research. PMID:27512998

  14. Effects of a cloned cell line with NK activity on bone marrow transplants, tumour development and metastasis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John F.; Dennert, Gunther

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells cloned in vitro have been transferred into NK-deficient hosts. These cells have been shown to have a role in the rejection of allogeneic bone marrow grafts, resistance to both radiation-induced thymic leukaemia and challenge with melanoma tumour cells. It appears that NK cells have an important role in immune surveillance.

  15. Human cloning 2001.

    PubMed

    Healy, David L; Weston, Gareth; Pera, Martin F; Rombauts, Luk; Trounson, Alan O

    2002-05-01

    This review summaries human cloning from a clinical perspective. Natural human clones, that is, monozygotic twins, are increasing in the general community. Iatrogenic human clones have been produced for decades in infertile couples given fertility treatment such as ovulation induction. A clear distinction must be made between therapeutic cloning using embryonic stem cells and reproductive cloning attempts. Unlike the early clinical years of in vitro fertilization, with cloning there is no animal model that is safe and dependable. Until there is such a model, 'Dolly'-style human cloning is medically unacceptable.

  16. Of clones, stem cells, and children: issues and challenges in human research ethics.

    PubMed

    Meslin, E M

    2000-10-01

    In the past 3 years, five scientific stories captivated the media and public attention: a sheep, Dolly, was cloned in Scotland; two scientific teams in the United States reported that they had isolated human stem cells; Jesse Gelsinger, an 18-year-old patient, died in a gene transfer experiment at the University of Pennsylvania; Vanderbilt University reported that it is providing fetal surgery for meningomyelocele; and researchers announced that a herd of previously cloned cows appears to be genetically younger than had been expected. These reports illustrate important issues in the ongoing discussion about research on children; indeed some of them challenge the breadth of the definition of research on children. This article, originally presented at an International Symposium sponsored by UNESCO on Bioethics and the Rights of the Child, describes how the National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC) addressed two of these subjects-cloning and stem cell research-and identifies five challenges that science and society must address in the face of such emerging research technologies. PMID:11074949

  17. Introduction of cloned human papillomavirus genomes into mouse cells and expression at the RNA level.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, K H; Green, M; Wold, W S; Rankin, A; Loewenstein, P M; Cartas, M A; Sanders, P R; Olson, K; Orth, G; Jablonska, S; Kremsdorf, D; Favre, M

    1983-08-01

    The entire DNA genomes of five different human papillomaviruses (HPVs) were cloned into the BamHI site of pBR322 (HPV-1a, HPV-3, HPV-4, and HPV-9) or the EcoRI site of pBR325 (HPV-2), using as starting materials virus preparations isolated from papillomas of individual patients. Under stringent hybridization conditions (Tm-28 degrees), the five cloned HPVs exhibited less than 10% homology with one another. To establish model cell systems that may be useful for the identification of HPV genes and HPV gene products, mouse thymidine kinase negative (tk-) cells were cotransformed to the tk+ phenotype with the herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene and each of the five HPV cloned DNAs (either as intact recombinants or excised HPV DNA without removal of pBR). In most tk+ cell clones, a complex pattern of multiple high molecular weight inserts of HPV DNA were present in high copy number. Most of the HPV DNA sequences in the cotransformed cells were not present as unit-length episomal viral DNA. Analyses of the integration pattern (DNA blot) and RNA expression (RNA blot) of several HPV-1a and HPV-3 transformed cell lines suggest that some copies of the viral genome are integrated in a similar manner in different cell lines leading to the expression of identical viral RNA-containing species. Two of the cell lines transformed by the intact HPV-1a/pBR322 recombinant synthesized substantial amounts of four discrete viral polyadenylated cytoplasmic RNA species of 1.9, 3.2, 3.8, and 4.5 kb. Two cell lines transformed by the intact HPV-3/pBR322 recombinant synthesized 4-5 polyadenylated cytoplasmic viral RNA species ranging from 0.8 to 4.6 kb. The analysis shows that each viral RNA species appears to be a hybrid RNA molecule containing both HPV and pBR322 sequences. Based on these findings and the molecular organization of the HPV-1a genome (O. Danos, M. Katinka, and M. Yaniv (1982). EMBO J. 1, 231-237), it is possible that transcription of each of the HPV-1a RNA species is initiated

  18. Molecular cloning of Phaseolus vulgaris cDNA encoding proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Ziemienowicz, Alicja

    2007-02-01

    A cDNA fragment encoding a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was isolated using rapid amplification of cDNA 3' end (3' RACE) method, cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of this clone contains an open reading frame of 798 nucleotides encoding a protein of 265 amino acids. Alignment of the common bean PCNA predicted sequence shows its high degree of identity with PCNA from other plant species. Analysis of PCNA content in the germinating embryos of common bean showed a decrease in the protein level after 60h of germination. Moreover, PCNA was not detected in the tested plant organs (root, stem, leaf and flower). The presence of PCNA in the germinating seeds and its absence from mature plants suggests that this protein plays a crucial role during early stages of plant development.

  19. Tissue engineering, stem cells, cloning, and parthenogenesis: new paradigms for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Jason; Atala, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Patients suffering from diseased and injured organs may be treated with transplanted organs. However, there is a severe shortage of donor organs which is worsening yearly due to the aging population. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, materials science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Both therapeutic cloning (nucleus from a donor cell is transferred into an enucleated oocyte), and parthenogenesis (oocyte is activated and stimulated to divide), permit extraction of pluripotent embryonic stem cells, and offer a potentially limitless source of cells for tissue engineering applications. The stem cell field is also advancing rapidly, opening new options for therapy. The present article reviews recent progress in tissue engineering and describes applications of these new technologies that may offer novel therapies for patients with end-stage organ failure. PMID:15588286

  20. Power frequency magnetic field exposure and gap junctional communication in Clone 9 cells.

    PubMed

    Griffin, G D; Khalaf, W; Hayden, K E; Miller, E J; Dowray, V R; Creekmore, A L; Carruthers, C W; Williams, M W; Gailey, P C

    2000-06-01

    Exposure to a power-frequency magnetic field has been reported to produce a statistically significant inhibition of gap junctional communication (GJC) in Clone 9 cells that have been pre-stressed by treatment with low concentrations of chloral hydrate (CH) [C.F. Blackman, J.P. Blanchard, S.G. Benane, D.E. House, J.A. Elder, Double blind test of magnetic field effects on neurite outgrowth, Bioelectromagnetics, 19 (1998) 204-209]. This observation might provide mechanistic insight into the possible role of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in the carcinogenic process, since cancer cells frequently show decreased or absent GJC, and tumor promoting chemicals have been observed to inhibit GJC. Magnetic field exposure conditions were 45 Hz, 23.8 microT rms + parallel DC 36.6 microT, for 30 min of exposure. The responses of Clone 9 cells to the GJC-inhibiting effects of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate and the chemical CH were evaluated and compared to reported results [S.G. Benane, C.F. Blackman, D.E. House, Effects of perchloroethylene and its metabolites on intercellular communication in Clone 9 rat liver cells, J. Toxicol. Environ. Health, 48 (1996) 427-437]. Before magnetic field exposure, cells were exposed for 24 h to either 3 (nine experiments) or 5 mM (11 experiments) CH to produce GJC of 67% or 50%, respectively, relative to unexposed controls. GJC was assessed microscopically using the scrape-loading technique and a blinded protocol. No statistically significant effect was observed due to magnetic field exposure with either CH concentration.

  1. Retained platinum uptake and indifference to p53 status make novel transplatinum agents active in platinum-resistant cells compared to cisplatin and oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert F.; Komlodi-Pasztor, Edina; Robey, Rob; Balis, Frank M.; Farrell, Nicholas P.; Fojo, Tito

    2012-01-01

    Despite the clinical success of platinum-containing drugs in the treatment of solid tumors, acquired resistance remains a major obstacle. We previously identified a group of novel transplanaramine or transplatinum compounds based on distinct activity profiles in the NCI-60 panel. In the present study, parental KB-3.1 cells with wild-type p53 and its cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant sublines harboring mutant p53 proteins were used to contrast several transplatinum compounds with cisplatin and oxaliplatin. The transplatinum compounds retained cytotoxic activity in the resistant cell lines. While intracellular accumulation and DNA platination of cisplatin and oxaliplatin was decreased in the resistant cells, the transplatinum compounds both accumulated intracellularly and platinated DNA at comparable levels in all cell lines. Cytoflow analysis confirmed that cisplatin and oxaliplatin alter the cell cycle distribution and result in apoptosis; however, at comparably toxic concentrations, the transplatinum compounds did not alter the cell cycle distribution. Analysis of the cytoplasmic fraction treated with acetone showed that cisplatin and oxaliplatin readily bound to macromolecules in the pellet, whereas a larger percentage of the transplatinum compounds remained in the supernatant. We concluded that, distinct from platinum compounds currently in use, transplatinum compounds accumulate intracellularly in resistant cells at levels comparable to those in drug-sensitive cells, do not affect the cell cycle and thus retain cytotoxicity independent of p53 status and likely have cytoplasmic targets that are important in their activity. PMID:22333583

  2. Quantitative and qualitative characterization of expanded CD4+ T cell clones in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ishigaki, Kazuyoshi; Shoda, Hirofumi; Kochi, Yuta; Yasui, Tetsuro; Kadono, Yuho; Tanaka, Sakae; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune destructive arthritis associated with CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity. Although expanded CD4+ T cell clones (ECs) has already been confirmed, the detailed characteristics of ECs have not been elucidated in RA. Using combination of a single-cell analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS) in TCR repertoire analysis, we here revealed the detailed nature of ECs by examining peripheral blood (PB) from 5 RA patients and synovium from 1 RA patient. When we intensively investigated the single-cell transcriptome of the most expanded clones in memory CD4+ T cells (memory-mECs) in RA-PB, senescence-related transcripts were up-regulated, indicating circulating ECs were constantly stimulated. Tracking of the transcriptome shift within the same memory-mECs between PB and the synovium revealed the augmentations in senescence-related gene expression and the up-regulation of synovium-homing chemokine receptors in the synovium. Our in-depth characterization of ECs in RA successfully demonstrated the presence of the specific immunological selection pressure, which determines the phenotype of ECs. Moreover, transcriptome tracking added novel aspects to the underlying sequential immune processes. Our approach may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of RA. PMID:26245356

  3. Transition of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma clones during clinical progression.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sakura; Firouzi, Sanaz; López, Yosvany; Yamochi, Tadanori; Nakano, Kazumi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utusnomiya, Atae; Iwanaga, Masako; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-09-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by the transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells. ATLL, especially its aggressive form, is known for its poor prognosis, even with intensive chemotherapy. ATLL cells are considered to be monoclonal; however, multiclonal proliferation or emergence of a new clone over time has been reported based on Southern blot analysis, although direct molecular evidence remains elusive. Furthermore, it is thought that clonal change may be a cause of early drug resistance in ATLL. To directly analyze potential clonal changes in ATLL during its clinical course, we used inverse PCR to detect integration sites in combination with a newly developed method using next-generation sequencing, and compared ATLL cell clonality at different time points. The results of inverse PCR indicated that the major clone was altered in three of 19 patients. Together with results from five patients, using this new method, we found direct evidence of clonal change occurring during the clinical course or in response to chemotherapy in ATLL. These results also highlight the importance of clonality analysis for understanding the mechanisms of ATLL development and drug resistance. PMID:27383637

  4. Assurance of monoclonality in one round of cloning through cell sorting for single cell deposition coupled with high resolution cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Albanetti, Thomas; Venkat, Raghavan; Schoner, Ronald; Savery, James; Miro‐Quesada, Guillermo; Rajan, Bhargavi; Groves, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory authorities require that cell lines used in commercial production of recombinant proteins must be derived from a single cell progenitor or clone. The limiting dilution method of cell cloning required multiple rounds of low‐density cell plating and microscopic observation of a single cell in order to provide evidence of monoclonality. Other cloning methods rely on calculating statistical probability of monoclonality rather than visual microscopic observation of cells. We have combined the single cell deposition capability of the Becton Dickinson Influx™ cell sorter with the microscopic imaging capability of the SynenTec Cellavista to create a system for producing clonal production cell lines. The efficiency of single cell deposition by the Influx™ was determined to be 98% using fluorescently labeled cells. The centrifugal force required to settle the deposited cells to the bottom of the microplate well was established to be 1,126g providing a 98.1% probability that all cells will be in the focal plane of the Cellavista imaging system. The probability that a single cell was deposited by the cell sorter combined with the probability of every cell settling into the focal plane of the imager yield a combined >99% probability of documented monoclonality. © 2015 The Authors Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 31:1172–1178, 2015 PMID:26195345

  5. Mouse Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cell Lines retain their phenotypic characteristics after transfection with Human Papilloma Virus: A new tool to further the study of RPE biology

    PubMed Central

    Catanuto, Paola; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Sanchez, Patricia; Salas, Pedro; Hernandez, Eleut; Cousins, Scott W.; Elliot, Sharon J.

    2009-01-01

    Development of immortalized mouse retinal pigmented epithelial cell (RPE) lines that retain many of their in vivo phenotypic characteristics, would aid in studies of ocular diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD). RPE cells were isolated from 16 month old (estrogen receptor knockout) ERKOα and ERKOβ mice and their C57Bl/6 wild type littermates. RPE65 and cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) expression, in vivo markers of RPE cells, were detected by real-time RT-PCR and western analysis. We confirmed the presence of epithelial cell markers, ZO1, cytokeratin 8 and 18 by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, we confirmed the distribution of actin filaments and the expression of ezrin. To develop cell lines, RPE cells were isolated, propagated and immortalized using human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 (E6/E7). RPE-specific markers and morphology were assessed before and after immortalization. In wildtype littermate controls, there was no evidence of any alterations in the parameters that we examined including MMP-2, TIMP-2, collagen type IV, and estrogen receptor (ER) α and ERβ protein expression and ER copy number ratio. Therefore, immortalized mouse RPE cell lines that retain their in vivo phenotype can be isolated from either pharmacologically or genetically manipulated mice, and may be used to study RPE cell biology. PMID:19013153

  6. Optimization of cell line development in the GS-CHO expression system using a high-throughput, single cell-based clone selection system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Omasa, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are commonly produced by high-expressing, clonal and recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Currently, CHO cells dominate as a commercial production host because of their ease of use, established regulatory track record, and safety profile. CHO-K1SV is a suspension, protein-free-adapted CHO-K1-derived cell line employing the glutamine synthetase (GS) gene expression system (GS-CHO expression system). The selection of high-producing mammalian cell lines is a crucial step in process development for the production of therapeutic antibodies. In general, cloning by the limiting dilution method is used to isolate high-producing monoclonal CHO cells. However, the limiting dilution method is time consuming and has a low probability of monoclonality. To minimize the duration and increase the probability of obtaining high-producing clones with high monoclonality, an automated single cell-based clone selector, the ClonePix FL system, is available. In this study, we applied the high-throughput ClonePix FL system for cell line development using CHO-K1SV cells and investigated efficient conditions for single cell-based clone selection. CHO-K1SV cell growth at the pre-picking stage was improved by optimizing the formulation of semi-solid medium. The efficiency of picking and cell growth at the post-picking stage was improved by optimization of the plating time without decreasing the diversity of clones. The conditions for selection, including the medium formulation, were the most important factors for the single cell-based clone selection system to construct a high-producing CHO cell line.

  7. Aging of recipient oocytes reduces the development of cloned embryos receiving cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohui; Kato, Yoko; Tsunoda, Yukio

    2007-08-01

    Parthenogenetic activation is an important factor in successful production of cloned mammals. Because it has been reported that aged oocytes are more sensitive to parthenogenetic activation than young oocytes, the present study examined the effects of oocyte aging on the in vitro and in vivo developmental potential of nuclear-transferred (NT) mouse oocytes receiving cumulus cells. The potentials of young NT oocytes (14 h after human chorionic gonadotrophin [hCG] injection) to develop into blastocysts was, however, significantly higher than that of aged oocytes (20 h after hCG injection; 16% vs 6%). When the nuclei of NT oocytes at the 2-cell stage were fused with enucleated fertilized 2-cell embryos, the potentials of the serial NT embryos to develop into blastocysts were no different for both young and aged oocytes (74% vs 74%). Live young, however, were obtained only after transfer of serial NT blastocysts developed from young NT oocytes (2%). In contrast to a report using embryonic nuclei as the nuclear donors, the results of the present study indicate that young oocytes are superior to aged oocytes as a source of recipient cytoplasm for mouse somatic cell cloning. PMID:17389775

  8. Retainer for laboratory animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Bio-retainer holds laboratory animals in fixed position for research and clinical experiments. Retainer allows full access to animals and can be rapidly opened and closed to admit and release specimens.

  9. Influence of somatic cell donor breed on reproductive performance and comparison of prenatal growth in cloned canines.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Hwang, Kyu Chan; Hwang, In-sung; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Han, Ho Jae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2014-06-01

    Using in vivo-flushed oocytes from a homogenous dog population and subsequent embryo transfer after nuclear transfer, we studied the effects of donor cells collected from 10 different breeds on cloning efficiency and perinatal development of resulted cloned puppies. The breeds were categorized into four groups according to their body weight: small (≤9 kg), medium (>9-20 kg), large (>20-40 kg), and ultra large (>40 kg). A total of 1611 cloned embryos were transferred into 454 surrogate bitches for production of cloned puppies. No statistically significant differences were observed for initial pregnancy rates at Day 30 of embryo transfer for the donor cells originated from different breeds. However, full-term pregnancy rates were 16.5%, 11.0%, 10.0%, and 7.1% for the donor cells originated from ultra-large breed, large, medium, and small breeds, respectively, where pregnancy rate in the ultra-large group was significantly higher compared with the small breeds (P < 0.01). Perinatal mortality until weaning was significantly higher in small breeds (33.3%) compared with medium, large, or ultra-large breeds where no mortality was observed. The mean birth weight of cloned pups significantly increased proportional to breed size. The highest litter size was examined in ultra-large breeds. There was no correlation between the number of embryo transferred and litter size. Taken together, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning and fetal survival after embryo transfer may be affected significantly by selecting the appropriate genotype.

  10. Alteration of the DNA methylation status of donor cells impairs the developmental competence of porcine cloned embryos

    PubMed Central

    HUAN, Yan Jun; WU, Zhan Feng; ZHANG, Ji Guang; ZHU, Jiang; XIE, Bing Teng; WANG, Jian Yu; LI, Jing Yu; XUE, Bing Hua; KONG, Qing Ran; LIU, Zhong Hua

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming induced by somatic cell nuclear transfer is an inefficient process, and donor cell DNA methylation status is thought to be a major factor affecting cloning efficiency. Here, the role of donor cell DNA methylation status regulated by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) or 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine-5'-triphosphate (5-methyl-dCTP) in the early development of porcine cloned embryos was investigated. Our results showed that 5-aza-dC or 5-methyl-dCTP significantly reduced or increased the global methylation levels and altered the methylation and expression levels of key genes in donor cells. However, the development of cloned embryos derived from these cells was reduced. Furthermore, disrupted pseudo-pronucleus formation and transcripts of early embryo development-related genes were observed in cloned embryos derived from these cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that alteration of the DNA methylation status of donor cells by 5-aza-dC or 5-methyl-dCTP disrupted nuclear reprogramming and impaired the developmental competence of porcine cloned embryos. PMID:26537205

  11. Reproductive semi-cloning respecting biparental embryo origin: embryos from syngamy between a gamete and a haploidized somatic cell.

    PubMed

    Tesarik, J

    2002-08-01

    Embryos formed by somatic cell nuclear transfer to enucleated oocytes (cloning) have given rise to viable offspring in several mammalian species. The possibility of future application of this technique to human assisted reproduction (reproductive cloning) has been widely debated. On this background there is current discussion of the potential for a cloning-derived technique, which aims at syngamy between a gamete nucleus from one parent and a somatic cell nucleus from the other. Critical analysis of the clinical indications, the current state of the art, biological concerns and ethical considerations relative to this technique, called here reproductive semi-cloning, are presented. Such a technique requires validation by further research before it can be considered as a treatment option. This debate explores issues raised by the technique.

  12. Dynamics of genomic clones in breast cancer patient xenografts at single cell resolution

    PubMed Central

    Eirew, Peter; Steif, Adi; Khattra, Jaswinder; Ha, Gavin; Yap, Damian; Farahani, Hossein; Gelmon, Karen; Chia, Stephen; Mar, Colin; Wan, Adrian; Laks, Emma; Biele, Justina; Shumansky, Karey; Rosner, Jamie; McPherson, Andrew; Nielsen, Cydney; Roth, Andrew J. L.; Lefebvre, Calvin; Bashashati, Ali; de Souza, Camila; Siu, Celia; Aniba, Radhouane; Brimhall, Jazmine; Oloumi, Arusha; Osako, Tomo; Bruna, Alejandra; Sandoval, Jose; Algara, Teresa; Greenwood, Wendy; Leung, Kaston; Cheng, Hongwei; Xue, Hui; Wang, Yuzhuo; Lin, Dong; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard; Zhao, Yongjun; Lorette, Julie; Nguyen, Long; Huntsman, David; Eaves, Connie J.; Hansen, Carl; Marra, Marco A.; Caldas, Carlos; Shah, Sohrab P.; Aparicio, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers, including breast cancers, are comprised of clones differing in mutation content. Clones evolve dynamically in space and time following principles of Darwinian evolution1,2, underpinning important emergent features such as drug resistance and metastasis3–7. Human breast cancer xenoengraftment is used as a means of capturing and studying tumour biology, and breast tumour xenografts are generally assumed to be reasonable models of the originating tumours8–10. However the consequences and reproducibility of engraftment and propagation on the genomic clonal architecture of tumours has not been systematically examined at single cell resolution. Here we show by both deep genome and single cell sequencing methods, the clonal dynamics of initial engraftment and subsequent serial propagation of primary and metastatic human breast cancers in immunodeficient mice. In all 15 cases examined, clonal selection on engraftment was observed in both primary and metastatic breast tumours, varying in degree from extreme selective engraftment of minor (<5% of starting population) clones to moderate, polyclonal engraftment. Furthermore, ongoing clonal dynamics during serial passaging is a feature of tumours experiencing modest initial selection. Through single cell sequencing, we show that major mutation clusters estimated from tumour population sequencing relate predictably to the most abundant clonal genotypes, even in clonally complex and rapidly evolving cases. Finally, we show that similar clonal expansion patterns can emerge in independent grafts of the same starting tumour population, indicating that genomic aberrations can be reproducible determinants of evolutionary trajectories. Our results show that measurement of genomically defined clonal population dynamics will be highly informative for functional studies utilizing patient-derived breast cancer xenoengraftment. PMID:25470049

  13. Comet assay, cloning assay, and light and electron microscopy on one preselected cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Fiedler, Ursula; Bauer, Eckhard; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1998-01-01

    In order to perform long-term studies up to one week on a preselected single cell after micromanipulation (e.g. UVA and NIR microbeam exposure) in comparison with non-treated neighbor cells (control cells) we applied a variety of single cell diagnostic techniques and developed a special comet assay for single preselected cells. For that purpose adherent cells were grown in low concentrations and maintained in special sterile centimeter-sized glass cell chambers. After preselection, a single cell was marked by means of diamond-produced circles on the outer cell chamber window. During exposure to microbeams, NADH-attributed autofluorescence of the chosen cell was detected by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, cell morphology was video-monitored (formation of pseudopodia, membrane blebbing,...). Maintaining the microchamber in the incubator, the irradiated cell was examined 24 h later for cell division (clone formation) and modifications in autofluorescence and morphology (including daughter cells). In the case that no division occurred the vitality of the light-exposed cell and of the control cells were probed by intranuclear propidium iodide accumulation. After fixation, either electron microscopy or single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was performed. To monitor comet formation indicating photoinduced DNA damage in the preselected single cell in comparison with the non-exposed neighbor cells the chamber was filled with low-melting gel and lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. In contrast to the conventional comet assay, where only randomly chosen cells of a suspension are investigated, the novel optimized electrophoresis technique should enhance the possibilities of DNA damage detection to a true single (preselected) cell level. The single cell techniques applied to UVA microexposed Chinese hamster ovary cells (364 nm, 1 mW, 3.5 W/cm2) revealed significant cell damage for J/cm2 fluences such as modifications of intracellular

  14. Comet assay, cloning assay, and light and electron microscopy on one preselected cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Oehring, H.; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Fiedler, Ursula; Bauer, Eckhard; Greulich, Karl O.

    1997-12-01

    In order to perform long-term studies up to one week on a preselected single cell after micromanipulation (e.g. UVA and NIR microbeam exposure) in comparison with non-treated neighbor cells (control cells) we applied a variety of single cell diagnostic techniques and developed a special comet assay for single preselected cells. For that purpose adherent cells were grown in low concentrations and maintained in special sterile centimeter-sized glass cell chambers. After preselection, a single cell was marked by means of diamond-produced circles on the outer cell chamber window. During exposure to microbeams, NADH-attributed autofluorescence of the chosen cell was detected by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, cell morphology was video-monitored (formation of pseudopodia, membrane blebbing,...). Maintaining the microchamber in the incubator, the irradiated cell was examined 24 h later for cell division (clone formation) and modifications in autofluorescence and morphology (including daughter cells). In the case that no division occurred the vitality of the light-exposed cell and of the control cells were probed by intranuclear propidium iodide accumulation. After fixation, either electron microscopy or single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was performed. To monitor comet formation indicating photoinduced DNA damage in the preselected single cell in comparison with the non-exposed neighbor cells the chamber was filled with low-melting gel and lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. In contrast to the conventional comet assay, where only randomly chosen cells of a suspension are investigated, the novel optimized electrophoresis technique should enhance the possibilities of DNA damage detection to a true single (preselected) cell level. The single cell techniques applied to UVA microexposed Chinese hamster ovary cells (364 nm, 1 mW, 3.5 W/cm2) revealed significant cell damage for J/cm2 fluences such as modifications of intracellular

  15. Stromal-cell-derived extracellular matrix promotes the proliferation and retains the osteogenic differentiation capacity of mesenchymal stem cells on three-dimensional scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Antebi, Ben; Zhang, ZhiLiang; Wang, Yu; Lu, ZhongDing; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Ling, Jian

    2015-02-01

    To date, expansion of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is typically carried out on two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture plastic. Since this 2D substratum is very different from the physiological situation, MSCs gradually lose their unique multipotent properties during expansion. Recently, the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment ("niche") in facilitating and regulating stem cell behavior in vivo has been elucidated. As a result, investigators have shifted their efforts toward developing three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds capable of functioning like the native tissue ECM. In this study, we demonstrated that stromal-cell-derived ECM, formed within a collagen/hydroxyapatite (Col/HA) scaffold to mimic the bone marrow "niche," promoted MSC proliferation and preserved their differentiation capacity. The ECM was synthesized by MSCs to reconstitute the tissue-specific 3D microenvironment in vitro. Following deposition of the ECM inside Col/HA scaffold, the construct was decellularized and reseeded with MSCs to study their behavior. The data showed that MSCs cultured on the ECM-Col/HA scaffolds grew significantly faster than the cells from the same batch cultured on the regular Col/HA scaffolds. In addition, MSCs cultured on the ECM-Col/HA scaffolds retained their "stemness" and osteogenic differentiation capacity better than MSCs cultured on regular Col/HA scaffolds. When ECM-Col/HA scaffolds were implanted into immunocompromised mice, with or without loading MSCs, it was found that those scaffolds formed less bone as compared with regular Col/HA scaffolds (i.e., without ECM), in both cases of with or without loading MSCs. The in vivo study further confirmed that the ECM-Col/HA scaffold was a suitable mimic of the bone marrow "niche." This novel 3D stromal-cell-derived ECM system has the potential to be developed into a biomedical platform for regenerative medicine applications.

  16. The Singapore approach to human stem cell research, therapeutic and reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Kian, Catherine Tay Swee; Leng, Tien Sim

    2005-06-01

    With the controversial ethical issues on the creation of human embryos through cloning for therapeutic research, which holds more promise of medical breakthroughs that the world could ever imagine and the acknowledgement by many scientists that this technology may not lead in the near future to therapies; this country report discusses the approach Singapore takes on human stem cell research, interjected with the authors' own arguments and suggestions especially on research compensation injuries, an often neglected important issue. International comparative viewpoints taken by the major countries in the world are also included in the appendix.

  17. Lack of correlation between membrane CD30 expression and cytokine secretion pattern in allergen-primed naive cord blood T-cell lines and clones.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Piattoni, S; Falini, B; Grignani, F; Bertotto, A

    1997-04-01

    Various surface molecules are expressed by activated T cells. Among them, the CD30 antigen has been proposed as a reproducible marker that identifies a subset of differentiated and/or activated T lymphocytes that produce T helper (Th)-2-type cytokines, i.e. interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5. However, because CD30 has mainly been detected on established T-cell clones, it is still unclear whether a priming allergen and/or cytokine can induce its membrane expression on naive T cells, perhaps in parallel with the up-regulation of other relevant activation markers, such as CD25, HLA-DR and L-selectin. It is also unknown whether proper allergen stimulation affects the cytokine secretion pattern by CD30+ T-cell clones derived from antigen-unprimed (naive) T lymphocytes. More information on these questions was sought by adopting a model that used cord blood as a source of virgin T cells and exposing them to native cypress allergen or cytokine (IL-2 or IL-4) stimulation, as well as to conventional polyclonal activators such as PHA or anti-CD3. Peripheral blood MC from four adult cypress-sensitive patients was also assayed and used as controls for all culture experiments. Freshly isolated cord and adult T cells did not express the CD30 antigen on their membrane. Many of the stimulating agents tested were able to up-regulate the expression of CD30. However, despite high expression of this molecule, cloned allergen-specific cord CD4+ T lymphocytes were unable to produce IFN-gamma and/or IL-4. In contrast, they retained the capability to produce IL-2. Thus, expression of the CD30 antigen on virgin T cells does not correlate with a polarized model of T helper (Th)-1 or Th-2 cytokine-producing cells, suggesting that these types of lymphokine-secreting lymphocytes are not a paradigmatic example of T-cell subpopulations that display stable phenotypical features. PMID:9105430

  18. Improvement of cloning efficiency in minipigs using post-thawed donor cells treated with roscovitine.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seongsoo; Oh, Keon Bong; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Ock, Sun-A; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Im, Gi-Sun; Lee, Sung-Soo; Lee, Kichoon; Park, Jin-Ki

    2013-11-01

    Massachusetts General Hospital miniature pigs (MGH minipigs) have been established for organ transplantation studies across the homozygous major histocompatibility complex, but cloning efficiency of MGH minipigs is extremely low. This study was designed to increase the productivity of MGH minipigs by nuclear transfer of post-thaw donor cells after 1 h co-incubation with roscovitine. The MGH minipig cells were genetically modified with GT KO (alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase knock-out) and hCD46 KI (human CD46 knock-in) and used as donor cells. The GT KO/hCD46 KI donor cells were cultured for either 3 days (control group) or 1 h after thawing with 15 μM roscovitine (experimental group) prior to the nuclear transfer. The relative percentage of the transgenic donor cells that entered into G0/G1 was 93.7 % (±2.54). This was different from the donor cells cultured for 1 h with the roscovitine-treated group (84.6 % ±4.6) (P < 0.05) and without roscovitine (78.6 % ±5.5) (P < 0.01), respectively. The pregnancy rate and delivery rate in the roscovitine group (8/12 and 6/8, respectively) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those in the control group (6/19 and 3/6, respectively). In the experimental group, 12 GT KO/hCD46 KI transgenic minipigs were successfully generated, and five minipigs among them survived for more than 6 months so far. The recipient-based individual cloning efficiency ranged from 0.74 to 2.54 %. In conclusion, gene-modified donor cells can be used for cloning of MGH minipigs if the cells are post-thawed and treated with roscovitine for 1 h prior to nuclear transfer.

