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Sample records for cell colony formation

  1. Study of budding yeast colony formation and its characterizations by using circular granular cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprianti, D.; Haryanto, F.; Purqon, A.; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Budding yeast can exhibit colony formation in solid substrate. The colony of pathogenic budding yeast can colonize various surfaces of the human body and medical devices. Furthermore, it can form biofilm that resists drug effective therapy. The formation of the colony is affected by the interaction between cells and with its growth media. The cell budding pattern holds an important role in colony expansion. To study this colony growth, the molecular dynamic method was chosen to simulate the interaction between budding yeast cells. Every cell was modelled by circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. Cohesion force, contact force, and Stokes force govern this model to mimic the interaction between cells and with the growth substrate. Characterization was determined by the maximum (L max) and minimum (L min) distances between two cells within the colony and whether two lines that connect the two cells in the maximum and minimum distances intersect each other. Therefore, it can be recognized the colony shape in circular, oval, and irregular shapes. Simulation resulted that colony formation are mostly in oval shape with little branch. It also shows that greater cohesion strength obtains more compact colony formation.

  2. Expression of an accessory cell phenotype by hairy cells during lymphocyte colony formation in agar culture.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; Testa, U; Andre, C; Jouault, H; Reyes, F

    1983-01-01

    Human T lymphocytes require the cooperation of accessory cells to generate lymphocyte colonies in agar culture under PHA stimulation. Various hairy cell enriched fractions, as well as normal monocytes, have been found to be able to initiate colony formation by normal lymphocytes. Leukemic monocytes from CMML patients were also effective, but not the leukemic lymphocytes from CLL patients. The phenotype expressed by HC in agar colonies was further studied using cell surface and enzymatic markers. We have concluded that HC in agar culture in the presence of both normal T lymphocytes and PHA lose the B phenotype that they express in vivo and function like an accessory cell in contrast to normal or leukemic B lymphocytes. PMID:6601222

  3. A method for toxicological evaluation of biomaterials based on colony formation of V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Kotoura, Y; Yamamuro, T; Shikata, J; Kakutani, Y; Kitsugi, T; Tanaka, H

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a method for cytotoxicity screening of biomaterials based on colony formation of V79 cells. For this test, two metals (titanium and nickel), two ceramics (alumina ceramic and tricalcium phosphate), and two types of polymeric material [high density polyethylene (HDP) and polyvinylchloride (PVC)] were used. Each metal and ceramic was cast into a disk and semidisk 49 mm in diameter and 1 to 2 mm thick. The HDP was molded into a petri dish and PVC was used as a thin film. The materials were sterilized by heating or with ethylene oxide and placed in plastic petri dishes, after which 8 ml cell suspension containing 100 cells were added to each dish. After 1 week, the colonies formed on the materials were fixed, stained, and then the number of colonies was counted. Titanium, alumina ceramic, and HDP showed no differences from the controls in terms of colonies. On the disks and the semidisks of nickel and tricalcium phosphate and on the thin disks of PVC, however, no colonies were detected. The V79 cells used in this experiment showed a rapid and logarithmically stable growth curve and such a high rate of colony formation as to form visible noticeable colonies, and were therefore suitable cells for screening test the cytotoxicity of biomaterials. Unlike other previously reported methods of in vitro cytotoxicity testing, this method permits assay of colonies formed from a single cell after proliferation directly on the materials. Moreover, the test with semidisks permits simple screening to assess the cytotoxicity is caused by either the chemical substances or the physical properties of the materials.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4038013

  4. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  5. miR-93 suppresses proliferation and colony formation of human colon cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Feng; Zou, Jian; Bao, Zhi-Jun; Dong, Jie

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) in human colon cancer stem cells (SW1116csc) and study their function in SW1116csc proliferation. METHODS: SW1116csc were isolated from the human colon cancer cell line, SW1116 and cultured in serum-free medium. A miRNA microarray was used to detect differential expression profiles of miRNAs in SW1116csc and SW1116 cells. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to verify the differential expression of candidate miRNAs obtained from the microarray. Target mRNAs of differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted with target prediction tools. miRNA expression plasmids were transfected into SW1116csc using Lipofectamine 2000 reagent. Cell proliferation curves were generated with trypan blue staining, and the colony formation rate of transfected cells was measured with the soft agar colony formation assay. Expression of target mRNAs and proteins from differentially expressed miRNAs were detected using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and western blotting. RESULTS: Compared with expression in SW1116 cells, 35 miRNAs (including hsa-miR-192, hsa-miR-29b, hsa-miR-215, hsa-miR-194, hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-32) were upregulated more than 1.5-fold, and 11 miRNAs (including hsa-miR-93, hsa-miR-1231, hsa-miRPlus-F1080, hsa-miR-524-3p, hsa-miR-886-3p and hsa-miR-561) were downregulated in SW1116csc. The miRNA microarray results were further validated with quantitative RT-PCR. miR-93 was downregulated, and its predicted mRNA targets included BAMBI, CCND2, CDKN1A, HDAC8, KIF23, MAP3K9, MAP3K11, MYCN, PPARD, TLE4 and ZDHHC1. Overexpressed miR-93 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation by SW1116csc. Furthermore, miR-93 negatively regulated the mRNA and protein levels of HDAC8 and TLE4. CONCLUSION: Some miRNAs were differentially expressed during differentiation of SW1116csc into SW1116 cells. miR-93 may inhibit SW1116csc proliferation and colony formation. PMID:22180714

  6. Nanofibrous substrates support colony formation and maintain stemness of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gauthaman, Kalamegam; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Yee, Fong Chui; Peh, Gary Swee Lim; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Bongso, Ariff

    2009-01-01

    Inadequate cell numbers in culture is one of the hurdles currently delaying the application of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for transplantation therapy. Nanofibrous scaffolds have been effectively used to expand and differentiate non-colony forming multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for the repair of tissues or organs. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of nanofibrous scaffolds for hESC proliferation, increase in colony formation, self-renewal properties, undifferentiation and retention of ‘stemness’. Polycaprolactone/collagen (PCL/collagen) and PCL/gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated using electrospinning technology. The hESCs were seeded on the nanofibrous scaffolds in the presence or absence of mitomycin-C treated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The hESCs grown on both scaffolds in the presence of the MEFs produced an increase in cell growth of 47.58% (P≤ 0.006) and 40.18% (P≤ 0.005), respectively, over conventional controls of hESCs on MEFs alone. The hESC colonies were also larger in diameter on the scaffolds compared to controls (PCL/collagen, 156.25 ± 7 μM and PCL/gelatin, 135.42 ± 5 μM). Immunohistochemistry of the hESCs grown on the nanofibrous scaffolds with MEFs, demonstrated positive staining for the various stemness-related markers (octamer 4 [OCT-4], tumour rejection antigen-1–60, GCTM-2 and TG-30), and semi-quantitative RT-PCR for the pluripotent stemness genomic markers (NANOG, SOX-2, OCT-4) showed that they were also highly expressed. Continued successful propagation of hESC colonies from nanofibrous scaffolds back to conventional culture on MEFs was also possible. Nanofibrous scaffolds support hESC expansion in an undifferentiated state with retention of stemness characteristics thus having tremendous potential in scaling up cell numbers for transplantation therapy. PMID:19228268

  7. Biophysical Properties of Scaffolds Modulate Human Blood Vessel Formation from Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critser, Paul J.; Yoder, Mervin C.

    A functional vascular system forms early in development and is continually remodeled throughout the life of the organism. Impairment to the regeneration or repair of this system leads to tissue ischemia, dysfunction, and disease. The process of vascular formation and remodeling is complex, relying on local microenvironmental cues, cytokine signaling, and multiple cell types to function properly. Tissue engineering strategies have attempted to exploit these mechanisms to develop functional vascular networks for the generation of artificial tissues and therapeutic strategies to restore tissue homeostasis. The success of these strategies requires the isolation of appropriate progenitor cell sources which are straightforward to obtain, display high proliferative potential, and demonstrate an ability to form functional vessels. Several populations are of interest including endothelial colony-forming cells, a subpopulation of endothelial progenitor cells. Additionally, the development of scaffolds to deliver and support progenitor cell survival and function is crucial for the formation of functional vascular networks. The composition and biophysical properties of these scaffolds have been shown to modulate endothelial cell behavior and vessel formation. However, further investigation is needed to better understand how these mechanical properties and biophysical properties impact vessel formation. Additionally, several other cell populations are involved in neoangiogenesis and formation of tissue parenchyma and an understanding of the potential impact of these cell populations on the biophysical properties of scaffolds will also be needed to advance these strategies. This chapter examines how the biophysical properties of matrix scaffolds can influence vessel formation and remodeling and, in particular, the impact on in vivo human endothelial progenitor cell vessel formation.

  8. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christoph A.; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation.

  9. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph A; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation.

  10. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph A; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation. PMID:26465495

  11. Disrupting the PIKE-A/Akt interaction inhibits glioblastoma cell survival, migration, invasion and colony formation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Q; He, K; Liu, X; Pham, C; Meyerkord, C; Fu, H; Ye, K

    2013-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) amplicon is frequently amplified in numerous human cancers including gliomas. PIKE-A, a proto-oncogene that is one of the important components of the CDK4 amplicon, binds to and enhances the kinase activity of Akt, thereby promoting cancer progression. To define the roles of the PIKE-A/Akt interaction in glioblastoma multiform (GBM) progression, we used biochemical protein/protein interaction (PPI) assays and live cell fluorescence-based protein complementation assays to search for small peptide antagonist from these proteins that were able to block their interaction. Here, we show that disruption of the interaction between PIKE-A and Akt by the small peptides significantly reduces glioblastoma cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion. Disruption of PIKE-A/Akt association potently suppressed GBM cell proliferation and sensitized the cells to two clinical drugs that are currently used to treat GBM. Interestingly, GBM cells containing the CDK4 amplicon were more responsive to the inhibition of the PIKE-A/Akt interaction than GBM cells lacking this amplicon. Taken together, our findings provide proof-of-principle that blocking a PPI that is essential for cancer progression provides a valuable strategy for therapeutic discovery. PMID:22450747

  12. Enhancement of committed hematopoietic stem cell colony formation by nandrolone decanoate after sublethal whole body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallicchio, V.S.; Chen, M.G.; Watts, T.D.

    1984-11-01

    The ability of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate, to increase committed topoietic stem cell (CFU-gm, CFU-e, and BFU-e) colony formation after sublethal irradiation was evaluated. Immediately after receiving whole body irradiation and on the next two days, each mouse was injected intraperitoneally with nandrolone decanoate (1.25 mg) in propylene glycol. Irradiated control mice received only propylene glycol. Compared to controls, drug-treated mice showed marked peripheral blood leukocytosis and more stable packed red cell volume. Drug-treated mice also demonstrated increased erythropoiesis, as CFU-e/BFU-e concentrations from both marrow (9% to 581%) and spleen (15% to 797%) were elevated. Granulopoiesis was increased similarly, as CFU-gm concentrations from marrow (38% to 685%) and spleen (9% to 373%) were elevated. These results demonstrate that nandrolone decanoate enhances hematopoietic stem cell recovery after sublethal whole body irradiation. This suggests that following hematopoietic suppression, nandrolone decanoate may stimulate the recovery of hematopoiesis at the stem cell level and in peripheral blood.

  13. Abiotic factors in colony formation: effects of nutrition and light on extracellular polysaccharide production and cell aggregates of Microcystis aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang

    2013-07-01

    Colony morphology is important for Microcystis to sustain a competitive advantage in eutrophic lakes. The mechanism of colony formation in Microcystis is currently unclear. Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has been reported to play an important role in cell aggregate formation of some phytoplankton. Microcystis aeruginosa was cultivated under varied abiotic conditions, including different nutrient, light, and temperature conditions, to investigate their effects on EPS production and morphological change. The results show that nutrient concentration and light intensity have great effects on EPS productionin M. aeruginosa. There was a considerable increase in EPS production after M. aeruginosa was cultivated in adjusted culture conditions similar to those present in the field (28.9 mg C/L, 1.98 mg N/L, 0.65 mg P/L, light intensity: 100 μmol/(m2 · s)). These results indicate that abiotic factors might be one of the triggers for colony formation in Microcystis.

  14. Convergence of bone morphogenetic protein and laminin-1 signaling pathways promotes proliferation and colony formation by fetal mouse pancreatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Fangxu . E-mail: jiang@wehi.edu.au; Harrison, Leonard C.

    2005-08-01

    We previously reported that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), members of the transforming growth factor superfamily, together with the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin-1 (Ln-1), promote proliferation of fetal pancreatic cells and formation of colonies containing peripheral insulin-positive cells. Here, we further investigate the cross-talk between BMP and Ln-1 signals. By RT-PCR, receptors for BMP (BMPR) (excepting BMPR-1B) and Ln-1 were expressed in the fetal pancreas between E13.5 and E17.5. Specific blocking antibodies to BMP-4 and -6 and selective BMP antagonists partially inhibited colony formation by fetal pancreas cells. Colony formation induced by BMP-6 and Ln-1 was completely abolished in a dose-dependent manner by blocking Ln-1 binding to its {alpha}{sub 6} integrin and {alpha}-dystroglycan receptors or by blocking the Ln-1 signaling molecules, phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (P13K) and MAP kinase kinase-1. These results demonstrate a convergence of BMP and Ln-1 signaling through P13K and MAP kinase pathways to induce proliferation and colony formation in E15.5 fetal mouse pancreatic cells.

  15. The Soft Agar Colony Formation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Borowicz, Stanley; Van Scoyk, Michelle; Avasarala, Sreedevi; Karuppusamy Rathinam, Manoj Kumar; Tauler, Jordi; Bikkavilli, Rama Kamesh; Winn, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Anchorage-independent growth is the ability of transformed cells to grow independently of a solid surface, and is a hallmark of carcinogenesis. The soft agar colony formation assay is a well-established method for characterizing this capability in vitro and is considered to be one of the most stringent tests for malignant transformation in cells. This assay also allows for semi-quantitative evaluation of this capability in response to various treatment conditions. Here, we will demonstrate the soft agar colony formation assay using a murine lung carcinoma cell line, CMT167, to demonstrate the tumor suppressive effects of two members of the Wnt signaling pathway, Wnt7A and Frizzled-9 (Fzd-9). Concurrent overexpression of Wnt7a and Fzd-9 caused an inhibition of colony formation in CMT167 cells. This shows that expression of Wnt7a ligand and its Frizzled-9 receptor is sufficient to suppress tumor growth in a murine lung carcinoma model. PMID:25408172

  16. Inhibition of colony formation in agarose of metastatic human breast carcinoma and melanoma cells by synthetic glycoamine analogs.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, G V; Mossine, V V; Price, J E; Bielenberg, D; Glinsky, V V; Ananthaswamy, H N; Feather, M S

    1996-05-01

    We studied the influence of 10 synthetic glycoamine analogs on colony formation in 0.3 and 0.9% agarose by metastatic human breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-435) and melanoma (TXM-13) cells. Nine synthetic analogs significantly inhibited the colony formation in 0.9% agarose of MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma cells; five compounds caused a 73-83% reduction of colony formation. Seven synthetic glycoamines caused a significant inhibition of colony formation in 0.9% agarose by TXM-13 melanoma cells with the inhibitory effect ranging from 71 to 87%. The 50% inhibition (I50) doses and relative activity rank of the compounds were similar for both breast carcinoma and melanoma cell lines. The murine B16 melanoma cell aggregation assay was employed to elucidate the potential mechanism(s) of the inhibitory activity of synthetic glycoamines. The relative activity ranks of the compounds based on the independently determined I50 doses for both cell aggregation and clonogenic growth assays were very similar for the four most active synthetic analogs and clearly indicated the importance of hydrophobic amino acid in mediating the bioactivity of synthetic glycoamines. In both experimental systems (clonogenic growth in agarose and cell aggregation assay) the leading compound was N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-D-leucine (Fru-D-Leu) and the least active analog was N-(l-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-glycine (Fru-Gly). These results show that synthetic glycoamines may act by competing for specific carbohydrate-lectin interactions, particularly those involving beta-galactoside-specific lectins expressed on metastatic cells. PMID:8674280

  17. Formation of Osteogenic Colonies on Well-Defined Adhesion Peptides by Freshly-Isolated Human Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Au, Ada; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Mayes, Anne M.; Muschler, George F.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2007-01-01

    Bone graft performance can be enhanced by addition of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from fresh bone marrow in a manner that concentrates the CTP cell population within the graft. Here, we used small peptide adhesion ligands presented against an otherwise adhesion-resistant synthetic polymer background in order to illuminate the molecular basis for the attachment and colony formation by osteogenic CTPs from fresh human marrow, and contrast the behavior of fresh marrow to many commonly-used osteogenic cell sources. The linear GRGDSPY ligand was as effective as tissue culture polystyrene in fostering attachment of culture-expanded porcine CTPs. Although this GRGDSPY peptide was more effective than control peptides in fostering alkaline phosphatase-positive (AP) colony formation from primary human marrow in 5 of the 7 patients tested, GRGDSPY was as effective as the control glass substrate in only one patient of 7. Thus, the peptide appears capable of enabling osteoblastic development from only a subpopulation of CTPs in marrow. The bone sialoprotein-derived peptide FHRRIKA was ineffective in fostering attachment of primary culture-expanded pig CTPs, although it was as effective as GRGDSPY in fostering AP-positive colonies from fresh human marrow. This study provides insights into integrin-mediated behaviors of CTPs and highlights differences between freshly-isolated marrow and culture-expanded cells. PMID:17222453

  18. Clonal T-cell colony formation in agar culture: an attractive assay to test the T-cell depletion from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Beaujean, F; Cordonnier, C; Pico, J; Gourdin, M F; Divine, M; Bracq, C; Bouguet, J; Laurent, G; Bernard, A

    1986-12-01

    Current studies suggest that the depletion of T-lymphocytes from donor marrow is an effective method for preventing acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in man. To deplete the T-lymphocytes from bone marrow cells we use either monoclonal anti-T-cell antibodies and complement or T101 ricin A-chain immunotoxin. Residual T-lymphocytes are analyzed by their capacity to form clonal T-cell colonies in the presence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), accessory cells, and recombinant interleukin 2. The method is compared to immediate indirect immunofluorescence (iF) and thymidine incorporation by marrow cells stimulated by PHA. IF is not suitable for evaluating the depletion by immunotoxin, and the interpretation of thymidine incorporation is generally questionable. The results of the colony formation show that the sensitivity of the colony assay is close to that of iF when T cells are depleted by complement lysis, and the sensitivity of the colony assay is not dependent upon the depletion procedure. Therefore, the T-cell colony assay is a simple functional control for the quality of bone marrow T-cell depletion, especially for T-cell depletion by immunotoxin. PMID:3536543

  19. Interleukin 18 inhibits osteoclast formation via T cell production of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, N J; Udagawa, N; Elliott, J; Grail, D; Okamura, H; Kurimoto, M; Dunn, A R; Martin, T; Gillespie, M T

    1998-01-01

    IL-18 inhibits osteoclast (OCL) formation in vitro independent of IFN-gamma production, and this was abolished by the addition of neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF. We now establish that IL-18 was unable to inhibit OCL formation in cocultures using GM-CSF-deficient mice (GM-CSF -/-). Reciprocal cocultures using either wild-type osteoblasts with GM-CSF -/- spleen cells or GM-CSF -/- osteoblasts with wild-type spleen cells were examined. Wild-type spleen cells were required to elicit a response to IL-18 indicating that cells of splenic origin were the IL-18 target. As T cells comprise a large proportion of the spleen cell population, the role of T cells in osteoclastogenesis was examined. Total T cells were removed and repleted in various combinations. Addition of wild-type T cells to a GM-CSF -/- coculture restored IL-18 inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Major subsets of T cells, CD4+ and CD8+, were also individually depleted. Addition of either CD4+ or CD8+ wild-type T cells restored IL-18 action in a GM-CSF -/- background, while IL-18 was ineffective when either CD4+ or CD8+ GM-CSF -/- T cells were added to a wild-type coculture. These results highlight the involvement of T cells in IL-18-induced OCL inhibition and provide evidence for a new OCL inhibitory pathway whereby IL-18 inhibits OCL formation due to action upon T cells promoting the release of GM-CSF, which in turn acts upon OCL precursors. PMID:9449693

  20. ColonyArea: an ImageJ plugin to automatically quantify colony formation in clonogenic assays.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Camilo; Bagga, Manish; Kaur, Amanpreet; Westermarck, Jukka; Abankwa, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The clonogenic or colony formation assay is a widely used method to study the number and size of cancer cell colonies that remain after irradiation or cytotoxic agent administration and serves as a measure for the anti-proliferative effect of these treatments. Alternatively, this assay is used to quantitate the transforming potential of cancer associated genes and chemical agents. Therefore, there is a need for a simplified and standardized analysis of colony formation assays for both routine laboratory use and for parallelized automated analysis. Here we describe the freely available ImageJ-plugin "ColonyArea", which is optimized for rapid and quantitative analysis of focus formation assays conducted in 6- to 24-well dishes. ColonyArea processes image data of multi-well dishes, by separating, concentrically cropping and background correcting well images individually, before colony formation is quantitated. Instead of counting the number of colonies, ColonyArea determines the percentage of area covered by crystal violet stained cell colonies, also taking the intensity of the staining and therefore cell density into account. We demonstrate that these parameters alone or in combination allow for robust quantification of IC50 values of the cytotoxic effect of two staurosporines, UCN-01 and staurosporine (STS) on human glioblastoma cells (T98G). The relation between the potencies of the two compounds compared very well with that obtained from an absorbance based method to quantify colony growth and to published data. The ColonyArea ImageJ plugin provides a simple and efficient analysis routine to quantitate assay data of one of the most commonly used cellular assays. The bundle is freely available for download as supporting information. We expect that ColonyArea will be of broad utility for cancer biologists, as well as clinical radiation scientists.

  1. Matrix rigidity regulates spatiotemporal dynamics of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics of endothelial colony forming cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Joon; Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Han, Bumsoo; Yoder, Mervin C; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-01-24

    Recent evidence has shown that endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) may serve as a cell therapy for improving blood vessel formation in subjects with vascular injury, largely due to their robust vasculogenic potential. The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 is known to play a primary role in this vasculogenesis process, but little is known about how extracellular matrix (ECM) rigidity affects Cdc42 activity during the process. In this study, we addressed two questions: Does matrix rigidity affect Cdc42 activity in ECFC undergoing early vacuole formation? How is the spatiotemporal activation of Cdc42 related to ECFC vacuole formation? A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based Cdc42 biosensor was used to examine the effects of the rigidity of three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices on spatiotemporal activity of Cdc42 in ECFCs. Collagen matrix stiffness was modulated by varying the collagen concentration and therefore fibril density. The results showed that soft (150 Pa) matrices induced an increased level of Cdc42 activity compared to stiff (1 kPa) matrices. Time-course imaging and colocalization analysis of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation revealed that Cdc42 activity was colocalized to the periphery of cytoplasmic vacuoles. Moreover, soft matrices generated faster and larger vacuoles than stiff matrices. The matrix-driven vacuole formation was enhanced by a constitutively active Cdc42 mutant, but significantly inhibited by a dominant-negative Cdc42 mutant. Collectively, the results suggest that matrix rigidity is a strong regulator of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics, and that enhanced activity of Cdc42 is an important step in early vacuole formation in ECFCs.

  2. Hematopoietic colony formation from human growth factor-dependent TF1 cells and human cord blood myeloid progenitor cells depends on SHP2 phosphatase function.

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, Hal E; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Gotoh, Akihiko; Braun, Stephen E; Lu, Li; Cooper, Scott; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Li, Xing Jun; Chan, Rebecca J

    2013-03-15

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase, SHP2, is widely expressed; however, previous studies demonstrated that hematopoietic cell development more stringently requires Shp2 expression compared to other tissues. Furthermore, somatic gain-of-function SHP2 mutants are commonly found in human myeloid leukemias. Given that pharmacologic inhibitors to SHP2 phosphatase activity are currently in development as putative antileukemic agents, we conducted a series of experiments examining the necessity of SHP2 phosphatase activity for human hematopoiesis. Anti-sense oligonucleotides to human SHP2 coding sequences reduced human cord blood- and human cell line, TF1-derived colony formation. Expression of truncated SHP2 bearing its Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, but lacking the phosphatase domain similarly reduced human cord blood- and TF1-derived colony formation. Mechanistically, expression of truncated SHP2 reduced the interaction between endogenous, full-length SHP2 with the adapter protein, Grb2. To verify the role of SHP2 phosphatase function in human hematopoietic cell development, human cord blood CD34+ cells were transduced with a leukemia-associated phosphatase gain-of-function SHP2 mutant or with a phosphatase dead SHP2 mutant, which indicated that increased phosphatase function enhanced, while decreased SHP2 phosphatase function reduced, human cord blood-derived colonies. Collectively, these findings indicate that SHP2 phosphatase function regulates human hematopoietic cell development and imply that the phosphatase component of SHP2 may serve as a pharmacologic target in human leukemias bearing increased SHP2 phosphatase activity.

  3. Mesenchymal stromal cells, colony-forming unit fibroblasts, from bone marrow of untreated advanced breast and lung cancer patients suppress fibroblast colony formation from healthy marrow.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Erica Leonor; Labovsky, Vivian; La Russa, Vincent; Vallone, Valeria Fernández; Honegger, Alba Elizabeth; Belloc, Carlos Gabriel; Wen, Huei Chi; Bordenave, Raúl Horacio; Bullorsky, Eduardo Oscar; Feldman, Leonardo; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2010-03-01

    We have shown that bone marrow (BM) from untreated advanced lung and breast cancer patients (LCP and BCP) have a reduced number of colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Factors that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of CFU-F are produced by the patients' BM microenvironment. We have now examined whether conditioned media (CM) from patients' CFU-F-derived stromal cells also inhibits the colony-forming efficiency (CFE) of CFU-F in primary cultures from healthy volunteers (HV)-BM. Thus the number and proliferation potential of HV-CFU-F were also found to be decreased and similar to colony numbers and colony size of patients' CFU-F. Stromal cells from both of these types of colonies appeared relatively larger and lacked the characteristic spindle morphology typically seen in healthy stromal cells. We developed an arbitrary mesenchymal stromal cell maturational index by taking three measures consisting of stromal cell surface area, longitudinal and horizontal axis. All stromal indices derived from HV-CFU-F grown in patients' CM were similar to those from stromal elements derived from patients' CFU-F. These indices were markedly higher than stromal indices typical of HV-CFU-F cultured in healthy CM or standard medium [alpha-medium plus 20% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS)]. Patients' CM had increased concentrations of the CFU-F inhibitor, GM-CSF, and low levels of bFGF and Dkk-1, strong promoters of self-renewal of MSCs, compared to the levels quantified in CM from HV-CFU-F. Moreover, the majority of patients' MSCs were unresponsive in standard medium and healthy CM to give CFU-F, indicating that the majority of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients' CFU-F are locked in maturational arrest. These results show that alterations of GM-CSF, bFGF, and Dkk-1 are associated with deficient cloning and maturation arrest of CFU-F. Defective autocrine and paracrine mechanisms may be involved in the BM microenvironments of

  4. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  5. NR4A1 promotes PDGF-BB-induced cell colony formation in soft agar.

    PubMed

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth. PMID:25269081

  6. NR4A1 Promotes PDGF-BB-Induced Cell Colony Formation in Soft Agar

    PubMed Central

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth. PMID:25269081

  7. NR4A1 promotes PDGF-BB-induced cell colony formation in soft agar.

    PubMed

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth.

  8. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  9. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chongqiang; Wang, Wenlong; Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-03-15

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  10. Vanadium(IV) complexes inhibit adhesion, migration and colony formation of UMR106 osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Molinuevo, María S; Cortizo, Ana M; Etcheverry, Susana B

    2008-04-01

    Vanadium is a trace element widely distributed in the environment. In vertebrates it is mainly stored in bone tissue. The unique cellular environment in the bone and the variety of interactions that mediate cancer metastasis determine that certain types of cancer, such as breast and prostate cancer, preferentially metastize in the skeleton. Since this effect usually signifies serious morbidity and grave prognosis there is an increasing interest in the development of new treatments for this pathology. The present work shows that vanadium complexes can inhibit some parameters related to cancer metastasis such as cell adhesion, migration and clonogenicity. We have also investigated the role of protein kinase A in these processes.

  11. Interleukin-6 from Ovarian Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Proliferation, Sphere and Colony Formation and Tumorigenesis of an Ovarian Cancer Cell Line SKOV3

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Chu, Tang-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the majority of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) is regarded as extraovarian, with the ovary being the secondary site. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of ovarian mesenchymal stem cells (OvMSCs) and secreted IL-6 in the development of EOC. OvMSCs were derived from normal ovarian stroma. Cell surface markers and differentiation capability were determined. The effects of IL-6 and conditioned medium of OvMSCs on the malignant phenotype of SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells were tested, and the status of STAT3 and ERK phosphorylation was investigated. OvMSCs had similar surface marker profiles as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, i.e., CD44 (+), CD90 (+) and CD45 (-), and was readily inducible to osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. OvMSCs secreted an extremely high level (>2500 pg/ml) of IL-6. Treatment of SKOV3 cells with conditioned media from OvMSCs increased cell proliferation, tumor sphere formation and anchorage independent growth, and resulted in activation of STAT3 but not ERK. Coinjection of OvMSCs with SKOV3 cell enhanced tumorigenesis in NOD-SCID mice. All of these behaviors were blocked by IL-6 receptor blocking antibody administered in vitro or in vivo. The OvMSCs alone injected into mice had no tumor growth after 3 months. By secreting high levels of IL-6, OvMSCs enhance the proliferation, sphere and colony formation and tumorigenesis of SKOV3 cells. PMID:27698921

  12. Interleukin-6 from Ovarian Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Proliferation, Sphere and Colony Formation and Tumorigenesis of an Ovarian Cancer Cell Line SKOV3

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Chu, Tang-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the majority of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) is regarded as extraovarian, with the ovary being the secondary site. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of ovarian mesenchymal stem cells (OvMSCs) and secreted IL-6 in the development of EOC. OvMSCs were derived from normal ovarian stroma. Cell surface markers and differentiation capability were determined. The effects of IL-6 and conditioned medium of OvMSCs on the malignant phenotype of SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells were tested, and the status of STAT3 and ERK phosphorylation was investigated. OvMSCs had similar surface marker profiles as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, i.e., CD44 (+), CD90 (+) and CD45 (-), and was readily inducible to osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. OvMSCs secreted an extremely high level (>2500 pg/ml) of IL-6. Treatment of SKOV3 cells with conditioned media from OvMSCs increased cell proliferation, tumor sphere formation and anchorage independent growth, and resulted in activation of STAT3 but not ERK. Coinjection of OvMSCs with SKOV3 cell enhanced tumorigenesis in NOD-SCID mice. All of these behaviors were blocked by IL-6 receptor blocking antibody administered in vitro or in vivo. The OvMSCs alone injected into mice had no tumor growth after 3 months. By secreting high levels of IL-6, OvMSCs enhance the proliferation, sphere and colony formation and tumorigenesis of SKOV3 cells.

  13. Prolonged Proteasome Inhibition Cyclically Upregulates Oct3/4 and Nanog Gene Expression, but Reduces Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Elizabeth Z.; Staszkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Power, Rachel A.; Kilroy, Gail; Kirk-Ballard, Heather; Barnes, Christian W.; Strickler, Karen L.; Rim, Jong S.; Harkins, Lettie L.; Gao, Ru; Kim, Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is ample evidence that the ubiquitin–proteasome system is an important regulator of transcription and its activity is necessary for maintaining pluripotency and promoting cellular reprogramming. Moreover, proteasome activity contributes to maintaining the open chromatin structure found in pluripotent stem cells, acting as a transcriptional inhibitor at specific gene loci generally associated with differentiation. The current study was designed to understand further the role of proteasome inhibition in reprogramming and its ability to modulate endogenous expression of pluripotency-related genes and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) colony formation. Herein, we demonstrate that acute combinatorial treatment with the proteasome inhibitors MG101 or MG132 and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) increases gene expression of the pluripotency marker Oct3/4, and that MG101 alone is as effective as VPA in the induction of Oct3/4 mRNA expression in fibroblasts. Prolonged proteasome inhibition cyclically upregulates gene expression of Oct3/4 and Nanog, but reduces colony formation in the presence of the iPSC induction cocktail. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the 26S proteasome is an essential modulator in the reprogramming process. Its inhibition enhances expression of pluripotency-related genes; however, efficient colony formation requires proteasome activity. Therefore, discovery of small molecules that increase proteasome activity might lead to more efficient cell reprogramming and generation of pluripotent cells. PMID:25826722

  14. Ultra-sensitive detection of tumorigenic cellular impurities in human cell-processed therapeutic products by digital analysis of soft agar colony formation.

    PubMed

    Kusakawa, Shinji; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kuroda, Takuya; Kawamata, Shin; Sato, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    Contamination with tumorigenic cellular impurities is one of the most pressing concerns for human cell-processed therapeutic products (hCTPs). The soft agar colony formation (SACF) assay, which is a well-known in vitro assay for the detection of malignant transformed cells, is applicable for the quality assessment of hCTPs. Here we established an image-based screening system for the SACF assay using a high-content cell analyzer termed the digital SACF assay. Dual fluorescence staining of formed colonies and the dissolution of soft agar led to accurate detection of transformed cells with the imaging cytometer. Partitioning a cell sample into multiple wells of culture plates enabled digital readout of the presence of colonies and elevated the sensitivity for their detection. In practice, the digital SACF assay detected impurity levels as low as 0.00001% of the hCTPs, i.e. only one HeLa cell contained in 10,000,000 human mesenchymal stem cells, within 30 days. The digital SACF assay saves time, is more sensitive than in vivo tumorigenicity tests, and would be useful for the quality control of hCTPs in the manufacturing process. PMID:26644244

  15. Maintenance and induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation using E-cadherin-Fc substrata without colony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Yuan; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2013-03-01

    Induced embryonic stem (ES) cells are expected to be promising cell resources for the observation of the cell behaviors in developmental biology as well as the implantation in cell treatments in human diseases. A recombinant E-cadherin substratum was developed as a cell recognizable substratum to maintain the ES cells' self-renewal and pluripotency at single cell level. Furthermore, the generation of various cell lineages in different germ layers, including hepatic or neural cells, was achieved on the chimeric protein layer precisely and effectively. The induction and isolation of specific cell population was carried out with the enhancing effect of other artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) in enzyme-free process. The murine ES cell-derived cells showed highly morphological similarities and functional expressions to matured hepatocytes or neural progenitor cells.

  16. Budding yeast colony growth study based on circular granular cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprianti, Devi; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-08-01

    Yeast colony growth can be modelled by using circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. The bud growth angle can be set to regulate cell budding pattern. Cohesion force, contact force and Stokes force were adopted to accommodate the behaviour and interactions among cells. Simulation steps are divided into two steps, the explicit step is due to cell growing and implicit step for the cell rearrangement. Only in explicit step that time change was performed. In this study, we examine the influence of cell diameter growth time and reproduction time combination toward the growth of cell number and colony formation. We find a commutative relation between the cell diameter growth time and reproduction time to the specific growth rate. The greater value of the multiplication of the parameters, the smaller specific growth rate is obtained. It also shows a linear correlation between the specific growth rate and colony diameter growth rate.

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) mediates the effects of hypoxia on the promotion of HeLa cell viability, colony formation, and invasion capacity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiong, J; Zhu, F F; Nie, M F

    2015-04-13

    Hypoxia reduces the oxygen supply to tumor cells and may limit tumor cell growth. However, hypoxia promotes tumor cell metabolic adaptation, apoptosis resistance, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) may be responsible for these hypoxia-induced changes. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and HIF-2α knockdown in HeLa cells. HIF-2α shRNA lentivirus was used to knock down HIF-2α expression; cell viability, colony formation, invasion capacity, and gene expression were assessed. Hypoxia promoted HeLa cell growth, whereas knockdown of HIF-2α expression reduced HeLa cell viability under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, with a greater effect observed under hypoxic conditions. Knockdown of HIF-2α expression also reduced HeLa cell colony formation and invasion capacity under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Expression of cyclooxygenase 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor was reduced after knockdown of HIF-2α expression, with a greater effect observed under hypoxic conditions. HIF-2α mediated the hypoxia-induced effect on the promotion of HeLa cell viability, colony formation, and invasion capacity in vitro. Further studies are needed to confirm the in vivo relevance of hypoxia and HIF-2α.

  18. Origin of T lymphocyte colony-forming cells in cell populations depleted of sheep erythrocyte rosette forming cells.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, C; Izaguirre, C A

    1988-01-01

    Cell populations depleted of sheep erythrocytes (E) rosette-forming T cells (E-cells) contain cells capable of giving rise to T cell colonies. We have characterized the T cell colony-forming cell from human bone marrow, blood and tonsil E- cells using a T-cell colony assay. Depletion of CD2+, CD3+ or CD4+ cells from E- cells reduced colony formation by 70-100%. Removal of CD8+ cells did not reduce, but rather enhanced colony formation by 50% or more. The most effective reduction (100%) in colony formation was obtained with anti-CD4, indicating that CD4 is a marker of all colony-forming T cells. The CD4+ lymphocytes generated two types of colonies, types I and II, in the presence or absence, respectively, of CD8+ lymphocytes. Type I were small and compact, reached a peak on days 5-7, and contained CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Type II were large and diffuse, reached a peak on days 9-10 and contained CD4+ cells. In continuous culture of single type II colony cells, we observed a consistent increase of CD8+ cells. In one colony the combined percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells exceeded 100% (averaging 83% CD4+ and 72% CD8+), indicating the presence of dual markers on some cells. We suggest that colony forming T cells are CD2+ CD3+ CD4+, the CD4+ antigen being the most consistent marker of such precursor cells. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3262466

  19. Growth dynamics of cancer cell colonies and their comparison with noncancerous cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H.; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth dynamics of HeLa (cervix cancer) cell colonies was studied following both their growth front and the pattern morphology evolutions utilizing large population colonies exhibiting linearly and radially spreading fronts. In both cases, the colony profile fractal dimension was df=1.20±0.05 and the growth fronts displaced at the constant velocity 0.90±0.05 μm min-1. Colonies showed changes in both cell morphology and average size. As time increased, the formation of large cells at the colony front was observed. Accordingly, the heterogeneity of the colony increased and local driving forces that set in began to influence the dynamics of the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough colony fronts resulted in a roughness exponent α = 0.50±0.05, a growth exponent β = 0.32±0.04, and a dynamic exponent z=1.5±0.2. The validity of this set of scaling exponents extended from a lower cutoff lc≈60 μm upward, and the exponents agreed with those predicted by the standard Kardar-Parisi-Zhang continuous equation. HeLa data were compared with those previously reported for Vero cell colonies. The value of df and the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang-type 2D front growth dynamics were similar for colonies of both cell lines. This indicates that the cell colony growth dynamics is independent of the genetic background and the tumorigenic nature of the cells. However, one can distinguish some differences between both cell lines during the growth of colonies that may result from specific cooperative effects and the nature of each biosystem.

  20. 17β-Estradiol regulates cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis by upregulating miR-9 and thus degrades MALAT-1 in osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an estrogen receptor-independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Dengfeng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Jing; Teng, Yi; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Jiao; Li, Yu

    2015-02-20

    In bone, different concentration of estrogen leads to various of physiological processes in osteoblast, such as the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. But little was known about the estrogen effects on osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, OS cell MG-63 was treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) with the presence or absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα), for evaluating the E2 effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis. Consistent with a previous study, high dose of E2 treatment dramatically downregulated expressing level of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1). The observation of upregulation of miR-9 after a high dose of E2 treatment indicated the cause of MALAT-1 reduction. Downregulation of MALAT-1 promoted the combination of SFPQ/PTBP2 complex. It was also observed that the proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis of OS cells were remarkably affected by high dose of E2 treatment, but not by low dose, in an ERα independent manner. Furthermore, the abolishment of the effects on these physiological processes caused by ectopic expression of miR-9 ASOs suggested the necessity of miR-9 in MALAT-1 regulation. Here we found that the high dose of E2 treatment upregulated miR-9 thus posttranscriptionally regulated MALAT-1 RNA level in OS cells, and then the downregulation of MALAT-1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes in the E2-dose dependent and ER-independent ways. - Highlights: • E2 affects osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an Estrogen receptor-independent way. • High dose of E2 treatment upregulates miR-9 which target to MALAT-1 RNA. • Upregulated miR-9 degrades MALAT-1 and thus affects combination of SFPQ/PTBP2. • E2 treatment block cell proliferation, colony formation, mobility, and enhance apoptosis.

  1. Stage-dependent reduction in T colony formation in Hodgkin's disease. Coincidence with monocyte synthesis of prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Bockman, R S

    1980-01-01

    Prostaglandin synthesis and T lymphocyte colony formation have been examined in previously untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease. Mononuclear cells have been isolated from peripheral blood and spleens of these patients. Significant augmentation in prostaglandin E levels were noted in the mononuclear cell cutures from Hodgkin's disease patients compared with controls (1.64 +/- 0.29 vs. 0.39 +/- 0.09 ng/10(6) cells, P < 0.005). Measured prostaglandin E levels increased with advancing stage of disease. Virtually all of the prostaglandins were synthesized by the adherent monocyte cell population. Prostaglandin E was the major product. Clonal expansion of a T lymphocyte precursor cell, which gives rise to colonies > 50 cells, was determined by a layered soft agar method. T colony formation was significantly reduced in patients with stage II, III, and IV disease. There were progressively reduced colony numbers seen with advancing stage of disease (609 +/- 209, 416 +/- 158, 207 +/- 58 compared with normals 2,274 +/- 360 colonies/10(6) cells plated; P < 0.005). The addition of inhibitors of endogenous prostaglandin synthesis resulted in significant augmentation of T colony number. However, a consistent relative decrease in T colony number was seen even when endogenous prostaglandin E synthesis was blocked. It would appear that both the prostaglandin-dependent and independent T colony precursor cells are lost with progressive stage of disease. A causative role of augmented prostaglandin synthesis in this stage-dependent reduction of T colony formation could not be established. PMID:6967491

  2. The PIM inhibitor AZD1208 synergizes with ruxolitinib to induce apoptosis of ruxolitinib sensitive and resistant JAK2-V617F-driven cells and inhibit colony formation of primary MPN cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzacurati, Lucia; Lambert, Que T.; Pradhan, Anuradha; Griner, Lori N.; Huszar, Dennis; Reuther, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Classical myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are hematopoietic stem cell disorders that exhibit excess mature myeloid cells, bone marrow fibrosis, and risk of leukemic transformation. Aberrant JAK2 signaling plays an etiological role in MPN formation. Because neoplastic cells in patients are largely insensitive to current anti-JAK2 therapies, effective therapies remain needed. Members of the PIM family of serine/threonine kinases are induced by JAK/STAT signaling, regulate hematopoietic stem cell growth, protect hematopoietic cells from apoptosis, and exhibit hematopoietic cell transforming properties. We hypothesized that PIM kinases may offer a therapeutic target for MPNs. We treated JAK2-V617F-dependent MPN model cells as well as primary MPN patient cells with the PIM kinase inhibitors SGI-1776 and AZD1208 and the JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. While MPN model cells were rather insensitive to PIM inhibitors, combination of PIM inhibitors with ruxolitinib led to a synergistic effect on MPN cell growth due to enhanced apoptosis. Importantly, PIM inhibitor mono-therapy inhibited, and AZD1208/ruxolitinib combination therapy synergistically suppressed, colony formation of primary MPN cells. Enhanced apoptosis by combination therapy was associated with activation of BAD, inhibition of downstream components of the mTOR pathway, including p70S6K and S6 protein, and activation of 4EBP1. Importantly, PIM inhibitors re-sensitized ruxolitinib-resistant MPN cells to ruxolitinib by inducing apoptosis. Finally, exogenous expression of PIM1 induced ruxolitinib resistance in MPN model cells. These data indicate that PIMs may play a role in MPNs and that combining PIM and JAK2 kinase inhibitors may offer a more efficacious therapeutic approach for MPNs over JAK2 inhibitor mono-therapy. PMID:26472029

  3. Lymphocyte culture: induction of colonies by conditioned medium from human lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R M; Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The presence of phytohemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in agar is known to stimulate the formation of lymphoid colonies. We now report that similar colonies can be induced in the absence of plant lectins upon addition of filtered and ultracentrifuged conditioned medium (CM) obtained from certain human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Colony formation required at least 6 X 10(5) mononuclear cells per milliliter, and optimum results were obtained at concentrations of 1 X 10(6) cells/ml in the presence of 20% CM (50-500 colonies per 10(6) cells cultured). Individual cells within colonies displayed uniform morphological characteristics of lymphoid cells, and the majority formed rosettes with sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that they were of T-cell type. PMID:303689

  4. Quantitation of Haemopoietic Cells from Normal and Leukaemic RFM Mice Using an In Vivo Colony Assay

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, M. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The conventional diffusion chamber (CDC) as described by Benestad (1970) had been modified to assay the colony forming capacity of RFM bone marrow and spleen cells in agar diffusion chambers (ADCs). The colonies are morphologically identical to those formed by the CFUc in agar culture in vitro and have an incidence of approximately 1 in 103 normal nucleated bone marrow cells, and 1 in 104 nucleated spleen cells. Comparison of the growth of normal bone marrow cells in CDCs and in ADCs suggests that cell proliferation in diffusion chambers may result from the same precursor cell as detected by colony formation in agar culture in vitro. This proposal is supported by the suicide of approximately 46% of the ADC colony precursor cells following incubation with 3H-labelled thymidine. Colony formation by haemopoietic cells taken from leukaemic mice appears to be due to the proliferation of a remaining normal cell population alone, while the leukaemic cells in the inoculum form a background of uniformly distributed blast cells. In the case of leukaemic cell culture, there are differences in the results from CDCs and ADCs, and data from colonies in leukaemic ADC cultures are similar to those from normal ADC colonies. These comparisons imply that the ADC technique may be used to monitor the functional capacity of normal bone marrow, by its ability to form colonies, during the development of leukaemia. A humoral effect of a leukaemic environment on the growth of normal bone marrow cells in ADCs has also been detected. PMID:4534200

  5. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  6. Two-Dimensionality of Yeast Colony Expansion Accompanied by Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Noorbakhsh, Javad; Adams, Rhys M.; Samaniego-Evans, Joseph; Agollah, Germaine; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Kuzdzal-Fick, Jennie; Mehta, Pankaj; Balázsi, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can form multicellular patterns as they expand on agar plates, a phenotype that requires a functional copy of the FLO11 gene. Although the biochemical and molecular requirements for such patterns have been examined, the mechanisms underlying their formation are not entirely clear. Here we develop quantitative methods to accurately characterize the size, shape, and surface patterns of yeast colonies for various combinations of agar and sugar concentrations. We combine these measurements with mathematical and physical models and find that FLO11 gene constrains cells to grow near the agar surface, causing the formation of larger and more irregular colonies that undergo hierarchical wrinkling. Head-to-head competition assays on agar plates indicate that two-dimensional constraint on the expansion of FLO11 wild type (FLO11) cells confers a fitness advantage over FLO11 knockout (flo11Δ) cells on the agar surface. PMID:25504059

  7. The induction of human peripheral blood lymphoid colonies by conditioned media from human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vesole, D H; Moore, G E

    1980-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from 29 human tumour cell lines and 3 malignant pleural fluids were tested for their ability to stimulate lymphoid colony formation in semi-solid agar; 9 of 14 malignant melanomas, 3 of 6 colonic carcinomas, 2 of 5 ovarian carcinomas, 3 of 4 breast carcinomas and 1 of 3 pleural fluids from breast cancer patients contained colony-stimulating activity (CSA) for human peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) in semi-solid agar. Conditioned media also stimulated PBL proliferation in liquid medium; these effects were dose dependent. With the exception of one pleural fluid, extensive dialysis of CM did not significantly increase colony formation; CM from two tumour cell lines demonstrated a significant decrease in the induction of colony formation after dialysis. PMID:6970165

  8. Modeling cell-matrix traction forces in Keratinocyte colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2013-03-01

    Crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions plays an essential role in the mechanical function of tissues. The traction forces exerted by cohesive keratinocyte colonies with strong cell-cell adhesions are mostly concentrated at the colony periphery. In contrast, for weak cadherin-based intercellular adhesions, individual cells in a colony interact with their matrix independently, with a disorganized distribution of traction forces extending throughout the colony. In this talk I will present a minimal physical model of the colony as contractile elastic media linked by springs and coupled to an elastic substrate. The model captures the spatial distribution of traction forces seen in experiments. For cell colonies with strong cell-cell adhesions, the total traction force of the colony measured in experiments is found to scale with the colony's geometrical size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension of magnitude comparable to that measured for non-adherent, three-dimensional cell aggregates. The physical model supports the scaling and indicates that the surface tension may be controlled by acto-myosin contractility. Supported by the NSF through grant DMR-1004789. This work was done in collaboration with Aaron F. Mertz, Eric R. Dufresne and Valerie Horsley (Yale University) and M. Cristina Marchetti (Syracuse University).

  9. Activation by PHA of CD8 lymphocytes into clonal colony forming cells. Role of interleukin-1.

    PubMed

    Oudrhiri, N; Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; Divine, M; Marolleau, J P; Bouguet, J; Le Couedic, J P; Shaw, A; Fradelizi, D; Reyes, F

    1988-06-13

    Monoclonal T cell colonies can be grown in agar culture from quiescent T lymphocytes under PHA stimulation, provided that (1) a low number of T lymphocytes (less than or equal to 5 X 10(4)/ml) is seeded, (2) IL-2 is added to the culture, and (3) a high number of accessory B cells (greater than or equal to 5 X 10(5)/ml) is present in contact with the T lymphocytes. Under these culture conditions the colony progenitors can be ascribed to the CD4 subset, whereas CD8 lymphocytes do not generate colonies. This finding is surprising since both CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes may be cloned in liquid culture. We now report the appropriate conditions required to grow cytotoxic CD8 lymphocyte colonies in agar. CD8 colony growth is dependent upon IL-2-IL-2 receptor interaction and is inhibited by anti-IL-2 receptor antibodies. In addition to PHA, accessory B cells and IL-2, an additional signal provided by recombinant IL-1 is necessary for CD8 colony formation. Exogenous IL-1 can be replaced by irradiated CD4 lymphocytes which stimulate the expression of membrane IL-1 activity in the accessory B cells. In addition, colony growth from quiescent but not preactivated CD8 lymphocytes is inhibited by anti-IL-1 antibodies. Altogether, the data show that an IL-1 signal is required for the induction of IL-2 responsive IL-2 receptors on quiescent CD8 colony forming cells. PMID:3132508

  10. Large area magnetic micropallet arrays for cell colony sorting.

    PubMed

    Cox-Muranami, Wesley A; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new micropallet array platform for adherent cell colony sorting has been developed. The platform consisted of thousands of square plastic pallets, 270 μm by 270 μm on each side, large enough to hold a single colony of cells. Each pallet included a magnetic core, allowing them to be collected with a magnet after being released using a microscope mounted laser system. The micropallets were patterned from 1002F epoxy resist and were fabricated on translucent, gold coated microscope slides. The gold layer was used as seed for electroplating the ferromagnetic cores within every individual pallet. The gold layer also facilitated the release of each micropallet during laser release. This array allows for individual observation, sorting and collection of isolated cell colonies for biological cell colony research. In addition to consistent release and recovery of individual colonies, we demonstrated stable biocompatibility and minimal loss in imaging quality compared to previously developed micropallet arrays. PMID:26606460

  11. Large area magnetic micropallet arrays for cell colony sorting.

    PubMed

    Cox-Muranami, Wesley A; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new micropallet array platform for adherent cell colony sorting has been developed. The platform consisted of thousands of square plastic pallets, 270 μm by 270 μm on each side, large enough to hold a single colony of cells. Each pallet included a magnetic core, allowing them to be collected with a magnet after being released using a microscope mounted laser system. The micropallets were patterned from 1002F epoxy resist and were fabricated on translucent, gold coated microscope slides. The gold layer was used as seed for electroplating the ferromagnetic cores within every individual pallet. The gold layer also facilitated the release of each micropallet during laser release. This array allows for individual observation, sorting and collection of isolated cell colonies for biological cell colony research. In addition to consistent release and recovery of individual colonies, we demonstrated stable biocompatibility and minimal loss in imaging quality compared to previously developed micropallet arrays.