  19. Generation of transgenic rabbits by the novel technique of chimeric somatic cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Skrzyszowska, M; Smorag, Z; Słomski, R; Katska-Ksiazkiewicz, L; Kalak, R; Michalak, E; Wielgus, K; Lehmann, J; Lipiński, D; Szalata, M; Pławski, A; Samiec, M; Jura, J; Gajda, B; Ryńska, B; Pieńkowski, M

    2006-06-01

    A novel technique of chimeric somatic cell cloning was applied to produce a transgenic rabbit (NT20). Karyoplasts of transgenic adult skin fibroblasts with Tg(Wap-GH1) gene construct as a marker were microsurgically transferred into one, previously enucleated, blastomere of 2-cell non-transgenic embryos, while the second one remained intact. The reconstructed embryos either were cultured in vitro up to the blastocyst stage (Experiment I) or were transferred into recipient-females immediately after the cloning procedure (Experiment II). In Experiment I, 25/102 (24.5%) embryos formed blastocysts from whole embryos and 46/102 (44.12%) embryos developed to the blastocyst stage from single non-operated blastomeres, while the reconstructed blastomeres were damaged and degenerated. Thirteen (12.7%) embryos did not exceed 3- to 4-cell stages and 18 (17.7%) embryos were inhibited at the initial 2-cell stage. Out of 14 blastocysts which were subjected to molecular analysis, the transgene was detected in the cells of 4 blastocysts. In Experiment II, 163/217 (75.0%) embryos were transferred into 9 pseudopregnant recipient-rabbits (an average of 18 embryos per recipient). Four recipient-females (44.4%) became pregnant and delivered a total of 24 (14.7%) pups. Molecular analysis confirmed that two pups (1.2%), one live and one stillborn, showed a positive transgene signal. Live transgenic rabbit NT20 appeared healthy and anatomically as well as physiologically normal. The results of our experiments showed that transgenic adult skin fibroblast cell nuclei, which have been introduced into the cytoplasmic microenvironment of single enucleated blastomeres from 2-cell stage rabbit embryos, are able to direct the development of chimeric embryos not only to the blastocyst stage but also up to term.

  20. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of a transforming gene detected by transfection of chicken B-cell lymphoma DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubin, Gerard; Goldman, Debra S.; Luce, Judith; Neiman, Paul E.; Cooper, Geoffrey M.

    1983-03-01

    A transforming gene detected by transfection of chicken B-cell lymphoma DNA has been isolated by molecular cloning. It is homologous to a conserved family of sequences present in normal chicken and human DNAs but is not related to transforming genes of acutely transforming retroviruses. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned transforming gene suggests that it encodes a protein that is partially homologous to the amino terminus of transferrin and related proteins although only about one tenth the size of transferrin.

  1. Primary culture of rat taste bud cells that retain molecular markers for taste buds and permit functional expression of foreign genes.

    PubMed

    Kishi, M; Emori, Y; Tsukamoto, Y; Abe, K

    2001-01-01

    Taste buds are constituted of several kinds of cells which have distinct characteristics and play different roles. In this study, we have established an in vitro culture system by optimizing the method for isolating the cells and by selecting culture media and reagents effective for cell viability and adhesion. As a result, the taste bud cells were adhesive and viable for over 3 days when cultured onto Matrigel-coated dishes in medium based on keratinocyte growth medium. The cells retained molecular markers for both the cytoskeleton and intracellular signaling such as cytokeratin 8 and phospholipase Cbeta2. In addition, three intracellular signaling molecules, gustducin, phospholipase Cbeta2, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 3, are expressed in the same correlation as those in vivo, although the ratio of signaling molecule-positive cells vs. total cells was somewhat lower in the culture than in vivo. Next, we tried several methods to introduce foreign genes into the cells, and obtained a greater than 90% efficiency of introduction using an adenovirus vector. Finally, we show that an exogenously expressed myc-tagged alpha1A-adrenoceptor sorts into the plasma membrane, and transduces a ligand-dependent signal resulting in intracellular [Ca(2+)] increase in about half of the infected cells. These results suggest that taste bud cells after 3 days of culture retain characteristic molecular markers, and may prove useful for describing the molecular and physiological features of taste bud cells, and that these cells can be further manipulated by adenovirus-mediated gene introduction. PMID:11564431

  2. Subtractive cDNA cloning using oligo(dT)30-latex and PCR: isolation of cDNA clones specific to undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hara, E; Kato, T; Nakada, S; Sekiya, S; Oda, K

    1991-01-01

    The human embryonal carcinoma cell line NEC14 can be induced to differentiate by the addition of 10(-2)M N,N'-hexamethylene-bis-acetamide (HMBA). A subtractive cDNA library specific to undifferentiated NEC14 cells was constructed using oligo(dT)30-Latex and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method was designed to improve the efficiency of subtraction and the enrichment of cDNA clones corresponding to low abundance mRNAs. The single strand of cDNA was made from mRNA prepared from the HMBA-treated NEC14 cells using an oligo(dT)30 primer covalently linked to Latex particles. After removal of the mRNA template by heat-denaturation and centrifugation, the subtractive hybridization was carried out between the cDNA-oligo(dT)30-Latex and mRNA from untreated NEC14 cells. Unhybridized mRNA collected by centrifugation was hybridized repeatedly to the cDNA-oligo(dT)30-Latex and subtractive mRNA was converted to cDNA. The subtractive cDNA was then amplified by PCR and cloned into pBluescript II KS-. The cDNA library thus constructed consisted of approximately 10,000 independent clones with cDNA inserts of 1.7 Kb on average. Differential hybridization of these transformants indicated that approximately 3% of them contained cDNA inserts specific to the undifferentiated EC cells, some of which were derived from low abundance mRNAs. Images PMID:1766870

  3. Do endothelial cells belong to the primitive stem leukemic clone in CML? Role of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Teresa L; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; López-Ruano, Guillermo; Muntión, Sandra; Preciado, Silvia; Hernández-Ruano, Montserrat; Rosado, Belén; de las Heras, Natalia; Chillón, M Carmen; Hernández-Hernández, Ángel; González, Marcos; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2015-08-01

    The expression of BCR-ABL in hematopoietic stem cells is a well-defined primary event in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Some reports have described the presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells from CML patients, suggesting the origin of the disease in a primitive hemangioblastic cell. On the other hand, extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by CML leukemic cells are involved in the angiogenesis modulation process. In the current work we hypothesized that EVs released from BCR-ABL(+) cells may carry inside the oncogene that can be transferred to endothelial cells leading to the expression of both BCR-ABL transcript and the oncoprotein. EVs from K562 cells and plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients were isolated by ultracentrifugation. RT-PCR analysis detected the presence of BCR-ABL RNA in the EVs isolated from both K562 cells and plasma of CML patients. The incorporation of these EVs into endothelial cells was demonstrated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that after 24h of incubation most EVs were incorporated. BCR-ABL transcripts were detected in all experiments on endothelial cells incubated with EVs from both sources. The presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells incubated with Philadelphia(+) EVs was also confirmed by Western blot assays. In summary, endothelial cells acquire BCR-ABL RNA and the oncoprotein after incubation with EVs released from Ph(+) positive cells (either from K562 cells or from plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients). This results challenge the hypothesis that endothelial cells may be part of the Philadelphia(+) clone in CML.

  4. Isolated Anxa5{sup +}/Sca-1{sup +} perivascular cells from mouse meningeal vasculature retain their perivascular phenotype in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Brachvogel, Bent . E-mail: bent.brachvogel@uni-koeln.de; Pausch, Friederike; Farlie, Peter; Gaipl, Udo; Etich, Julia; Zhou, Zhigang; Cameron, Trevor; Mark, Klaus von der; Bateman, John F.; Poeschl, Ernst . E-mail: e.poschl@uea.ac.uk

    2007-07-15

    Pericytes are closely associated with endothelial cells, contribute to vascular stability and represent a potential source of mesenchymal progenitor cells. Using the specifically expressed annexin A5-LacZ fusion gene (Anxa5-LacZ), it became possible to isolate perivascular cells (PVC) from mouse tissues. These cells proliferate and can be cultured without undergoing senescence for multiple passages. PVC display phenotypic characteristics of pericytes, as they express pericyte-specific markers (NG2-proteoglycan, desmin, {alpha}SMA, PDGFR-{beta}). They also express stem cell marker Sca-1, whereas endothelial (PECAM), hematopoietic (CD45) or myeloid (F4/80, CD11b) lineage markers are not detectable. These characteristics are in common with the pericyte-like cell line 10T1/2. PVC also display a phagocytoic activity higher than 10T1/2 cells. During coculture with endothelial cells both cell types stimulate angiogenic processes indicated by an increased expression of PECAM in endothelial cells and specific deposition of basement membrane proteins. PVC show a significantly increased induction of endothelial specific PECAM expression compared to 10T1/2 cells. Accordingly, in vivo grafts of PVC aggregates onto chorioallantoic membranes of quail embryos recruit endothelial cells, get highly vascularized and deposit basement membrane components. These data demonstrate that isolated Anxa5-LacZ{sup +} PVC from mouse meninges retain their capacity for differentiation to pericyte-like cells and contribute to angiogenic processes.

  5. Activation of resting human B cells by helper T-cell clone supernatant: characterization of a human B-cell-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Diu, A; Gougeon, M L; Moreau, J L; Reinherz, E L; Thèze, J

    1987-01-01

    The effects of helper T-cell clone supernatants on resting human B cells were investigated. Four different helper T-cell clones (two T4+ and two T8+) were stimulated by anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies on Sepharose beads or anti-T11(2) plus anti-T11(3) monoclonal antibodies. The supernatants from these activated clones induced the proliferation of highly purified resting B lymphocytes from the peripheral blood. The B cells exhibited a cell size and a surface-antigen pattern (4F2 antigen and transferrin receptor) of phase G0 B cells, and they were functionally resting. In response to T-cell supernatants a large fraction of the B cells enlarged and expressed 4F2 antigens and transferrin receptors. In gel filtration, the corresponding activity migrated with an apparent Mr of 12,000-15,000. Our findings strongly support the existence of a human B-cell-activating factor acting on resting B cells and causing them to enter phase G1 of the cell cycle. PMID:2962196

  6. Molecular cloning, expression analysis, and function of decorin in goat ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, J Y; Gao, K X; Xin, H Y; Han, P; Zhu, G Q; Cao, B Y

    2016-10-01

    Decorin (DCN), a component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), participates in ECM assembly and influences cell proliferation and apoptosis in many mammalian tissues and cells. However, expression and function of DCN in the ovary remain unclear. This study cloned the full-length cDNA of goat DCN obtained from the ovary of an adult goat. Sequence analysis revealed that the putative DCN protein shared a highly conserved amino acid sequence with known mammalian homologs. The tissue distribution of DCN mRNA expression was evaluated by real-time PCR, and the results showed that DCN was widely expressed in the tissues of adult goat. Immunohistochemistry results suggested that DCN protein existed in the granulosa cells and oocytes from all types of follicles and theca cells of antral follicles. Moreover, hCG-induced DCN mRNA expression was significantly reduced by the inhibitors of protein kinase A, PI3K, or p38 kinase (P < 0.05), which are key mediators involved in hCG-induced DCN expression. Overexpression of DCN significantly increased apoptosis and blocked cell cycle progression in cultured granulosa cells (P < 0.05). Western blot analysis also showed that overexpression of DCN upregulated the expression levels of p21 protein (P < 0.05), whereas no effects were observed on the expression of Bax and Bcl-2 and on Bcl-2/Bax ratio (P > 0.05). These findings suggested that DCN regulates the apoptosis and cell cycle of granulosa cells. PMID:27565237

  7. The complete primary structure of the T-cell receptor genes from an alloreactive cytotoxic human T-lymphocyte clone.

    PubMed

    Leiden, J M; Fraser, J D; Strominger, J L

    1986-01-01

    The complete primary structure of the cDNAs encoding the alpha and beta chains of the T-lymphocyte receptor for antigen from a human alloreactive, cytotoxic T-cell clone, L17, is presented. Sequence analysis of these genes reveals that both are related to immunoglobulins and are composed of variable, diversity (at least in the case of the Ti beta clone), joining, and constant region sequences. Comparison of the sequence of the alpha-chain cDNA to that of previously sequenced mouse and human alpha cDNAs suggests the presence of human T-cell receptor alpha D-region sequences. Southern blot analysis confirms the finding that these cDNAs represent the functional receptor genes expressed by the L17 cytotoxic T-cell clone. The availability of these full-length T-cell receptor cDNA clones from a human T-lymphocyte clone of known antigen specificity should allow an analysis of the relationship between T-cell receptor structure and function. PMID:2426193

  8. Identification of key factors conquering developmental arrest of somatic cell cloned embryos by combining embryo biopsy and single-cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenqiang; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Chenfei; Gao, Yawei; Gao, Rui; Kou, Xiaochen; Zhao, Yanhong; Li, Jingyi; Wu, You; Xiu, Wenchao; Wang, Su; Yin, Jiqing; Liu, Wei; Cai, Tao; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Yong; Gao, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into totipotent embryos through somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, most cloned embryos arrest at early stages and the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unexplored. Here, we first developed a somatic cell nuclear transfer embryo biopsy system at two- or four-cell stage, which allows us to trace the developmental fate of the biopsied embryos precisely. Then, through single-cell transcriptome sequencing of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos with different developmental fates, we identified that inactivation of Kdm4b, a histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation demethylase, functions as a barrier for two-cell arrest of cloned embryos. Moreover, we discovered that inactivation of another histone demethylase Kdm5b accounts for the arrest of cloned embryos at the four-cell stage through single-cell analysis. Co-injection of Kdm4b and Kdm5b can restore transcriptional profiles of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos and greatly improve the blastocyst development (over 95%) as well as the production of cloned mice. Our study therefore provides an effective approach to identify key factors responsible for the developmental arrest of somatic cell cloned embryos. PMID:27462457

  9. Identification of key factors conquering developmental arrest of somatic cell cloned embryos by combining embryo biopsy and single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqiang; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Chenfei; Gao, Yawei; Gao, Rui; Kou, Xiaochen; Zhao, Yanhong; Li, Jingyi; Wu, You; Xiu, Wenchao; Wang, Su; Yin, Jiqing; Liu, Wei; Cai, Tao; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Yong; Gao, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into totipotent embryos through somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, most cloned embryos arrest at early stages and the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unexplored. Here, we first developed a somatic cell nuclear transfer embryo biopsy system at two- or four-cell stage, which allows us to trace the developmental fate of the biopsied embryos precisely. Then, through single-cell transcriptome sequencing of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos with different developmental fates, we identified that inactivation of Kdm4b, a histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation demethylase, functions as a barrier for two-cell arrest of cloned embryos. Moreover, we discovered that inactivation of another histone demethylase Kdm5b accounts for the arrest of cloned embryos at the four-cell stage through single-cell analysis. Co-injection of Kdm4b and Kdm5b can restore transcriptional profiles of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos and greatly improve the blastocyst development (over 95%) as well as the production of cloned mice. Our study therefore provides an effective approach to identify key factors responsible for the developmental arrest of somatic cell cloned embryos. PMID:27462457

  10. Stochastic differentiation into an osteoclast lineage from cloned macrophage-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Murata, Akihiko; Okuyama, Kazuki; Shimoda, Yuhki; Hikosaka, Mari; Yasuda, Hisataka; Yoshino, Miya

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frequency of C7 differentiation into osteoclast was low and constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only extended C7 cell cultures exponentially increased osteoclast+ cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may maintain the stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. -- Abstract: Differentiation into osteoclasts is induced by a macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand. The macrophage-like cell line, C7 has the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts when it is cultured with both factors for 6 days. Although C7 is an established cell line, the frequency of differentiation into this lineage was less than 10%, and the ratio was maintained at a constant level, even after repeated cloning. In this study, to increase the differentiation of C7 cells to osteoclasts, C7 derivative treatments with several activators and/or inhibitors were performed for 3 days prior to setting osteoclast induction analysis; however, a reagent to significantly up-regulate the frequency of differentiation was not found. Only extended cultures for osteoclastogenesis exponentially increased the frequency of osteoclast precursors. It is likely that C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot' rather than requiring specific signals to drive this process.

  11. Effect of Acteoside as a Cell Protector to Produce a Cloned Dog.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hye; Chun, Ju Lan; Kim, Keun Jung; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Dong-Hee; Lee, Bo Myeong; Han, Kil Woo; Park, Kang-Sun; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Kim, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a well-known laboratory technique. The principle of the SCNT involves the reprogramming a somatic nucleus by injecting a somatic cell into a recipient oocyte whose nucleus has been removed. Therefore, the nucleus donor cells are considered as a crucial factor in SCNT. Cell cycle synchronization of nucleus donor cells at G0/G1 stage can be induced by contact inhibition or serum starvation. In this study, acteoside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside compound, was investigated to determine whether it is applicable for inducing cell cycle synchronization, cytoprotection, and improving SCNT efficiency in canine fetal fibroblasts. Primary canine fetal fibroblasts were treated with acteoside (10, 30, 50 μM) for various time periods (24, 48 and 72 hours). Cell cycle synchronization at G0/G1 stage did not differ significantly with the method of induction: acteoside treatment, contact inhibition or serum starvation. However, of these three treatments, serum starvation resulted in significantly increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (99.5 ± 0.3%) and apoptosis. The results also revealed that acteoside reduced ROS and apoptosis processes including necrosis in canine fetal fibroblasts, and improved the cell survival. Canine fetal fibroblasts treated with acteoside were successfully arrested at the G0/G1 stage. Moreover, the reconstructed embryos using nucleus donor cells treated with acteoside produced a healthy cloned dog, but not the embryos produced using nucleus donor cells subjected to contact inhibition. In conclusion, acteoside induced cell cycle synchronization of nucleus donor cells would be an alternative method to improve the efficiency of canine SCNT because of its cytoprotective effects. PMID:27428333

  12. Effect of Acteoside as a Cell Protector to Produce a Cloned Dog

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keun Jung; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Dong-hee; Lee, Bo Myeong; Han, Kil Woo; Park, Kang-Sun; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Kim, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a well-known laboratory technique. The principle of the SCNT involves the reprogramming a somatic nucleus by injecting a somatic cell into a recipient oocyte whose nucleus has been removed. Therefore, the nucleus donor cells are considered as a crucial factor in SCNT. Cell cycle synchronization of nucleus donor cells at G0/G1 stage can be induced by contact inhibition or serum starvation. In this study, acteoside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside compound, was investigated to determine whether it is applicable for inducing cell cycle synchronization, cytoprotection, and improving SCNT efficiency in canine fetal fibroblasts. Primary canine fetal fibroblasts were treated with acteoside (10, 30, 50 μM) for various time periods (24, 48 and 72 hours). Cell cycle synchronization at G0/G1 stage did not differ significantly with the method of induction: acteoside treatment, contact inhibition or serum starvation. However, of these three treatments, serum starvation resulted in significantly increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (99.5 ± 0.3%) and apoptosis. The results also revealed that acteoside reduced ROS and apoptosis processes including necrosis in canine fetal fibroblasts, and improved the cell survival. Canine fetal fibroblasts treated with acteoside were successfully arrested at the G0/G1 stage. Moreover, the reconstructed embryos using nucleus donor cells treated with acteoside produced a healthy cloned dog, but not the embryos produced using nucleus donor cells subjected to contact inhibition. In conclusion, acteoside induced cell cycle synchronization of nucleus donor cells would be an alternative method to improve the efficiency of canine SCNT because of its cytoprotective effects. PMID:27428333

  13. Fractionation of a tumor-initiating UV dose introduces DNA damage-retaining cells in hairless mouse skin and renders subsequent TPA-promoted tumors non-regressing.

    PubMed

    van de Glind, Gerline; Rebel, Heggert; van Kempen, Marika; Tensen, Kees; de Gruijl, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Sunburns and especially sub-sunburn chronic UV exposure are associated with increased risk of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Here we focus on a possible difference in tumor initiation from a single severe-sunburn dose (on day 1, 21 hairless mice) and from an equal dose fractionated into very low sub-sunburn doses not causing any (growth-promoting) epidermal hyperplasia (40 days daily exposure, n=20). From day 47 all mice received 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) applications (2x/wk) for 20 weeks to promote tumor development within the lifetime of the animals. After the sub-sunburn regimen sparse DNA damage-retaining basal cells (quiescent stem cells, QSCs) remained in the non-hyperplastic epidermis. These cells were forced to divide by TPA. After discontinuation of TPA tumors regressed and disappeared in the 'sunburn group' but persisted and grew in the 'sub-sunburn group' (0.06 vs 2.50 SCCs and precursors ≥4 mm/mouse after 280 days, p=0.03). As the tumors carried no mutations in p53, H/K/N-Ras and Notch1/2, these 'usual suspects' were not involved in the UV-driven tumor initiation. Although we could not selectively eliminate QSCs (unknown phenotype) to establish causality, our data suggest that forcing specifically DNA damage-retaining QSCs to divide--with high mutagenic risk--gives rise to persisting (mainly 'in situ') skin carcinomas. PMID:26797757

  14. Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 regulates mesangial cell proliferation in proliferative glomerulonephritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Jamba, Ariunbold; Kondo, Shuji; Urushihara, Maki; Nagai, Takashi; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-Ri; Miyazaki, Akira; Kagami, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5) is a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-inducible focal adhesion protein. We previously demonstrated that Hic-5 was localized in mesangial cells and its expression was associated with glomerular cell proliferation and matrix expansion in human and rat glomerulonephritis (GN). In the present study, we first assessed the role of Hic-5 in mesangioproliferative GN by injecting Habu venom into heminephrectomized wild type (Hic-5+/+) and Hic-5-deficient (Hic-5-/-) mice. Hic-5+/+ GN mice exhibited glomerular cell proliferation on day 7. Surprisingly, glomerular cell number and Ki-67-positive cells in Hic-5-/- GN mice were significantly greater than those in Hic-5+/+ GN mice on day 7, although the number of glomerular apoptotic cells and the expression of growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor-BB and TGF-β1) and their receptors were similarly increased in both Hic-5+/+ and Hic-5-/- GN mice. In culture experiments, proliferation assays showed that platelet-derived growth factor-BB and TGF-β1 enhanced the proliferation of Hic-5-/- mesangial cells compared with Hic-5+/+ mesangial cells. In addition, mitogenic regulation by Hic-5 was associated with altered and coordinated expression of cell cycle-related proteins including cyclin D1 and p21. The present results suggest that Hic-5 might regulate mesangial cell proliferation in proliferative GN in mice. In conclusion, modulation of Hic-5 expression might have a potential to prevent mesangial cell proliferation in the acute mitogenic phase of glomerulonephritis.

  15. Transfer of cloned human class I major histocompatibility complex genes into HLA mutant human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y; Koller, B; Geraghty, D; Orr, H; Shaw, S; Kavathas, P; DeMars, R

    1986-01-01

    Three new kinds of recombinant DNA constructs were used to transfer cloned human class I HLA genes (A2 and B8) into unique HLA mutant lymphoblastoid cells: pHeBo(x): a class I gene, "x," in plasmid vector pHeBo, which contains a hygromycin resistance gene and Epstein-Barr virus oriP element that sustains extrachromosomal replication; pHPT(x): gene x in a vector with a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene; pHPTe(x): gene x in a vector with the HPRT gene and oriP element. Cell surface class I antigen expression was strong in transferents made with class I-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line mutants .144 (A-null), .53 (B-null), and .184 (A-null, B-null). Transferents expressing HLA-A2 were recognized specifically by HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. When introduced on either of the vectors with the Epstein-Barr virus oriP element, the class I gene replicated extrachromosomally and was lost at rates of 0.2 to 0.3 per cell division. When introduced with vector pHPT (lacking Epstein-Barr virus oriP), the B8 gene was inserted at different chromosomal locations. Introduction of the HLA-B8 gene failed to restore antigen expression by HLA-B-null mutant .174, providing evidence that, unlike mutants exemplified by .53, .144, and .184, some HLA antigen loss mutants are deficient in a trans-acting function needed for class I antigen expression. Of more general interest, the results obtained with HLA class I genes in vectors that replicate extrachromosomally suggest ways of relating genic expression to chromatin structure and function and of attempting to clone functional human centromeres. Images PMID:3023867

  16. Induced overexpression of OCT4A in human embryonic stem cells increases cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Steven C; Chang, David F; Hong, Chang-Mu; Xia, Ping; Senadheera, Dinithi; Trump, Lisa; Mishra, Suparna; Lutzko, Carolyn

    2014-06-15

    Our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying human embryonic stem cell (hESC) self-renewal and differentiation is incomplete. The level of octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4), a critical regulator of pluripotency, is precisely controlled in mouse embryonic stem cells. However, studies of human OCT4 are often confounded by the presence of three isoforms and six expressed pseudogenes, which has complicated the interpretation of results. Using an inducible lentiviral overexpression and knockdown system to manipulate OCT4A above or below physiological levels, we specifically examine the functional role of the OCT4A isoform in hESC. (We also designed and generated a comparable series of vectors, which were not functional, for the overexpression and knockdown of OCT4B.) We show that specific knockdown of OCT4A results in hESC differentiation, as indicated by morphology changes, cell surface antigen expression, and upregulation of ectodermal genes. In contrast, inducible overexpression of OCT4A in hESC leads to a transient instability of the hESC phenotype, as indicated by changes in morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and transcriptional profile, that returns to baseline within 5 days. Interestingly, sustained expression of OCT4A past 5 days enhances hESC cloning efficiency, suggesting that higher levels of OCT4A can support self-renewal. Overall, our results indicate that high levels of OCT4A increase hESC cloning efficiency and do not induce differentiation (whereas OCT4B expression cannot be induced in hESC), highlighting the importance of isoform-specific studies in a stable and inducible expression system for human OCT4. Additionally, we demonstrate the utility of an efficient method for conditional gene expression in hESC.

  17. Molecular cloning, expression and bioactivity of B cell activating factor (BAFF) in African ostrich.

    PubMed

    Yang, Keli; Xiao, Ke; Huang, Haibo; Lu, Shun; Zhong, Juming; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Khaliq, Haseeb; Song, Hui; Liu, Huazhen; Peng, Kemei

    2015-09-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF), which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, is testified to play a critical role in B cell survival, proliferation, maturation and immunoglobulin secretion. In the present study, the cDNA of open reading frame (ORF) in African ostrich (Struthio camelus) BAFF (designated OsBAFF) was cloned by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The OsBAFF gene encodes a 288-amino acid protein containing a predicted transmembrane domain and a putative furin protease cleavage site like BAFFs from chicken (cBAFF), quail (qBAFF), duck (dBAFF), goose (gBAFF) and dove (doBAFF). RT-PCR analysis showed that the OsBAFF gene is strongly expressed in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen, and bone marrow. The soluble OsBAFF had been cloned into pET28a. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis confirmed that the soluble fusion protein His-OsBAFF was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli Rosset (DE3). In vitro, purified OsBAFF was not only able to promote the survival of African ostrich bursal lymphocytes, but also able to co-stimulate proliferation of mouse splenic B cells. The expression of OsBAFF in lymphocyte cells was higher than the control after LPS stimulation. These findings indicated that OsBAFF plays an important role in survival and proliferation of African ostrich bursal lymphocytes, which may provide valuable information for research into the immune system of African ostrich and OsBAFF may serve as a potential immunologic factor for enhancing immunological efficacy in African ostrich and any other birds. PMID:26256697

  18. Transfer of cloned human class I major histocompatibility complex genes into HLA mutant human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Koller, B; Geraghty, D; Orr, H; Shaw, S; Kavathas, P; DeMars, R

    1986-04-01

    Three new kinds of recombinant DNA constructs were used to transfer cloned human class I HLA genes (A2 and B8) into unique HLA mutant lymphoblastoid cells: pHeBo(x): a class I gene, "x," in plasmid vector pHeBo, which contains a hygromycin resistance gene and Epstein-Barr virus oriP element that sustains extrachromosomal replication; pHPT(x): gene x in a vector with a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene; pHPTe(x): gene x in a vector with the HPRT gene and oriP element. Cell surface class I antigen expression was strong in transferents made with class I-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line mutants .144 (A-null), .53 (B-null), and .184 (A-null, B-null). Transferents expressing HLA-A2 were recognized specifically by HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. When introduced on either of the vectors with the Epstein-Barr virus oriP element, the class I gene replicated extrachromosomally and was lost at rates of 0.2 to 0.3 per cell division. When introduced with vector pHPT (lacking Epstein-Barr virus oriP), the B8 gene was inserted at different chromosomal locations. Introduction of the HLA-B8 gene failed to restore antigen expression by HLA-B-null mutant .174, providing evidence that, unlike mutants exemplified by .53, .144, and .184, some HLA antigen loss mutants are deficient in a trans-acting function needed for class I antigen expression. Of more general interest, the results obtained with HLA class I genes in vectors that replicate extrachromosomally suggest ways of relating genic expression to chromatin structure and function and of attempting to clone functional human centromeres. PMID:3023867

  19. Malignant progressive tumor cell clone exhibits significant up-regulation of cofilin-2 and 27-kDa modified form of cofilin-1 compared to regressive clone.

    PubMed

    Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Wang, Yufeng; Okada, Futoshi; Baron, Byron; Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Takao; Akada, Junko; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2013-09-01

    QR-32 is a regressive murine fibrosarcoma cell clone which cannot grow when they are transplanted in mice; QRsP-11 is a progressive malignant tumor cell clone derived from QR-32 which shows strong tumorigenicity. A recent study showed there to be differentially expressed up-regulated and down-regulated proteins in these cells, which were identified by proteomic differential display analyses by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Cofilins are small proteins of less than 20 kDa. Their function is the regulation of actin assembly. Cofilin-1 is a small ubiquitous protein, and regulates actin dynamics by means of binding to actin filaments. Cofilin-1 plays roles in cell migration, proliferation and phagocytosis. Cofilin-2 is also a small protein, but it is mainly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles. There are many reports showing the positive correlation between the level of cofilin-1 and cancer progression. We have also reported an increased expression of cofilin-1 in pancreatic cancer tissues compared to adjacent paired normal tissues. On the other hand, cofilin-2 was significantly less expressed in pancreatic cancer tissues. Therefore, the present study investigated the comparison of the levels of cofilin-1 and cofilin-2 in regressive QR-32 and progressive QRsP-11cells by western blotting. Cofilin-2 was significantly up-regulated in QRsP-11 compared to QR-32 cells (p<0.001). On the other hand, the difference of the intensities of the bands of cofilin-1 (18 kDa) in QR-32 and QRsP-11 was not significant. However, bands of 27 kDa showed a quite different intensity between QR-32 and QRsP-11, with much higher intensities in QRsP-11 compared to QR-32 (p<0.001). These results suggested that the 27-kDa protein recognized by the antibody against cofilin-1 is a possible biomarker for progressive tumor cells.

  20. Conventional and Regulatory CD4+ T Cells That Share Identical TCRs Are Derived from Common Clones.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kyle J; Emerson, Ryan O; Pingel, Jeanette; Buller, R Mark; DiPaolo, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Results from studies comparing the diversity and specificity of the TCR repertoires expressed by conventional (Tconv) and regulatory (Treg) CD4+ T cell have varied depending on the experimental system employed. We developed a new model in which T cells express a single fixed TCRα chain, randomly rearranged endogenous TCRβ chains, and a Foxp3-GFP reporter. We purified CD4+Foxp3- and CD4+Foxp3+ cells, then performed biased controlled multiplex PCR and high throughput sequencing of endogenous TCRβ chains. We identified >7,000 different TCRβ sequences in the periphery of 5 individual mice. On average, ~12% of TCR sequences were expressed by both conventional and regulatory populations within individual mice. The CD4+ T cells that expressed shared TCR sequences were present at higher frequencies compared to T cells expressing non-shared TCRs. Furthermore, nearly all (>90%) of the TCR sequences that were shared within mice were identical at the DNA sequence level, indicating that conventional and regulatory T cells that express shared TCRs are derived from common clones. Analysis of TCR repertoire overlap in the thymus reveals that a large proportion of Tconv and Treg sharing observed in the periphery is due to clonal expansion in the thymus. Together these data show that there are a limited number of TCR sequences shared between Tconv and Tregs. Also, Tconv and Tregs sharing identical TCRs are found at relatively high frequencies and are derived from common progenitors, of which a large portion are generated in the thymus. PMID:27100298

  1. Tissue engineering, stem cells and cloning: current concepts and changing trends.

    PubMed

    Atala, Anthony

    2005-07-01

    Organ damage or loss can occur from congenital disorders, cancer, trauma, infection, inflammation, iatrogenic injuries or other conditions and often necessitates reconstruction or replacement. Replacement may take the form of organ transplant. At present, there is a severe shortage of donor organs that is worsening with the aging of the population. Tissue engineering follows the principles of cell transplantation, materials science and engineering towards the development of biological substitutes that can restore and maintain normal tissue function. Therapeutic cloning involves the introduction of a nucleus from a donor cell into an enucleated oocyte to generate embryonic stem cell lines whose genetic material is identical to that of its source. These autologous stem cells have the potential to become almost any type of cell in the adult body, and thus would be useful in tissue and organ replacement applications. This paper reviews recent advances in stem cell research and regenerative medicine, and describes the clinical applications of these technologies as novel therapies for tissue or organ loss.