  12. PLACENTAL GROWTH FACTOR ATTENUATES SUPPRESSION OF ERYTHROID COLONY FORMATION BY INTERFERON

    PubMed Central

    Dallalio, Gail; Means, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor family and is associated with inflammation and with pathologic angiogenesis. PlGF is released from marrow erythroid cells and serum PlGF concentrations have been reported to distinguish sickle cell patients from healthy controls. We observed that CFU-E from homozygous sickle cell (SS) patients are less sensitive to inhibition by recombinant human (rh) γ interferon (IFN) than those from healthy controls, and the contribution of PlGF to this process was evaluated. At concentrations 10 – 1000 pg/mL, PlGF neither inhibits nor enhances CFU-E colony formation, and there were no differences between the responses of SS patients or healthy controls. rhPlGF 100 pg/mL reversed the inhibitory effects of rhγIFN on CFU-E colony formation. rhPlGF significantly attenuated rhγIFN induction of Fas ligandin an erythroid cell line (HCD57). Both HCD57 cells and CD36+ human marrow cells express Flt-1, a receptor for PlGF. Neutralizing antibody against Flt-1 partially attenuated the IFN-protective effect of rhPlGF, although this effect was not statistically significant. In conclusion, increased PlGF concentrations in the marrow of SS patients may protect erythroid progenitors from cytokine-induced inhibition of colony formation, and may be a mechanism by which erythropoiesis in sickle cell disease is preserved despite concurrent inflammation. PMID:19010294

  13. High-Throughput Method for Automated Colony and Cell Counting by Digital Image Analysis Based on Edge Detection

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Counting cells and colonies is an integral part of high-throughput screens and quantitative cellular assays. Due to its subjective and time-intensive nature, manual counting has hindered the adoption of cellular assays such as tumor spheroid formation in high-throughput screens. The objective of this study was to develop an automated method for quick and reliable counting of cells and colonies from digital images. For this purpose, I developed an ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge and a CellProfiler Pipeline Cell Colony Counting, and compared them to other open-source digital methods and manual counts. The ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge is valuable in counting cells and colonies, and measuring their area, volume, morphology, and intensity. In this study, I demonstrate that Cell Colony Edge is superior to other open-source methods, in speed, accuracy and applicability to diverse cellular assays. It can fulfill the need to automate colony/cell counting in high-throughput screens, colony forming assays, and cellular assays. PMID:26848849

  14. 'Cup cell disease' in the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri.

    PubMed

    Moiseeva, Elisabeth; Rabinowitz, Claudette; Yankelevich, Irena; Rinkevich, Baruch

    2004-07-01

    A new progressive, fatal disease called 'cup cell disease' was characterized in ex situ cultures of Botryllus schlosseri, a colonial tunicate. The disease originated as a few dark spots growing within zooids. The infected colonies then started to deteriorate, morphologically diagnosed by ampullar retraction, lethargic blood circulation and by a swollen and soft tunic matrix. In later stages of the disease, developed buds were also affected. Many large black dots were scattered within the tunic matrix, and zooids were transformed to opaque, dilated, sac-like structures, signaling impending death. Colonies were infected periodically, even without direct tissue contact. The time course from first appearance to colony death ranged between 30 and 45 d. Histological studies, in vitro culturing of blood cells and blood smears revealed the existence of numerous cup-like cells (up to 4.8 microm diameter on average) with a yellowish cell wall and transparent cytoplasm that was not stained by various dyes (except azocarmine-G). Cells were refractive under bright-field illumination and revealed a flattened wall with flanges, characteristic of species of the phylum Haplosporidia. Cup cells aggregated in blood vessels and in internal parts of zooids and buds and were phagocytosed by blood cells. In a single case, plasmodia-like structures were found only in the tunic matrix of an infected colony. This is the first record in botryllid ascidians of an infectious lethal disease associated with haplosporidian protists.

  15. Defect-Mediated Morphologies in Growing Cell Colonies.

    PubMed

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Thampi, Sumesh P; Yeomans, Julia M

    2016-07-22

    Morphological trends in growing colonies of living cells are at the core of physiological and evolutionary processes. Using active gel equations, which include cell division, we show that shape changes during the growth can be regulated by the dynamics of topological defects in the orientation of cells. The friction between the dividing cells and underlying substrate drives anisotropic colony shapes toward more isotropic morphologies, by mediating the number density and velocity of topological defects. We show that the defects interact with the interface at a specific interaction range, set by the vorticity length scale of flows within the colony, and that the cells predominantly reorient parallel to the interface due to division-induced active stresses. PMID:27494503

  16. Defect-Mediated Morphologies in Growing Cell Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Thampi, Sumesh P.; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2016-07-01

    Morphological trends in growing colonies of living cells are at the core of physiological and evolutionary processes. Using active gel equations, which include cell division, we show that shape changes during the growth can be regulated by the dynamics of topological defects in the orientation of cells. The friction between the dividing cells and underlying substrate drives anisotropic colony shapes toward more isotropic morphologies, by mediating the number density and velocity of topological defects. We show that the defects interact with the interface at a specific interaction range, set by the vorticity length scale of flows within the colony, and that the cells predominantly reorient parallel to the interface due to division-induced active stresses.

  17. Whole Cell Modeling: From Single Cells to Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Cole, John A.

    2015-01-01

    A great deal of research over the last several years has focused on how the inherent randomness in movements and reactivity of biomolecules can give rise to unexpected large-scale differences in the behavior of otherwise identical cells. Our own research has approached this problem from two vantage points – a microscopic kinetic view of the individual molecules (nucleic acids, proteins, etc.) diffusing and interacting in a crowded cellular environment; and a broader systems-level view of how enzyme variability can give rise to well-defined metabolic phenotypes. The former led to the development of the Lattice Microbes software – a GPU-accelerated stochastic simulator for reaction-diffusion processes in models of whole cells; the latter to the development of a method we call population flux balance analysis (FBA). The first part of this article reviews the Lattice Microbes methodology, and two recent technical advances that extend the capabilities of Lattice Microbes to enable simulations of larger organisms and colonies. The second part of this article focuses on our recent population FBA study of Escherichia coli, which predicted variability in the usage of different metabolic pathways resulting from heterogeneity in protein expression. Finally, we discuss exciting early work using a new hybrid methodology that integrates FBA with spatially resolved kinetic simulations to study how cells compete and cooperate within dense colonies and consortia. PMID:26989262

  18. Automated selection and harvesting of pluripotent stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Simone; Grützner, Jan; Thier, Marc-Christian; Kallweit, Tobias; Rath, Barbara Helen; Laufenberg, Iris; Forgber, Michael; Eberhardt, Jens; Edenhofer, Frank; Brüstle, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The ability of pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into specialized cells of all three germ layers, their capability to self-renew, and their amenability to genetic modification provide fascinating prospects for the generation of cell lines for biomedical applications. Therefore, stem cells must increasingly suffice in terms of industrial standards, and automation of critical or time-consuming steps becomes a fundamental prerequisite for their routine application. Cumbersome manual picking of individual stem cell colonies still represents the most frequently used method for passaging or derivation of clonal stem cell lines. Here, we explore an automated harvesting system (CellCelector™) for detection, isolation, and propagation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and murine induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Automatically transferred hESC colonies maintained their specific biological characteristics even after repeated passaging. We also selected and harvested primary iPSCs derived from mouse embryonic fibroblasts expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the Oct4 promotor using either morphological criteria or GFP fluorescence. About 80% of the selected and harvested primary iPSC colonies gave rise to homogenously GFP-expressing iPSC lines. To validate the iPSC lines, we analyzed the expression of pluripotency-associated markers and multi-germ layer differentiation potential in vitro. Our data indicate that the CellCelector™ technology enables efficient identification and isolation of pluripotent stem cell colonies at the phase contrast or fluorescence level.

  19. Sequestration and Distribution Characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and Its Role in Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xiangdong; Yan, Ran; Li, Fenxiang; Dai, Wei; Jiao, Kewei; Liu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the sequestration and distribution characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and its role in Microcystis colony formation, M. aeruginosa was exposed to six different Cd(II) concentrations for 10 days. Cd(II) exposure caused hormesis in the growth of M. aeruginosa. Low concentrations of Cd(II) significantly induced formation of small Microcystis colonies (P < 0.05) and increased the intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) and bound extracellular polysaccharide (bEPS) contents of M. aeruginosa significantly (P < 0.05). There was a linear relationship between the amount of Cd(II) sequestrated by algal cells and the amount added to cultures in the rapid adsorption process that occurred during the first 5 min of exposure. After 10 d, M. aeruginosa sequestrated nearly 80% of 0.2 mg L−1 added Cd(II), while >93% of Cd(II) was sequestrated in the groups with lower added concentrations of Cd(II). More than 80% of the sequestrated Cd(II) was bioadsorbed by bEPS. The Pearson correlation coefficients of exterior and interior factors related to colony formation of M. aeruginosa revealed that Cd(II) could stimulate the production of IPS and bEPS via increasing Cd(II) bioaccumulation and bioadsorption. Increased levels of cross-linking between Cd(II) and bEPS stimulated algal cell aggregation, which eventually promoted the formation of Microcystis colonies. PMID:27777956

  20. Pattern Formation of Bacterial Colonies by Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Rie; Katoh, Takaki; Maeda, Yusuke; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Sano, Masaki; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the morphological diversity and change in bacterial colonies, using the bacterial species Escherichia coli, as a function of both agar concentration Ca and nutrient concentration Cn. We observed various colony patterns, classified them into four types by pattern characteristics and established a morphological diagram by dividing it into four regions. They are regions A [diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA)-like], B (Eden-like), C (concentric-ring), and D (fluid-spreading). In particular, we have observed a concentric-ring colony growth for E. coli. We focused on the periodic growth in region C and obtained the following results: (i) A colony grows cyclically with the growing front repeating an advance (migration phase) and a momentary rest (consolidation phase) alternately. (ii) The growth width L and the bulge width W in one cycle decrease asymptotically to certain values, when Ca is increased. (iii) L does not depend on Cn, while W is an increasing function of Cn. Plausible mechanisms are proposed to explain the experimental results, by comparing them with those obtained for other bacterial species such as Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus subtilis.

  1. Longevity of U cells of differentiated yeast colonies grown on respiratory medium depends on active glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Čáp, Michal; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-01-01

    Colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains pass through specific developmental phases when growing on solid respiratory medium. During entry into the so-called alkali phase, in which ammonia signaling is initiated, 2 prominent cell types are formed within the colonies: U cells in upper colony regions, which have a longevity phenotype and activate the expression of a large number of metabolic genes, and L cells in lower regions, which die more quickly and exhibit a starvation phenotype. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of the activities of enzymes of central carbon metabolism in lysates of both cell types and determined several fermentation end products, showing that previously reported expression differences are reflected in the different enzymatic capabilities of each cell type. Hence, U cells, despite being grown on respiratory medium, behave as fermenting cells, whereas L cells rely on respiratory metabolism and possess active gluconeogenesis. Using a spectrum of different inhibitors, we showed that glycolysis is essential for the formation, and particularly, the survival of U cells. We also showed that β-1,3-glucans that are released from the cell walls of L cells are the most likely source of carbohydrates for U cells.

  2. Edges of human embryonic stem cell colonies display distinct mechanical properties and differentiation potential

    PubMed Central

    Rosowski, Kathryn A.; Mertz, Aaron F.; Norcross, Samuel; Dufresne, Eric R.; Horsley, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms that guide cell fate decisions during early human development, we closely examined the differentiation process in adherent colonies of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Live imaging of the differentiation process reveals that cells on the outer edge of the undifferentiated colony begin to differentiate first and remain on the perimeter of the colony to eventually form a band of differentiation. Strikingly, this band is of constant width in all colonies, independent of their size. Cells at the edge of undifferentiated colonies show distinct actin organization, greater myosin activity and stronger traction forces compared to cells in the interior of the colony. Increasing the number of cells at the edge of colonies by plating small colonies can increase differentiation efficiency. Our results suggest that human developmental decisions are influenced by cellular environments and can be dictated by colony geometry of hESCs. PMID:26391588

  3. Heterogeneous accessory cell requirement for human peripheral blood T lymphocyte activation by PHA into IL-2-responsive colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Oudhriri, N; Gourdin, M F; Bouguet, J; Fradelizi, D; Reyes, F

    1984-08-01

    Mitogen-driven T cell proliferation in liquid culture requires accessory cells that cooperate in interleukin 2 production. We have investigated the accessory cell requirement for human lymphocyte colony formation under PHA stimulation. Semisolid medium limits cell-to-cell contact emphasizing the role of cooperating cells both in growth factor production and in triggering events. Culturing at high T cell density demonstrates that accessory cells can be substituted for colony formation by exogenous IL-2. Culturing at low T cell density in the presence of IL-2 also demonstrates that accessory cells are required for activation of a subset of progenitors into IL-2 responsive colony-forming cells. Consequently, T colony progenitors, contained in the E-rosetting cell fraction of peripheral blood, are heterogeneous in their triggering signals: a minor subset is directly inducible by PHA, and a major subset is inducible by PHA in the presence of accessory cells. We found that monocytes and some leukemic B cells support effective accessory function in both colony growth factor production and colony progenitor sensitization. PMID:6611211

  4. In vitro effects of fluor-hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite on colony formation, DNA damage and mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Jantová, S; Theiszová, M; Letasiová, S; Birosová, L; Palou, T M

    2008-04-30

    The number of biomaterials used in biomedical applications has rapidly increased in the past two decades. Fluorapatite (FA) is one of the inorganic constituents of bone or teeth used for hard-tissue repairs and replacements. Fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) is a new synthetically prepared composite that in its structure contains the same molecular concentration of OH(-) groups and F(-) ions. The aim of this experimental investigation was to evaluate cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of FHA and FA eluates on Chinese hamster V79 cells and to compare them with the effects of hydroxyapatite (HA) eluate. Cytotoxicity of the biomaterials tested was evaluated by use of the cell colony-formation assay and by direct counting of the cells in each colony. Genotoxicity was assessed by single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) and mutagenicity was evaluated by the Hprt gene-mutation assay and in bacterial mutagenicity tests using Salmonella typhimurium TA100. The results show that the highest test concentrations of the biomaterials (100% and 75% eluates) induced very weak inhibition of colony growth (about 10%). On the other hand, the reduction of cell number per colony induced by these concentrations was in the range from 43% to 31%. The comet assay showed that biomaterials induced DNA breaks, which increased with increasing test concentrations in the order HAcell division in V79 cell colonies.

  5. Mechanism of accessory cell requirement in inducing IL 2 responsiveness by human T4 lymphocytes that generate colonies under PHA stimulation.

    PubMed

    Oudrhiri, N; Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; Divine, M; Bouguet, J; Fradelizi, D; Reyes, F

    1985-09-01

    PHA-driven monoclonal colony formation by low concentrations of resting T4 lymphocytes in agar culture requires the presence of interleukin 2 (IL 2) and accessory cells. Using recombinant IL 2 and anti-Tac monoclonal antibody as a probe for the IL 2 receptor, we demonstrate that the requirement of accessory cells (here an irradiated B cell line) in inducing IL 2 responsiveness relies on their enhancing effect in functional IL 2 receptor expression by the T colony progenitors. Furthermore, it is shown that cell to cell interaction between accessory cells and colony progenitors results in IL 2 response, i.e., colony formation, when the IL 2 receptor density reaches a critical threshold. The asynchronism in IL 2 responsiveness expression by the T colony progenitors upon activation and the short-lived T cell-accessory cell interaction, due to accessory cell death, determine the 10% colony efficiency of the culture system. In addition, we demonstrate that the accessory function in IL 2 receptor and IL 2 responsiveness expression by the T colony progenitors can be supported by irradiated T lymphocytes as well as B cells. The absence of lineage restriction of the signal delivered by accessory cells, and the requirement of physical interaction between T colony progenitors and accessory cells, emphasize the necessity of cross-linking the activation-signal receptors in inducing IL 2 responsiveness by resting T4 cells. PMID:3926884

  6. The effects of interleukins and other soluble factors on T-lymphocyte colony formation.

    PubMed Central

    Winkelstein, A; Simon, P L; Wood, D; Machen, L L; Shadduck, R K; Waheed, A

    1986-01-01

    When plated in semi-solid media, PHA-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) form discrete T-cell colonies. By contrast, Sephadex G-10 non-adherent (NA) cells (greater than 96% T lymphocytes) show virtually no clonal growth unless cocultured with soluble factors derived from either normal adherent cells or tumour cell lines. Purified IL-1 was able to initiate colony growth of mitogen-stimulated NA cells; cultures containing 20 U of human IL-1 yielded colony counts that were only slightly less than those with PBMC. In addition, recombinant IL-2, free of measurable IL-1, was able to provide the initiating signal required for clonal expansion. Both recombinant and lymphocyte-derived IL-2 were able to enhance the clonal growth of PBMC. Colony growth could be initiated by supernatants derived from short-term cultures of either monocytic (U937, HL60) or B-cell (Raji, Daudi) tumour cell lines. The abilities of these tumour cell lines to promote clonal responses did not correlate with their contents of either IL-1 or IL-2. By contrast, supernatants derived from either K562 (an erythroleukaemic line) or MOLT 4 (a T-cell lymphoma) cells did not provide the initiating signal. PMID:3486822

  7. A local PDE model of aggregation formation in bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavy-Waddy, Paul-Christopher; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2016-10-01

    We study pattern formation in a model of cyanobacteria motion recently proposed by Galante, Wisen, Bhaya and Levy. By taking a continuum limit of their model, we derive a novel fourth-order nonlinear parabolic PDE equation that governs the behaviour of the model. This PDE is {{u}t}=-{{u}xx}-{{u}xxxx}+α {{≤ft(\\frac{{{u}x}{{u}xx}}{u}\\right)}x} . We then derive the instability thresholds for the onset of pattern formation. We also compute analytically the spatial profiles of the steady state aggregation density. These profiles are shown to be of the form \\text{sec}{{\\text{h}}p} where the exponent p is related to the parameters of the model. Full numerical simulations give a favorable comparison between the continuum and the underlying discrete system, and show that the aggregation profiles are stable above the critical threshold.

  8. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  9. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  10. Agent Based Modelling Helps in Understanding the Rules by Which Fibroblasts Support Keratinocyte Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; McMinn, Phil; Holcombe, Mike; Smallwood, Rod; MacNeil, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Background Autologous keratincoytes are routinely expanded using irradiated mouse fibroblasts and bovine serum for clinical use. With growing concerns about the safety of these xenobiotic materials, it is desirable to culture keratinocytes in media without animal derived products. An improved understanding of epithelial/mesenchymal interactions could assist in this. Methodology/Principal Findings A keratincyte/fibroblast o-culture model was developed by extending an agent-based keratinocyte colony formation model to include the response of keratinocytes to both fibroblasts and serum. The model was validated by comparison of the in virtuo and in vitro multicellular behaviour of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in single and co-culture in Greens medium. To test the robustness of the model, several properties of the fibroblasts were changed to investigate their influence on the multicellular morphogenesis of keratinocyes and fibroblasts. The model was then used to generate hypotheses to explore the interactions of both proliferative and growth arrested fibroblasts with keratinocytes. The key predictions arising from the model which were confirmed by in vitro experiments were that 1) the ratio of fibroblasts to keratinocytes would critically influence keratinocyte colony expansion, 2) this ratio needed to be optimum at the beginning of the co-culture, 3) proliferative fibroblasts would be more effective than irradiated cells in expanding keratinocytes and 4) in the presence of an adequate number of fibroblasts, keratinocyte expansion would be independent of serum. Conclusions A closely associated computational and biological approach is a powerful tool for understanding complex biological systems such as the interactions between keratinocytes and fibroblasts. The key outcome of this study is the finding that the early addition of a critical ratio of proliferative fibroblasts can give rapid keratinocyte expansion without the use of irradiated mouse fibroblasts and bovine

  11. High nutrient concentration and temperature alleviated formation of large colonies of Microcystis: Evidence from field investigations and laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zhou, Xiaohua; Chen, Huaimin; Gao, Li; Xiao, Man; Li, Ming

    2016-09-15

    Correlations between Microcystis colony size and environmental factors were investigated in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay of Lake Taihu (China) from 2011 to 2013. Compared with Gonghu Bay, both nutrient concentrations and Microcystis colony sizes were greater in Meiliang Bay. The median colony size (D50: 50% of the total mass of particles smaller than this size) increased from April to August and then decreased until November. In both bays, the average D50 of Microcystis colonies were <100 μm in spring, but colonies within moderate-size (100-500 μm) dominated in summer. The differences in colony size in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay were probably due to horizontal drift driven by the prevailing south wind in summer. Redundancy analysis (RDA) of field data indicated that colony size was negatively related to nutrient concentrations but positively related to air temperature, suggesting that low nutrient concentrations and high air temperature promoted formation of large colonies. To validate the field survey, Microcystis colonies collected from Lake Taihu were cultured at different temperatures (15, 20, 25 and 30 °C) under high and low nutrient concentrations for 9 days. The size of Microcystis colonies significantly decreased when temperature was above 20 °C but had no significant change at 15 °C. The differences in temperature effects on colony formation shown from field and laboratory suggested that the larger colonies in summer were probably due to the longer growth period rather than the higher air temperature and light intensity. In addition, colony size decreased more significantly at high nutrient levels. Therefore, it could be concluded that high nutrient concentration and temperature may alleviate formation of large colonies of Microcystis. PMID:27262121

  12. Microtable Arrays for Culture and Isolation of Cell Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Jeng-Hao; Xu, Wei; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Cell microarrays with culture sites composed of individually removable microstructures or micropallets have proven benefits for isolation of cells from a mixed population. The laser energy required to selectively remove these micropallets with attached cells from the array depends on the microstructure surface area in contact with the substrate. Laser energies sufficient to release micropallets greater than 100 μm resulted in loss of cell viability. A new 3-dimensional culture site similar in appearance to a table was designed and fabricated using a simple process that relied on a differential sensitivity of two photoresists to UV-mediated photopolymerization. With this design, the larger culture area rests on four small supports to minimize the surface area in contact with the substrate. Microtables up to 250 × 250 μm were consistently released with single 10 μJ pulses to each of the 4 support structures. In contrast, microstructures with a 150 × 150 μm surface area in contact with the substrate could not be reliably released at pulse energies up to 212 μJ. Cassie-Baxter wetting is required to provide a barrier of air to localize and sequester cells to the culture sites. A second asset of the design was an increased retention of this air barrier under conditions of decreased surface tension and after prolonged culture of cells. The improved air retention was due to the hydrophobic cavity created beneath the table and above the substrate which entrapped air when an aqueous solution was added to the array. The microtables proved an efficient method for isolating colonies from the array with 100% of selected colonies competent to expand following release from the array. PMID:20644916

  13. Development of serum-free quality and quantity control culture of colony-forming endothelial progenitor cell for vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Haruchika; Iwasaki, Hiroto; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Ii, Masaaki; Shizuno, Tomoko; Sato, Atsuko; Ito, Rie; Horii, Miki; Ishida, Hideyuki; Kato, Shunichi; Asahara, Takayuki

    2012-02-01

    Quantitative and qualitative impairment of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) limits the efficacy of autologous cell therapy in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Here, we developed a serum-free quality and quantity control culture system for colony-forming EPCs to enhance their regenerative potential. A culture with serum-free medium containing stem cell factor, thrombopoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-6, and Flt-3 ligand was determined as optimal quality and quantity culture (QQc) in terms of the most vasculogenic colony-forming EPC expansion, evaluated by the newly established EPC colony formation assay. The QQc of umbilical cord blood-CD133(+) cells for 7 days produced a 52.9-fold increase in total cell number and 3.28-fold frequency in definitive EPC colony development, resulting in a 203.9-fold increase in estimated total definitive EPC colony number in vitro. Pre- or post-QQc cells were intramyocardially transplanted into nude rats with myocardial infarction (MI). Echocardiographic and micromanometer-tipped conductance catheter examinations 28 days post-MI revealed significant preservation of left ventricular (LV) function in rats receiving pre- or post-QQc cells compared with those receiving phosphate-buffered saline. Assessments of global LV contractility indicated a dose-dependent effect of pre- or post-QQc cells and the superior potency of post-QQc cells over pre-QQc cells. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed more abundant formation of both human and rat endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes in the infarcted myocardium following transplantation of post-QQc cells compared with pre-QQc cells. Our optimal serum-free quality and quantity culture may enhance the therapeutic potential of EPCs in both quantitative and qualitative aspects for cardiovascular regeneration.

  14. Pro-angiogenic Cell Colonies Grown In Vitro from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatis, Kreton; Sutcliffe, Diane; Joseph, Giji; Alexander, R. Wayne; Waller, Edmund K.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Taylor, W. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Although multiple culture assays have been designed to identify “endothelial progenitor cells” (EPCs), the phenotype of cells grown in culture often remains undefined. We sought to define and characterize the pro-angiogenic cell population within human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood and grown under angiogenic conditions for 7 days. Formed colonies (CFU-As) were identified and analyzed for proliferation, mRNA and surface antigen expression, tube-forming ability and chromosomal content. Colonies were composed of a heterogeneous group of cells expressing the leukocyte antigens CD45, CD14, and CD3, as well as the endothelial proteins vascular endothelial (VE) cadherin, von Willebrand's Factor (vWF), CD31 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Colony cells expressed increased levels of pro-angiogenic growth factors, and they formed tubes in Matrigel. In comparison with colonies from the CFU-Hill assay, our assay resulted in a greater number of colonies (19±9 vs. 13±7; p<0.0001) with a substantial number of cells expressing an endothelial phenotype (20.2±7.4% vs. 2.2±1.2% expressing eNOS, p=0006). Chromosomal analysis indicated the colony cells were bone marrow-derived. We, therefore, describe a colony forming unit assay that measures bone marrow-derived circulating mononuclear cells with the capacity to proliferate and mature into proangiogenic leukocytic and endothelial-like cells. This assay, therefore, reflects circulating, bone marrow-derived pro-angiogenic activity. PMID:22904201

  15. The role of gravity in the nutrition and formation of Bacillus colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzyr, A.; Tirranen, L.; Krylova, T.

    The soil-like substrate is used to cultivate higher plants in man-made closed ecosystems. It allows increasing the closeness of the systems and decreasing the plant solid residues and human wastes. Unusual funnel-shaped bacterial colonies of Bacillus species have been observed during analysis of microflora of plant nutritional solution. The colonies have the following characteristics: a) the diameter of "funnel socket" (the biomass contacting with nutritional agar) is 10.0-15.0 mm; b) the thickness of "funnel socket" is 0.5-2.5 mm; c) the diameter of the middle part of the "funnel spout" (the biomass contacting with the gas phase) is 1,0-1,5 mm; d) the length of the "funnel spout" is 10.0-15.0 mm. In the socket and the middle part of the "funnel spout" there is a gas cavity which is most probably formed by bacterial gas metabolites. It has been shown that: i) the surface of these funnel-shaped colonies of Bacillus species is hydrophobic, as is the surface of other Bacillus species ( . brevis, B. cellulomonos, B. flavus, B.B formosus, B. subtilis); ii) the forms of colonies can be changed by varying the position of the growing biomass in relation to the gravitation forces. The experiment proved that the form of the "funnel sockets" and the length of the "funnel spouts" of the colonies are determined by hydrophobic air-contacting surface layer, which does not leak and stretches under the weight of accumulated water. A hypothesis has been suggested that the gravity force plays the role of a "pump" supplying and holding water within the colony. Thus, the water that comes under the gravity force contains dissolved nutrients and bacterial cells in the hydrophobic layer. These cells that are situated far away from the nutrient agar have no nutrient deficiency. The water accumulated by the colonies might be free water of agar media or it can be produced by metabolic disruption of medium fat. Hence, when growing a colony in agar media the water-soluble nutrient substances

  16. Modulation of colony stimulating factor release and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells by anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, S; Warner, T D; Mitchell, J A

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of the immune response against tumour cells is emerging as a valuable approach for cancer treatment. Some experimental studies have shown that secretion of colony stimulating factors by cancer cells reduces their tumorigenicity and increases their immunogenicity probably by promoting the cytolitic and antigen presenting activities of leukocytes. We have observed that human colon cancer cells (HT-29) are able to secrete granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor when stimulated with cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α). In this study we assessed, for the first time, the effects of several anticancer drugs on colony stimulating factor release or apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Cytokine-induced release of granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor was significantly increased by cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine. Taxol only increased macrophage-colony stimulating factor release while reduced that of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. No changes in colony stimulating factor secretion were observed after treatment with methotrexate. Only cisplatin and taxol induced apoptosis in these cells. Secretion of colony stimulating factors by colon cancer cells may contribute to the immune host response against them. Anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine increase colony stimulating factor secretion by cytokine stimulated cancer cells probably through mechanisms different to those leading to cell apoptosis, an effect that may contribute to their anti-neoplasic action. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1316–1321. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600240 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953891

  17. Action of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors: studies using a human leukemia cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Lusis, A J; Koeffler, H P

    1980-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) have previously been shown to stimulate colony formation in soft agar culture by a human myelogenous leukemia cell line known as KG-1. We have used KG-1 cells as a model system to investigate the interaction of CSF with myeloid cells. We now report that exposure of KG-1 cells to human CSFs in liquid culture results in a rapid (within 3 hr) burst of RNA synthesis and, after a lag of about 10 hr, a stimulation of DNA and protein synthesis. RNA and protein synthesis were maximally stimulated about 2-fold and DNA synthesis was stimulated about 2.5-fold. The stimulation was specific; various growth factors, hormones, and mouse CSFs had no effect on KG-1 macromolecular synthesis. Treatment with CSF did not discernibly alter the morphological appearance of the KG-1 cells (primarily myeloblasts) nor did it qualitatively affect the pattern of newly synthesized proteins separable by one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Several myeloid leukemia cell lines that were not responsive to CSF in agar culture, including a dedifferentiated variant of KG-1, showed little or no stimulation of macromolecular synthesis upon exposure to CSF. We have used the CSF-dependent stimulation of macromolecular synthesis of KG-1 to develop a rapid, sensitive microassay for human CSFs. The assay, involving thymidine incorporation by the cells, should be useful for characterization and purification of human CSFs. Images PMID:6159645

  18. Characteristics of rat megakaryocyte colonies and their progenitors in agar culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.L.; Rolovic, Z.; Evatt, B.L.; Sewell, E.T.

    1985-11-01

    The characteristics of megakaryocyte colonies that develop from megakaryocyte progenitors of rat bone marrow stimulated by rat spleen-conditioned medium (SCM) in agar culture were investigated. Colony frequency was optimal on day 7 and increased relative to both the number of cells plated and the concentration of SCM used. Colonies were categorized as small cell and big cell. Small-cell colonies had a greater proliferative potential, with a mean of 25 cells/colony. Big-cell colonies averaged 15 cells/colony. The ratio of big-cell to small-cell colonies was 0.69 +/- 0.29. Granulocyte-macrophage colonies, which were also stimulated by SCM, accounted for 70% +/- 15% of the total colonies in the cultures. Cytocidal experiments with tritiated thymidine reduced megakaryocyte colony formation by 45% and granulocyte-macrophage colony formation by 21%. The properties of rat, mouse, and human megakaryocyte progenitors as assayed in vitro are compared.

  19. Pulmonary artery endothelium resident endothelial colony-forming cells in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Heng T.; Comhair, Suzy A.; Aldred, Micheala A.; Mavrakis, Lori; Savasky, Benjamin M.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Asosingh, Kewal

    2011-01-01

    Proliferative pulmonary vascular remodeling is the pathologic hallmark of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) that ultimately leads to right heart failure and death. Highly proliferative endothelial cells known as endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) participate in vascular homeostasis in health as well as in pathological angiogenic remodeling in disease. ECFC are distinguished by the capacity to clonally proliferate from a single cell. The presence of ECFC in the human pulmonary arteries and their role in PAH pathogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we established a simple technique for isolating and growing ECFC from cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC) to test the hypothesis that ECFC reside in human pulmonary arteries and that the proliferative vasculopathy of PAH is related to greater numbers and/or more proliferative ECFC in the pulmonary vascular wall. Flow cytometric forward and side scatter properties and aggregate correction were utilized to sort unmanipulated, single PAEC to enumerate ECFC in primary PAEC cultures derived from PAH and healthy lungs. After 2 weeks, wells were assessed for ECFC formation. ECFC derived from PAH PAEC were more proliferative than control. A greater proportion of PAH ECFC formed colonies following subculturing, demonstrating the presence of more ECFC with high proliferative potential among PAH PAEC. Human androgen receptor assay showed clonality of progeny, confirming that proliferative colonies were single cell-derived. ECFC expressed CD31, von Willebrand factor, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, caveolin-1 and CD34, consistent with an endothelial cell phenotype. We established a simple flow cytometry method that allows ECFC quantification using unmanipulated cells. We conclude that ECFC reside among PAEC and that PAH PAEC contain ECFC that are more proliferative than ECFC in control cultures, which likely contributes to the proliferative angiopathic process in PAH. PMID:22530103

  20. Simple method for a cell count of the colonial Cyanobacterium, Microcystis sp.

    PubMed

    Joung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Choong-Jae; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Jang, Kam-Yong; Boo, Sung Min; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2006-10-01

    The cell counting of colonial Microcystis spp. is a rather difficult and error-prone proposition, as this genus forms irregularly-shaped and irregularly-sized colonies, which are packed with cells. Thus, in order to facilitate a cell count, four methods of dividing the colonies into single cells were compared, including vortexing, sonication, TiO2 treatment, and boiling. As a result, the boiling method was determined to generate the greatest number of single cells from a colony, and all colonies were found to have divided completely after only 6 min of treatment. Furthermore, no significant cell destruction, which might alter the actual cell density, was detected in conjunction with the boiling method (P = 0.158). In order to compute the cell number more simply, the relationship between the colony size and the cell number was determined, via the boiling method. The colony volume, rather than the area or diameter was correlated more closely with the cell number (r2 = 0.727), thereby suggesting that the cell numbers of colonial Microcystis sp. can also be estimated effectively from their volumes. PMID:17082751

  1. Interferon-gamma enhances megakaryocyte colony-stimulating activity in murine bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuji-Takayama, K; Tahata, H; Harashima, A; Nishida, Y; Izumi, N; Fukuda, S; Ohta, T; Kurimoto, M

    1996-09-01

    We have demonstrated previously that interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) accelerates platelet recovery in mice with 5-FU induced-marrow aplasia in vivo. However, the mechanism for the regulation of megakaryocyte development induced by IFN-gamma in bone marrow cells in vivo remains unknown. To further study the effects of IFN-gamma on megakaryocyte development, various steps during IFN-gamma-mediated accelerated differentiation of the megakaryocytes were investigated in serum-free cultures of murine bone marrow cells in vitro. IFN-gamma markedly induced acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity, a marker of murine megakaryocytic cells, accompanied by increased colony formation of the megakaryocyte lineage. A prominent increase in megakaryocyte number was observed after IFN-gamma treatment. All of these effects were dependent on the presence of IL-3, and, therefore, these results suggest that IFN-gamma acts as a megakaryocyte potentiator (Meg-POT). However, IFN-gamma did not enhance megakaryocyte maturation with respect to increase in cell size. The effects of IFN-gamma on megakaryocyte maturation were similar to those observed after treatment with higher doses of IL-3 alone. Meg-POT is defined as a factor that induces megakaryocyte maturation. Since IFN-gamma enhanced IL-3-dependent megakaryocyte colony formation and proliferation rather than megakaryocyte maturation, the effects on megakaryocyte development, which were induced by IFN-gamma treatment, seem to be different from the effects of a Meg-POT. We, therefore, propose a new function for IFN-gamma as an enhancer of megakaryocyte colony-stimulating factor activity. The effect of IFN-gamma in vitro appears to correlate well with the acceleration of platelet recovery in vivo.

  2. Regulation of the colony-stimulating activity produced by a murine marrow-derived cell line (H-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, H.M.; Cronkite, E.P.; Harigaya, K.

    1982-03-01

    The production of molecular species that stimulate growth of granulocyte or macrophage colonies (GM-CSF) by the fibroblastoid H-1 cell line is unaffected by either native or iron-saturated lactoferrin, although some inhibition is detected with 10 ..mu..M prostaglandin E/sub 1/. The H-1 GM-CSF is able to support the formation of macrophage, neutrophil, and mixed colonies. This inhibitory effect is observed irrespective of the presence of an additional agar layer between the feeder cells and plated bone marrow cells, implying that diffusable substances are involved. Addition of indomethacin (10 ..mu..M) to feeder layers derived from 2.5 x 10/sup 3/ H-1 cells increases the number of GM-CFU/sub c/ detected to 50% of that seen with conditioned medium alone. This result suggests that released prostaglandin may be responsible for some, but not all, of the observed inhibition of colony formation. In the presence of the H-1 feeder layers, only macrophage colonies are detected and hence it appears that the H-1 cells produce, in addition to prostaglandin, a diffusible inhibitory substance that preferentially inhibits granulopoiesis.

  3. Automated cell colony counting and analysis using the circular Hough image transform algorithm (CHiTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewes, J. M.; Suchowerska, N.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    We present an automated cell colony counting method that is flexible, robust and capable of providing more in-depth clonogenic analysis than existing manual and automated approaches. The full form of the Hough transform without approximation has been implemented, for the first time. Improvements in computing speed have facilitated this approach. Colony identification was achieved by pre-processing the raw images of the colonies in situ in the flask, including images of the flask edges, by erosion, dilation and Gaussian smoothing processes. Colony edges were then identified by intensity gradient field discrimination. Our technique eliminates the need for specialized hardware for image capture and enables the use of a standard desktop scanner for distortion-free image acquisition. Additional parameters evaluated included regional colony counts, average colony area, nearest neighbour distances and radial distribution. This spatial and qualitative information extends the utility of the clonogenic assay, allowing analysis of spatially-variant cytotoxic effects. To test the automated system, two flask types and three cell lines with different morphology, cell size and plating density were examined. A novel Monte Carlo method of simulating cell colony images, as well as manual counting, were used to quantify algorithm accuracy. The method was able to identify colonies with unusual morphology, to successfully resolve merged colonies and to correctly count colonies adjacent to flask edges.

  4. Pattern formation in a growing bacterial colony facilitated by extra-cellular polymeric substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Mondal, Jagannath; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Self-organization in bacterial colony is quite pervasive and diverse phenomena. Bacteria are known to self-organize into multicellular communities, commonly known as biofilms, in which microbial cells live in close association with a solid surface and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric substances(EPS). In such dense systems mechanical interactions among the structural components can be expected to significantly contribute to the morphological properties. By a simple particle-based simulation model of nonmotile rod-shaped bacterial cells and EPS secreted in a growing colony, we investigate how the combined mechanical effects can give rise naturally spatial heterogeneity observed in a biofilm. In our individual-based simulation model all the components interact mechanically via repulsive forces by pushing each other away as bacterial cells grow and divide consuming diffusing nutrient and produce EPS. We show that mechanical interactions control the collective behavior of the system, particularly, we show that the presence of non-adsorbing EPS leads spontaneous aggregation of bacterial cells by depletion attraction and generates phase separated patterns in a nonequilibrium growing colony.

  5. Involvement of allelopathy in the formation of monospecific colonies of ferns.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2015-05-01

    Some fern species often dominate plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination of the ferns remains obscure. Many plants secrete a wide range of compounds into the rhizosphere and change the chemical and physical properties of the rhizosphere soil. Through the secretion of compounds, such as allelopathic substances, plants inhibit the germination and growth of neighboring plants to compete more effectively for the resources. Ferns contain a variety of secondary metabolites and some of those compounds are released from the ferns into the rhizosphere soil, either as exudates from living ferns or by decomposition of fern residues in sufficient quantities to affect the germination and growth of neighboring plants as allelopathic substances. Therefore, allelopathic chemical interaction of the ferns with neighboring plants may play an important role in the formation of the monospecific colonies of the ferns.

  6. Involvement of allelopathy in the formation of monospecific colonies of ferns.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2015-05-01

    Some fern species often dominate plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination of the ferns remains obscure. Many plants secrete a wide range of compounds into the rhizosphere and change the chemical and physical properties of the rhizosphere soil. Through the secretion of compounds, such as allelopathic substances, plants inhibit the germination and growth of neighboring plants to compete more effectively for the resources. Ferns contain a variety of secondary metabolites and some of those compounds are released from the ferns into the rhizosphere soil, either as exudates from living ferns or by decomposition of fern residues in sufficient quantities to affect the germination and growth of neighboring plants as allelopathic substances. Therefore, allelopathic chemical interaction of the ferns with neighboring plants may play an important role in the formation of the monospecific colonies of the ferns. PMID:26058163

  7. Cooperation between human fibrocytes and endothelial colony forming cells increases angiogenesis via CXCR4 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Smadja, David M.; Dorfmüller, Peter; Bieche, Ivan; Guerin, Coralie; Badoual, Cécile; Boscolo, Elisa; Kambouchner, Marianne; Cazes, Aurélie; Mercier, Olaf; Humbert, Marc; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Israël-Biet, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibrotic diseases of the lung are associated with a vascular remodeling process. Fibrocytes (Fy) are a distinct population of blood-borne cells that coexpress hematopoietic cell antigens and fibroblast markers, which have been shown to contribute to organ fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Fy might cooperate with endothelial colony forming cells to induce angiogenesis. Methods/Results We successfully isolated Fy from blood of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients, which were further characterized by flow cytometry, Reverse Transcriptase quantitative-PCR (RTQ-PCR), and confocal analysis. We investigated the interaction between Fy and cord blood derived endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) angiogenic potential in vitro and in vivo in a Matrigel implant model. Compared to fibroblast culture media, secreted media from Fy increase ECFC proliferation and their differentiation ability via SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. IPF-Fy co-implanted with human ECFC in a matrigel plug in immunodeficient mice formed functional microvascular beds, whereas fibroblasts did not. Evaluation of implants after 2 weeks revealed an extensive network of blood vessels containing erythrocytes. CXCR4 blockade significantly inhibited blood vessel formation in the implants. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by the high expression level of CXCR4 in vessels close to fibrotic areas in biopsy specimens from patients with IPF, in contrast to control lungs. Conclusions Circulating Fy might be contribute to the intense remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature in patients with IPF. PMID:25103869

  8. Sorting and Expansion of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Colonies using Micropallet Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Shadpour, Hamed; Sims, Christopher E.; Thresher, Randy J.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Isolation of cell colonies is an essential task in most stem cell studies. Conventional techniques for colony selection and isolation require significant time, labor, and consumption of expensive reagents. New microengineered technologies hold the promise for improving colony manipulation by reducing the required manpower and reagent consumption. Methods Murine embryonic stem cells were cultured on arrays composed of releasable elements termed micropallets created from a biocompatible photoresist. Micropallets containing undifferentiated colonies were released using a laser-based technique followed by cell collection and expansion in culture. Results The micropallet arrays provided a biocompatible substrate for maintaining undifferentiated murine stem cells in culture. A surface coating of 0.025% gelatin was shown to be optimal for cell culture and collection. Arrays composed of surface roughened micropallets provided further improvements in culture and isolation. Colonies of viable stem cells were efficiently isolated and collected. Colonies sorted in this manner were shown to remain undifferentiated even after collection and further expansion in culture. Conclusions Qualitative and quantitative analyses of sorting, collection efficiency and cell viability after release and expansion of stem cell colonies demonstrated that the micropallet array technology is a promising alternative to conventional sorting methods for stem cell applications. PMID:19012319

  9. Manufacture of Clinical-Grade Human Clonal Mesenchymal Stem Cell Products from Single Colony Forming Unit-Derived Colonies Based on the Subfractionation Culturing Method.

    PubMed

    Yi, TacGhee; Kim, Si-na; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Junghee; Cho, Yun-Kyoung; Shin, Dong-Hee; Tak, Sun-Ji; Moon, Sun-Hwa; Kang, Ji-Eun; Ji, In-Mi; Lim, Huyn-Ja; Lee, Dong-Soon; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Song, Sun U

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell products derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely used in clinical trials, and a few products have been already commercialized. However, the therapeutic effects of clinical-grade MSCs are still controversial owing to mixed results from recent clinical trials. A potential solution to overcome this hurdle may be to use clonal stem cells as the starting cell material to increase the homogeneity of the final stem cell products. We have previously developed an alternative isolation and culture protocol for establishing a population of clonal MSCs (cMSCs) from single colony forming unit (CFU)-derived colonies. In this study, we established a good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible procedure for the clinical-grade production of human bone marrow-derived cMSCs based on the subfractionation culturing method. We optimized the culture procedures to expand and obtain a clonal population of final MSC products from single CFU-derived colonies in a GMP facility. The characterization results of the final cMSC products met our preset criteria. Animal toxicity tests were performed in a good laboratory practice facility, and showed no toxicity or tumor formation in vivo. These tests include single injection toxicity, multiple injection toxicity, biodistribution analysis, and tumorigenicity tests in vivo. No chromosomal abnormalities were detected by in situ karyotyping using oligo-fluorescence in situ hydridization (oligo-FISH), providing evidence of genetic stability of the clinical-grade cMSC products. The manufacture and quality control results indicated that our GMP methodology could produce sufficient clonal population of MSC products from a small amount of bone marrow aspirate to treat a number of patients. PMID:26421757

  10. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Azevedo, Angela Rita Pontes; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating) influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. Methods Search strategy: four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME) were selected to search relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. Selection Criteria: in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The full text was obtained from publications that met the inclusion criteria. Data collection and analysis: Two reviewers independently extracted data using the keywords: conventional, self-ligating, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans, and systematic review; and independently evaluated the quality of the studies. In case of divergence, the technique of consensus was adopted. Results The search strategy resulted in 1,401 articles. The classification of scientific relevance revealed the high quality of the 6 eligible articles of which outcomes were not unanimous in reporting not only the influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over adhesion and formation of colonies of Streptococcus mutans, but also that other factors such as the quality of the bracket type, the level of individual oral hygiene, bonding and age may have greater influence. Statistical analysis was not feasible because of the heterogeneous methodological design. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no evidence for a possible influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over colony formation and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans. PMID:24713561

  11. Measuring Survival of Hematopoietic Cancer Cells with the Colony-Forming Assay in Soft Agar.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Colony-forming assays measure the ability of cells in culture to grow and divide into groups. Any cell that has the potential to form a colony may also have the potential to cause cancer or relapse in vivo. Colony-forming assays also provide an indirect measurement of cell death because any cell that is dead or dying will not continue to proliferate. The proliferative capacity of adherent cells such as fibroblasts can be determined by growing cells at low density on culture dishes and counting the number of distinct groups that form over time. Cells that grow in suspension, such as hematopoietic cells, cannot be assayed this way because the cells move freely in the media. Assays to determine the colony-forming ability of hematopoietic cells must therefore be performed in solid matrices that restrict large-scale movement of the cells. One such matrix is soft agar. This protocol describes the use of soft agar to compare the colony-forming ability of untreated hematopoietic cells to the colony-forming ability of hematopoietic cells that have been treated with a cytotoxic agent. PMID:27480718

  12. Continuum Model of Collective Cell Migration in Wound Healing and Colony Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, Julia C.; Mi, Qi; Branca, Maria F.; Hackam, David J.; Swigon, David

    2011-01-01

    Collective cell migration plays an important role during wound healing and embryo development. Although the exact mechanisms that coordinate such migration are still unknown, experimental studies of moving cell layers have shown that the primary interactions governing the motion of the layer are the force of lamellipodia, the adhesion of cells to the substrate, and the adhesion of cells to each other. Here, we derive a two-dimensional continuum mechanical model of cell-layer migration that is based on a novel assumption of elastic deformation of the layer and incorporates basic mechanical interactions of cells as well as cell proliferation and apoptosis. The evolution equations are solved numerically using a level set method. The model successfully reproduces data from two types of experiments: 1), the contraction of an enterocyte cell layer during wound healing; and 2), the expansion of a radially symmetric colony of MDCK cells, both in the edge migration velocity and in cell-layer density. In accord with experimental observations, and in contrast to reaction-diffusion models, this model predicts a partial wound closure if lamellipod formation is inhibited at the wound edge and gives implications of the effect of spatially restricted proliferation. PMID:21281567

  13. Characterization of Ectopic Colonies That Form in Widespread Areas of the Nervous System with Neural Stem Cell Transplants into the Site of a Severe Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Kelli G.; Yee, Kelly Matsudaira; Hatch, Maya N.; Bonner, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    We reported previously the formation of ectopic colonies in widespread areas of the nervous system after transplantation of fetal neural stem cells (NSCs) into spinal cord transection sites. Here, we characterize the incidence, distribution, and cellular composition of the colonies. NSCs harvested from E14 spinal cords from rats that express GFP were treated with a growth factor cocktail and grafted into the site of a complete spinal cord transection. Two months after transplant, spinal cord and brain tissue were analyzed histologically. Ectopic colonies were found at long distances from the transplant in the central canal of the spinal cord, the surface of the brainstem and spinal cord, and in the fourth ventricle. Colonies were present in 50% of the rats, and most rats had multiple colonies. Axons extended from the colonies into the host CNS. Colonies were strongly positive for nestin, a marker for neural precursors, and contained NeuN-positive cells with processes resembling dendrites, GFAP-positive astrocytes, APC/CC1-positive oligodendrocytes, and Ki-67-positive cells, indicating ongoing proliferation. Stereological analyses revealed an estimated 21,818 cells in a colony in the fourth ventricle, of which 1005 (5%) were Ki-67 positive. Immunostaining for synaptic markers (synaptophysin and VGluT-1) revealed large numbers of synaptophysin-positive puncta within the colonies but fewer VGluT-1 puncta. Continuing expansion of NSC-derived cell masses in confined spaces in the spinal cord and brain could produce symptoms attributable to compression of nearby tissue. It remains to be determined whether other cell types with self-renewing potential can also form colonies. PMID:25319698

  14. Short communication: Colony-forming hematopoietic progenitor cells are not preferentially infected by HIV type 1 subtypes A and D in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mullis, Caroline E; Oliver, Amy E; Eller, Leigh Anne; Guwatudde, David; Mueller, Amy C; Eller, Michael A; Kibuuka, Hannah; Robb, Merlin; Quinn, Thomas C; Redd, Andrew D

    2012-09-01

    HIV subtype C has previously been shown to infect hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at a significantly higher rate than subtype B. To better understand the subtype-specific nature of HPC infection, we examined the prevalence of HPC infection in vivo by HIV-1 subtypes A and D. HIV-1 infection of HPC was examined in 40 individuals, 19 infected with subtype A and 21 with subtype D, using a single colony assay format. DNA from 1177 extracted colonies was tested for integrated viral DNA of the p24 gene. Four colonies were found to be stably infected, three of 462 colonies (0.65%) from HIV-1A-infected individuals (1/19 individuals) and one of 715 colonies (0.14%) from HIV-1D-infected individuals (1/22 individuals). These rates of colony infection were comparable to the rates observed in PBMCs from the same subjects. Additionally, no correlation was observed between cell colony density and circulating viral load or proviral load. Our findings suggest that HIV-1 subtypes A and D do not preferentially infect colony-forming HPCs over mature HIV target cells in vivo.

  15. Cloning and characterization of the cDNA encoding a novel human pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, B.; Sun, Yinghao; Stearns, G.

    1994-02-01

    A novel gene coding for the pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) has been isolated from a human peripheral blood lymphocyte cDNA library. The expression of this gene is induced by pokeweed mitogen and superinduced by cycloheximide. It is also induced in the T-lymphoblastoid cell line HUT 78 after phorbol ester (phorbol myristate acetate) treatment. The predominant mRNA for PBEF is approximately 2.4 kb long and codes for a 52-kDa secreted protein. The 3{prime} untranslated region of the mRNA has multiple TATT motifs, usually found in cytokine and oncogene messages. The PBEF gene is mainly transcribed in human bone marrow, liver tissue, and muscle. We have expressed PBEF in COS 7 and PA317 cells and have tested the biological activities of the conditioned medium as well as the antibody-purified protein in different in vitro assays. PBEF itself had no activity but synergized the pre-B-cell colony formation activity of stem cell factor and interleukin 7. In the presence of PBEF, the number of pre-B-cell colonies was increased by at least 70% above the amount stimulated by stem cell factor plus interleukin 7. No effect of PBEF was found with cells of myeloid or erythroid lineages. These data define PBEF as a novel cytokine which acts on early B-lineage precursor cells. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Quantification of biomass and cell motion in human pluripotent stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Zangle, Thomas A; Chun, Jennifer; Zhang, Jin; Reed, Jason; Teitell, Michael A

    2013-08-01

    Somatic cell reprogramming to pluripotency requires an immediate increase in cell proliferation and reduction in cell size. It is unknown whether proliferation and biomass controls are similarly coordinated with early events during the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). This impasse exists because PSCs grow in tight clusters or colonies, precluding most quantifying approaches. Here, we investigate live cell interferometry as an approach to quantify the biomass and growth of HSF1 human PSC colonies before and during retinoic acid-induced differentiation. We also provide an approach for measuring the rate and coordination of intracolony mass redistribution in HSF1 clusters using live cell interferometry images. We show that HSF1 cells grow at a consistent, exponential rate regardless of colony size and display coordinated intracolony movement that ceases with the onset of differentiation. By contrast, growth and proliferation rates show a decrease of only ∼15% decrease during early differentiation despite global changes in gene expression and previously reported changes in energy metabolism. Overall, these results suggest that cell biomass and proliferation are regulated independent of pluripotency during early differentiation, which is distinct from what occurs with successful reprogramming. PMID:23931307

  17. Cell-Surface Phenol Soluble Modulins Regulate Staphylococcus aureus Colony Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Kizaki, Hayato; Omae, Yosuke; Tabuchi, Fumiaki; Saito, Yuki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), which are amphipathic small peptides with lytic activity against mammalian cells. We previously reported that PSMα1–4 stimulate S. aureus colony spreading, the phenomenon of S. aureus colony expansion on the surface of soft agar plates, whereas δ-toxin (Hld, PSMγ) inhibits colony-spreading activity. In this study, we revealed the underlying mechanism of the opposing effects of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin in S. aureus colony spreading. PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin are abundant on the S. aureus cell surface, and account for 18% and 8.5% of the total amount of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin, respectively, in S. aureus overnight cultures. Knockout of PSMα1–4 did not affect the amount of cell surface δ-toxin. In contrast, knockout of δ-toxin increased the amount of cell surface PSMα1–4, and decreased the amount of culture supernatant PSMα1–4. The δ-toxin inhibited PSMα3 and PSMα2 binding to the S. aureus cell surface in vitro. A double knockout strain of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin exhibited decreased colony spreading compared with the parent strain. Expression of cell surface PSMα1–4, but not culture supernatant PSMα1–4, restored the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. Expression of δ-toxin on the cell surface or in the culture supernatant did not restore the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. These findings suggest that cell surface PSMα1–4 promote S. aureus colony spreading, whereas δ-toxin suppresses colony-spreading activity by inhibiting PSMα1–4 binding to the S. aureus cell surface. PMID:27723838

  18. Development of a bioassay for ovarian carcinoma colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Hamburger, A W; Salmon, S E; Alberts, D S

    1980-01-01

    We have reviewed the application of our in vitro assay for human tumor stem cells to the cloning of human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells in soft agar. Tumor colonies grew from both effusions and biopsies from 85% of more than 100 ovarian cancer patients tested. Up to 2,000 colonies appeared after 10 to 14 days in culture, yielding a maximum plating efficiency of 1%. Cells from nonmalignant effusions did not form colonies under these conditions. The number of tumor colonies was proportional to the number of cells plated between concentrations of 104 to 106 cells/dish. Morphological and histochemical criteria showed that the colonies consisted of cells with the same characteristics as those of the original tumor. H3Tdr suicide colony-forming cells were actively in transient through the cell cycle. Removal of phagocytic cells with carbonyl iron markedly reduced the plating efficiency, and 2-mercaptoethanol could only partially substitute for macrophages. Spleen cell-conditioned medium from oil-primed BALB/c mice was not required. Endogenous macrophages within the tumor may provide the conditioning factor or factors required for in vitro growth. Thus, this assay is proving extremely useful for studying the biology and drug sensitivity of human ovarian cancer. PMID:7208527

  19. Proliferation and colony-forming ability of peritoneal exudate cells in liquid culture.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C C; Lin, H S; Adles, C

    1975-05-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells, obtained from mice injected with thioglycollate medium and cultured in medium containing L-cell-conditioned medium, will proliferate in an exponential fashion for 18 days with a doubling time of 68 h. After a 2 h pulse of tritiated thymidine, labeled adherent cells increased to a maximum of 22-34% during the 1st and 2nd wk of culture. Increasing the cell concentration from 2 times 10-3 to 2 times 10-5 cells/culture reduced exponential growth to 10 days and the doubling time was increased to 81.6 h. Under these culture conditions, peritoneal exudate cells were shown to form colonies on the surface of culture dishes when plated at low density. The cells within the colony were shown to be macrophages using yeast and antibody-coated sheep erythrocytes as a test for phagocytic function. The plating efficiolonies arose from a single precursor cell. The adherent cell population contains the colony-forming precursors. These precursors can be stimulated to form colonies for at least 2 wk by the addition of conditioned medium to cultures at various times after plating. While very few colony-forming cells could be demonstrated in the unstimulated peritoneal lavage, their numbers begin to increase in the exudate 4 h after injection of thioglycollate medium and reach a maximum by day 3 and then decrease. Isolated colonies may be useful in studying the function of macrophages. PMID:1092793

  20. Experimental Investigation on the Validity of Population Dynamics Approach to Bacterial Colony Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakita, Jun-ichi; Komatsu, Kenji; Nakahara, Akio; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    1994-03-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of a two-dimensional spreading of a bacterial population in a surface environment. After point inoculation of flagellated bacteria ( Bacillus subtilis) on nutrient-rich semi-solid medium, the bacterial population grew up by multiplication and translocation of cells, and developed a homogeneous round colony. By comparing experimental results with those of numerical simulations of the model equation, we found that this homogeneous population growth of bacteria is an actual manifestation of growth dynamics described by the Fisher's equation.

  1. Endothelial colony-forming cells for preparing prevascular three-dimensional cell-dense tissues using cell-sheet engineering.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Tadashi; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2016-09-01

    Vascular-derived endothelial cell (EC) network prefabrication in three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs before transplantation is useful for inducing functional anastomosis with the host vasculature. However, the clinical application of ECs is limited by cell isolation from the existing vasculature, because of the requirement for invasive biopsies and difficulty in obtaining a sufficient number of cells. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), which are a subtype of endothelial progenitor cells in the blood, have a strong proliferative and vasculogenic potential. This study attempted to fabricate prevascular 3D cell-dense tissue constructs using cord blood-derived ECFCs and evaluate the in vivo angiogenic potential of these constructs. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were also used in comparison with ECFCs, which were sandwiched between two human dermal-derived fibroblast (FB) sheets using a fibrin-coated cell-sheet manipulator. The inserted ECFCs in double-layered FB sheets were cultured for 3 days, resulting in the formation of network structures similar to those of HUVECs. Additionally, when ECFCs were sandwiched with three FB sheets, a lumen structure was found in the triple-layered cell-sheet constructs at 3 days after co-culture. These constructs containing ECFCs were transplanted into the subcutaneous tissue of immune-deficient rats. One week after transplantation, ECFC-lined functional microvessels containing rat erythrocytes were observed in the same manner as transplanted HUVEC-positive grafts. These results suggest that ECFCs might become an alternative cell source for fabricating a prevascular structure in 3D cell-dense tissue constructs for clinical application. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Allelopathy is involved in the formation of pure colonies of the fern Gleichenia japonica.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Saito, Yoshihumi; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2013-04-15

    The fern Gleichenia japonica is one of the most widely distributed fern and occurs throughout East to South Asia. The species often dominates plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination has not yet been described. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that allelochemicals are involved in the formation of G. japonica colonies. An aqueous methanol extract of G. japonica inhibited the growth of seedlings of garden cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and timothy (Phleum pratense). Increasing extract concentration increased the inhibition. These results suggest that G. japonica contain allelopathic substances. The extract was then purified by several chromatographies with monitoring the inhibitory activity and two growth inhibitory substances causing the allelopathic effect were isolated. The chemical structures of the two substances were determined by spectral data to be a novel compound 3-O-β-allopyranosyl-13-O-β-fucopyranosyl-3β-hydroxymanool (1) and 18-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-13-epitorreferol (2). These compounds inhibited the shoot and root growth of garden cress, lettuce, alfalfa (Medicago sativa), timothy, ryegrass and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli) at concentrations greater than 0.1-1.0mM. The concentrations required for 50% growth inhibition of root and shoot growth of these test plants ranged from 0.72 to 3.49mM and 0.79 to 3.51mM for compounds 1 and 2, respectively. Concentration of compounds 1 and 2 in soil under the pure colony of G. japonica was 4.9 and 5.7mM, respectively, indicating concentrations over those required for 50% growth inhibition are potentially available under monocultural stands of these ferns. Therefore, these compounds may contribute to the allelopathic effects caused by presence of G. japonica and may thus contribute to the establishment of monocultural stands by this

  3. Influence of the oxygen microenvironment on the proangiogenic potential of human endothelial colony forming cells.

    PubMed

    Decaris, Martin L; Lee, Chang I; Yoder, Mervin C; Tarantal, Alice F; Leach, J Kent

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis is a promising strategy to promote the formation of new or collateral vessels for tissue regeneration and repair. Since changes in tissue oxygen concentrations are known to stimulate numerous cell functions, these studies have focused on the oxygen microenvironment and its role on the angiogenic potential of endothelial cells. We analyzed the proangiogenic potential of human endothelial colony-forming cells (hECFCs), a highly proliferative population of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and compared outcomes to human dermal microvascular cells (HMVECs) under oxygen tensions ranging from 1% to 21% O2, representative of ischemic or healthy tissues and standard culture conditions. Compared to HMVECs, hECFCs (1) exhibited significantly greater proliferation in both ischemic conditions and ambient air; (2) demonstrated increased migration compared to HMVECs when exposed to chemotactic gradients in reduced oxygen; and (3) exhibited comparable or superior proangiogenic potential in reduced oxygen conditions when assessed using a vessel-forming assay. These data demonstrate that the angiogenic potential of both endothelial populations is influenced by the local oxygen microenvironment. However, hECFCs exhibit a robust angiogenic potential in oxygen conditions representative of physiologic, ischemic, or ambient air conditions, and these findings suggest that hECFCs may be a superior cell source for use in cell-based approaches for the neovascularization of ischemic or engineered tissues.

  4. Parametric analysis of colony morphology of non-labelled live human pluripotent stem cells for cell quality control

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Ryuji; Matsumoto, Megumi; Sasaki, Hiroto; Joto, Risako; Okada, Mai; Ikeda, Yurika; Kanie, Kei; Suga, Mika; Kinehara, Masaki; Yanagihara, Kana; Liu, Yujung; Uchio-Yamada, Kozue; Fukuda, Takayuki; Kii, Hiroaki; Uozumi, Takayuki; Honda, Hiroyuki; Kiyota, Yasujiro; Furue, Miho K

    2016-01-01

    Given the difficulties inherent in maintaining human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in a healthy state, hPSCs should be routinely characterized using several established standard criteria during expansion for research or therapeutic purposes. hPSC colony morphology is typically considered an important criterion, but it is not evaluated quantitatively. Thus, we designed an unbiased method to evaluate hPSC colony morphology. This method involves a combination of automated non-labelled live-cell imaging and the implementation of morphological colony analysis algorithms with multiple parameters. To validate the utility of the quantitative evaluation method, a parent cell line exhibiting typical embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like morphology and an aberrant hPSC subclone demonstrating unusual colony morphology were used as models. According to statistical colony classification based on morphological parameters, colonies containing readily discernible areas of differentiation constituted a major classification cluster and were distinguishable from typical ESC-like colonies; similar results were obtained via classification based on global gene expression profiles. Thus, the morphological features of hPSC colonies are closely associated with cellular characteristics. Our quantitative evaluation method provides a biological definition of ‘hPSC colony morphology’, permits the non-invasive monitoring of hPSC conditions and is particularly useful for detecting variations in hPSC heterogeneity. PMID:27667091

  5. Hairdressing and nursing: presentation of self and professional formation in colonial Australia.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S

    2001-04-01

    When Lucy Osburn led her team of Nightingale sisters to the Sydney Infirmary in 1868 she knew that a challenge awaited her. Her goal was to transform the colony's only public hospital into a respectable, ordered environment where, according to the Sanitarian view of the universe espoused by Miss Nightingale, the patient would find the resources to heal himself (sic). The prime difficulty was not the filth and disorder of the institution, it was the calibre of the nurses. This paper offers a case study into the issues of presentation of self, institutional shaping and the professional formation of nurses in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The aesthetics of bodily grooming and the class and ethnic issues embedded in the professionalisation of nursing will be discussed. The story of nursing provides an exemplar of the disaggregation of a domain of female expertise. The translation of this expertise to a mass occupation embodied significant difficulties. Not the least of these difficulties was the problem nursing leaders encountered when attempting to instil certain personal attributes and vocational values in non pious common women. It will be argued here that it was the inculcation of a specific set of attributes that created the nurse. It is this persona of the nurse, and the challenge that it presented for colonial nurses in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, that this paper explores. PMID:15484620

  6. Hairdressing and nursing: presentation of self and professional formation in colonial Australia.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S

    2001-04-01

    When Lucy Osburn led her team of Nightingale sisters to the Sydney Infirmary in 1868 she knew that a challenge awaited her. Her goal was to transform the colony's only public hospital into a respectable, ordered environment where, according to the Sanitarian view of the universe espoused by Miss Nightingale, the patient would find the resources to heal himself (sic). The prime difficulty was not the filth and disorder of the institution, it was the calibre of the nurses. This paper offers a case study into the issues of presentation of self, institutional shaping and the professional formation of nurses in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The aesthetics of bodily grooming and the class and ethnic issues embedded in the professionalisation of nursing will be discussed. The story of nursing provides an exemplar of the disaggregation of a domain of female expertise. The translation of this expertise to a mass occupation embodied significant difficulties. Not the least of these difficulties was the problem nursing leaders encountered when attempting to instil certain personal attributes and vocational values in non pious common women. It will be argued here that it was the inculcation of a specific set of attributes that created the nurse. It is this persona of the nurse, and the challenge that it presented for colonial nurses in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, that this paper explores.

  7. Impact of chlorine on the cell integrity and toxin release and degradation of colonial Microcystis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiajia; Rao, La; Chiu, Yi-Ting; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence of toxic cyanobacteria in drinking water sources is problematic for water authorities as they can impair drinking water quality. Chlorine as a commonly used oxidant in water treatment plants has shown the potential to lyse cyanobacterial cells, resulting in the release of secondary metabolites which are hard to be removed during conventional water treatment processes. The majority of cyanobacterial species such as Microcystis, often occur in colonial forms under natural conditions. However, previous studies have mainly focused on the influence of chlorination on individual cyanobacterial cells due to technique limitations. A syringe dispersion method combined with a fluorescence technique (SYTOX Green stain with flow cytometry), was successfully developed for the evaluation of cell integrity of colonial Microcystis. Chlorination of Microcystis-laden water was conducted at different chlorine dosages for different colonial sizes (<37, 37-270 and 270-550 μm). The results indicated that colonial Microcystis cells were more resistant to chlorine oxidation than individual cells, which may be attributed to protection from the cell-bound mucilage. There was a lag phase before cell rupture occurred and a Delayed Chick Watson Model describes the experimental data very well for the kinetics of cyanobacterial cell rupture. The growing colonial size caused increases in the lag phases but decreases in the cell lysis rates. Chlorination also induced the release of microcystins (MCs) from colonial Microcystis cells. In particular, increased levels of dissolved MCs were observed in Cheng Kung Lake (CKL) water. In summary, the reaction of chlorine with colonial cyanobacteria is more complicated than with individual cells. The efficiency of chlorine oxidation could be reduced by the cell-bound mucilage and natural water matrix. These observations may provide insights for water authorities to assess the risk to drinking water quality posed by chlorination under

  8. Analysis of cell concentration, volume concentration, and colony size of Microcystis via laser particle analyzer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Gao, Li

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of the cell concentration, volume concentration, and colony size of Microcystis is widely used to provide early warnings of the occurrence of blooms and to facilitate the development of predictive tools to mitigate their impact. This study developed a new approach for the analysis of the cell concentration, volume concentration, and colony size of Microcystis by applying a laser particle analyzer. Four types of Microcystis samples (55 samples in total) were analyzed by a laser particle analyzer and a microscope. By the application of the laser particle analyzer (1) when n = 1.40 and k = 0.1 (n is the intrinsic refractive index, whereas k is absorption of light by the particle), the results of the laser particle analyzer showed good agreement with the microscopic results for the obscuration indicator, volume concentration, and size distribution of Microcystis; (2) the Microcystis cell concentration can be calculated based on its linear relationship with obscuration; and (3) the volume concentration and size distribution of Microcystis particles (including single cells and colonies) can be obtained. The analytical processes involved in this new approach are simpler and faster compared to that by microscopic counting method. From the results, it was identified that the relationship between cell concentration and volume concentration depended on the colony size of Microcystis because the intercellular space was high when the colony size was high. Calculation of cell concentration and volume concentration may occur when the colony size information is sufficient.

  9. Bionomics and formation of "Bonsai" colonies with long term rearing of Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This laboratory study reports the ability of Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, colonies to survive for at least 9-yr while restricted to a sweater box. Colonies survived by limiting queen size and worker numbers, allowing these bonsai colonies to thrive. Queen physogastr...

  10. Hepatic differentiation of human embryonic stem cells as microscaled multilayered colonies leading to enhanced homogeneity and maturation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rui; Wang, Jingyu; Li, Xiaokang; Jung Jung, Da; Qi, Hao; Kee, Keh Kooi; Du, Yanan

    2014-11-12

    Directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) towards hepatocyte-like cells on planar tissue culture plates has been extensively investigated with great promise to provide alternative cell sources for drug metabolism/toxicity testing. Recently, hepatic differentiation of hESCs in 3D configuration with better mimicry of embryonic liver development represents incremental efforts to improve the differentiation efficiency and cellular maturation. However, most of the present 3D differentiation configurations involved interruptive operations during the multi-staged differentiation process, which might impose unwanted influence on cellular differentiation. Most of the current researches resulted in generation of hepatocytes with high expression of AFP, which is minimally expressed in primary hepatocytes. Here, off-the-shelf micro-stencil arrays are developed to generate adherent multilayered colonies composed of hESCs-derived cells. Uninterrupted cellular differentiation and proliferation is achieved to recapitulate the continuous and multi-stage liver development. Compared with conventional 2D format, the micro-scaled multilayered colonies with uniform and defined sizes constrained within the microwells are composed of more homogenous and mature hepatocyte-like cells with significantly lowered AFP expression and elevated hepatic functions. The multilayered colonies as novel 3D configuration for hepatic differentiation of hESCs represent a significant step toward efficient generation of functional hepatocytes for regenerative medicine and drug discovery. PMID:25059765

  11. The sulfated polysaccharide fucoidan rescues senescence of endothelial colony-forming cells for ischemic repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Hun; Choi, Sung Hyun; Asahara, Takayuki; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2015-06-01

    The efficacy of cell therapy using endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) in the treatment of ischemia is limited by the replicative senescence of isolated ECFCs in vitro. Such senescence must therefore be overcome in order for such cell therapies to be clinically applicable. This study aimed to investigate the potential of sulfated polysaccharide fucoidan to rescue ECFCs from cellular senescence and to improve in vivo vascular repair by ECFCs. Fucoidan-preconditioning of senescent ECFCs was shown by flow cytometry to restore the expression of functional ECFC surface markers (CD34, c-Kit, VEGFR2, and CXCR4) and stimulate the in vitro tube formation capacity of ECFCs. Fucoidan also promoted the expression of cell cycle-associated proteins (cyclin E, Cdk2, cyclin D1, and Cdk4) in senescent ECFCs, significantly reversed cellular senescence, and increased the proliferation of ECFCs via the FAK, Akt, and ERK signaling pathways. Fucoidan was found to enhance the survival, proliferation, incorporation, and endothelial differentiation of senescent ECFCs transplanted in ischemic tissues in a murine hind limb ischemia model. Moreover, ECFC-induced functional recovery and limb salvage were markedly improved by fucoidan pretreatment of ECFCs. To our knowledge, the findings of our study are the first to demonstrate that fucoidan enhances the neovasculogenic potential of ECFCs by rescuing them from replicative cellular senescence. Pretreatment of ECFCs with fucoidan may thus provide a novel strategy for the application of senescent stem cells to therapeutic neovascularization.

  12. Morphology and dynamic scaling analysis of cell colonies with linear growth fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Pasquale, M. A.; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.; González, P. H.

    2010-09-01

    The growth of linear cell colony fronts is investigated from the morphology of cell monolayer colonies, the cell size and shape distribution, the front displacement velocity, and the dynamic scaling analysis of front roughness fluctuations. At the early growth stages, colony patterns consist of rather ordered compact domains of small cells, whereas at advanced stages, an uneven distribution of cells sets in, and some large cells and cells exhibiting large filopodia are produced. Colony front profiles exhibit overhangs and behave as fractals with the dimension DF=1.25±0.05 . The colony fronts shift at 0.22±0.02μmmin-1 average constant linear velocity and their roughness (w) increases with time (t) . Dynamic scaling analysis of experimental and overhang-corrected growth profile data shows that w versus system width l log-log plots collapse to a single curve when l exceeds a certain threshold value lo , a width corresponding to the average diameter of few cells. Then, the influence of overhangs on the roughness dynamics becomes negligible, and a growth exponent β=0.33±0.02 is derived. From the structure factor analysis of overhang-corrected profiles, a global roughness exponent αs=0.50±0.05 is obtained. For l>200μm , this set of exponents fulfills the Family-Vicsek relationship. It is consistent with the predictions of the continuous Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model.

  13. DECREASED LEVEL OF CORD BLOOD CIRCULATING ENDOTHELIAL COLONY-FORMING CELLS IN PREECLAMPSIA

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Hernandez, Rocio; Miranda, Maria L.; Stiefel, Pablo; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Dominguez-Simeon, Maria J.; Villar, Jose; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder associated with increased cardiovascular risk for the offspring. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that participate in the formation of vasculature during development. However, the effect of preeclampsia on fetal levels of ECFCs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether cord blood ECFC abundance and function are altered in preeclampsia. We conducted a prospective cohort study that included women with normal (n=35) and preeclamptic (n=15) pregnancies. We measured ECFC levels in the umbilical cord blood of neonates and characterized ECFC phenotype, cloning-forming ability, proliferation and migration towards VEGF-A and FGF-2, in vitro formation of capillary-like structures, and in vivo vasculogenic ability in immunodeficient mice. We found that the level of cord blood ECFCs was statistically lower in preeclampsia than in control pregnancies (P = .04), a reduction that was independent of other obstetric factors. In addition, cord blood ECFCs from preeclamptic pregnancies required more time to emerge in culture than control ECFCs. However, once derived in culture, ECFC function was deemed normal and highly similar between preeclampsia and control, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. This study demonstrates that preeclampsia affects ECFC abundance in neonates. A reduced level of ECFCs during preeclamptic pregnancies may contribute to an increased risk of developing future cardiovascular events. PMID:24752434

  14. Decreased level of cord blood circulating endothelial colony-forming cells in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Hernandez, Rocio; Miranda, Maria L; Stiefel, Pablo; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Praena-Fernández, Juan M; Dominguez-Simeon, Maria J; Villar, Jose; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2014-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder associated with increased cardiovascular risk for the offspring. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that participate in the formation of vasculature during development. However, the effect of preeclampsia on fetal levels of ECFCs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether cord blood ECFC abundance and function are altered in preeclampsia. We conducted a prospective cohort study that included women with normal (n=35) and preeclamptic (n=15) pregnancies. We measured ECFC levels in the umbilical cord blood of neonates and characterized ECFC phenotype, cloning-forming ability, proliferation, and migration toward vascular endothelial growth factor-A and fibroblast growth factor-2, in vitro formation of capillary-like structures, and in vivo vasculogenic ability in immunodeficient mice. We found that the level of cord blood ECFCs was statistically lower in preeclampsia than in control pregnancies (P=0.04), a reduction that was independent of other obstetric factors. In addition, cord blood ECFCs from preeclamptic pregnancies required more time to emerge in culture than control ECFCs. However, once derived in culture, ECFC function was deemed normal and highly similar between preeclampsia and control, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. This study demonstrates that preeclampsia affects ECFC abundance in neonates. A reduced level of ECFCs during preeclamptic pregnancies may contribute to an increased risk of developing future cardiovascular events.

  15. The Legacy of Literacy Practices in Colonial Taiwan. Japanese-Taiwanese-Chinese: Language Interaction and Identity Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heylen, Ann

    2005-01-01

    This paper offers a historical and sociolinguistic interrogation of Taiwanese to demonstrate the significance of language continuum in relation to identity formation. To this end, Taiwanese is discussed as a particular variety of language. Literacy practices in the Japanese colonial period (1895-1945) are contrasted with the precolonial and…

  16. Persistence of a Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants (S. aureus SCV) within bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Atalla, Heba; Gyles, Carlton; Mallard, Bonnie

    2010-07-14

    Persistent bovine Staphylococcus aureus mastitis is attributable to the versatility of this pathogen within the mammary gland environment and to the formation of small colony variants (SCVs) that can survive within host cells. Previous studies had shown that S. aureus SCV Heba3231, isolated from a cow with chronic mastitis, had invaded and persisted in primary bovine aortic endothelial cells but caused minimal deleterious effects. The objective of this study was to investigate the interaction of SCV Heba3231 with bovine mammary epithelial cells (MAC-T cells) compared to its parent strain 3231 and to prototype strain Newbould 305. Monolayer cells were infected with each strain at various multiplicity of infections (MOIs) for 1 and 3.5h, followed by 20 min incubation with lysostaphin. Recovery of the SCV was significantly higher (P<0.05) after 3.8h with MOI of 100 compared to recovery of strains 3231 and Newbould 305. Upon further incubation, viable SCV were detected up to 96 h while 3231 were not isolated at 24h or later. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated SCV uptake by MAC-T cells following a series of events similar to those for strain 3231. At 24h, multiple SCV were seen within enclosed vacuoles, while the 3231 parent strain was released extracellularly and the monolayer cells were damaged. The ability of SCV Heba3231 to survive inside vacuoles could be related to up-regulation of protective mechanisms. These findings highlight the potential role of bovine mammary epithelial cells and S. aureus SCV in persistent bovine mastitis.

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis small colony variants associated with prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Maduka-Ezeh, Awele N; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Karau, Melissa J; Berbari, Elie F; Osmon, Douglas R; Hanssen, Arlen D; Steckelberg, James M; Patel, Robin

    2012-11-01

    We determined the frequency of isolation of non-aureus staphylococcal small colony variants (SCVs) from 31 patients with staphylococcal prosthetic joint infection (PJI) and described the antimicrobial susceptibility, auxotrophy, and biofilm-forming capacity of these SCVs. Eleven non-aureus SCVs were recovered, all of which were Staphylococcus epidermidis, and none of which was auxotrophic for hemin, menadione, or thymidine. Aminoglycoside resistance was detected in 5. Two were proficient, and 7 were poor, biofilm formers. With passage on antimicrobial free media, we observed a fluctuating phenotype in 3 isolates. We also noted a difference in antimicrobial susceptibility of different morphology isolates recovered from the same joints despite similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. Our findings suggest S. epidermidis SCVs are common in PJI, and while they have a similar appearance to S. aureus SCVs, they do not necessarily share such characteristics as aminoglycoside resistance; auxotrophy for hemin, menadione, or thymidine; or enhanced biofilm formation. We also underscore the importance of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of all morphologies of isolates recovered from PJI.

  18. Existence, Functional Impairment, and Lung Repair Potential of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells in Oxygen-Induced Arrested Alveolar Growth

    PubMed Central

    Alphonse, Rajesh S.; Vadivel, Arul; Fung, Moses; Shelley, William Chris; Critser, Paul John; Ionescu, Lavinia; O’Reilly, Megan; Ohls, Robin K.; McConaghy, Suzanne; Eaton, Farah; Zhong, Shumei; Yoder, Merv; Thébaud, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia and emphysema are life-threatening diseases resulting from impaired alveolar development or alveolar destruction. Both conditions lack effective therapies. Angiogenic growth factors promote alveolar growth and contribute to alveolar maintenance. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) represent a subset of circulating and resident endothelial cells capable of self-renewal and de novo vessel formation. We hypothesized that resident ECFCs exist in the developing lung, that they are impaired during arrested alveolar growth in experimental bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and that exogenous ECFCs restore disrupted alveolar growth. Methods and Results Human fetal and neonatal rat lungs contain ECFCs with robust proliferative potential, secondary colony formation on replating, and de novo blood vessel formation in vivo when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. In contrast, human fetal lung ECFCs exposed to hyperoxia in vitro and neonatal rat ECFCs isolated from hyperoxic alveolar growth–arrested rat lungs mimicking bronchopulmonary dysplasia proliferated less, showed decreased clonogenic capacity, and formed fewer capillary-like networks. Intrajugular administration of human cord blood–derived ECFCs after established arrested alveolar growth restored lung function, alveolar and lung vascular growth, and attenuated pulmonary hypertension. Lung ECFC colony- and capillary-like network-forming capabilities were also restored. Low ECFC engraftment and the protective effect of cell-free ECFC-derived conditioned media suggest a paracrine effect. Long-term (10 months) assessment of ECFC therapy showed no adverse effects with persistent improvement in lung structure, exercise capacity, and pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions Impaired ECFC function may contribute to arrested alveolar growth. Cord blood–derived ECFC therapy may offer new therapeutic options for lung diseases characterized by alveolar damage. PMID:24710033

  19. Replica plating and in situ enzymatic assay of animal cell colonies established on filter paper.

    PubMed

    Esko, J D; Raetz, C R

    1978-03-01

    We have developed a simple technique for the replica plating of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In this procedure cells are allowed to divide for 8-16 days between the plastic surface of a petri dish and a disc of Whatman no. 50 filter paper, weighted down with glass beads. The culture medium can be replaced when necessary without disturbing the growing colonies. Cells from each developing colony grow into the fibers of the paper, while others remain attached to the plate. The cell colonies transferred to the paper are viable and can be replica plated to a new petri dish with high resolution. In this way several inositol auxotrophs have been identified in a stock of mutagen-treated cells without prior enrichment. Alternatively, the cells on the paper can be rendered permeable in situ, which permits autoradiographic screening for specific biochemical defects, as reported previously for Escherichia coli [Raetz, C. R.H. (1975 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 72, 2274-2278]. This technique is applicable to other common cell lines and is especially useful for the identification of single colonies defective in the synthesis of DNA, RNA, protein, and membrane lipids.

  20. Cell differentiation within a yeast colony: metabolic and regulatory parallels with a tumor-affected organism.

    PubMed

    Cáp, Michal; Stěpánek, Luděk; Harant, Karel; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2012-05-25

    Nutrient sensing and metabolic reprogramming are crucial for metazoan cell aging and tumor growth. Here, we identify metabolic and regulatory parallels between a layered, multicellular yeast colony and a tumor-affected organism. During development, a yeast colony stratifies into U and L cells occupying the upper and lower colony regions, respectively. U cells activate a unique metabolism controlled by the glutamine-induced TOR pathway, amino acid-sensing systems (SPS and Gcn4p) and signaling from mitochondria with lowered respiration. These systems jointly modulate U cell physiology, which adapts to nutrient limitations and utilize the nutrients released from L cells. Stress-resistant U cells share metabolic pathways and other similar characteristics with tumor cells, including the ability to proliferate. L cells behave similarly to stressed and starving cells, which activate degradative mechanisms to provide nutrients to U cells. Our data suggest a nutrient flow between both cell types, resembling the Cori cycle and glutamine-NH(4)(+) shuttle between tumor and healthy metazoan cells.

  1. Treprostinil indirectly regulates endothelial colony forming cell angiogenic properties by increasing VEGF-A produced by mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Smadja, David M; Levy, Marilyne; Huang, Lan; Rossi, Elisa; Blandinières, Adeline; Israel-Biet, Dominique; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary vasodilators and prostacyclin therapy in particular, have markedly improved the outcome of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Endothelial dysfunction is a key feature of PH, and we previously reported that treprostinil therapy increases number and proliferative potential of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) isolated from PH patients' blood. In the present study, the objective was to determine how treprostinil contributes to the proangiogenic functions of ECFC. We examined the effect of treprostinil on ECFC obtained from cord blood in terms of colony numbers, proliferative and clonogenic properties in vitro, as well as in vivo vasculogenic properties. Surprisingly, treprostinil inhibited viability of cultured ECFC but did not modify their clonogenic properties or the endothelial differentiation potential from cord blood stem cells. Treprostinil treatment significantly increased the vessel-forming ability of ECFC combined with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in Matrigel implanted in nude mice. In vitro, ECFC proliferation was stimulated by conditioned media from treprostinil-pretreated MSC, and this effect was inhibited either by the use of VEGF-A blocking antibodies or siRNA VEGF-A in MSC. Silencing VEGF-A gene in MSC also blocked the pro-angiogenic effect of treprostinil in vivo. In conclusion, increased VEGF-A produced by MSC can account for the increased vessel formation observed during treprostinil treatment. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by the high level of VEGF-A detected in plasma from patients with paediatric PH who had been treated with treprostinil. Moreover, our results suggest that VEGF-A level in patients could be a surrogate biomarker of treprostinil efficacy.

  2. Treprostinil indirectly regulates endothelial colony forming cell angiogenic properties by increasing VEGF-A produced by mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Smadja, David M; Levy, Marilyne; Huang, Lan; Rossi, Elisa; Blandinières, Adeline; Israel-Biet, Dominique; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary vasodilators and prostacyclin therapy in particular, have markedly improved the outcome of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Endothelial dysfunction is a key feature of PH, and we previously reported that treprostinil therapy increases number and proliferative potential of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) isolated from PH patients' blood. In the present study, the objective was to determine how treprostinil contributes to the proangiogenic functions of ECFC. We examined the effect of treprostinil on ECFC obtained from cord blood in terms of colony numbers, proliferative and clonogenic properties in vitro, as well as in vivo vasculogenic properties. Surprisingly, treprostinil inhibited viability of cultured ECFC but did not modify their clonogenic properties or the endothelial differentiation potential from cord blood stem cells. Treprostinil treatment significantly increased the vessel-forming ability of ECFC combined with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in Matrigel implanted in nude mice. In vitro, ECFC proliferation was stimulated by conditioned media from treprostinil-pretreated MSC, and this effect was inhibited either by the use of VEGF-A blocking antibodies or siRNA VEGF-A in MSC. Silencing VEGF-A gene in MSC also blocked the pro-angiogenic effect of treprostinil in vivo. In conclusion, increased VEGF-A produced by MSC can account for the increased vessel formation observed during treprostinil treatment. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by the high level of VEGF-A detected in plasma from patients with paediatric PH who had been treated with treprostinil. Moreover, our results suggest that VEGF-A level in patients could be a surrogate biomarker of treprostinil efficacy. PMID:26062754

  3. A Mechanistic Collective Cell Model for Epithelial Colony Growth and Contact Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Aland, Sebastian; Hatzikirou, Haralambos; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2015-10-01

    We present a mechanistic hybrid continuum-discrete model to simulate the dynamics of epithelial cell colonies. Collective cell dynamics are modeled using continuum equations that capture plastic, viscoelastic, and elastic deformations in the clusters while providing single-cell resolution. The continuum equations can be viewed as a coarse-grained version of previously developed discrete models that treat epithelial clusters as a two-dimensional network of vertices or stochastic interacting particles and follow the framework of dynamic density functional theory appropriately modified to account for cell size and shape variability. The discrete component of the model implements cell division and thus influences cell size and shape that couple to the continuum component. The model is validated against recent in vitro studies of epithelial cell colonies using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. In good agreement with experiments, we find that mechanical interactions and constraints on the local expansion of cell size cause inhibition of cell motion and reductive cell division. This leads to successively smaller cells and a transition from exponential to quadratic growth of the colony that is associated with a constant-thickness rim of growing cells at the cluster edge, as well as the emergence of short-range ordering and solid-like behavior. A detailed analysis of the model reveals a scale invariance of the growth and provides insight into the generation of stresses and their influence on the dynamics of the colonies. Compared to previous models, our approach has several advantages: it is independent of dimension, it can be parameterized using classical elastic properties (Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus), and it can easily be extended to incorporate multiple cell types and general substrate geometries.

  4. A Mechanistic Collective Cell Model for Epithelial Colony Growth and Contact Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Aland, Sebastian; Hatzikirou, Haralambos; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2015-01-01

    We present a mechanistic hybrid continuum-discrete model to simulate the dynamics of epithelial cell colonies. Collective cell dynamics are modeled using continuum equations that capture plastic, viscoelastic, and elastic deformations in the clusters while providing single-cell resolution. The continuum equations can be viewed as a coarse-grained version of previously developed discrete models that treat epithelial clusters as a two-dimensional network of vertices or stochastic interacting particles and follow the framework of dynamic density functional theory appropriately modified to account for cell size and shape variability. The discrete component of the model implements cell division and thus influences cell size and shape that couple to the continuum component. The model is validated against recent in vitro studies of epithelial cell colonies using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. In good agreement with experiments, we find that mechanical interactions and constraints on the local expansion of cell size cause inhibition of cell motion and reductive cell division. This leads to successively smaller cells and a transition from exponential to quadratic growth of the colony that is associated with a constant-thickness rim of growing cells at the cluster edge, as well as the emergence of short-range ordering and solid-like behavior. A detailed analysis of the model reveals a scale invariance of the growth and provides insight into the generation of stresses and their influence on the dynamics of the colonies. Compared to previous models, our approach has several advantages: it is independent of dimension, it can be parameterized using classical elastic properties (Poisson’s ratio and Young’s modulus), and it can easily be extended to incorporate multiple cell types and general substrate geometries. PMID:26445436

  5. Isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells from blood samples collected from the jugular and cephalic veins of healthy adult horses.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Ashley N; Seeto, Wen J; Winter, Randolph L; Zhong, Qiao; Lipke, Elizabeth A; Wooldridge, Anne A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate optimal isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from peripheral blood of horses. SAMPLE Jugular and cephalic venous blood samples from 17 adult horses. PROCEDURES Each blood sample was divided; isolation was performed with whole blood adherence (WBA) and density gradient centrifugation (DGC). Isolated cells were characterized by uptake of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL), vascular tubule formation, and expression of endothelial (CD34, CD105, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and von Willebrand factor) and hematopoietic (CD14) cell markers by use of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and flow cytometry. RESULTS Colonies with cobblestone morphology were isolated from 15 of 17 horses. Blood collected from the cephalic vein yielded colonies significantly more often (14/17 horses) than did blood collected from the jugular vein (8/17 horses). Of 14 cephalic blood samples with colonies, 13 were obtained with DGC and 8 with WBA. Of 8 jugular blood samples with colonies, 8 were obtained with DGC and 4 with WBA. Colony frequency (colonies per milliliter of blood) was significantly higher for cephalic blood samples and samples isolated with DGC. Cells formed vascular tubules, had uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL, and expressed endothelial markers by use of IFA and flow cytometry, which confirmed their identity as ECFCs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Maximum yield of ECFCs was obtained for blood samples collected from both the jugular and cephalic veins and use of DGC to isolate cells. Consistent yield of ECFCs from peripheral blood of horses will enable studies to evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic uses.

  6. Isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells from blood samples collected from the jugular and cephalic veins of healthy adult horses.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Ashley N; Seeto, Wen J; Winter, Randolph L; Zhong, Qiao; Lipke, Elizabeth A; Wooldridge, Anne A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate optimal isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from peripheral blood of horses. SAMPLE Jugular and cephalic venous blood samples from 17 adult horses. PROCEDURES Each blood sample was divided; isolation was performed with whole blood adherence (WBA) and density gradient centrifugation (DGC). Isolated cells were characterized by uptake of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL), vascular tubule formation, and expression of endothelial (CD34, CD105, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and von Willebrand factor) and hematopoietic (CD14) cell markers by use of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and flow cytometry. RESULTS Colonies with cobblestone morphology were isolated from 15 of 17 horses. Blood collected from the cephalic vein yielded colonies significantly more often (14/17 horses) than did blood collected from the jugular vein (8/17 horses). Of 14 cephalic blood samples with colonies, 13 were obtained with DGC and 8 with WBA. Of 8 jugular blood samples with colonies, 8 were obtained with DGC and 4 with WBA. Colony frequency (colonies per milliliter of blood) was significantly higher for cephalic blood samples and samples isolated with DGC. Cells formed vascular tubules, had uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL, and expressed endothelial markers by use of IFA and flow cytometry, which confirmed their identity as ECFCs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Maximum yield of ECFCs was obtained for blood samples collected from both the jugular and cephalic veins and use of DGC to isolate cells. Consistent yield of ECFCs from peripheral blood of horses will enable studies to evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic uses. PMID:27668588

  7. Identification and enrichment of colony-forming cells from the adult murine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Lepore, D.A.; Roeszler, K.; Wagner, J.; Ross, S.A.; Bauer, K.; Thomas, P.Q. , E-Mail: paul.thomas@mcri.edu.au

    2005-08-01

    Stem and progenitor cells have been identified in many adult tissues including bone marrow, the central nervous system, and skin. While there is direct evidence to indicate the activity of a progenitor cell population in the pituitary gland, this putative subpopulation has not yet been identified. Herein we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel clonogenic cell type in the adult murine pituitary, which we have termed Pituitary Colony-Forming Cells (PCFCs). PCFCs constitute 0.2% of pituitary cells, and generate heterogeneous colonies from single cells. PCFCs exhibit variable proliferative potential, and may exceed 11 population doublings in 14 days. Enrichment of PCFCs to 61.5-fold with 100% recovery can be obtained through the active uptake of the fluorescent dipeptide, {beta}-Ala-Lys-N{epsilon}-AMCA. PCFCs are mostly contained within the large, agranular subpopulation of AMCA{sup +} cells, and constitute 28% of this fraction, corresponding to 140.5-fold enrichment. Interestingly, the AMCA{sup +} population contains rare cells that are GH{sup +} or PRL{sup +}. GH{sup +} cells were also identified in PCFC single cell colonies, suggesting that PCFCs have the potential to differentiate into GH{sup +} cells. Together, these data show that the pituitary contains a rare clonogenic population which may correspond to the somatotrope/lactotrope progenitors suggested by previous experiments.

  8. Measuring Survival of Adherent Cells with the Colony-Forming Assay.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Christensen, Melinda E; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Measuring cell death with colorimetric or fluorimetric dyes such as trypan blue and propidium iodide (PI) can provide an accurate measure of the number of dead cells in a population at a specific time; however, these assays cannot be used to distinguish cells that are dying or marked for future death. In many cases it is essential to measure the proliferative capacity of treated cells to provide an indirect measurement of cell death. This can be achieved using the colony-forming assay described here. This protocol specifically applies to measurement of HeLa cells but can be used for most adherent cell lines with limited motility. PMID:27480717

  9. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  10. LitR Is a Repressor of syp Genes and Has a Temperature-Sensitive Regulatory Effect on Biofilm Formation and Colony Morphology in Vibrio (Aliivibrio) salmonicida

    PubMed Central

    Bjelland, Ane Mohn; Ronessen, Maria; Robertsen, Espen; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio (Aliivibrio) salmonicida is the etiological agent of cold water vibriosis, a disease in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) that is kept under control due to an effective vaccine. A seawater temperature below 12°C is normally required for disease development. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density-regulated communication system that bacteria use to coordinate activities involved in colonization and pathogenesis, and we have previously shown that inactivation of the QS master regulator LitR attenuates the V. salmonicida strain LFI1238 in a fish model. We show here that strain LFI1238 and a panel of naturally occurring V. salmonicida strains are poor biofilm producers. Inactivation of litR in the LFI1238 strain enhances medium- and temperature-dependent adhesion, rugose colony morphology, and biofilm formation. Chemical treatment and electron microscopy of the biofilm identified an extracellular matrix consisting mainly of a fibrous network, proteins, and polysaccharides. Further, by microarray analysis of planktonic and biofilm cells, we identified a number of genes regulated by LitR and, among these, were homologues of the Vibrio fischeri symbiosis polysaccharide (syp) genes. The syp genes were regulated by LitR in both planktonic and biofilm lifestyle analyses. Disruption of syp genes in the V. salmonicida ΔlitR mutant alleviated adhesion, rugose colony morphology, and biofilm formation. Hence, LitR is a repressor of syp transcription that is necessary for expression of the phenotypes examined. The regulatory effect of LitR on colony morphology and biofilm formation is temperature sensitive and weak or absent at temperatures above the bacterium's upper threshold for pathogenicity. PMID:24973072

  11. Multipotent epithelial cells in the process of regeneration and asexual reproduction in colonial tunicates.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazuo; Sugino, Yasuo; Sunanaga, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Shigeki

    2008-01-01

    The cellular and molecular features of multipotent epithelial cells during regeneration and asexual reproduction in colonial tunicates are described in the present study. The epicardium has been regarded as the endodermal tissue-forming epithelium in the order Enterogona, because only body fragments having the epicardium exhibit the regenerative potential. Epicardial cells in Polycitor proliferus have two peculiar features; they always accompany coelomic undifferentiated cells, and they contain various kinds of organelles in the cytoplasm. During strobilation a large amount of organelles are discarded in the lumen, and then, each tissue-forming cell takes an undifferentiated configuration. Septum cells in the stolon are also multipotent in Enterogona. Free cells with a similar configuration to the septum inhabit the hemocoel. They may provide a pool for epithelial septum cells. At the distal tip of the stolon, septum cells are columnar in shape and apparently undifferentiated. They are the precursor of the stolonial bud. In Pleurogona, the atrial epithelium of endodermal origin is multipotent. In Polyandrocarpa misakiensis, it consists of pigmented squamous cells. The cells have ultrastructurally fine granules in the cytoplasm. During budding, coelomic cells with similar morphology become associated with the atrial epithelium. Then, cells of organ placodes undergo dedifferentiation, enter a cell division cycle, and commence morphogenesis. Retinoic acid-related molecules are involved in this dedifferentiation process of multipotent cells. We conclude that in colonial tunicates two systems support the flexibility of tissue remodeling during regeneration and asexual reproduction; dedifferentiation of epithelial cells and epithelial transformation of coelomic free cells.

  12. A subset of OKT4+ peripheral T cells can generate colonies containing mixed progeny with OKT4+ helper and OKT8+ suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; Calvo, C; Oudrhiri, N; Divine, M; Bouguet, J; Fradelizzi, D; Senik, A; Reyes, F

    1985-10-01

    The membrane phenotype of human T cell colony progenitors and that of their clonal progeny was studied for expression of the T4 and T8 determinants. Using clonal culture conditions, the colonies were grown in semi-solid agar medium from peripheral blood cells. Clonality was assessed using the glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase isoenzyme marker. Combination of this marker with the culture of sorted cell fractions allowed us to ascribe the colony progenitors to a subset of OKT4+ lymphocytes. The progeny consisted of the mixture of single OKT4+, single OKT8+ and double OKT4+8+ cells, as determined by double staining. Double staining was performed on mass-harvested colony cells and on individual colonies expanded in liquid culture with fresh interleukin 2. Expression of the OKT8 positivity on colony cells deriving from OKT4+ progenitors required an interaction with radioresistant OKT8+ cells that were co-cultured with these progenitors. Furthermore, the functional capacities of the cell progeny were assayed on the pokeweed mitogen-driven immunoglobulin production by B cells. It was found that OKT4+ colony cells were helper whereas OKT8+ colony cells were suppressor cells. It is concluded that a subset of OKT4+ peripheral blood T lymphocytes can generate colonies containing both helper OKT4+ cells and suppressor OKT8+ cells. PMID:2932339

  13. Large-scale time-lapse microscopy of Oct4 expression in human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Halter, Michael; Amelot, Julien; Bajcsy, Peter; Chalfoun, Joe; Vandecreme, Antoine; Mallon, Barbara S; Park, Kye-Yoon; Sista, Subhash; Elliott, John T; Plant, Anne L

    2016-07-01

    Identification and quantification of the characteristics of stem cell preparations is critical for understanding stem cell biology and for the development and manufacturing of stem cell based therapies. We have developed image analysis and visualization software that allows effective use of time-lapse microscopy to provide spatial and dynamic information from large numbers of human embryonic stem cell colonies. To achieve statistically relevant sampling, we examined >680 colonies from 3 different preparations of cells over 5days each, generating a total experimental dataset of 0.9 terabyte (TB). The 0.5 Giga-pixel images at each time point were represented by multi-resolution pyramids and visualized using the Deep Zoom Javascript library extended to support viewing Giga-pixel images over time and extracting data on individual colonies. We present a methodology that enables quantification of variations in nominally-identical preparations and between colonies, correlation of colony characteristics with Oct4 expression, and identification of rare events.

  14. Maternal Body-Mass Index and Cord Blood Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Miranda, Maria L.; Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J.; Stiefel, Pablo; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Bernal-Bermejo, Jose; Jimenez-Jimenez, Luis M.; Villar, Jose; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that are particularly abundant in umbilical cord blood. We sought to determine whether ECFC abundance in cord blood is associated with maternal body-mass index (BMI) in non-pathological pregnancies. Study design We measured the level of ECFCs in the cord blood of neonates (n=27) born from non-obese healthy mothers with non-pathological pregnancies and examined whether ECFC abundance correlated with maternal BMI. We also examined the effect of maternal BMI on ECFC phenotype and function using angiogenic and vasculogenic assays. Results We observed variation in ECFC abundance among subjects and found a positive correlation between pre-pregnancy maternal BMI and ECFC content (r=0.51, P=0.007), which was independent of other obstetric factors. Despite this variation, ECFC phenotype and functionality were deemed normal and highly similar between subjects with maternal BMI <25 kg/m2 and BMI between 25–30 kg/m2, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. Conclusions This study underlines the need to consider maternal BMI as a potential confounding factor for cord blood levels of ECFCs in future comparative studies between healthy and pathological pregnancies. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of progenitor cells that circulate in peripheral blood and can give rise to endothelial cells (1,2), contributing to the formation of new vasculature and the maintenance of vascular integrity (3–5). The mechanisms that regulate the abundance of these cells in vivo remain poorly understood. ECFCs are rare in adult peripheral blood (1,2,10). In contrast, there is an elevated number of these cells in fetal blood during the third trimester of pregnancy (11–13). Emerging evidence indicates that deleterious conditions during fetal life can impair ECFC content and function. For instance, offspring of diabetic mothers have been shown to have

  15. Absence of a relationship between immunophenotypic and colony enumeration analysis of endothelial progenitor cells in clinical haematopoietic cell sources

    PubMed Central

    Tura, Olga; Barclay, G Robin; Roddie, Huw; Davies, John; Turner, Marc L

    2007-01-01

    Background The discovery of adult endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) offers potential for vascular regenerative therapies. The expression of CD34 and VEGFR2 by EPC indicates a close relationship with haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), and HPC-rich sources have been used to treat cardiac and limb ischaemias with apparent clinical benefit. However, the laboratory characterisation of the vasculogenic capability of potential or actual therapeutic cell autograft sources is uncertain since the description of EPC remains elusive. Various definitions of EPC based on phenotype and more recently on colony formation (CFU-EPC) have been proposed. Methods We determined EPC as defined by proposed phenotype definitions (flow cytometry) and by CFU-EPC in HPC-rich sources: bone marrow (BM); cord blood (CB); and G-CSF-mobilised peripheral blood (mPB), and in HPC-poor normal peripheral blood (nPB). Results As expected, the highest numbers of cells expressing the HPC markers CD34 or CD133 were found in mPB and least in nPB. The proportions of CD34+ cells co-expressing CD133 is of the order mPB>CB>BM≈nPB. CD34+ cells co-expressing VEGFR2 were also most frequent in mPB. In contrast, CFU-EPC were virtually absent in mPB and were most readily detected in nPB, the source lowest in HPC. Conclusion HPC sources differ in their content of putative EPC. Normal peripheral blood, poor in HPC and in HPC-related phenotypically defined EPC, is the richest source of CFU-EPC, suggesting no direct relationship between the proposed EPC immunophenotypes and CFU-EPC potential. It is not apparent whether either of these EPC measurements, or any, is an appropriate indicator of the therapeutic vasculogenic potential of autologous HSC sources. PMID:17640360

  16. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor inhibits Fas-triggered apoptosis in bone marrow cells isolated from patients with refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Mende, J; Tehranchi, R; Forsblom, A M; Joseph, B; Christensson, B; Fadeel, B; Zhivotovsky, B; Hellström-Lindberg, E

    2001-05-01

    Treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plus erythropoietin may synergistically improve hemoglobin levels and reduce bone marrow apoptosis in patients with refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS). Fas-induced caspase activity is increased in RARS bone marrow cells. We showed that G-CSF significantly reduced Fas-mediated caspase-8 and caspase-3-like activity and the degree of nuclear apoptotic changes in bone marrow from nine RARS patients. A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species occurred in Fas-treated cells, but became significant only 24 h after changes in caspase activity and decrease in proliferation. G-CSF also reduced the magnitude of these late apoptotic changes. In CD34-selected normal cells, G-CSF induced myeloid colony growth, and an overall small decrease in the number of erythroid colonies. By contrast, G-CSF induced a 33-263% increase of erythroid colony formation in CD34+ cells from four of five RARS patients with severely reduced erythroid growth, while the normal or slightly reduced erythroid growth of three other patients was not influenced by G-CSF. This study suggests that G-CSF may reduce the pathologically increased caspase activity and concomitant apoptotic changes, and promote erythroid growth and differentiation of stem cells from RARS patients. Our data support the clinical benefit of G-CSF in this subgroup of myelodysplastic syndromes.