  2. Conventional and Regulatory CD4+ T Cells That Share Identical TCRs Are Derived from Common Clones

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Ryan O.; Pingel, Jeanette; Buller, R. Mark; DiPaolo, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Results from studies comparing the diversity and specificity of the TCR repertoires expressed by conventional (Tconv) and regulatory (Treg) CD4+ T cell have varied depending on the experimental system employed. We developed a new model in which T cells express a single fixed TCRα chain, randomly rearranged endogenous TCRβ chains, and a Foxp3-GFP reporter. We purified CD4+Foxp3- and CD4+Foxp3+ cells, then performed biased controlled multiplex PCR and high throughput sequencing of endogenous TCRβ chains. We identified >7,000 different TCRβ sequences in the periphery of 5 individual mice. On average, ~12% of TCR sequences were expressed by both conventional and regulatory populations within individual mice. The CD4+ T cells that expressed shared TCR sequences were present at higher frequencies compared to T cells expressing non-shared TCRs. Furthermore, nearly all (>90%) of the TCR sequences that were shared within mice were identical at the DNA sequence level, indicating that conventional and regulatory T cells that express shared TCRs are derived from common clones. Analysis of TCR repertoire overlap in the thymus reveals that a large proportion of Tconv and Treg sharing observed in the periphery is due to clonal expansion in the thymus. Together these data show that there are a limited number of TCR sequences shared between Tconv and Tregs. Also, Tconv and Tregs sharing identical TCRs are found at relatively high frequencies and are derived from common progenitors, of which a large portion are generated in the thymus. PMID:27100298

  3. Clones of T cells discriminate between native and deglycosylated forms of MHC class II antigen in allostimulation.

    PubMed

    Culley, D; Waldron-Edward, D; Manjunath, P; Mamer, O A; Abikar, K; Rode, H; Gordon, J

    1993-07-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of the oligosaccharide side chains of MHC Class II antigens in allostimulation. The approach was to cleave the oligosaccharides from protein by subjecting plasma membranes (PM) of the Daudi cell line to chemical deglycosylation yielding deglycosylated (dgl) proteins and a supernatant fraction containing plasma membrane oligosaccharides (dgl sup). MHC Class II antigens affinity purified from the native and the dgl PM were inserted into the plasma membrane of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) used as stimulators in a mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR). Cells used as stimulators and as responders were from the same donor. Both native and to a lesser extent the dgl antigen could elicit a proliferative as well as a cytolytic (CML) response. A comparable reduction in the CML reaction was also obtained when native antigen was used to elicit effector cells, but the target was stripped of N-linked oligosaccharides by pretreatment with tunicamycin (TM). Five clones of responding cells raised against the native antigen were studied. Two gave proliferative reactions of equal magnitude to native and to dgl antigen alike, while three responded only to the native form. These three clones did not lyse TM-treated target cells. Inhibition experiments of CML were performed with either the dgl sup containing Daudi PM oligosaccharides or with an anti MHC-Class II MoAb. CML reactivity of the three clones which responded to native antigen was blocked by the dgl sup but not by the anti-MHC antibody. Conversely, the reaction of the two clones reactive to both forms of antigen was only inhibited by the anti-MHC antibody using intact or TM-treated targets. Accordingly, in terms of the latter set of clones oligosaccharide side chains of MHC may not be required for allostimulation. Data obtained with the set of three clones suggest that oligosaccharides could act as target of cytotoxic T cells.

  4. Comparison of in vitro developmental competence of cloned caprine embryos using donor karyoplasts from adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells vs ear fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kwong, P J; Nam, H Y; Wan Khadijah, W E; Kamarul, T; Abdullah, R B

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to produce cloned caprine embryos using either caprine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or ear fibroblast cells (EFCs) as donor karyoplasts. Caprine MSCs were isolated from male Boer goats of an average age of 1.5 years. To determine the pluripotency of MSCs, the cells were induced to differentiate into osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Subsequently, MSCs were characterized through cell surface antigen profiles using specific markers, prior to their use as donor karyoplasts for nuclear transfer. No significant difference (p > 0.05) in fusion rates was observed between MSCs (87.7%) and EFCs (91.3%) used as donor karyoplasts. The cleavage rate of cloned embryos derived with MSCs (87.0%) was similar (p > 0.05) to those cloned using EFCs (84.4%). However, the in vitro development of MSCs-derived cloned embryos (25.3%) to the blastocyst stage was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those derived with EFCs (20.6%). In conclusion, MSCs could be reprogrammed by caprine oocytes, and production of cloned caprine embryos with MSCs improved their in vitro developmental competence, but not in their fusion and cleavage rate as compared to cloning using somatic cells such as EFCs. PMID:24456113

  5. Improved development of somatic cell cloned bovine embryos by a mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-bing; He, Xiao-ning; Si, Wan-tong; Zheng, Yue-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have established a bovine mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model by the adenovirus-mediated telomerase (hTERT-bMGEs). The present study was conducted to confirm whether hTERT-bMGEs were effective target cells to improve the efficiency of transgenic expression and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). To accomplish this, a mammary-specific vector encoding human lysozyme and green fluorescent protein was used to verify the transgenic efficiency of hTERT-bMGEs, and untreated bovine mammary gland epithelial cells (bMGEs) were used as a control group. The results showed that the hTERT-bMGEs group had much higher transgenic efficiency and protein expression than the bMGEs group. Furthermore, the nontransgenic and transgenic hTERT-bMGEs were used as donor cells to evaluate the efficiency of SCNT. There were no significant differences in rates of cleavage or blastocysts or hatched blastocysts of cloned embryos from nontransgenic hTERT-bMGEs at passage 18 and 28 groups (82.8% vs. 81.9%, 28.6% vs. 24.8%, 58.6% vs. 55.3%, respectively) and the transgenic group (80.8%, 26.5% and 53.4%); however, they were significantly higher than the bMGEs group (71.2%, 12.8% and 14.8%), (p < 0.05). We confirmed that hTERT-bMGEs could serve as effective target cells for improving development of somatic cell cloned cattle embryos. PMID:26243608

  6. Improved development of somatic cell cloned bovine embryos by a mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Ying; Ma, Li-Bing; He, Xiao-Ning; Si, Wan-Tong; Zheng, Yue-Mao

    2016-06-30

    Previous studies have established a bovine mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model by the adenovirus-mediated telomerase (hTERT-bMGEs). The present study was conducted to confirm whether hTERT-bMGEs were effective target cells to improve the efficiency of transgenic expression and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). To accomplish this, a mammary-specific vector encoding human lysozyme and green fluorescent protein was used to verify the transgenic efficiency of hTERT-bMGEs, and untreated bovine mammary gland epithelial cells (bMGEs) were used as a control group. The results showed that the hTERT-bMGEs group had much higher transgenic efficiency and protein expression than the bMGEs group. Furthermore, the nontransgenic and transgenic hTERT-bMGEs were used as donor cells to evaluate the efficiency of SCNT. There were no significant differences in rates of cleavage or blastocysts or hatched blastocysts of cloned embryos from nontransgenic hTERT-bMGEs at passage 18 and 28 groups (82.8% vs. 81.9%, 28.6% vs. 24.8%, 58.6% vs. 55.3%, respectively) and the transgenic group (80.8%, 26.5% and 53.4%); however, they were significantly higher than the bMGEs group (71.2%, 12.8% and 14.8%), (p < 0.05). We confirmed that hTERT-bMGEs could serve as effective target cells for improving development of somatic cell cloned cattle embryos. PMID:26243608

  7. Improved development of somatic cell cloned bovine embryos by a mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Ying; Ma, Li-Bing; He, Xiao-Ning; Si, Wan-Tong; Zheng, Yue-Mao

    2016-06-30

    Previous studies have established a bovine mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model by the adenovirus-mediated telomerase (hTERT-bMGEs). The present study was conducted to confirm whether hTERT-bMGEs were effective target cells to improve the efficiency of transgenic expression and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). To accomplish this, a mammary-specific vector encoding human lysozyme and green fluorescent protein was used to verify the transgenic efficiency of hTERT-bMGEs, and untreated bovine mammary gland epithelial cells (bMGEs) were used as a control group. The results showed that the hTERT-bMGEs group had much higher transgenic efficiency and protein expression than the bMGEs group. Furthermore, the nontransgenic and transgenic hTERT-bMGEs were used as donor cells to evaluate the efficiency of SCNT. There were no significant differences in rates of cleavage or blastocysts or hatched blastocysts of cloned embryos from nontransgenic hTERT-bMGEs at passage 18 and 28 groups (82.8% vs. 81.9%, 28.6% vs. 24.8%, 58.6% vs. 55.3%, respectively) and the transgenic group (80.8%, 26.5% and 53.4%); however, they were significantly higher than the bMGEs group (71.2%, 12.8% and 14.8%), (p < 0.05). We confirmed that hTERT-bMGEs could serve as effective target cells for improving development of somatic cell cloned cattle embryos.

  8. Modulation of antigen presentation by autoreactive B cell clones specific for GAD65 from a type I diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    BANGA, J P; MOORE, J K; DUHINDAN, N; MADEC, A M; VAN ENDERT, P M; ORGIAZZI, J; ENDL, J

    2004-01-01

    We used a GAD65-specific human B–T cell line cognate system in vitro to investigate the modulation of GAD65 presentation by autoantibody, assessed in a proliferation assay. Generally, if the T cell determinant overlaps or resides within the antibody epitope, effects of presentation are blunted while if they are distant can lead to potent presentation. For three different autoreactive B–T cell line cognate pairs, the modulation of GAD65 presentation followed the mode of overlapping or distant epitopes with resultant potent or undetectable presentation. However, other cognate pairs elicited variability in this pattern of presentation. Notably, one B cell line, DPC, whose antibody epitope did not overlap with the T cell determinants, was consistently poor in presenting GAD65. Using the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 647 conjugated to GAD65 to study receptor-mediated antigen endocytosis showed that all the antigen-specific B cell clones were efficient in intracellular accumulation of the antigen. Additionally, multicolour immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the internalized GAD65/surface IgG complexes were rapidly targeted to a perinuclear compartment in all GAD-specific B cell clones. This analysis also demonstrated that HLA-DM expression was reduced strongly in DPC compared to the stimulatory B cell clones. Thus the capability of antigen-specific B cells to capture and present antigen to human T cell lines is dependent on the spatial relationship of B and T cell epitopes as well other factors which contribute to the efficiency of presentation. PMID:14678267

  9. Isolation and characterization of an Huh.7.5.1-derived cell clone highly permissive to hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Shirasago, Yoshitaka; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Kyoko; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji; Hanada, Kentaro; Kuroda, Makoto; Abe, Ryo; Fukasawa, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    An efficient cell culture and infection system for hepatitis C virus (HCV) facilitates analyses of the complete virus life cycle. Human hepatic Huh7.5.1 cells and an HCV-JFH1 strain have been widely employed in infection experiments. In the present study, cultured Huh7.5.1 cells exhibited heterogeneous phenotypes of HCV infection. Using single-cell cloning of Huh7.5.1 cells, we isolated a clone highly permissive to HCV (Huh7.5.1-8) and a CD81-defective clone nonpermissive to HCV (Huh7.5.1-5). Expression of CD81 in Huh7.5.1-5 cells restored permissiveness to HCV, indicating that CD81 is essential for HCV infection and a defect in CD81 causes nonpermissiveness to HCV in Huh7.5.1-5 cells. Huh7.5.1-8 cells had approximately 10-fold higher HCV replication rates, with cellular HCV RNA copy numbers of >10(9) copies/μg of cellular RNA and viral titers of >10(6) infectious units/ml of culture supernatant. Permissiveness of Huh7.5.1-8 cells to HCV infection was phenotypically very stable because there was no difference in permissiveness after more than 100 passages (1-year culture). This efficient cell culture system for HCV using Huh7.5.1-8 cell provides a powerful tool for studying the HCV life cycle and constructing antiviral strategies.

  10. Cloning and regulation of rat tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, T. F.; Burke, J. S.; Bergman, K. D.; Quinn, C. O.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1994-01-01

    Rat tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) was cloned from a UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cDNA library. The 969-bp full-length clone demonstrates 98 and 86% sequence identity to human TIMP-2 at the amino acid and nucleic acid levels, respectively. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), at 10(-8) M, stimulates an approximately twofold increase in both the 4.2- and 1.0-kb transcripts over basal levels in UMR cells after 24 h of exposure. The PTH stimulation of TIMP-2 transcripts was not affected by the inhibitor of protein synthesis, cycloheximide (10(-5) M), suggesting a primary effect of the hormone. This is in contradistinction to regulation of interstitial collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase-1) by PTH in these same cells. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrate that PTH causes an increase in TIMP-2 transcription that parallels the increase in message levels. Parathyroid hormone, in its stimulation of TIMP-2 mRNA, appears to act through a signal transduction pathway involving protein kinase A (PKA) since the increase in TIMP-2 mRNA is reproduced by treatment with the cAMP analogue, 8-bromo-cAMP (5 x 10(-3) M). The protein kinase C and calcium pathways do not appear to be involved due to the lack of effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (2.6 x 10(-6) M) and the calcium ionophore, ionomycin (10(-7) M), on TIMP-2 transcript abundance. In this respect, regulation of TIMP-2 and collagenase in osteoblastic cells by PTH are similar. However, we conclude that since stimulation of TIMP-2 transcription is a primary event, the PKA pathway must be responsible for a direct increase in transcription of this gene.

  11. Stable expression of cloned rat GABAA receptor subunits in a human kidney cell line.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, B J; Lennon, D J; Im, H K; Im, W B; Seeburg, P H; Carter, D B

    1993-04-30

    A predominant form of the GABAA/benzodiazepine receptor-Cl- channel complex is believed to consist of three different 48-55 kDa subunits (alpha, beta, gamma) with unknown stoichiometry. Plasmids containing the rat GABAA receptor cDNAs coding for alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2 were co-transfected, along with a plasmid encoding G418 resistance, into human embryonic kidney cells previously transformed with Adenovirus 5 (HEK-293) [J. Gen. Virol., 36 (1977) 59-72]. Four percent of the G418 resistant colonies were found to express mRNA for all three of the GABAA subunits constitutively. A single cell clone derived from one of the alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 expressors has demonstrated stable electrophysiological characteristics over 25 passages. The GABA-activated Cl- current in this cell line is blocked by picrotoxin and bicuculline, and is modulated by a variety of agonist and inverse agonist ligands including diazepam, Ro 154513, zolpidem, and beta-CCE. The cell line has been used successfully over a 12-month period as a screen for novel drugs modulating GABA-mediated polarization of neuronal cells. PMID:7687050

  12. Characterization of the heterogeneity of R3327 rat prostatic tumors derived from single-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S A; Johnson, M P; Heidger, P M; Lubaroff, D M

    1985-01-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by cellular diversity, which is well demonstrated in the Dunning R3327 rat prostatic adenocarcinoma. This heterogeneity may arise from epigenetic influences, ie, cellular adaptation or selection, and/or from genetic changes. To investigate the question of genetic instability, four tissue culture cell lines were derived from single cells isolated from the uncloned late (UCL) passage of the Dunning R3327H prostate cell culture. Each of these clonally derived tissue cultures was injected into castrated and intact young adult male rats for tumor production. Uncloned early (UCE) and UCL passage tissue cultures were also propagated as solid tumors. Tumors and the cultures from which they were derived were examined for evidence of phenotypic and genetic changes using morphological and cytometric methods. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed only slight differences among the cell cultures. A single population of diploid cells was demonstrated in each of the cell cultures by propidium iodide staining and subsequent flow cytometric measurement of DNA content/nucleus. Tumors of unicellular as well as multicellular origin exhibited extreme heterogeneity of histological features, both among animals as well as within a single tumor. Tumors were surveyed and tissue types were characterized and cataloged. Clone 3 was generally better differentiated than the others; tumors from castrated animals were better differentiated than those from intact animals. Flow cytometry revealed multiple hyperdiploid cell populations that were variable from one sample to another. We concluded that changes in genotype as well as phenotype occurred in the tumors derived from single cells. Some of these changes may have occurred in the cells while still in culture. PMID:4088951

  13. Disease-causing mitochondrial heteroplasmy segregated within induced pluripotent stem cell clones derived from a patient with MELAS.

    PubMed

    Folmes, Clifford D L; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Li, Xing; McDonald, Amber; Oglesbee, Devin; Hrstka, Sybil C; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J

    2013-07-01

    Mitochondrial diseases display pathological phenotypes according to the mixture of mutant versus wild-type mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), known as heteroplasmy. We herein examined the impact of nuclear reprogramming and clonal isolation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) on mitochondrial heteroplasmy. Patient-derived dermal fibroblasts with a prototypical mitochondrial deficiency diagnosed as mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) demonstrated mitochondrial dysfunction with reduced oxidative reserve due to heteroplasmy at position G13513A in the ND5 subunit of complex I. Bioengineered iPSC clones acquired pluripotency with multilineage differentiation capacity and demonstrated reduction in mitochondrial density and oxygen consumption distinguishing them from the somatic source. Consistent with the cellular mosaicism of the original patient-derived fibroblasts, the MELAS-iPSC clones contained a similar range of mtDNA heteroplasmy of the disease-causing mutation with identical profiles in the remaining mtDNA. High-heteroplasmy iPSC clones were used to demonstrate that extended stem cell passaging was sufficient to purge mutant mtDNA, resulting in isogenic iPSC subclones with various degrees of disease-causing genotypes. On comparative differentiation of iPSC clones, improved cardiogenic yield was associated with iPSC clones containing lower heteroplasmy compared with isogenic clones with high heteroplasmy. Thus, mtDNA heteroplasmic segregation within patient-derived stem cell lines enables direct comparison of genotype/phenotype relationships in progenitor cells and lineage-restricted progeny, and indicates that cell fate decisions are regulated as a function of mtDNA mutation load. The novel nuclear reprogramming-based model system introduces a disease-in-a-dish tool to examine the impact of mutant genotypes for MELAS patients in bioengineered tissues and a cellular probe for molecular features of individual

  14. Identification of two T-cell epitopes on the candidate Epstein-Barr virus vaccine glycoprotein gp340 recognized by CD4+ T-cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L E; Wright, J; Ulaeto, D O; Morgan, A J; Rickinson, A B

    1991-01-01

    Current efforts to develop an Epstein-Barr virus subunit vaccine are based on the major envelope glycoprotein gp340. Given the central role of CD4+ T cells in regulating immune responses to subunit vaccine antigens, the present study has begun the work of identifying linear epitopes which are recognized by human CD4+ T cells within the 907-amino-acid sequence of gp340. A panel of gp340-specific CD4+ T-cell clones from an Epstein-Barr virus-immune donor were first assayed for their proliferative responses to a series of truncated gp340 molecules expressed from recombinant DNA vectors in rat GH3 cells, by using an autologous B lymphoblastoid cell line as a source of antigen-presenting cells. The first four T-cell clones analyzed all responded to a truncated form of gp340 which contained only the first 260 N-terminal amino acids. These clones were subsequently screened for responses to each of a panel of overlapping synthetic peptides (15-mers) corresponding to the primary amino acid sequence of the first 260 N-terminal amino acids of gp340. One clone (CG2.7) responded specifically to peptides from the region spanning amino acids 61 to 81, while three other clones (CG5.15, CG5.24, and CG5.36) responded specifically to peptides from the region spanning amino acids 163 to 183. Work with individual peptides from these regions allowed finer mapping of the T-cell epitopes and also revealed the highly dose-dependent nature of peptide-induced responses, with inhibitory effects apparent when the most antigenic peptides were present at supraoptimal concentrations. Experiments using homozygous typing B lymphoblastoid cell lines as antigen-presenting cells showed that the T-cell clones with different epitope specificities were restricted through different HLA class II antigens; clone CG2.7 recognized epitope 61-81 in the context of HLA DRw15, whereas clones CG5.15, CG5.24, and CG5.36 recognized epitope 163-183 in the context of HLA DRw11. The present protocol therefore makes a

  15. An autologous T cell clone overcomes intra-melanoma heterogeneity for susceptibility to cell-mediated lysis by using multiple lytic mechanisms: in vitro and in vivo analysis.

    PubMed

    Mazzocchi, A; Rodolfo, M; Parmiani, G; Anichini, A

    1991-01-01

    An HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone (CTL49), capable of killing the HLA-A2-negative autologous melanoma (Me665/2) in a T cell receptor and MHC-independent fashion, lysed six of 16 Me665/2 tumour clones in short-term (4 and 18 hour) 51Cr-release assays. In long-term (96 hour) lytic assays, CTL49 could lyse all the 16 tumour clones. The lysis observed in the 96 hour assay could be enhanced by stimulating CTL49 with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies (MAb) and interleukin-2 (IL-2). Supernatants of anti-CD3- or antigen-stimulated CTL49, known to contain tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and interferon (IFN)gamma, were also able to lyse all but one (665/2/51) of the tumour clones in 96 hour assays. Absence of lysis of tumour clone 2/51 by supernatants correlated with resistance of the same tumour clone to lysis by recombinant IFN-gamma plus TNF-alpha. Antibodies to TNF-alpha and, to a lesser extent, to IFN-gamma, reduced significantly the 96 hour lysis of Me2/9 and Me2/10, two of the tumour clones killed in long term but not in short term assays. Winn assays in nude mice revealed that CTL49, stimulated with anti-CD3-MAb plus IL-2, could abolish tumour cell growth when injected together with clones 2/9 or 2/10. These results indicate that intra-tumour heterogeneity for susceptibility to lysis can be overcome even by a single CTL clone providing that appropriate signals (i.e. anti-CD3-MAb and IL-2) are supplied to an effector able to mediate tumour cell lysis by multiple mechanisms. PMID:1841713

  16. Production of interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha by human T-cell clones expressing different forms of the gamma delta receptor.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Meager, A

    1990-12-01

    Panels of human T-cell clones bearing the gamma delta T-cell receptor (TcR) were obtained from peripheral blood and decidual tissue and maintained in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). TcR V gamma and V delta gene expression was determined in 40 TcR delta 1+ clones using the gamma delta T-cell subset markers Ti gamma A and delta TCS1, in conjunction with Southern blot analysis using TcR J gamma and J delta probes. gamma delta T-cell clones, together with control alpha beta T-cell clones derived from the same lymphocyte populations, were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and their ability to produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) tested using specific ELISA. Many clones representative of the major peripheral V gamma 9/V delta 2J1 subset produced high amounts of both cytokines and mean levels were not significantly different from those produced by alpha beta T-cell clones. Panels of clones expressing V gamma 9 and V delta 2J1 produced significantly higher levels of TNF-alpha than clones not expressing V delta 2J1 and those expressing V delta 1J1. There was no relationship between levels of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha produced by individual gamma delta T-cell clones and also no relationship between their non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic activity and levels of either cytokine. There was a significant tendency for gamma delta T-cell clones to produce more TNF-alpha than IFN-gamma in comparison to alpha beta T-cell clones. The significance of these findings is discussed in the light of the reported differences in distribution in vivo of V delta 1J1+ and V delta 2J1+ cells.

  17. Molecular cloning, primary structure, and expression of the human platelet/erythroleukemia cell 12-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, C.D.; Furci, L.; FitzGerald, G.A. )

    1990-08-01

    The major pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism in human platelets proceeds via a 12-lipoxygenase enzyme; however, the biological role of the product of this reaction, 12-hydro(pero)xyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-H(P)ETE), is unknown. Using a combination of the polymerase chain reaction and conventional screening procedures, the authors have isolated cDNA clones encoding the human platelet/human erythroleukemia (HEL) cell 12-lipoxygenase. From the deduced primary structure, human platelet/HEL 12-lipoxygenase would encode a M{sub r} 75,000 protein consisting of 663 amino acids. The cDNA encoding the full-length protein (pCDNA-12lx) under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter was expressed in simian COS-M6 cells. Intact cells and lysed-cell supernatants were able to synthesize 12-H(P)ETE from arachidonic acid, whereas no 12-H(P)ETE synthesis was detected in mock-transfected cells. A single 2.4-kilobase mRNA was detected in erythroleukemia cells but not in several other tissues and cell lines evaluated by Northern blot analysis. Comparison of the human platelet/HEL 12-lipoxygenase sequence with that of porcine leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase revealed 65% amino acid identity to both enzymes. By contrast, the leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase is 86% identical to human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase. Sequence data and previously demonstrated immunochemical and biochemical evidence support the existence of distinct 12-lipoxygenase isoforms. The availability of cDNA probes for human platelet/HEL cell 12-lipoxygenase should facilitate elucidation of the biological role of this pathway.

  18. Production of a Cloned Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Calf from Somatic Cells Isolated from Urine

    PubMed Central

    Madheshiya, Pankaj K.; Sahare, Amol A.; Jyotsana, Basanti; Singh, Karn P.; Saini, Monika; Raja, Anuj K.; Kaith, Sakshi; Singla, Suresh K.; Chauhan, Manmohan S.; Manik, Radhey S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study was aimed at isolation of cells from urine and skin on the ventral part of the tails of healthy adult female buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis), an area rarely exposed to solar radiation, establishment of the cells in culture, and their use as donor cells for production of buffalo embryos by handmade cloning (HMC). The blastocyst rate and total cell number of urine- and tail skin–derived embryos were similar to those of control embryos derived from ear skin cells; however, their apoptotic index was lower (p<0.05) than that of control blastocysts. The global level of histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9ac) was similar in the three types of donor cells and in urine- and tail skin–derived HMC blastocysts and in vitro–fertilized (IVF) blastocysts (controls). The global level of histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in the cells was in the order (p<0.05) urine≥tail skin>ear skin–derived cells, whereas in blastocysts, it was higher (p<0.05) in urine- and tail skin–derived HMC blastocysts than that in IVF blastocysts. The expression level of CASPASE3, CASPASE9, P53, DNMT1, DNMT3a, OCT4, and NANOG, which was similar in HMC blastocysts of three the groups, was lower (p<0.05) than that in IVF blastocysts, whereas that of HDAC1 was similar among the four groups. Following transfer of urine-derived embryos (n=10) to five recipients (two embryos/recipient), one of the recipients delivered a normal calf that is now 5 weeks old. PMID:26053516

  19. Transcript levels of several epigenome regulatory genes in bovine somatic donor cells are not correlated with their cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenli; Sadeghieh, Sanaz; Abruzzese, Ronald; Uppada, Subhadra; Meredith, Justin; Ohlrichs, Charletta; Broek, Diane; Polejaeva, Irina

    2009-09-01

    Among many factors that potentially affect somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryo development is the donor cell itself. Cloning potentials of somatic donor cells vary greatly, possibly because the cells have different capacities to be reprogrammed by ooplasma. It is therefore intriguing to identify factors that regulate the reprogrammability of somatic donor cells. Gene expression analysis is a widely used tool to investigate underlying mechanisms of various phenotypes. In this study, we conducted a retrospective analysis investigating whether donor cell lines with distinct cloning efficiencies express different levels of genes involved in epigenetic reprogramming including histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), -2 (HDAC2); DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1), -3a (DNMT3a),-3b (DNMT3b), and the bovine homolog of yeast sucrose nonfermenting-2 (SNF2L), a SWI/SNF family of ATPases. Cell samples from 12 bovine donor cell lines were collected at the time of nuclear transfer experiments and expression levels of the genes were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our results show that there are no significant differences in expression levels of these genes between donor cell lines of high and low cloning efficiency defined as live calving rates, although inverse correlations are observed between in vitro embryo developmental rates and expression levels of HDAC2 and SNF2L. We also show that selection of stable reference genes is important for relative quantification, and different batches of cells can have different gene expression patterns. In summary, we demonstrate that expression levels of these epigenome regulatory genes in bovine donor cells are not correlated with cloning potential. The experimental design and data analysis method reported here can be applied to study any genes expressed in donor cells.

  20. Differential responses to radiation and hyperthermia of cloned cell lines derived from a single human melanoma xenograft

    SciTech Connect

    Rofstad, E.K.; Brustad, T.

    1984-06-01

    One uncloned and five cloned cell lines were derived from a single human melanoma xenograft. Cells from passages 7-12 were exposed to either radiation or hyperthermia (42.5/sup 0/C, pH = 7.4) under aerobic conditions and the colony forming ability of the cells was assayed in soft agar. The five cloned lines showed individual and characteristic responses to radiation as well as to hyperthermia. The variation in the response to radiation was mainly reflected in the size of the shoulders of the survival curves rather than in the D/sub 0/-values. The variation in the response to hyperthermia was mainly reflected in the terminal slopes of the survival curves. The survival curve of cells from the uncloned line, both when exposed to radiation and hyperthermia, was positioned in the midst of those of the cloned lines. The response of the cloned lines to radiation did not correlate with the response to hyperthermia, indicating that tumor cell subpopulations which are resistant to radiation may respond well to hyperthermia.

  1. Engineering human peripheral blood stem cell grafts that are depleted of naïve T cells and retain functional pathogen-specific memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Marie; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jones, Lori A; Turtle, Cameron; Krause, Diane; Riddell, Stanley R; Shlomchik, Warren

    2014-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a frequent major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Approaches that selectively deplete T cells that cause GVHD from allogeneic stem cell grafts and preserve T cells specific for pathogens may improve HCT outcomes. It has been hypothesized that the majority of T cells that can cause GVHD reside within the naïve T cell (TN) subset, and previous studies performed in mouse models and with human cells in vitro support this hypothesis. As a prelude to translating these findings to the clinic, we developed and evaluated a novel 2-step clinically compliant procedure for manipulating peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) to remove TN, preserve CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells, and provide for a fixed dose of memory T cells (TM) that includes T cells with specificity for common opportunistic pathogens encountered after HCT. Our studies demonstrate effective and reproducible performance of the immunomagnetic cell selection procedure for depleting TN. Moreover, after cell processing, the CD45RA-depleted PBSC products are enriched for CD4(+) and CD8(+) TM with a central memory phenotype and contain TM cells that are capable of proliferating and producing effector cytokines in response to opportunistic pathogens.

  2. Molecular cloning, expression, and regulation of the ovalbumin gene in pigeon oviduct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Lu, L Z; Chen, L; Tao, Z R; Chen, F; Zhong, S L; Liu, Y L; Tian, Y; Yan, P S

    2014-01-10

    The full-length pigeon ovalbumin (OVA) gene cDNA was cloned and sequenced by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. A 386-amino acid protein was predicted for the obtained sequence, which had 67% identity with the chicken protein. Similar to chicken OVA, the pigeon OVA gene is a non-inhibitory serine protease inhibitor. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that pigeon OVA mRNA was highly expressed in the oviduct, and trace amounts were detected in other tissues. During the reproductive cycle, pigeon oviduct OVA mRNA expression reached its peak during the egg-laying stage, decreased with brooding, and then increased again during the squab-feeding period. Moreover, the relative OVA expression level in pigeon oviduct epithelial cells could be upregulated by a constant concentration of steroid hormones.

  3. Expression of active human clotting factor IX from recombinant DNA clones in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Anson, D S; Austen, D E; Brownlee, G G

    Haemophilia B, or Christmas disease, is an inherited X-chromosome-linked bleeding disorder caused by a defect in clotting factor IX and occurs in about 1 in 30,000 males in the United Kingdom. Injection of factor IX concentrate obtained from blood donors allows most patients to be successfully managed. However, because of impurities in the factor IX concentrate presently in use, this treatment involves some risk of infection by blood-borne viruses such as non-A, non-B hepatitis and the virus causing acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Because of the recent concern about the increasing incidence of AIDS amongst haemophiliacs, a factor IX preparation derived from a source other than blood is desirable. Here, we report that after introduction of human factor IX DNA clones into a rat hepatoma cell line using recombinant DNA methods, we were able to isolate small amounts of biologically active human factor IX.