  17. Differences in estimates of cisplatin-induced cell kill in vitro between colorimetric and cell count/colony assays.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Eva; Kjellén, Elisabeth; Wahlberg, Peter; Wennerberg, Johan; Kjellström, Johan H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate some bioassays that are different in principle: cell counting, colony forming assay, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), sulforhodamine B (SRB), crystal violet, and alamarBlue, with respect to their ability to measure cisplatin-induced cell death of in vitro-cultivated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Cisplatin was applied in concentrations of 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, and 100 microM. The cells were incubated for 1 h, and the cell survival was measured 5 d after treatment. We found the colorimetric assays and cell counting to be comparable. The colony forming assay indicated a higher degree of cell kill compared with the other techniques. Measurement of cell survival after treatment with cisplatin can be done by use of any of the above tested assays. However, the majority of SCCHN cell lines available do not form colonies easily, or at all. Therefore, comparing the chemosensitivity between such cell lines is limited to alternative assays. In this respect, any of the tested colorimetric assays can be used. However, they seem to underestimate cell kill. Cell counting is also an alternative. This technique, however, is time consuming and operator dependent, as in the case of manual counting, or relatively expensive when counting is performed electronically, compared with the colorimetric assays. PMID:17316066

  18. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  19. Colony stimulating factor 1 is an extrinsic stimulator of mouse spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Oatley, Jon M.; Oatley, Melissa J.; Avarbock, Mary R.; Tobias, John W.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) provide the foundation for testis homeostasis, yet mechanisms that control their functions in mammals are poorly defined. We used microarray transcript profiling to identify specific genes whose expressions are augmented in the SSC-enriched Thy1+ germ cell fraction of mouse pup testes. Comparisons of gene expression in the Thy1+ germ cell fraction with the Thy1-depleted testis cell population identified 202 genes that are expressed 10-fold or higher in Thy1+ cells. This database provided a mining tool to investigate specific characteristics of SSCs and identify novel mechanisms that potentially influence their functions. These analyses revealed that colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (Csf1r) gene expression is enriched in Thy1+ germ cells. Addition of recombinant colony stimulating factor 1 (Csf1), the specific ligand for Csf1r, to culture media significantly enhanced the self-renewal of SSCs in heterogeneous Thy1+ spermatogonial cultures over a 63-day period without affecting total germ cell expansion. In vivo, expression of Csf1 in both pre-pubertal and adult testes was localized to clusters of Leydig cells and select peritubular myoid cells. Collectively, these results identify Csf1 as an extrinsic stimulator of SSC self-renewal and implicate Leydig and myoid cells as contributors of the testicular stem cell niche in mammals. PMID:19270176

  20. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher’s equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase–a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics. PMID:27362260

  1. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production.

    PubMed

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2016-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher's equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase-a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics.

  2. Curcumin Veto the Effects of Osteopontin (OPN) Specific Inhibitor on Leukemic Stem Cell Colony Forming Potential via Promotion of OPN Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Saeed; Ghaffari, Seyed H.; Shaiegan, Mojgan; Nikogoftar Zarif, Mahin; Nikbakht, Mohsen; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an immunophenotypically heterogeneous malignant disease, in which CD34 positivity is associated with poor prognosis. Osteopontin (OPN) plays different roles in physiologic and pathologic conditions like: survival, metastasis and cell protection from cytotoxic and apoptotic stimuli. Due to anti-apoptotic effect of OPN in normal and malignant cells, silencing of OPN leads to elevation of sensitivity towards chemotherapeutic agents and attenuates cancer cells migration and invasion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate OPN roles in modulating curcumin-mediated growth inhibitory on leukemic stem cells (LSCs) colony forming potential and survival in AML cell lines and primary CD34+/CD38- bone marrow-derived AML cells. Materials and Methods: Primary human CD34+/CD38- cells were isolated from bone marrow mononuclear cells of 10 AML patients at initial state of diagnosis, using a CD34 Multi sort kit. The growth inhibitory effects of curcumin (CUR) were evaluated by MTT and colony-formation assays. Apoptosis was analyzed by 7AAD assay in CD34+ KG-1, U937 cell lines and primary isolated cells. Short interfering RNA (siRNA) against OPN was used for OPN silencing in both cell lines and primary AML cells. Then, transfected cells were incubated with/without curcumin. The change in OPN gene expression was examined by Real-time PCR. Results: CUR inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both KG-1 and U937 cells and also primary isolated AML cells. OPN silencing by siRNA increased the susceptibility of KG-1, U937 and primary CD34+/CD38- AML cells to apoptosis. Moreover, soft agar colony assays revealed that silencing of OPN with siRNA significantly decreased colony numbers in LSCs compared with the non-targeting group. Furthermore, CD34+/CD38- populations as a main LSCs compartment through OPN overexpression towards CUR treatment might be nullified the inhibitory effects of OPN siRNA on their survival and colony forming

  3. Effects of microwaves on the colony-forming capacity of haemopoietic stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Rotkovská, D; Vacek, A; Bartonícková, A

    1987-01-01

    A suspension of bone marrow cells from femurs of female (CBA X C57Bl)F1 mice was exposed to 2450 MHz CW microwaves in a specially designed waveguide exposure system. The temperature of the suspension rose, during exposure to microwaves, from 20 degrees C to 45 degrees C, and at an interval within 20 degrees C to 45 degrees C the number of haemopoietic stem cells (CFUs) was determined by the spleen exocolony method. The time of exposure of bone marrow cells to each temperature studied was 20 s. Control suspensions of bone marrow cells were exposed to a water bath temperature. There were no significant effects of the CFUs with the water bath temperature, while after exposure to microwaves the number of spleen colonies was elevated with a nadir at the temperature of 37 degrees C. With a microwave-induced increase of the temperature above 41 degrees C the number of CFUs in the bone marrow suspension decreased. The increase in the number of colonies was related to the rise in the seeding rate of the CFUs as well as to a rise in their proliferative activity, while the drop in the number of colonies was influenced also by heat-killing of the CFUs by microwave exposure.

  4. [Isolation and nuclear transfer of ES-like cells colonies derived from embryos being cloning of bovine somatic].

    PubMed

    Dong, Ya-Juan; Bai, Xue-Jin; Li, Jian-Dong; Suzuki, Tatsuyuki

    2003-02-01

    In this experiment, it was designed to carry out proliferous culture of bovine blastocysts(day 7) derived from embryos cloned through bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer, isolating and passaging of ES cells. The cells of blastocysts, which were planted on feeder layer, formed small colonies within 24 h. The nest-shape colonies occurred after culturing for 2-3 days. After the colonies in the same shape were isolated and passaged 4-5 times, many different size colonies with monolayer of multi-cells appeared. The colonies that had been passaged 4-5 times were planted into 4-wells multi-dishes without feeder layer. The colonies with monolayer of multi-cells appeared after 24 h, spread all over the bottom of the dishes, emerged epidermis-like cells that appeared reticulate after 4-7 days. These cells were used as donor cells to carry out nuclear transfer. The results showed that 80% (40/50) of the reconstructed embryos cleaved, 5% (2/40) and 2.5% (1/40) of them developed to the morulaes and blastocyst stage, respectively. It revealed that ES-like cells derived embryos constructed through somatic cell nuclear transfer have the developmental potentials.

  5. Some observations on the three-dimensional growth of L5178Y cell colonies in soft agar culture.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalen, H.; Burki, H. J.

    1971-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of spherical colonies formed by L5178Y cells grown in soft agar cultures was investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy. Visible colonies were formed after 7 days of incubation and increased in size for more than 2 weeks. At this time the colonies contained a central core of necrotic cells surrounded by an outer shell of normal-looking cells in loose contact with each other. Cross sectional radioautographs revealed that tritiated precursors were incorporated only into those cells in the ?viable cell' shell and not in the necrotic center of the colony. It is pointed out that increased knowledge of the factors leading to this type of three-dimensional organization is of particular interest, since it is similar to the conditions found in certain types of solid tumors (Thomlinson and Gray, 1955).

  6. Establishment and characterization of a human thyroid carcinoma cell line (HOTHC) producing colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Isamu; Ono, Isao; Kiguchi, Kazushige; Ishiwata, Chieko; Soma, Masayuki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    A cell line designated HOTHC was established from an anaplastic carcinoma (giant cell type) of the thyroid gland of 80-year-old woman. The HOTHC line grew rapidly in multilayer without contact inhibition, and more than 120 serial passages were made within 27 months. The cells were spindle or polygonal in shape and revealed neoplastic and pleomorphic features. These cells were characterized as containing coloid droplets and poorly developed rough-endoplasmic reticulum in the cytoplasm. Doubling time was about 24 hours and plating efficiency was about 70%. The karyotype exhibits hyperploidy and marker chromosomes, and the modal chromosome number ranged between 77-90. The HOTHC cells were transplanted into the subcutis of BALB/c nude mice and produced anaplatic carcinomas (giant cell type) resembling the original tumor. The HOTHC cells produced colony stimulating factor (CSF) and caused granulocytosis in the mice. PMID:17022149

  7. Recovery of hematopoietic colony-forming cells in irradiated mice pretreated with interleukin 1 (IL-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, G.N.; Neta, R.; Vigneulle, R.M.; Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1988-10-01

    Data in this report determined the effect of a single injection of recombinant interleukin 1 alpha (rIL-1) prior to irradiation of B6D2F1 mice on the recovery of colony-forming cells (CFC) at early and late times after sublethal and lethal doses of radiation. Injection of rIL-1 promoted an earlier recovery of mature cells in the blood and CFC in the bone marrow and spleen. For example, 8 days after 6.5 Gy irradiation, the number of CFU-E (colony-forming units-erythroid), BFU-E (burst-forming units-erythroid), and GM-CFC (granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells) per femur was approximately 1.5-fold higher in rIL-1-injected mice than in saline-injected mice. Also, 5, 9, and 12 days after irradiation, the number of both day 8 and day 12 CFU-S (colony-forming units-spleen) was almost twofold greater in bone marrow from rIL-1-injected mice. The earlier recovery of CFU-S in rIL-1-injected mice was not associated with an increase in the number of CFU-S that survived immediately after irradiation. Also, 7 months after irradiation, the number of CFU-S per femur of both saline- and rIL-1-injected mice was still less than 50% of normal values. Data in this report demonstrate that a single injection of rIL-1 prior to irradiation accelerates early hematopoietic recovery in irradiated mice, but does not prevent expression of radiation-induced frontend damage or long-term damage to hematopoietic tissues.

  8. Machine Learning Approach to Automated Quality Identification of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Images.

    PubMed

    Joutsijoki, Henry; Haponen, Markus; Rasku, Jyrki; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina; Juhola, Martti

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this research is on automated identification of the quality of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colony images. iPS cell technology is a contemporary method by which the patient's cells are reprogrammed back to stem cells and are differentiated to any cell type wanted. iPS cell technology will be used in future to patient specific drug screening, disease modeling, and tissue repairing, for instance. However, there are technical challenges before iPS cell technology can be used in practice and one of them is quality control of growing iPSC colonies which is currently done manually but is unfeasible solution in large-scale cultures. The monitoring problem returns to image analysis and classification problem. In this paper, we tackle this problem using machine learning methods such as multiclass Support Vector Machines and several baseline methods together with Scaled Invariant Feature Transformation based features. We perform over 80 test arrangements and do a thorough parameter value search. The best accuracy (62.4%) for classification was obtained by using a k-NN classifier showing improved accuracy compared to earlier studies. PMID:27493680

  9. Machine Learning Approach to Automated Quality Identification of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Images

    PubMed Central

    Haponen, Markus; Rasku, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this research is on automated identification of the quality of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colony images. iPS cell technology is a contemporary method by which the patient's cells are reprogrammed back to stem cells and are differentiated to any cell type wanted. iPS cell technology will be used in future to patient specific drug screening, disease modeling, and tissue repairing, for instance. However, there are technical challenges before iPS cell technology can be used in practice and one of them is quality control of growing iPSC colonies which is currently done manually but is unfeasible solution in large-scale cultures. The monitoring problem returns to image analysis and classification problem. In this paper, we tackle this problem using machine learning methods such as multiclass Support Vector Machines and several baseline methods together with Scaled Invariant Feature Transformation based features. We perform over 80 test arrangements and do a thorough parameter value search. The best accuracy (62.4%) for classification was obtained by using a k-NN classifier showing improved accuracy compared to earlier studies. PMID:27493680

  10. A novel combinatorial therapy with pulp stem cells and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for total pulp regeneration.

    PubMed

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Takeuchi, Norio; Osako, Yohei; Ito, Masataka; Ishizaka, Ryo; Utunomiya, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kenji; Nakashima, Misako

    2013-07-01

    Treatment of deep caries with pulpitis is a major challenge in dentistry. Stem cell therapy represents a potential strategy to regenerate the dentin-pulp complex, enabling conservation and restoration of teeth. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pulp stem cell transplantation as a prelude for the impending clinical trials. Clinical-grade pulp stem cells were isolated and expanded according to good manufacturing practice conditions. The absence of contamination, abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype, and tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse ensured excellent quality control. After autologous transplantation of pulp stem cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a dog pulpectomized tooth, regenerated pulp tissue including vasculature and innervation completely filled in the root canal, and regenerated dentin was formed in the coronal part and prevented microleakage up to day 180. Transplantation of pulp stem cells with G-CSF yielded a significantly larger amount of regenerated dentin-pulp complex compared with transplantation of G-CSF or stem cells alone. Also noteworthy was the reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and apoptotic cells and the significant increase in neurite outgrowth compared with results without G-CSF. The transplanted stem cells expressed angiogenic/neurotrophic factors. It is significant that G-CSF together with conditioned medium of pulp stem cells stimulated cell migration and neurite outgrowth, prevented cell death, and promoted immunosuppression in vitro. Furthermore, there was no evidence of toxicity or adverse events. In conclusion, the combinatorial trophic effects of pulp stem cells and G-CSF are of immediate utility for pulp/dentin regeneration, demonstrating the prerequisites of safety and efficacy critical for clinical applications.

  11. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  12. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  13. Phase Field Simulations of Autocatalytic Formation of Alpha Lamellar Colonies in Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Bala; Gorti, Sarma; Babu, Suresh Sudharsanam

    2016-09-01

    We present phase field simulations incorporating contributions due to chemical free energy, anisotropic interfacial energy, and elastic energy due to transformation strain, to demonstrate the nucleation and growth of multiple variants of alpha from undercooled beta in Ti-6Al-4V under isothermal conditions. A new composite nucleation seeding approach is used within the phase field simulations to demonstrate that the presence of a pre-existing strain field can cause the nucleation of specific crystallographic variants of alpha based on minimization of local elastic strain energy. Under conditions where specific combinations of elastic strains exist, for example in the vicinity of one or more pre-existing alpha variants, the nucleation of a new alpha variant is followed by the successive nucleation of the same variant in the form of a lamellar colony by an autocatalytic mechanism. At a given thermodynamic undercooling, the colony structure was favored at a nucleation rate that was low enough to allow sufficient growth of previously nucleated variants before another nucleus formed in their vicinity. Basket weave morphology was formed at higher nucleation rates where multiple nuclei variants grew almost simultaneously under evolving strain fields of several adjacent nuclei.

  14. Subculture of Germ Cell-Derived Colonies with GATA4-Positive Feeder Cells from Neonatal Pig Testes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Kim, Jin Hoi; Park, Chan Kyu; Do, Jeong Tae; Kim, Jae Hwan; Choi, Young Suk; Kim, Nam Hyung; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Enrichment of spermatogonial stem cells is important for studying their self-renewal and differentiation. Although germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs) have been successfully cultured from neonatal pig testicular cells under 31°C conditions, the short period of in vitro maintenance (<2 months) limited their application to further investigations. To develop a culture method that allows for in vitro maintenance of GDCs for long periods, we subcultured the GDCs with freshly prepared somatic cells from neonatal pig testes as feeder cells. The subcultured GDCs were maintained up to passage 13 with the fresh feeder cells (FFCs) and then frozen. Eight months later, the frozen GDCs could again form the colonies on FFCs as shown in passages 1 to 13. Immunocytochemistry data revealed that the FFCs expressed GATA-binding protein 4 (GATA4), which is also detected in the cells of neonatal testes and total testicular cells, and that the expression of GATA4 was decreased in used old feeder cells. The subcultured GDCs in each passage had germ and stem cell characteristics, and flow cytometric analyses revealed that ~60% of these cells were GFRα-1 positive. In conclusion, neonatal pig testes-derived GDCs can be maintained for long periods with GATA4-expressing testicular somatic cells. PMID:26880974

  15. Subculture of Germ Cell-Derived Colonies with GATA4-Positive Feeder Cells from Neonatal Pig Testes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Kim, Jin Hoi; Park, Chan Kyu; Do, Jeong Tae; Kim, Jae Hwan; Choi, Young Suk; Kim, Nam Hyung; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Enrichment of spermatogonial stem cells is important for studying their self-renewal and differentiation. Although germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs) have been successfully cultured from neonatal pig testicular cells under 31°C conditions, the short period of in vitro maintenance (<2 months) limited their application to further investigations. To develop a culture method that allows for in vitro maintenance of GDCs for long periods, we subcultured the GDCs with freshly prepared somatic cells from neonatal pig testes as feeder cells. The subcultured GDCs were maintained up to passage 13 with the fresh feeder cells (FFCs) and then frozen. Eight months later, the frozen GDCs could again form the colonies on FFCs as shown in passages 1 to 13. Immunocytochemistry data revealed that the FFCs expressed GATA-binding protein 4 (GATA4), which is also detected in the cells of neonatal testes and total testicular cells, and that the expression of GATA4 was decreased in used old feeder cells. The subcultured GDCs in each passage had germ and stem cell characteristics, and flow cytometric analyses revealed that ~60% of these cells were GFRα-1 positive. In conclusion, neonatal pig testes-derived GDCs can be maintained for long periods with GATA4-expressing testicular somatic cells.

  16. In vitro and in vivo activation of endothelial cells by colony-stimulating factors.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolino, F; Ziche, M; Wang, J M; Alessi, D; Morbidelli, L; Cremona, O; Bosia, A; Marchisio, P C; Mantovani, A

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the set of functions activated in cultured endothelial cells by the hematopoietic growth factors, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and to compare them with those elicited by prototypic cytokines active on these cells. Moreover, indications as to the in vivo relevance of in vitro effects were obtained. G-CSF and GM-CSF induced endothelial cells to proliferate and migrate. In contrast, unlike appropriate reference cytokines (IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor, IFN-gamma), G-CSF and GM-CSF did not modulate endothelial cell functions related to hemostasis-thrombosis (production of procoagulant activity and of platelet activating factor), inflammation (expression of leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 and production of platelet activating factor), and accessory function (expression of class II antigens of MHC). Other colony-stimulating factors (IL-3 and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor) were inactive on all functions tested. In comparison to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), G-CSF and GM-CSF induced lower maximal proliferation of endothelial cells, whereas migration was of the same order of magnitude. G-CSF and GM-CSF stimulated repair of mechanically wounded endothelial monolayers. Exposure to both cytokines induced shape changes and cytoskeletal reorganization consistent with a migratory phenotype. To explore the in vivo relevance of the in vitro effects of these cytokines on endothelium, we studied the angiogenic activity of human G-CSF in the rabbit cornea. G-CSF, but not the heat-inactivated molecule, had definite angiogenic activity, without any sign of inflammatory reactions. G-CSF was less active than bFGF. However, the combination of a nonangiogenic dose of bFGF with G-CSF resulted in an angiogenic response higher than that elicited by either individual cytokines. Thus, G-CSF and GM-CSF induce endothelial cells to express an activation

  17. Influence of water activity and temperature on survival of and colony formation by heat-stressed Chrysosporium farinicola aleuriospores.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, L R; Pitt, J I

    1990-10-01

    The ability of sublethally heat-stressed aleuriospores of Chrysosporium farinicola to form colonies on yeast extract-glucose agar (YGA) supplemented with sufficient glucose, sorbitol, glycerol, and NaCl to achieve reduced water activity (aw) in the range of 0.88 to 0.95 was determined. The effects of the aw of diluent and incubation temperature during recovery and colony formation were also investigated. Aleuriospores harvested from 14-day-old cultures grown at 25 degrees C were less resistant to heat inactivation compared with aleuriospores from 20-day-cultures. Increased populations of heat-stressed aleuriospores were recovered as the aw of YGA was decreased from 0.95 (glucose and glycerol) and 0.94 (sorbitol) to 0.89 and 0.88, respectively. In NaCl-supplemented YGA, populations recovered at an aw of 0.94 were greatly reduced compared with populations detected at an aw of 0.92; no colonies were formed on NaCl-supplemented YGA at an aw of 0.88. Tolerance to aw values above 0.88 to 0.89 as influenced by solute type was in the order of glucose greater than sorbitol greater than glycerol greater than NaCl. Incubation at 20 degrees generally resulted in an increase in recoverable aleuriospores compared with incubation at 25 degrees C or at 30 degrees C for 14 days followed by 20 degrees C for 10 days. The lethal effect of NaCl on heat-stressed aleuriospores was enhanced at 30 degrees C. The retention of viability of aleuriospores held in sucrose-peptone water diluent (aw, 0.936) for 20 min was essentially the same as that observed when aleuriospores were held in peptone water (aw, 0.997).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2285307

  18. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein.

    PubMed

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98-99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample.

  19. Multiple types of data are required to identify the mechanisms influencing the spatial expansion of melanoma cell colonies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The expansion of cell colonies is driven by a delicate balance of several mechanisms including cell motility, cell–to–cell adhesion and cell proliferation. New approaches that can be used to independently identify and quantify the role of each mechanism will help us understand how each mechanism contributes to the expansion process. Standard mathematical modelling approaches to describe such cell colony expansion typically neglect cell–to–cell adhesion, despite the fact that cell–to-cell adhesion is thought to play an important role. Results We use a combined experimental and mathematical modelling approach to determine the cell diffusivity, D, cell–to–cell adhesion strength, q, and cell proliferation rate, λ, in an expanding colony of MM127 melanoma cells. Using a circular barrier assay, we extract several types of experimental data and use a mathematical model to independently estimate D, q and λ. In our first set of experiments, we suppress cell proliferation and analyse three different types of data to estimate D and q. We find that standard types of data, such as the area enclosed by the leading edge of the expanding colony and more detailed cell density profiles throughout the expanding colony, does not provide sufficient information to uniquely identify D and q. We find that additional data relating to the degree of cell–to–cell clustering is required to provide independent estimates of q, and in turn D. In our second set of experiments, where proliferation is not suppressed, we use data describing temporal changes in cell density to determine the cell proliferation rate. In summary, we find that our experiments are best described using the range D=161−243μm2hour−1, q=0.3−0.5 (low to moderate strength) and λ=0.0305−0.0398hour−1, and with these parameters we can accurately predict the temporal variations in the spatial extent and cell density profile throughout the expanding melanoma cell colony. Conclusions Our

  20. Bionomics and Formation of “Bonsai” Colonies With Long-Term Rearing of Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Osbrink, W L A; Cornelius, M L; Showler, A T

    2016-04-01

    This laboratory study reports the ability of Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, colonies to survive for at least 9 yr while restricted to a sweater box. Colonies survived by limiting queen size and worker numbers, allowing these bonsai colonies to thrive. Queen physogastry appeared to plateau with 9-yr-old queens not larger than 6-yr-old queens, but nearly triple the size of 2-yr-old queens. Nine-year-old colony worker numbers were not greater than 6-yr-old colonies, but worker numbers were greater than in 2-yr-old colonies. Such colony survival under conditions of restricted resources provides a mechanism for re-infestation of areas following extensive area-wide control efforts. “Bonsai” colonies are relevant to the ability of marginalized colonies to avoid detection and then expand and invade into areas once the large, mature colonies are eliminated, and their potential to produce alates to start new C. formosanus colonies in areas which have been subjected to colony elimination programs impacts termite management strategies.

  1. Bionomics and Formation of “Bonsai” Colonies With Long-Term Rearing of Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Osbrink, W L A; Cornelius, M L; Showler, A T

    2016-04-01

    This laboratory study reports the ability of Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, colonies to survive for at least 9 yr while restricted to a sweater box. Colonies survived by limiting queen size and worker numbers, allowing these bonsai colonies to thrive. Queen physogastry appeared to plateau with 9-yr-old queens not larger than 6-yr-old queens, but nearly triple the size of 2-yr-old queens. Nine-year-old colony worker numbers were not greater than 6-yr-old colonies, but worker numbers were greater than in 2-yr-old colonies. Such colony survival under conditions of restricted resources provides a mechanism for re-infestation of areas following extensive area-wide control efforts. “Bonsai” colonies are relevant to the ability of marginalized colonies to avoid detection and then expand and invade into areas once the large, mature colonies are eliminated, and their potential to produce alates to start new C. formosanus colonies in areas which have been subjected to colony elimination programs impacts termite management strategies. PMID:26662736

  2. Prolonged growth of a clinical Staphylococcus aureus strain selects for a stable small-colony-variant cell type.

    PubMed

    Bui, Long M G; Hoffmann, Peter; Turnidge, John D; Zilm, Peter S; Kidd, Stephen P

    2015-02-01

    An undetermined feature of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is its persistence and then relapse of disease. This has been explained by its switch to alternative lifestyles, mainly as biofilm or small-colony variants (SCVs). Studying the native characteristics of SCVs has been problematic due to their reversion to the parental lifestyle. We have observed that for a number of S. aureus strains as they switch to an SCV lifestyle, there is the formation of an extracellular matrix. We focused our analysis on one strain, WCH-SK2. For bacterial survival in the host, the combination of low nutrients and the prolonged time frame forms a stress that selects for a specific cell type from the population. In this context, we used steady-state growth conditions with low nutrients and a controlled low growth rate for a prolonged time and with methylglyoxal. These conditions induced S. aureus WCH-SK2 into a stable SCV cell type; the cells did not revert after subculturing. Analysis revealed these cells possessed a metabolic and surface profile that was different from those of previously described SCVs or biofilm cells. The extracellular matrix was protein and extracellular DNA but not polysaccharide. The SCV cells induced expression of certain surface proteins (such as Ebh) and synthesis of lantibiotics while downregulating factors that stimulate the immune response (leucocidin, capsule, and carotenoid). Our data reveal cell heterogeneity within an S. aureus population and under conditions that resemble long-term survival in the host have identified a previously unnoticed S. aureus cell type with a distinctive metabolic and molecular profile. PMID:25385795

  3. Prolonged Growth of a Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Strain Selects for a Stable Small-Colony-Variant Cell Type

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Long M. G.; Hoffmann, Peter; Turnidge, John D.; Zilm, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    An undetermined feature of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is its persistence and then relapse of disease. This has been explained by its switch to alternative lifestyles, mainly as biofilm or small-colony variants (SCVs). Studying the native characteristics of SCVs has been problematic due to their reversion to the parental lifestyle. We have observed that for a number of S. aureus strains as they switch to an SCV lifestyle, there is the formation of an extracellular matrix. We focused our analysis on one strain, WCH-SK2. For bacterial survival in the host, the combination of low nutrients and the prolonged time frame forms a stress that selects for a specific cell type from the population. In this context, we used steady-state growth conditions with low nutrients and a controlled low growth rate for a prolonged time and with methylglyoxal. These conditions induced S. aureus WCH-SK2 into a stable SCV cell type; the cells did not revert after subculturing. Analysis revealed these cells possessed a metabolic and surface profile that was different from those of previously described SCVs or biofilm cells. The extracellular matrix was protein and extracellular DNA but not polysaccharide. The SCV cells induced expression of certain surface proteins (such as Ebh) and synthesis of lantibiotics while downregulating factors that stimulate the immune response (leucocidin, capsule, and carotenoid). Our data reveal cell heterogeneity within an S. aureus population and under conditions that resemble long-term survival in the host have identified a previously unnoticed S. aureus cell type with a distinctive metabolic and molecular profile. PMID:25385795

  4. Large-scale time-lapse microscopy of Oct4 expression in human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Halter, Michael; Amelot, Julien; Bajcsy, Peter; Chalfoun, Joe; Vandecreme, Antoine; Mallon, Barbara S; Park, Kye-Yoon; Sista, Subhash; Elliott, John T; Plant, Anne L

    2016-07-01

    Identification and quantification of the characteristics of stem cell preparations is critical for understanding stem cell biology and for the development and manufacturing of stem cell based therapies. We have developed image analysis and visualization software that allows effective use of time-lapse microscopy to provide spatial and dynamic information from large numbers of human embryonic stem cell colonies. To achieve statistically relevant sampling, we examined >680 colonies from 3 different preparations of cells over 5days each, generating a total experimental dataset of 0.9 terabyte (TB). The 0.5 Giga-pixel images at each time point were represented by multi-resolution pyramids and visualized using the Deep Zoom Javascript library extended to support viewing Giga-pixel images over time and extracting data on individual colonies. We present a methodology that enables quantification of variations in nominally-identical preparations and between colonies, correlation of colony characteristics with Oct4 expression, and identification of rare events. PMID:27286574

  5. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra; Vorozhko, Valeriya; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Hanigan, Marie H.; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Plafker, Scott M.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-02-05

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

  6. Cooperation between human fibrocytes and endothelial colony-forming cells increases angiogenesis via the CXCR4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Smadja, David M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Guerin, Coralie L; Bieche, Ivan; Badoual, Cécile; Boscolo, Elisa; Kambouchner, Marianne; Cazes, Aurélie; Mercier, Olaf; Humbert, Marc; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Israël-Biet, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    Fibrotic diseases of the lung are associated with a vascular remodelling process. Fibrocytes (Fy) are a distinct population of blood-borne cells that co-express haematopoietic cell antigens and fibroblast markers, and have been shown to contribute to organ fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes cooperate with endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) to induce angiogenesis. We isolated fibrocytes from blood of patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and characterised them by flow cytometry, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RTQ-PCR), and confocal microscopy. We then investigated the angiogenic interaction between fibrocytes and cord-blood-derived ECFC, both in vitro and in an in vivo Matrigel implant model. Compared to fibroblast culture medium, fibrocyte culture medium increased ECFC proliferation and differentiation via the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. IPF-Fy co-implanted with human ECFC in Matrigel plugs in immunodeficient mice formed functional microvascular beds, whereas fibroblasts did not. Evaluation of implants after two weeks revealed an extensive network of erythrocyte-containing blood vessels. CXCR4 blockade significantly inhibited this blood vessel formation. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by strong CXCR4 expression in vessels close to fibrotic areas in biopsy specimens from patients with IPF, by comparison with control lungs. In conclusion, circulating fibrocytes might contribute to the intense remodelling of the pulmonary vasculature in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25103869

  7. Identification of vitamin B1 metabolism as a tumor-specific radiosensitizing pathway using a high-throughput colony formation screen

    PubMed Central

    Buffa, Francesca M.; Yu, Sheng; Ebner, Daniel V.; Howarth, Alison; Folkes, Lisa K.; Budwal, Balam; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Durrant, Lisa; Muschel, Ruth J.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Higgins, Geoff S.

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation is the gold standard assay for determining reproductive cell death after radiation treatment, since effects on proliferation often do not reflect survival. We have developed a high-throughput radiosensitivity screening method based on clonogenicity and screened a siRNA library against kinases. Thiamine pyrophosphokinase-1 (TPK1), a key component of Vitamin B1/thiamine metabolism, was identified as a target for radiosensitization. TPK1 knockdown caused significant radiosensitization in cancer but not normal tissue cell lines. Other means of blocking this pathway, knockdown of thiamine transporter-1 (THTR1) or treatment with the thiamine analogue pyrithiamine hydrobromide (PyrH) caused significant tumor specific radiosensitization. There was persistent DNA damage in cells irradiated after TPK1 and THTR1 knockdown or PyrH treatment. Thus this screen allowed the identification of thiamine metabolism as a novel radiosensitization target that affects DNA repair. Short-term modulation of thiamine metabolism could be a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor specific radiosensitization. PMID:25788274

  8. Identification of vitamin B1 metabolism as a tumor-specific radiosensitizing pathway using a high-throughput colony formation screen.

    PubMed

    Tiwana, Gaganpreet S; Prevo, Remko; Buffa, Francesca M; Yu, Sheng; Ebner, Daniel V; Howarth, Alison; Folkes, Lisa K; Budwal, Balam; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Durrant, Lisa; Muschel, Ruth J; McKenna, W Gillies; Higgins, Geoff S

    2015-03-20

    Colony formation is the gold standard assay for determining reproductive cell death after radiation treatment, since effects on proliferation often do not reflect survival. We have developed a high-throughput radiosensitivity screening method based on clonogenicity and screened a siRNA library against kinases. Thiamine pyrophosphokinase-1 (TPK1), a key component of Vitamin B1/thiamine metabolism, was identified as a target for radiosensitization. TPK1 knockdown caused significant radiosensitization in cancer but not normal tissue cell lines. Other means of blocking this pathway, knockdown of thiamine transporter-1 (THTR1) or treatment with the thiamine analogue pyrithiamine hydrobromide (PyrH) caused significant tumor specific radiosensitization. There was persistent DNA damage in cells irradiated after TPK1 and THTR1 knockdown or PyrH treatment. Thus this screen allowed the identification of thiamine metabolism as a novel radiosensitization target that affects DNA repair. Short-term modulation of thiamine metabolism could be a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor specific radiosensitization.

  9. Autophagosome formation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Burman, Chloe; Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2010-12-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental intracellular trafficking pathway conserved from yeast to mammals. It is generally thought to play a pro-survival role, and it can be up regulated in response to both external and intracellular factors, including amino acid starvation, growth factor withdrawal, low cellular energy levels, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, hypoxia, oxidative stress, pathogen infection, and organelle damage. During autophagy initiation a portion of the cytosol is surrounded by a flat membrane sheet known as the isolation membrane or phagophore. The isolation membrane then elongates and seals itself to form an autophagosome. The autophagosome fuses with normal endocytic traffic to mature into a late autophagosome, before fusing with lysosomes. The molecular machinery that enables formation of an autophagosome in response to the various autophagy stimuli is almost completely identified in yeast and-thanks to the observed conservation-is also being rapidly elucidated in higher eukaryotes including mammals. What are less clear and currently under intense investigation are the mechanism by which these various autophagy components co-ordinate in order to generate autophagosomes. In this review, we will discuss briefly the fundamental importance of autophagy in various pathophysiological states and we will then review in detail the various players in early autophagy. Our main thesis will be that a conserved group of heteromeric protein complexes and a relatively simple signalling lipid are responsible for the formation of autophagosomes in mammalian cells.

  10. Synergy of interleukin 1 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: in vivo stimulation of stem-cell recovery and hematopoietic regeneration following 5-fluorouracil treatment of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.A.S.; Warren, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    The human bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 produces hematopoietic growth factors (granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF and GM-CSF)) and hemopoietin 1, which synergizes with CSFs to stimulate colony formation by primitive hematopoietic stem cells in 5-fluorouracil-treated mouse bone marrow. Molecular and functional properties of hemopoietin 1 identified it as identical to interleukin 1..cap alpha.. (IL-1..cap alpha..). When bone marrow cells from 5-fluorouracil-treated mice were cultured in suspension for 7 days with recombinant human IL-1..cap alpha.. and/or G-CSF, it was found that the two factors synergized to enhance recovery of myelopoietic cells and colony-forming cells of both high and low proliferative potential. G-CSF alone did not sustain these populations, but the combination had greater-than-additive stimulating capacity. In vivo, 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) produced profound myelosuppression and delayed neutrophil regeneration for up to 2 weeks in C3H/HeJ mice. Daily administration of recombinant human G-CSF or human IL-1..cap alpha.. accelerated recovery of stem cells, progenitor cells, and blood neutrophils by up to 4 days in 5-fluorouracil-treated C3H/HeJ and B6D2F/sub 1/ mice. The combination of IL-1..cap alpha.. and G-CSF acted synergistically, reducing neutropenia and accelerating recovery of normal neutrophil numbers by up to 7 days. These results indicate the possible therapeutic potential of combination therapy with IL-1 and hematopoietic growth factors such as G-CSF in the treatment of chemotherapy- or radiation-induced myelosuppression.

  11. Growth of a radiation-transformed clone of C3H 1OT1/2 cells into melanin-producing colonies

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.G.; Raaphorst, G.P.; Lobreau, A.U.; Azzam, E.I.; Vadasz, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    When R25, a radiation-transformed clone of C3H 1OT1/2 cells, was plated in soft agarose, a fraction of the colonies became pigmented. The morphologies of the white and dark colonies and their cells were compared by optical, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The transformed R25 cells had apparently differentiated into melanin-producing cells in the soft agarose, with the white colonies containing actively growing cells having only a few melanosomes, and the dark colonies being made up of stationary-phase cells filled with electronopaque melanosomes. Exposure of the R25 cells to 4.0 Gy of X-rays decreased the percentage of dark colonies, while exposure to 1% DMSO had no effect.

  12. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jarel K; Zivkovic, Lada; Fisher, John P; Yoder, Mervin C; Brey, Eric M

    2015-09-18

    Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC), within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating.

  13. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Jarel K.; Zivkovic, Lada; Fisher, John P.; Yoder, Mervin C.; Brey, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC), within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating. PMID:26393602

  14. CD34 expression modulates tube-forming capacity and barrier properties of peripheral blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs).

    PubMed

    Tasev, Dimitar; Konijnenberg, Lara S F; Amado-Azevedo, Joana; van Wijhe, Michiel H; Koolwijk, Pieter; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) are grown from circulating CD34(+) progenitors present in adult peripheral blood, but during in vitro expansion part of the cells lose CD34. To evaluate whether the regulation of CD34 characterizes the angiogenic phenotypical features of PB-ECFCs, we investigated the properties of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs with respect to their ability to form capillary-like tubes in 3D fibrin matrices, tip-cell gene expression, and barrier integrity. Selection of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs from subcultured ECFCs was accomplished by magnetic sorting (FACS: CD34(+): 95 % pos; CD34(-): 99 % neg). Both fractions proliferated at same rate, while CD34(+) ECFCs exhibited higher tube-forming capacity and tip-cell gene expression than CD3(4-) cells. However, during cell culture CD34(-) cells re-expressed CD34. Cell-seeding density, cell-cell contact formation, and serum supplements modulated CD34 expression. CD34 expression in ECFCs was strongly suppressed by newborn calf serum. Stimulation with FGF-2, VEGF, or HGF prepared in medium supplemented with 3 % albumin did not change CD34 mRNA or surface expression. Silencing of CD34 with siRNA resulted in strengthening of cell-cell contacts and increased barrier function of ECFC monolayers as measured by ECIS. Furthermore, CD34 siRNA reduced tube formation by ECFC, but did not affect tip-cell gene expression. These findings demonstrate that CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells are different phenotypes of similar cells and that CD34 (1) can be regulated in ECFC; (2) is positively involved in capillary-like sprout formation; (3) is associated but not causally related to tip-cell gene expression; and (4) can affect endothelial barrier function. PMID:27043316

  15. Growth of human hemopoietic colonies in response to recombinant gibbon interleukin 3: comparison with human recombinant granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, H.A.; Yamasaki, K.; Jamal, N.; Minden, M.M.; Yang, Y.C.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.

    1987-10-01

    Supernatants of COS-1 cells transfected with gibbon cDNA encoding interleukin 3 (IL-3) with homology to sequences for human IL-3 were tested for ability to promote growth of various human hemopoietic progenitors. The effect of these supernatants as a source of recombinant IL-3 was compared to that of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as well as to that of medium conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes. The frequency of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies in cultures containing the COS-1 cell supernatant was equivalent to the frequency observed in the controls and significantly higher than found in cultures plated with recombinant GM-CSF. G-CSF did not support the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. In contrast, growth of granulocyte-macrophage colonies was best supported with GM-CSF, while recombinant IL-3 yielded colonies at lower or at best equivalent frequency. The simultaneous addition of higher concentrations of GM-CSF to cultures containing IL-3 in optimal amounts did not enhance the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. However, the frequency of such colonies and bursts increased with GM-CSF when cultures were plated with suboptimal concentrations of IL-3. Growth of colonies within the granulocyte-macrophage lineage is optimally supported by GM-CSF and does not increase with further addition of IL-3.

  16. Expression of Genes Related to Germ Cell Lineage and Pluripotency in Single Cells and Colonies of Human Adult Germ Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Sabine; Azizi, Hossein; Hatami, Maryam; Kubista, Mikael; Bonin, Michael; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Skutella, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular status of single human adult germ stem cells (haGSCs) and haGSC colonies, which spontaneously developed from the CD49f MACS and matrix- (collagen−/laminin+ binding-) selected fraction of enriched spermatogonia. Single-cell transcriptional profiling by Fluidigm BioMark system of a long-term cultured haGSCs cluster in comparison to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human fibroblasts (hFibs) revealed that haGSCs showed a characteristic germ- and pluripotency-associated gene expression profile with some similarities to hESCs and with a significant distinction from somatic hFibs. Genome-wide comparisons with microarray analysis confirmed that different haGSC colonies exhibited gene expression heterogeneity with more or less pluripotency. The results of this study confirm that haGSCs are adult stem cells with a specific molecular gene expression profile in vitro, related but not identical to true pluripotent stem cells. Under ES-cell conditions haGSC colonies could be selected and maintained in a partial pluripotent state at the molecular level, which may be related to their cell plasticity and potential to differentiate into cells of all germ layers. PMID:26649052

  17. Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca(2+) Handling and Apoptotic Resistance in Tumor-Derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Valentina; Dragoni, Silvia; Lim, Dmitry; Biggiogera, Marco; Aronica, Adele; Cinelli, Mariapia; De Luca, Antonio; Rosti, Vittorio; Porta, Camillo; Guerra, Germano; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Truly endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be mobilized from bone marrow to support the vascular network of growing tumors, thereby sustaining the metastatic switch. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) are the only EPC subtype belonging to the endothelial phenotype and capable of incorporating within neovessels. The intracellular Ca(2+) machinery plays a key role in ECFC activation and is remodeled in renal cellular carcinoma-derived ECFCs (RCC-ECFCs). Particularly, RCC-ECFCs seems to undergo a drop in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]ER ). This feature is remarkable when considering that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3 )-dependent ER-to-mitochondria Ca(2+) transfer regulates the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Herein, we sought to assess whether: (1) the [Ca(2+) ]ER and the InsP3 -induced ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) shuttle are reduced in RCC-ECFCs; and (2) the dysregulation of ER Ca(2+) handling leads to apoptosis resistance in tumor-derived cells. RCC-ECFCs displayed a reduction both in [Ca(2+) ]ER and in the InsP3 -dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, while they expressed normal levels of Bcl-2 and Bak. The decrease in [Ca(2+) ]ER was associated to a remarkable ER expansion in RCC-ECFCs, which is a hallmark of ER stress, and did not depend on the remodeling of the Ca(2+) -transporting and the ER Ca(2+) -storing systems. As expected, RCC-ECFCs were less sensitive to rapamycin- and thapsigargin-induced apoptosis; however, buffering intracellular Ca(2+) levels with BAPTA dampened apoptosis in both cell types. Finally, store-operated Ca(2+) entry was seemingly uncoupled from the apoptotic machinery in RCC-ECFCs. Thus, the chronic underfilling of the ER Ca(2+) pool could confer a survival advantage to RCC-ECFCs and underpin RCC resistance to pharmacological treatment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2260-2271, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Gender differences in circulating endothelial progenitor cell colony-forming capacity and migratory activity in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Hoetzer, Greta L; MacEneaney, Owen J; Irmiger, Heather M; Keith, Rebecca; Van Guilder, Gary P; Stauffer, Brian L; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    Middle-aged women have a lower prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular events compared with men. The mechanisms responsible for this gender-specific difference are unclear. Numeric and functional impairments of bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are associated with increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality. It is currently unknown whether there are gender-related differences in EPC number and function in middle-aged adults. We tested the hypothesis that EPCs isolated from middle-aged women demonstrate greater colony-forming capacity and migratory activity compared with men of similar age. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 50 sedentary adults, 25 men (59 +/- 1 years of age) and 25 women (58 +/- 1 years of age). Mononuclear cells were isolated and preplated for 2 days, and nonadherent cells were further cultured for 7 days to determine EPC colony-forming units. Migratory activity of EPCs was determined using a modified Boyden chamber. The number of EPC colony-forming units was significantly higher (approximately 150%) in samples collected from women (16 +/- 3) compared with that collected from men (7 +/- 1). In addition, EPC migration (relative fluorescent units) was approximately 40% greater in women (729 +/- 74) than in men (530 +/- 67). In conclusion, these results demonstrate that EPC colony-forming capacity and migratory activity are higher in middle-aged women than in men.

  19. Human macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces macrophage colonies after L-phenylalanine methylester treatment of human marrow.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, C S; Evans, C; Shadduck, R K

    1990-11-01

    Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) has well-known effects on murine bone marrow, but its colony stimulating activity for human bone marrow is controversial. After treatment of human bone marrow with L-phenylalanine methylester (PME), macrophage-colonies (CFU-M) were induced by M-CSF in a dose-dependent fashion. The optimal concentration of recombinant human-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rhM-CSF) was 1,000 U/mL. Purified human urine M-CSF had colony stimulating activity similar to rhM-CSF. Further studies were performed to determine the factors responsible for the enhanced CFU-M formation from PME treated marrow. Compared with nylon wool and carbonyl iron monocyte depletion methods, PME eliminated significantly more monocytes and myeloid cells. This observation suggested that these cells may release hematopoietic inhibitory factors for CFU-M. Low concentrations (1%) but not normal (10%) concentrations of blood monocytes were inhibitory (mean inhibition, 48%) to CFU-M. High concentrations of monocytes (50%) augmented CFU-M colonies. HL-60 conditioned media was used to simulate secretory products of early myeloid cells. HL-60 conditioned media (1%) inhibited CFU-M formation but not granulocyte macrophage or granulocyte colonies. We conclude that M-CSF has colony stimulating activity for human marrow that can be recognized after removal of inhibitory cells by PME treatment. PMID:2224128

  20. Cord blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cell function is disrupted in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Hideshi; Fujinaga, Hiroko; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Kato, Tomoko; Tamano, Moe; Terao, Miho; Takada, Shuji; Ito, Yushi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Vascular growth is necessary for normal lung development. Although endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in vascularization, little is known about EPC function in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a severe neonatal condition that is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. We hypothesized that the function of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), a type of EPC, is impaired in CDH. Cord blood (CB) was collected from full-term CDH patients and healthy controls. We assessed CB progenitor cell populations as well as plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF1α) levels. CB ECFC clonogenicity; growth kinetics; migration; production of VEGF, SDF1α, and nitric oxide (NO); vasculogenic capacity; and mRNA expression of VEGF-A, fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (FLT1), kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 1-3, SDF1, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) were also assessed. Compared with controls, CB ECFCs were decreased in CDH. CDH ECFCs had reduced potential for self-renewal, clonogenicity, proliferation, and migration. Their capacity for NO production was enhanced but their response to VEGF was blunted in CDH ECFCs. In vivo potential for de novo vasculogenesis was reduced in CDH ECFCs. There was no difference in CB plasma VEGF and SDF1α concentrations, VEGF and SDF1α production by ECFCs, and ECFC mRNA expression of VEGF-A, FLT1, KDR, NOS1-3, SDF1, and CXCR4 between CDH and control subjects. In conclusion, CB ECFC function is disrupted in CDH, but these changes may be caused by mechanisms other than alteration of VEGF-NO and SDF1-CXCR4 signaling. PMID:27130531

  1. In Vitro Colony Assays for Characterizing Tri-potent Progenitor Cells Isolated from the Adult Murine Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Jacob R; LeBon, Jeanne M; Luo, Angela; Quijano, Janine C; Wedeken, Lena; Jou, Kevin; Riggs, Arthur D; Tirrell, David A; Ku, H Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells from the adult pancreas could be a potential source of therapeutic beta-like cells for treating patients with type 1 diabetes. However, it is still unknown whether stem and progenitor cells exist in the adult pancreas. Research strategies using cre-lox lineage-tracing in adult mice have yielded results that either support or refute the idea that beta cells can be generated from the ducts, the presumed location where adult pancreatic progenitors may reside. These in vivo cre-lox lineage-tracing methods, however, cannot answer the questions of self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation-two criteria necessary to define a stem cell. To begin addressing this technical gap, we devised 3-dimensional colony assays for pancreatic progenitors. Soon after our initial publication, other laboratories independently developed a similar, but not identical, method called the organoid assay. Compared to the organoid assay, our method employs methylcellulose, which forms viscous solutions that allow the inclusion of extracellular matrix proteins at low concentrations. The methylcellulose-containing assays permit easier detection and analyses of progenitor cells at the single-cell level, which are critical when progenitors constitute a small sub-population, as is the case for many adult organ stem cells. Together, results from several laboratories demonstrate in vitro self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells from mice. The current protocols describe two methylcellulose-based colony assays to characterize mouse pancreatic progenitors; one contains a commercial preparation of murine extracellular matrix proteins and the other an artificial extracellular matrix protein known as a laminin hydrogel. The techniques shown here are 1) dissociation of the pancreas and sorting of CD133(+)Sox9/EGFP(+) ductal cells from adult mice, 2) single cell manipulation of the sorted cells, 3) single colony analyses using microfluidic q

  2. Xenogeneic transfer of fetal liver and adult bone marrow-derived haemopoietic cells in rodents: changes in spleen colony differentials with increased doses of cells.

    PubMed

    Gulya, E; Gábor Szabó, L; Kelemen, E

    1997-01-01

    The effect of very high haemopoietic cell doses were investigated on the composition of splenic cell colonies/clusters in irradiated animals under xenogeneic circumstances. Differential cluster/colony counts from serial histological sections of the spleen were investigated before, and 9-12 days after transplantation of fetal liver- or adult bone marrow-derived haemopoietic cells following 5.0 to 8.5 Gy total body irradiation. Syngeneic as well as xenogeneic (mouse to rat and rat to mouse) transplantations were carried out. Cluster/colony differentials changed with the increase of the injected cell mass from 10(5) to 10(6) and 10(7) or more, i.e. the overwhelming erythroid pattern became trilinear even with xenogeneic transplants.

  3. Characterization of the Maize Stalk Rot Pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum and the Effect of Fungicides on Their Mycelial Growth and Colony Formation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Han, Joon-Hee; Lee, Ju Kyong; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2014-12-01

    Maize is a socioeconomically important crop in many countries. Recently, a high incidence of stalk rot disease has been reported in several maize fields in Gangwon province. In this report, we show that maize stalk rot is associated with the fungal pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum. Since no fungicides are available to control these pathogens on maize plants, we selected six fungicides (tebuconazole, difenoconazole, fluquinconazole, azoxystrobin, prochloraz and kresoxim-methyl) and examined their effectiveness against the two pathogens. The in vitro antifungal effects of the six fungicides on mycelial growth and colony formation were investigated. Based on the inhibition of mycelial growth, the most toxic fungicide was tebuconazole with 50% effective concentrations (EC50) of <0.1 μg/ml and EC90 values of 0.9 μg/ml for both pathogens, while the least toxic fungicide was azoxystrobin with EC50 values of 0.7 and 0.5 μg/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, and EC90 values of >3,000 μg/ml for both pathogens. Based on the inhibition of colony formation by the two pathogens, kresoxim-methyl was the most toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.01 μg/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, whereas azoxystrobin was the least toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations >3,000 μg/ml for both pathogens. PMID:25506304

  4. Characterization of the Maize Stalk Rot Pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum and the Effect of Fungicides on Their Mycelial Growth and Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Han, Joon-Hee; Lee, Ju Kyong; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2014-01-01

    Maize is a socioeconomically important crop in many countries. Recently, a high incidence of stalk rot disease has been reported in several maize fields in Gangwon province. In this report, we show that maize stalk rot is associated with the fungal pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum. Since no fungicides are available to control these pathogens on maize plants, we selected six fungicides (tebuconazole, difenoconazole, fluquinconazole, azoxystrobin, prochloraz and kresoxim-methyl) and examined their effectiveness against the two pathogens. The in vitro antifungal effects of the six fungicides on mycelial growth and colony formation were investigated. Based on the inhibition of mycelial growth, the most toxic fungicide was tebuconazole with 50% effective concentrations (EC50) of <0.1 μg/ml and EC90 values of 0.9 μg/ml for both pathogens, while the least toxic fungicide was azoxystrobin with EC50 values of 0.7 and 0.5 μg/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, and EC90 values of >3,000 μg/ml for both pathogens. Based on the inhibition of colony formation by the two pathogens, kresoxim-methyl was the most toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.01 μg/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, whereas azoxystrobin was the least toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations >3,000 μg/ml for both pathogens. PMID:25506304

  5. Ionizing Radiation Induces Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Aggregation Through JNK-Dependent Activation of CD36 Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Ikuo; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sumi, Tadateru; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Irradiated arteries of cancer patients can be associated with atherosclerosis-like lesions containing cholesterol-laden macrophages (foam cells). Endothelial cell damage by irradiation does not completely explain the foam cell formation. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced foam cell formation. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood monocytes were activated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with varying doses of IR in vitro in the absence of endothelial cells. Scavenger receptor expression and foam cell formation of IR-treated macrophages were investigated in the presence or absence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. We also assessed the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human monocytes (macrophages) for the foam cell formation. Results: We found that IR treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human peripheral blood monocytes resulted in the enhanced expression of CD36 scavenger receptors and that cholesterol accumulated in the irradiated macrophages with resultant foam cell formation in the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, when cultured on collagen gels, human macrophages formed large foam cell aggregates in response to IR. Antibodies against CD36 inhibited the IR-induced foam cell formation and aggregation, indicating that the IR-induced foam cell formation and the subsequent aggregation are dependent on functional CD36. In addition, we found that IR of human macrophages resulted in c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition suppressed IR-induced CD36 expression and the subsequent foam cell formation and aggregation. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that IR-induced foam cell formation is mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent CD36 activation.