  4. The effect of Arbas Cashmere goat bone marrow stromal cells on production of transgenic cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yu; Wu, Haiqing; Wang, Hefei; Wang, Xiao; Liang, Hao; Liu, Dongjun

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for the in vitro separation and culture of Arbas Cashmere goat bone marrow stromal cells (gBMSCs). Arbas Cashmere gBMSCs were isolated and cultured in vitro, and cell surface markers were identified immunohistochemically. The gBMSCs were differentiated into neurocytes and osteoblasts, and the expression of neuron-specific enolase and osteocalcin was identified by immunohistochemistry. The gBMSCs and goat fetal fibroblast cells (gFFCs) were compared for transient transfection efficiency and fluorescent colony-forming efficiency with Arbas Cashmere gFFCs as a control. pDsRed2-1 encodes DsRed2, a variant of the Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DsRed). In addition, the coding sequence for DsRed2 contains a series of silent base-pair changes for higher expression in mammalian cells. Of the gBMSCs-pDsRed2-1, one fraction was tested for pluripotency, whereas the other fraction was manipulated using somatic cell nuclear transfer, and the in vitro growth status of transgenic embryos derived from gBMSCs-pDsRed2-1 and gFFCs-pDsRed2-1 was compared. The findings showed that gBMSCs were isolated and amplified to express CD29, CD44, and CD90 through adherent culture, with no marked signs of aging after multiple passages. Expression of neuron-specific enolase and osteocalcin by gBMSCs and gBMSCs-pDsRed2-1 was strongly induced by neuronal and osteogenic differentiation, whereas the integrated exogenous genes did not influence pluripotency (P > 0.05). The transient transfection efficiencies of gBMSCs and gFFCs after 48 hours were not significantly different; however, the fluorescent colony-forming efficiency of gBMSCs-pDsRed2-1 after G418 screening was approximately 13% higher than that of gFFCs-pDsRed2-1. The convergence and cleavage rates of cloned embryos derived from gBMSCs-pDsRed2-1 were higher than those derived from gFFCs-pDsRed2-1, whereas their eight-cell and blastocyst rates were similar. The red fluorescent protein

  5. Ethical and legal issues in therapeutic cloning and the study of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lisker, Rubén

    2003-01-01

    Therapeutic cloning is a new technology with great medical potential, particularly in the area of transplantation medicine. It involves the transfer of the nucleus of a patient's cell into an enucleated donor oocyte for the purpose of generating an embryo. This embryo is allowed to grow until the blastocyst stage, at which time stem cells can be obtained and differentiated into the tissue needed. Stem cells can also be obtained from adult tissues, as they seem to have sufficient plasticity to use for the stated purpose. A literature review was performed, and it is clear that the main controversy regarding the use of stem cells is the origin. Few people would object to their use if obtained from adult tissues; however, many oppose harvesting them from embryos in the blastocyst stage regardless of whether 1) they are obtained from surplus embryos donated by couples after assisted reproductive techniques, or 2) they are specially manufactured for research purposes. The central reason is the consideration that embryos should be treated as full humans from the moment of fertilization. This argument is also at the bottom of an older discussion regarding the validity of abortion. There is no consensus at the present time in this regard, and it is unlikely one will be forthcoming in the future. Arguments on both sides of the issue are presented, but emphasis is made on the need for using this technology for research purposes because of its potential value as a therapeutic tool.

  6. The transcriptomic architecture of mouse Sertoli cell clone embryos reveals temporal–spatial-specific reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Fukuda, Atsushi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kono, Tomohiro

    2013-03-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer, a technique used to generate clone embryos by transferring the nucleus of a somatic cell into an enucleated oocyte, is an excellent approach to study the reprogramming of the nuclei of differentiated cells. Here, we conducted a transcriptomic study by performing microarray analysis on single Sertoli cell nuclear transfer (SeCNT) embryos throughout preimplantation development. The extensive data collected from the oocyte to the blastocyst stage helped to identify specific genes that were incorrectly reprogrammed at each stage, thereby providing a novel perspective for understanding reprogramming progression in SeCNT embryos.This attempt provided an opportunity to discuss the possibility that ectopic gene expression could be involved in the developmental failure of SeCNT embryos. Network analysis at each stage suggested that in total, 127 networks were involved in developmental and functional disorders in SeCNT embryos. Furthermore, chromosome mapping using our time-lapse expression data highlighted temporal–spatial changes of the abnormal expression, showing the characteristic distribution of the genes on each chromosome.Thus, the present study revealed that the preimplantation development of SeCNT embryos appears normal; however, the progression of incorrect reprogramming is concealed throughout development.

  7. Cloning-independent expression and screening of enzymes using cell-free protein synthesis systems.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Chan; Song, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2014-01-01

    We present a strategy for expression and screening of microbial enzymes without involving cloning procedures. Libraries of putative ω-transaminases (ω-TA) and mutated Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) are PCR-amplified from bacterial colonies and directly expressed in an Escherichia coli-based cell-free protein synthesis system. The open nature of cell-free protein synthesis system also allows streamlined analysis of the enzymatic activity of the expressed enzymes, which greatly shortens the time required for enzyme screening. We expect that the proposed strategy will provide a universal platform for bridging the information gap between nucleotide sequence and protein function, in order to accelerate the discovery of novel enzymes. The proposed strategy can also serve as a viable option for the rapid and precise tuning of enzyme molecules, not only for analytical purposes, but also for industrial applications. This is accomplished via large-scale production using microbial cells transformed with variant genes selected from the cell-free expression screening. PMID:24395411

  8. Cloning-independent expression and screening of enzymes using cell-free protein synthesis systems.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Chan; Song, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2014-01-01

    We present a strategy for expression and screening of microbial enzymes without involving cloning procedures. Libraries of putative ω-transaminases (ω-TA) and mutated Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) are PCR-amplified from bacterial colonies and directly expressed in an Escherichia coli-based cell-free protein synthesis system. The open nature of cell-free protein synthesis system also allows streamlined analysis of the enzymatic activity of the expressed enzymes, which greatly shortens the time required for enzyme screening. We expect that the proposed strategy will provide a universal platform for bridging the information gap between nucleotide sequence and protein function, in order to accelerate the discovery of novel enzymes. The proposed strategy can also serve as a viable option for the rapid and precise tuning of enzyme molecules, not only for analytical purposes, but also for industrial applications. This is accomplished via large-scale production using microbial cells transformed with variant genes selected from the cell-free expression screening.

  9. Altering histone acetylation status in donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid does not affect dog cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A; Suh, Han Na; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Kim, Dong Hoon; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-10-15

    Although dog cloning technology has been applied to conservation of endangered canids, propagation of elite dogs, and production of transgenic dogs, the efficiency of cloning is still very low. To help overcome this problem, we evaluated the effect of treating donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on dog cloning efficiency. Relative messenger RNA expressions of the bax1/bcl2 ratio and Dnmt1 in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations (0, 1, 10, 50 μM) of SAHA and durations (0, 20, 44 hours) were compared. Treatment with 1 μM for 20 hours showed significantly lower bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcript abundance. Acetylation of H3K9 was significantly increased after SAHA treatment, but H4K5, H4K8 and H4K16 were not changed. After SCNT using control or donor cells treated with SAHA, a total of 76 and 64 cloned embryos were transferred to seven and five recipients, respectively. Three fetuses were diagnosed in both control and SAHA-treated groups by ultrasonography 29 days after the embryo transfer, but there was no significant difference in the pregnancy rate (4.2% vs. 4.3%). In conclusion, although SAHA treatment as used in this study significantly decreased bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcripts of donor nuclei, as well as increased H3 acetylation, it was not enough to increase in vivo developmental competence of cloned dog embryos.

  10. Overexpressed cyclin D3 contributes to retaining the growth inhibitor p27 in the cytoplasm of thyroid tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarre, Gustavo; Belletti, Barbara; Bruni, Paola; Boccia, Angelo; Trapasso, Francesco; Pentimalli, Francesca; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Vento, Maria Teresa; Spiezia, Stefania; Fusco, Alfredo; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    The majority of thyroid carcinomas maintain the expression of the cell growth suppressor p27, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (Cdk2). However, we find that 80% of p27-expressing tumors show an uncommon cytoplasmic localization of p27 protein, associated with high Cdk2 activity. To reproduce such a situation, a mutant p27 devoid of its COOH-terminal nuclear-localization signal was generated (p27-NLS). p27-NLS accumulates in the cytoplasm and fails to induce growth arrest in 2 different cell lines, indicating that cytoplasm-residing p27 is inactive as a growth inhibitor, presumably because it does not interact with nuclear Cdk2. Overexpression of cyclin D3 may account in part for p27 cytoplasmic localization. In thyroid tumors and cell lines, cyclin D3 expression was associated with cytoplasmic localization of p27. Moreover, expression of cyclin D3 in thyroid carcinoma cells induced cytoplasmic retention of cotransfected p27 and rescued p27-imposed growth arrest. Endogenous p27 also localized prevalently to the cytoplasm in normal thyrocytes engineered to stably overexpress cyclin D3 (PC-D3 cells). In these cells, cyclin D3 induced the formation of cytoplasmic p27–cyclin D3–Cdk complexes, which titrated p27 away from intranuclear complexes that contain cyclins A–E and Cdk2. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism that may contribute to overcoming the p27 inhibitory threshold in transformed thyroid cells. PMID:10510327

  11. Human CD4-8- -derived clones. Phenotypic and functional characteristics and variation between donors in patterns of T-cell receptor gamma gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E

    1989-06-01

    Clones were derived from highly purified human CD4-8- lymphocytes from three different donors and maintained in the presence of interleukin 2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Considerable variation was noted between donors in the phenotype and T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma gene rearrangements of CD4-8- -derived clones. In one donor, most clones remained CD4-8- and all were CD3+WT31- and therefore expressed gamma/delta heterodimers. TCR gamma gene rearrangements almost all involved C gamma 1. In contrast, most clones from a second donor were CD3+WT31+, and therefore expressed alpha/beta heterodimers, and many were positive for CD4 or CD8. Most clones from a third donor were CD3+WT31- with a high proportion of TCR gamma gene rearrangements involving C gamma 2. The V gamma 9JP rearrangement was exclusively confined to CD3+WT31- clones and was present in the majority of clones. Almost all CD3+WT31- clones showed TCR beta as well as gamma gene rearrangements. Most CD3+WT31- clones with at least one chromosome rearranged to C gamma 1 exhibited high non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic activity, while most of those with two C gamma 2 rearrangements, and therefore expressing a non-disulphide-linked gamma/delta heterodimer, had low activity. Preincubation of effector cells with anti-CD3 strongly inhibited the cytotoxicity of CD3+WT31- clones while that of CD3+WT31+ clones was enhanced. This implicates the CD3-gamma/delta complex in target cell recognition by cytotoxic gamma/delta-bearing T-cell clones. The results show that there is heterogeneity between donors in the relative proportions of CD4-8- -derived clones expressing alpha/beta heterodimers and the different forms of the gamma/delta heterodimer.

  12. Factors Influencing the Production of MFSV Full-Length Clone: Maize Fine Streak Virus Proteins in Drosophila S2 Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize fine streak virus (MFSV) is negative-sense RNA virus member of the genus Nucleorhabdovirus. Our goal is to determine whether Drosophila S2 cells can support the production of a full-length clone of MFSV. We have previously demonstrated that the full-length MFSV nucleoprotein (N) and phosphopro...

  13. Cloning of DNA from double minutes of Y1 mouse adrenocortical tumor cells: evidence for gene amplification.

    PubMed

    George, D L; Powers, V E

    1981-04-01

    We have isolated a metaphase chromosome fraction highly enriched in double minutes (dm) from a mouse adrenocortical tumor cell line (Y1-DM). We have cloned DNA from this dm-enriched fraction in the lambda vector Charon 4A, and have characterized two randomly chosen recombinant bacteriophage clones from this dm DNA library. When 32 P-labeled DNA from each recombinant was hybridized to Southern blots of restriction endonuclease-digested DNA from different mouse cell lines, large differences were seen in the intensity of the resulting autoradiographic images, depending on the source of the genomic DNA. A very strong signal was obtained with DNA from the Y1-DM cells and with DNA from a related Y1 subline that lacks dm but contains a marker chromosome bearing a large homogeneously staining region (HSR). Hybridization to DNA from parental inbred mice and from two unrelated mouse cell lines produced a significantly weaker signal than that obtained with DNA from the Y1 cells, but the DNA fragments from the sources were of similar size. Based on results from filter hybridization analysis, we estimate that sequences homologous to the cloned fragments are approximately 100- to 200-fold more abundant in the genome of the Y1-DM cells than in the parental mouse cells. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that dm and HSRs in these cells contain amplified genes.

  14. Hope for Restoration of Dead Valuable Bulls through Cloning Using Donor Somatic Cells Isolated from Cryopreserved Semen

    PubMed Central

    Selokar, Naresh L.; Saini, Monika; Palta, Prabhat; Chauhan, Manmohan S.; Manik, Radheysham; Singla, Suresh K.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells were isolated from cryopreserved semen of 4 buffalo bulls, 3 of which had died over 10 years earlier, and were established in culture. The cells expressed cytokeratin-18, keratin and vimentin indicating that they were of epithelial origin. The cells were used as nuclear donors for hand-made cloning for producing buffalo embryos. The blastocyst rate and quality, as indicated by apoptotic index, were comparable among embryos produced using cells obtained from fresh or frozen-thawed semen or those obtained from conventional cell sources such as skin. Examination of the epigenetic status revealed that the global level of H3K27me3 but not that of H3K9/14ac and H4K5ac differed significantly (P<0.05) among cloned embryos from different bulls. The relative mRNA abundance of HDAC1, DNMT1, P53 and CASPASE 3 but not that of DNMT3a differed in cells and in cloned embryos. Following transfer of 24 cloned embryos produced from fresh semen-derived cells to 12 recipients, one calf weighing 55 kg, which is now 6 months of age and is normal, was born through normal parturition. Following transfer of 20 embryos produced from frozen-thawed semen-derived cells to 10 recipients, 2 became pregnant, one of which aborted in the first trimester; the calf born was severely underweight (17 kg), and died 12 h after birth. The ability of cells derived from fresh and frozen-thawed semen to produce live offspring confirms the ability of these cells to be reprogrammed. Our findings pave the way for restoration of highly precious progeny-tested bulls, which has immense economic importance, and can also be used for restoration of endangered species. PMID:24614586

  15. Hope for restoration of dead valuable bulls through cloning using donor somatic cells isolated from cryopreserved semen.

    PubMed

    Selokar, Naresh L; Saini, Monika; Palta, Prabhat; Chauhan, Manmohan S; Manik, Radheysham; Singla, Suresh K

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells were isolated from cryopreserved semen of 4 buffalo bulls, 3 of which had died over 10 years earlier, and were established in culture. The cells expressed cytokeratin-18, keratin and vimentin indicating that they were of epithelial origin. The cells were used as nuclear donors for hand-made cloning for producing buffalo embryos. The blastocyst rate and quality, as indicated by apoptotic index, were comparable among embryos produced using cells obtained from fresh or frozen-thawed semen or those obtained from conventional cell sources such as skin. Examination of the epigenetic status revealed that the global level of H3K27me3 but not that of H3K9/14ac and H4K5ac differed significantly (P<0.05) among cloned embryos from different bulls. The relative mRNA abundance of HDAC1, DNMT1, P53 and CASPASE 3 but not that of DNMT3a differed in cells and in cloned embryos. Following transfer of 24 cloned embryos produced from fresh semen-derived cells to 12 recipients, one calf weighing 55 kg, which is now 6 months of age and is normal, was born through normal parturition. Following transfer of 20 embryos produced from frozen-thawed semen-derived cells to 10 recipients, 2 became pregnant, one of which aborted in the first trimester; the calf born was severely underweight (17 kg), and died 12 h after birth. The ability of cells derived from fresh and frozen-thawed semen to produce live offspring confirms the ability of these cells to be reprogrammed. Our findings pave the way for restoration of highly precious progeny-tested bulls, which has immense economic importance, and can also be used for restoration of endangered species.

  16. Specific Antibody Production by Blood B Cells is Retained in Late Stage Drug-naïve HIV-infected Africans

    PubMed Central

    Béniguel, Lydie; Bégaud, Evelyne; Cognasse, Fabrice; Gabrié, Philippe; Mbolidi, Christophe D.; Marovich, Mary A.; Cazorla, Céline; Lucht, Frédéric; Genin, Christian; Garraud, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    Unseparated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from drug-naïve African individuals living in a context of multi-infections and presenting with high viral load (VL), were cultured in vitro and tested for their ability to produce antibodies (Abs) reacting with HIV-1 antigens. Within these PBMCs, circulating B cells were differentiated in vitro and produced IgG Abs against not only ENV, but also GAG and POL proteins. Under similar experimental conditions, HAART treated patients produced Abs to ENV proteins only. The in vitro antibody production by drug-naïve individuals' PBMCs depended on exogenous cytokines (IL-2 and IL-10) but neither on the re-stimulation of reactive cells in cultures by purified HIV-1-gp 160 antigen nor on the re-engagement of CD40 surface molecules. Further, it was not abrogated by the addition of various monoclonal Abs (mAbs) to co-stimulatory molecules. This suggests that the in vitro antibody production by drug-naïve individuals' PBMCs resulted from the maturation of already envelope and core antigen-primed, differentiated B cells, presumably pre-plasma cells, which are not known to circulate at homeostasy. As in vitro produced Abs retained the capacity of binding antigen and forming complexes, this study provides pre-clinical support for functional humoral responses despite major HIV- and other tropical pathogen-induced B cell perturbations. PMID:15330447

  17. Molecular cloning of cDNA coding for rat proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)/cyclin.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, K; Moriuchi, T; Koji, T; Nakane, P K

    1987-01-01

    The 'proliferating cell nuclear antigen' (PCNA), also known as cyclin, appears at the G1/S boundary in the cell cycle. Because of its possible relationship with cell proliferation, PCNA/cyclin has been receiving attention. PCNA/cyclin is a non-histone acidic nuclear protein with an apparent mol. wt of 33000-36000. The amino acid composition and the sequence of the first 25 amino acids of rabbit PCNA/cyclin are known. Using an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to the sequence of the first five amino acids, a cDNA clone for PCNA/cyclin was isolated from rat thymocyte cDNA library. The cDNA (1195 bases) contains an open reading frame of 813 nucleotides coding for 261 amino acids. The 3'-non-coding region is 312 nucleotides long and contains three putative polyadenylation signals. The mol. wt of rat PCNA/cyclin was calculated to be 28 748. The deduced amino acid sequence and composition of rat PCNA/cyclin are in excellent agreement with the published data. Using the cDNA probe, two species of mRNA (1.1 and 0.98 kb) were detected in rat thymocyte RNA. Southern blot analysis of total human genomic DNA suggests that there is a single gene coding for PCNA/cyclin. The deduced amino acid sequence of rat PCNA/cyclin has a similarity with that of herpes simplex virus type-1 DNA binding protein. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2884104

  18. Retaining the 3D framework of zinc sponge anodes upon deep discharge in Zn-air cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joseph F; Nelson, Eric S; Wattendorf, Matthew D; Chervin, Christopher N; Long, Jeffrey W; Rolison, Debra R

    2014-11-26

    We fabricate three-dimensional zinc electrodes from emulsion-cast sponges of Zn powder that are thermally treated to produce rugged monoliths. This highly conductive, 3D-wired aperiodic scaffold achieves 740 mA h gZn(-1) when discharged in primary Zn-air cells (>90% of theoretical Zn capacity). We use scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction to monitor the microstructural evolution of a series of Zn sponges when oxidized in Zn-air cells to specific depths-of-discharge (20, 40, 60, 80% DOD) at a technologically relevant rate (C/40; 4-6 mA cm(-2)). The Zn sponges maintain their 3D-monolithic form factor at all DOD. The cell resistance remains low under all test conditions, indicating that an inner core of metallic Zn persists that 3D-electrically wires the electrode, even to deep DOD.

  19. Retaining the 3D framework of zinc sponge anodes upon deep discharge in Zn-air cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joseph F; Nelson, Eric S; Wattendorf, Matthew D; Chervin, Christopher N; Long, Jeffrey W; Rolison, Debra R

    2014-11-26

    We fabricate three-dimensional zinc electrodes from emulsion-cast sponges of Zn powder that are thermally treated to produce rugged monoliths. This highly conductive, 3D-wired aperiodic scaffold achieves 740 mA h gZn(-1) when discharged in primary Zn-air cells (>90% of theoretical Zn capacity). We use scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction to monitor the microstructural evolution of a series of Zn sponges when oxidized in Zn-air cells to specific depths-of-discharge (20, 40, 60, 80% DOD) at a technologically relevant rate (C/40; 4-6 mA cm(-2)). The Zn sponges maintain their 3D-monolithic form factor at all DOD. The cell resistance remains low under all test conditions, indicating that an inner core of metallic Zn persists that 3D-electrically wires the electrode, even to deep DOD. PMID:25350789

  20. Met-ase: Cloning and distinct chromosomal location of a serine protease preferentially expressed in human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, M.J.; Trapani, J.A. ); Sayers, T.J.; Wiltrout, T. ); Powers, J.C. )

    1993-12-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human NK serine protease was obtained by screening a [lambda]-gt10 library from the Lopez NK leukemia with the rat natural killer Met-ase (RNK-Met-1) cDNA clone. In Northern blot analysis human Met-ase (Hu-Met-1) cDNA hybridized with a 0.9-kb mRNA in two human NK leukemia cell lines, unstimulated human PBMC, and untreated purified CD3[sup [minus

  1. Production of Pigs by Hand-Made Cloning Using Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenzhen; Vajta, Gábor; Xu, Ying; Luan, Jing; Lin, Mufei; Liu, Cong; Tian, Jianing; Dou, Hongwei; Li, Yong; Liu, Tianbin; Zhang, Yijie; Li, Lin; Yang, Wenxian; Bolund, Lars; Yang, Huanming; Du, Yutao

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibited self-renewal and less differentiation, making the MSCs promising candidates for adult somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this article, we tried to produce genome identical pigs through hand-made cloning (HMC), with MSCs and adult skin fibroblasts as donor cells. MSCs were derived from either adipose tissue or peripheral blood (aMSCs and bMSCs, respectively). MSCs usually showed the expression pattern of CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105 together with lack of expression of the hematopoietic markers CD34and CD45. Flow cytometry results demonstrated high expression of CD29 and CD90 in both MSC lines, while CD73, CD34, and CD45 expression were not detected. In contrary, in reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, CD73 and CD34 were detected indicating that human antibodies CD73 and CD34 were not suitable to identify porcine cell surface markers and porcine MSC cellular surface markers of CD34 might be different from other species. MSCs also had potential to differentiate successfully into chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes. After HMC, embryos reconstructed with aMSCs had higher blastocyst rate on day 5 and 6 than those reconstructed with bMSCs and fibroblasts (29.6% ± 1.3% and 41.1% ± 1.4% for aMSCs vs. 23.9% ± 1.2% and 35.5% ± 1.6% for bMSCs and 22.1% ± 0.9% and 33.3% ± 1.1% for fibroblasts, respectively). Live birth rate per transferred blastocyst achieved with bMSCs (1.59%) was the highest among the three groups. This article was the first report to compare the efficiency among bMSCs, aMSCs, and fibroblasts for boar cloning, which offered a realistic perspective to use the HMC technology for commercial breeding. PMID:27459584

  2. Porcine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Stem Cell Characteristics and Cell Activities While Enhancing the Expression of Liver-Specific Genes after Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chenxia; Zhou, Ning; Li, Jianzhou; Shi, Ding; Cao, Hongcui; Li, Jun; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-05

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a kind of complicated syndrome. Furthermore, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) can serve as a useful cell resource for autotransplantation due to their abundance and micro-invasive accessability. However, it is unknown how ALF will influence the characteristics of ADMSCs and whether ADMSCs from patients suffering from end-stage liver diseases are potential candidates for autotransplantation. This study was designed to compare various properties of ALF-derived ADMSCs with normal ADMSCs in pig models, with regard to their cellular morphology, cell proliferative ability, cell apoptosis, expression of surface antigens, mitochondrial and lysosomal activities, multilineage potency, and expression of liver-specific genes. Our results showed that ALF does not influence the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs. Intriguingly, the expression levels of several liver-specific genes in ALF-derived ADMSCs are higher than in normal ADMSCs. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs were not altered by ALF and these cells can serve as a new source for regenerative medicine.

  3. Porcine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Stem Cell Characteristics and Cell Activities While Enhancing the Expression of Liver-Specific Genes after Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chenxia; Zhou, Ning; Li, Jianzhou; Shi, Ding; Cao, Hongcui; Li, Jun; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a kind of complicated syndrome. Furthermore, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) can serve as a useful cell resource for autotransplantation due to their abundance and micro-invasive accessability. However, it is unknown how ALF will influence the characteristics of ADMSCs and whether ADMSCs from patients suffering from end-stage liver diseases are potential candidates for autotransplantation. This study was designed to compare various properties of ALF-derived ADMSCs with normal ADMSCs in pig models, with regard to their cellular morphology, cell proliferative ability, cell apoptosis, expression of surface antigens, mitochondrial and lysosomal activities, multilineage potency, and expression of liver-specific genes. Our results showed that ALF does not influence the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs. Intriguingly, the expression levels of several liver-specific genes in ALF-derived ADMSCs are higher than in normal ADMSCs. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs were not altered by ALF and these cells can serve as a new source for regenerative medicine. PMID:26742034

  4. The cell agglutination agent, phytohemagglutinin-L, improves the efficiency of somatic nuclear transfer cloning in cattle (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Du, Fuliang; Shen, Perng-Chih; Xu, Jie; Sung, Li-Ying; Jeong, B-Seon; Lucky Nedambale, Tshimangadzo; Riesen, John; Cindy Tian, X; Cheng, Winston T K; Lee, Shan-Nan; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2006-02-01

    One of the several factors that contribute to the low efficiency of mammalian somatic cloning is poor fusion between the small somatic donor cell and the large recipient oocyte. This study was designed to test phytohemagglutinin (PHA) agglutination activity on fusion rate, and subsequent developmental potential of cloned bovine embryos. The toxicity of PHA was established by examining its effects on the development of parthenogenetic bovine oocytes treated with different doses (Experiment 1), and for different durations (Experiment 2). The effective dose and duration of PHA treatment (150 microg/mL, 20 min incubation) was selected and used to compare membrane fusion efficiency and embryo development following somatic cell nuclear transfer (Experiment 3). Cloning with somatic donor fibroblasts versus cumulus cells was also compared, both with and without PHA treatment (150 microg/mL, 20 min). Fusion rate of nuclear donor fibroblasts, after phytohemagglutinin treatment, was increased from 33 to 61% (P < 0.05), and from 59 to 88% (P < 0.05) with cumulus cell nuclear donors. The nuclear transfer (NT) efficiency per oocyte used was improved following PHA treatment, for both fibroblast (13% versus 22%) as well as cumulus cells (17% versus 34%; P < 0.05). The cloned embryos, both with and without PHA treatment, were subjected to vitrification and embryo transfer testing, and resulted in similar survival (approximately 90% hatching) and pregnancy rates (17-25%). Three calves were born following vitrification and embryo transfer of these embryos; two from the PHA-treated group, and one from non-PHA control group. We concluded that PHA treatment significantly improved the fusion efficiency of somatic NT in cattle, and therefore, increased the development of cloned blastocysts. Furthermore, within a determined range of dose and duration, PHA had no detrimental effect on embryo survival post-vitrification, nor on pregnancy or calving rates following embryo transfer.

  5. Single TCR-Vβ2 evaluation discloses the circulating T cell clone in Sezary syndrome: one family fits all!

    PubMed

    Scala, Enrico; Abeni, Damiano; Pomponi, Debora; Russo, Nicoletta; Russo, Giandomenico; Narducci, Maria Grazia

    2015-08-01

    Sézary Syndrome (SS/L-CTCL) is a rare but aggressive variant of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), characterized by erythroderma, lymphadenopathy, and the presence of a circulating memory CD4(+) T cell malignant clone with a skin homing behavior, lacking CD26 and CD49d and over-expressing CD60. The availability of a panel of monoclonal antibodies recognizing distinct TCR-Vβ families, allows to typify the clone by flow cytometry in about 70 % of cases. The TCR-Vβ repertoire of 533 individuals, comprising 308 patients affected by CTCL, 50 healthy donors, and subjects affected by various non-neoplastic dermatological affections was evaluated by flow cytometry. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical software package for Microsoft Windows (SPSS, version 21, Chicago, IL). TCR-Vβ2 levels below 5.4 % or above 39.5 %, within total CD4(+) T cells, showed the best balance between sensitivity (98.1 %) and specificity (96 %) to identify the presence of a clone in the peripheral blood of patients affected by SS. Based on this observation, a "two-step" procedure in the detection of the malignant T cell clone in CTCLs is herein suggested. TCR-Vβ2 assessment in all cases (first step). In the case of TCR-Vβ2 levels above 39.5 %, the presence of a clonal expansion of this family is suggested, deserving further confirmation by means of T cell gene rearrangement evaluation. In patients having a TCR-Vβ2 reactivity below 5.4 % (second step), the entire TCR-Vβ repertoire should be evaluated to typify the expanded clone. In conclusion, the single TCR-Vβ2 expression check, instead of the entire repertoire assessment, represents an easy and cost-effective method for the recognition of CTCL aggressive leukemic variant.

  6. Persistence and selection of an expanded B-cell clone in the setting of rituximab therapy for Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Subjects with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) have an increased risk of developing B-cell lymphoma and may harbor monoclonal B-cell expansions in the peripheral blood. Expanded B-cell clones could be pathogenic, and their persistence could exacerbate disease or predispose toward the development of lymphoma. Therapy with anti-CD20 (rituximab) has the potential to eliminate expanded B-cell clones and thereby potentially ameliorate disease. This study was undertaken to identify and track expanded B-cell clones in the blood of subjects with primary SjS who were treated with rituximab. Methods To determine whether circulating B-cell clones in subjects with primary SjS emerge or remain after B cell-depleting therapy with rituximab, we studied the antibody heavy-chain repertoire. We performed single-memory B-cell and plasmablast sorting and antibody heavy-chain sequencing in six rituximab-treated SjS subjects over the course of a 1-year follow-up period. Results Expanded B-cell clones were identified in four out of the six rituximab-treated SjS subjects, based upon the independent amplification of sequences with identical or highly similar VH, DH, and JH gene segments. We identified one SjS subject with a large expanded B-cell clone that was present prior to therapy and persisted after therapy. Somatic mutations in the clone were numerous but did not increase in frequency over the course of the 1-year follow-up, suggesting that the clone had been present for a long period of time. Intriguingly, a majority of the somatic mutations in the clone were silent, suggesting that the clone was under chronic negative selection. Conclusions For some subjects with primary SjS, these data show that (a) expanded B-cell clones are readily identified in the peripheral blood, (b) some clones are not eliminated by rituximab, and (c) persistent clones may be under chronic negative selection or may not be antigen-driven. The analysis of sequence variation among members of an

  7. CD8+ T Cell Clones Specific for the 5T4 Antigen Target Renal Cell Carcinoma Tumor-Initiating Cells in a Murine Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Tykodi, Scott S.; Satoh, Shoko; Deming, Janise D.; Chou, Jeffrey; Harrop, Richard; Warren, Edus H.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor antigen 5T4 is frequently expressed at high levels on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other epithelial carcinomas. Surveys of normal tissues demonstrate abundant 5T4 expression on placental trophoblast cells with limited expression elsewhere. 5T4 is the target for a therapeutic cancer vaccine (MVA-5T4) that elicits 5T4-specific serological, proliferative, and CTL responses. However, the anti-tumor activity of 5T4-specific CTL has not been extensively characterized. CD8+ T cells from HLA-A2+ healthy donors (n=4) or RCC patients (n=2) were stimulated in vitro with the HLA-A2-binding nonamer peptides 5T417–25 or 5T497–105 and screened by flow cytometry with specific tetramers (TET). CD8+/TET+ T cell clones specific for 5T417–25 or 5T497–105 peptide were isolated from 4/6 and 1/4 donors respectively. A subset of clones specific for 5T417–25 was cytolytic for MVA-5T4 infected HLA-A2+ LCL target cells and for constitutively HLA-A2- and 5T4- expressing RCC tumor cell lines (including A498 RCC). In a xenoengraftment assay, the co-inoculation of a representative 5T417–25-specific CTL clone with A498 RCC tumors cells into immune deficient mice completely prevented growth of A498 tumors. Taken together, these data demonstrate high avidity CD8+ CTL able to recognize the naturally-processed 5T417–25 epitope on RCC tumor cells including putative tumor-initiating cells are present in peripheral blood of both healthy donors and RCC patients. CD8+ T cell immunity targeting 5T417–25 is therefore of substantial interest both as a potential target for further development of vaccination or adoptive cellular immunotherapy and for immune monitoring studies in association with nonspecific immunotherapies. PMID:22892449

  8. Growth, reproductive performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality in F1 and F2 progenies of somatic cell-cloned pigs.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Noritaka; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Akiyuki; Miura, Narumi; Sunaga, Seiji; Oishi, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Michiko; Oishi, Takatsugu; Iwamoto, Masaki; Hanada, Hirofumi; Kubo, Masanori; Onishi, Akira

    2014-04-24

    The objective of this study was to examine the health and meat production of cloned sows and their progenies in order to demonstrate the application of somatic cell cloning to the pig industry. This study compared the growth, reproductive performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality of Landrace cloned sows, F1 progenies and F2 progenies. We measured their body weight, growth rate and feed conversion and performed a pathological analysis of their anatomy to detect abnormalities. Three of the five cloned pigs were used for a growth test. Cloned pigs grew normally and had characteristics similar to those of the control purebred Landrace pigs. Two cloned gilts were bred with a Landrace boar and used for a progeny test. F1 progenies had characteristics similar to those of the controls. Two of the F1 progeny gilts were bred with a Duroc or Large White boar and used for the progeny test. F2 progenies grew normally. There were no biological differences in growth, carcass characteristics and amino acid composition among cloned sows, F1 progenies, F2 progenies and conventional pigs. The cloned sows and F1 progenies showed normal reproductive performance. No specific abnormalities were observed by pathological analysis, with the exception of periarteritis in the F1 progenies. All pigs had a normal karyotype. These results demonstrate that cloned female pigs and their progenies have similar growth, reproductive performance and carcass quality characteristics and that somatic cell cloning could be a useful technique for conserving superior pig breeds in conventional meat production.