  6. Bioluminescence imaging of transplanted human endothelial colony-forming cells in an ischemic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Cong-Xiao; Li, Pei-Cheng; Qian, Cheng; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic strokes are devastating events responsible for high mortality and morbidity worldwide each year. Endothelial colony-forming cell (ECFC) therapy holds promise for stroke treatment; however, grafted ECFCs need to be monitored better understand their biological behavior in vivo, so as to evaluate their safety and successful delivery. The objectives of this study are to visualize the fate of infused human cord blood derived ECFCs via bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in an ischemic stroke mouse model and to determine the therapeutic effects of ECFC transplantation. ECFCs derived from human umbilical cord blood were infected with lentivirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and firefly luciferase (Luc2) double fusion reporter gene. Labeled ECFCs were grafted into a photothrombotic ischemic stroke mouse model via intra-arterial injection though the left cardiac ventricle. The homing of infused cells and functional recovery of stroke mice were evaluated using BLI, neurological scoring, and immunohistochemistry. Significantly, BLI signals were highest in the brain on day 1 and decreased steadily until day 14. GFP-positive cells were also found surrounding infarct border zones in brain sections using immunohistochemical staining, suggesting that ECFCs properly homed to the ischemic brain tissue. Using a modified neurological severity score assay and histological analysis of brain slices with CD31 immunostaining in brain tissue, double cortin analysis, and the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, we demonstrated functional restoration, improved angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and decreased apoptosis in ischemic mice after ECFC infusion. Collectively, our data support that ECFCs may be a promising therapeutic agent for stroke. PMID:27038754

  7. Bioluminescence imaging of transplanted human endothelial colony-forming cells in an ischemic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Cong-Xiao; Li, Pei-Cheng; Qian, Cheng; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic strokes are devastating events responsible for high mortality and morbidity worldwide each year. Endothelial colony-forming cell (ECFC) therapy holds promise for stroke treatment; however, grafted ECFCs need to be monitored better understand their biological behavior in vivo, so as to evaluate their safety and successful delivery. The objectives of this study are to visualize the fate of infused human cord blood derived ECFCs via bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in an ischemic stroke mouse model and to determine the therapeutic effects of ECFC transplantation. ECFCs derived from human umbilical cord blood were infected with lentivirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and firefly luciferase (Luc2) double fusion reporter gene. Labeled ECFCs were grafted into a photothrombotic ischemic stroke mouse model via intra-arterial injection though the left cardiac ventricle. The homing of infused cells and functional recovery of stroke mice were evaluated using BLI, neurological scoring, and immunohistochemistry. Significantly, BLI signals were highest in the brain on day 1 and decreased steadily until day 14. GFP-positive cells were also found surrounding infarct border zones in brain sections using immunohistochemical staining, suggesting that ECFCs properly homed to the ischemic brain tissue. Using a modified neurological severity score assay and histological analysis of brain slices with CD31 immunostaining in brain tissue, double cortin analysis, and the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, we demonstrated functional restoration, improved angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and decreased apoptosis in ischemic mice after ECFC infusion. Collectively, our data support that ECFCs may be a promising therapeutic agent for stroke.

  8. Measurement of secondary colony formation after 5 weeks in long-term cultures in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Kim, S; Selleri, C; Young, N S; Maciejewski, J P

    1998-08-01

    Pancytopenia is a frequent manifestation of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In the presence of an empty bone marrow, clinical distinction from aplastic anemia may be difficult. The hypoplastic marrow morphology seen in some cases of MDS raises questions about etiologic and pathophysiologic relationships between aplastic anemia and MDS. The goal of our study was to compare the degree of the hematopoietic failure in these diseases at the level of the most immature progenitor and stem cells that can be measured in vitro. In a systemic, prospective fashion, we have studied bone marrow (n = 45) and peripheral blood (n = 33) of patients with MDS for the number of long-term culture initiating cells (LTC-IC) in comparison to 17 normal controls and patients with new, untreated aplastic anemia (46 marrow; 62 blood samples). Due to the low numbers of cells available for the analysis, formal limiting dilution analysis could not be performed, instead secondary colony-forming cells (CFC) after 5 weeks of LTBMC were measured. As the number of these cells is proportional to the input number of LTC-IC, the number of secondary CFC per 10(6) mononuclear cells (MNC) initiating the LTBMC can be used as a measure of the content of immature stem cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood. The MDS group consisted of 34 RA, three RARS, eight RAEB and two RAEB-T patients with mean absolute neutrophil values of 1992, 1413, 1441, and 380 per mm3, respectively. The diagnosis was established based on bone marrow morphology and results of cytogenetic studies. In comparison to controls (147 +/- 38/10(6) MNC), significantly decreased numbers of bone marrow secondary CFC were found in MDS: in patients with RA and RARS, 21 +/- 7 secondary CFC per 10(6) bone marrow MNC (P < 0.001); patients with RAEB and RAEB-T: 39 +/- 12 CFC per 10(6) marrow MNC (P < 0.001). In all groups tested, the decrease in peripheral blood secondary CFC numbers was consistently less pronounced. In MDS patients with

  9. Programmed cell death in vegetative development: apoptosis during the colonial life cycle of the ascidian Botryllus schlosseri.

    PubMed

    Tiozzo, S; Ballarin, L; Burighel, P; Zaniolo, G

    2006-06-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) by apoptosis is a physiological mechanism by which cells are eliminated during embryonic and post-embryonic stages of animal life cycle. During asexual reproduction, the zooids of colonial ascidians originate from an assorted cell population instead of a single zygote, so that we assume that regulation of the equilibrium among proliferation, differentiation and cell death may follow different pathways in comparison to the embryonic development. Here we investigate the presence of apoptotic events throughout the blastogenetic life cycle of the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, by means of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) coupled with histochemical and electron microscopy techniques. The occurrence of low levels of morphogenetic cell death suggests that, in contrast to what happens during sexual development (embryogenesis and metamorphosis), apoptosis does not play a pivotal role during asexual propagation in botryllid ascidian. Nevertheless, PCD emerges as a key force to regulate homeostasis in adult zooids and to shape and modulate the growth of the whole colony.

  10. Expression of DDX27 contributes to colony-forming ability of gastric cancer cells and correlates with poor prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Fumoto, Shoichi; Noguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Hirashita, Yuka; Nakada, Chisato; Hijiya, Naoki; Uchida, Tomohisa; Matsuura, Keiko; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Murakami, Kazunari; Seto, Masao; Inomata, Masafumi; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that gain at chromosome 20q13 is the most common genomic copy number aberration in gastric cancer (GC) (29/30 cases), and that among the genes located in this region, we have identified DDX27, whose expression level shows the highest correlation with genomic copy number, as a candidate therapeutic target for GC. Here, we analyzed the clinicopathological significance of DDX27 using immunohistochemistry and studied its functions using knockdown assays. We found that DDX27 was frequently upregulated in GC tissues (98 of 140 cases, 70%), and significantly associated with venous invasion and liver metastasis. Furthermore, multivariate analysis of GC patients showed that high expression of DDX27 was independently associated with poorer prognosis. In functional assays, knockdown of DDX27 reduced the ability of GC cells to form colonies both on conventional plates and soft agar, but had little effect on their invasiveness. We also found that knockdown of DDX27 reduced the viability of GC cells through inhibition of cell cycle progression independently of apoptosis. Interestingly, DDX27 depletion induced accumulation of TP53 in a TP53 wild-type cell line, AGS, but not in a TP53-deleted cell line, 44As3, although DDX27 knockdown commonly reduced the viability of both, indicating the TP53-dependent and independent cell cycle control of DDX27. Thus, our results suggest that expression of DDX27 contributes to colony formation by GC cells through cell cycle control and may be a potential therapeutic target for GC patients with chromosome gain at 20q13. PMID:26693055

  11. Functional granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor is constitutively expressed on neoplastic plasma cells and mediates tumour cell longevity.

    PubMed

    Villunger, A; Egle, A; Kos, M; Egle, D; Tinhofer, I; Henn, T; Uberall, F; Maly, K; Greil, R

    1998-09-01

    It has been shown that granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is able to support myeloma cell propagation in cooperation with interleukin (IL)-6, the major growth factor for malignant plasma cells, although the biological mechanisms involved remain unknown. Therefore we investigated (i) the expression levels of the GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) constituents in three malignant plasma cell lines and in native malignant plasma cells, (ii) the ability of the receptor to mediate common signalling pathways regulating proliferation and cell survival in malignant plasma cell lines, and (iii) the effects of GM-CSF on tumour cell biology. The GM-CSFRalpha subunit was detected in the malignant plasma cell lines RPMI-8226, MC/CAR, IM-9 as well as 6/6 native myeloma cell samples derived from the bone marrow of patients with overt disease. Furthermore, GM-CSFR expression was also detected in the CD19+ fraction from 2/3 bone marrow samples and 5/8 peripheral blood samples derived from patients with malignant plasma cell disorders, but not in the CD19+ fraction of peripheral blood from healthy donors. The expressed cytokine receptor alpha-subunit was able to constitute a functional signalling complex with the ubiquitously expressed GM-CSFRbeta subunit, as demonstrated by the fact that GM-CSF induced the p21-ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascade in malignant plasma cell lines. Since this signalling cascade plays an essential role in the mediation of both proliferation and cell survival, we investigated the impact of GM-CSF on these two events. Application of GM-CSF led to an increase of DNA-synthesis in MC/CAR, IM-9 and RPMI-8226 cells. Furthermore, it increased longevity of these malignant plasma cell lines by reducing the rates of spontaneous apoptosis. We conclude that (i) the functional GM-CSFR is commonly expressed on malignant plasma cells and that (ii) GM-CSF promotes the clonal expansion of myeloma cells by inhibiting spontaneous

  12. Infection of human synovial cells by human T cell lymphotropic virus type I. Proliferation and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor production by synovial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, M; Eguchi, K; Terada, K; Nakashima, M; Yamashita, I; Ida, H; Kawabe, Y; Aoyagi, T; Takino, H; Nakamura, T

    1993-01-01

    The present study was performed to clarify the relationship between human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection and chronic inflammatory arthropathy. To determine the ability of HTLV-I to infect synovial cells and the effect on synovial cell proliferation, synovial cells were cocultured with the HTLV-I-producing T cell lines (MT-2 or HCT-1). After coculture with HTLV-I-infected T cells, the synovial cells expressed HTLV-I-specific core antigens, and HTLV-I proviral DNA was detected from the synovial cells by polymerase chain reaction. These cocultured synovial cells with HTLV-I-infected T cells proliferated more actively than the synovial cells cocultured with uninfected T cells. This stimulatory effect of HTLV-I-infected T cells on synovial cell proliferation seems necessary to contact each other. After being cocultured with MT-2 cells, synovial cells proliferated more actively than control cells even after several passages. Furthermore, HTLV-I-infected synovial cells produced significant amounts of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor. These results suggest that HTLV-I can infect synovial cells, resulting their active proliferation and may be involved in the pathogenesis of proliferative synovitis similar to that found in rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:8408648

  13. Cationic star copolymers based on β-cyclodextrins for efficient gene delivery to mouse embryonic stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Loh, Xian Jun; Wu, Yun-Long

    2015-07-11

    A cationic star copolymer with a β-cyclodextrin core was developed for nonviral gene transfer to mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). The copolymer comprises poly(2-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate) as the cationic component and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) as the non-toxic stealth component. These materials have very low toxicity and show highly efficient transfection to mESC colonies. PMID:26040469

  14. Divergent branches of mitochondrial signaling regulate specific genes and the viability of specialized cell types of differentiated yeast colonies

    PubMed Central

    Rešetárová, Stanislava; Kučerová, Helena; Hlaváček, Otakar; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial retrograde signaling mediates communication from altered mitochondria to the nucleus and is involved in many normal and pathophysiological changes, including cell metabolic reprogramming linked to cancer development and progression in mammals. The major mitochondrial retrograde pathway described in yeast includes three activators, Rtg1p, Rtg2p and Rtg3p, and repressors, Mks1p and Bmh1p/Bmh2p. Using differentiated yeast colonies, we show that Mks1p-Rtg pathway regulation is complex and includes three branches that divergently regulate the properties and fate of three specifically localized cell subpopulations via signals from differently altered mitochondria. The newly identified RTG pathway-regulated genes ATO1/ATO2 are expressed in colonial upper (U) cells, the cells with active TORC1 that metabolically resemble tumor cells, while CIT2 is a typical target induced in one subpopulation of starving lower (L) cells. The viability of the second L cell subpopulation is strictly dependent on RTG signaling. Additional co-activators of Rtg1p-Rtg3p specific to particular gene targets of each branch are required to regulate cell differentiation. PMID:26992228

  15. Order and instabilities in dense bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimring, Lev

    2012-02-01

    The structure of cell colonies is governed by the interplay of many physical and biological factors, ranging from properties of surrounding media to cell-cell communication and gene expression in individual cells. The biomechanical interactions arising from the growth and division of individual cells in confined environments are ubiquitous, yet little work has focused on this fundamental aspect of colony formation. By combining experimental observations of growing monolayers of non-motile strain of bacteria Escherichia coli in a shallow microfluidic chemostat with discrete-element simulations and continuous theory, we demonstrate that expansion of a dense colony leads to rapid orientational alignment of rod-like cells. However, in larger colonies, anisotropic compression may lead to buckling instability which breaks perfect nematic order. Furthermore, we found that in shallow cavities feedback between cell growth and mobility in a confined environment leads to a novel cell streaming instability. Joint work with W. Mather, D. Volfson, O. Mondrag'on-Palomino, T. Danino, S. Cookson, and J. Hasty (UCSD) and D. Boyer, S. Orozco-Fuentes (UNAM, Mexico).

  16. Dynamics of Superoxide Production and Decay in Natural Trichodesmium Colonies from the Sargasso Sea: Implications for Cell Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C. M.; Buchwald, C.; Diaz, J. M.; Dyhrman, S.; Van Mooy, B. A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key players in the biogeochemistry of the ocean, where they serve a critical role in the cycling of carbon and metals. Research in the past decade has introduced phytoplankton and, most recently, heterotrophic bacteria as significant sources of ROS, including superoxide, within both photic and aphotic regions of the ocean. ROS are both beneficial and detrimental to life. For instance, superoxide is a vital inter- and intra-cellular signaling molecule, yet at high concentrations it induces lipid peroxidation and initiates programmed cell death (PCD). In fact, superoxide has been implicated in PCD in the nitrogen-fixing diazotroph Trichodesmium, presumably leading to the demise of blooms within oligotrophic marine systems. Here, we explore the rates of superoxide production and decay by natural Trichodesmium populations obtained from various surface waters in the Sargasso Sea. We investigate also the role of light and colony density and morphology (puff v. raft) on superoxide fluxes. We find that Trichodesmium colonies produce extracellular superoxide at extremely high rates in the dark that are on par with those of the toxic raphidophyte Chattonella. The rates of superoxide production, however, rapidly decline with increasing cell density pointing to a role for superoxide in cell signaling in these organisms. We also find extremely rapid extracellular superoxide degradation by Trichodesmium. Together, this likely reflects a need for these organisms to maintain ROS at levels that will support signaling but below the threshold level that triggers PCD or oxidative damage. We also show differences in the effect of light on superoxide fluxes as a function of Trichodesmium colony morphology, suggesting differences in either colony physiology or associated bacterial symbionts. These findings point to complex physiological, ecological, and physical influences on ROS dynamics in phytoplankton that require further exploration.

  17. Direct formate fuel cells: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Chen, R.

    2016-07-01

    Direct formate fuel cells (DFFC), which convert the chemical energy stored in formate directly into electricity, are recently attracting more attention, primarily because of the use of the carbon-neutral fuel and the low-cost electrocatalytic and membrane materials. As an emerging energy technology, the DFFC has made a rapid progress in recent years (currently, the state-of-the-art power density is 591 mW cm-2 at 60 °C). This article provides a review of past research on the development of this type of fuel cell, including the working principle, mechanisms and materials of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formate, singe-cell designs and performance, as well as innovative system designs. In addition, future perspectives with regard to the development of this fuel cell system are also highlighted.

  18. Overexpression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces pulmonary granulation tissue formation and fibrosis by induction of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and myofibroblast accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Z.; Tremblay, G. M.; Sime, P. J.; Gauldie, J.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that transfer to rat lung of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene leads to high expression of GM-CSF between days 1 and 4 and granulation tissue formation followed by an irreversible fibrotic response starting from day 12 onward. In the current study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms. We found that GM-CSF overexpression did not enhance production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in a significant manner at any time after GM-CSF gene transfer. However, the content of transforming growth factor-beta 1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was markedly induced at day 4 and appeared to be maximal around day 7 and remained high at day 12. Macrophages purified from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 7 days after GM-CSF gene transfer spontaneously released significant quantities of transforming growth factor-beta 1 protein in vitro. After peak transforming growth factor-beta 1 production was the emergence of alpha-smooth muscle actin-rich myofibroblasts. Accumulation of these cells was most prominent at day 12 within the granulation tissues and they were still present in fibrotic areas between days 12 and 24 and diminished markedly afterward. Thus, we provide the first in vivo evidence that tumor necrosis factor-alpha may be dissociated from participation in a fibrotic process in the lung and GM-CSF may play a more direct role in pulmonary fibrogenesis at least in part through its capability to induce transforming growth factor-beta 1 in macrophages and the subsequent emergence of myofibroblast phenotypes. This GM-CSF transgene lung model is useful for a stepwise dissection of both cellular and molecular events involved in pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9006322

  19. Colonial America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents resources for grades K-8, on the subject of Colonial America. Describes Web sites; CD-ROMs and software; videos; books; audios; magazines; and professional resources. Includes two articles, "Native Americans in the Colonies," and "The Golden Age of Pirates," which also highlight resources. Presents a Web activity focusing on daily life in…

  20. Formation and separation of root border cells.

    PubMed

    Driouich, Azeddine; Durand, Caroline; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté

    2007-01-01

    Plant roots release a large number of border cells into the rhizosphere, which are believed to play a key role in root development and health. The formation and loss of these cells from the root cap region is a developmentally regulated process that is also controlled by phytohormones and environmental factors. The separation of border cells involves the complete dissociation of individual cells from each other and from root tissue. This process requires the activity of cell wall-degrading enzymes that solubilize the cell wall connections between cells. We present and discuss the solubilization process with an emphasis on pectin-degrading enzymes as well as the recently discovered root border-like cells of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  1. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M.; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A.; Patmanidi, Alexandra L.; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell–induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable. PMID:25915587

  2. Dynamic scaling analysis of two-dimensional cell colony fronts in a gel medium: A biological system approaching a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Muzzio, N. E.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H. Pedro; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.

    2014-08-01

    The interfacial two-dimensional spreading dynamics of quasilinear Vero cell colony fronts in methylcellulose (MC)-containing culture medium, under a constant average front displacement velocity regime, was investigated. Under comparable experimental conditions, the average colony front displacement velocity becomes lower than that reported for a standard culture medium. Initially, the presence of MC in the medium hinders both the colony spreading, due to a gradual change in the average size and shape of cells and their distribution in the colony, and the cell motility in the gelled medium. Furthermore, at longer culture times enlarged cells appear at random in the border region of the colony. These cells behave as obstacles (pinning sites) for the displacement of smaller cells towards the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough fronts yields the set of exponents α =0.63±0.04,β =0.75±0.05, and z =0.84±0.05, which is close to that expected for a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model.

  3. Cooperatively Generated Stresslet Flows Supply Fresh Fluid to Multicellular Choanoflagellate Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Marcus; Dayel, Mark J.; Pepper, Rachel E.; Koehl, M. A. R.

    2013-05-01

    The flagellated protozoan Salpingoeca rosetta is one of the closest relatives of multicellular animals. Unicellular S. rosetta can be induced to form multicellular colonies, but colonies swim more slowly than individual cells so the advantages conferred by colony formation are uncertain. Here we use theoretical models to show that hydrodynamic cooperation between cells can increase the fluid supply to the colony, an important predictor of feeding rate. Our results suggest that hydrodynamic benefits may have been an important selective factor in the evolution of early multicellular animals.

  4. Colony Size of Phaeocystis Antarctica (Prymnesiophyceae) as Influenced by Zooplankton Grazers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haptophyte Phaeocystis antarctica is a dominant phytoplankton species in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, and exists as solitary cells and mucilaginous colonies that differ by several orders of magnitude in size. Recent studies with P. globosa suggested that colony formation and enl...

  5. Concise Review: When Colonies Are Not Clones: Evidence and Implications of Intracolony Heterogeneity in Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Rennerfeldt, Deena A; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of heterogeneity in putative mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) populations during in vitro expansion is not appreciated fully by the various communities who study, engineer, and use such stem cells. However, this functional diversity holds direct implications for basic research and therapeutic applications of MSCs that require predictable phenotypic function and efficacy. Despite numerous clinical trials pursuing MSC therapies, the in vitro expansion of homogeneous populations to therapeutically relevant quantities remains an elusive goal. Variation in MSC cultures has been noted not only among donors and within populations expanded from the same donor, but also debatably within single-cell-derived colonies. The potential for even intracolony heterogeneity suggests that any purified subpopulation will inevitably become heterogeneous upon further expansion under current culture conditions. Here, we review the noted or retrospective evidence of intracolony MSC heterogeneity, to facilitate discussion of its possible causes and potential solutions to its mitigation. This analysis suggests that functional diversity within an MSC colony must be considered in design of experiments and trials for even nonclonal stem cell populations, and can be mitigated or even exploited when the mechanisms of onset are better understood. Stem Cells 2016;34:1135-1141.

  6. Growing yeast into cylindrical colonies.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Clément; Di Meglio, Jean-Marc; Lindner, Ariel B; Daerr, Adrian; Murray, Andrew; Hersen, Pascal

    2014-05-20

    Microorganisms often form complex multicellular assemblies such as biofilms and colonies. Understanding the interplay between assembly expansion, metabolic yield, and nutrient diffusion within a freely growing colony remains a challenge. Most available data on microorganisms are from planktonic cultures, due to the lack of experimental tools to control the growth of multicellular assemblies. Here, we propose a method to constrain the growth of yeast colonies into simple geometric shapes such as cylinders. To this end, we designed a simple, versatile culture system to control the location of nutrient delivery below a growing colony. Under such culture conditions, yeast colonies grow vertically and only at the locations where nutrients are delivered. Colonies increase in height at a steady growth rate that is inversely proportional to the cylinder radius. We show that the vertical growth rate of cylindrical colonies is not defined by the single-cell division rate, but rather by the colony metabolic yield. This contrasts with cells in liquid culture, in which the single-cell division rate is the only parameter that defines the population growth rate. This method also provides a direct, simple method to estimate the metabolic yield of a colony. Our study further demonstrates the importance of the shape of colonies on setting their expansion. We anticipate that our approach will be a starting point for elaborate studies of the population dynamics, evolution, and ecology of microbial colonies in complex landscapes. PMID:24853750

  7. Information use in colonial living.

    PubMed

    Evans, Julian C; Votier, Stephen C; Dall, Sasha R X

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that many animals live in groups, there is still no clear consensus about the ecological or evolutionary mechanisms underlying colonial living. Recently, research has suggested that colonies may be important as sources of social information. The ready availability of information from conspecifics allows animals to make better decisions about avoiding predators, reducing brood parasitism, migratory phenology, mate choice, habitat choice and foraging. These choices can play a large part in the development and maintenance of colonies. Here we review the types of information provided by colonial animals and examine the different ways in which decision-making in colonies can be enhanced by social information. We discuss what roles information might take in the evolution, formation and maintenance of colonies. In the process, we illustrate that information use permeates all aspects of colonial living.

  8. Influence of receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL), macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and fetal calf serum on human osteoclast formation and activity.

    PubMed

    Kreja, Ludwika; Liedert, Astrid; Schmidt, Carla; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2007-10-01

    Human osteoclast (OC) formation and activity was studied in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) from six healthy donors after stimulation with fetal calf serum (FCS), under the influence of the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and the macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). The results showed that selected FCS could stimulate OC formation without any medium supplementation with osteoclastogenic factors. The OC formation, investigated by quantification of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells (TRAP+ cells), and the sensitivity of OC progenitors to RANKL and M-CSF, varied widely between individual donors. The OC resorption activity, measured in the "pit-assay" on dentine, was strictly dependent on the presence of RANKL and M-CSF in the medium and was also donor dependent. The considerable donor variability should be considered in culture studies investigating, e.g. the interactions of OC with biomaterials or the influence of cytokines, growth factors and drugs on osteoclastogenesis. PMID:18161075

  9. Diatom cell size, coloniality and motility: trade-offs between temperature, salinity and nutrient supply with climate change.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Filip; Norberg, Jon; Snoeijs, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    Reduction in body size has been proposed as a universal response of organisms, both to warming and to decreased salinity. However, it is still controversial if size reduction is caused by temperature or salinity on their own, or if other factors interfere as well. We used natural benthic diatom communities to explore how "body size" (cells and colonies) and motility change along temperature (2-26°C) and salinity (0.5-7.8) gradients in the brackish Baltic Sea. Fourth-corner analysis confirmed that small cell and colony sizes were associated with high temperature in summer. Average community cell volume decreased linearly with 2.2% per °C. However, cells were larger with artificial warming when nutrient concentrations were high in the cold season. Average community cell volume increased by 5.2% per °C of artificial warming from 0 to 8.5°C and simultaneously there was a selection for motility, which probably helped to optimize growth rates by trade-offs between nutrient supply and irradiation. Along the Baltic Sea salinity gradient cell size decreased with decreasing salinity, apparently mediated by nutrient stoichiometry. Altogether, our results suggest that climate change in this century may polarize seasonality by creating two new niches, with elevated temperature at high nutrient concentrations in the cold season (increasing cell size) and elevated temperature at low nutrient concentrations in the warm season (decreasing cell size). Higher temperature in summer and lower salinity by increased land-runoff are expected to decrease the average cell size of primary producers, which is likely to affect the transfer of energy to higher trophic levels.

  10. Diatom Cell Size, Coloniality and Motility: Trade-Offs between Temperature, Salinity and Nutrient Supply with Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Filip; Norberg, Jon; Snoeijs, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    Reduction in body size has been proposed as a universal response of organisms, both to warming and to decreased salinity. However, it is still controversial if size reduction is caused by temperature or salinity on their own, or if other factors interfere as well. We used natural benthic diatom communities to explore how “body size” (cells and colonies) and motility change along temperature (2–26°C) and salinity (0.5–7.8) gradients in the brackish Baltic Sea. Fourth-corner analysis confirmed that small cell and colony sizes were associated with high temperature in summer. Average community cell volume decreased linearly with 2.2% per °C. However, cells were larger with artificial warming when nutrient concentrations were high in the cold season. Average community cell volume increased by 5.2% per °C of artificial warming from 0 to 8.5°C and simultaneously there was a selection for motility, which probably helped to optimize growth rates by trade-offs between nutrient supply and irradiation. Along the Baltic Sea salinity gradient cell size decreased with decreasing salinity, apparently mediated by nutrient stoichiometry. Altogether, our results suggest that climate change in this century may polarize seasonality by creating two new niches, with elevated temperature at high nutrient concentrations in the cold season (increasing cell size) and elevated temperature at low nutrient concentrations in the warm season (decreasing cell size). Higher temperature in summer and lower salinity by increased land-runoff are expected to decrease the average cell size of primary producers, which is likely to affect the transfer of energy to higher trophic levels. PMID:25279720

  11. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  12. Interleukin-10 inhibits burst-forming unit-erythroid growth by suppression of endogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production from T cells.

    PubMed

    Oehler, L; Kollars, M; Bohle, B; Berer, A; Reiter, E; Lechner, K; Geissler, K

    1999-02-01

    Numerous cytokines released from accessory cells have been shown to exert either stimulatory or inhibitory growth signals on burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) growth. Because of its cytokine synthesis-inhibiting effects on T cells and monocytes, interleukin-10 (IL-10) may be a potential candidate for indirectly affecting erythropoiesis. We investigated the effects of IL-10 on BFU-E growth from normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using a clonogenic progenitor cell assay. The addition of recombinant human IL-10 to cultures containing recombinant human erythropoietin suppressed BFU-E growth in a dose-dependent manner (by 55.2%, range 47.3-63.3%, p < 0.01, at 10 ng/mL). In contrast, no inhibitory effect of IL-10 was seen when cultivating highly enriched CD34+ cells. BFU-E growth from PBMC also was markedly suppressed in the presence of a neutralizing anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibody (by 48.7%, range 32.9-61.2% inhibition,p < 0.01), but not by neutralizing antibodies against granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-3. This suggests a stimulatory role of endogenously released GM-CSF on BFU-E formation. Also, the addition of exogenous GM-CSF completely restored IL-10-induced suppression of BFU-E growth. To determine the cellular source of GM-CSF production, we analyzed GM-CSF levels in suspension cultures containing PBMC that were either depleted of monocytes or T cells. Monocyte-depleted PBMC showed spontaneous production of increasing amounts of GM-CSF on days 3, 5, and 7, respectively, which could be suppressed by IL-10, whereas GM-CSF levels did not increase in cultures containing T-cell-depleted PBMC. Our data indicate that IL-10 inhibits the growth of erythroid progenitor cells in vitro, most likely by suppression of endogenous GM-CSF production from T cells.

  13. OpenCFU, a new free and open-source software to count cell colonies and other circular objects.

    PubMed

    Geissmann, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    Counting circular objects such as cell colonies is an important source of information for biologists. Although this task is often time-consuming and subjective, it is still predominantly performed manually. The aim of the present work is to provide a new tool to enumerate circular objects from digital pictures and video streams. Here, I demonstrate that the created program, OpenCFU, is very robust, accurate and fast. In addition, it provides control over the processing parameters and is implemented in an intuitive and modern interface. OpenCFU is a cross-platform and open-source software freely available at http://opencfu.sourceforge.net.

  14. Brief report: serpin Spi2A as a novel modulator of hematopoietic progenitor cell formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Byrne, Susan M; Rainville, Nicole; Su, Su; Jachimowicz, Edward; Aucher, Anne; Davis, Daniel M; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G; Wojchowski, Don M

    2014-09-01

    Prime regulation over hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) production is exerted by hematopoietins (HPs) and their Janus kinase-coupled receptors (HP-Rs). For HP/HP-R studies, one central challenge in determining specific effects involves the delineation of nonredundant signal transduction factors and their lineage restricted actions. Via loss-of-function studies, we define roles for an HP-regulated Serpina3g/Spi2A intracellular serpin during granulomyelocytic, B-cell, and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) formation. In granulomyelocytic progenitors, granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) strongly induced Serpina3g expression with Stat5 dependency. Spi2A-knockout (KO) led to 20-fold decreased CFU-GM formation, limited GMCSF-dependent granulocyte formation, and compromised neutrophil survival upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) exposure. In B-cell progenitors, Serpina3g was an interleukin-7 (IL7) target. Spi2A-KO elevated CFU-preB greater than sixfold and altered B-cell formation in competitive bone marrow transplant (BMT), and CpG challenge experiments. In HSCs, Serpina3g/Spi2A expression was also elevated. Spi2A-KO compromised LT-HSC proliferation (as well as lineage(neg) Sca1(pos) Kit(pos) (LSK) cell lysosomal integrity), and skewed LSK recovery post 5-FU. Spi2A therefore functions to modulate HP-regulated immune cell and HSC formation post-5-FU challenge.

  15. Kinetics of human hemopoietic cells after in vivo administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Aglietta, M; Piacibello, W; Sanavio, F; Stacchini, A; Aprá, F; Schena, M; Mossetti, C; Carnino, F; Caligaris-Cappio, F; Gavosto, F

    1989-01-01

    The kinetic changes induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on hemopoietic cells were assessed in physiological conditions by administering GM-CSF (8 micrograms/kg per d) for 3 d to nine patients with solid tumors and normal bone marrow (BM), before chemotherapy. GM-CSF increased the number of circulating granulocytes and monocytes; platelets, erythrocytes, lymphocyte number, and subsets were unmodified. GM-CSF increased the percentage of BM S phase BFU-E (from 32 +/- 7 to 79 +/- 16%), day 14 colony-forming unit granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) (from 43 +/- 20 to 82 +/- 11%) and day 7 CFU-GM (from 41 +/- 14 to 56 +/- 20%). The percentage of BM myeloblasts, promyelocytes, and myelocytes in S phase increased from 26 +/- 14 to 41 +/- 6%, and that of erythroblasts increased from 25 +/- 12 to 30 +/- 12%. This suggests that GM-CSF activates both erythroid and granulomonopoietic progenitors but that, among the morphologically recognizable BM precursors, only the granulomonopoietic lineage is a direct target of the molecule. GM-CSF increased the birth rate of cycling cells from 1.3 to 3.4 cells %/h and decreased the duration of the S phase from 14.3 to 9.1 h and the cell cycle time from 86 to 26 h. After treatment discontinuation, the number of circulating granulocytes and monocytes rapidly fell. The proportion of S phase BM cells dropped to values lower than pretreatment levels, suggesting a period of relative refractoriness to cell cycle-active antineoplastic agents. PMID:2643633

  16. Akt2 knock-down reveals its contribution to human lung cancer cell proliferation, growth, motility, invasion and endothelial cell tube formation.

    PubMed

    Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; Hammadi, Nasseredine Kamel; Mester, Jan; Gaben, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    The Akt/PKB serine/threonine protein kinase consists of three isoforms: Akt-1, -2 and -3. Their overexpression has been detected in human cancers, but their roles in cancer progression are unclear. We investigated the impact of specific silencing of Akt1 and Akt2 on human lung cancer cell proliferation, colony growth, motility, and invasion in vitro as well as tumor growth in vivo using human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer cells LNM35, and on the vascular tube formation using HUVEC cells. Although silencing of Akt1 decreased cellular invasion at least in part via COX-2 inhibition, it had almost no effect on cell motility, proliferation, colony formation, and angiogenesis. Transient as well as stable silencing of Akt2 resulted in a strong inhibition of Rb phosphorylation associated with a decrease in cellular proliferation and colony formation, leading to the inhibition of tumor growth in the xenograft model. Silencing of Akt2 also reduced cellular motility and invasion in vitro, presumably via COX-2 inhibition. Moreover, silencing of Akt2 in the HUVEC cells resulted in the inhibition of their spontaneous angiogenic phenotype. Altogether, these results indicate that Akt2 plays an important role in lung cancer progression and can be a promising target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:26234648

  17. Akt2 knock-down reveals its contribution to human lung cancer cell proliferation, growth, motility, invasion and endothelial cell tube formation

    PubMed Central

    Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; Kamel Hammadi, Nasseredine; Mester, Jan; Gaben, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    The Akt/PKB serine/threonine protein kinase consists of three isoforms: Akt-1, −2 and −3. Their overexpression has been detected in human cancers, but their roles in cancer progression are unclear. We investigated the impact of specific silencing of Akt1 and Akt2 on human lung cancer cell proliferation, colony growth, motility, and invasion in vitro as well as tumor growth in vivo using human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer cells LNM35, and on the vascular tube formation using HUVEC cells. Although silencing of Akt1 decreased cellular invasion at least in part via COX-2 inhibition, it had almost no effect on cell motility, proliferation, colony formation, and angiogenesis. Transient as well as stable silencing of Akt2 resulted in a strong inhibition of Rb phosphorylation associated with a decrease in cellular proliferation and colony formation, leading to the inhibition of tumor growth in the xenograft model. Silencing of Akt2 also reduced cellular motility and invasion in vitro, presumably via COX-2 inhibition. Moreover, silencing of Akt2 in the HUVEC cells resulted in the inhibition of their spontaneous angiogenic phenotype. Altogether, these results indicate that Akt2 plays an important role in lung cancer progression and can be a promising target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:26234648

  18. The role of stem cell factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in brain repair during chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Piao, Chun-Shu; Gonzalez-Toledo, Maria E; Xue, Yue-Qiang; Duan, Wei-Ming; Terao, Satoshi; Granger, D Neil; Kelley, Roger E; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2009-04-01

    Chronic stroke is a highly important but under-investigated scientific problem in neurologic research. We have reported earlier that stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment during chronic stroke improves functional outcomes. Here we have determined the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells in angiogenesis and neurogenesis, which are enhanced by SCF+G-CSF treatment during chronic stroke. Using bone marrow tracking, flow cytometry, 2-photon live brain imaging, and immunohistochemistry, we observed that the levels of circulating bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) (CD34+/c-kit+) were significantly increased by SCF+G-CSF treatment. In addition, live brain imaging revealed that numerous bone marrow-derived cells migrate into the brain parenchyma in the treated mice. We also found that bone marrow-derived cells, bone marrow-derived endothelial cells, vascular density, and bone marrow-derived neurons were significantly augmented by SCF+G-CSF. It is interesting that, in addition to the increase in bone marrow-derived endothelial cells, the number of bone marrow-derived pericytes was reduced after SCF+G-CSF treatment during chronic stroke. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF treatment can enhance repair of brain damage during chronic stroke by mobilizing BMSCs, and promoting the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to angiogenesis and neurogenesis. PMID:19209180

  19. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  20. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  1. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  2. Downregulation of ROS-FIG inhibits cell proliferation, colony‑formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gang; Hu, Chenghuan; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Feizhou; Huang, Wei; Xu, Hongbo; Nie, Wanpin

    2014-09-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is the second most common primary liver cancer with poor responsiveness to existing drug therapies. Therefore, novel treatment strategies against ICC are required to improve survival. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of fused-in-glioblastoma-c-ros-oncogene1 (FIG-ROS) fusion gene in ICC. ROS was positively expressed in ICC tissues and HUCCT1 cells. Plasmids expressing ROS- and FIG-specific shRNAs were constructed and transfected into HUCCT1 cells. The results showed that single transfection of ROS- or FIG-specific shRNA inhibited HUCCT1 cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis. Moreover, the co-inhibition of ROS- and FIG-specific shRNA exhibited stronger effects on HUCCT1 cell proliferation, apoptosis, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, when compared to single inhibition of ROS and FIG. Furthermore, findings of this study suggested that the AKT signaling pathway was involved in the ROS-FIG-mediated biological processes of HUCCT1 cells. In summary, the results suggest that FIG-ROS plays an oncogenic role in ICC. Additionally, ROS1-6290 and FIG-363 segments may become effective therapeutic targets for ICC harboring ROS-FIG fusion protein.

  3. Organochlorine formation in magnesium electrowinning cells.

    PubMed

    Deutscher, R L; Cathro, K J

    2001-04-01

    The formation of organochlorines during the electrolytic production of magnesium was investigated using a laboratory-scale electrolytic cell having a graphite anode, a liquid aluminium alloy cathode, and a molten chloride electrolyte. The cell was operated at current densities ranging from 3000 to 10,000 A m(-2) and at temperatures ranging from 660 degrees C to 750 degrees C. Organochlorines were adsorbed from the cell off-gases onto silica gel, extracted with hexane, and determined by gas chromatography. All compounds identified were fully chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, the major components being hexachlorobutadiene, hexachlorobenzene, hexachloroethylene, and octachlorostyrene. The total amount of organochlorines per tonne of magnesium produced decreased with electrolysis time and with current density and increased with operating temperature; it was also dependent on the type of graphite employed. The output of organochlorines varied from 5 to 20 g t(-1) of magnesium. PMID:11297394

  4. Collagen-IV supported embryoid bodies formation and differentiation from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Taru Sharma, G.; Dubey, Pawan K.; Verma, Om Prakash; Pratheesh, M.D.; Nath, Amar; Sai Kumar, G.

    2012-08-03

    Graphical abstract: EBs formation, characterization and expression of germinal layers marker genes of in vivo developed teratoma using four different types of extracellular matrices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV matrix is found cytocompatible for EBs formation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Established 3D microenvironment for ES cells development and differentiation into three germ layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV may be useful as promising candidate for ES cells based therapeutic applications. -- Abstract: Embryoid bodies (EBs) are used as in vitro model to study early extraembryonic tissue formation and differentiation. In this study, a novel method using three dimensional extracellular matrices for in vitro generation of EBs from buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells and its differentiation potential by teratoma formation was successfully established. In vitro derived inner cell masses (ICMs) of hatched buffalo blastocyst were cultured on buffalo fetal fibroblast feeder layer for primary cell colony formation. For generation of EBs, pluripotent ES cells were seeded onto four different types of extracellular matrices viz; collagen-IV, laminin, fibronectin and matrigel using undifferentiating ES cell culture medium. After 5 days of culture, ESCs gradually grew into aggregates and formed simple EBs having circular structures. Twenty-six days later, they formed cystic EBs over collagen matrix with higher EBs formation and greater proliferation rate as compared to other extracellular matrices. Studies involving histological observations, fluorescence microscopy and RT-PCR analysis of the in vivo developed teratoma revealed that presence of all the three germ layer derivatives viz. ectoderm (NCAM), mesoderm (Flk-1) and endoderm (AFP). In conclusion, the method described here demonstrates a simple and cost-effective way of generating EBs from buffalo ES cells. Collagen-IV matrix was found cytocompatible as it

  5. Intravenous Administration of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Overexpressing Integrin β1 Augments Angiogenesis in Ischemic Legs.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuko; Takemura, Genzou; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Okada, Hideshi; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Kawamura, Itta; Watanabe, Takatomo; Morishita, Kentaro; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Miyazaki, Nagisa; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Masanori; Mikami, Atsushi; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2016-02-01

    When injected directly into ischemic tissue in patients with peripheral artery disease, the reparative capacity of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) appears to be limited by their poor survival. We, therefore, attempted to improve the survival of transplanted EPCs through intravenous injection and gene modification. We anticipated that overexpression of integrin β1 will enable injected EPCs to home to ischemic tissue, which abundantly express extracellular matrix proteins, the ligands for integrins. In addition, integrin β1 has an independent angiogenesis-stimulating function. Human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs; late-outgrowth EPCs) were transduced using a lentiviral vector encoding integrin β1 (ITGB1) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). We then locally or systemically injected phosphate-buffered saline or the genetically modified ECFCs (GFP-ECFCs or ITGB1-ECFCs; 1 × 10(5) cells each) into NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull mice whose right femoral arteries had been occluded 24 hours earlier. Upregulation of extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, was apparent in the ischemic legs. Four weeks later, blood perfusion of the ischemic limb was significantly augmented only in the ITGB1-ECFC group. Scanning electron microscopy of vascular casts revealed increases in the perfused blood vessels in the ischemic legs of mice in the ITGB1-ECFC group and significant increases in the density of both capillaries and arterioles. Transplanted ECFC-derived vessels accounted for 28% ± 4.2% of the vessels in the ITGB1-ECFC group, with no cell fusion. Intravenous administration of ECFCs engineered to home to ischemic tissue appears to efficiently mediate therapeutic angiogenesis in a mouse model of peripheral artery disease. Significance: The intravenous administration of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) genetically modified to overexpress integrin β1 effectively stimulated angiogenesis in ischemic mouse hindlimbs. Transplanted ECFCs were

  6. Intravenous Administration of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Overexpressing Integrin β1 Augments Angiogenesis in Ischemic Legs.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuko; Takemura, Genzou; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Okada, Hideshi; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Kawamura, Itta; Watanabe, Takatomo; Morishita, Kentaro; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Miyazaki, Nagisa; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Masanori; Mikami, Atsushi; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2016-02-01

    When injected directly into ischemic tissue in patients with peripheral artery disease, the reparative capacity of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) appears to be limited by their poor survival. We, therefore, attempted to improve the survival of transplanted EPCs through intravenous injection and gene modification. We anticipated that overexpression of integrin β1 will enable injected EPCs to home to ischemic tissue, which abundantly express extracellular matrix proteins, the ligands for integrins. In addition, integrin β1 has an independent angiogenesis-stimulating function. Human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs; late-outgrowth EPCs) were transduced using a lentiviral vector encoding integrin β1 (ITGB1) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). We then locally or systemically injected phosphate-buffered saline or the genetically modified ECFCs (GFP-ECFCs or ITGB1-ECFCs; 1 × 10(5) cells each) into NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull mice whose right femoral arteries had been occluded 24 hours earlier. Upregulation of extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, was apparent in the ischemic legs. Four weeks later, blood perfusion of the ischemic limb was significantly augmented only in the ITGB1-ECFC group. Scanning electron microscopy of vascular casts revealed increases in the perfused blood vessels in the ischemic legs of mice in the ITGB1-ECFC group and significant increases in the density of both capillaries and arterioles. Transplanted ECFC-derived vessels accounted for 28% ± 4.2% of the vessels in the ITGB1-ECFC group, with no cell fusion. Intravenous administration of ECFCs engineered to home to ischemic tissue appears to efficiently mediate therapeutic angiogenesis in a mouse model of peripheral artery disease. Significance: The intravenous administration of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) genetically modified to overexpress integrin β1 effectively stimulated angiogenesis in ischemic mouse hindlimbs. Transplanted ECFCs were

  7. Enhanced expression of DNA topoisomerase II by recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Towatari, M; Ito, Y; Morishita, Y; Tanimoto, M; Kawashima, K; Morishima, Y; Andoh, T; Saito, H

    1990-11-15

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on DNA topoisomerase II (topo II) expression was studied in two human acute myelogenous leukemia cell lines, NKM-1 and NOMO-1, which express G-CSF receptor and proliferate in response to exogenous G-CSF. Northern blot analysis revealed that the level of topo II mRNA in 16-h stimulated cells in serum-free medium with G-CSF (10 ng/ml) was approximately 2-fold higher than that in cells without G-CSF. Enhanced topo II mRNA expression was detectable within 3 h after the addition of G-CSF. Topo II activity in crude nuclear extracts from 16-h G-CSF-stimulated cells was also found to be approximately 2-fold greater than that from unstimulated cells. According to in vitro cytotoxic assay, the sensitivity of G-CSF-stimulated cells to intercalating (daunorubicin) and nonintercalating (etoposide) topo II-targeting drugs increased significantly, whereas no enhancement of sensitivity was observed with an alkylating agent (4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide). The augmented drug sensitivity observed was not due to the increased level of drug transport, as suggested by the similar extent of [3H]etoposide uptake between G-CSF-stimulated and unstimulated cells. By measuring the topo II mRNA and the cytotoxicity of the above mentioned drugs, we obtained essentially the same results in G-CSF-responsive leukemia cells isolated from three acute myeloblastic leukemia patients, as observed in the cultured cell lines. These findings strongly suggest that the sensitivity to "topo II-targeting drugs" could be augmented by exogenous G-CSF through elevated topo II activity in G-CSF-responsive leukemia cells. PMID:1699657

  8. Recombinant hybrid protein, Shiga toxin and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor effectively induce apoptosis of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi; Bouzari, Saeid; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Roushandeh, Amaneh Mohammadi; Oloomi, Mana; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the selective cytotoxic effect of constructed hybrid protein on cells expressing granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor. METHODS: HepG2 (human hepatoma) and LS174T (colon carcinoma) were used in this study. The fused gene was induced with 0.02 % of arabinose for 4 h and the expressed protein was detected by Western blotting. The chimeric protein expressed in E.coli was checked for its cytotoxic activity on these cells and apoptosis was measured by comet assay and nuclear staining. RESULTS: The chimeric protein was found to be cytotoxic to the colon cancer cell line expressing GM-CSFRs, but not to HepG2 lacking these receptors. Maximum activity was observed at the concentration of 40 ng/mL after 24 h incubation. The IC50 was 20  ±  3.5 ng/mL. CONCLUSION: Selective cytotoxic effect of the hybrid protein on the colon cancer cell line expressing GM-CSF receptors (GM-CSFRs) receptor and apoptosis can be observed in this cell line. The hybrid protein can be considered as a therapeutic agent. PMID:16688822

  9. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice.

    PubMed

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C A; Woll, Petter S; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Sitnicka, Ewa

    2016-07-14

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19(+) B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R(+)CD19(+) ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported.

  10. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C. A.; Woll, Petter S.; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19+ B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R+CD19+ ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R+ myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R+ myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported. PMID:27207794

  11. Biologic Activity of Autologous, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Secreting Alveolar Soft Parts Sarcoma and Clear Cell Sarcoma Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, John; Fisher, David E.; Demetri, George D.; Neuberg, Donna; Allsop, Stephen A.; Fonseca, Catia; Nakazaki, Yukoh; Nemer, David; Raut, Chandrajit P.; George, Suzanne; Morgan, Jeffrey A.; Wagner, Andrew J.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ritz, Jerome; Lezcano, Cecilia; Mihm, Martin; Canning, Christine; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Alveolar soft parts sarcoma (ASPS) and clear cell sarcoma (CCS) are rare mesenchymal malignancies driven by chromosomal translocations that activate members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) family. However, in contrast to malignant melanoma, little is known about their immunogenicity. To learn more about the host response to ASPS and CCS, we conducted a phase I clinical trial of vaccination with irradiated, autologous sarcoma cells engineered by adenoviral mediated gene transfer to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Experimental Design Metastatic tumors from ASPS and CCS patients were resected, processed to single cell suspensions, transduced with a replication defective adenoviral vector encoding GM-CSF, and irradiated. Immunizations were administered subcutaneously and intradermally weekly times three and then every other week. Results Vaccines were successfully manufactured for 11 of the 12 enrolled patients. Eleven subjects received from 3 to 13 immunizations. Toxicities were restricted to grade 1–2 skin reactions at inoculation sites. Vaccination elicited local dendritic cell infiltrates and stimulated T cell mediated delayed type-hypersensitivity reactions to irradiated, autologous tumor cells. Antibody responses to tissue-type plasminogen activator (tTPA) and angiopoietins-1/2 were detected. Tumor biopsies showed programmed death-1 (PD-1) positive CD8+ T cells in association with PD ligand-1 (PD-L1) expressing sarcoma cells. No tumor regressions were observed. Conclusions Vaccination with irradiated, GM-CSF secreting autologous sarcoma cell vaccines is feasible, safe, and biologically active. Concurrent targeting of angiogenic cytokines and antagonism of the PD-1 negative regulatory pathway might intensify immune-mediated tumor destruction. PMID:25805798

  12. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor impairs CD8(+) T cell functionality by interfering with central activation elements.

    PubMed

    Bunse, C E; Tischer, S; Lahrberg, J; Oelke, M; Figueiredo, C; Blasczyk, R; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2016-07-01

    Besides mobilizing stem cells into the periphery, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to influence various types of innate and adaptive immune cells. For example, it impairs the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). It is assumed that this effect is mediated indirectly by monocytes, regulatory T cells and immunomodulatory cytokines influenced by G-CSF. In this study, isolated G-CSF-treated CD8(+) T cells were stimulated antigen-dependently with peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC)-coupled artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) or stimulated antigen-independently with anti-CD3/CD28 stimulator beads. By measuring the changes in interferon (IFN)-γ and granzyme B expression at the mRNA and protein level, we showed for the first time that G-CSF has a direct effect on CD8(+) CTLs, which was confirmed based on the reduced production of IFN-γ and granzyme B by the cytotoxic T cell line TALL-104 after G-CSF treatment. By investigating further elements affected by G-CSF in CTLs from stem cell donors and untreated controls, we found a decreased phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) and CD3ζ after G-CSF treatment. Additionally, miRNA-155 and activation marker expression levels were reduced. In summary, our results show that G-CSF directly influences the effector function of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and affects various elements of T cell activation. PMID:26990855

  13. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice.