  9. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells from cirrhotic patients retain similar capacity for maturation/activation and antigen presentation as those from healthy subjects☆

    PubMed Central

    Tanoue, Shiroh; Chang, Li-Yuan; Li, Yonghai; Kaplan, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the impact of liver cirrhosis on dendritic cell function. The purpose of this study was to compare the activation and antigen-presentation capacity of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC) from cirrhotic patients (CIR) relative to healthy donors (HD). MoDC from CIR and HD were matured, phenotyped, irradiated and pulsed with 15mer peptides for two hepatocellular carcinoma-related antigens, alphafetoprotein and glypican-3, then co-cultured with autologous T-cells. Expanded T-cells were evaluated by interferon-gamma ELISPOT and intracellular staining. 15 CIR and 7 HD were studied. While CD14+ monocytes from CIR displayed enhanced M2 polarization, under MoDC-polarizing conditions, we identified no significant difference between HD and CIR in maturation-induced upregulation of co-stimulation markers. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed between CIR and HD in subsequent expansion of tumor antigen-specific IFNγ+ T-cells. Conclusion MoDCs isolated from cirrhotic individuals retain similar capacity for in vitro activation, maturation and antigen-presentation as those from healthy donors. PMID:25734547

  10. An expressed sequence tag database of T-cell-enriched activated chicken splenocytes: sequence analysis of 5251 clones.

    PubMed

    Tirunagaru, V G; Sofer, L; Cui, J; Burnside, J

    2000-06-01

    The cDNA and gene sequences of many mammalian cytokines and their receptors are known. However, corresponding information on avian cytokines is limited due to the lack of cross-species activity at the functional level or strong homology at the molecular level. To improve the efficiency of identifying cytokines and novel chicken genes, a directionally cloned cDNA library from T-cell-enriched activated chicken splenocytes was constructed, and the partial sequence of 5251 clones was obtained. Sequence clustering indicates that 2357 (42%) of the clones are present as a single copy, and 2961 are distinct clones, demonstrating the high level of complexity of this library. Comparisons of the sequence data with known DNA sequences in GenBank indicate that approximately 25% of the clones match known chicken genes, 39% have similarity to known genes in other species, and 11% had no match to any sequence in the database. Several previously uncharacterized chicken cytokines and their receptors were present in our library. This collection provides a useful database for cataloging genes expressed in T cells and a valuable resource for future investigations of gene expression in avian immunology. A chicken EST Web site (http://udgenome. ags.udel. edu/chickest/chick.htm) has been created to provide access to the data, and a set of unique sequences has been deposited with GenBank (Accession Nos. AI979741-AI982511). Our new Web site (http://www. chickest.udel.edu) will be active as of March 3, 2000, and will also provide keyword-searching capabilities for BLASTX and BLASTN hits of all our clones. PMID:10860659

  11. T cell receptor V beta gene usage in a human alloreactive response. Shared structural features among HLA-B27-specific T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A strategy, based on using V beta family-specific oligonucleotides, was developed for specific amplification and direct sequencing of human TCR V beta genes. With this strategy, it was possible to undertake a structural analysis of TCRs from human T cell clones in specific responses. 12 HLA-B27-specific cytotoxic clones were examined. The results reveal a nonrandom use of V beta gene diversity in this alloreactive response in that: (a) the clones express a restricted number of V beta segments, including a subset of V beta families that are significantly more related to one another than to most other V beta families; (b) five of seven clones having a particular reaction pattern with HLA-B27 subtypes possess Alanine at the D-J junction; and (c) identical J beta segments are found associated in several instances with identical or highly homologous V beta gene segments. In addition, two new V beta 13 members are reported. PMID:1691261

  12. T-cell-activating monoclonal antibodies, reacting with both leukocytes and erythrocytes, recognize the guinea pig Thy-1 differentiation antigen: characterization and cloning of guinea pig CD90.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, H; Bartels, T; Hahn, G; Otto, A; Burger, R

    1999-11-01

    A glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked differentiation antigen expressed on guinea pig T and B lymphocytes was identified by several monoclonal antibodies; it has been shown previously that this membrane protein induced strong polyclonal T cell proliferation upon antibody binding and costimulation by PMA. Purification by immunoadsorption and microsequencing revealed that this T-cell-activating protein is the homologue of Thy-1 or CD90. In contrast to the Thy-1 antigen of most other species, guinea pig Thy-1 has a much higher molecular weight, which is due to a more extensive N-linked glycosylation, bringing the molecular weight of the total antigen up to 36 kDa. Molecular cloning of guinea pig Thy-1 indicated that the deduced molecular weight of the protein backbone is 12,777 after removal of an N-terminal 19-amino-acid leader peptide and cleavage of the 31 amino acids for GPI anchoring the C-terminal end. Sequence comparison showed that guinea pig Thy-1 has an 82% homology to human and a 72% homology to mouse Thy-1 on the amino acid level. Immunohistological staining of cryostat sections revealed intensive staining with the monoclonal antibody H154 on fibroblasts, fibrocytes, Kupffer cells, alveolar macrophages, and mesangial cells. As observed in the human, mouse, and rat, Thy-1 is abundant in the guinea pig brain. Unlike Thy-1 expression in other species, guinea pig Thy-1 is strongly expressed on most resting, nonactivated B cells and, to a lesser extent, on erythrocytes. While treatment of erythrocytes and lymphocytes with GPI-specific phospholipase C largely decreased reactivity with mAb H154, T cells retained the proliferative response to antibody and phorbol esters.

  13. Recognition of minor histocompatibility antigens on lymphocytic and myeloid leukemic cells by cytotoxic T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    van der Harst, D; Goulmy, E; Falkenburg, J H; Kooij-Winkelaar, Y M; van Luxemburg-Heijs, S A; Goselink, H M; Brand, A

    1994-02-15

    Clinical studies indicated an enhanced antileukemic effect of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), as compared with autologous BMT. After allogeneic HLA-identical BMT, donor-derived cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) directed at minor histocompatibility (mH) antigens on the recipients, tissues can be shown. To evaluate the antileukemic reactivity of mH antigen-specific CTLs, we analyzed the expression of mH antigens on circulating lymphocytic and myeloid leukemic cells. We show that the defined mH specificities HA-1 through HA-5 and H-Y are present on leukemic cells, indicating that mH antigen-specific CTLs are capable of HLA class I-restricted antigen-specific lysis of leukemic cells. Compared with interleukin-2-stimulated normal lymphocytes, leukemic cells of lymphocytic origin are less susceptible to T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity by the HA-2 mH antigen-specific CTL and the anti-HLA-A2 CTL clone. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is impaired expression of the LFA-1 adhesion molecule. Our study suggests that mH antigen-specific HLA class I-restricted CD8+ CTLs may be involved in the graft-versus-leukemia reactivity after allogeneic BMT.

  14. Cloning and Expression of CD19, a Human B-Cell Marker in NIH-3T3 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi-Kenarsari, Hajar; Shafaghat, Farzaneh; Baradaran, Behzad; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Kazemi, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Background CD19 is a pan B cell marker that is recognized as an attractive target for antibody-based therapy of B-cell disorders including autoimmune disease and hematological malignancies. The object of this study was to stably express the human CD19 antigen in the murine NIH-3T3 cell line aimed to be used as an immunogen in our future study. Methods Total RNA was extracted from Raji cells in which high expression of CD19 was confirmed by flow cytometry. Synthesized cDNA was used for CD19 gene amplification by conventional PCR method using Pfu DNA polymerase. PCR product was ligated to pGEM-T Easy vector and ligation mixture was transformed to DH5α competent bacteria. After blue/white selection, one positive white colony was subjected to plasmid extraction and direct sequencing. Then, CD19 cDNA was sub-cloned into pCMV6-Neo expression vector by double digestion using KpnI and HindIII enzymes. NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line was subsequently transfected by the construct using Jet-PEI transfection reagent. After 48 hours, surface expression of CD19 was confirmed by flow cytometry and stably transfected cells were selected by G418 antibiotic. Results Amplification of CD19 cDNA gave rise to 1701 bp amplicon confirmed by alignment to reference sequence in NCBI database. Flow cytometric analysis showed successful transient and stable expression of CD19 on NIH-3T3 cells (29 and 93%, respectively). Conclusion Stable cell surface expression of human CD19 antigen in a murine NIH-3T3 cell line may develop a proper immunogene which raises specific anti-CD19 antibody production in the mice immunized sera. PMID:25926951

  15. Production of Bovine Embryos and Calves Cloned by Nuclear Transfer Using Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Amniotic Fluid and Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carolina Gonzales; Martins, Carlos Frederico; Cardoso, Tereza Cristina; da Cunha, Elisa Ribeiro; Bessler, Heidi Christina; Martins, George Henrique Lima; Pivato, Ivo; Báo, Sônia Nair

    2016-04-01

    The less differentiated the donor cells are used in nuclear transfer (NT), the more easily are they reprogrammed by the recipient cytoplasm. In this context, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) appear as an alternative to donor nuclei for NT. The amniotic fluid and adipose tissue are sources of MSCs that have not been tested for the production of cloned embryos in cattle. The objective of this study was to isolate, characterize, and use MSCs derived from amniotic fluid (MSC-AF) and adipose tissue (MSC-AT) to produce cloned calves. Isolation of MSC-AF was performed using in vivo ultrasound-guided transvaginal amniocentesis, and MSC-AT were isolated by explant culture. Cellular phenotypic and genotypic characterization by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR were performed, as well as induction in different cell lineages. The NT was performed using MSC-AF and MSC-AT as nuclear donors. The mesenchymal markers of MSC were expressed in bovine MSC-AF and MSC-AT cultures, as evidenced by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR. When induced, these cells differentiated into osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Embryo production was similar between the cell types, and two calves were born. The calf from MSC-AT was born healthy, and this fact opens a new possibility of using this type of cell to produce cloned cattle by NT. PMID:27055630

  16. In vitro stemness characterization of radio-resistant clones isolated from a medulloblastoma cell line ONS-76

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lue; Moritake, Takashi; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Suzuki, Kenshi; Gerelchuluun, Ariungerel; Hong, Zhengshan; Zenkoh, Junko; Taniguchi, Hideki; Tsuboi, Koji

    2013-01-01

    One-third of patients with medulloblastoma die due to recurrence after various treatments including radiotherapy. Although it has been postulated that cancer stem-like cells are radio-resistant and play an important role in tumor recurrence, the “stemness” of medulloblastoma cells surviving irradiation has not yet been elucidated. Using a medulloblastoma cell line ONS-76, cells that survived gamma irradiation were investigated on their “stemness” in vitro. From 10 500 cells, 20 radio-resistant clones were selected after gamma ray irradiation (5 Gy × two fractions) using the replica micro-well technique. These 20 resistant clones were screened for CD133 positivity by flow cytometry followed by side population assay, tumor sphere formation assay and clonogenic survival assay. Results revealed CD133 fractions were significantly elevated in three clones, which also exhibited significantly increased levels of tumor sphere formation ability and side population fraction. Clonogenic survival assay demonstrated that their radio-resistance was significantly higher than the parental ONS-76. This may support the hypothesis that a small number of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are the main culprits in local recurrence after radiotherapy, and disruption of the resistance mechanism of these CSCs is a critical future issue in improving the outcome of patients with medulloblastoma. PMID:22951319

  17. Statistical analysis of data from limiting dilution cloning to assess monoclonality in generating manufacturing cell lines.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Jorge; Tsao, Yung-Shyeng

    2016-07-01

    Assurance of monoclonality of recombinant cell lines is a critical issue to gain regulatory approval in biological license application (BLA). Some of the requirements of regulatory agencies are the use of proper documentations and appropriate statistical analysis to demonstrate monoclonality. In some cases, one round may be sufficient to demonstrate monoclonality. In this article, we propose the use of confidence intervals for assessing monoclonality for limiting dilution cloning in the generation of recombinant manufacturing cell lines based on a single round. The use of confidence intervals instead of point estimates allow practitioners to account for the uncertainty present in the data when assessing whether an estimated level of monoclonality is consistent with regulatory requirements. In other cases, one round may not be sufficient and two consecutive rounds are required to assess monoclonality. When two consecutive subclonings are required, we improved the present methodology by reducing the infinite series proposed by Coller and Coller (Hybridoma 1983;2:91-96) to a simpler series. The proposed simpler series provides more accurate and reliable results. It also reduces the level of computation and can be easily implemented in any spreadsheet program like Microsoft Excel. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1061-1068, 2016.

  18. Cloning, stem cells, and the current national debate: incorporating ethics into a large introductory biology course.

    PubMed

    Fink, Rachel D

    2002-01-01

    Discussing the ethical issues involved in topics such as cloning and stem cell research in a large introductory biology course is often difficult. Teachers may be wary of presenting material biased by personal beliefs, and students often feel inhibited speaking about moral issues in a large group. Yet, to ignore what is happening "out there" beyond the textbooks and lab work is to do a disservice to students. This essay describes a semester-long project in which upperclass students presented some of the most complex and controversial ideas imaginable to introductory students by staging a mock debate and acting as members of the then newly appointed President's Council on Bioethics. Because the upperclass students were presenting the ideas of real people who play an important role in shaping national policy, no student's personal beliefs were put on the line, and many ideas were articulated. The introductory audience could accept or reject what they were hearing and learn information important for making up their own minds on these issues. This project is presented as an example of how current events can be used to put basic cell biology into context and of how exciting it can be when students teach students.

  19. Cloning, Stem Cells, and the Current National Debate: Incorporating Ethics into a Large Introductory Biology Course

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Discussing the ethical issues involved in topics such as cloning and stem cell research in a large introductory biology course is often difficult. Teachers may be wary of presenting material biased by personal beliefs, and students often feel inhibited speaking about moral issues in a large group. Yet, to ignore what is happening “out there” beyond the textbooks and lab work is to do a disservice to students. This essay describes a semester-long project in which upperclass students presented some of the most complex and controversial ideas imaginable to introductory students by staging a mock debate and acting as members of the then newly appointed President's Council on Bioethics. Because the upperclass students were presenting the ideas of real people who play an important role in shaping national policy, no student's personal beliefs were put on the line, and many ideas were articulated. The introductory audience could accept or reject what they were hearing and learn information important for making up their own minds on these issues. This project is presented as an example of how current events can be used to put basic cell biology into context and of how exciting it can be when students teach students. PMID:12669102

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of lymphocyte cell kinase from humphead snapper (Lutjanus sanguineus).

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Cai, J; Wang, B; Tang, J-F; Jian, J-C; Wu, Z-H; Gan, Z; Lu, Y-S

    2016-07-01

    Lymphocyte cell kinase (LCK) belongs to the Src family of tyrosine kinases, which involves in the proliferation control of lymphocytes. In this study, we cloned the LCK gene of humphead snapper (Lutjanus sanguineus) (designed as LsLCK). Sequence analysis showed that the full-length cDNA of LsLCK was 2279 bp, contained a 1506-bp open reading frame (ORF), encoding a polypeptide of 501 amino acids. The deduced amino acid possessed the typical structural features of known LCK proteins, including four Src homology (SH) domains arranged as the SH1 domain followed by a regulatory C-terminal tail (COOH-domain), SH2 and SH3 adapter domains and SH4 domain which required for membrane attachment and CD4/CD8 binding. Fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that LsLCK transcripts were expressed mainly in thymus, spleen and head kidney in healthy fish. Moreover, the mRNA expressions in these tissues were significantly up-regulated after challenge with Vibrio harveyi. The results of immunohistochemistry showed that LsLCK protein localized distinctly in cytoplasm of cell in thymus, spleen and head kidney. Taken together, these findings indicated that LsLCK may play an important role in the immune response of humphead snapper against bacterial infection.

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of lymphocyte cell kinase from humphead snapper (Lutjanus sanguineus).

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Cai, J; Wang, B; Tang, J-F; Jian, J-C; Wu, Z-H; Gan, Z; Lu, Y-S

    2016-07-01

    Lymphocyte cell kinase (LCK) belongs to the Src family of tyrosine kinases, which involves in the proliferation control of lymphocytes. In this study, we cloned the LCK gene of humphead snapper (Lutjanus sanguineus) (designed as LsLCK). Sequence analysis showed that the full-length cDNA of LsLCK was 2279 bp, contained a 1506-bp open reading frame (ORF), encoding a polypeptide of 501 amino acids. The deduced amino acid possessed the typical structural features of known LCK proteins, including four Src homology (SH) domains arranged as the SH1 domain followed by a regulatory C-terminal tail (COOH-domain), SH2 and SH3 adapter domains and SH4 domain which required for membrane attachment and CD4/CD8 binding. Fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that LsLCK transcripts were expressed mainly in thymus, spleen and head kidney in healthy fish. Moreover, the mRNA expressions in these tissues were significantly up-regulated after challenge with Vibrio harveyi. The results of immunohistochemistry showed that LsLCK protein localized distinctly in cytoplasm of cell in thymus, spleen and head kidney. Taken together, these findings indicated that LsLCK may play an important role in the immune response of humphead snapper against bacterial infection. PMID:26660470

  2. A modified choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet reduces morbidity and retains a liver progenitor cell response in mice.

    PubMed

    Passman, Adam M; Strauss, Robyn P; McSpadden, Sarah B; Finch-Edmondson, Megan L; Woo, Ken H; Diepeveen, Luke A; London, Roslyn; Callus, Bernard A; Yeoh, George C

    2015-12-01

    The choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) dietary model induces chronic liver damage, and stimulates liver progenitor cell (LPC)-mediated repair. Long-term CDE administration leads to hepatocellular carcinoma in rodents and lineage-tracing studies show that LPCs differentiate into functional hepatocytes in this model. The CDE diet was first modified for mice by our laboratory by separately administering choline-deficient chow and ethionine in the drinking water (CD+E diet). Although this CD+E diet is widely used, concerns with variability in weight loss, morbidity, mortality and LPC response have been raised by researchers who have adopted this model. We propose that these inconsistencies are due to differential consumption of chow and ethionine in the drinking water, and that incorporating ethionine in the choline-deficient chow, and altering the strength, will achieve better outcomes. Therefore, C57Bl/6 mice, 5 and 6 weeks of age, were fed an all-inclusive CDE diet of various strengths (67% to 100%) for 3 weeks. The LPC response was quantitated and cell lines were derived. We found that animal survival, LPC response and liver damage are correlated with CDE diet strength. The 67% and 75% CDE diet administered to mice older than 5 weeks and greater than 18 g provides a consistent and acceptable level of animal welfare and induces a substantial LPC response, permitting their isolation and establishment of cell lines. This study shows that an all-inclusive CDE diet for mice reproducibly induces an LPC response conducive to in vivo studies and isolation, whilst minimizing morbidity and mortality.

  3. Cloning, expression and identification of an isoform of human stromal cell derived factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YIN-KU; PING, WEI; BIAN, LIU-JIAO

    2015-01-01

    Human stromal cell derived factor-1α (hSDF-1α), a chemotactic factor of stem cells, regulates inflammation, promotes the mobilization of stem cells and induces angiogenesis following ischemia. Six SDF-1 isoforms, SDF-1α, SDF-1β, SDF-1γ, SDF-1δ, SDF-1ε and SDF-1ϕ, which all contain a signal peptide at the N-terminus, have been reported. In the present study a special isoform of hSDF-1α is described that does not contain the N-terminal signal peptide sequence. The hSDF-1α gene was cloned with the recombinant plasmid pCMV-SPORT6-hSDF1 as the template, and the prokaryotic expression vector pET15b-hSDF-1α was constructed. This hSDF-1α was successfully expressed as an inclusion body in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The recombinant hSDF-1α was refolded in vitro and separated by cation exchange chromatography. Following these two steps the purity of the hSDF-1α was able to reach >85%. The recombinant hSDF-1α was then purified by size-exclusion chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that the purity of the hSDF-1α was >95%, which meets almost all the requirements of a protein experiment. Chemotactic activity of the recombinant hSDF-1α was analyzed by Transwell migration assay and it was found that the recombinant hSDF-1α was able to stimulate THP-1 cell migration. These data suggest that the procedure of producing recombinant hSDF-1α proteins with chemotactic activity was feasible and the N-terminal signal peptide of hSDF-1α has little effect on the chemotactic activity of hSDF-1α. PMID:26136888

  4. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease.

    PubMed Central

    Gershenfeld, H K; Hershberger, R J; Shows, T B; Weissman, I L

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage lambda gt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16+ natural killer cells and CD3+, CD16- T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The predicted protein has a 22-amino acid presegment, a 6-amino acid prosegment, and an active enzyme of 234 amino acids with a calculated unglycosylated molecular weight of 25,820. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. We propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Images PMID:3257574

  5. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  6. Rapid cloning, expression, and functional characterization of paired αβ and γδ T-cell receptor chains from single-cell analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xi-zhi J; Dash, Pradyot; Calverley, Matthew; Tomchuck, Suzanne; Dallas, Mari H; Thomas, Paul G

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic expression of antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) genes is a promising approach for immunotherapy against infectious diseases and cancers. A key to the efficient application of this approach is the rapid and specific isolation and cloning of TCRs. Current methods are often labor-intensive, nonspecific, and/or relatively slow. Here, we describe an efficient system for antigen-specific αβTCR cloning and CDR3 substitution. We demonstrate the capability of cloning influenza-specific TCRs within 10 days using single-cell polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Gibson Assembly techniques. This process can be accelerated to 5 days by generating receptor libraries, requiring only the exchange of the antigen-specific CDR3 region into an existing backbone. We describe the construction of this library for human γδ TCRs and report the cloning and expression of a TRGV9/TRDV2 receptor that is activated by zoledronic acid. The functional activity of these αβ and γδ TCRs can be characterized in a novel reporter cell line (Nur77-GFP Jurkat 76 TCRα–β–) for screening of TCR specificity and avidity. In summary, we provide a rapid method for the cloning, expression, and functional characterization of human and mouse TCRs that can assist in the development of TCR-mediated therapeutics. PMID:26858965

  7. Presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: evidence for specific and non-specific presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1988-01-01

    Non-immune SJL (H-2s) spleen cells were fused with (H-2d) Balb/c 653-myeloma cells and the hybridomas were cloned by two limiting dilutions. The resulting hybrid B- cell clones were tested for their antigen presentation capability to SJL T-cell lines that were specific for either lysozyme or myoglobin. In proliferative assays, 53% of the antigen presenting B-cell clones were able to present both myoglobin and lysozyme (general presenters) while the other 47% presented specifically either myoglobin or lysozyme (specific presenters). The ability to selectively present either myoglobin or lysozyme indicates that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific depending on the particular B-cell clone.

  8. Presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: evidence for specific and non-specific presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Zouhair Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Non-immune SJL (H-2s) spleen cells were fused with non-secreting, non-antigen presenting (H-2d) Balb/c 653-myeloma cells and the hybridomas were cloned by two limiting dilutions. The resulting hybrid B-cell clones were tested for their antigen presentation capability to SJL T-cell lines that were specific for either lysozyme or myoglobin. In proliferative assays, 53% of the antigen presenting B-cell clones presented both myoglobin and lysozyme (general presenters) while the other 47% presented specifically either myoglobin or lysozyme (specific presenters). The ability to selectively present either myoglobin or lysozyme indicates that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific depending on the particular B-cell clone.

  9. Further characterization of protective Trypanosoma cruzi-specific CD4+ T-cell clones: T helper type 1-like phenotype and reactivity with shed trypomastigote antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, S P; Keane, M; So, M

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported the isolation from immune mice of a panel of murine clonal T-cell lines which specifically recognize antigens expressed by the trypomastigote stage of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of human Chagas' disease. Our analysis indicated that distinct clones which recognize common as well as strain-specific antigenic determinants were represented. The immunoprotective potential of several of these T-cell clones was demonstrated by adoptive transfer of protection to naive syngeneic recipients. Here we report that these T-cell clones are all of the TH1 phenotype, as determined from their lymphokine secretion patterns. Significant levels of stimulatory activity for each clone were detected in trypomastigote supernatants, and the release of this activity was time and temperature dependent. Seven of 10 T-cell clones tested responded to nitrocellulose-immunoblotted trypomastigote proteins in the range of 90 to 47 kDa; no fewer than six distinct epitopes residing on at least five distinct polypeptide species were recognized by this panel of clones. Two clones (2G8 and 4B10) previously shown to protect in vivo responded to immunoblotted proteins in the range of 65 to 53 and 90 to 80 kD, respectively. Stimulatory activity for the latter clone was shown to be expressed on the surface of trypomastigotes and to bind specifically to wheat germ agglutinin, indicating that its target antigen is an 85-kDa trypomastigote surface glycoprotein. PMID:8335358

  10. The cervical malignant cells display a down regulation of ER-α but retain the ER-β expression

    PubMed Central

    López-Romero, Ricardo; Garrido-Guerrero, Efraín; Rangel-López, Angélica; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Lazos-Ochoa, Minerva; Mantilla-Morales, Alejandra; Bandala, Cindy; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    The human cervix is a tissue target of sex steroid hormones as estradiol (E2) which exerts its action through of the estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ER-α and ER-β). In this study we investigated the expression of ER-α and ER-β in human invasive cervical carcinomas using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analyses and compared with that observed in the corresponding normal tissue. The results show nuclear expression of ER-α mainly in the first third of normal cervical epithelium, however, decreased or absent expression were present in invasive cervical carcinoma, indicating that expression of ER-α is lost in cervical cancer. Nevertheless, by RT-PCR we were able to demonstrate mRNA expression of ER-α in invasive cervical tissues. These results suggest that loss of ER-α could be due to a mechanism of post-transcriptional and/or post-translational regulation of its gene during the progression to invasive carcinoma. On the other hand, ER-β was expressed in normal cervix with an expression pattern similar to ER-α. In addition to its nuclear localization, cytoplasmic immunoreaction of ER-β was present in the epithelium of invasive cervical carcinomas, suggesting an association between cytoplasmic ER-β expression and invasive phenotype in the cervical tumors. In summary, the results show that the cervical malignant cells tend to loss the ER-α but maintain the ER-β actively expressed. Loss of expression of ER-α in neoplastic tissue suggests that the estrogenic effects could be conducted through the ER-β in human neoplastic cervical tissue. More detailed studies are needed to confirm this suggestion and to determine the role of ER-β in cervical cancer. PMID:23923078

  11. Enhanced histone acetylation in somatic cells induced by a histone deacetylase inhibitor improved inter-generic cloned leopard cat blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Sang; Yu, Xian-Feng; Bang, Jae-Il; Cho, Su-Jin; Deb, Gautam Kumar; Kim, Byeong-Woo; Kong, Il-Keun

    2010-11-01

    The objective was to determine whether alterations of histone acetylation status in donor cells affected inter-generic SCNT (igSCNT)-cloned embryo development. Leopard cat cells were treated with trichostatin A (TSA; a histone deacetylase inhibitor) for 48 h, and then donor cells were transferred into enucleated oocytes from domestic cats. Compared to non-treated cells, the acetylated histone 3 at lysine 9 (AcH3K9) and histone 4 at lysine 5 (AcH4K5) in the TSA group increased for up to 48 h (P < 0.05). The AcH3K9 signal ratios of igSCNT group was higher than control group 3 h after activation (P < 0.05). Treatment with TSA significantly increased total cell number of blastocysts (109.1 ± 6.9 vs. 71.8 ± 2.9, mean ± SEM), with no significant effects on rates of cleavage or blastocyst development (71.1 ± 2.8 vs. 67.6 ± 2.9 and 12.2 ± 2.6 vs. 11.0 ± 2.6, respectively). When igSCNT cloned embryos were transferred into a domestic cat oviduct and recovered after 8 d, blastocyst development rates and total cell numbers were greater in the TSA-igSCNT group (20.7 ± 3.0% and 2847.6 ± 37.2) than in the control igSCNT group (5.7 ± 2.2% and 652.1 ± 17.6, P < 0.05). Average total cell numbers of blastocysts were approximately 4.4-fold higher in the TSA-igSCNT group (2847.6 ± 37.2, n = 10) than in the control group (652.1 ± 17.6, n = 8; P < 0.05), but were ∼2.9-fold lower than in vivo cat blastocysts produced by intrauterine insemination (8203.8 ± 29.6, n = 5; P < 0.001). Enhanced histone acetylation levels of donor cells improved in vivo developmental competence and quality of inter-generic cloned embryos; however, fewer cells in blastocysts derived from igSCNT than blastocysts produced by insemination may reduce development potential following intergeneric cloning (none of the cloned embryos were maintained to term).

  12. Cloning and substrate specificity of a human phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase expressed in COS-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, D; Fournel-Gigleux, S; Jackson, M R; Burchell, B

    1988-01-01

    A rat kidney phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase cDNA was used to isolate a human liver phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase cDNA by screening of a human liver cDNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11. The 2.4-kilobase cDNA contained an open reading frame of 1593 base pairs coding for a protein of 531 residues. The human liver cDNA was subcloned into the vector pKCRH2. Transfection of this recombinant plasmid into COS-7 cells allowed the expression of a protein of approximately 55 kDa. The enzyme synthesized was a glycoprotein, as indicated by a reduction in molecular mass of approximately 3 kDa after biosynthesis in the presence of tunicamycin. The expressed enzyme rapidly catalyzed the glucuronidation of 1-naphthol, 4-methylumbelliferone, and 4-nitrophenol. The use of a related series of simple phenols provided an outline description of the substituent restrictions imposed upon the phenolic structures accepted as substrates. The glucuronidation of testosterone, androsterone, and estrone was not catalyzed by this cloned UDP-glucuronosyltransferase. Images PMID:3141926

  13. Longevity of Paramecium Cell Clone under Microgravity in Space: Hypergravity Experiment as a Ground Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Y.; Mogami, Y.; Baba, S. A.

    We proposed a space experiment aboard International Space Station to explore the effects of the stay under microgravity on the longevity of Paramecium cell clone (Mogami et al., 1999, Adv. Space Res., 23/12, 2087-2090). Former space experiments in CYTOS and Space Lab D-1 demonstrated that Paramecium proliferated faster in space. In combination with the fact that aging process in Paramecium is largely related to the fission age, the results of the proliferation experiment in space may predict that the longevity of Paramecium decreases when measured by clock time. As a ground simulation of the space experiment, we made an experiment to assess the aging process under hypergravity, which is known to reduce the proliferation rate. As a result, the length of autogamy immaturity increased when measured by clock time, whereas it remained unchanged by fission age (Kato et al., 2003, Zool. Sci., 1373-1380). It is therefore expected that autogamy immaturity in the measure of the clock time would be shortened under microgravity. Since the length of clonal life span of Paramecium is related to the length of autogamy immaturity, the result of hypergravity experiment may support the prediction above; i.e. a decrease in the clonal longevity of Paramecium under microgravity in space.

  14. Longevity of a Paramecium cell clone in space: Hypergravity experiments as a basis for microgravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuko; Mogami, Yoshihiro; Baba, Shoji A.

    We proposed a space experiment aboard International Space Station to explore the effects of microgravity on the longevity of a Paramecium cell clone. Earlier space experiments in CYTOS and Space Lab D-1 demonstrated that Paramecium proliferated faster in space. In combination with the fact that aging process in Paramecium is largely related to the fission age, the results of the proliferation experiment in space may predict that the longevity of Paramecium decreases when measured by clock time. In preparation of the space experiment, we assessed the aging process under hypergravity, which is known to reduce the proliferation rate. As a result, the length of autogamy immaturity increased when measured by clock time, whereas it remained unchanged by fission age. It is therefore expected that autogamy immaturity in the measure of the clock time would be shortened under microgravity. Since the length of clonal life span of Paramecium is related to the length of autogamy immaturity, the result of hypergravity experiment supports the prediction that the clonal longevity of Paramecium under microgravity decreases. Effects of gravity on proliferation are discussed in terms of energetics of swimming during gravikinesis and gravitaxis of Paramecium.

  15. Effect of cryopreservation on fusion efficiency and in vitro development into blastocysts of bovine cell lines used in somatic cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Hayes, O; Rodríguez, L L; González, A; Falcón, V; Aguilar, A; Castro, F O

    2005-11-01

    The outcome of the process of cloning by nuclear transfer depends on multiple factors that affect its efficiency. Donor cells should be carefully selected for their use in somatic nuclear transfer, and the protocols used for keeping frozen cell banks are of cardinal importance. Here we studied the effect of two protocols for freezing donor cells on fusion rate and development into blastocysts. Our hypothesis is that freezing affects cell membranes in a way that interferes with the fusion process upon cloning but without hampering normal cell development in vitro. We found that freezing cell lines without controlling the cooling rate gives lower yields in the fusion step and in the final development into blastocysts, compared with cells frozen with a controlled cooling rate of approximately 1 degrees C/min. Transmission electron microscopy of the cells subjected to different freezing procedures showed major damage to the cells frozen with a non-controlled protocol. We conclude that freezing of donor cells for cloning is a critical step in the procedure and should be monitored carefully using a method that allows for a step-wise, controlled cooling rate.

  16. An Improved System for Generation of Diploid Cloned Porcine Embryos Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Synchronized to Metaphase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunhye; Zheng, Zhong; Jeon, Yubyeol; Jin, Yong-Xun; Hwang, Seon-Ung; Cai, Lian; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Pigs provide outstanding models of human genetic diseases due to their striking similarities with human anatomy, physiology and genetics. Although transgenic pigs have been produced using genetically modified somatic cells and nuclear transfer (SCNT), the cloning efficiency was extremely low. Here, we report an improved method to produce diploid cloned embryos from porcine induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs), which were synchronized to the G2/M stage using a double blocking method with aphidicolin and nocodazole. The efficiency of this synchronization method on our piPSC lines was first tested. Then, we modified our traditional SCNT protocol to find a workable protocol. In particular, the removal of a 6DMAP treatment post-activation enhanced the extrusion rate of pseudo-second-polar bodies (p2PB) (81.3% vs. 15.8%, based on peak time, 4hpa). Moreover, an immediate activation method yielded significantly more blastocysts than delayed activation (31.3% vs. 16.0%, based on fused embryos). The immunofluorescent results confirmed the effect of the 6DMAP treatment removal, showing remarkable p2PB extrusion during a series of nuclear transfer procedures. The reconstructed embryos from metaphase piPSCs with our modified protocol demonstrated normal morphology at 2-cell, 4-cell and blastocyst stages and a high rate of normal karyotype. This study demonstrated a new and efficient way to produce viable cloned embryos from piPSCs when synchronized to the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, which may lead to opportunities to produce cloned pigs from piPSCs more efficiently. PMID:27472781

  17. An Improved System for Generation of Diploid Cloned Porcine Embryos Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Synchronized to Metaphase

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yubyeol; Jin, Yong-Xun; Hwang, Seon-Ung; Cai, Lian; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Pigs provide outstanding models of human genetic diseases due to their striking similarities with human anatomy, physiology and genetics. Although transgenic pigs have been produced using genetically modified somatic cells and nuclear transfer (SCNT), the cloning efficiency was extremely low. Here, we report an improved method to produce diploid cloned embryos from porcine induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs), which were synchronized to the G2/M stage using a double blocking method with aphidicolin and nocodazole. The efficiency of this synchronization method on our piPSC lines was first tested. Then, we modified our traditional SCNT protocol to find a workable protocol. In particular, the removal of a 6DMAP treatment post-activation enhanced the extrusion rate of pseudo-second-polar bodies (p2PB) (81.3% vs. 15.8%, based on peak time, 4hpa). Moreover, an immediate activation method yielded significantly more blastocysts than delayed activation (31.3% vs. 16.0%, based on fused embryos). The immunofluorescent results confirmed the effect of the 6DMAP treatment removal, showing remarkable p2PB extrusion during a series of nuclear transfer procedures. The reconstructed embryos from metaphase piPSCs with our modified protocol demonstrated normal morphology at 2-cell, 4-cell and blastocyst stages and a high rate of normal karyotype. This study demonstrated a new and efficient way to produce viable cloned embryos from piPSCs when synchronized to the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, which may lead to opportunities to produce cloned pigs from piPSCs more efficiently. PMID:27472781

  18. An Alternative Method to Facilitate cDNA Cloning for Expression Studies in Mammalian Cells by Introducing Positive Blue White Selection in Vaccinia Topoisomerase I-Mediated Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Udo, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    One of the most basic techniques in biomedical research is cDNA cloning for expression studies in mammalian cells. Vaccinia topoisomerase I-mediated cloning (TOPO cloning by Invitrogen) allows fast and efficient recombination of PCR-amplified DNAs. Among TOPO vectors, a pcDNA3.1 directional cloning vector is particularly convenient, since it can be used for expression analysis immediately after cloning. However, I found that the cloning efficiency was reduced when RT-PCR products were used as inserts (about one-quarter). Since TOPO vectors accept any PCR products, contaminating fragments in the insert DNA create negative clones. Therefore, I designed a new mammalian expression vector enabling positive blue white selection in Vaccinia topoisomerase I–mediated cloning. The method utilized a short nontoxic LacZα peptide as a linker for GFP fusion. When cDNAs were properly inserted into the vector, minimal expression of the fusion proteins in E. coli (harboring lacZΔM15) resulted in formation of blue colonies on X-gal plates. This method improved both cloning efficiency (75%) and directional cloning (99%) by distinguishing some of the negative clones having non-cording sequences, since these inserts often disturbed translation of lacZα. Recombinant plasmids were directly applied to expression studies using GFP as a reporter. Utilization of the P2A peptide allowed for separate expression of GFP. In addition, the preparation of Vaccinia topoisomerase I-linked vectors was streamlined, which consisted of successive enzymatic reactions with a single precipitation step, completing in 3 hr. The arrangement of unique restriction sites enabled further modification of vector components for specific applications. This system provides an alternative method for cDNA cloning and expression in mammalian cells. PMID:26422141

  19. An Alternative Method to Facilitate cDNA Cloning for Expression Studies in Mammalian Cells by Introducing Positive Blue White Selection in Vaccinia Topoisomerase I-Mediated Recombination.

    PubMed

    Udo, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    One of the most basic techniques in biomedical research is cDNA cloning for expression studies in mammalian cells. Vaccinia topoisomerase I-mediated cloning (TOPO cloning by Invitrogen) allows fast and efficient recombination of PCR-amplified DNAs. Among TOPO vectors, a pcDNA3.1 directional cloning vector is particularly convenient, since it can be used for expression analysis immediately after cloning. However, I found that the cloning efficiency was reduced when RT-PCR products were used as inserts (about one-quarter). Since TOPO vectors accept any PCR products, contaminating fragments in the insert DNA create negative clones. Therefore, I designed a new mammalian expression vector enabling positive blue white selection in Vaccinia topoisomerase I-mediated cloning. The method utilized a short nontoxic LacZα peptide as a linker for GFP fusion. When cDNAs were properly inserted into the vector, minimal expression of the fusion proteins in E. coli (harboring lacZΔM15) resulted in formation of blue colonies on X-gal plates. This method improved both cloning efficiency (75%) and directional cloning (99%) by distinguishing some of the negative clones having non-cording sequences, since these inserts often disturbed translation of lacZα. Recombinant plasmids were directly applied to expression studies using GFP as a reporter. Utilization of the P2A peptide allowed for separate expression of GFP. In addition, the preparation of Vaccinia topoisomerase I-linked vectors was streamlined, which consisted of successive enzymatic reactions with a single precipitation step, completing in 3 hr. The arrangement of unique restriction sites enabled further modification of vector components for specific applications. This system provides an alternative method for cDNA cloning and expression in mammalian cells. PMID:26422141

  20. Nuclear donor cell lines considerably influence cloning efficiency and the incidence of large offspring syndrome in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Wang, Y; Su, J; Luo, Y; Quan, F; Zhang, Y

    2013-08-01

    Total five ear skin fibroblast lines (named F1, F2, F3, F4 and F5) from different newborn Holstein cows have been used as nuclear donor cells for producing cloned cows by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The effects of these cell lines on both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates of cloned embryos, post-natal survivability and incidence of large offspring syndrome (LOS) were examined in this study. We found that the different cell lines possessed the same capacity to support pre-implantation development of cloned embryos, the cleavage and blastocyst formation rates ranged from 80.2 ± 0.9 to 84.5 ± 2.5% and 28.5 ± 0.9 to 33.3 ± 1.4%, respectively. However, their capacities to support the in vivo development of SCNT embryos showed significant differences (p < 0.05). The pregnancy rates at 90 and 240 day were significantly lower in groups F2 (4.9% and 3.3%) and F3 (5.4% and 5.4%) compared to groups F1 (23.3% and 16.3%), F4 (25.7% and 18.6%) and F5 (25.9% and 19.8%) (p < 0.05). The cloning efficiency was significantly higher in group F5 than those in group F1, F2, F3 and F4 (9.3% vs 4.1%, 1.2%, 2.0% and 5.0%, respectively, p < 0.05). Moreover, large offspring syndrome (LOS) incidence in group F5 was significantly lower than those in other groups (p < 0.05). All cloned offspring from cell line F1, F2, F3 and F4 showed LOS and gestation length delay, while all cloned offspring from F5 showed normal birthweight and gestation length. We concluded that the nuclear donor cell lines have significant impact on the in vivo development of cloned embryos and the incidence of LOS in cloned calves.

  1. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of programmed cell death 10 from sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Jie; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Lu, Shi-Ying; Li, Chuang; Hu, Pan; Li, Yan-Song; Liu, Nan-Nan; Tang, Feng; Xu, Yun-Ming; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Li, Zhao-Hui; Feng, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Hong-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) is a highly conserved adaptor protein. Its mutations result in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). In this study, PDCD10 cDNA from the buffy coat of Small Tail Han sheep (Ovis aries) was cloned from a suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library, named OaPDCD10. The full-length cDNA of OaPDCD10 was 1343bp with a 639bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 212 amino acid residues. Tissue distribution of OaPDCD10 mRNA determined that it was ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissue samples, and the highest expression was observed in the heart. The differential expression of OaPDCD10 between infected sheep (challenged with Brucella melitensis) and vaccinated sheep (vaccinated with Brucella suis S2) was also investigated. The results revealed that, compared to the control group, the expression of OaPDCD10 from infected and vaccinated sheep was both significantly up-regulated (p<0.05). Moreover, the expression levels of OaPDCD10 from the vaccinated sheep were significantly higher than the infected sheep (p<0.05) after 30days post-inoculation. The recombinant OaPDCD10 (rOaPDCD10) protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then purified by affinity chromatography. The rOaPDCD10 protein was demonstrated to induce apoptosis and promote cell proliferation. Our studies are intended to discover potential diagnostic biomarkers of brucellosis to discern infected sheep from vaccinated sheep, and OaPDCD10 could be considered as a potential diagnostic biomarker of brucellosis.

  2. Potassium channels cloned from neuroblastoma cells display slowly inactivating outward currents in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Yokoyama, S; Higashida, H

    1992-05-22

    Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) specific for NGK1 and NGK2 potassium channels were synthesized from complementary DNAs (cDNAs) that had been cloned from mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid NG108-15 cells. Outward pottasium currents were evoked by 5 s depolarizing voltage commands in Xenopus oocytes injected with NGK1- or NGK2-specific mRNAs. The NGK1 or NGK2 currents showed different activation and inactivation kinetics, and different pharmacological sensitivities. The threshold potential for activation of the NGK2 current (-14 mV) was more positive than that for the NGK1 (-36 mV). The NGK2 current showed faster inactivation during a 5 s depolarizing pulse than did the NGK1 current. Inactivation was best fit by time constants of 0.37, 1.5 and 19 s for the NGK2 current and 4.4 and 19 s for NGK1. Extracellularly applied tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) was 1000 times more potent on the NGK2 current than the NGK1 current. Furthermore we examined outward current following co-injection of an equal amount of mRNAs for NGK1 and NGK2. The timecourse of inactivation differed from either alone or from a simple sum of the two individual currents. TEA sensitivity could not be explained by summation of the two homomultimeric channels. These findings suggest that both NGK1 and NGK2 proteins assemble to form heteromultimeric K+ channels in addition to homomultimeric K+ channels. NGK2 channels and the heteromultimeric channels may be responsible for the native transient outward current with slow inactivation in NG108-15 hybrid cells.

  3. Analysis of ENPP2 in the Uterine Endometrium of Pigs Carrying Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Cloned Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Heewon; Choi, Yohan; Yu, Inkyu; Shim, Jangsoo; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Eunsong; Ka, Hakhyun

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a useful tool for animal cloning, but the efficiency of producing viable offspring by SCNT is very low. To improve this efficiency in the production of cloned pigs, it is critical to understand the interactions between uterine function and cloned embryos during implantation. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator that plays an important role in the establishment of pregnancy in pigs; however, LPA production in the uterine endometrium of pigs carrying SCNT-cloned conceptuses has not been determined. Therefore, we investigated expression of ENPP2, an LPA-generating enzyme, in the uterine endometrium of gilts with conceptuses derived from SCNT during the implantation period. Uterine endometrial tissue and uterine flushing were obtained from gilts carrying SCNT-derived conceptuses and from gilts carrying conceptuses resulting from natural mating on d 12 of pregnancy. Our results demonstrated no difference in the level of ENPP2 mRNA expression in the uterine endometrium between gilts carrying SCNT-derived conceptuses and gilts carrying naturally-conceived conceptuses, but secretion of ENPP2 protein into the uterine lumen did decrease significantly in pigs with SCNT-derived conceptuses. These results indicate that expression and secretion of ENPP2, which are critical for appropriate LPA production and successful pregnancy, are dysregulated in the uterine endometrium of pigs carrying SCNT-derived conceptuses. PMID:25049907

  4. Carbohydrate metabolism and cell protection mechanisms differentiate drought tolerance and sensitivity in advanced potato clones (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Legay, Sylvain; Lefèvre, Isabelle; Lamoureux, Didier; Barreda, Carolina; Luz, Rosalina Tincopa; Gutierrez, Raymundo; Quiroz, Roberto; Hoffmann, Lucien; Hausman, Jean-François; Bonierbale, Merideth; Evers, Danièle; Schafleitner, Roland

    2011-06-01

    In potatoes and many other crops, drought is one of the most important environmental constraints leading to yield loss. Development of drought-tolerant cultivars is therefore required for maintaining yields under climate change conditions and for the extension of agriculture to sub-optimal cropping areas. Drought tolerance mechanisms have been well described for many crop plants including Native Andean potato. However, knowledge on tolerance traits suitable for commercial potato varieties is scarce. In order to describe drought tolerance mechanisms that sustain potato yield under water stress, we have designed a growth-chamber experiment with two Solanum tuberosum L. cultivars, the more drought tolerant accession 397077.16, and the sensitive variety Canchan. After 21 days of drought exposure, gene expression was studied in leaves using cDNA microarrays. The results showed that the tolerant clone presented more differentially expressed genes than the sensitive one, suggesting greater stress response and adaptation. Moreover, it exhibited a large pool of upregulated genes belonging to cell rescue and detoxication such as LEAs, dehydrins, HSPs, and metallothioneins. Transcription factors related to abiotic stresses and genes belonging to raffinose family oligosaccharide synthesis, involved in desiccation tolerance, were upregulated to a greater extent in the tolerant clone. This latter result was corroborated by biochemical analyses performed at 32 and 49 days after drought that showed an increase in galactinol and raffinose especially in clone 397077.16. The results depict key components for the drought tolerance of this advanced potato clone.

  5. Cell culture replication of a genotype 1b hepatitis C virus isolate cloned from a patient who underwent liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koutsoudakis, George; Perez-del-Pulgar, Sofia; Coto-Llerena, Mairene; Gonzalez, Patricia; Dragun, Jakub; Mensa, Laura; Crespo, Gonzalo; Navasa, Miguel; Forns, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the genotype 2a isolate JFH1 was a major breakthrough in the field of hepatitis C virus (HCV), allowing researchers to study the complete life cycle of the virus in cell culture. However, fully competent culture systems encompassing the most therapeutically relevant HCV genotypes are still lacking, especially for the highly drug-resistant genotype 1b. For most isolated HCV clones, efficient replication in cultured hepatoma cells requires the introduction of replication-enhancing mutations. However, such mutations may interfere with viral assembly, as occurs in the case of the genotype 1b isolate Con1. In this study, we show that a clinical serum carrying a genotype 1b virus with an exceptionally high viral load was able to infect Huh7.5 cells. Similar to previous reports, inoculation of Huh7.5 cells by natural virus is very inefficient compared to infection by cell culture HCV. A consensus sequence of a new genotype 1b HCV isolate was cloned from the clinical serum (designated Barcelona HCV1), and then subjected to replication studies. This virus replicated poorly in a transient fashion in Huh7.5 cells after electroporation with in vitro transcribed RNA. Nonetheless, approximately 3 weeks post electroporation and thereafter, core protein-positive cells were detected by immunofluorescence. Surprisingly, small amounts of core protein were also measurable in the supernatant of electroporated cells, suggesting that HCV particles might be assembled and released. Our findings not only enhance the current method of cloning in vitro HCV replication-competent isolates, but also offer valuable insights for the realization of fully competent culture systems for HCV. PMID:21887279

  6. Cell Culture Replication of a Genotype 1b Hepatitis C Virus Isolate Cloned from a Patient Who Underwent Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Koutsoudakis, George; Perez-del-Pulgar, Sofia; Coto-Llerena, Mairene; Gonzalez, Patricia; Dragun, Jakub; Mensa, Laura; Crespo, Gonzalo; Navasa, Miguel; Forns, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the genotype 2a isolate JFH1 was a major breakthrough in the field of hepatitis C virus (HCV), allowing researchers to study the complete life cycle of the virus in cell culture. However, fully competent culture systems encompassing the most therapeutically relevant HCV genotypes are still lacking, especially for the highly drug-resistant genotype 1b. For most isolated HCV clones, efficient replication in cultured hepatoma cells requires the introduction of replication-enhancing mutations. However, such mutations may interfere with viral assembly, as occurs in the case of the genotype 1b isolate Con1. In this study, we show that a clinical serum carrying a genotype 1b virus with an exceptionally high viral load was able to infect Huh7.5 cells. Similar to previous reports, inoculation of Huh7.5 cells by natural virus is very inefficient compared to infection by cell culture HCV. A consensus sequence of a new genotype 1b HCV isolate was cloned from the clinical serum (designated Barcelona HCV1), and then subjected to replication studies. This virus replicated poorly in a transient fashion in Huh7.5 cells after electroporation with in vitro transcribed RNA. Nonetheless, approximately 3 weeks post electroporation and thereafter, core protein-positive cells were detected by immunofluorescence. Surprisingly, small amounts of core protein were also measurable in the supernatant of electroporated cells, suggesting that HCV particles might be assembled and released. Our findings not only enhance the current method of cloning in vitro HCV replication-competent isolates, but also offer valuable insights for the realization of fully competent culture systems for HCV. PMID:21887279

  7. Single-step cloning-screening method: a new tool for developing and studying high-titer viral vector producer cells.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A F; Formas-Oliveira, A S; Guerreiro, M R; Tomás, H A; Alves, P M; Coroadinha, A S

    2015-09-01

    This article describes a novel method merging the cloning of viral vector producer cells with vector titer screening, allowing for screening 200-500 clones in 2 weeks. It makes use of a GFP separated into two fragments, S10 and S11 (Split GFP), fluorescing only upon transcomplementation. Producer cells carrying a S11 viral transgene are cloned in 96-well plates and co-cultured with target cells stably expressing S10. During the period of clone expansion, S11 viruses infect S10 target cells reconstituting the GFP signal. Transcomplemented fluorescence data provide direct estimation of the clone's productivity and can be analyzed in terms of density distribution, offering valuable information on the average productivity of the cell population and allowing the identification of high-producing clones. The method was validated by establishing a retrovirus producer from a nude cell line, in <3 months, inserting three vector constructs without clone selection or screening in between. Clones producing up to 10(8) infectious particles per ml were obtained, delivering optimal ratios of infectious-to-total particles (1 to 5). The method was additionally used to evaluate the production performance of HEK 293 and HEK 293T cell lines demonstrating that the latter sustains increased titers. Finally, it was used to study genetic manipulation of glutathione metabolism in retrovirus production showing that changing cell metabolism steers higher vector expression with titer increases of more than one order of magnitude.This method is a valuable tool not only for cell line development but also for genetic manipulation of viral vector and/or producer cells contributing to advancing the field of viral gene therapy.

  8. Functional polymorphism of each of the two HLA-DR beta chain loci demonstrated with antigen-specific DR3- and DRw52-restricted T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    HLA-DR3- and HLA-DRw52-associated functional polymorphism was investigated with selected tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific T cell clones. We have shown earlier that HLA-DR antigens are encoded by two distinct loci, DR beta I and DR beta III. The alloantigenic determinant(s) defined by the serological HLA-DR3 specificity map to the former, while the supratypic HLA-DRw52 determinants map to DR beta III. Furthermore, we have recently recognized by DNA sequencing three alleles of HLA- DRw52 at locus DR beta III, referred to as 52 a, b, and c. Our objective was to correlate the pattern of T cell restriction with the gene products of individual DR beta chain loci and with the three newly described alleles of locus DR beta III. Among the selected T cell clones, 5 reacted exclusively when TT was presented by HLA-DR3+ APCs (TT-DR3-APC). In contrast, two T cell clones were stimulated by TT- DRw52-APC. More specifically, these two T cell clones (Clones 10 and 16) were stimulated by different subsets of TT-DRw52-APC. Clone 16 responded to some DR3 and TT-DRw6-APC, while clone 10 was stimulated by other TT-DR3 and TT-DRw6, and all TT-DR5-APC. This same pattern of DRw52 restriction was found in panel, as well as in family studies. Because this suggested a correlation with the pattern of DRw52 polymorphism observed earlier by DNA sequencing and oligonucleotide hybridization, the APC used in these experiments were typed for the 52 a, b, and c alleles of locus DR beta III by allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. This distribution overlapped exactly with the stimulation pattern defined by the T cell clones. Clone 16 responded to TT-52a-APC, clone 10 to TT-52b-APC, and both clones to a TT-52c-APC. The response of the T cell clones was inhibited differentially by mAbs to DR. Raising TT concentration, or increasing HLA-class II expression with INF-gamma both affected the magnitude of response of the TT- specific clones but did not modify their specificities. These results demonstrate that

  9. Repetitive busulfan administration after hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy associated with a dominant HDAC7 clone in a nonhuman primate.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianjun; Larochelle, Andre; Maric, Irina; Faulhaber, Marion; Donahue, Robert E; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2010-06-01

    The risk of genotoxicity of retroviral vector-delivered gene therapy targeting hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has been highlighted by the development of clonal dominance and malignancies in human and animal gene therapy trials. Large-animal models have proven invaluable to test the safety of retroviral vectors, but the detection of clonal dominance may require years of follow-up. We hypothesized that hematopoietic stress may accelerate the proliferation and therefore the detection of abnormal clones in these models. We administered four monthly busulfan (Bu) infusions to induce hematopoietic stress in a healthy rhesus macaque previously transplanted with CD34+ cells transduced with retroviral vectors carrying a simple marker gene. Busulfan administration resulted in significant cytopenias with each cycle, and prolonged pancytopenia after the final cycle with eventual recovery. Before busulfan treatment there was highly polyclonal marking in all lineages. After Bu administration clonal diversity was markedly decreased in all lineages. Unexpectedly, we found no evidence of selection of the MDS1/EVI1 clones present before Bu administration, but a clone with a vector integration in intron 1 of the histone deacetylase-7 (HDAC7) gene became dominant in granulocytes over time after Bu administration. The overall marking level in the animal was increased significantly after Bu treatment and coincident with expansion of the HDAC7 clone, suggesting an in vivo advantage for this clone under stress. HDAC7 expression was upregulated in marrow progenitors containing the vector. Almost 5 years after Bu administration, the animal developed progressive cytopenias, and at autopsy the marrow showed complete lack of neutrophil or platelet maturation, with a new population of approximately 20% undifferentiated blasts. These data suggest that chemotherapeutic stress may accelerate vector-related clonal dominance, even in the absence of drug resistance genes expressed by the vector

  10. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of a Chinese Hamster Cell Line. I. Selection of Clones with Defective Macromolecular Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roufa, Donald J.; Reed, Susan J.

    1975-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive clones have been selected from a mutagenized culture of Chinese hamster lung cells by a procedure involving bromodeoxy-uridine (BrdU) incorporation and irradiation with black light. The selection procedure used in these studies was adapted from methods developed by others to yield mutants that cease DNA replication within a short time after they are transferred to nonpermissive temperature. After mutagenesis with ethyl methanosulfonate ten clones survived the selection procedure. Three of the clones (mutants) were temperature-sensitive as measured by growth properties. Two mutants ceased DNA synthesis within six hours of being shifted to 39° and the third mutant continued to synthesize DNA at nonpermissive temperature at a reduced rate for at least 24 hours. Thus, all three mutants survived the selection procedure for understandable reasons, since each was unable to incorporate sufficient BrdU at 39° to lethally protosensitize its DNA during the standard exposure period. The two mutants that cease DNA synthesis at high temperature (clones 115–47 and 115–53) also stop incorporating radioactive amino acids and uridine within six hours at 39°. Their complex phenotype, i.e. defective DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis, is reversible. When these mutants were returned to 33° after 8 hours at 39°, both resumed DNA synthesis immediately (< 1 hour). Reversal of defective DNA synthesis in both mutants was sensitive to drugs that inhibit protein biosynthesis specifically. Those same drugs, as well as toxic amino acids analogs, also effected a striking mutant phenocopy in wild-type cells. The phenocopy produced by amino acid analogs that are incorporated into mammalian proteins suggested that one or more proteins must be synthesized continuously to support mammalian cells engaged in programmed DNA replication. PMID:1232024

  11. Persistence of Anti-Desmoglein 3 IgG+ B-Cell Clones in Pemphigus Patients Over Years

    PubMed Central

    Hammers, Christoph M.; Chen, Jing; Lin, Chenyan; Kacir, Stephen; Siegel, Don L.; Payne, Aimee S.; Stanley, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a prototypic tissue-specific autoantibody-mediated disease in which anti-desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies cause life-threatening blistering. We characterized the autoimmune B-cell response over 14 patient-years in two patients with active and relapsing disease, then in one of these patients after long-term remission induced by multiple courses of rituximab (anti-CD20 antibody). Characterization of the anti-Dsg3 IgG+ repertoire by antibody phage display (APD) and PCR indicated that 6 clonal lines persisted in patient 1 (PV3) over 5.5 years, with only one new clone detected. Six clonal lines persisted in patient 2 (PV1) for 4 years, of which 5 persisted for another 4.5 years without any new clones detected. However, after long-term clinical and serologic remission, ~11 years after initial characterization, we could no longer detect any anti-Dsg3 clones in PV1 by APD. Similarly, in another PV patient, ~4.5 years after a course of rituximab that induced long-term remission, anti-Dsg3 B-cell clones were undetectable. These data suggest that in PV a given set of non-tolerant B-cell lineages causes autoimmune disease and that new sets do not frequently or continually escape tolerance. Therapy such as rituximab, aimed at eliminating these aberrant sets of lineages, may be effective for disease because new ones are unlikely to develop. PMID:25142730

  12. Increasing histone acetylation of cloned embryos, but not donor cells, by sodium butyrate improves their in vitro development in pigs.

    PubMed

    Das, Ziban Chandra; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Uhm, Sang Jun; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that increased histone acetylation in donor cells or cloned embryos, by applying a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) such as trichostatin A (TSA), significantly enhances their developmental competence. However, its effect may vary with the type of HDACi and the target species, with some research showing nonsignificant or detrimental effects of TSA on in vitro and in vivo development of embryos. In this study, we show that sodium salt of butyric acid, a short-chain fatty acid produced naturally in the body by bacterial degradation of dietary fibers in the colon and rectum, increases histone acetylation in pig fibroblast and embryos at a concentration of 1.0 and 5.0 mM, respectively. However, treatment of donor cells with NaBu did not affect the rate of blastocyst formation or embryo quality in terms of histone acetylation and total nuclei per blastocyst (p > 0.05). On the contrary, treatment of cloned pig embryos with NaBu for 4 h significantly enhanced (p < 0.01) the rate of blastocyst formation (18.3 +/- 2.1 vs. 11.2 +/- 3.0%), although the total nuclei number per blastocyst did not differ. More importantly, blastocysts generated from NaBu-treated cloned embryos had increased levels of histone acetylation that was comparable to those of in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos (36.7 +/- 3.6 vs. 45.9 +/- 2.5). In conclusion, our data suggest that histone hyperacetylation by NaBu treatment of cloned embryos, but not donor cell, enhances their in vitro development up to blastocyst stage.

  13. A protocol for adult somatic cell nuclear transfer in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) with a high rate of viable clone formation.

    PubMed

    Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Kaftanovskaya, Elena; Adachi, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Kinoshita, Masato; Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2013-12-01

    Previously, we successfully generated fully grown, cloned medaka (the Japanese rice fish, Oryzias latipes) using donor nuclei from primary culture cells of adult caudal fin tissue and nonenucleated recipient eggs that were heat shock-treated to induce diploidization of the nuclei. However, the mechanism of clone formation using this method is unknown, and the rate of adult clone formation is not high enough for studies in basic and applied sciences. To gain insight into the mechanism and increase the success rate of this method of clone formation, we tested two distinct nuclear transfer protocols. In one protocol, the timing of transfer of donor nuclei was changed, and in the other, the size of the donor cells was changed; each protocol was based on our original methodology. Ultimately, we obtained an unexpectedly high rate of adult clone formation using the protocol that differed with respect to the timing of donor nuclei transfer. Specifically, 17% of the transplants that developed to the blastula stage ultimately developed into adult clones. The success rate with this method was 13 times higher than that obtained using the original method. Analyses focusing on the reasons for this high success rate of clone formation will help to elucidate the mechanism of clone formation that occurs with this method.

  14. Significant improvement of pig cloning efficiency by treatment with LBH589 after somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun-Xue; Li, Suo; Gao, Qing-Shan; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Yan, Chang-Guo; Kang, Jin-Dan; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2013-10-01

    The low success rate of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) associates with epigenetic aberrancy, including the abnormal acetylation of histones. Altering the epigenetic status by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) enhances the developmental potential of SCNT embryos. In the current study, we examined the effects of LBH589 (panobinostat), a novel broad-spectrum HDACi, on the nuclear reprogramming and development of pig SCNT embryos in vitro. In experiment 1, we compared the in vitro developmental competence of nuclear transfer embryos treated with different concentrations of LBH589. Embryos treated with 50 nM LBH589 for 24 hours showed a significant increase in the rate of blastocyst formation compared with the control or embryos treated with 5 or 500 nM LBH589 (32.4% vs. 11.8%, 12.1%, and 10.0%, respectively, P < 0.05). In experiment 2, we examined the in vitro developmental competence of nuclear transfer embryos treated with 50 nM LBH589 for various intervals after activation and 6-dimethylaminopurine. Embryos treated for 24 hours had higher rates of blastocyst formation than the other groups. In experiment 3, when the acetylation of H4K12 was examined in SCNT embryos treated for 6 hours with 50 nM LBH589 by immunohistochemistry, the staining intensities of these proteins in LBH589-treated SCNT embryos were significantly higher than in the control. In experiment 4, LBH589-treated nuclear transfer and control embryos were transferred into surrogate mothers, resulting in three (100%) and two (66.7%) pregnancies, respectively. In conclusion, LBH589 enhances the nuclear reprogramming and developmental potential of SCNT embryos by altering the epigenetic status and expression, and increasing blastocyst quality.