    PubMed

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C A; Woll, Petter S; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Sitnicka, Ewa

    2016-07-14

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19(+) B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R(+)CD19(+) ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported. PMID:27207794

  14. Coupled Positive and Negative Feedbacks Produce Diverse Gene Expression Patterns in Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Mitarai, Namiko; Jensen, Mogens Høgh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of multicellular organism as well as of microbial communities. To investigate the formation of gene expression patterns in colonies, we build a mathematical model of two-dimensional colony growth, where cells carry a coupled positive-and-negative-feedback circuit. We demonstrate that the model can produce sectored, target (concentric), uniform, and scattered expression patterns of regulators, depending on gene expression dynamics and nutrient diffusion. We reconstructed the same regulatory structure in Escherichia coli cells and found gene expression patterns on the surface of colonies similar to the ones produced by the computer simulations. By comparing computer simulations and experimental results, we observed that very simple rules of gene expression can yield a spectrum of well-defined patterns in a growing colony. Our results suggest that variations of the protein content among cells lead to a high level of heterogeneity in colonies. Importance Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of microbial communities. In this work, we show that a simple genetic circuit composed of a positive-feedback loop and a negative-feedback loop can produce diverse expression patterns in colonies. We obtained similar sets of gene expression patterns in the simulations and in the experiments. Because the combination of positive feedback and negative feedback is common in intracellular molecular networks, our results suggest that the protein content of cells is highly diversified in colonies. PMID:25852158

  15. Colony Polymerase Chain Reaction with Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-01-01

    When screening a large number of individual Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a rapid "colony PCR" approach may be used. Numerous colony PCR protocols are available, and fundamental to them all is that the colony must be fresh (grown overnight) and that as few cells as possible are used. In this protocol, we present three reliable methods for preparing S. pombe cells for colony PCR.

  16. Giant Cell Arteritis which Developed after the Administration of Granulocyte-colony Stimulating Factor for Cyclic Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Ikenaga, Jin; Koga, Tomohiro; Michitsuji, Toru; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Fukui, Shoichi; Nishino, Ayako; Nakasima, Yoshikazu; Kawashiri, Sin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Hirai, Yasuko; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman diagnosed with cyclic neutropenia 5 years previously had been treated with recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). She developed fever, tenderness and distension of temporal arteries after the treatment with G-CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography revealed wall thickening of the temporal arteries. She was therefore diagnosed with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Small vessel vasculitis has been reported as a complication of G-CSF. However, the development of large vessel vasculitis after G-CSF treatment is quite rare. To our knowledge, the present case is the first report of GCA suspected to be associated with coexisting cyclic neutropenia and G-CSF treatment. PMID:27523011

  17. Weekly CODE chemotherapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for relapsed or refractory small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Tsuchiya, S; Minato, K; Sunaga, N; Ishihara, S I; Makimoto, T; Naruse, I; Hoshino, H; Watanabe, S; Saitoh, R; Mori, M

    2000-01-01

    We used cisplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide (CODE) plus recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) weekly for salvage chemotherapy in relapsed or refractory small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We reviewed the medical charts of patients between January 1993 and December 1996 at the National Nishi-Gunma Hospital. Twenty patients were treated with salvage chemotherapy. The overall response rate was 55.0%. The median survival time of extensive disease patients from the start of CODE therapy was 23 weeks and the 1-year survival rate was 21.0%. Toxicities were severe, especially in myelosuppression. CODE could be selected as a salvage therapy for chemotherapy- relapsed SCLC cases.

  18. Effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on pluripotent marker expression and colony forming unit capacity of stem cells isolated from human exfoliated deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Sukarawan, Waleerat; Nowwarote, Nunthawan; Kerdpon, Piyarat; Pavasant, Prasit; Osathanon, Thanaphum

    2014-07-01

    Human dental pulp of exfoliated deciduous teeth contains the population of cells that exhibited mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characters. Though, a cell amplification process is indeed required to secure an adequate cell number for such a potential employment. Several publications suggested the alteration of MSCs upon in vitro culture, for example, the decrease in proliferation and the loss of stem cell characters. Here, we investigated an influence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on stem cells isolated from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) with respect to cell proliferation, colony forming unit efficiency and stem cell marker expression in both short- and long-term cultures. For short-term bFGF treatment, SHEDs were treated with bFGF for 48 h. While, in long-term bFGF supplementation, SHEDs were maintained in culture and continuous passage upon confluence in medium supplemented with bFGF. Cells at passage (P) 5 and 10 were employed for characterization. Our results showed that short-term bFGF treatment enhanced OCT4, REX1, and NANOG mRNA expression as well as colony forming unit ability. The FGFR inhibitor pretreatment was able to attenuate the influence of bFGF on pluripotent stem cell marker expression, confirming bFGF function. In addition, cells cultured in high passage number had decreased in cell proliferation, colony forming unit capacity, and pluripotent stem cell maker mRNA expression. However, bFGF supplementation in culture medium enhanced both pluripotent stem cell marker expression and colony forming unit capacity in later passage, though the effect was not robust. Together, these results indicate that high passage number may attenuate pluripotent properties of SHEDs and bFGF supplementation could be the beneficial approach to maintain SHEDs' stemness properties.

  19. Up-regulation of transferrin receptor gene expression by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Y; Kataoka, T; Towatari, M; Ito, T; Inoue, H; Ogura, M; Morishima, Y; Saito, H

    1990-12-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced surface transferrin receptor (TfR) expression in two human myeloid leukemia cell lines, NKM-1 and NOMO-1, which possess G-CSF receptors. Radioligand-binding assay revealed that 10 ng/ml G-CSF significantly increased TfR to 186 +/- 20 and 276 +/- 38% of control for NKM-1 cells and NOMO-1 cells, respectively, in a 24-h culture. Scatchard analysis showed the increase of transferrin (Tf)-binding sites but no change in the receptor affinity. The enhanced TfR expression was not mediated either by the kinetic change of receptor cycling or by cellular iron content. Immunoprecipitation with anti-TfR antibody was used, and the increased biosynthesis of the receptor was demonstrated in G-CSF-stimulated cells. Northern blot analysis showed a 2- to 3-fold increase of TfR mRNA of NKM-1 cells cultured in medium containing Tf and G-CSF, whereas the mRNA declined without G-CSF. The effect of G-CSF on the TfR mRNA was observed within 2 h, which preceded the increase of surface TfR and the transition to the S phase of the cell cycle. G-CSF also potentiated TfR expression in freshly obtained myeloid leukemia cells. The present study shows up-regulation of TfR expression by G-CSF in myeloid leukemia cells and provides evidence that the regulation is mediated by controlling the steady-state level of the mRNA. PMID:1701357

  20. Vaccination with Irradiated Autologous Melanoma Cells Engineered to Secrete Human Granulocyte--Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Generates Potent Antitumor Immunity in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soiffer, Robert; Lynch, Thomas; Mihm, Martin; Jung, Ken; Rhuda, Catherine; Schmollinger, Jan C.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Liebster, Laura; Lam, Prudence; Mentzer, Steven; Singer, Samuel; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Duda, Rosemary; Sober, Arthur; Bhan, Atul; Daley, John; Neuberg, Donna; Parry, Gordon; Rokovich, Joseph; Richards, Laurie; Drayer, Jan; Berns, Anton; Clift, Shirley; Cohen, Lawrence K.; Mulligan, Richard C.; Dranoff, Glenn

    1998-10-01

    We conducted a Phase I clinical trial investigating the biologic activity of vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete human granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic melanoma. Immunization sites were intensely infiltrated with T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages, and eosinophils in all 21 evaluable patients. Although metastatic lesions resected before vaccination were minimally infiltrated with cells of the immune system in all patients, metastatic lesions resected after vaccination were densely infiltrated with T lymphocytes and plasma cells and showed extensive tumor destruction (at least 80%), fibrosis, and edema in 11 of 16 patients examined. Antimelanoma cytotoxic T cell and antibody responses were associated with tumor destruction. These results demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent antitumor immunity in humans with metastatic melanoma.

  1. vasa-related genes and their expression in stem cells of colonial parasitic rhizocephalan barnacle Polyascus polygenea (Arthropoda: Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala).

    PubMed

    Shukalyuk, Andrey I; Golovnina, Kseniya A; Baiborodin, Sergei I; Gunbin, Konstantin V; Blinov, Alexander G; Isaeva, Valeria V

    2007-02-01

    vasa (vas)-related genes are members of the DEAD-box protein family and are expressed in the germ cells of many Metazoa. We cloned vasa-related genes (PpVLG, CpVLG) and other DEAD-box family related genes (PpDRH1, PpDRH2, CpDRH, AtDRHr) from the colonial parasitic rhizocephalan barnacle Polyascus polygenea, the non-colonial Clistosaccus paguri (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala), and the parasitic isopodan Athelgis takanoshimensis (Crustacea: Isopoda). The colonial Polyascus polygenea, a parasite of the coastal crabs Hemigrapsus sanguineus and Hemigrapsus longitarsis was used as a model object for further detailed investigations. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that PpVLG and CpVLG are closely related to vasa-like genes of other Arthropoda. The rest of the studied genes form their own separate branch on the phylogenetic tree and have a common ancestry with the p68 and PL10 subfamilies. We suppose this group may be a new subfamily of the DEAD-box RNA helicases that is specific for parasitic Crustacea. We found PpVLG and PpDRH1 expression products in stem cells from stolons and buds of internae, during asexual reproduction of colonial P. polygenea, and in germ cells from sexually reproducing externae, including male spermatogenic cells and female oogenic cells.

  2. An optimized colony forming assay for low-dose-radiation cell survival measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu J.; Sutherland B.; Hu W.; Ding N.; Ye C.; Usikalu M.; Li S.; Hu B.; Zhou G.

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a simple and reliable method to quantify the cell survival of low-dose irradiations. Two crucial factors were considered, the same number of cells plated in each flask and an appropriate interval between cell plating and irradiation. For the former, we optimized cell harvest with trypsin, diluted cells in one container, and directly seeded cells on the bottom of flasks in a low density before irradiation. Reproducible plating efficiency was obtained. For the latter, we plated cells on the bottom of flasks and then monitored the processing of attachment, cell cycle variations, and the plating efficiency after exposure to 20 cGy of X-rays. The results showed that a period of 4.5 h to 7.5 h after plating was suitable for further treatment. In order to confirm the reliability and feasibility of our method, we also measured the survival curves of these M059K and M059J glioma cell lines by following the optimized protocol and obtained consistent results reported by others with cell sorting system. In conclusion, we successfully developed a reliable and simple way to measure the survival fractions of human cells exposed to low dose irradiation, which might be helpful for the studies on low-dose radiation biology.

  3. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 enhances pro-angiogenic effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yaohong; Shao, Hongwei; Eton, Darwin; Yang, Zhe; Alonso-Diaz, Luis; Zhang, Hongkun; Schulick, Andrew; Livingstone, Alan S.; Yu, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes bone marrow mononuclear cells into the peripheral circulation. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) enhances the homing of progenitor cells mobilized from the bone marrow and augments neovascularization in ischemic tissue. We hypothesize that SDF-1 will boost the pro-angiogenic effect of G-CSF. Methods and results NIH 3T3 cells retrovirally transduced with SDF-1α gene (NIH 3T3/SDF-1) were used to deliver SDF-1 in vitro and in vivo. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) co-cultured with NIH 3T3/SDF-1 cells using cell culture inserts migrated faster and were less apoptotic compared to those not exposed to SDF-1. NIH 3T3/SDF-1 (106 cells) were injected into the ischemic muscles immediately after resection of the left femoral artery and vein of C57BL/6J mice. G-CSF (25 μg/kg/day) was injected intraperitioneally daily for 3 days after surgery. Blood perfusion was examined using a laser Doppler perfusion imaging system. The perfusion ratio of ischemic/non-ischemic limb increased to 0.57±0.03 and 0.50±0.06 with the treatment of either SDF-1 or G-CSF only, respectively, 3 weeks after surgery, which was significantly higher than the saline-injected control group (0.41±0.01, P<0.05). Combined treatment with both SDF-1 and G-CSF resulted in an even better perfusion ratio of 0.69±0.08 (P<0.05 versus the single treatment groups). Mice were sacrificed 21 days after surgery. Immunostaining and Western blot assay of the tissue lysates showed that the injected NIH 3T3/SDF-1 survived and expressed SDF-1. CD34+ cells were detected with immunostaining, capillary density was assessed with alkaline phosphatase staining, and the apoptosis of muscle cells was viewed using an in situ cell death detection kit. More CD34+ cells, increased capillary density, and less apoptotic muscle cells were found in both G-CSF and SDF-1 treated group (P<0.05 versus other groups). Conclusion Combination of G-CSF-mediated progenitor cell

  4. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    polyelectrolyte layer functioning as the surface dipole formation layer to provide better electrical contact with the photoactive layer. Due to the effectiveness of the conjugated polyelectrolyte layer, performance improvement was also observed. Furthermore, other issues regarding the semi-transparent tandem solar cells (e.g., photocurrent matching, exterior color tuning, and transparency tuning) are all explored to optimize best performance. In Chapter 5 and 6, the architectures of double- and triple-junction tandem solar cells are explored. Theoretically, triple-junction tandem solar cells with three photoactive absorbers with cascaded energy bandgaps have the potential to achieve higher performance, in comparison with double-junction tandem solar cells. Such expectations can be ascribed to the minimized carrier thermalization loss and further improved light absorption. However, the design of triple-junction solar cells often involves sophisticated multiple layer deposition as well as substantial optimization. Therefore, there is a lack of successful demonstrations of triple-junction solar cells outperforming the double-junction counterparts. To solve the incompatible issues related to the layer deposition in the fabrication, we proposed a novel architecture of inverted-structure tandem solar cells with newly designed interconnecting layers. Our design of interconnecting layers does not only focus on maintaining the orthogonal solution processing advantages, but also provides an excellent compatibility in the energy level alignment to allow different absorber materials to be used. Furthermore, we also explored the light management inside the double- and triple-junction tandem solar cells. The study of light management was carried out through optical simulation method based transfer matrix formalism. The intention is to obtain a balanced photocurrent output from each subcells inside the tandem solar cell, thus the minimal recombination loss at the contact of interconnecting

  5. Thiotepa cyclophosphamide followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilized allogeneic peripheral blood cells in adults with advanced leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, A; Van Lint, M T; Valbonesi, M; Lercari, G; Carlier, P; Lamparelli, T; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Bregante, S; Valeriani, A; Piaggio, G; Pitto, A; Benvenuto, F; Figari, O; De Stefano, G; Caimo, A; Sessarego, M

    1996-07-01

    Thirty-one patients (median age, 44 years) with advanced hematologic malignancies were given thiotepa 15 mg/kg, and cyclophosphamide 120 (n = 14) or 150 (n = 17) mg/kg followed by unfractionated peripheral blood stem cell transplants (PBSCT) from genotypically identical siblings (n = 28) or one antigen mismatched family donor (n = 3). Donors were mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 5 to 10 microgram/kg/d for 6 days and underwent two to three leukapheresis on days +5, +6, +7. The median cell yield per donor expressed/kg of recipients body weight was as follows: nucleated cells 13 x 10(8)/kg; CD34+ cells 6 x 10(6)/kg; colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage 38 x 10(4)/kg, and CD3+ cells 449 x 10(6)/kg. The diagnoses were chronic myeloid leukemia (n = 4), acute myeloid (n = 9) or lymphoid leukemia (n = 2), acute myelofibrosis (n = 2), multiple myeloma (n = 1), lymphoma (n = 6), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 1) myelodysplasia (n = 6). Twenty-eight patients had advanced disease, 29 patients were first grafts, and 2 were second transplants 3 and 9 years after the first. Neutrophil counts of 0.5 x 10(9)/L and platelet counts of 30 x 10(9)/L platelets were both achieved on day +14 (median). Engraftment could be proven by sex markers or DNA polymorphism in 29 of 31 patients: one had early leukemia relapse and one patient was unevaluable because of early death. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was scored as minimal or absent (grade 0 to 1) in 14 patients, moderate (grade II) in 13, and severe (grade III to IV) in four. Causes of death were leukemia (n = 4), acute GVHD (n = 4, with associated cytomegalovirus infections in three), sepsis (n = 1), liver failure (n = 1), multiorgan failure (n = 1), and hemorrhage (n = 1). The actuarial transplant mortality is 29%, the actuarial relapse rate 22%. Nineteen patients survive with a median follow up of 288 days (100-690). The actuarial 2-year survival is 57%. Three patients received PBSCT from family

  6. Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Activity Promotes Cysteine Cathepsin-dependent Invasiveness and Colony Growth of Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Ludovic; Roger, Sébastien; Besson, Pierre; Lecaille, Fabien; Gore, Jacques; Bougnoux, Philippe; Lalmanach, Gilles; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2009-03-27

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)) are functionally expressed in highly metastatic cancer cells derived from nonexcitable epithelial tissues (breast, prostate, lung, and cervix). MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells express functional sodium channel complexes, consisting of Na(V)1.5 and associated auxiliary beta-subunits, that are responsible for a sustained inward sodium current at the membrane potential. Although these channels do not regulate cellular multiplication or migration, their inhibition by the specific blocker tetrodotoxin impairs both the extracellular gelatinolytic activity (monitored with DQ-gelatin) and cell invasiveness leading to the attenuation of colony growth and cell spreading in three-dimensional Matrigel-composed matrices. MDA-MB-231 cells express functional cysteine cathepsins, which we found play a predominant role ( approximately 65%) in cancer invasiveness. Matrigel invasion is significantly decreased in the presence of specific inhibitors of cathepsins B and S (CA-074 and Z-FL-COCHO, respectively), and co-application of tetrodotoxin does not further reduce cell invasion. This suggests that cathepsins B and S are involved in invasiveness and that their proteolytic activity partly depends on Na(V) function. Inhibiting Na(V) has no consequence for cathepsins at the transcription, translation, and secretion levels. However, Na(V) activity leads to an intracellular alkalinization and a perimembrane acidification favorable for the extracellular activity of these acidic proteases. We propose that Na(v) enhance the invasiveness of cancer cells by favoring the pH-dependent activity of cysteine cathepsins. This general mechanism could lead to the identification of new targets allowing the therapeutic prevention of metastases. PMID:19176528

  7. Spontaneous emergence of large-scale cell cycle synchronization in amoeba colonies.

    PubMed

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, David; Franck, Carl

    2014-06-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. Here we show that cell populations grown on a substrate spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state. PMID:24732749

  8. Spontaneous emergence of large-scale cell cycle synchronization in amoeba colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, David; Franck, Carl

    2014-06-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. Here we show that cell populations grown on a substrate spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state.

  9. Radioprotection of mice with interleukin-1: Relationship to the number of erythroid and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, G.N.; Patchen, M.L.; Neta, R.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of changes in the number of erythroid and granulocyte-macrophage colony forming cells (GM-CFC) that had occurred in tissues of normal B6D2F1 mice 20 h after administration of a radioprotective dose (150 ng) of human recombinant interleukin-1 (rIL-1). Neutrophilia in the peripheral blood and changes in the tissue distribution of GM-CFC demonstrated that cells were mobilized from the bone marrow in response to rIL-1 injection. For example, 20 h after rIL-1 injection marrow GM-CFC numbers were 80% of the numbers in bone marrow from saline-injected mice. Associated with this decrease there was a twofold increase in the number of peripheral blood and splenic GM-CFC. Also, as determined by hydroxyurea injection, there was an increase in the number of GM-CFC in S phase of the cell cycle in the spleen, but not in the bone marrow. Data in this report suggest that when compared to the spleen, stimulation of granulopoiesis after rIL-1 injection is delayed in the bone marrow.

  10. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Kátia Aparecida de Brito; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 μg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 – patients who received a single daily dose of 10 μg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 – patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3%) for Group 10 and 36 (24.7%) for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1–7) leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59) were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1–3) and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95). A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001). Conclusions To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed. PMID:26041417

  11. A novel function of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor in hTERT immortalization of human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, N F; Kocher, H M; Salako, M A; Obermueller, E; Sandle, J; Balkwill, F

    2009-02-01

    The receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) is a product of the proto-oncogene c-fms and a member of the class III transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor family. Earlier, we described increased mRNA expression of CSF1R in human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) immortalized human ovarian surface epithelial (IOSE) cell lines derived from a single donor. Here, we further describe that CSF1R is upregulated at both the mRNA and protein level in hTERT immortalized human normal OSE cells from two different donors and in hTERT immortalized human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. CSF1R was not upregulated in hTERT immortalized epithelial clones that subsequently underwent senescence or in immortalized fibroblasts. Upon stimulation by the CSF1R ligand CSF1, the immortalized epithelial cell lines showed rapid internalization of CSF1R with concomitant down-modulation and colocalization of phosphorylated NFkappaBp65 with hTERT protein, hTERT translocation into the nucleus and the binding of c-Myc to the hTERT promoter region. Reducing the expression of CSF1R using short hairpin interfering RNA abolished these effects and also decreased cell survival and the number of population doublings under suboptimal culture conditions. The telomerase inhibitor GRN163L confirmed a role for telomerase in the cleavage of the intracellular domain of CSF1R. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that CSF1R may be a critical factor facilitating hTERT immortalization of epithelial cells.

  12. 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-induced differentiation of myelomonocytic leukemic cells unresponsive to colony stimulating factors and phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Bettens, F.; Schlick, E.; Farrar, W.; Ruscetti, F.

    1986-12-01

    The murine myelomonocytic leukemia cell line WEHI-3B D/sup +/, which differentiates in response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), can also be induced to differentiate into monocyte-macrophages by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treatment, whereas the WEHI-3B D/sup -/ subline, which is unresponsive to G-CSF and PMA, can be induced to differentiate to granulocytes as well as monocytes by 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3), the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D3. A newly developed variant of the WEHI-3B D/sup +/ line, named WEHI-3B D/sup +/G, which was responsive to G-CSF but not to PMA, was also differentiated to granulocytes by 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3. Although vitamin D3 has been reported to induce macrophage differentiation in responsive tumor cells, this is the first demonstration that 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3 can induce granulocyte differentiation. In both differentiation pathways, cessation of cellular proliferation accompanies changes in morphologic and cytochemical properties of the cells. This suggests that leukemic cell lines unresponsive to differentiation agents acting at the cell surface retain their ability to differentiate in response to agents that do not act via the plasma membrane such as 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3, which has cytosolic/nuclear receptors. These results suggest that low doses of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3 may be useful in combination with hemopoietic growth factors (CSFs) as therapeutic agent to induce leukemic cell differentiation in vivo.

  13. CORONETTE KERATINOCYTE COLONY FORMATION IS SUPPORTED BY EPIDERMAL-DERMAL CELL INTERACTIONS IN THE BOVINE CLAW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delineating factors that orchestrate keratinocyte growth and differentiation in the claw is pivotal to understanding the quality of hoof horn production in health and disease. The specific objectives of this investigation were to establish an in vitro culture system for bovine coronette keratinocyt...

  14. Formative cell divisions: principal determinants of plant morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Smolarkiewicz, Michalina; Dhonukshe, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    Formative cell divisions utilizing precise rotations of cell division planes generate and spatially place asymmetric daughters to produce different cell layers. Therefore, by shaping tissues and organs, formative cell divisions dictate multicellular morphogenesis. In animal formative cell divisions, the orientation of the mitotic spindle and cell division planes relies on intrinsic and extrinsic cortical polarity cues. Plants lack known key players from animals, and cell division planes are determined prior to the mitotic spindle stage. Therefore, it appears that plants have evolved specialized mechanisms to execute formative cell divisions. Despite their profound influence on plant architecture, molecular players and cellular mechanisms regulating formative divisions in plants are not well understood. This is because formative cell divisions in plants have been difficult to track owing to their submerged positions and imprecise timings of occurrence. However, by identifying a spatiotemporally inducible cell division plane switch system applicable for advanced microscopy techniques, recent studies have begun to uncover molecular modules and mechanisms for formative cell divisions. The identified molecular modules comprise developmentally triggered transcriptional cascades feeding onto microtubule regulators that now allow dissection of the hierarchy of the events at better spatiotemporal resolutions. Here, we survey the current advances in understanding of formative cell divisions in plants in the context of embryogenesis, stem cell functionality and post-embryonic organ formation.

  15. Formative cell divisions: principal determinants of plant morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Smolarkiewicz, Michalina; Dhonukshe, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    Formative cell divisions utilizing precise rotations of cell division planes generate and spatially place asymmetric daughters to produce different cell layers. Therefore, by shaping tissues and organs, formative cell divisions dictate multicellular morphogenesis. In animal formative cell divisions, the orientation of the mitotic spindle and cell division planes relies on intrinsic and extrinsic cortical polarity cues. Plants lack known key players from animals, and cell division planes are determined prior to the mitotic spindle stage. Therefore, it appears that plants have evolved specialized mechanisms to execute formative cell divisions. Despite their profound influence on plant architecture, molecular players and cellular mechanisms regulating formative divisions in plants are not well understood. This is because formative cell divisions in plants have been difficult to track owing to their submerged positions and imprecise timings of occurrence. However, by identifying a spatiotemporally inducible cell division plane switch system applicable for advanced microscopy techniques, recent studies have begun to uncover molecular modules and mechanisms for formative cell divisions. The identified molecular modules comprise developmentally triggered transcriptional cascades feeding onto microtubule regulators that now allow dissection of the hierarchy of the events at better spatiotemporal resolutions. Here, we survey the current advances in understanding of formative cell divisions in plants in the context of embryogenesis, stem cell functionality and post-embryonic organ formation. PMID:23248201

  16. Spatio-temporal morphology changes in and quenching effects on the 2D spreading dynamics of cell colonies in both plain and methylcellulose-containing culture media.

    PubMed

    Muzzio, N E; Pasquale, M A; Huergo, M A C; Bolzán, A E; González, P H; Arvia, A J

    2016-06-01

    To deal with complex systems, microscopic and global approaches become of particular interest. Our previous results from the dynamics of large cell colonies indicated that their 2D front roughness dynamics is compatible with the standard Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) or the quenched KPZ equations either in plain or methylcellulose (MC)-containing gel culture media, respectively. In both cases, the influence of a non-uniform distribution of the colony constituents was significant. These results encouraged us to investigate the overall dynamics of those systems considering the morphology and size, the duplication rate, and the motility of single cells. For this purpose, colonies with different cell populations (N) exhibiting quasi-circular and quasi-linear growth fronts in plain and MC-containing culture media are investigated. For small N, the average radial front velocity and its change with time depend on MC concentration. MC in the medium interferes with cell mitosis, contributes to the local enlargement of cells, and increases the distribution of spatio-temporal cell density heterogeneities. Colony spreading in MC-containing media proceeds under two main quenching effects, I and II; the former mainly depending on the culture medium composition and structure and the latter caused by the distribution of enlarged local cell domains. For large N, colony spreading occurs at constant velocity. The characteristics of cell motility, assessed by measuring their trajectories and the corresponding velocity field, reflect the effect of enlarged, slow-moving cells and the structure of the medium. Local average cell size distribution and individual cell motility data from plain and MC-containing media are qualitatively consistent with the predictions of both the extended cellular Potts models and the observed transition of the front roughness dynamics from a standard KPZ to a quenched KPZ. In this case, quenching effects I and II cooperate and give rise to the quenched

  17. Glucose induced fractal colony pattern of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Manas K; Banerjee, Paromita; Sengupta, Tapas K; Dattagupta, Sushanta

    2010-08-01

    Growing colonies of bacteria on the surface of thin agar plates exhibit fractal patterns as a result of nonlinear response to environmental conditions, such as nutrients, solidity of the agar medium and temperature. Here, we examine the effect of glucose on pattern formation by growing colonies of Bacillus thuringiensis isolate KPWP1. We also present the theoretical modeling of the colony growth of KPWP1 and the associated spatio-temporal patterns. Our experimental results are in excellent agreement with simulations based on a reaction-diffusion model that describes diffusion-limited aggregation and branching, in which individual cells move actively in the periphery, but become immotile in the inner regions of the growing colony. We obtain the Hausdorff fractal dimension of the colony patterns: D(H.Expt)=1.1969 and D(H, R.D.=)1.1965, for experiment and reaction-diffusion model, respectively. Results of our experiments and modeling clearly show how glucose at higher concentration can prove to be inhibitory for motility of growing colonies of B. thuringiensis cells on semisolid support and be responsible for changes in the growth pattern. PMID:20553734

  18. Contact formation in gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments were performed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are explained by invoking this mechanism.

  19. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor promotes tumor angiogenesis via increasing circulating endothelial progenitor cells and Gr1+CD11b+ cells in cancer animal models.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Tatsuma; Ebihara, Satoru; Asada, Masanori; Kanda, Akio; Sasaki, Hidetada; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used for cancer patients with myelosuppression induced by chemotherapy. G-CSF has been reported to progress tumor growth and angiogenesis, but the precise mechanism of tumor angiogenesis activated by G-CSF has not been fully clarified. N-terminal-mutated recombinant human G-CSF administration increased WBCs and neutrophils in peripheral blood and reduced bone marrow stromal cell-derived factor-1 in mice, indicating its biological relevance. Mice were inoculated with Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LLCs) or KLN205 cells and treated with G-CSF. G-CSF accelerated tumor growth and intratumoral vessel density, while it did not accelerate proliferation of LLCs, KLN205 cells or human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. In the absence of tumors, G-CSF did not increase circulating cells that displayed phenotypic characteristics of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). In the presence of tumors, G-CSF increased circulating EPCs. In addition, G-CSF treatment increased immune suppressor and endothelial cell-differentiating Gr1+CD11b+ cells in tumor-bearing mice. We conclude that G-CSF promotes tumor growth by activating tumor angiogenesis via increasing circulating EPCs and Gr1+CD11b+ cells in cancer animal models.

  20. Branching instability in expanding bacterial colonies

    PubMed Central

    Giverso, Chiara; Verani, Marco; Ciarletta, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Self-organization in developing living organisms relies on the capability of cells to duplicate and perform a collective motion inside the surrounding environment. Chemical and mechanical interactions coordinate such a cooperative behaviour, driving the dynamical evolution of the macroscopic system. In this work, we perform an analytical and computational analysis to study pattern formation during the spreading of an initially circular bacterial colony on a Petri dish. The continuous mathematical model addresses the growth and the chemotactic migration of the living monolayer, together with the diffusion and consumption of nutrients in the agar. The governing equations contain four dimensionless parameters, accounting for the interplay among the chemotactic response, the bacteria–substrate interaction and the experimental geometry. The spreading colony is found to be always linearly unstable to perturbations of the interface, whereas branching instability arises in finite-element numerical simulations. The typical length scales of such fingers, which align in the radial direction and later undergo further branching, are controlled by the size parameters of the problem, whereas the emergence of branching is favoured if the diffusion is dominant on the chemotaxis. The model is able to predict the experimental morphologies, confirming that compact (resp. branched) patterns arise for fast (resp. slow) expanding colonies. Such results, while providing new insights into pattern selection in bacterial colonies, may finally have important applications for designing controlled patterns. PMID:25652464

  1. Dysregulation of VEGF-induced proangiogenic Ca2+ oscillations in primary myelofibrosis-derived endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Dragoni, Silvia; Reforgiato, Marta; Zuccolo, Estella; Poletto, Valentina; Lodola, Francesco; Ruffinatti, Federico Alessandro; Bonetti, Elisa; Guerra, Germano; Barosi, Giovanni; Rosti, Vittorio; Moccia, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells could be implicated in the aberrant neoangiogenesis that occurs in bone marrow and spleen in patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). However, antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monotherapy had only a modest and transient effect in these individuals. Recently it was found that VEGF-induced proangiogenic intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations could be impaired in endothelial progenitor cells of subjects with malignancies. Therefore, we employed Ca(2+) imaging, wavelet analysis, and functional assays to assess whether and how VEGF-induced Ca(2+) oscillations are altered in PMF-derived endothelial progenitor cells. We focused on endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), which are the only endothelial progenitor cell subtype capable of forming neovessels both in vivo and in vitro. VEGF triggers repetitive Ca(2+) spikes in both normal ECFCs (N-ECFCs) and ECFCs obtained from PMF patients (PMF-ECFCs). However, the spiking response to VEGF is significantly weaker in PMF-ECFCs. VEGF-elicited Ca(2+) oscillations are patterned by the interaction between inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Ca(2+) mobilization and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. However, in most PMF-ECFCs, Ca(2+) oscillations are triggered by a store-independent Ca(2+) entry pathway. We found that diacylglycerol gates transient receptor potential canonical 1 channel to trigger VEGF-dependent Ca(2+) spikes by recruiting the phospholipase C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate signaling pathway, reflected as a decrease in endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) content. Finally, we found that, apart from being less robust and dysregulated as compared with N-ECFCs, VEGF-induced Ca(2+) oscillations modestly stimulate PMF-ECFC growth and in vitro angiogenesis. These results may explain the modest effect of anti-VEGF therapies in PMF. PMID:26432919

  2. Changes in different parameters, lymphocyte proliferation and hematopoietic progenitor colony formation in EAE mice treated with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Vasilii B; Parkhomenko, Taisiya A; Korablev, Alexey; Toporkova, Ludmila B; Lopatnikova, Julia A; Alshevskaja, Alina A; Sennikov, Sergei V; Buneva, Valentina N; Budde, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Orlovskaya, Irina A; Popova, Nelly A; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is an antigen of the myelin sheath, which may trigger immune cell responses and the production of auto-antibodies in multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we used MOG(35-55) -induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of human MS, to assess the production of catalytically active immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies or abzymes which have been shown to be present in sera of patients with several autoimmune diseases. Here, we show that IgGs from the sera of control C57BL/6 mice are catalytically inactive. During development of EAE, a specific reorganization of the immune system of mice occurred leading to a condition which was associated with the generation of catalytically active IgGs hydrolysing DNA, myelin basic protein (MBP) and MOG which was associated with increased proteinuria, changes in differentiation of mice bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and an increase in proliferation of lymphocytes in bone marrow, spleen and thymus as well as a significant suppression of cell apoptosis in these organs. The strongest alterations were found in the early disease phase (18-24 days after immunization) and were less pronounced in later EAE stages (40 days after EAE induction). We conclude that a significant increase in DNase and proteolytic activities of antibodies may be considered the earliest statistically significant marker of MOG-induced EAE in mice. The possible differences in immune system reorganizations during preclinical phases of the disease, acute and late EAE, leading to production of different auto-antibodies and abzymes as well other changes are discussed. PMID:26493273

  3. Changes in different parameters, lymphocyte proliferation and hematopoietic progenitor colony formation in EAE mice treated with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Vasilii B; Parkhomenko, Taisiya A; Korablev, Alexey; Toporkova, Ludmila B; Lopatnikova, Julia A; Alshevskaja, Alina A; Sennikov, Sergei V; Buneva, Valentina N; Budde, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Orlovskaya, Irina A; Popova, Nelly A; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is an antigen of the myelin sheath, which may trigger immune cell responses and the production of auto-antibodies in multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we used MOG(35-55) -induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of human MS, to assess the production of catalytically active immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies or abzymes which have been shown to be present in sera of patients with several autoimmune diseases. Here, we show that IgGs from the sera of control C57BL/6 mice are catalytically inactive. During development of EAE, a specific reorganization of the immune system of mice occurred leading to a condition which was associated with the generation of catalytically active IgGs hydrolysing DNA, myelin basic protein (MBP) and MOG which was associated with increased proteinuria, changes in differentiation of mice bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and an increase in proliferation of lymphocytes in bone marrow, spleen and thymus as well as a significant suppression of cell apoptosis in these organs. The strongest alterations were found in the early disease phase (18-24 days after immunization) and were less pronounced in later EAE stages (40 days after EAE induction). We conclude that a significant increase in DNase and proteolytic activities of antibodies may be considered the earliest statistically significant marker of MOG-induced EAE in mice. The possible differences in immune system reorganizations during preclinical phases of the disease, acute and late EAE, leading to production of different auto-antibodies and abzymes as well other changes are discussed.

  4. Cell acidification in apoptosis: granulocyte colony-stimulating factor delays programmed cell death in neutrophils by up-regulating the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, R A; Giesing, H A; Zhu, J Y; Engler, R L; Babior, B M

    1995-01-01

    Neutrophils in tissue culture spontaneously undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis), a process characterized by well-defined morphological alterations affecting the cell nucleus. We found that these morphological changes were preceded by intracellular acidification and that acidification and the apoptotic changes in nuclear morphology were both delayed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Among the agents that defend neutrophils against intracellular acidification is a vacuolar H(+)-ATPase that pumps protons out of the cytosol. When this proton pump was inhibited by bafilomycin A1, G-CSF no longer protected the neutrophils against apoptosis. We conclude that G-CSF delays apoptosis in neutrophils by up-regulating the cells' vacuolar H(+)-ATPase and that intracellular acidification is an early event in the apoptosis program. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7541139

  5. Stem cells are units of natural selection for tissue formation, for germline development, and in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Irving L.

    2015-01-01

    It is obvious that natural selection operates at the level of individuals and collections of individuals. Nearly two decades ago we showed that in multi-individual colonies of protochordate colonial tunicates sharing a blood circulation, there exists an exchange of somatic stem cells and germline stem cells, resulting in somatic chimeras and stem cell competitions for gonadal niches. Stem cells are unlike other cells in the body in that they alone self-renew, so that they form clones that are perpetuated for the life of the organism. Stem cell competitions have allowed the emergence of competitive somatic and germline stem cell clones. Highly successful germline stem cells usually outcompete less successful competitors both in the gonads of the genotype partner from which they arise and in the gonads of the natural parabiotic partners. Therefore, natural selection also operates at the level of germline stem cell clones. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri the formation of natural parabionts is prevented by a single-locus highly polymorphic histocompatibility gene called Botryllus histocompatibility factor. This limits germline stem cell predation to kin, as the locus has hundreds of alleles. We show that in mice germline stem cells compete for gonad niches, and in mice and humans, blood-forming stem cells also compete for bone marrow niches. We show that the clonal progression from blood-forming stem cells to acute leukemias by successive genetic and epigenetic events in blood stem cells also involves competition and selection between clones and propose that this is a general theme in cancer. PMID:26195745

  6. Stem cells are units of natural selection for tissue formation, for germline development, and in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Irving L

    2015-07-21

    It is obvious that natural selection operates at the level of individuals and collections of individuals. Nearly two decades ago we showed that in multi-individual colonies of protochordate colonial tunicates sharing a blood circulation, there exists an exchange of somatic stem cells and germline stem cells, resulting in somatic chimeras and stem cell competitions for gonadal niches. Stem cells are unlike other cells in the body in that they alone self-renew, so that they form clones that are perpetuated for the life of the organism. Stem cell competitions have allowed the emergence of competitive somatic and germline stem cell clones. Highly successful germline stem cells usually outcompete less successful competitors both in the gonads of the genotype partner from which they arise and in the gonads of the natural parabiotic partners. Therefore, natural selection also operates at the level of germline stem cell clones. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri the formation of natural parabionts is prevented by a single-locus highly polymorphic histocompatibility gene called Botryllus histocompatibility factor. This limits germline stem cell predation to kin, as the locus has hundreds of alleles. We show that in mice germline stem cells compete for gonad niches, and in mice and humans, blood-forming stem cells also compete for bone marrow niches. We show that the clonal progression from blood-forming stem cells to acute leukemias by successive genetic and epigenetic events in blood stem cells also involves competition and selection between clones and propose that this is a general theme in cancer.

  7. Stem cells are units of natural selection for tissue formation, for germline development, and in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Irving L

    2015-07-21

    It is obvious that natural selection operates at the level of individuals and collections of individuals. Nearly two decades ago we showed that in multi-individual colonies of protochordate colonial tunicates sharing a blood circulation, there exists an exchange of somatic stem cells and germline stem cells, resulting in somatic chimeras and stem cell competitions for gonadal niches. Stem cells are unlike other cells in the body in that they alone self-renew, so that they form clones that are perpetuated for the life of the organism. Stem cell competitions have allowed the emergence of competitive somatic and germline stem cell clones. Highly successful germline stem cells usually outcompete less successful competitors both in the gonads of the genotype partner from which they arise and in the gonads of the natural parabiotic partners. Therefore, natural selection also operates at the level of germline stem cell clones. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri the formation of natural parabionts is prevented by a single-locus highly polymorphic histocompatibility gene called Botryllus histocompatibility factor. This limits germline stem cell predation to kin, as the locus has hundreds of alleles. We show that in mice germline stem cells compete for gonad niches, and in mice and humans, blood-forming stem cells also compete for bone marrow niches. We show that the clonal progression from blood-forming stem cells to acute leukemias by successive genetic and epigenetic events in blood stem cells also involves competition and selection between clones and propose that this is a general theme in cancer. PMID:26195745

  8. Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor protects against apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial damage in ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF), also known as nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD+ biosynthesis pathway, plays a brain and neuronal protective role in ischemic stroke. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism of its neuroprotective effect after ischemia in the primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Using apoptotic cell death assay, fluorescent imaging, molecular biology, mitochondrial biogenesis measurements and Western blotting analysis, our results show that the overexpression of PBEF in neurons can significantly promote neuronal survival, reduce the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to nuclei and inhibit the activation of capase-3 after glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. We further found that the overexpression of PBEF can suppress glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, the loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and the reduction of PGC-1 and NRF-1 expressions. Furthermore, these beneficial effects by PBEF are dependent on its enzymatic activity of NAD+ synthesis. In summary, our study demonstrated that PBEF ameliorates ischemia-induced neuronal death through inhibiting caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic signaling pathways and suppressing mitochondrial damage and dysfunction. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of PBEF, and helps to identify potential targets for ischemic stroke therapy. PMID:27576732

  9. Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor protects against apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial damage in ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF), also known as nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD(+) biosynthesis pathway, plays a brain and neuronal protective role in ischemic stroke. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism of its neuroprotective effect after ischemia in the primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Using apoptotic cell death assay, fluorescent imaging, molecular biology, mitochondrial biogenesis measurements and Western blotting analysis, our results show that the overexpression of PBEF in neurons can significantly promote neuronal survival, reduce the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to nuclei and inhibit the activation of capase-3 after glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. We further found that the overexpression of PBEF can suppress glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, the loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and the reduction of PGC-1 and NRF-1 expressions. Furthermore, these beneficial effects by PBEF are dependent on its enzymatic activity of NAD(+) synthesis. In summary, our study demonstrated that PBEF ameliorates ischemia-induced neuronal death through inhibiting caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic signaling pathways and suppressing mitochondrial damage and dysfunction. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of PBEF, and helps to identify potential targets for ischemic stroke therapy. PMID:27576732

  10. Flow cytometric method for in situ preparation of standard materials of a small defined number of microbial cells with colony-forming potentiality.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hideaki; Nakano, Koichiro; Takatani, Norimasa; Yoshida, Tomonori; Igimi, Shizunobu; Saito, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    Standard materials of a small defined number of cells with colony-forming potentiality are essential for the rational validation of food microbiological methods. An in situ flow cytometric method using viable staining with 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and tryptic soy agar (TSA) was previously proposed and its feasibility was demonstrated with five strains. In this study, this method was applied to 16 strains to support its broad applicability. The cell sorting gate was previously determined based on the CFDA stainability alone. Now the structural properties of cells designated by forward and side-scattering intensities have been introduced as the second gating criteria. Under the optimum gate condition, 100 cells have been selected and sorted on TSA. Consequently, a 95% or higher colony-forming rate has been attained for every strain. A successful application to microaerophilic Campylobacter spp. is especially of great importance because it suggests further broader applicability.

  11. The effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes from renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Steger, G. G.; Kaboo, R.; deKernion, J. B.; Figlin, R.; Belldegrun, A.

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce specific and non-specific anti-tumour cytotoxicity and also stimulates the proliferation and function of peripheral lymphocytes and thymocytes. GM-CSF and interleukin 2 (IL-2) act synergistically on peripheral lymphocytes for the induction of a highly effective cytotoxic cell population. Thus, the goal of our investigation was to study the effects of GM-CSF upon expansion, proliferation and in vitro killing activity of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). TILs from seven consecutive tumours were cultured with GM-CSF (500 or 1000 nmol ml-1) without IL-2 supplementation, with suboptimal doses of IL-2 (8 and 40 U ml-1) plus GM-CSF (1000 nmol ml-1), and with a dose of IL-2 (400 U ml-1) which sufficed alone to induce TIL development plus GM-CSF (500 or 1000 nmol ml-1). GM-CSF alone or together with suboptimal doses of IL-2 was not able to induce or facilitate TIL development in these cultures. When GM-CSF at both concentrations studied was added to optimal doses of IL-2 the resulting TIL populations proliferated significantly better and faster (+66%), resulting in a higher cell yield (+24%) at the time of maximal expansion of the TIL cultures. The length of the culture periods of TILs was not affected by GM-CSF when compared with the control cultures supplemented with IL-2 alone. In vitro killing activity of TIL populations stimulated with IL-2 and GM-CSF remained unspecific, but lysis of the autologous tumour targets as well as the allogeneic renal tumour targets was significantly enhanced (+138%) as compared with the corresponding control TILs stimulated with IL-2 alone. Lysis of the natural killer (NK)-sensitive control cell line K562 and the NK-resistant Daudi cell line remained unchanged even though FACS analysis of TILs cultured with IL-2 and 1000 nmol of GM-CSF demonstrated a significantly higher proportion of cells expressing the CD56

  12. Vitrified canine testicular cells allow the formation of spermatogonial stem cells and seminiferous tubules following their xenotransplantation into nude mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Kim, Dong Hoon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Do, Jung Tae; Park, Chankyu; Kim, Jae Hwan; Choi, Young Suk; Song, Hyuk

    2016-02-24

    Belgian Malinois (BM), one of the excellent military dog breeds in South Korea, is usually castrated before sexual maturation. Therefore, the transfer of their genetic features to the next generation is difficult. To overcome this, testicular cells from 4-month-old BMs were frozen. Testicular cells were thawed after 3 months and cultured in StemPro-34 medium. Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) characteristics were determined by the transplantation of the cultured germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs) into empty testes, containing only several endogenous SSCs and Sertoli cells, of immunodeficient mice, 4 weeks after busulfan treatment. Following the implantation, the transplanted cells localized in the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules, and ultimately colonized the recipient testes. Xenotransplantation of GDCs together with testicular somatic cells conjugated with extracellular matrix (ECM), led to the formation of de novo seminiferous tubules. These seminiferous tubules were mostly composed of Sertoli cells. Some germ cells were localized in the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules. This study revealed that BM-derived SSCs, obtained from the castrated testes, might be a valuable tool for the transfer of BM genetic features to the next generation.

  13. Vitrified canine testicular cells allow the formation of spermatogonial stem cells and seminiferous tubules following their xenotransplantation into nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Kim, Dong Hoon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Do, Jung Tae; Park, Chankyu; Kim, Jae Hwan; Choi, Young Suk; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Malinois (BM), one of the excellent military dog breeds in South Korea, is usually castrated before sexual maturation. Therefore, the transfer of their genetic features to the next generation is difficult. To overcome this, testicular cells from 4-month-old BMs were frozen. Testicular cells were thawed after 3 months and cultured in StemPro-34 medium. Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) characteristics were determined by the transplantation of the cultured germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs) into empty testes, containing only several endogenous SSCs and Sertoli cells, of immunodeficient mice, 4 weeks after busulfan treatment. Following the implantation, the transplanted cells localized in the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules, and ultimately colonized the recipient testes. Xenotransplantation of GDCs together with testicular somatic cells conjugated with extracellular matrix (ECM), led to the formation of de novo seminiferous tubules. These seminiferous tubules were mostly composed of Sertoli cells. Some germ cells were localized in the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules. This study revealed that BM-derived SSCs, obtained from the castrated testes, might be a valuable tool for the transfer of BM genetic features to the next generation. PMID:26907750

  14. The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor: linking its structure to cell signaling and its role in disease.

    PubMed

    Hercus, Timothy R; Thomas, Daniel; Guthridge, Mark A; Ekert, Paul G; King-Scott, Jack; Parker, Michael W; Lopez, Angel F

    2009-08-13

    Already 20 years have passed since the cloning of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha-chain, the first member of the GM-CSF/interleukin (IL)-3/IL-5 family of hemopoietic cytokine receptors to be molecularly characterized. The intervening 2 decades have uncovered a plethora of biologic functions transduced by the GM-CSF receptor (pleiotropy) and revealed distinct signaling networks that couple the receptor to biologic outcomes. Unlike other hemopoietin receptors, the GM-CSF receptor has a significant nonredundant role in myeloid hematologic malignancies, macrophage-mediated acute and chronic inflammation, pulmonary homeostasis, and allergic disease. The molecular mechanisms underlying GM-CSF receptor activation have recently been revealed by the crystal structure of the GM-CSF receptor complexed to GM-CSF, which shows an unexpected higher order assembly. Emerging evidence also suggests the existence of intracellular signosomes that are recruited in a concentration-dependent fashion to selectively control cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation by GM-CSF. These findings begin to unravel the mystery of cytokine receptor pleiotropy and are likely to also apply to the related IL-3 and IL-5 receptors as well as other heterodimeric cytokine receptors. The new insights in GM-CSF receptor activation have clinical significance as the structural and signaling nuances can be harnessed for the development of new treatments for malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  15. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 regulates granulopoiesis by inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Shively, John E

    2010-10-29

    Although carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1) is an activation marker for neutrophils and delays neutrophil apoptosis, the role of CEACAM1 in granulopoiesis and neutrophil-dependent host immune responses has not been investigated. CEACAM1 expression correlated with granulocytic differentiation, and Ceacam1(-/-) mice developed neutrophilia because of loss of the Src-homology-phosphatase-1 (SHP-1)-dependent inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat3) pathway provided by CEACAM1. Moreover, Ceacam1(-/-) mice were hypersensitive to Listeria Monocytogenes (LM) infection with an accelerated mortality. Reintroduction of CEACAM1 into Ceacam1(-/-) bone marrow restored normal granulopoiesis and host sensitivity to LM infection, while mutation of its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) abrogated this restoration. shRNA-mediated reduction of Stat3 amounts rescued normal granulopoiesis, attenuating host sensitivity to LM infection in Ceacam1(-/-) mice. Thus, CEACAM1 acted as a coinhibitory receptor for G-CSFR regulating granulopoiesis and host innate immune response to bacterial infections.

  16. Theoretical size controls of the giant Phaeocystis globosa colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Smith, Walker O.; Tang, Kam W.; Doan, Nhu Hai; Nguyen, Ngoc Lam

    2015-06-01

    An unusual characteristic of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Phaeocystis globosa is its ability to form colonies of strikingly large size-up to 3 cm in diameter. The large size and the presence of a mucoid envelope are believed to contribute to the formation of dense blooms in Southeast Asia. We collected colonies of different sizes in shallow coastal waters of Viet Nam and conducted a series of measurements and experiments on individual colonies. Using these empirical data, we developed a simple carbon-based model to predict the growth and maximal size of P. globosa colonies. Our model suggests that growth of a colony from 0.2 cm to 1.4 cm (the maximal size in our samples) would take 16 days. This number, however, is strongly influenced by the maximal photosynthetic rate and other physiological parameters used in the model. The model also returns a specific growth rate of 0.30 d-1 for colonial cells, comparable to satellite estimates, but lower than have been measured for unicellular P. globosa in batch culture at similar temperatures. We attribute this low growth rate to not only the model uncertainties, but factors such as self-shading and diffusive limitation of nutrient uptake.

  17. Cell-cell interactions impacts on the rate of swarm expansion and the edge shape of a colony swarming Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Aboutaleb; Tierra, Giordano; Xu, Zhiliang; Shrout, Joshua; Alber, Mark

    Collective motion has been observed by several bacterial species including the pathogenic bacterium P. aeruginosa. A flagellum at the pole is known to generate a self-propulsion motion. However, the role of type IV pili (TFP), distributed on the cell membrane, during swarming needs to be investigated in more details. In this work we introduce a model that combines the hydrodynamic and biophysical interactions in order to study the impact of the TFP interactions on swarming behavior of the colony. The model describes the motion and interactions of rod-shaped self propelled bacteria inside a thin liquid film. It also includes the equations describing the production and diffusion of surfactant rhamnolipids that is responsible for extraction of water from substrate, and Marangoni driven expansion of the thin liquid film by altering the surface tension. We show that TFP interactions are responsible for slower expansion rate of colonies of TFP deficient mutants compared to wild type. Experimental observations were used to calibrate the model and verify the model assumptions and predictions.