  15. Expression of functional molecules by human CD3- decidual granular leucocyte clones.

    PubMed

    Gudelj, L; Deniz, G; Rukavina, D; Johnson, P M; Christmas, S E

    1996-04-01

    Cell surface and cytoplasmic antigen expression by 35 CD3- decidual granular leucocyte (DGL) clones, derived from human endometrial tissue in the first trimester of pregnancy, has been compared with both that of fresh CD3- decidual leucocytes and that of CD3- peripheral blood natural killer (PBNK) cell clones (n = 12). The majority of DGL clones retained the antigenic phenotype of fresh cells, although CD103 (HML-1) was expressed on 50% of DGL clones but only 17% of fresh DGL. Both cytoplasmic CD3 zeta and CD3 epsilon chains were detected in > 90% of DGL clones in the absence of cell surface CD3. Cytoplasmic CD3 zeta was present in almost all fresh CD3- DGL, whereas CD3 epsilon was not. Most DGL clones did not express surface Fc gamma receptors I-III (CD64, -32 and -16, respectively) and complement receptors (CR) types 1 and 2 (CD35 and 21, respectively), but 43% expressed CR3 (CD11b/18); in contrast, all PBNK clones were CR3+. The NK cell-associated molecules Kp43 (CD94) and the p58 molecule recognized by the HP3E4 monoclonal antibody were both present on a higher proportion of CD3- PBNK (91% and 50%, respectively) than DGL clones (31% and 14%, respectively), despite expression of CD94 by > 90% of fresh CD56+ decidual leucocytes. Five of 35 CD3- DGL clones expressed cytoplasmic CD3 zeta in the absence of expression of CD2, CD16 or the p58 molecule recognized by HP3E4. These variations between CD3- DGL and PBNK cell clones in expression of functional molecules may be related to previously reported differences in major histocompatibility complex-non-restricted cytotoxic activities between these two cell types.

  16. Dry-coated live viral vector vaccines delivered by nanopatch microprojections retain long-term thermostability and induce transgene-specific T cell responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Frances E; McNeilly, Celia L; Crichton, Michael L; Primiero, Clare A; Yukiko, Sally R; Fernando, Germain J P; Chen, Xianfeng; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hill, Adrian V S; Kendall, Mark A F

    2013-01-01

    The disadvantages of needle-based immunisation motivate the development of simple, low cost, needle-free alternatives. Vaccine delivery to cutaneous environments rich in specialised antigen-presenting cells using microprojection patches has practical and immunological advantages over conventional needle delivery. Additionally, stable coating of vaccine onto microprojections removes logistical obstacles presented by the strict requirement for cold-chain storage and distribution of liquid vaccine, or lyophilised vaccine plus diluent. These attributes make these technologies particularly suitable for delivery of vaccines against diseases such as malaria, which exerts its worst effects in countries with poorly-resourced healthcare systems. Live viral vectors including adenoviruses and poxviruses encoding exogenous antigens have shown significant clinical promise as vaccines, due to their ability to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells. Here, the simian adenovirus serotype 63 and the poxvirus modified vaccinia Ankara--two vectors under evaluation for the delivery of malaria antigens to humans--were formulated for coating onto Nanopatch microprojections and applied to murine skin. Co-formulation with the stabilising disaccharides trehalose and sucrose protected virions during the dry-coating process. Transgene-specific CD8(+) T cell responses following Nanopatch delivery of both vectors were similar to intradermal injection controls after a single immunisation (despite a much lower delivered dose), though MVA boosting of pre-primed responses with Nanopatch was found to be less effective than the ID route. Importantly, disaccharide-stabilised ChAd63 could be stored for 10 weeks at 37°C with less than 1 log10 loss of viability, and retained single-dose immunogenicity after storage. These data support the further development of microprojection patches for the deployment of live vaccines in hot climates.

  17. Effect of calf death loss on cloned cattle herd derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer: clones with congenital defects would be removed by the death loss.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya

    2013-09-01

    To increase public understanding on cloned cattle derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the present review describes the effect of calf death loss on an SCNT cattle herd. The incidence of death loss in SCNT cattle surviving more than 200 days reached the same level as that in conventionally bred cattle. This process could be considered as removal of SCNT cattle with congenital defects caused by calf death loss. As a result of comparative studies of SCNT cattle and conventionally bred cattle, the substantial equivalences in animal health status, milk and meat productive performance have been confirmed. Both sexes of SCNT cattle surviving to adulthood were fertile and their reproductive performance, including efficiency of progeny production, was the same as that in conventionally bred cattle. The presence of substantial equivalence between their progeny and conventionally bred cattle also existed. Despite these scientific findings, the commercial use of food products derived from SCNT cattle and their progeny has not been allowed by governments for reasons including the lack of public acceptance of these products and the low efficiency of animal SCNT. To overcome this situation, communication of the low risk of SCNT technology and research to improve SCNT efficiency are required.

  18. A probable identical Epstein-Barr virus clone-positive composite lymphoma with aggressive natural killer-cell leukemia and cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Kei-Ji; Shimada, Asami; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Imai, Hidenori; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Ota, Yasunori; Takeuchi, Kengo; Ito, Yoshinori; Kimura, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 52-year old woman with a history of mosquito-bite hypersensitivity since childhood. In July 2011, she developed pyrexia, headaches, and nausea, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive aggressive natural killer leukemia (ANKL) was diagnosed on the basis of both a peripheral blood and bone marrow examination. An inguinal lymph node biopsy, on the other hand, revealed EBV-positive cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma plus the presence of a small number of EBV-positive ANKL cells, and a diagnosis of EBV-positive composite lymphoma was made. Both the cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma and ANKL exhibited EBV terminal repeat (Southern blot analysis) monoclonal patterns, and they were almost the same size, approximately 9.0 kb. If it was the identical EBV clone, it is possible that EBV infected progenitor cells common to both NK cells and T cells, that the progenitor cells then differentiated into NK cells and T cells, a chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection developed, and neoplastic transformation occurred. If it was not the identical EBV clone, fairly similar EBVs must have infected NK cells and T cells separately, and they then underwent neoplastic transformation. Because the mechanism by which EBV infects NK cells or T cells is still unknown, we concluded that this case is also important from the standpoint of elucidating it. We are currently in the process of conducting gene analyses to determine whether the fairly similar EBVs that infected the ANKL and cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma are the identical clone. PMID:24427365

  19. [Cloning and expression of bacteriophage FMV lysocyme gene in cells of yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, D G; Cheperigin, S E; Chestkov, A V; Krylov, V N; Tsygankov, Iu D

    2010-03-01

    Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene for soluble lysozyme of bacteriophage FMV from Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria were conducted in yeast cells. Comparable efficiency of two lysozyme expression variants (as intracellular or secreted proteins) was estimated in cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris. Under laboratory conditions, yeast S. cerevisiae proved to be more effective producer of phage lysozyme than P. pastoris, the yield of the enzyme in the secreted form being significantly higher than that produced in the intracellular form. PMID:20391778

  20. The possibilities of practical application of transgenic mammalian species generated by somatic cell cloning in pharmacology, veterinary medicine and xenotransplantology.

    PubMed

    Samiec, M; Skrzyszowska, M

    2011-01-01

    Cloning of genetically-modified mammals to produce: 1) novel animal bioreactors expressing human genes in rens, urinary bladder and the male accessory sex glands, as well as 2) porcine organs suitable in pig-to-human xenotransplantology, could offer new advantages for biomedical purposes. So too does the generation and/or multiplication of genetically-engineered cloned animals in order to produce: 3) physiologically-relevant animal models of serious monogenic human diseases and 4) prion disease-resistant small as well as large animals (i.e., rodents, ruminants). The basic purpose of this paper is to overview current knowledge deciphering the possibilities of using transgenic specimens created by somatic cell nuclear transfer in medical pharmacology, veterinary medicine, agriculture, transplantational medicine and immunology.

  1. Costimulation of CD3/TcR complex with either integrin or nonintegrin ligands protects CD4+ allergen-specific T-cell clones from programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Agea, E; Bistoni, O; Bini, P; Migliorati, G; Nicoletti, I; Bassotti, G; Riccardi, C; Bertotto, A; Spinozzi, F

    1995-08-01

    An optimal stimulation of CD4+ cells in an immune response requires not only signals transduced via the TcR/CD3 complex, but also costimulatory signals delivered as a consequence of interactions between T-cell surface-associated costimulatory receptors and their counterparts on antigen-presenting cells (APC). The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54) efficiently costimulates proliferation of resting, but not antigen-specific, T cells. In contrast, CD28 and CD2 support interleukin (IL)-2 synthesis and proliferation of antigen-specific T cells more efficiently than those of resting T cells. The molecular basis for this differential costimulation of T cells is poorly understood. Cypress-specific T-cell clones (TCC) were generated from four allergic subjects during in vivo seasonal exposure to the allergen. Purified cypress extract was produced directly from fresh collected pollen and incubated with the patients' mononuclear cells. Repeated allergen stimulation was performed in T-cell cultures supplemented with purified extract and autologous APC. The limiting-dilution technique was then adopted to generate allergen-specific TCC, which were also characterized by their cytokine secretion pattern as Th0 (IL-4 plus interferon-gamma) or Th2 (IL-4). Costimulation-induced proliferation or apoptosis was measured by propidium iodide cytofluorometric assay. By cross-linking cypress-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones with either anti-CD3 or anti-CD2, anti-CD28, and anti-CD54 monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrated that CD4+ clones (with Th0- or Th2-type cytokine production pattern) undergo programmed cell death only after anti-CD3 stimulation, whereas costimulation with either anti-CD54 or anti-CD28 protects target cells from apoptosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7503404

  2. Bovine oocytes vitrified by the open pulled straw method and used for somatic cell cloning supported development to term.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yun-Peng; Dai, Yun-Ping; Zhu, Shi-En; Zhu, Hua-Bin; Wu, Tong-Yi; Gong, Guo-Chun; Wang, Hai-Ping; Wang, Li-Li; Liu, Ying; Li, Rong; Wan, Rong; Li, Ning

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine if oocytes vitrified by the open pulled straw (OPS) method could subsequently be used to produce somatic cell cloned cattle. Post-thaw survival rates were 77.0, 79.1, 97.2 and 97.5% for oocytes vitrified with EDFS30 (15% ethylene glycol, 15% dimethyl sulfoxide, ficoll and sucrose), EDFS40 (20% ethylene glycol, 20% dimethyl sulfoxide, ficoll and sucrose), EDFSF30 (15% ethylene glycol, 15% dimethyl sulfoxide, ficoll, sucrose and FBS) and EDFSF40 (20% ethylene glycol, 20% dimethyl sulfoxide, ficoll, sucrose and FBS), respectively. The parthenogenetic blastocyst rates of the vitrified-thawed oocytes activated with 5 microM of the calcium ionophore A23187 for 5 min and 2 microM of 6-dimethylaminopurin (6-DMAP) for 4h ranged from 10.3 to 23.0%, with the highest group not significantly differing from that of the controls (33.2%). In total, 722 vitrified-thawed oocytes were used as recipients for nuclear transfer, of which 343 fused (47.6%). Fifty-six (16.3%) of the reconstructed embryos reached the blastocyst stage after 7d of in vitro culture. Twenty-four blastocysts derived from vitrified-thawed oocytes were transferred to six Luxi yellow cattle recipients. Two recipients (33%) were diagnosed pregnant; one aborted 97 d after transfer, whereas the other delivered a cloned calf after 263 d. As a control, 28 synchronous Luxi yellow cattle recipients each received a single blastocyst produced using a fresh oocyte as a nuclear recipient; 10 recipients were diagnosed pregnant, of which 6 (21.4% of the original 28) delivered cloned calves. In conclusion, bovine oocytes vitrified by the OPS method and subsequently thawed supported development (to term) of somatic cell cloned embryos.

  3. Why Clone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How might cloning be used in medicine? Cloning animal models of disease Much of what researchers learn about human disease comes from studying animal models such as mice. Often, animal models are ...

  4. Establishment and characterization of Epstein-Barr virus gp350-expressing transfected human lymphoid (Raji) cell clones.

    PubMed

    Khyatti, M; Patel, P C; Menezes, J

    1991-06-19

    Gp350, a late Epstein-Barr-virus (EBV) glycoprotein expressed on both the envelope of viral particles and EBV-producing cells, is also the candidate for the development of an anti-EBV subunit vaccine. This glycoprotein is thought to play an important role in anti-EBV immunity. However, studies on the role of this viral antigen in cellular cytotoxicity and other immune functions have been hampered by the lack of a suitable model expressing gp350. We describe here a study in which we successfully transfected a gp350-negative cell line resistant to natural-killer(NK)-cell activity (i.e., Raji) with a recombinant plasmid (pZIP-MA) containing the EBV-gp350 and the neomycin resistance gene. Three clones with a stable and strong expression of gp350 on their surface membrane, as demonstrated using a gp350-specific (i.e., 2LI0) monoclonal antibody (MAb) were isolated, characterized and used as targets in an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. However, gp350 expression on 2 of the 3 isolated clones was not recognized by an anti-gp350 MAb (72AI) which is specific to a unique gp350 epitope with a dual function (i.e., involved in both EBV binding to its target cell receptors and in inducing virus-neutralizing antibody). We have also found that gp350 expression on our 3 selected clones does not affect EBV-receptor (CR2) density. Our model of gp350-expressing, NK-cell-activity-resistant targets revealed very useful in determining that gp350 serves as a target antigen for EBV-specific ADCC. These gp350-expressing cell clones appear to represent a valuable tool for diagnostic purposes (i.e., for detecting and titrating gp350 antibodies in patients with EBV-associated diseases). Our approach should also prove useful for studying the expression of other cell-surface-associated viral and tumor antigens and their role in specific cellular immunity and immunosurveillance. PMID:1646179

  5. Long-term effect on in vitro cloning efficiency after treatment of somatic cells with Xenopus egg extract in the pig.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Ostrup, Olga; Li, Rong; Li, Juan; Vajta, Gábor; Kragh, Peter M; Schmidt, Mette; Purup, Stig; Hyttel, Poul; Klærke, Dan; Callesen, Henrik

    2014-08-01

    In somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), donor cell reprogramming is considered as a biologically important and vulnerable event. Various donor cell pre-treatments with Xenopus egg extracts can promote reprogramming. Here we investigated if the reprogramming effect of one treatment with Xenopus egg extract on donor cells was maintained for several cell passages. The extract treatment resulted in increased cell-colony formation from early passages in treated porcine fibroblasts (ExTES), and increased development of cloned embryos. Partial dedifferentiation was observed in ExTES cells, shown as a tendency towards upregulation of NANOG, c-MYC and KLF-4 and downregulation of DESMIM compared with ExTES at Passage 2. Compared with our routine SCNT, continuously increased development of cloned embryos was observed in the ExTES group, and ExTES cloned blastocysts displayed hypermethylated DNA patterns and hypermethylation of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 in ICM compared with TE. All seven recipients became pregnant after transferral of ExTES cloned embryos and gave birth to 7-22 piglets per litter (average 12). In conclusion, our results demonstrate that one treatment of porcine fibroblasts with Xenopus egg extract can result in long-term increased ability of the cells to promote their in vitro function in subsequent SCNT. Finally these cells can also result in successful development of cloned embryos to term.

  6. Equivalency of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cells derived from fertilized, parthenogenetic, and hand-made cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Musharifa; Selokar, Naresh L; Singh, Karn P; Zandi, Mohammad; Singh, Manoj K; Shah, Riaz A; Chauhan, Manmohan S; Singla, Suresh K; Palta, Prabhat; Manik, Radheysham

    2012-06-01

    This study was aimed at establishing buffalo embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from in vitro fertilized (IVF), parthenogenetic, and hand-made cloned (HMC) embryos and to check their equivalency in terms of stem cell marker expression, longevity, proliferation, and differentiation pattern. ESCs derived from all three sources were found by immunofluorescence to express the pluripotency markers SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, OCT4, and SOX2 and were able to form embryoid bodies containing cells expressing genes specific to endoderm (AFP, HNF4, and GATA4), mesoderm (MSX1, BMP4, and ASA), and ectoderm (cytokeratin 8 and NF68). Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) showed cells from all sources to be positive for pluripotency markers OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, STAT3, REX1, FOXD3, NUCLEOSTEMIN, and TELOMERASE. Pluripotency markers OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, and c-MYC were also analyzed by real-time PCR. No significant differences were observed among ESCs from all three sources for all these genes except NANOG, whose expression was higher (p<0.05) in HMC-derived ESCs (6.897±2.3) compared to that in parthenogenesis- and IVF-derived cells (1.603±0.315 and 1±0, respectively). Pluripotent, stable buffalo ESC lines derived from IVF, parthenogenesis, and HMC embryos may be genetically manipulated to provide a powerful tool for studies involving embryonic development, genomic imprinting, gene targeting, cloning, chimera formation, and transgenic animal production.

  7. Bald scalp in men with androgenetic alopecia retains hair follicle stem cells but lacks CD200-rich and CD34-positive hair follicle progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Luis A.; Yang, Chao-Chun; Zhao, Tailun; Blatt, Hanz B.; Lee, Michelle; He, Helen; Stanton, David C.; Carrasco, Lee; Spiegel, Jeffrey H.; Tobias, John W.; Cotsarelis, George

    2011-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), also known as common baldness, is characterized by a marked decrease in hair follicle size, which could be related to the loss of hair follicle stem or progenitor cells. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed bald and non-bald scalp from AGA individuals for the presence of hair follicle stem and progenitor cells. Cells expressing cytokeratin15 (KRT15), CD200, CD34, and integrin, α6 (ITGA6) were quantitated via flow cytometry. High levels of KRT15 expression correlated with stem cell properties of small cell size and quiescence. These KRT15hi stem cells were maintained in bald scalp samples. However, CD200hiITGA6hi and CD34hi cell populations — which both possessed a progenitor phenotype, in that they localized closely to the stem cell–rich bulge area but were larger and more proliferative than the KRT15hi stem cells — were markedly diminished. In functional assays, analogous CD200hiItga6hi cells from murine hair follicles were multipotent and generated new hair follicles in skin reconstitution assays. These findings support the notion that a defect in conversion of hair follicle stem cells to progenitor cells plays a role in the pathogenesis of AGA. PMID:21206086

  8. Supraagonistic, bispecific single-chain antibody purified from the serum of cloned, transgenic cows induces T-cell-mediated killing of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Wick, Wolfgang; Minoia, Rosa; Weller, Michael; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Brem, Gottfried; Jung, Gundram

    2005-12-20

    Here we characterize the antitumor activity of a recombinant bispecific single-chain antibody isolated from the serum of cloned transgenic cows. The antibody, termed r28M, is directed to a melanoma-associated proteoglycan, also expressed on glioblastoma cells, and to human CD28. Bound to tumor cells, r28M induced exceedingly efficient supraagonistic T-cell activation via the CD28 molecule without an additional stimulus via the TCR/CD3 complex. In vitro, T cells and NK cells contributed to tumor cell killing after r28M-mediated activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, NK activity depended on T-cell-derived cytokines. In vivo, r28M markedly inhibited the growth of human glioblastoma cells in nude mice. The serum half-life of the protein after i.v. injection was approximately 6 hr. Thus, r28M is unique not only in inducing supraagonistic CD28-mediated T-cell activation against tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, it also meets 2 additional requirements that are critical for clinical application: a relatively long serum half-life and the possibility of obtaining large amounts of active material from cloned transgenic livestock.

  9. Cloning the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, T; Yanagimachi, R

    1999-06-01

    A brief account is given of early attempts to clone mammals (mice) by transferring cells (nuclei) of preimplantation embryos into enucleated oocytes, zygotes or blastomeres of two-cell embryos. This is followed by a brief review of recent successes using adult somatic cells: mammary gland cells for sheep, muscle cells for cattle and cumulus cells for mice. We have developed a technique for cloning the laboratory mouse by transferring cumulus cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes. With this technique, we have produced a population of over 80 cloned animals, and have carried the process over four generations. Development and fertility of these appear normal. However, the yield is very low; only approximately 1% of injected oocytes are carried to term. The challenge is now to understand the reason for this high loss. Is it a problem of technique, genomic reprogramming, somatic mutation, imprinting or incompatible cell cycle phases?

  10. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe?

  11. A novel SIV gag-specific CD4(+)T-cell clone suppresses SIVmac239 replication in CD4(+)T cells revealing the interplay between antiviral effector cells and their infected targets.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Victor I; Trivett, Matthew T; Coren, Lori V; Jain, Sumiti; Bohn, Patrick S; Wiseman, Roger W; O'Connor, David H; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E

    2016-06-01

    To study CD4(+)T-cell suppression of AIDS virus replication, we isolated nine rhesus macaque SIVGag-specific CD4(+)T-cell clones. One responding clone, Gag68, produced a typical cytotoxic CD8(+)T-cell response: induction of intracellular IFN-γ, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and CD107a degranulation. Gag68 effectively suppressed the spread of SIVmac239 in CD4(+)T cells with a corresponding reduction of infected Gag68 effector cells, suggesting that CD4(+)effectors need to suppress their own infection in addition to their targets to be effective. Gag68 TCR cloning and gene transfer into CD4(+)T cells enabled additional experiments with this unique specificity after the original clone senesced. Our data supports the idea that CD4(+)T cells can directly limit AIDS virus spread in T cells. Furthermore, Gag68 TCR transfer into CD4(+)T-cell clones with differing properties holds promise to better understand the suppressive effector mechanisms used by this important component of the antiviral response using the rhesus macaque model.

  12. The retained placenta.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Andrew D

    2008-12-01

    The incidence and importance of retained placenta (RP) varies greatly around the world. In less developed countries, it affects about 0.1% of deliveries but has up to 10% case fatality rate. In more developed countries, it is more common (about 3% of vaginal deliveries) but very rarely associated with mortality. There are three main types of retained placenta following the vagina delivery: placenta adherens (when there is failed contraction of the myometrium behind the placenta), trapped placenta (a detached placenta trapped behind a closed cervix) and partial accreta (when there is a small area of accreta preventing detachment). All can be treated by manual removal of placenta, which should be carried out at 30-60 minutes postpartum. Medical management is also an option for placenta adherens and trapped placenta. The need for manual removal can be reduced by 20% by the use of intraumbilical oxytocin (30 i.u. in 30 mL saline). A trapped placenta may respond to glyceryl trinitrate (500 mcg sublingually) or gentle, persistent, controlled cord traction.

  13. Retained gas inventory comparison

    SciTech Connect

    BARTON, W.B.

    1999-05-18

    Gas volume data derived from four different analytical methods were collected and analyzed for comparison to volumes originally used in the technical basis for the Basis for Interim Operations (BIO). The original volumes came from Hodgson (1996) listed in the reference section of this document. Hodgson (1996) screened all 177 single and double-shell tanks for the presence of trapped gas in waste via two analytical methods: Surface Level Rise (SLR), and Barometric Pressure Effect (BPE). More recent gas volume projections have been calculated using different analytical techniques along with updates to the parameters used as input to the SLR and BPE models. Gas volumes derived from new analytical instruments include those as measured by the Void Fraction Instrument (VFI) and Retained Gas Sampler (RGS). The results of this comparison demonstrate that the original retained gas volumes of Hodgson (1996) used as a technical basis in developing the BIO were conservative, and were conservative from a safety analysis standpoint. These results represent only comparisons to the original reported volumes using the limited set of newly acquired data that is available.

  14. Conformation-dependent recognition of a protein by T-lymphocytes: apomyoglobin-specific T-cell clone recognizes conformational changes between apomyoglobin and myoglobin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1988-01-01

    A T-cell clone specific to apomyoglobin was generated. It was prepared from a T-cell culture obtained by in vitro driving of lymph node cells with apomyoglobin from SJL mice that have been primed in vivo with apomyoglobin. In proliferative assays, the T-cell clone responded to apomyoglobin but did not recognize native myoglobin or any of the synthetic peptides corresponding to the six T sites of myoglobin. The demonstration that a T-cell clone can be isolated, whose specificity is directed entirely to apomyoglobin and not to its counterpart myoglobin, with an identical amino acid composition, indicates the importance of the three-dimensional structure in the presentation of the protein to T cells.

  15. Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells in Hodgkin's disease represent the outgrowth of a dominant tumor clone derived from (crippled) germinal center B cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In Hodgkin's disease (HD), the Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells represent only a minute population in the diseased tissue. The investigation of lineage derivation and clonal origin of these cells has yielded conflicting results. We have analyzed HRS cells micromanipulated from infiltrated tissue sections of 10 primary HD patients for rearranged V genes, extending a previous study. Clonally related rearrangements were found in nine cases, indicating that HRS cells represent a dominant clone of B lineage-derived cells in at least a large fraction of cases of HD. Rearranged VH genes from HRS cells carried a high load of somatic mutation, indicating that HRS cells are derived from germinal center (GC) cells or their progeny. Stop codons in some in-frame V gene rearrangements suggest that the HRS cell precursors reside inside GCs, have acquired crippling mutations that prevent antigenic selection, but escape apoptosis through some transforming event. PMID:8879220

  16. The in vitro generation of multi-tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell clones: Candidates for leukemia adoptive immunotherapy following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Yehia S; Bashawri, Layla A; Vatte, Chittibabu; Abu-Rish, Eman Y; Cyrus, Cyril; Khalaf, Wafaa S; Browning, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy is a promising approach to manage and maintain relapse-free survival of leukemia patients, especially following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Post-transplant adoptive immunotherapy using cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of the donor origin provide graft-versus-tumor effects, with or without graft-versus-host disease. Myeloid leukemias express immunogenic leukemia associated antigens (LAAs); such as WT-1, PRAME, MAGE, h-TERT and others, most of them are able to induce specific T cell responses whenever associated with the proper co-stimulation. We investigated the ability of a LAA-expressing hybridoma cell line to induce CTL clones in PBMCs of HLA-matched healthy donors in vitro. The CTL clones were induced by repetitive co-culture with LAAs-expressing, HLA-A*0201(+) hybrid cell line, generated by fusion of leukemia blasts to human immortalized APC (EBV-sensitized B-lymphoblastoid cell line; HMy2). The induced cytotoxic T cell clones were phenotypically and functionally characterized by pentamer analysis, IFN-γ release ELISPOT and cellular cytotoxicity assays. All T cell lines showed robust peptide recognition and functional activity when sensitized with HLA-A*0201-restricted WT-1235-243, hTERT615-624 or PRAME100-108 peptides-pulsed T2 cells, in addition to partially HLA-matched leukemia blasts. This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing multi-tumor antigen-specific T cell lines in allogeneic PBMCs in vitro, using LAA-expressing tumor/HMy2 hybrid cell line model, for potential use in leukemia adoptive immunotherapy in partially matched donor-recipient setting. PMID:27490939

  17. T cell receptor gamma gene status of human alpha/beta+ and gamma/delta+ T cell clones: absence of V9JP rearrangements in alpha/beta+ clones is not a result of a lack of rearrangements involving more 5' J gamma segments.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E

    1989-11-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) gamma gene rearrangements were examined in panels of human T cell clones expressing TCR alpha/beta or gamma/delta heterodimers. Over half of the alpha/beta+ clones had both chromosomes rearranged to C gamma 2 but this was the case for only 20% of the gamma/delta+ clones. While more than half of the gamma/delta+ clones showed a V9JP rearrangement, this configuration was absent from all 49 alpha/beta+ clones analysed. However, this was not a result of all rearrangements being to the more 3' J gamma genes as 11 alpha/beta+ clones had rearrangement(s) to JP1, the most 5' J gamma gene segment. Both alpha/beta+ and gamma/delta+ clones showed a similar pattern of V gamma gene usage in rearrangements to J gamma 1 or J gamma 2 with a lower proportion of the more 3' genes being rearranged to J gamma 2 than for the more 5' genes. Several alpha/beta+ and several gamma/delta+ clones had noncoordinate patterns of rearrangement involving both C gamma 1 and C gamma 2. Eleven out of fourteen CD8+ clones tested had both chromosomes rearranged to C gamma 2 whereas all clones derived from CD4-8- cells and having unconventional phenotypes (CD4-8- or CD4+8+) had at least one C gamma 1 rearrangement. Twelve out of twenty-seven CD4+ clones also had this pattern, suggesting that CD4-8+ clones had a tendency to utilize more 3' J gamma gene segments than CD4+ clones. There was some evidence for interdonor variation in the proportions of TCR gamma rearrangements to C gamma 1 or C gamma 2 in alpha/beta+ clones as well as gamma/delta+ clones. The results illustrate the unique nature of the V9JP rearrangement in gamma/delta+ clones and the possible use of a sequential mechanism of TCR gamma gene rearrangements during T cell differentiation is discussed.

  18. [Cloning - controversies].

    PubMed

    Twardowski, T; Michalska, A

    2001-01-01

    Cloning of the human being is not only highly controversial; in the opinion of the authors it is impossible - we are not able to reproduce human behaviour and character traits. Reproduction through cloning is limited to personal genome resources. The more important is protection of genomic characteristics as private property and taking advantage of cloning for production of the human organs directly or through xenotransplants. In this paper we present the legislation related to cloning in Poland, in the European Union and other countries. We also indicate who and why is interested in cloning.

  19. Interclonal variations in the molecular karyotype of Trypanosoma cruzi: chromosome rearrangements in a single cell-derived clone of the G strain.

    PubMed

    Lima, Fabio Mitsuo; Souza, Renata Torres; Santori, Fábio Rinaldo; Santos, Michele Fernandes; Cortez, Danielle Rodrigues; Barros, Roberto Moraes; Cano, Maria Isabel; Valadares, Helder Magno Silva; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Mortara, Renato Arruda; da Silveira, José Franco

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi comprises a pool of populations which are genetically diverse in terms of DNA content, growth and infectivity. Inter- and intra-strain karyotype heterogeneities have been reported, suggesting that chromosomal rearrangements occurred during the evolution of this parasite. Clone D11 is a single-cell-derived clone of the T. cruzi G strain selected by the minimal dilution method and by infecting Vero cells with metacyclic trypomastigotes. Here we report that the karyotype of clone D11 differs from that of the G strain in both number and size of chromosomal bands. Large chromosomal rearrangement was observed in the chromosomes carrying the tubulin loci. However, most of the chromosome length polymorphisms were of small amplitude, and the absence of one band in clone D11 in relation to its reference position in the G strain could be correlated to the presence of a novel band migrating above or below this position. Despite the presence of chromosomal polymorphism, large syntenic groups were conserved between the isolates. The appearance of new chromosomal bands in clone D11 could be explained by chromosome fusion followed by a chromosome break or interchromosomal exchange of large DNA segments. Our results also suggest that telomeric regions are involved in this process. The variant represented by clone D11 could have been induced by the stress of the cloning procedure or could, as has been suggested for Leishmania infantum, have emerged from a multiclonal, mosaic parasite population submitted to frequent DNA amplification/deletion events, leading to a 'mosaic' structure with different individuals having differently sized versions of the same chromosomes. If this is the case, the variant represented by clone D11 would be better adapted to survive the stress induced by cloning, which includes intracellular development in the mammalian cell. Karyotype polymorphism could be part of the T. cruzi arsenal for responding to environmental pressure.