  18. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage.

    PubMed

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-09-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. PMID:27354413

  19. Deadly competition between sibling bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Er, Avraham

    2011-03-01

    As a result of stress due to nutrient limitation or antibiotics, competing individual bacteria within a single colony may lyse sibling cells to release nutrients (cannibalism) or DNA (fratricide). However, we have recently shown that competition is not limited to individuals, but can occur at the colony level [A. Be'er et al., PNAS 106, 428 (2009); A. Be'er et al., PNAS 107, 6258 (2010).] In response to the presence of an encroaching sibling colony, Paenibacillus dendritiformis bacteria secrete a lethal protein, lysing cells at the interface between the colonies. Analysis of the proteins secreted by these competing sibling colonies, combined with a mathematical model, shows how colonies maintain their growth by self-regulating the secretion of two proteins: subtilisin (a well-known growth promoter), and Slf (a previously unknown protein, which is lethal). The results also explain why a single colony is not inhibited by its own secretions.

  20. Formation and cultivation of medaka primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Yi, Meisheng; Hong, Yunhan

    2014-07-01

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) formation is pivotal for fertility. Mammalian PGCs are epigenetically induced without the need for maternal factors and can also be derived in culture from pluripotent stem cells. In egg-laying animals such as Drosophila and zebrafish, PGCs are specified by maternal germ plasm factors without the need for inducing factors. In these organisms, PGC formation and cultivation in vitro from indeterminate embryonic cells have not been possible. Here, we report PGC formation and cultivation in vitro from blastomeres dissociated from midblastula embryos (MBEs) of the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes). PGCs were identified by using germ-cell-specific green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression from a transgene under the control of the vasa promoter. Embryo perturbation was exploited to study PGC formation in vivo, and dissociated MBE cells were cultivated under various conditions to study PGC formation in vitro. Perturbation of somatic development did not prevent PGC formation in live embryos. Dissociated MBE blastomeres formed PGCs in the absence of normal somatic structures and of known inducing factors. Most importantly, under culture conditions conducive to stem cell derivation, some dissociated MBE blastomeres produced GFP-positive PGC-like cells. These GFP-positive cells contained genuine PGCs, as they expressed PGC markers and migrated into the embryonic gonad to generate germline chimeras. Our data thus provide evidence for PGC preformation in medaka and demonstrate, for the first time, that PGC formation and derivation can be obtained in culture from early embryos of medaka as a lower vertebrate model.

  1. Microfabricated Arrays for Splitting and Assay of Clonal Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Gach, Philip C.; Xu, Wei; King, Samantha J.; Sims, Christopher E.; Bear, James; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    A microfabricated platform was developed for highly parallel and efficient colony picking, splitting and clone identification. A pallet array provided patterned cell colonies which mated to a second printing array composed of bridging microstructures formed by a supporting base and attached post. The posts enabled mammalian cells from colonies initially cultured on the pallet array to migrate to corresponding sites on the printing array. Separation of the arrays simultaneously split the colonies creating a patterned replica. Optimization of array elements provided transfer efficiencies greater than 90% using bridging posts of 30 μm diameter and 100 μm length and total colony numbers of 3000. Studies using five mammalian cell lines demonstrated that a variety of adherent cell types could be cultured and effectively split with printing efficiencies of 78–92%. To demonstrate the technique’s utility, clonal cell lines with siRNA knockdown of Coronin 1B were generated using the arrays and compared to a traditional FACS/Western Blotting-based approach. Identification of target clones required a destructive assay to identify cells with an absence of Coronin 1B brought about by the successful infection of interfering shRNA construct. By virtue of miniaturization and its parallel format, the platform enabled the identification and generation of 12 target clones from a starting sample of only 3900 cells and required only 5-man hours over 11 days. In contrast, the traditional method required 500,000 cells and generated only 5 target clones with 34-man hours expended over 47 days. These data support the considerable reduction in time, manpower and reagents using the miniaturized platform for clonal selection by destructive assay versus conventional approaches. PMID:23153031

  2. Microfabricated arrays for splitting and assay of clonal colonies.

    PubMed

    Gach, Philip C; Xu, Wei; King, Samantha J; Sims, Christopher E; Bear, James; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2012-12-18

    A microfabricated platform was developed for highly parallel and efficient colony picking, splitting, and clone identification. A pallet array provided patterned cell colonies which mated to a second printing array composed of bridging microstructures formed by a supporting base and attached post. The posts enabled mammalian cells from colonies initially cultured on the pallet array to migrate to corresponding sites on the printing array. Separation of the arrays simultaneously split the colonies, creating a patterned replica. Optimization of array elements provided transfer efficiencies greater than 90% using bridging posts of 30 μm diameter and 100 μm length and total colony numbers of 3000. Studies using five mammalian cell lines demonstrated that a variety of adherent cell types could be cultured and effectively split with printing efficiencies of 78-92%. To demonstrate the technique's utility, clonal cell lines with siRNA knockdown of Coronin 1B were generated using the arrays and compared to a traditional FACS/Western Blotting-based approach. Identification of target clones required a destructive assay to identify cells with an absence of Coronin 1B brought about by the successful infection of interfering shRNA construct. By virtue of miniaturization and its parallel format, the platform enabled the identification and generation of 12 target clones from a starting sample of only 3900 cells and required only 5 man hours over 11 days. In contrast, the traditional method required 500,000 cells and generated only 5 target clones with 34 man hours expended over 47 days. These data support the considerable reduction in time, manpower, and reagents using the miniaturized platform for clonal selection by destructive assay versus conventional approaches. PMID:23153031

  3. Effects of western honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colony, cell type, and larval sex on host acquisition by female Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae).

    PubMed

    Calderone, N W; Kuenen, L P

    2001-10-01

    Female mites of the genus Varroa reproduce on the immature stages of Apis cerana F. and A. mellifera L. Mites are found more often in drone brood than worker brood, and while evolutionary explanations for this bias are well supported, the proximate mechanisms are not known. In one experiment, we verified that the proportion of hosts with one or more mites (MPV, mite prevalence value) was significantly greater for drones (0.763 +/- 0.043) (lsmean +/- SE) than for workers (0.253 +/- 0.043) in populations of mites and bees in the United States. Similar results were found for the average number of mites per host. In a second experiment, using a cross-fostering technique in which worker and drone larvae were reared in both worker and drone cells, we found that cell type, larval sex, colony and all interactions affected the level of mites on a host. Mite prevalence values were greatest in drone larvae reared in drone cells (0.907 +/- 0.025), followed by drone larvae reared in worker cells (0.751 +/- 0.025), worker larvae reared in worker cells (0.499 +/- 0.025), and worker larvae reared in drone cells (0.383 +/- 0.025). Similar results were found for the average number of mites per host. Our data show that mite levels are affected by environmental factors (cell type), by factors intrinsic to the host (sex), and by interactions between these factors. In addition, colony-to-colony variation is important to the expression of intrinsic and environmental factors.

  4. Lipocalin-2 inhibits osteoclast formation by suppressing the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Yoon, Kyung-Ae; Gwon, Mi-Ri; Jin Seong, Sook; Suk, Kyoungho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2015-06-10

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily and plays a critical role in the regulation of various physiological processes, such as inflammation and obesity. In this study, we report that LCN2 negatively modulates the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast precursors, resulting in impaired osteoclast formation. The overexpression of LCN2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages or the addition of recombinant LCN2 protein inhibits the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts. LCN2 suppresses macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced proliferation of osteoclast precursor cells without affecting their apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, LCN2 decreases the expression of the M-CSF receptor, c-Fms, and subsequently blocks its downstream signaling cascades. In addition, LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and attenuates the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), which are important modulators in osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, LCN2 inhibits NF-κB signaling pathways, as demonstrated by the suppression of IκBα phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of p65, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Thus, LCN2 is an anti-osteoclastogenic molecule that exerts its effects by retarding the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells. - Highlights: • LCN2 expression is regulated during osteoclast development. • LCN2 suppresses M-CSF-mediated osteoclast precursor proliferation. • LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

  5. Lipocalin-2 inhibits osteoclast formation by suppressing the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Yoon, Kyung-Ae; Gwon, Mi-Ri; Jin Seong, Sook; Suk, Kyoungho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2015-06-10

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily and plays a critical role in the regulation of various physiological processes, such as inflammation and obesity. In this study, we report that LCN2 negatively modulates the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast precursors, resulting in impaired osteoclast formation. The overexpression of LCN2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages or the addition of recombinant LCN2 protein inhibits the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts. LCN2 suppresses macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced proliferation of osteoclast precursor cells without affecting their apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, LCN2 decreases the expression of the M-CSF receptor, c-Fms, and subsequently blocks its downstream signaling cascades. In addition, LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and attenuates the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), which are important modulators in osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, LCN2 inhibits NF-κB signaling pathways, as demonstrated by the suppression of IκBα phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of p65, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Thus, LCN2 is an anti-osteoclastogenic molecule that exerts its effects by retarding the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells.

  6. Perivascular mast cells regulate vein graft neointimal formation and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Grassia, Gianluca; Cambrook, Helen; Ialenti, Armando; MacRitchie, Neil; Carberry, Jaclyn; Lawrence, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Emerging evidence suggests an important role for mast cells in vein graft failure. This study addressed the hypothesis that perivascular mast cells regulate in situ vascular inflammatory and proliferative responses and subsequent vein graft neointimal lesion formation, using an optimized local mast cell reconstitution method. Methods and Results. Neointimal hyperplasia was induced by insertion of a vein graft into the right carotid artery in wild type and mast cell deficient KitW−sh/W−sh mice. In some experiments, mast cells were reconstituted systemically (tail vein injection of bone marrow-derived mast cells) or locally (directly into the right neck area) prior to vein grafting. Vein graft neointimal lesion formation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in KitW−sh/W−sh mice. Mast cell deficiency reduced the number of proliferating cells, and inhibited L-selectin, CCL2, M-CSF and MIP-3α expression in the vein grafts. Local but not systemic mast cell reconstitution restored a perivascular mast cell population that subsequently promoted neointimal formation in mast cell deficient mice. Conclusion. Our data demonstrate that perivascular mast cells play a key role in promoting neointima formation by inducing local acute inflammatory and proliferative responses. These results suggest that ex vivo intraoperative targeting of mast cells may have therapeutic potential for the prevention of pathological vein graft remodeling. PMID:26312183

  7. In Vivo Generation of Neural Stem Cells Through Teratoma Formation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yean Ju; Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Hyun Woo; Song, Hyuk; Park, Chankyu; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-09-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have the potential to differentiate into all cell types of the body in vitro through embryoid body formation or in vivo through teratoma formation. In this study, we attempted to generate in vivo neural stem cells (NSCs) differentiated through teratoma formation using Olig2-GFP transgenic embryonic stem cells (ESCs). After 4 to 6 weeks of injection with Olig2-GFP transgenic ESCs, Olig2-GFP(+) NSCs were identified in teratomas formed in immunodeficient mice. Interestingly, 4-week-old teratomas contained higher percentage of Olig2-GFP(+) cells (∼11%) than 6-week-old teratomas (∼3%). These in vivo-derived NSCs expressed common NSC markers (Nestin and Sox2) and differentiated into terminal neuronal and glial lineages. These results suggest that pure NSC populations exhibiting properties similar to those of brain-derived NSCs can be established through teratoma formation. PMID:27439546

  8. The effects of vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor and colony-stimulating factor-1 on hematopoietic cells in normal and osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Benis, K A; Schneider, G B

    1996-10-15

    Osteopetrosis is a heterogeneous group of bone disorders characterized by the failure of osteoclasts to resorb bone and by several immunological defects including macrophage dysfunction. Two compounds, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) were used in the present study to evaluate their effects on the peritoneal population of cells and on cells within the bone marrow microenvironment in normal and incisors absent (ia) osteopetrotic rats. Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that administration of DBP-MAF to newborn ia animals results in a substantial increase in bone marrow cavity size due to upregulated osteoclast function. To study the effects of these compounds on the macrophage/osteoclast precursors, DBP-MAF, CSF-1, and the combination of these compounds were given to newborn ia and normal littermate animals. Both the normal and mutant phenotypes responded similarly when treated with these compounds. Rats exhibited a profound shift toward the macrophage lineage from the neutrophil lineage when compared with vehicle-treated control animals after treatment with these compounds. In the in vivo peritoneal lavage study, animals received injections of CSF-1, DBP-MAF or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 over a 4-week period. The various types of cells in the peritoneal cavity were then enumerated. The in vitro study consisted of cells isolated from the bone marrow microenvironment and cultured on feeder layers of CSF-1, DBP-MAF, or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 for colony enumeration. The increase in macrophage numbers at the expense of neutrophil numbers could be seen in both the in vivo and in vitro experiments. The macrophage/osteoclast and neutrophil lineages have a common precursor, the granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC). With the addition of CSF-1, the GM-CFC precursor may be induced into the macrophage/osteoclast lineage rather than the granulocyte lineage. This increased pool of cells in the

  9. Identification of a complex genetic network underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae colony morphology

    PubMed Central

    Voordeckers, Karin; De Maeyer, Dries; Zande, Elisa; Vinces, Marcelo D; Meert, Wim; Cloots, Lore; Ryan, Owen; Marchal, Kathleen; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    When grown on solid substrates, different microorganisms often form colonies with very specific morphologies. Whereas the pioneers of microbiology often used colony morphology to discriminate between species and strains, the phenomenon has not received much attention recently. In this study, we use a genome-wide assay in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify all genes that affect colony morphology. We show that several major signalling cascades, including the MAPK, TORC, SNF1 and RIM101 pathways play a role, indicating that morphological changes are a reaction to changing environments. Other genes that affect colony morphology are involved in protein sorting and epigenetic regulation. Interestingly, the screen reveals only few genes that are likely to play a direct role in establishing colony morphology, with one notable example being FLO11, a gene encoding a cell-surface adhesin that has already been implicated in colony morphology, biofilm formation, and invasive and pseudohyphal growth. Using a series of modified promoters for fine-tuning FLO11 expression, we confirm the central role of Flo11 and show that differences in FLO11 expression result in distinct colony morphologies. Together, our results provide a first comprehensive look at the complex genetic network that underlies the diversity in the morphologies of yeast colonies. PMID:22882838

  10. Pattern formation by vascular mesenchymal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, Alan; Tintut, Yin; Petrasek, Danny; Boström, Kristina; Demer, Linda L.

    2004-06-01

    In embryogenesis, immature mesenchymal cells aggregate and organize into patterned tissues. Later in life, a pathological recapitulation of this process takes place in atherosclerotic lesions, when vascular mesenchymal cells organize into trabecular bone tissue within the artery wall. Here we show that multipotential adult vascular mesenchymal cells self-organize in vitro into patterns that are predicted by a mathematical model based on molecular morphogens interacting in a reaction-diffusion process. We identify activator and inhibitor morphogens for stripe, spot, and labyrinthine patterns and confirm the model predictions in vitro. Thus, reaction-diffusion principles may play a significant role in morphogenetic processes in adult mesenchymal cells.

  11. Colonial and Cellular Polymorphism in Xenorhabdus luminescens

    PubMed Central

    Hurlbert, Ronald E.; Xu, Jimin; Small, Christopher L.

    1989-01-01

    A highly polymorphic Xenorhabdus luminescens strain was isolated. The primary form of X. luminescens was luminescent and nonswarming and produced a yellow pigment and antimicrobial substances. The primary form generated a secondary form that had a distinct orange pigmentation, was weakly luminescent, and did not produce antimicrobial substances. Both the primary and secondary forms generated a set of colony variants at frequencies that exceeded normal rates for spontaneous mutation. The variant forms include nonswarming and swarming forms that formed large colonies and a small-colony (SC) form. The primary and secondary forms generated their SC forms at frequencies of between 1 and 14% and 1 and 2%, respectively. The SC forms were distinct from their parental primary and secondary forms in colony and cellular morphology and in protein composition. The cellular morphology and protein patterns of the nonswarming and swarming colony variants were all very similar. The DNA fingerprints of all forms were similar. Each SC-form colony reverted at high frequency to the form from which it was derived. The proportion of parental-type cells in the SC-form colonies varied with age, with young colonies containing as few as 0.0002% parental-type cells. The primary-to-secondary switch was stable, but all the other colony forms were able to switch at high frequencies to the alternative colony phenotypes. Images PMID:16347906

  12. Lysobacter enzymogenes Uses Two Distinct Cell-Cell Signaling Systems for Differential Regulation of Secondary-Metabolite Biosynthesis and Colony Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Guoliang; Wang, Yulan; Liu, Yiru; Xu, Feifei; He, Ya-Wen; Du, Liangcheng; Venturi, Vittorio; Fan, Jiaqin; Hu, Baishi

    2013-01-01

    Lysobacter enzymogenes is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium that is emerging as a potentially novel biological control agent and a new source of bioactive secondary metabolites, such as the heat-stable antifungal factor (HSAF) and photoprotective polyene pigments. Thus far, the regulatory mechanism(s) for biosynthesis of these bioactive secondary metabolites remains largely unknown in L. enzymogenes. In the present study, the diffusible signal factor (DSF) and diffusible factor (DF)-mediated cell-cell signaling systems were identified for the first time from L. enzymogenes. The results show that both Rpf/DSF and DF signaling systems played critical roles in modulating HSAF biosynthesis in L. enzymogenes. Rpf/DSF signaling and DF signaling played negative and positive effects in polyene pigment production, respectively, with DF playing a more important role in regulating this phenotype. Interestingly, only Rpf/DSF, but not the DF signaling system, regulated colony morphology of L. enzymgenes. Both Rpf/DSF and DF signaling systems were involved in the modulation of expression of genes with diverse functions in L. enzymogenes, and their own regulons exhibited only a few loci that were regulated by both systems. These findings unveil for the first time new roles of the Rpf/DSF and DF signaling systems in secondary metabolite biosynthesis of L. enzymogenes. PMID:23974132

  13. Suppression of T cell-induced osteoclast formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Genistein and coumestrol prevent activated T cell induced osteoclast formation. •Anti-TNF neutralising antibodies prevent the pro-osteoclastic effect of activated T cells. •Phytoestrogens inhibit T cell derived TNF alpha and inflammatory cytokine production. •Phytoestrogens have a broader range of anti-osteoclastic actions than other anti-resorptives. -- Abstract: Inhibition of T cell derived cytokine production could help suppress osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory skeletal disorders. Bisphosphonates are typically prescribed to prevent inflammatory bone loss but are not tolerated by all patients and are associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In light of this other anti-resorptives such as phytoestrogens are being considered. However the effect of phytoestrogens on T cell-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. The effect of genistein and coumestrol on activated T cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and cytokine production was therefore examined. Concentrations of genistein and coumestrol (10{sup −7} M) previously shown to directly inhibit osteoclast formation also suppressed the formation of TRAP positive osteoclast induced by con A activated T cells, which was dependent on inhibition of T cell derived TNF-α. While both reduced osteoclast formation their mechanism of action differed. The anti-osteoclastic effect of coumestrol was associated with a dual effect on con A induced T cell proliferation and activation; 10{sup −7} M coumestrol significantly reducing T cell number (0.36) and TNF-α (0.47), IL-1β (0.23) and IL-6 (0.35) expression, whereas genistein (10{sup −7} M) had no effect on T cell number but a more pronounced effect on T cell differentiation reducing expression of TNF-α (0.49), IL-1β (0.52), IL-6 (0.71) and RANKL (0.71). Phytoestrogens therefore prevent the pro-osteoclastic action of T cells suggesting they may have a role in the control of inflammatory bone loss.

  14. Endogenous formation of morphine in human cells.

    PubMed

    Poeaknapo, Chotima; Schmidt, Jürgen; Brandsch, Matthias; Dräger, Birgit; Zenk, Meinhart H

    2004-09-28

    Morphine is a plant (opium poppy)-derived alkaloid and one of the strongest known analgesic compounds. Studies from several laboratories have suggested that animal and human tissue or fluids contain trace amounts of morphine. Its origin in mammals has been believed to be of dietary origin. Here, we address the question of whether morphine is of endogenous origin or derived from exogenous sources. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids present in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) and human pancreas carcinoma cells (DAN-G) were identified by GC/tandem MS (MS/MS) as norlaudanosoline (DAN-G), reticuline (DAN-G and SH-SY5Y), and morphine (10 nM, SH-SY5Y). The stereochemistry of reticuline was determined to be 1-(S). Growth of the SH-SY5Y cell line in the presence of (18)O(2) led to the [(18)O]-labeled morphine that had the molecular weight 4 mass units higher than if grown in (16)O(2), indicating the presence of two atoms of (18)O per molecule of morphine. Growth of DAN-G cells in an (18)O(2) atmosphere yielded norlaudanosoline and (S)-reticuline, both labeled at only two of the four oxygen atoms. This result clearly demonstrates that all three alkaloids are of biosynthetic origin and suggests that norlaudanosoline and (S)-reticuline are endogenous precursors of morphine. Feeding of [ring-(13)C(6)]-tyramine, [1-(13)C, N-(13)CH(3)]-(S)-reticuline and [N-CD(3)]-thebaine to the neuroblastoma cells led each to the position-specific labeling of morphine, as established by GC/MS/MS. Without doubt, human cells can produce the alkaloid morphine. The studies presented here serve as a platform for the exploration of the function of "endogenous morphine" in the neurosciences and immunosciences.

  15. Signaling events in pathogen-induced macrophage foam cell formation.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yazdani B; Mekasha, Samrawit; He, Xianbao; Gibson, Frank C; Ingalls, Robin R

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage foam cell formation is a key event in atherosclerosis. Several triggers induce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake by macrophages to create foam cells, including infections with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Chlamydia pneumoniae, two pathogens that have been linked to atherosclerosis. While gene regulation during foam cell formation has been examined, comparative investigations to identify shared and specific pathogen-elicited molecular events relevant to foam cell formation are not well documented. We infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages with P. gingivalis or C. pneumoniae in the presence of LDL to induce foam cell formation, and examined gene expression using an atherosclerosis pathway targeted plate array. We found over 30 genes were significantly induced in response to both pathogens, including PPAR family members that are broadly important in atherosclerosis and matrix remodeling genes that may play a role in plaque development and stability. Six genes mainly involved in lipid transport were significantly downregulated. The response overall was remarkably similar and few genes were regulated in a pathogen-specific manner. Despite very divergent lifestyles, P. gingivalis and C. pneumoniae activate similar gene expression profiles during foam cell formation that may ultimately serve as targets for modulating infection-elicited foam cell burden, and progression of atherosclerosis.

  16. The Formation of Germ Cell for Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivaldi, Silvia; Scaratti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to analyze the process of "germ cell" formation by framing it as an opportunity for promoting organizational learning and transformation. The paper aims to specifically answer two research questions: Why does the "germ cell" have a pivotal role in organization's transformation? and Which…

  17. Cell-fusion method to visualize interphase nuclear pore formation.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Funakoshi, Tomoko; Imamoto, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the nucleus is a complex and sophisticated organelle that organizes genomic DNA to support essential cellular functions. The nuclear surface contains many nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), channels for macromolecular transport between the cytoplasm and nucleus. It is well known that the number of NPCs almost doubles during interphase in cycling cells. However, the mechanism of NPC formation is poorly understood, presumably because a practical system for analysis does not exist. The most difficult obstacle in the visualization of interphase NPC formation is that NPCs already exist after nuclear envelope formation, and these existing NPCs interfere with the observation of nascent NPCs. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a novel system using the cell-fusion technique (heterokaryon method), previously also used to analyze the shuttling of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, to visualize the newly synthesized interphase NPCs. In addition, we used a photobleaching approach that validated the cell-fusion method. We recently used these methods to demonstrate the role of cyclin-dependent protein kinases and of Pom121 in interphase NPC formation in cycling human cells. Here, we describe the details of the cell-fusion approach and compare the system with other NPC formation visualization methods.

  18. Single cell pattern formation and transient cytoskeletal arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bement, William M.; von Dassow, George

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of developmental biology is to explain the emergence of pattern in cell layers, tissues and organs. Developmental biologists now accept that reaction diffusion-based mechanisms are broadly employed in developing organisms to direct pattern formation. Here we briefly consider these mechanisms and then apply some of the concepts derived from them to several processes that occur in single cells: wound repair, yeast budding, and cytokinesis. Two conclusions emerge from this analysis: first, there is considerable overlap at the level of general mechanisms between developmental and single cell pattern formation; second, dynamic structures based on the actin cytoskeleton may be far more ordered than is generally recognized. PMID:24529246

  19. Hypersaline conditions induce changes in cell-wall melanization and colony structure in a halophilic and a xerophilic black yeast species of the genus Trimmatostroma.

    PubMed

    Kogej, Tina; Gorbushina, Anna A; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2006-06-01

    Melanized yeast-like meristematic fungi are characteristic inhabitants of highly stressed environments and are rare eukaryotic extremophiles. Therefore, they are attractive organisms for studies of adaptations. In this study we compared two meristematic species of the genus Trimmatostroma on media of differing water potentials isolated from distinct water-stressed environments: T. salinum from the hypersaline water of a solar saltern, and T. abietis from a marble monument in Crimea. The morphology and melanization of both isolates in response to sodium chloride-induced water stress were investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. We describe and compare the colony form and structure, ultrastructure, and degree of cell-wall melanization of both species in reaction to salinity and to inhibited melanin synthesis. The halophilic T. salinum responded to changed salinity conditions on the level of individual cell ultrastructure and degree of cell wall melanization, whereas the xerophilic rock-inhabiting T. abietis responded with modification of its colony structure. Surprisingly, both the halophilic and the xerophilic Trimmatostroma species were able to adapt to hypersaline growth conditions, although their growth patterns show distinct adaptation of each species to their natural ecological niches.

  20. Therapeutic efficacy of T cells derived from lymph nodes draining a poorly immunogenic tumor transduced to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Arca, M J; Krauss, J C; Aruga, A; Cameron, M J; Shu, S; Chang, A E

    1996-01-01

    We examined the host immune response to the poorly immunogenic B16-BL6 melanoma, which was transduced to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (450 ng/10(6)/24 h). Tumor growth after subcutaneous inoculation was not significantly altered, although an influx of neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages was evident within tumors and draining lymph nodes (LNs). Immunization with irradiated transduced cells did not induce systemic immunity to the parental tumor. However, vaccination with transduced tumors significantly augmented in vivo sensitization of draining LN cells. These tumor-draining LN (TDLN) cells, when secondarily stimulated in vitro with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies and expanded in interleukin-2 (10 U/ml), exhibited greater release of GM-CST and interferon-gamma against tumor compared with TDLN cells from animals with parental tumor. In adoptive immunotherapy, activated LN cells draining transduced tumors mediated significant reductions of the numbers of established pulmonary metastases compared with LN cells draining parental tumor, which were ineffective. In addition, the therapeutic efficacy of LN cells draining transduced tumors was significantly better than LN cells primed in vivo with tumor cells admixed with Corynebacterium parvum, which we have previously described as an approach to generate immune cells. Thus, GM-CSF appears to be an important adjuvant in the induction of tumor immunity. PMID:8785710

  1. Asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miseon; Chang, Jaerak; Chang, Sunghoe; Lee, Kyung S; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2014-02-21

    CPAP is an essential component for centriole formation. Here, we report that CPAP is also critical for symmetric spindle pole formation during mitosis. We observed that pericentriolar material between the mitotic spindle poles were asymmetrically distributed in CPAP-depleted cells even with intact numbers of centrioles. The length of procentrioles was slightly reduced by CPAP depletion, but the length of mother centrioles was not affected. Surprisingly, the young mother centrioles of the CPAP-depleted cells are not fully matured, as evidenced by the absence of distal and subdistal appendage proteins. We propose that the selective absence of centriolar appendages at the young mother centrioles may be responsible for asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted cells. Our results suggest that the neural stem cells with CPAP mutations might form asymmetric spindle poles, which results in premature initiation of differentiation.

  2. Germ cell formation from embryonic stem cells and the use of somatic cell nuclei in oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Emanuele; Forabosco, Antonino; Schlessinger, David

    2011-03-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have remarkable properties of pluripotency and self-renewal, along with the retention of chromosomal integrity. Germ cells function as a kind of "transgenerational stem cells," transmitting genetic information from one generation to the next. The formation of putative primordial germ cells (PGCs) and germ cells from mouse and human ESCs (hESCs) has, in fact, been shown, and the apparent derivation of functional mouse male gametes has also been described. Additionally, investigators have successfully reprogrammed somatic nuclei into a pluripotent state by inserting them into ESCs or oocytes. This would enable the generation of ESCs genetically identical to the somatic cell donor and their use in cell therapy. However, these methodologies are still inefficient and their mechanisms poorly understood. Until full comprehension of these processes is obtained, clinical applications remain remote. Nevertheless, they represent promising tools in the future, enhancing methods of therapeutic cloning and infertility treatment.

  3. Enhanced product formation in continuous fermentations with microbial cell recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, D.N.; Young, M.D.

    1981-02-01

    The effect of partial recycle of microbial cells on the operation of a chemostat has been investigated for two fermentations. Stable steady states with and without partial cell recycle were obtained for the conversion of d-sorbitol to L-sorbose by Gluconobacter oxydans subsp. suboxydans 1916B and for the conversion of glucose to 2-ketogluconic acid by Serratia marcescens NRRl B-486. The employment of partial cell recycle dramatically increased product formation rates for both fermentations.

  4. Tracing behavior of endothelial cells promotes vascular network formation.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Noriko; Sekine, Hidekazu; Bise, Ryoma; Okano, Teruo; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2016-05-01

    The in vitro formation of network structures derived from endothelial cells in grafts before transplantation contributes to earlier engraftment. In a previous study, endothelial cells migrated to form a net-shaped structure in co-culture. However, the specific network formation behavior of endothelial cells during migration remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated the tracing behavior and cell cycle of endothelial cells using Fucci-labeled (Fluorescent Ubiquitination-based Cell Cycle Indicator) endothelial cells. Here, we observed the co-culture of Fucci-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) together with normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) using time-lapse imaging and analyzed by multicellular concurrent tracking. In the G0/G1 period, HUVECs migrate faster than in the S/G2/M period, because G0/G1 is the mobile phase and S/G2/M is the proliferation phase in the cell cycle. When HUVECs are co-cultured, they tend to move randomly until they find existing tracks that they then follow to form clusters. Extracellular matrix (ECM) staining showed that collagen IV, laminin and thrombospondin deposited in accordance with endothelial cell networks. Therefore the HUVECs may migrate on the secreted ECM and exhibit tracing behavior, where the HUVECs migrate toward each other. These results suggested that ECM and a cell phase contributed to form a network by accelerating cell migration.

  5. Cell-adhesion molecules in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R

    1995-01-23

    After learning events the CNS of higher organisms selects, which acquired informations are permanently stored as a memory trace. This period of memory consolidation is susceptible to interference by biochemical inhibitors of transcription and translation. Ependymin is a specific CNS glycoprotein functionally involved in memory consolidation in goldfish: after active shock-avoidance conditioning ependymin mRNA is rapidly induced in meningeal fibroblasts followed by enhanced synthesis and secretion of several closely related forms of the protein. Intracranial injections of anti-ependymin antisera or antisense oligodeoxynucleotides interfere specifically with memory consolidation, indicating that only de novo synthesized ependymin molecules are involved. Ependymin is capable of directing the growth of central axons in vitro and participates in neuronal regeneration in situ, presumably by its HNK-1 cell-adhesion epitope. Experiments reviewed in this article suggest a model that involves two regulation mechanisms for the function of ependymin in behavioural plasticity: while hormones appear to determine, how much of this cell adhesion molecule is synthesized after learning, local changes of metal cation concentrations in the micro-environment of activated neurons may polymerize ependymin at those synapses, that have to be consolidated to improve their efficacy for future use.

  6. The Amana Colonies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilja, Marilyn

    Designed for use in Iowa elementary schools, this unit introduces students to Iowa's Amana Colonies. Four lessons cover the history and cultural heritage of the colonies, daily life in historical times, daily life in modern times, and the colonies as a corporate museum. Throughout the lessons, emphasis is placed on the values and organization of…

  7. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  8. Vaccination with irradiated tumor cells engineered to secrete murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent, specific, and long-lasting anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Dranoff, G; Jaffee, E; Lazenby, A; Golumbek, P; Levitsky, H; Brose, K; Jackson, V; Hamada, H; Pardoll, D; Mulligan, R C

    1993-01-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines. PMID:8097319

  9. Pretransplant Mobilization with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Improves B-Cell Reconstitution by Lentiviral Vector Gene Therapy in SCID-X1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Marshall W.; Riegman, Adriaan R.A.; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg−/− mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin−) cells or Il2rg−/− Lin− cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  10. Pulp stem cells: implication in reparative dentin formation.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova-Nakov, Sasha; Baudry, Anne; Harichane, Yassine; Kellermann, Odile; Goldberg, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Many dental pulp stem cells are neural crest derivatives essential for lifelong maintenance of tooth functions and homeostasis as well as tooth repair. These cells may be directly implicated in the healing process or indirectly involved in cell-to-cell diffusion of paracrine messages to resident (pulpoblasts) or nonresident cells (migrating mesenchymal cells). The identity of the pulp progenitors and the mechanisms sustaining their regenerative capacity remain largely unknown. Taking advantage of the A4 cell line, a multipotent stem cell derived from the molar pulp of mouse embryo, we investigated the capacity of these pulp-derived precursors to induce in vivo the formation of a reparative dentin-like structure upon implantation within the pulp of a rodent incisor or a first maxillary molar after surgical exposure. One month after the pulp injury alone, a nonmineralized fibrous matrix filled the mesial part of the coronal pulp chamber. Upon A4 cell implantation, a mineralized osteodentin was formed in the implantation site without affecting the structure and vitality of the residual pulp in the central and distal parts of the pulp chamber. These results show that dental pulp stem cells can induce the formation of reparative dentin and therefore constitute a useful tool for pulp therapies. Finally, reparative dentin was also built up when A4 progenitors were performed by alginate beads, suggesting that alginate is a suitable carrier for cell implantation in teeth. PMID:24698687

  11. Effects of transforming growth factor beta and epidermal growth factor on cell proliferation and the formation of bone nodules in isolated fetal rat calvaria cells.

    PubMed

    Antosz, M E; Bellows, C G; Aubin, J E

    1989-08-01

    When cells enzymatically isolated from fetal rat calvaria (RC cells) are cultured in vitro in the presence of ascorbic acid and Na beta-glycerophosphate, discrete three-dimensional nodules form with the histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural characteristics of bone (Bellows et al; Calcified Tissue International 38:143-154, 1986; Bhargava et al., Bone, 9:155-163, 1988). Quantitation of the number of bone nodules that forms provides a colony assay for osteoprogenitor cells present in the RC population (Bellows and Aubin, Develop. Biol., 133:8-13, 1989). Continuous culture with either epidermal growth factor (EGF) or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) results in dose-dependent inhibition of bone nodule formation; however, the former causes increased proliferation and saturation density, while the latter reduces both parameters. Addition of EGF (48 h pulse, 2-200 ng/ml) to RC cells at day 1 after plating results in increased proliferation and population saturation density and an increased number of bone nodules formed. Similar pulses at confluence and in postconfluent multilayered cultures when nodules first begin forming (approx. day 11) inhibited bone nodule formation and resulted in a smaller stimulation of cell proliferation. Forty-eight hour pulses of TGF-beta (0.01-1 ng/ml) reduced bone nodule formation and proliferation at all times examined, with pulses on day 1 causing maximum inhibition. The effects of pulses with TGF-beta and EGF on inhibition of nodule formation are independent of the presence of serum in the culture medium during the pulse. The data suggest that whereas EGF can either stimulate or inhibit the formation of bone nodules depending upon the time and duration of exposure, TGF-B inhibits bone nodule formation under all conditions tested. Moreover, these effects on osteoprogenitor cell differentiation do not always correlate with the effects of the growth factors on RC cell proliferation. PMID:2787326

  12. Formation of dimethylthioarsenicals in red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Naranmandura, Hua; Suzuki, Kazuo T.

    2008-03-15

    The bladder and skin are the primary targets for arsenic-induced carcinogenicity in mammals. Thioarsenicals dimethylmonothioarsinic (DMMTA{sup V}) and dimethyldithioarsinic (DMDTA{sup V}) acids are common urinary metabolites, the former being much more toxic than non-thiolated dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) and comparable to dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in epidermoid cells, suggesting that the metabolic production of thioarsenicals may be a risk factor for the development of cancer in these organs. To reveal their production sites (tissues/body fluids), we examined the uptake and transformation of the four dimethylated arsenicals by incubation with rat and human red blood cells (RBCs). Although DMA{sup V} and DMDTA{sup V} were not taken up by either type of RBCs, DMA{sup III} and DMMTA{sup V} were taken up by both (more efficiently by rat ones), though DMMTA{sup V} was taken up slowly, and then the arsenic transformed into DMDTA{sup V} was excreted from both types of animal RBCs. On the other hand, although DMA{sup III} taken up rapidly by rat RBCs was retained in the RBCs, that taken up by human RBCs was immediately transformed into DMMTA{sup V} and then excreted into the incubation medium without being retained in the RBCs. In a separate experiment, arsenic remaining in primary rat hepatocytes after incubation with 1.5 {mu}M DMA{sup III} was recovered from the incubation medium in the forms of DMA{sup V} and DMMTA{sup V} in the presence of human RBCs, but not in the presence of rat RBCs (in which the arsenic was bound to hemoglobin). Thus, DMMTA{sup V} was detected in the medium only in the presence of human RBCs and increased with incubation time. It was proposed that arsenic is excreted from hepatocytes into the bloodstream in the form of DMA{sup III} and then taken up by RBCs in humans, where it is transformed into DMMTA{sup V} and then excreted again into the bloodstream.

  13. Agarose plating and a bead type culture technique enable and stimulate development of protoplast-derived colonies in a number of plant species.

    PubMed

    Shillito, R D; Paszkowski, J; Potrykus, I

    1983-10-01

    Two novel techniques improve division and colony formation from protoplasts: 1) Plating in agarose stimulates colony formation of protoplasts from a wide range of species. Protoplasts from Nicotiana tabacum developed to colonies from lower initial population densities in agarose than in agar or liquid. Protoplasts from Hyoscyamus muticus which do not divide in agar divided and formed colonies in agarose at higher efficiencies than in liquid medium. 2) Culture of gel embedded protoplasts in large volumes of liquid medium on a gyrotatory shaker ('bead culture') further improved plating efficiencies in some species (e.g. Lycopersicon esculentum and Crepis capillaris) and enabled sustained proliferation of protoplasts which had not previously developed beyond the few cell colony stage (Brassica rapa and a mutator gene variety of Petunia hybrida). The combination of 'agarose plating' and 'bead culture' dramatically improved plating efficiencies of protoplasts in all species tested.

  14. Contraction-induced cluster formation in cardiac cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Takahiro; Isomura, Akihiro; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2008-11-01

    The evolution of the spatial arrangement of cells in a primary culture of cardiac tissue derived from newborn rats was studied experimentally over an extended period. It was found that cells attract each other spontaneously to form a clustered structure over the timescale of several days. These clusters exhibit spontaneous rhythmic contraction and have been confirmed to consist of cardiac muscle cells. The addition of a contraction inhibitor (2,3-butanedione-2-monoxime) to the culture medium resulted in the inhibition of both the spontaneous contractions exhibited by the cells as well as the formation of clusters. Furthermore, the formation of clusters is suppressed when high concentrations of collagen are used for coating the substratum to which the cells adhere. From these experimental observations, it was deduced that the cells are mechanically stressed by the tension associated with repeated contractions and that this results in the cells becoming compact and attracting each other, finally resulting in the formation of clusters. This process can be interpreted as modulation of a cellular network by the activity associated with contraction, which could be employed to control cellular networks by modifying the dynamics associated with the contractions in cardiac tissue culture.

  15. Immunomodulation Induced by Stem Cell Mobilization and Harvesting in Healthy Donors: Increased Systemic Osteopontin Levels after Treatment with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Melve, Guro Kristin; Ersvaer, Elisabeth; Akkök, Çiğdem Akalın; Ahmed, Aymen Bushra; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Hervig, Tor; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells from healthy donors mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and harvested by leukapheresis are commonly used for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The frequency of severe graft versus host disease is similar for patients receiving peripheral blood and bone marrow allografts, even though the blood grafts contain more T cells, indicating mobilization-related immunoregulatory effects. The regulatory phosphoprotein osteopontin was quantified in plasma samples from healthy donors before G-CSF treatment, after four days of treatment immediately before and after leukapheresis, and 18–24 h after apheresis. Myeloma patients received chemotherapy, combined with G-CSF, for stem cell mobilization and plasma samples were prepared immediately before, immediately after, and 18–24 h after leukapheresis. G-CSF treatment of healthy stem cell donors increased plasma osteopontin levels, and a further increase was seen immediately after leukapheresis. The pre-apheresis levels were also increased in myeloma patients compared to healthy individuals. Finally, in vivo G-CSF exposure did not alter T cell expression of osteopontin ligand CD44, and in vitro osteopontin exposure induced only small increases in anti-CD3- and anti-CD28-stimulated T cell proliferation. G-CSF treatment, followed by leukapheresis, can increase systemic osteopontin levels, and this effect may contribute to the immunomodulatory effects of G-CSF treatment. PMID:27447610

  16. Tracing haematopoietic stem cell formation at single-cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fan; Li, Xianlong; Wang, Weili; Zhu, Ping; Zhou, Jie; He, Wenyan; Ding, Meng; Xiong, Fuyin; Zheng, Xiaona; Li, Zhuan; Ni, Yanli; Mu, Xiaohuan; Wen, Lu; Cheng, Tao; Lan, Yu; Yuan, Weiping; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Bing

    2016-05-18

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are derived early from embryonic precursors, such as haemogenic endothelial cells and pre-haematopoietic stem cells (pre-HSCs), the molecular identity of which still remains elusive. Here we use potent surface markers to capture the nascent pre-HSCs at high purity, as rigorously validated by single-cell-initiated serial transplantation. Then we apply single-cell RNA sequencing to analyse endothelial cells, CD45(-) and CD45(+) pre-HSCs in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region, and HSCs in fetal liver. Pre-HSCs show unique features in transcriptional machinery, arterial signature, metabolism state, signalling pathway, and transcription factor network. Functionally, activation of mechanistic targets of rapamycin (mTOR) is shown to be indispensable for the emergence of HSCs but not haematopoietic progenitors. Transcriptome data-based functional analysis reveals remarkable heterogeneity in cell-cycle status of pre-HSCs. Finally, the core molecular signature of pre-HSCs is identified. Collectively, our work paves the way for dissection of complex molecular mechanisms regulating stepwise generation of HSCs in vivo, informing future efforts to engineer HSCs for clinical applications.

  17. Tracing haematopoietic stem cell formation at single-cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fan; Li, Xianlong; Wang, Weili; Zhu, Ping; Zhou, Jie; He, Wenyan; Ding, Meng; Xiong, Fuyin; Zheng, Xiaona; Li, Zhuan; Ni, Yanli; Mu, Xiaohuan; Wen, Lu; Cheng, Tao; Lan, Yu; Yuan, Weiping; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Bing

    2016-05-26

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are derived early from embryonic precursors, such as haemogenic endothelial cells and pre-haematopoietic stem cells (pre-HSCs), the molecular identity of which still remains elusive. Here we use potent surface markers to capture the nascent pre-HSCs at high purity, as rigorously validated by single-cell-initiated serial transplantation. Then we apply single-cell RNA sequencing to analyse endothelial cells, CD45(-) and CD45(+) pre-HSCs in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region, and HSCs in fetal liver. Pre-HSCs show unique features in transcriptional machinery, arterial signature, metabolism state, signalling pathway, and transcription factor network. Functionally, activation of mechanistic targets of rapamycin (mTOR) is shown to be indispensable for the emergence of HSCs but not haematopoietic progenitors. Transcriptome data-based functional analysis reveals remarkable heterogeneity in cell-cycle status of pre-HSCs. Finally, the core molecular signature of pre-HSCs is identified. Collectively, our work paves the way for dissection of complex molecular mechanisms regulating stepwise generation of HSCs in vivo, informing future efforts to engineer HSCs for clinical applications. PMID:27225119

  18. Drosophila neural stem cells in brain development and tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanrui; Reichert, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblasts, the neural stem cells in Drosophila, generate the complex neural structure of the central nervous system. Significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms regulating the self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation in Drosophila neuroblast lineages. Deregulation of these mechanisms can lead to severe developmental defects and the formation of malignant brain tumors. Here, the authors review the molecular genetics of Drosophila neuroblasts and discuss some recent advances in stem cell and cancer biology using this model system.

  19. Streptomycin favors biofilm formation by altering cell surface properties.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2016-10-01

    Studies have shown that external stress induces biofilm formation, but the underlying details are not clearly understood. This study investigates the changes in cell surface properties leading to increase in biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of streptomycin. Bacterial attachment in the presence and absence of streptomycin was quantified by fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, cell surface charge and contact angle were measured and the free energy barrier for attachment was modeled using extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (xDLVO) theory. Peptides from bacterial cell surface were shaved by protease treatment and identified with ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-QTOF and a homology search program SPIDER. Biofilm formation increased significantly in the presence of streptomycin (10 mg/L) in the culture. Bacterial cell surface charge reduced, and hydrophobicity increased leading to a net decrease in the free energy barrier for attachment. Extracellular matrix-binding protein was positively regulated in S. aureus under stress, indicating stronger interaction between bacterial cells and solid surface. In addition, several other proteins including biofilm regulatory proteins, multidrug efflux pumps, transporters, signaling proteins, and virulence factors were differentially expressed on bacterial cell surface, which is indicative of a strong stress response by bacteria to streptomycin treatment. PMID:27568380

  20. Influence of preharvest tumor cell contamination in bone marrow or blood does not predict resultant tumor cell contamination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilized stem cells.

    PubMed

    Krüger, W; Kröger, N; Tögel, F; Badbaran, A; Renges, H; Gieseking, F; Gutensohn, K; Jänicke, F; Zander, A R

    2001-04-01

    Tumor cell contamination of stem cell collections harvested from breast cancer patients is a common phenomenon described by several investigators but with findings that vary among reports. Although so-called co-mobilization of these cells has been hypothesized, the origin of tumor cell contamination in stem cells is still unknown. A total of 47 G-CSF mobilized stem cell grafts from patients with nodal-positive (n = 30), chemosensitive metastatic (n = 11), and 5 women with inflammatory breast cancer were evaluated for cancer cells by immunocytochemistry. Additionally, 40 bone marrow aspirations and 23 peripheral blood samples collected prior to apheresis and after one to two cycles of conventional chemotherapy were available for examination. Tumor cell contamination of leukapheresis correlated best with preharvest blood state. This was valid when the nominal (positive/negative) presence of tumor cells in blood was compared to the nominal presence of tumor cells in apheresis samples and when the it was correlated to the tumor cell load of apheresis samples (TCL = tumor cells per 10(6) nucleated cells investigated). The correlation between blood and stem cells was better (nominal and quantitative) than that between marrow and stem cells, despite the larger sample size of marrow aspirations. The presence or absence of cancer cells in apheresis samples could not be safely predicted by the presence or absence of tumor cells in marrow or blood alone. Diagnostic specificity seems to improve from a combination of results from marrow and blood analysis. No correlation was found in quantitative analysis of tumor cell contamination between marrow and blood. In conclusion, the results suggest that blood and bone marrow represent different compartments for epithelial cancer cells and that contaminating tumor cells in stem cell harvests may be derived from the blood and/or marrow compartment. The tumor cell contamination of a stem cell harvest cannot be safely predicted by a

  1. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 negatively regulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor production by breast tumor-associated macrophages that mediate tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Samineni, Sridhar; Zhang, Zhifang; Shively, John E

    2013-07-15

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), a cell adhesion molecule expressed on epithelial cells and activated immune cells, is downregulated in many cancers and plays a role in inhibition of inflammation in part by inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production by myeloid cells. As macrophages are associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer, but play important roles in normal breast, we hypothesized that CEACAM1 downregulation would lead to tumor promotion under inflammatory conditions. Cocultures of proinflammatory M1 macrophages with CEACAM1 negative MCF7 breast cells produced high levels of G-CSF (10 ng/mL) compared to CEACAM1-transfected MCF7/4S cells (1 ng/mL) or anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage cocultures (0.5 or 0.1 ng/mL, MCF7 or MCF7/4S, respectively). The expression of CEACAM1 on M1s was much greater than for M2s and was observed only in cocultures with either MCF7 or MCF7/4S cells. When M1 macrophages were mixed with MCF7 cells and implanted in murine mammary fat pads of nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice, tumor size and blood vessel density were significantly greater than MCF7 or MCF7/4S only tumors which were hardly detected after 8 weeks of growth. In contrast, M1 cells had a much reduced effect on MCF7/4S tumor growth and blood vessel density, indicating that the tumor inhibitory effect of CEACAM1 is most likely related to its anti-inflammatory action on inflammatory macrophages. These results support our previous finding that CEACAM1 inhibits both G-CSF production by myeloid cells and G-CSF-stimulated tumor angiogenesis.

  2. Colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor protein expression is a specific marker for goldfish (Carassius auratus L.) macrophage progenitors and their differentiated cell types.

    PubMed

    Katzenback, Barbara A; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2012-03-01

    Signaling through the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) mediates the proliferation, differentiation, and activation of macrophages and their progenitors. In this study we report on the use of an anti-goldfish CSF-1R antibody to specifically recognize a population of CSF-1R positive cells from goldfish tissues. Furthermore, using our previously characterized primary kidney macrophage culture system, we show that CSF-1R positive cells include monocytes, macrophages, and their progenitor cells. Freshly isolated progenitor cells had a higher median florescent intensity ratio than those progenitor cells cultured for up to four days. The decrease in CSF-1R expression on the progenitor cells coincides with the appearance and development of monocytes and macrophages. Monocytes were consistently CSF-1R+ and maintained the high level of CSF-1R expression as they developed into macrophages. Like that of mammalian systems, CSF-1R is expressed on all macrophage sub-populations (progenitors, monocytes, macrophages), and CSF-1R expression increases with macrophage development in teleosts.

  3. Cell autonomous roles of Nedd4 in craniofacial bone formation.

    PubMed

    Wiszniak, Sophie; Harvey, Natasha; Schwarz, Quenten

    2016-02-01

    Nedd4 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that has an essential role in craniofacial development. However, how and when Nedd4 controls skull formation is ill defined. Here we have used a collection of complementary genetic mouse models to dissect the cell-autonomous roles of Nedd4 in the formation of neural crest cell derived cranial bone. Removal of Nedd4 specifically from neural crest cells leads to profound craniofacial defects with marked reduction of cranial bone that was preceded by hypoplasia of bone forming osteoblasts. Removal of Nedd4 after differentiation of neural crest cells into progenitors of chondrocytes and osteoblasts also led to profound deficiency of craniofacial bone in the absence of cartilage defects. Notably, these skull malformations were conserved when Nedd4 was specifically removed from the osteoblast lineage after specification of osteoblast precursors from mesenchymal skeletal progenitors. We further show that absence of Nedd4 in pre-osteoblasts results in decreased cell proliferation and altered osteogenic differentiation. Taken together our data demonstrate a novel cell-autonomous role for Nedd4 in promoting expansion of the osteoblast progenitor pool to control craniofacial development. Nedd4 mutant mice therefore represent a unique mouse model of craniofacial anomalies that provide an ideal resource to explore the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of neural crest cells in craniofacial morphogenesis. PMID:26681395

  4. In vitro myelin formation using embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kerman, Bilal E.; Kim, Hyung Joon; Padmanabhan, Krishnan; Mei, Arianna; Georges, Shereen; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.; Jappelli, Roberto; Chandross, Karen J.; August, Paul; Gage, Fred H.