  20. Mechanosensitive channel of Thermoplasma, the cell wall-less archaea: cloning and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Kloda, A; Martinac, B

    2001-01-01

    By using a functional approach of reconstituting detergent-solubilized membrane proteins into liposomes and following their function in patch-clamp experiments, we identified a novel mechanosensitive (MS) channel in the thermophilic cell wall-less archaeon Thermoplasma volcanium. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the enriched protein fractions revealed a band of approx 15 kDa comparable to MscL, the bacterial MS channel of large conductance. 20 N-terminal residues determined by protein microsequencing, matched the sequence to an unknown open reading frame in the genome of a related species Thermoplasma acidophilum. The protein encoded by the T. acidophilum gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and reconstituted into liposomes. When examined for function, the reconstituted protein exhibited properties typical of an MS ion channel: 1) activation by negative pressure applied to the patch-clamp pipet, 2) blockage by gadolinium, and 3) activation by the anionic amphipath trinitrophenol. In analogy to the nomenclature used for bacterial MS channels, the MS channel of T acidophilum was termed MscTA. Secondary structural analysis indicated that similar to MscL, the T. acidophilum MS protein may have two transmembrane domains, suggesting that MS channels of thermophilic Archaea belong to a family of structurally related MscL-like ion channels with two membrane-spanning regions. When the mscTA gene was expressed in the mscL- knockout strain and the MscTA protein reconstituted into liposomes, the gating of MscTA was characterized by very brief openings of variable conductance. In contrast, when the mscTA gene was expressed in the wild-type mscL+ strain of E. coli, the gating properties of the channel resembled MscL. However, the channel had reduced conductance and differed from MscL in its kinetics and in the free energy of activation, suggesting that MscTA and MscL can form functional complexes and/or modulate each other

  1. Patterns of T cell receptor gamma gene rearrangements in human CD3+ clones derived from WT31- or Leu7+ cells in relation to non-MHC-restricted cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E

    1989-01-01

    Clones were obtained from human peripheral blood WT31-, WT31-CD4-8-, CD4-8- or Leu 7+ cells in the presence of interleukin 2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Almost all clones were CD3+, about 50% were CD4-8- and all clones tested derived from WT31- remained WT31-, indicating that they were expressing a gamma/delta heterodimer in association with CD3. Some clones derived from CD4-8- cells expressing CD3 were WT31- and some were WT31+. All CD3+ clones had T cell receptor (TCR) gamma gene rearrangements; most also had their TCR beta genes rearranged, including all clones derived from Leu 7+ cells. TCR gamma gene rearrangements were noted involving all five known J segments. There was a tendency for V gene segments from the VII and VIII subgroups to be rearranged to J gamma 2 less often than those from the more 5' VI subgroup. Two clones definitely had one rearrangement to C gamma 1 and one to C gamma 2. When clones derived from WT31- cells were considered, the only obvious relationship which emerged was that all clones with both chromosomes rearranged to C gamma 2 had low or negligible cytotoxic activity against natural killer (NK)-sensitive and NK-resistant targets. Several of these clones were expressing CD8 on about 30% of cells. Most clones with rearrangements involving only C gamma 1 had high non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity while those with at least one C gamma 1 rearrangement had either high or low activity. The only exceptions noted were a clone with a single V9JP rearrangement and a clone with a V9JP and a VI/IIIJP1 rearrangement, which both had low activity. A similar pattern was also found with most clones derived from Leu 7+ cells. The data are consistent with the participation of most types of disulphide-linked (C gamma 1) gamma/delta heterodimers in non-MHC-restricted cytotoxic activity mediated by CD3+ gamma/delta + T cell clones.

  2. Down-modulation of antigen-induced activation of murine cultured mast cells sensitized with a highly cytokinergic IgE clone.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, Mariko; Kurimune, Yuki; Yamada, Keiko; Hyodo, Nao; Natsuhara, Mayuko; Ichikawa, Atsushi; Furuta, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that several IgE clones can activate mast cells during the sensitization phase even in the absence of antigen. They were found to induce pro-inflammatory cytokine release, histamine synthesis, chemotaxis, adhesion, and accelerated maturation of mast cells, although it remains unknown whether antigen-induced responses can be affected by differences of IgE clones. We compared two IgE clones, which were different in the capacity to activate mast cells during sensitization, in terms of potentials to affect antigen-induced degranulation and cytokine releases using IL-3-dependent murine bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs). Antigen-induced degranulation and pro-inflammatory cytokine release were augmented, when BMMCs were sensitized with elevated concentrations of a clone IgE-3, which did not induce phosphorylation of JNK and cytokine release in the absence of antigen, whereas those were significantly rather decreased, when BMMCs were sensitized with elevated concentrations of a clone SPE-7, one of the most potent cytokinergic IgE clones, which intensively induced phosphorylation of JNK. This attenuated response with SPE-7 was accompanied by decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of the cellular proteins including Syk upon antigen stimulation. SP600125, which is known to inhibit JNK, restored the levels of antigen-induced degranulation and phosphorylation of Syk in BMMCs sensitized with higher concentrations of a clone SPE-7 when it was added before sensitization. Treatment with anisomycin, a potent activator of JNK, before IgE sensitization significantly suppressed antigen-induced degranulation. These findings suggest that differences of sensitizing IgE clones can affect antigen-induced responses and activation of JNK during sensitization might suppress antigen-induced activation of mast cells.

  3. Specific inhibition of lymphokine biosynthesis and autocrine growth using antisense oligonucleotides in Th1 and Th2 helper T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    T helper cells have recently been divided into two subsets. The Th1 subset secretes and responds to IL-2 in an autocrine manner. The Th2 subset upon mitogen or antigen stimulation releases IL-4. Here we describe a novel technology that allowed us to confirm this distinction. We have used synthetic oligonucleotides complementary to the 5' end of mouse IL-2 and IL-4 to specifically block the biosynthesis of IL-2 or IL-4 in two murine helper T cell clones from the Th1 or Th2 subset. We show that the antisense IL-2 oligonucleotide inhibited the proliferation of the Th1 clone and had no effect on the Th2 clone. In parallel experiments, the antisense IL-4 oligonucleotide blocked the proliferation of the Th2 clone and not the proliferation of the Th1 clone. The inhibition was significantly reversed in both cases by the addition of the relevant lymphokine (IL-2 in the case of the Th1 clone, IL-4 in the case of the Th2 clone). Northern analysis, using cDNA probes specific for the two lymphokines, showed a decrease in the steady-state level of the relevant lymphokine mRNA, suggesting the specific degradation of the mRNA by an RNase H-like enzymatic activity. This strategy, which allows the specific blockade of the biosynthesis of a lymphokine, could be useful for future studies on the role of each T helper subset in physiological immune responses. PMID:2974066

  4. Persistence of collagen type II-specific T-cell clones in the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Londei, M.; Savill, C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Brennan, F.; Leech, Z.A.; Feldmann, M. ); Duance, V. ); Maini, R.N. )

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell infiltration of the synovium of joints. Analysis of the phenotype and antigen specificity of the infiltrating cells may thus provide insight into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. T cells were cloned with interleukin 2, a procedure that selects for in vivo-activated cells. All clones had the CD4 CDW29 phenotype. Their antigen specificity was tested by using a panel of candidate joint autoantigens. Four of 17 reacted against autologous blood mononuclear cells. Two clones proliferated in response to collagen type II. After 21 months, another set of clones was derived from synovial tissue of the same joint. One of eight clones tested showed a strong proliferative response against collagen type II. The uncloned synovial T cells of a third operation from another joint also responded to collagen type II. The persistence of collagen type II-specific T cells in active rheumatoid joints over a period of 3 years suggests that collagen type II could be one of the autoantigens involved in perpetuating the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Hemoglobin and hemin induce DNA damage in human colon tumor cells HT29 clone 19A and in primary human colonocytes.

    PubMed

    Glei, Michael; Klenow, Stefanie; Sauer, Julia; Wegewitz, Uta; Richter, Konrad; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice L

    2006-02-22

    Epidemiological findings have indicated that red meat increases the likelihood of colorectal cancer. Aim of this study was to investigate whether hemoglobin, or its prosthetic group heme, in red meat, is a genotoxic risk factor for cancer. Human colon tumor cells (HT29 clone 19A) and primary colonocytes were incubated with hemoglobin/hemin and DNA damage was investigated using the comet assay. Cell number, membrane damage, and metabolic activity were measured as parameters of cytotoxicity in both cell types. Effects on cell growth were determined using HT29 clone 19A cells. HT29 clone 19A cells were also used to explore possible pro-oxidative effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and antigenotoxic effects of the radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Additionally we determined in HT29 clone 19A cells intracellular iron levels after incubation with hemoglobin/hemin. We found that hemoglobin increased DNA damage in primary cells (> or =10 microM) and in HT29 clone 19A cells (> or =250 microM). Hemin was genotoxic in both cell types (500-1000 microM) with concomitant cytotoxicity, detected as membrane damage. In both cell types, hemoglobin and hemin (> or =100 microM) impaired metabolic activity. The growth of HT29 clone 19A cells was reduced by 50 microM hemoglobin and 10 microM hemin, indicating cytotoxicity at genotoxic concentrations. Hemoglobin or hemin did not enhance the genotoxic activity of H2O2 in HT29 clone 19A cells. On the contrary, DMSO reduced the genotoxicity of hemoglobin, which indicated that free radicals were scavenged by DMSO. Intracellular iron increased in hemoglobin/hemin treated HT29 clone 19A cells, reflecting a 40-50% iron uptake for each compound. In conclusion, our studies show that hemoglobin is genotoxic in human colon cells, and that this is associated with free radical mechanisms and with cytotoxicity, especially for hemin. Thus, hemoglobin/hemin, whether available from red meat or from bowel bleeding, may pose genotoxic and

  6. [Isolation and nuclear transfer of ES-like cells colonies derived from embryos being cloning of bovine somatic].

    PubMed

    Dong, Ya-Juan; Bai, Xue-Jin; Li, Jian-Dong; Suzuki, Tatsuyuki

    2003-02-01

    In this experiment, it was designed to carry out proliferous culture of bovine blastocysts(day 7) derived from embryos cloned through bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer, isolating and passaging of ES cells. The cells of blastocysts, which were planted on feeder layer, formed small colonies within 24 h. The nest-shape colonies occurred after culturing for 2-3 days. After the colonies in the same shape were isolated and passaged 4-5 times, many different size colonies with monolayer of multi-cells appeared. The colonies that had been passaged 4-5 times were planted into 4-wells multi-dishes without feeder layer. The colonies with monolayer of multi-cells appeared after 24 h, spread all over the bottom of the dishes, emerged epidermis-like cells that appeared reticulate after 4-7 days. These cells were used as donor cells to carry out nuclear transfer. The results showed that 80% (40/50) of the reconstructed embryos cleaved, 5% (2/40) and 2.5% (1/40) of them developed to the morulaes and blastocyst stage, respectively. It revealed that ES-like cells derived embryos constructed through somatic cell nuclear transfer have the developmental potentials.

  7. Therapeutic cloning: The ethical limits

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Peter A. . E-mail: p.whittaker@lancaster.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    A brief outline of stem cells, stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning is given. The position of therapeutic cloning with regard to other embryonic manipulations - IVF-based reproduction, embryonic stem formation from IVF embryos and reproductive cloning - is indicated. The main ethically challenging stages in therapeutic cloning are considered to be the nuclear transfer process including the source of eggs for this and the destruction of an embryo to provide stem cells for therapeutic use. The extremely polarised nature of the debate regarding the status of an early human embryo is noted, and some potential alternative strategies for preparing immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells are indicated.

  8. Polyurethane retainers for ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of a new ball bearing retainer material is reported. A special composite polyurethane foam ball retainer has been developed that has virtually zero wear, is chemically inert to hydrocarbon lubricants, and stores up to 60 times as much lubricant per unit volume as the most commonly used retainer material, cotton phenolic. This new retainer concept shows promise of years of ball bearing operation without reoiling, based on life testing in high vacuum.

  9. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  10. Retained Placenta Accreta Mimicking Choriocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kohi, Maureen P.; Rizzuto, Gabrielle A.; Fidelman, Nicholas; Lucero, Jennifer; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2015-01-01

    This case demonstrates a rare event of retained invasive placenta masquerading as choriocarcinoma. The patient presented with heavy vaginal bleeding following vaginal delivery complicated by retained products of conception. Ultrasound and computed tomography demonstrated a vascular endometrial mass, invading the uterine wall and raising suspicion for choriocarcinoma. Hysterectomy revealed retained invasive placenta. PMID:26495146

  11. Significant improvement in cloning efficiency of an inbred miniature pig by histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment after somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianguo; Ross, Jason W; Hao, Yanhong; Spate, Lee D; Walters, Eric M; Samuel, Melissa S; Rieke, August; Murphy, Clifton N; Prather, Randall S

    2009-09-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) miniature pig was developed specifically for xenotransplantation and has been extensively used as a large-animal model in many other biomedical experiments. However, the cloning efficiency of this pig is very low (<0.2%), and this has been an obstacle to the promising application of these inbred swine genetics for biomedical research. It has been demonstrated that increased histone acetylation in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, by applying a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor such as trichostatin A (TSA), significantly enhances the developmental competence in several species. However, some researchers also reported that TSA treatment had various detrimental effects on the in vitro and in vivo development of the SCNT embryos. Herein, we report that treatment with 500 nM 6-(1,3-dioxo-1H, 3H-benzo[de]isoquinolin-2-yl)-hexanoic acid hydroxyamide (termed scriptaid), a novel HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced the development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage when NIH inbred fetal fibroblast cells (FFCs) were used as donors compared with the untreated group (21% vs. 9%, P < 0.05). Scriptaid treatment resulted in eight pregnancies from 10 embryo transfers (ETs) and 14 healthy NIH miniature pigs from eight litters, while no viable piglets (only three mummies) were obtained from nine ETs in the untreated group. Thus, scriptaid dramatically increased the cloning efficiency when using inbred genetics from 0.0% to 1.3%. In contrast, scriptaid treatment decreased the blastocyst rate in in vitro fertilization embryos (from 37% to 26%, P < 0.05). In conclusion, the extremely low cloning efficiency in the NIH miniature pig may be caused by its inbred genetic background and can be improved by alteration of genomic histone acetylation patterns.

  12. 40 CFR 98.437 - Records that must be retained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Contained in Pre-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.437 Records that must be retained. (a) In... closed-cell foams must retain the following records substantiating each of the imports that they report... entry form. (4) Ports of entry through which the pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams passed....

  13. 40 CFR 98.437 - Records that must be retained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Contained in Pre-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.437 Records that must be retained. (a) In... closed-cell foams must retain the following records substantiating each of the imports that they report... entry form. (4) Ports of entry through which the pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams passed....

  14. Transgenic mammalian species, generated by somatic cell cloning, in biomedicine, biopharmaceutical industry and human nutrition/dietetics--recent achievements.

    PubMed

    Samiec, M; Skrzyszowska, M

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cell cloning technology in mammals promotes the multiplication of productively-valuable genetically engineered individuals, and consequently allows also for standardization of transgenic farm animal-derived products, which, in the context of market requirements, will have growing significance. Gene farming is one of the most promising areas in modern biotechnology. The use of live bioreactors for the expression of human genes in the lactating mammary gland of transgenic animals seems to be the most cost-effective method for the production/processing of valuable recombinant therapeutic proteins. Among the transgenic farm livestock species used so far, cattle, goats, sheep, pigs and rabbits are useful candidates for the expression of tens to hundreds of grams of genetically-engineered proteins or xenogeneic biopreparations in the milk. At the beginning of the new millennium, a revolution in the treatment of disease is taking shape due to the emergence of new therapies based on recombinant human proteins. The ever-growing demand for such pharmaceutical or nutriceutical proteins is an important driving force for the development of safe and large-scale production platforms. The aim of this paper is to present an overall survey of the state of the art in investigations which provide the current knowledge for deciphering the possibilities of practical application of the transgenic mammalian species generated by somatic cell cloning in biomedicine, the biopharmaceutical industry, human nutrition/dietetics and agriculture.

  15. Cloning and chromosomal localization of the human and murine genes for the T-cell transcription factors NFATc and NFATp.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Ho, S N; Luna, J; Giacalone, J; Thomas, D J; Timmerman, L A; Crabtree, G R; Francke, U

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is a transcription factor complex involved in the activation of cytokines and cell surface molecules associated with coordinating the actions of different cells required for an immune response. Two different genes have recently been cloned that encode proteins capable of functioning as the pre-existing (p) and cytosolic (c) component of the NFAT transcription complex, NFATc of human and NFATp of murine origin (Northrop et al., 1994; McCaffrey et al., 1993b). We report here the partial cDNA cloning of the murine homolog of NFATc and the human homolog of NFATp, and the chromosomal localization of both genes in both species to conserved syntenic regions. Through the use of mapping panels of human x Chinese hamster and mouse x rodent cells hybrids, the NFATc genes were mapped to human and mouse chromosomes 18. By analyzing a chromosome 18 radiation hybrid panel, the human NFATc gene was localized to the q terminus, closely linked to STS marker D18S497. The murine Nfatc gene was sublocalized to chromosome band 18E4 by FISH. The NFATp genes were mapped by somatic cell hybrid analysis to human chromosome 20 and mouse chromosome 2. Human NFATp was assigned to chromosome region 20q13.2-->q13.3 by FISH. Based on the conserved syntenic region on human chromosome 20 and mouse chromosome 2, murine Nfatp is predicted to reside in the vicinity of a mutant locus wasted. Homozygous wst/wst mice display a phenotype reminiscent of severe combined immune deficiency or ataxia telangiectasia, disorders that could therefore be considered candidates for NFATp mutations.

  16. Cutaneous histopathology of Sézary syndrome: a study of 41 cases with a proven circulating T-cell clone.

    PubMed

    Trotter, M J; Whittaker, S J; Orchard, G E; Smith, N P

    1997-05-01

    Sezary syndrome is an uncommon variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) characterized by erythroderma, pruritus, adenopathy, and circulating atypical T-lymphocytes with cerebriform nuclei. The definition of Sezary syndrome can be further refined by including only patients with a circulating peripheral blood population of clonal T-cells. We have evaluated 79 skin biopsies from such a group of 41 erythrodermic patients with circulating Sezary cells and a clonal population of T-cells detected by T-cell receptor-beta gene rearrangement on Southern analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Histopathologic features consistent with chronic dermatitis were observed in 26/79 (33%) skin biopsy specimens, emphasizing that a non-specific histologic appearance is common. Evidence of CTCL was lacking in 11/41 patients on biopsy of their erythrodermic skin. The survival of these patients was not significantly different from 30/41 patients in whom skin biopsies revealed changes diagnostic of CTCL, such as a dermal lymphocytic band with atypical lymphocytes (18/79, 23%) or a mycosis fungoides-like infiltrate (30/79, 38%). This study confirms that non-specific cutaneous histopathologic findings are common in Sezary syndrome, even when a circulating T-cell clone is present. This stresses the need for peripheral blood genetic analysis and for multiple or repeat skin biopsies in erythrodermic patients when there is high clinical suspicion of CTCL.

  17. Auto-transporter A protein of Neisseria meningitidis: a potent CD4+ T-cell and B-cell stimulating antigen detected by expression cloning.

    PubMed

    Ait-Tahar, K; Wooldridge, K G; Turner, D P; Atta, M; Todd, I; Ala'Aldeen, D A

    2000-09-01

    A meningococcal genomic expression library was screened for potent CD4+ T-cell antigens, using patients' peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). One of the most promising positive clones was fully characterized. The recombinant meningococcal DNA contained a single, incomplete, open reading frame (ORF), which was fully reconstructed with reference to available genomic sequence data. The gene was designated autA (auto-transporter A) as its peptide sequence shares molecular characteristics of the auto-transporter family of proteins. Only a single copy of this gene was detected in the meningococcal, and none in the gonococcal, genomic sequence databases. The complete autA gene, when cloned into an expression vector, expressed a protein of approximately 68 kDa. Purified rAutA recalled strong secondary T-cell responses in PBLs of patients and some healthy donors, and induced strong primary T-cell responses in healthy donors. The human B-cell immunogenicity and cross-reactivity of AutA, purified under native conditions, was confirmed in dot immunoblot experiments. Immunoblots with rabbit polyclonal antibodies to rAutA demonstrated the conserved nature, antigenicity and cross-reactivity of AutA amongst meningococci of different serogroups and strains representing different hypervirulent lineages. AutA showed homology with another meningococcal and gonococcal ORF (designated AutB). AutB was cloned and expressed and used to raise an autB-specific antiserum. Immunoblot experiments indicated that AutB is not expressed in meningococci and does not cross-react with AutA. Thus, AutA, being a potent CD4+ T-cell and B-cell-stimulating antigen, which is highly conserved, deserves further investigation as a potential vaccine candidate.

  18. Epigenomics of Neural Cells: REST-Induced Down- and Upregulation of Gene Expression in a Two-Clone PC12 Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manteiga, Jose M.; Bonfiglio, Silvia; Malosio, Maria Luisa; Lazarevic, Dejan; Stupka, Elia; Cittaro, Davide; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    Cell epigenomics depends on the marks released by transcription factors operating via the assembly of complexes that induce focal changes of DNA and histone structure. Among these factors is REST, a repressor that, via its strong decrease, governs both neuronal and neural cell differentiation and specificity. REST operation on thousands of possible genes can occur directly or via indirect mechanisms including repression of other factors. In previous studies of gene down- and upregulation, processes had been only partially investigated in neural cells. PC12 are well-known neural cells sharing properties with neurons. In the widely used PC12 populations, low-REST cells coexist with few, spontaneous high-REST PC12 cells. High- and low-REST PC12 clones were employed to investigate the role and the mechanisms of the repressor action. Among 15,500 expressed genes we identified 1,770 target and nontarget, REST-dependent genes. Functionally, these genes were found to operate in many pathways, from synaptic function to extracellular matrix. Mechanistically, downregulated genes were predominantly repressed directly by REST; upregulated genes were mostly governed indirectly. Among other factors, Polycomb complexes cooperated with REST for downregulation, and Smad3 and Myod1 participated in upregulation. In conclusion, we have highlighted that PC12 clones are a useful model to investigate REST, opening opportunities to development of epigenomic investigation. PMID:26413508

  19. Replication of Ljungan virus in cell culture: the genomic 5'-end, infectious cDNA clones and host cell response to viral infections.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Jens-Ola; Tolf, Conny; Fahlgren, Camilla; Johansson, E Susanne; Arbrandt, Gustav; Niklasson, Bo; Edman, Kjell-A; Lindberg, A Michael

    2007-12-01

    Ljungan virus (LV) is a picornavirus recently isolated from bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus). The previously uncharacterised 5'-end sequence of the LV genome was determined. Infectious cDNA clones were constructed of the wild type LV prototype strain 87-012 and of the cytolytically replicating cell culture adapted variant 87-012G. Virus generated from cDNA clones showed identical growth characteristics as uncloned virus stocks. Cell culture adapted LV, 87-012G, showed a clear cytopathic effect (CPE) at 3-4 days post-infection (p.i.). Virus titers, determined by plaque titration, increased however only within the first 18h p.i. Replication of LV (+) strand RNA was determined by real-time PCR and corresponded in time with increasing titers. In contrast, the amounts of the replication intermediate, the (-) strand, continued to increase until the cells showed CPE. This indicates separate controlling mechanisms for replication of LV (+) and (-) genome strands. Replication was also monitored by immunofluorescence (IF) staining. IF staining of both prototype 87-012 and the CPE causing 87-012G showed groups of 5-25 infected cells at 48h p.i., suggesting a, for picornaviruses, not previously described direct cell-to-cell transmission.

  20. Cloning and stem cell research: a critical overview of the present legislative regime in Australia and the way forward.

    PubMed

    Slabbert, Melodie

    2003-05-01

    The application of stem cell research in biomedical science has recently sparked debates similar to the calls nearly 25 years ago for a ban involving recombinant DNA. This article critically examines the present legislative framework in Australia governing stem cell research and cloning, after briefly seeking a clear understanding of what these procedures involve, as well as suggesting an ethical paradigm within which these issues can be approached. The deficiencies in the proposed legislative framework are also highlighted. Australia has a duty to future generations to pursue the benefits unlocked by this type of research and it is hoped that the next two years will lead to more insights regarding the potential of such research and hence a revision of the present legal impediments.

  1. Detection of CD133 (prominin-1) in a human hepatoblastoma cell line (HuH-6 clone 5)

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Masumi; Tanaka, Kayoko; Murai, Noriko; Matsumoto, Sachiko; Fujita, Keiko; Takaki, Takashi; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    We examined CD133 distribution in a human hepatoblastoma cell line (HuH-6 clone 5). We directly observed the cultured cells on a pressure-resistant thin film (silicon nitride thin film) in a buffer solution by using the newly developed atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM), which features an open sample dish with a silicon nitride thin film window at its base, through which the scanning electron microscope beam scans samples in solution, from below. The ASEM enabled observation of the ventral cell surface, which could not be observed using standard SEM. However, observation of the dorsal cell surface was difficult with the ASEM. Therefore, we developed a new method to observe the dorsal side of cells by using Aclar® plastic film. In this method, cells are cultured on Aclar plastic film and the dorsal side of cells is in contact with the thin silicon nitride film of the ASEM dish. A preliminary study using the ASEM showed that CD133 was mainly localized in membrane ruffles in the peripheral regions of the cell. Standard transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that CD133 was preferentially concentrated in a complex structure comprising filopodia and the leading edge of lamellipodia. We also observed co-localization of CD133 with F-actin. An antibody against CD133 decreased cell migration. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment decreased cell adhesion as well as lamellipodium and filopodium formation. A decrease in the cholesterol level may perturb CD133 membrane localization. The results suggest that CD133 membrane localization plays a role in tumor cell adhesion and migration. PMID:23712466

  2. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally negative practice.…

  3. Cloning and expression analysis of nonspecific cytotoxic cell receptor 1 (Ls-NCCRP1) from red snapper (Lutjanus sanguineus).

    PubMed

    Cai, Jia; Wei, Shina; Wang, Bei; Huang, Yucong; Tang, Jufen; Lu, Yishan; Wu, Zaohe; Jian, Jichang

    2013-09-01

    It is well known that nonspecific cytotoxic cells (NCCs) are kinds of natural killer cell mediated innate immune responses in teleosts. The nonspecific cytotoxic cell receptor protein 1 (NCCRP-1) is an important cell surface protein on NCC, which serves crucial functions in target cell recognition and cytotoxicity activation. In the present study, a nonspecific cytotoxic cell receptor protein NCCRP-1 (Ls-NCCRP1) was cloned from red snapper, Lutjanus sanguineus. The Ls-NCCRP1 cDNA is composed of 986bp with a 43bp of 5'-UTR, 702bp open reading frame (ORF) and 241bp 3'-UTR, encoding a polypeptide of 233 amino acids (GenBank accession no: ADK32635). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Ls-NCCRP1 showed highest similarity to sea bream NCCRP-1. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that Ls-NCCRP1 had relatively high expression level in the head kidney, spleen and liver. After Vibrio alginolyticus infection, transcripts of Ls-NCCRP1 increased and reached its peak at 4h p.i. These results indicated that Ls-NCCRP1 may play an important role in innate immune response to bacteria.

  4. CD8+ T-cell clones deficient in the expression of the CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase have impaired responses to T-cell receptor stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, C T; Pingel, J T; Nelson, J O; Thomas, M L

    1991-01-01

    CD45 is a high-molecular-weight transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed only by nucleated cells of hematopoietic origin. To examine function, mouse CD8+ cytolytic T-cell clones were derived that had a specific defect in the expression of CD45. Northern (RNA) blot analysis indicates that the CD45 deficiency is due to either a transcriptional defect or mRNA instability. The CD45-deficient cells were greatly diminished in their ability to respond to antigen. All functional parameters of T-cell receptor signalling analyzed (cytolysis of targets, proliferation, and cytokine production) were markedly diminished. A CD45+ revertant was isolated, and the ability to respond to antigen was restored. These results support a central and immediate role for this transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase in T-cell receptor signalling. Images PMID:1652055

  5. Quality improvement of transgenic cloned bovine embryos using an aggregation method: Effects on cell number, cell ratio, embryo perimeter, mitochondrial distribution, and gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Bang, J I; Jin, J I; Ghanem, N; Choi, B H; Fakruzzaman, M; Ha, A N; Lee, K L; Uhm, S J; Ko, D H; Koo, B C; Lee, J G; Kong, I K

    2015-09-01

    The production of cloned embryos using conventional methods has extremely low success rates owing to low embryo quality. To improve the quality of cloned bovine embryos expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), we applied an aggregation culture method. The EGFP gene was transfected into bovine fetal fibroblasts using a retroviral vector system. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was performed using these cells, and the resulting embryos were cultured in aggregates or individually. Gene expression was analyzed by a microarray, and differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The total number of cells per blastocyst and the ratio of inner cell mass cells to trophectoderm cells were higher in aggregated transgenic cloned blastocysts (agBL; 368.7 ± 109.6 and 1:4.8, respectively) than in in vitro-fertilized blastocysts (ivfBL; 189.8 ± 65.8 and 1:2.6, respectively) and nonaggregated transgenic cloned blastocysts (sBL; 113.1 ± 36.3 and 1:1.5, respectively; P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Moreover, the blastocyst perimeter was larger in the agBL group than in the ivfBL and sBL groups (1168.8 ± 200.23 vs. 887.33 ± 187.62 and 678 ± 226.1 μm; P < 0.05). In addition, mitochondrial fluorescence intensity was higher in the agBL group than in the ivfBL and sBL groups (P < 0.05). The number of apoptotic cells per blastocyst was lower in the ivfBL and agBL groups than in the sBL group (3.7 ± 2.2 and 3.4 ± 2.1 vs. 6.7 ± 6.8; P < 0.05). The genes identified in the microarray belonged to 18 categories. Expression of the Krüppel-like factor 4 gene, which is associated with cell proliferation, development, and transcription, was 7.2-fold higher in the agBL group than in the ivfBL group (P < 0.05) but did not differ between the sBL and ivfBL groups (P > 0.05). Expression of the heat shock 70-kDa protein 1A gene, which is associated with apoptosis, was 12-fold higher in the s

  6. The effect of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha on the eosinophilic differentiation and NADPH oxidase activation of human HL-60 clone 15 cells.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Juan A; Newburger, Peter E; Condino-Neto, Antonio

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on NADPH oxidase activity and gp91-phox gene expression in HL-60 clone 15 cells as they differentiate along the eosinophilic lineage. The results were compared to the eosoniphilic inducers interleukin-5 (IL-5) and butyric acid. IFN-gamma (100 U/ml) and TNF-alpha (1000 U/ml) or IL-5 (200 pM) caused a significant increase in the expression of the eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and the major basic protein (MBP) genes. Similar results were observed when the cells were cultured with 0.5 mM butyric acid for 5 days. IFN-gamma (100 U/ml) and TNF-alpha (1000 U/ml) also caused a significant increase in superoxide release by HL-60 clone 15 cells after 2 days compared with control or with butyric acid-induced cells. After 5 days, these cytokines and butyric acid induced an even stronger release of superoxide. HL-60 clone 15 cells cultured with IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha for 2 days showed a significant increase in gp91-phox gene expression. We conclude that IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha are sufficient to induce the differentiation of HL-60 clone 15 cells to the eosinophilic lineage and to upregulate gp91-phox gene expression and activity of the NADPH oxidase system.

  7. Continuous expression and replication of the hepatitis delta virus genome in Hep G2 hepatoblastoma cells transfected with cloned viral DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, P J; Kuo, M Y; Chen, M L; Tu, S J; Chiu, M N; Wu, H L; Hsu, H C; Chen, D S

    1990-07-01

    To establish stable cell clones allowing continuous replication of hepatitis delta virus (HDV), Hep G2, a hepatoblastoma cell line containing no hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA sequences, was transfected with a recombinant plasmid containing a tandem trimer of HDV cDNA (driven by the simian virus 40 late promoter) and a neomycin-resistance gene. After selection with the neomycin analogue G418, at least two of the resistant clones were shown to have intact delta antigen by specific immunoblotting, and the delta antigen was located in the cell nucleus by immunofluorescence. Transfected cloned viral DNAs were found to be integrated into cell chromosomes. Replication of the HDV genome was demonstrated by the presence of not only genomic and antigenomic HDV RNAs but also HDV RNAs in multimeric and circular forms. In addition, a 0.8-kilobase antigenomic RNA containing a poly(A) tail and encoding the delta-antigen open reading frame was documented. Continuous replication and transcription of the HDV genome was thus achieved in these transfected cell lines. The results confirmed that replication of HDV was unassisted by HBV. Stable passage of such cell lines strongly suggests that HDV lacks direct cytopathicity in hepatocytes. These clones should be useful in studying the details of the HDV life cycle and the relationship between HDV and its helper virus, HBV.

  8. Human therapeutic cloning.

    PubMed

    Lanza, R P; Cibelli, J B; West, M D

    1999-09-01

    Somatic cell nuclear 'reprogramming' in livestock species is now routine in many laboratories. Here, Robert Lanza, Jose Cibelli and Michael West discuss how these techniques may soon be used to clone genetically matched cells and tissues for transplantation into patients suffering from a wide range of disorders that result from tissue loss or dysfunction.

  9. Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Jun; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Tomizawa, Hitoshi

    1995-04-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate B-cell growth and development through their surface molecules and cytokines. In this study, we generated a mAb, RS38, that recognized a novel human membrane protein, BST-2, expressed on bone marrow stromal cell lines and synovial cell lines. We cloned a cDNA encoding BST-2 from a rheumatoid arthritis-derived synovial cell line. BST-2 is a 30- to 36-kDa type II transmembrane protein, consisting of 180 amino acids. The BST-2 gene (HGMW-approved symbol BST2) is located on chromosome 19p13.2.