    2015-01-01

    Myelination in the central nervous system is the process by which oligodendrocytes form myelin sheaths around the axons of neurons. Myelination enables neurons to transmit information more quickly and more efficiently and allows for more complex brain functions; yet, remarkably, the underlying mechanism by which myelination occurs is still not fully understood. A reliable in vitro assay is essential to dissect oligodendrocyte and myelin biology. Hence, we developed a protocol to generate myelinating oligodendrocytes from mouse embryonic stem cells and established a myelin formation assay with embryonic stem cell-derived neurons in microfluidic devices. Myelin formation was quantified using a custom semi-automated method that is suitable for larger scale analysis. Finally, early myelination was followed in real time over several days and the results have led us to propose a new model for myelin formation. PMID:26015546

  5. In vitro myelin formation using embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kerman, Bilal E; Kim, Hyung Joon; Padmanabhan, Krishnan; Mei, Arianna; Georges, Shereen; Joens, Matthew S; Fitzpatrick, James A J; Jappelli, Roberto; Chandross, Karen J; August, Paul; Gage, Fred H

    2015-06-15

    Myelination in the central nervous system is the process by which oligodendrocytes form myelin sheaths around the axons of neurons. Myelination enables neurons to transmit information more quickly and more efficiently and allows for more complex brain functions; yet, remarkably, the underlying mechanism by which myelination occurs is still not fully understood. A reliable in vitro assay is essential to dissect oligodendrocyte and myelin biology. Hence, we developed a protocol to generate myelinating oligodendrocytes from mouse embryonic stem cells and established a myelin formation assay with embryonic stem cell-derived neurons in microfluidic devices. Myelin formation was quantified using a custom semi-automated method that is suitable for larger scale analysis. Finally, early myelination was followed in real time over several days and the results have led us to propose a new model for myelin formation.

  6. Proteoglycans support proper granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Aroso, Miguel; Agricola, Brigitte; Hacker, Christian; Schrader, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Zymogen granules (ZG) are specialized organelles in the exocrine pancreas which allow digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion. The molecular mechanisms of their biogenesis and the sorting of zymogens are still incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of proteoglycans in granule formation and secretion of zymogens in pancreatic AR42J cells, an acinar model system. Cupromeronic Blue cytochemistry and biochemical studies revealed an association of proteoglycans primarily with the granule membrane. Removal of proteoglycans by carbonate treatment led to a loss of membrane curvature indicating a supportive role in the maintenance of membrane shape and stability. Chemical inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis impaired the formation of normal electron-dense granules in AR42J cells and resulted in the formation of unusually small granule structures. These structures still contained the zymogen carboxypeptidase, a cargo molecule of secretory granules, but migrated to lighter fractions after density gradient centrifugation. Furthermore, the basal secretion of amylase was increased in AR42J cells after inhibitor treatment. In addition, irregular-shaped granules appeared in pancreatic lobules. We conclude that the assembly of a proteoglycan scaffold at the ZG membrane is supporting efficient packaging of zymogens and the proper formation of stimulus-competent storage granules in acinar cells of the pancreas.

  7. Endocytosis of cell surface material mediates cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Dhonukshe, Pankaj; Baluska, Frantisek; Schlicht, Markus; Hlavacka, Andrej; Samaj, Jozef; Friml, Jirí; Gadella, Theodorus W J

    2006-01-01

    Dividing plant cells perform a remarkable task of building a new cell wall within the cytoplasm in a few minutes. A long-standing paradigm claims that this primordial cell wall, known as the cell plate, is generated by delivery of newly synthesized material from Golgi apparatus-originated secretory vesicles. Here, we show that, in diverse plant species, cell surface material, including plasma membrane proteins, cell wall components, and exogenously applied endocytic tracers, is rapidly delivered to the forming cell plate. Importantly, this occurs even when de novo protein synthesis is blocked. In addition, cytokinesis-specific syntaxin KNOLLE as well as plasma membrane (PM) resident proteins localize to endosomes that fuse to initiate the cell plate. The rate of endocytosis is strongly enhanced during cell plate formation, and its genetic or pharmacological inhibition leads to cytokinesis defects. Our results reveal that endocytic delivery of cell surface material significantly contributes to cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis.

  8. Solvent effect on columnar formation in solar-cell geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Sosa-Vargas, L.; Takanishi, Y.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, Y. W.; Yamamoto, J.; Labardi, M.; Lagerwall, J. P. F.; Shimizu, Y.; Scalia, G.

    2016-03-01

    The efficiency of the conduction of photocurrent in discotic liquid crystals is known to depend on the quality of the columnar organization. Solvents have shown to be able to influence the formation of wire structures on substrates promoting very long and ordered wired formations or bulkier structures depending on the affinity of the solvent with parts of the molecular structure of discotics. Here we present a study on the effect of solvents when the liquid crystal is confined between two substrates with the columns running perpendicular to them, geometry used in solar cells. We focused on toluene and dodecane, solvents that have shown to promote on substrates the formation of aligned and long nanowires and bulk large and isolated fibers, respectively. The phase transition behavior indicates that toluene does not interfere with the columnar formation while dodecane strongly influence increasing the disorder in the structure.

  9. Sphere formation permits Oct4 reprogramming of ciliary body epithelial cells into induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Aiguo; Wu, Ming Jing; Chavala, Sai H

    2014-12-15

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by defined sets of transcription factors. We previously described reprogramming of monolayer-cultured adult mouse ciliary body epithelial (CE) cells by Oct4 and Klf4, but not with Oct4 alone. In this study, we report that Oct4 alone is sufficient to reprogram CE cells to iPS cells through sphere formation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that sphere formation induces a partial reprogramming state characterized by expression of retinal progenitor markers, upregulation of reprogramming transcription factors, such as Sall4 and Nanog, demethylation in the promoter regions of pluripotency associated genes, and mesenchymal to epithelial transition. The Oct4-iPS cells maintained normal karyotypes, expressed markers for pluripotent stem cells, and were capable of differentiating into derivatives of all three embryonic germ layers in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that sphere formation may render somatic cells more susceptible to reprogramming.

  10. Formation and maintenance of nitrogen-fixing cell patterns in filamentous cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Javier; Ares, Saúl

    2016-05-31

    Cyanobacteria forming one-dimensional filaments are paradigmatic model organisms of the transition between unicellular and multicellular living forms. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions, in filaments of the genus Anabaena, some cells differentiate into heterocysts, which lose the possibility to divide but are able to fix environmental nitrogen for the colony. These heterocysts form a quasiregular pattern in the filament, representing a prototype of patterning and morphogenesis in prokaryotes. Recent years have seen advances in the identification of the molecular mechanism regulating this pattern. We use these data to build a theory on heterocyst pattern formation, for which both genetic regulation and the effects of cell division and filament growth are key components. The theory is based on the interplay of three generic mechanisms: local autoactivation, early long-range inhibition, and late long-range inhibition. These mechanisms can be identified with the dynamics of hetR, patS, and hetN expression. Our theory reproduces quantitatively the experimental dynamics of pattern formation and maintenance for wild type and mutants. We find that hetN alone is not enough to play the role as the late inhibitory mechanism: a second mechanism, hypothetically the products of nitrogen fixation supplied by heterocysts, must also play a role in late long-range inhibition. The preponderance of even intervals between heterocysts arises naturally as a result of the interplay between the timescales of genetic regulation and cell division. We also find that a purely stochastic initiation of the pattern, without a two-stage process, is enough to reproduce experimental observations. PMID:27162328

  11. Purified murine granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells express a high-affinity receptor for recombinant murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.E.; Bicknell, D.C.; Park, L.S.; Straneva, J.E.; Cooper, S.; Broxmeyer, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    Purified recombinant murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was labeled with /sup 125/I and used to examine the GM-CSF receptor on unfractionated normal murine bone marrow cells, casein-induced peritoneal exudate cells, and highly purified murine granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM). CFU-GM were isolated from cyclophosphamide-treated mice by Ficoll-Hypaque density centrifugation followed by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. The resulting population had a cloning efficiency of 62-99% in cultures containing conditioned medium from pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cells and 55-86% in the presence of a plateau concentration of purified recombinant murine GM-CSF. Equilibrium binding studies with /sup 125/I-labeled GM-CSF showed that normal bone marrow cells, casein-induced peritoneal exudate cells, and purified CFU-GM had a single class of high-affinity receptor. Affinity crosslinking studies demonstrated that /sup 125/I-labeled GM-CSF bound specifically to two species of M/sub r/ 180,000 and 70,000 on CFU-GM, normal bone marrow cells, and peritoneal exudate cells. The M/sub r/ 70,000 species is thought to be a proteolytic fragment of the intact M/sub r/ 180,000 receptor. The present studies indicate that the GM-CSF receptor expressed on CFU-GM and mature myeloid cells are structurally similar. In addition, the number of GM-CSF receptors on CFU-GM is twice the average number of receptors on casein-induced mature myeloid cells, suggesting that receptor number may decrease as CFU-GM mature.

  12. Antigen activation of THP-1 human monocytic cells after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide from oral microorganisms and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Baqui, A A; Meiller, T F; Kelley, J I; Turng, B F; Falkler, W A

    1999-05-01

    A human THP-1 monocyte cell line culture system has been utilized to evaluate the morphological changes in THP-1 cells and to measure expression of activation antigens (CD-11b, CD-11c, CD-14, CD-35, CD-68, CD-71 and HLA-DR) as evidence of maturation of THP-1 cells in response to stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the oral microorganisms, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. THP-1 cells were stimulated with LPS (1 microgram/ml) of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum for different time periods (1, 2, 4 and 7 d). Detection of different activation antigens on THP-1 cells was performed by indirect immunohistochemical staining followed by light microscopy. Confirmational studies were performed in parallel using indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy for detection of the corresponding activation antigens. Expression of different activation antigens by resting THP-1 cells revealed HLA-DR to be on 3% of the cells; CD-11b, 9%; CD-11c, 8%; CD-14, 22%; CD-35, 9% and CD-68, 7%. The CD-71 activation antigen was not expressed in untreated THP-1 cells. LPS stimulation increased expression of all activation antigens. A significant (p < 0.05) increase in expression of CD-11b, CD-11c, CD-14, CD-35, CD-68 and CD-71 was observed when GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) was supplemented during the treatment of THP-1 cells with LPS of F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis. Activation and differentiation of THP-1 cells by LPS from oral microorganisms in the presence of GM-CSF supports a role for human macrophages in acute and chronic periodontal diseases and may explain the clinically observable periodontal exacerbations in some patients after GM-CSF therapy.

  13. Colony Fusion in a Parthenogenetic Ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus

    PubMed Central

    Satow, Show; Satoh, Toshiyuki; Hirota, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    In the ant Pristomyrmex punctatus Smith (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), all young workers lay a small number of eggs parthenogenetically. Some colonies consist of monoclonal individuals that provide high inclusive fitness, according to the kin selection theory. However, in some populations, a majority of the colonies contain multiple lineages. Intracolonial genetic variation of parthenogenetic ants cannot be explained by the multiple mating of single founderesses or by the foundation of a colony by multiple foundresses, which are the usual causes of genetically diverse colonies in social insects. Here, we hypothesized that the fusion of established colonies might facilitate the formation of multiclonal colonies. Colony fusion decreases indirect benefits because of the reduction in intracolonial relatedness. However, when suitable nesting places for overwintering are scarce, colony fusion provides a strategy for the survival of colonies. Here, ants derived from different colonies were allowed to encounter one another in a container with just one nesting place. Initially, high aggression was observed; however, after several days, no aggression was observed and the ants shared the nest. When the fused colonies were allowed to transfer to two alternative nests, ants from different colonies occupied the same nest. This study highlights the importance of limiting the number of nesting places in order to understand the genetic diversity of parthenogenetic ant colonies. PMID:23895053

  14. Role of polarized cell divisions in zebrafish neural tube formation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jon

    2009-04-01

    Development of epithelial cell polarity and morphogenesis of a central lumen are essential prerequisites for the formation of the vertebrate neural tube. In teleost fish embryos this first involves the formation of a solid neural rod structure that then undergoes a process of cavitation to form a lumen. This process is initiated from a neural plate that has a distinct organization compared to other vertebrates, and involves complex cell intercalations and rearrangements. A key element is a mode of polarized cell division that generates daughters with mirror-image apico-basal polarity. These mirror-symmetric divisions have powerful morphogenetic influence because when they occur in ectopic locations they orchestrate the development of ectopic apical and basal specializations and the development of ectopic neural tubes.

  15. Polydatin Inhibits Formation of Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Liu, Meixia; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Wengao; Liu, Longtao

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, a Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. Polydatin, one of the major active ingredients in Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, has been recently shown to possess extensive cardiovascular pharmacological activities. In present study, we examined the effects of Polydatin on the formation of peritoneal macrophage-derived foam cells in Apolipoprotein E gene knockout mice (ApoE−/−) and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Peritoneal macrophages were collected from ApoE−/− mice and cultured in vitro. These cells sequentially were divided into four groups: Control group, Model group, Lovastatin group, and Polydatin group. Our results demonstrated that Polydatin significantly inhibits the formation of foam cells derived from peritoneal macrophages. Further studies indicated that Polydatin regulates the metabolism of intracellular lipid and possesses anti-inflammatory effects, which may be regulated through the PPAR-γ signaling pathways. PMID:26557864

  16. Dolomitized cells within chert of the Permian Assistência Formation, Paraná Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calça, Cléber P.; Fairchild, Thomas R.; Cavalazzi, Barbara; Hachiro, Jorge; Petri, Setembrino; Huila, Manuel Fernando Gonzalez; Toma, Henrique E.; Araki, Koiti

    2016-04-01

    Dolomitic microscopic structures in the form of microspheres, "horseshoe- shaped" objects, and thin botryoidal crusts found within microfossiliferous chert within stromatolites of the Evaporite Bed (EB) of the Permian Assistência Formation, Irati Subgroup, Paraná Basin, Brazil, have been investigated by means of optical microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometry and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The microspheres were identified as dolomitized coccoidal cyanobacteria based on similarity in size, spheroidal and paired hemispheroidal morphologies and colonial habit to co-occurring silicified organic-walled cyanobacteria embedded within the same microfabric and rock samples. The co-occurrence of dolomite, pyrite framboids, and abundant dispersed carbonaceous material and silicified cells is consistent with a hypersaline depositional environment with abundant cyanobacterial mats and elevated Mg2 +/Ca2 + ratios and reducing conditions with active anoxic microbial processes near the water-(bio)sediment interface. The abundance of extracellular polymeric substances facilitated anoxic microbial processes (sulfate reduction), providing essential conditions for possible primary microbially induced dolomitization. In most of the dolomitized cells dolomite occurs only as an external layer; in fully dolomitized cells magnesium is richest in the outermost layer. Presumably, the dolomitization process was favored by the presence of anoxic microbial degraders and negatively charged functional groups at the surface of the cyanobacterial cells. Botryoidal dolomite rims of silica-filled fenestrae formed by a similar process and inherited the botryoidal morphology of the cell as originally lining the fenestrae. Silicification interrupted the dolomitization of the largely organic biosediment, mostly by permineralization, but locally by substitution, thereby preserving not only dolomitic microspheres, but also huge numbers of structurally

  17. TWIST1 expression in breast cancer cells facilitates bone metastasis formation.

    PubMed

    Croset, Martine; Goehrig, Delphine; Frackowiak, Agnieszka; Bonnelye, Edith; Ansieau, Stéphane; Puisieux, Alain; Clézardin, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    The transcription factor TWIST1 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and/or escape to the oncogenic-induced failsafe program, facilitating the intravasation of breast cancer cells in the systemic circulation and their dissemination to the lungs. Its involvement in breast cancer bone metastasis is unknown. To address this question, human osteotropic MDA-MB-231/B02 breast cancer cells were stably transfected with a Tet-inducible vector encoding for TWIST1, whose expression was specifically repressed in the presence of doxycycline (dox). The intra-arterial inoculation of transfectants expressing TWIST1 in immunodeficient mice substantially increased the extent of osteolytic lesions in these animals, being 50% larger than that of animals bearing mock-transfected tumors, as determined by radiography. This difference was accompanied by a sharp reduction of the bone volume (indicating a higher bone destruction) and a twofold increase in the tumor volume compared with mice bearing mock-transfected tumors, as determined by histomorphometry. Importantly, the suppression of TWIST1 expression in MDA-MB-231/B02 cells in the presence of dox abolished the stimulatory effect of TWIST1 on bone metastasis formation in vivo. Additionally, examination of the bone marrow from untreated and dox-treated animals on day 7 after tumor cell inoculation, at which time there was no evidence of radiographic osteolytic lesions, revealed that the number of tumor cell colonies that were recovered from the bone marrow of untreated mice was dramatically increased compared with that of dox-fed animals. In vitro, TWIST1 expression promoted tumor cell invasion and enhanced microRNA 10b (miR-10b) expression, a proinvasive factor, but was dispensable for growth of tumor cells. In vivo, the repression of miR-10b substantially decreased the presence of TWIST1-expressing breast cancer cells in the bone marrow. Overall, these results establish that TWIST1 facilitates breast cancer bone metastasis

  18. Characterization of Commercial Li-ion Cells in Pouch Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The li-ion pouch design cells exhibit similar behavior under off-nominal conditions as those in metal cans that do not have the internal safety devices. Safety should be well characterized before batteries are designed. Some of the li-ion pouch cell designs studied in this program reacted most violently to overcharge conditions at the medium rates but were tolerant to overcharge at very low rates. Some pouch cell designs have higher tolerance to vacuum exposures than some others. A comparison of the pouch material itself does not show a correlation between this tolerance and the number of layers or composition of the pouch indicating that this is a property of the electrode stack design inside the pouch. Reduced pressure (8 to 10 psi) test environments show that the extent of capacity degradation under reduced pressure environments is much less than that observed under vacuum conditions. Lithium-ion Pouch format cells are not necessarily true polymer cells.

  19. Local administration of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces local accumulation of dendritic cells and antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and enhances dendritic cell cross-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Jong; Song, Liwen; Yang, Ming-Cheh; Mao, Chih-Ping; Yang, Benjamin; Yang, Andrew; Jeang, Jessica; Peng, Shiwen; Wu, T.-C.; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment strategy for the control of HPV-associated malignancies. Various therapeutic HPV vaccines have elicited potent antigen-specific CD8+ T cell mediated antitumor immune responses in preclinical models and are currently being tested in several clinical trials. Recent evidence indicates the importance of local immune activation, and higher number of immune cells in the site of lesion correlates with positive prognosis. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) has been reported to posses the ability to induce migration of antigen presentation cells and CD8+ T cells. Therefore, in the current study, we employ a combination of systemic therapeutic HPV DNA vaccination with local GMCSF application in the TC-1 tumor model. We show that intramuscular vaccination with CRT/E7 DNA followed by GMCSF intravaginal administration effectively controls cervicovaginal TC-1 tumors in mice. Furthermore, we observe an increase in the accumulation of E7-specific CD8+ T cells and dendritic cells in vaginal tumors following the combination treatment. In addition, we show that GMCSF induces activation and maturation in dendritic cells and promotes antigen cross-presentation. Our results support the clinical translation of the combination treatment of systemic therapeutic vaccination followed by local GMCSF administration as an effective strategy for tumor treatment. PMID:25701675

  20. Real-time monitoring of non-viable airborne particles correlates with airborne colonies and represents an acceptable surrogate for daily assessment of cell-processing cleanroom performance

    PubMed Central

    RAVAL, JAY S.; KOCH, EILEEN; DONNENBERG, ALBERT D.

    2014-01-01

    Background aims Airborne particulate monitoring is mandated as a component of good manufacturing practice. We present a procedure developed to monitor and interpret airborne particulates in an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) class 7 cleanroom used for the cell processing of Section 351 and Section 361 products. Methods We collected paired viable and non-viable airborne particle data over a period of 1 year in locations chosen to provide a range of air quality. We used receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine empirically the relationship between non-viable and viable airborne particle counts. Results Viable and non-viable particles were well-correlated (r 2 = 0.78), with outlier observations at the low end of the scale (non-viable particles without detectable airborne colonies). ROC analysis predicted viable counts ≥0.5/feet 3 (a limit set by the United States Pharmacopeia) at an action limit of ≥32 000 particles (≥0.5 μ)/feet 3 , with 95.6% sensitivity and 50% specificity. This limit was exceeded 2.6 times during 18 months of retrospective daily cleanroom data (an expected false alarm rate of 1.3 times/year). After implementing this action limit, we were alerted in real time to an air-handling failure undetected by our hospital facilities management. Conclusions A rational action limit for non-viable particles was determined based on the correlation with airborne colonies. Reaching or exceeding the action limit of 32 000 non-viable particles/feet 3 triggers suspension of cleanroom cell-processing activities, deep cleaning, investigation of air handling, and a deviation management process. Our full procedure for particle monitoring is available as an online supplement. PMID:22746538

  1. Modulation of Decidual Macrophage Polarization by Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Derived from First-Trimester Decidual Cells: Implication in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Piao, Longzhu; Chen, Chie-Pein; Wu, Xianqing; Yeh, Chang-Ching; Masch, Rachel; Chang, Chi-Chang; Huang, S Joseph

    2016-05-01

    During human pregnancy, immune tolerance of the fetal semiallograft occurs in the presence of abundant maternal leukocytes. At the implantation site, macrophages comprise approximately 20% of the leukocyte population and act as primary mediators of tissue remodeling. Decidual macrophages display a balance between anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory phenotypes. However, a shift to an M1 subtype is reported in preeclampsia. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating-factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) are major differentiating factors that mediate M1 and M2 polarization, respectively. Previously, we observed the following: i) the preeclamptic decidua contains an excess of both macrophages and GM-CSF, ii) the preeclampsia-associated proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, markedly enhance GM-CSF and M-CSF expression in cultured leukocyte-free first-trimester decidual cells (FTDCs), iii) FTDC-secreted GM-CSF polarizes macrophages toward an M1 subtype. The microenvironment is a key determinant of macrophage phenotype. Thus, we examined proinflammatory stimulation of FTDC-secreted M-CSF and its role in macrophage development. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated elevated M-CSF-positive decidual cell numbers in preeclamptic decidua. In FTDCs, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α signal through the NF-κB pathway to induce M-CSF production, which does the following: i) enhances differentiation of and elevates CD163 expression in macrophages, ii) increases macrophage phagocytic capacity, and iii) inhibits signal-regulatory protein α expression by macrophages. These findings suggest that FTDC-secreted M-CSF modulates the decidual immune balance by inducing M2 macrophage polarization and phagocytic capacity in response to proinflammatory stimuli.

  2. Colletotrichum higginsianum Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase ChMK1: Role in Growth, Cell Wall Integrity, Colony Melanization, and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Nancong; Yang, Guogen; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. To facilitate the efficient control of anthracnose disease, it will be important to understand the mechanism by which the cruciferous crops and C. higginsianum interact. A key step in understanding this interaction is characterizing the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway of C. higginsianum. MAPK plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. In this study, a Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK gene, ChMK1, from C. higginsianum was analyzed. The results showed that the Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK ChMK1 plays a significant role in cell wall integrity. Targeted deletion of ChMK1 resulted in a hypersensitivity to cell wall inhibitors, reduced conidiation and albinistic colonies. Further, the deletion mutant was also unable to form melanized appressorium, a specialized infection structure that is necessary for successful infection. Therefore, the deletion mutant loses pathogenicity on A. thaliana leaves, demonstrating that ChMK1 plays an essential role in the early infection step. In addition, the ChMK1 deletion mutant showed an attenuated growth rate that is different from that of its homolog in Colletotrichum lagenarium, indicating the diverse roles that Fus3/Kss1-related MAPKs plays in phytopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the expression level of three melanin synthesis associated genes were clearly decreased in the albinistic ChMK1 mutant compared to that of the wild type strain, suggesting that ChMK1 is also required for colony melanization in C. higginsianum. PMID:27536296

  3. Disruption of the pdhB Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Gene Affects Colony Morphology, In Vitro Growth and Cell Invasiveness of Mycoplasma agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Shivanand; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of available substrates, the metabolic potential and the growth rates of bacteria can play significant roles in their pathogenicity. This study concentrates on Mycoplasma agalactiae, which causes significant economic losses through its contribution to contagious agalactia in small ruminants by as yet unknown mechanisms. This lack of knowledge is primarily due to its fastidious growth requirements and the scarcity of genetic tools available for its manipulation and analysis. Transposon mutagenesis of M. agalactiae type strain PG2 resulted in several disruptions throughout the genome. A mutant defective in growth in vitro was found to have a transposon insertion in the pdhB gene, which encodes a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This growth difference was quite significant during the actively dividing logarithmic phase but a gradual recovery was observed as the cells approached stationary phase. The mutant also exhibited a different and smaller colony morphology compared to the wild type strain PG2. For complementation, pdhAB was cloned downstream of a strong vpma promoter and upstream of a lacZ reporter gene in a newly constructed complementation vector. When transformed with this vector the pdhB mutant recovered its normal growth and colony morphology. Interestingly, the pdhB mutant also had significantly reduced invasiveness in HeLa cells, as revealed by double immunofluorescence staining. This deficiency was recovered in the complemented strain, which had invasiveness comparable to that of PG2. Taken together, these data indicate that pyruvate dehydrogenase might be an important player in infection with and colonization by M. agalactiae. PMID:25799063

  4. Colletotrichum higginsianum Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase ChMK1: Role in Growth, Cell Wall Integrity, Colony Melanization, and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Nancong; Yang, Guogen; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. To facilitate the efficient control of anthracnose disease, it will be important to understand the mechanism by which the cruciferous crops and C. higginsianum interact. A key step in understanding this interaction is characterizing the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway of C. higginsianum. MAPK plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. In this study, a Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK gene, ChMK1, from C. higginsianum was analyzed. The results showed that the Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK ChMK1 plays a significant role in cell wall integrity. Targeted deletion of ChMK1 resulted in a hypersensitivity to cell wall inhibitors, reduced conidiation and albinistic colonies. Further, the deletion mutant was also unable to form melanized appressorium, a specialized infection structure that is necessary for successful infection. Therefore, the deletion mutant loses pathogenicity on A. thaliana leaves, demonstrating that ChMK1 plays an essential role in the early infection step. In addition, the ChMK1 deletion mutant showed an attenuated growth rate that is different from that of its homolog in Colletotrichum lagenarium, indicating the diverse roles that Fus3/Kss1-related MAPKs plays in phytopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the expression level of three melanin synthesis associated genes were clearly decreased in the albinistic ChMK1 mutant compared to that of the wild type strain, suggesting that ChMK1 is also required for colony melanization in C. higginsianum. PMID:27536296

  5. Spatial patterns in ant colonies.

    PubMed

    Theraulaz, Guy; Bonabeau, Eric; Nicolis, Stamatios C; Solé, Ricard V; Fourcassié, Vincent; Blanco, Stéphane; Fournier, Richard; Joly, Jean-Louis; Fernández, Pau; Grimal, Anne; Dalle, Patrice; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2002-07-23

    The origins of large-scale spatial patterns in biology have been an important source of theoretical speculation since the pioneering work by Turing (1952) on the chemical basis of morphogenesis. Knowing how these patterns emerge and their functional role is important to our understanding of the evolution of biocomplexity and the role played by self organization. However, so far, conclusive evidence for local activation-long-range inhibition mechanisms in real biological systems has been elusive. Here a well-defined experimental and theoretical analysis of the pattern formation dynamics exhibited by clustering behavior in ant colonies is presented. These experiments and a simple mathematical model show that these colonies do indeed use this type of mechanism. All microscopic variables have been measured and provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for this type of self-organized behavior in complex biological systems, supporting early conjectures about its role in the organization of insect societies. PMID:12114538

  6. Characterizing cell surface of blooming Microcystis in Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lizhen; Huang, Qi; Qin, Boqiang; Zhu, Guangwei; Wu, Pan; Wu, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Microcystis occurs as colonies in the natural environment but disaggregates into single cells in laboratory cultures. In order to explore the mechanism of how Microcystis forms colonies, the zeta potentials of Microcystis cells from the laboratory and the field were studied, and the hydrophobicity of Microcystis colonies in different sizes was investigated in Lake Taihu. The incubation experiment indicated that the zeta potentials of Microcystis cells were affected by growth phase and species. The absolute values in exponential phase were lower than those in stationary phase, suggesting that the cells with rapid growth easily formed colonies due to more instability on the cell surface. The values of Microcystis aeruginosa were higher than those of Microcystis flos-aquae, which confirmed that M. aeruginosa prevailed in waters for a longer time and at a larger size compared with M. flos-aquae. In another aspect, the absolute zeta potentials of Microcystis spp. at pH 7.0 decreased from spring to autumn in the field; the values in spring were higher than those in summer, suggesting that a large-sized Microcystis colony would more easily form in summer. Additionally, differences in hydrophobicity exist among Microcystis colonies of various sizes. The surface hydrophobicity of colonies in the <20 μm size class was higher than that of larger colonies. This characteristic allowed small colonies to easily form large colonies to survive better. These results would be helpful to understand the mechanism of the bloom formation, especially the colony formation, in Microcystis. PMID:27232410

  7. Accumulation of cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor gene in the ovary of a pregnant viviparous fish, Neoditrema ransonnetii (Perciformes, Embiotocidae).

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kazuki; Saito, Erina; Iwasaki, Kaoru; Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Nozawa, Aoi; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (M-CSFR), a member of the group of type III protein tyrosine kinase receptors, is expressed primarily by monocyte/macrophage lineage cells. In order to describe the distribution of macrophages at the maternal-fetal interface in Neoditrema ransonnetii, a viviparous fish species, M-CSFR cDNA was sequenced. Two sequences were obtained: NrM-CSFR1 (4381 bp, encoding 980 amino acids), and NrM-CSFR2 (3573 bp, encoding 1016 amino acids). Both the genes were expressed in the ovary of pregnant females. In situ hybridization revealed that a number of cells that were positive for NrM-CSFR1 and/or NrM-CSFR2 populated the ovigerous lamellae of the ovary during pregnancy. Following parturition, M-CSFR-positive cells disappeared from the subepithelial region of ovigerous lamellae, and were localized in perivascular tissues. These results suggest the role of M-CSFR-positive cells, which appear to be macrophages, in N. ransonnetii during pregnancy.

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor does not enhance recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells in rats with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Otani, Hajime; Fujita, Masanori; Shimazu, Takayuki; Yoshioka, Kei; Enoki, Chiharu; Minato, Naoki; Iwasaka, Toshiji

    2012-09-01

    Despite the potential benefit of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), the efficacy of G-CSF in regenerating the heart after MI remains controversial. The authors hypothesize that the limited efficacy of G-CSF is related to its inhibitory effect on recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) to the infarcted tissue. MI was induced in rats with intrabone marrow-bone marrow transplantation from syngenic rats expressing green fluorescence protein to track BMCs. G-CSF was administered for five days after the onset of MI. G-CSF increased the number of CD45(+) cells in the peripheral circulation but did not increase their recruitment to the heart. G-CSF had no effect on myocardial stromal-derived factor-1 alpha and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) expression in mononuclear cells in the peripheral blood and CXCR4(+) cells in the heart. G-CSF had no effect on angiogenesis, myocardial fibrosis or left ventricular function four weeks after MI. These results suggest that G-CSF mobilizes BMCs to the peripheral circulation but does not increase recruitment to the infarcted myocardium despite preservation of the stromal-derived factor-1 alpha/CXCR4 axis. PMID:23620693

  9. Effect of Periodic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Administration on Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Different Monocyte Subsets in Pediatric Patients with Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Grubczak, Kamil; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Miklasz, Paula; Singh, Paulina; Radzikowska, Urszula; Kulak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by progressive muscle dysfunction. There is a large body of evidence indicating that angiogenesis is impaired in muscles of MD patients. Therefore, induction of dystrophic muscle revascularization should become a novel approach aimed at diminishing the extent of myocyte damage. Recently, we and others demonstrated that administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) resulted in clinical improvement of patients with neuromuscular disorders. To date, however, the exact mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects of G-CSF have not been fully understood. Here we used flow cytometry to quantitate numbers of CD34+ cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and different monocyte subsets in peripheral blood of pediatric MD patients treated with repetitive courses of G-CSF administration. We showed that repetitive cycles of G-CSF administration induced efficient mobilization of above-mentioned cells including cells with proangiogenic potential. These findings contribute to better understanding the beneficial clinical effects of G-CSF in pediatric MD patients. PMID:26770204

  10. Induction of Specific Cellular and Humoral Responses against Renal Cell Carcinoma after Combination Therapy with Cryoablation and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Archana; Littrup, Peter; Paul, Elyse N.; Adam, Barbara; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Cryotherapy offers a minimally invasive treatment option for the management of both irresectable and localized prostate, liver, pulmonary and renal tumors. The anti-neoplastic effects of cryotherapy are mediated by direct tumor lysis and by indirect effects such as intracellular dehydration, pH changes, and microvascular damage resulting in ischemic necrosis. In this study, we investigated whether percutaneous cryoablation of lung metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in combination with aerosolized granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce systemic cellular and humoral immune responses in 6 RCC patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were sequentially studied up to 63 days post cryoimmunotherapy (CI). PBMC from pre and post CI were phenotyped for lymphocyte subsets and tested for cytotoxicity and IFNγ Elispots directed at RCC cells. Humoral responses were measured by in vitro antibody synthesis assay directed at RCC cells. The immune monitoring data showed that CI induced tumor specific CTL, specific in vitro anti-tumor antibody responses, and enhanced Th1 cytokine production in 4 out of 6 patients. More importantly, the magnitude of cellular and humoral anti-tumor response appears to be associated with clinical responses. These pilot data show that CI can induce robust and brisk cellular and humoral immune responses in metastatic RCC patients, but requires further evaluation in optimized protocols. PMID:21577139

  11. Effect of supercooling and cell volume on intracellular ice formation.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Richelle C; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular ice formation (IIF) has been linked to death of cells cryopreserved in suspension. It has been assumed that cells can be supercooled by 2 to 10°C before IIF occurs, but measurements of the degree of supercooling that cells can tolerate are often confounded by changing extracellular temperature and solutions of different osmolality (which affect the cell volume). The purpose of this study was to examine how the incidence of IIF in the absence of cryoprotectants is affected by the degree of supercooling and cell volume. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were suspended in isotonic (300 mOsm) and hypertonic (∼600 to 700 mOsm) solutions and exposed to supercooling ranging from 2 to 10°C before extracellular ice was nucleated. The number of cells undergoing IIF was examined in a cryostage (based on the darkening of cells upon intracellular freezing ("flashing")) as a function of the degree of supercooling, and cell survival post-thaw was assessed using a membrane integrity assay. We found that while the incidence of IIF increased with supercooling in both isotonic and hypertonic solutions, it was higher in the isotonic solution at any given degree of supercooling. Since cells in hypertonic solution were shrunken due to water efflux, we hypothesized that the difference in IIF behavior could be attributed to the decreased volume of cells in the hypertonic solution. Our results confirm that cells with a smaller diameter before extracellular ice nucleation have a decreased probability of IIF and suggest that cell volume could play a more significant role in the incidence of IIF than the extracellular ice nucleation temperature. PMID:25707695

  12. Effect of supercooling and cell volume on intracellular ice formation.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Richelle C; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular ice formation (IIF) has been linked to death of cells cryopreserved in suspension. It has been assumed that cells can be supercooled by 2 to 10°C before IIF occurs, but measurements of the degree of supercooling that cells can tolerate are often confounded by changing extracellular temperature and solutions of different osmolality (which affect the cell volume). The purpose of this study was to examine how the incidence of IIF in the absence of cryoprotectants is affected by the degree of supercooling and cell volume. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were suspended in isotonic (300 mOsm) and hypertonic (∼600 to 700 mOsm) solutions and exposed to supercooling ranging from 2 to 10°C before extracellular ice was nucleated. The number of cells undergoing IIF was examined in a cryostage (based on the darkening of cells upon intracellular freezing ("flashing")) as a function of the degree of supercooling, and cell survival post-thaw was assessed using a membrane integrity assay. We found that while the incidence of IIF increased with supercooling in both isotonic and hypertonic solutions, it was higher in the isotonic solution at any given degree of supercooling. Since cells in hypertonic solution were shrunken due to water efflux, we hypothesized that the difference in IIF behavior could be attributed to the decreased volume of cells in the hypertonic solution. Our results confirm that cells with a smaller diameter before extracellular ice nucleation have a decreased probability of IIF and suggest that cell volume could play a more significant role in the incidence of IIF than the extracellular ice nucleation temperature.

  13. In Vitro Ectopic Behavior of Porcine Spermatogonial Germ Cells and Testicular Somatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Do, Jung Tae; Park, Chan Kyu; Kim, Nam Hyung; Kim, Jin Hoi; Chung, Hak Jae; Kim, Dong Woon; Song, Hyuk

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic body-like colony formation is a unique pattern in male germ cell cultures, including spermatogonial stem cells. However, detailed information of the colony formation has not yet been sufficiently reported in male germ cell culture. To elucidate the formation of germ cell-derived colony (GDC), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha-1 (GFRα-1)-positive pig germ cells were isolated using an immunomagnetic cell isolation method and labeled with red- or green-fluorescent dye. In GDC culture, red-fluorescent-labeled germ cells were evenly distributed in the wells from day 1 to 4, and they clustered together at the time of GDC formation on day 6. Interestingly, feeder cells migrated to the site of colony formation as spermatogonia carriers. Furthermore, when freshly prepared green-labeled GFRα-1-positive germ cells were added, mixed-fluorescent dye (red and green) colonies were observed. On bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) treatment, 58% ± 3.13% of germ cells were positive to protein gene product 9.5 but negative to BrdU cells. Immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results showed that cultured GDC cells were positive to stem cell- and pig germ cell-specific marker genes. In conclusion, in vitro formation of GDCs is mainly dependent on the aggregation of single germ cells as well as on the slow proliferation of germ cells.

  14. In Vitro Ectopic Behavior of Porcine Spermatogonial Germ Cells and Testicular Somatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Do, Jung Tae; Park, Chan Kyu; Kim, Nam Hyung; Kim, Jin Hoi; Chung, Hak Jae; Kim, Dong Woon; Song, Hyuk

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic body-like colony formation is a unique pattern in male germ cell cultures, including spermatogonial stem cells. However, detailed information of the colony formation has not yet been sufficiently reported in male germ cell culture. To elucidate the formation of germ cell-derived colony (GDC), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha-1 (GFRα-1)-positive pig germ cells were isolated using an immunomagnetic cell isolation method and labeled with red- or green-fluorescent dye. In GDC culture, red-fluorescent-labeled germ cells were evenly distributed in the wells from day 1 to 4, and they clustered together at the time of GDC formation on day 6. Interestingly, feeder cells migrated to the site of colony formation as spermatogonia carriers. Furthermore, when freshly prepared green-labeled GFRα-1-positive germ cells were added, mixed-fluorescent dye (red and green) colonies were observed. On bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) treatment, 58% ± 3.13% of germ cells were positive to protein gene product 9.5 but negative to BrdU cells. Immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results showed that cultured GDC cells were positive to stem cell- and pig germ cell-specific marker genes. In conclusion, in vitro formation of GDCs is mainly dependent on the aggregation of single germ cells as well as on the slow proliferation of germ cells. PMID:27328332

  15. Plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for first-line steady-state autologous peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in lymphoma and multiple myeloma: results of the prospective PREDICT trial

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Nigel; Douglas, Kenny; Ho, Anthony D.; Mohty, Mohamad; Carlson, Kristina; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Milone, Giuseppe; Pareja, Macarena Ortiz; Shaheen, Daniel; Willemsen, Arnold; Whitaker, Nicky; Chabannon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, the combination of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is approved for the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells for autologous transplantation in patients with lymphoma and myeloma whose cells mobilize poorly. The purpose of this study was to further assess the safety and efficacy of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for front-line mobilization in European patients with lymphoma or myeloma. In this multicenter, open label, single-arm study, patients received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (10 μg/kg/day) subcutaneously for 4 days; on the evening of day 4 they were given plerixafor (0.24 mg/kg) subcutaneously. Patients underwent apheresis on day 5 after a morning dose of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. The primary study objective was to confirm the safety of mobilization with plerixafor. Secondary objectives included assessment of efficacy (apheresis yield, time to engraftment). The combination of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was used to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells in 118 patients (90 with myeloma, 25 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 3 with Hodgkin's disease). Treatment-emergent plerixafor-related adverse events were reported in 24 patients. Most adverse events occurred within 1 hour after injection, were grade 1 or 2 in severity and included gastrointestinal disorders or injection-site reactions. The minimum cell yield (≥2×106 CD34+ cells/kg) was harvested in 98% of patients with myeloma and in 80% of those with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a median of one apheresis. The optimum cell dose (≥5×106 CD34+ cells/kg for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or ≥6×106 CD34+ cells/kg for myeloma) was harvested in 89% of myeloma patients and 48% of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients. In this prospective, multicenter European study, mobilization with plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor allowed the majority of patients with myeloma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma to undergo transplantation with

  16. Genomics, genetics, and cell biology of magnetosome formation.

    PubMed

    Jogler, Christian; Schüler, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Magnetosomes are specialized organelles for magnetic navigation that comprise membrane-enveloped, nano-sized crystals of a magnetic iron mineral; they are formed by a diverse group of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB). The synthesis of magnetosomes involves strict genetic control over intracellular differentiation, biomineralization, and their assembly into highly ordered chains. Physicochemical control over biomineralization is achieved by compartmentalization within vesicles of the magnetosome membrane, which is a phospholipid bilayer associated with a specific set of proteins that have known or suspected functions in vesicle formation, iron transport, control of crystallization, and arrangement of magnetite particles. Magnetosome formation is genetically complex, and relevant genes are predominantly located in several operons within a conserved genomic magnetosome island that has been likely transferred horizontally and subsequently adapted between diverse MTB during evolution. This review summarizes the recent progress in our understanding of magnetobacterial cell biology, genomics, and the genetic control of magnetosome formation and magnetotaxis.

  17. Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Activity Promotes Cysteine Cathepsin-dependent Invasiveness and Colony Growth of Human Cancer Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Ludovic; Roger, Sébastien; Besson, Pierre; Lecaille, Fabien; Gore, Jacques; Bougnoux, Philippe; Lalmanach, Gilles; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are functionally expressed in highly metastatic cancer cells derived from nonexcitable epithelial tissues (breast, prostate, lung, and cervix). MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells express functional sodium channel complexes, consisting of NaV1.5 and associated auxiliary β-subunits, that are responsible for a sustained inward sodium current at the membrane potential. Although these channels do not regulate cellular multiplication or migration, their inhibition by the specific blocker tetrodotoxin impairs both the extracellular gelatinolytic activity (monitored with DQ-gelatin) and cell invasiveness leading to the attenuation of colony growth and cell spreading in three-dimensional Matrigel®-composed matrices. MDA-MB-231 cells express functional cysteine cathepsins, which we found play a predominant role (∼65%) in cancer invasiveness. Matrigel® invasion is significantly decreased in the presence of specific inhibitors of cathepsins B and S (CA-074 and Z-FL-COCHO, respectively), and co-application of tetrodotoxin does not further reduce cell invasion. This suggests that cathepsins B and S are involved in invasiveness and that their proteolytic activity partly depends on NaV function. Inhibiting NaV has no consequence for cathepsins at the transcription, translation, and secretion levels. However, NaV activity leads to an intracellular alkalinization and a perimembrane acidification favorable for the extracellular activity of these acidic proteases. We propose that Nav enhance the invasiveness of cancer cells by favoring the pH-dependent activity of cysteine cathepsins. This general mechanism could lead to the identification of new targets allowing the therapeutic prevention of metastases. PMID:19176528

  18. A hydrodynamic microchip for formation of continuous cell chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Zhang, Wei; Tang, Shi-Yang; Nasabi, Mahyar; Soffe, Rebecca; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Mitchell, Arnan

    2014-05-01

    Here, we demonstrate the unique features of a hydrodynamic based microchip for creating continuous chains of model yeast cells. The system consists of a disk shaped microfluidic structure, containing narrow orifices that connect the main channel to an array of spoke channels. Negative pressure provided by a syringe pump draws fluid from the main channel through the narrow orifices. After cleaning process, a thin layer of water is left between the glass substrate and the polydimethylsiloxane microchip, enabling leakage beneath the channel walls. A mechanical clamp is used to adjust the operation of the microchip. Relaxing the clamp allows leakage of liquid beneath the walls in a controllable fashion, leading to formation of a long cell chain evenly distributed along the channel wall. The unique features of the microchip are demonstrated by creating long chains of yeast cells and model 15 μm polystyrene particles along the side wall and analysing the hydrogen peroxide induced death of patterned cells.

  19. A peptide antagonist disrupts NK cell inhibitory synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Borhis, Gwenoline; Ahmed, Parvin S; Mbiribindi, Bérénice; Naiyer, Mohammed M; Davis, Daniel M; Purbhoo, Marco A; Khakoo, Salim I

    2013-03-15

    Productive engagement of MHC class I by inhibitory NK cell receptors depends on the peptide bound by the MHC class I molecule. Peptide:MHC complexes that bind weakly to killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) can antagonize the inhibition mediated by high-affinity peptide:MHC complexes and cause NK cell activation. We show that low-affinity peptide:MHC complexes stall inhibitory signaling at the step of Src homology protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 recruitment and do not go on to form the KIR microclusters induced by high-affinity peptide:MHC, which are associated with Vav dephosphorylation and downstream signaling. Furthermore, the low-affinity peptide:MHC complexes prevented the formation of KIR microclusters by high-affinity peptide:MHC. Thus, peptide antagonism of NK cells is an active phenomenon of inhibitory synapse disruption.

  20. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes.

  1. Phenotypic and genetic differences between opaque and translucent colonies of Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chen; Jin, Xie; Chaoqun, Hu

    2009-01-01

    Many pathogens undergo phase variation between rugose and smooth colony morphology or between opaque and translucent colony morphology, which is mainly due to the variation in the surface polysaccharides. In this study, Vibrio alginolyticus ZJ-51 displayed phase variation between opaque, rugose colonies (Op) and translucent, smooth colonies (Tr). Unlike the vibrios reported previously, Tr cells of ZJ-51 enhanced biofilm formation and motility, but they did not differ from Op cells in the quantity of surface polysaccharides produced. Real time PCR was used to analyze the expression of the genes involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis, flagellar synthesis, and the AI-2 quorum-sensing system. The results revealed that the K-antigen capsule gene cluster (which consists of homologs to the cpsA-K in Vibrio parahaemolyticus) and O-antigen polysaccharide gene cluster (which contains homologs to the wza-wzb-wzc) were significantly more transcribed in Tr cells. The AI-2 quorum-sensing genes showed enhanced expression in the Tr variant which also exhibited greater expression of genes associated with polar flagellar biosynthesis. These results suggest that colony phase variation might affect the virulence and survival ability in the stressful environment inhabited by V. alginolyticus.

  2. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  3. Exocytosis of macrophage lysosomes leads to digestion of apoptotic adipocytes and foam cell formation[S

    PubMed Central

    Haka, Abigail S.; Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria C.; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Falcone, Domenick J.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Many types of apoptotic cells are phagocytosed and digested by macrophages. Adipocytes can be hundreds of times larger than macrophages, so they are too large to be digested by conventional phagocytic processes. The nature of the interaction between macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes has not been studied in detail. We describe a cellular process, termed exophagy, that is important for macrophage clearance of dead adipocytes and adipose tissue homeostasis. Using mouse models of obesity, human tissue, and a cell culture model, we show that macrophages form hydrolytic extracellular compartments at points of contact with dead adipocytes using local actin polymerization. These compartments are acidic and contain lysosomal enzymes delivered by exocytosis. Uptake and complete degradation of adipocyte fragments, which are released by extracellular hydrolysis, leads to macrophage foam cell formation. Exophagy-mediated foam cell formation is a highly efficient means by which macrophages internalize large amounts of lipid, which may ultimately overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the macrophage. This process provides a mechanism for degradation of objects, such as dead adipocytes, that are too large to be phagocytosed by macrophages. PMID:27044658

  4. Drugs elevating extracellular adenosine promote regeneration of haematopoietic progenitor cells in severely myelosuppressed mice: their comparison and joint effects with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Vacek, Antonín; Weiterova, Lenka; Holá, Jirina; Vácha, Jirí

    2002-01-01

    We tested capabilities of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine and of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) given alone or in combination to modulate regeneration from severe myelosuppression resulting from combined exposure of mice to ionizing radiation and carboplatin. Elevation of extracellular adenosine was induced by joint administration of dipyridamole (DP), a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), serving as an adenosine prodrug. DP+AMP, G-CSF or all these drugs in combination were administered in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on day 3 after induction of myelosuppression. Comparable enhancements of haematopoietic regeneration due to elevation of extracellular adenosine or to action of G-CSF were demonstrated as shown by elevated numbers of haematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes/macrophages (GM-CFC) and erythrocytes (BFU-E) in the bone marrow and spleen in early time intervals after termination of the drug treatment, i.e. on days 7 and 10 after induction of myelosuppression. Coadministration of all the drugs further potentiated the restoration of progenitor cell pools in the haematopoietic organs. The effects of the drug treatments on progenitor cells were reflected in the peripheral blood in later time intervals of days 15 and 20 after induction of myelosuppression, especially as significantly elevated numbers of granulocytes and less pronounced elevation of lymphocytes and erythrocytes. The results substantiate the potential of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine for clinical utilization in myelosuppressive states, e.g. those accompanying oncological radio- and chemotherapy.

  5. Identification of a Colonial Chordate Histocompatibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Newman, Aaron M.; Corey, Daniel M.; Sahoo, Debashis; Pushkarev, Dmitry; Neff, Norma F.; Passarelli, Benedetto; Koh, Winston; Ishizuka, Katherine J.; Palmeri, Karla J.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Keasar, Chen; Fan, H. Christina; Mantalas, Gary L.; Sinha, Rahul; Penland, Lolita; Quake, Stephen R.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2013-01-01

    Histocompatibility is the basis by which multicellular organisms of the same species distinguish self from non-self. Relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying histocompatibility reactions in lower organisms. Botryllus schlosseri is a colonial urochordate, a sister group of vertebrates, that exhibits a genetically determined natural transplantation reaction, whereby self-recognition between colonies leads to formation of parabionts with a common vasculature, whereas rejection occurs between incompatible colonies. Using genetically defined lines, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and genomics, we identified a single gene that encodes self/non-self and determines “graft” outcomes in this organism. This gene is significantly upregulated in colonies poised to undergo fusion or rejection, is highly expressed in the vasculature, and is functionally linked to histocompatibility outcomes. These findings establish a platform for advancing the science of allorecognition. PMID:23888037

  6. Botryllus schlosseri (Tunicata) whole colony irradiation: Do senescent zooid resorption and immunological resorption involve similar recognition events

    SciTech Connect

    Rinkevich, B.; Weissman, I.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri undergoes cyclic blastogenesis where feeding zooids are senescened and resorbed and a new generation of zooids takes over the colony. When non-identical colonies come into direct contact, they either reject each other or fuse. Fusion is usually followed by the resorption of one of the partners in the chimera (immunological resorption). The striking morphological similarities between the two resorption phenomena suggest that both may involve tissue destruction following self-nonself recognition events. Here we attempt to modify these two events by whole colony gamma irradiation assays. Three sets of experiments were performed: (1) different doses of whole colony irradiation for determination of irradiation effects (110 colonies); (2) pairs of irradiated-nonirradiated isografts of clonal replicates for the potential of reconstruction of the irradiated partners (23 pairs); (3) chimeras of irradiated-nonirradiated partners for analysis of resorption hierarchy. Mortality increased with the irradiation dose. All colonies exposed to more than 5,000 rads died within 19 days, while no colony died below 2,000 rads. The average mortality periods, in days, for doses of 6,000-8,000, 5,000, and 2,500-4,000 rads were 14.4 +/- 3.1 (n = 24), 19.8 +/- 6.0 (n = 15), and 19.6 + 5.1 (n = 22), respectively. Younger colonies (3-6 months old) may survive radiation better than older ones (more than 13 months). Many morphological alterations were recorded in irradiated colonies: ampullar contraction and/or dilation, accumulation of pigment cells within ampullae, abnormal bleeding from blood vessels, sluggish blood circulation, necrotic zones, reduction in bud number, and irregularities in zooid and system structures. With doses of 3,000-4,000 rads and above, irradiation arrested the formation of new buds and interrupted normal takeover.

  7. Valine-Resistance, a Potential Marker in Plant Cell Genetics. II. Optimization of Uv Mutagenesis and Selection of Valine-Resistant Colonies Derived from Tobacco Mesophyll Protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Grandbastien, M A; Bourgin, J P; Caboche, M

    1985-02-01

    The induction and selection of valine-resistant mutants from haploid tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) mesophyll protoplast-derived cells have been studied. Using cells from an original mutant plant obtained previously, we performed reconstruction experiments in order to determine the best conditions for the recovery of resistant cells among a population of sensitive cells. Optimal selective conditions were shown to depend on various factors including cell density, time of addition of valine and seasonal variations affecting the mother plants.-Using cell densities of approximately 10( 4) cells/ml, we defined efficient selective conditions: more than 25% of the putative mutant clones selected from UV-mutagenized protoplasts were reproducibly confirmed to be valine resistant. Further characterization of some regenerated mutant plants indicated that valine-resistance was associated with an uptake deficiency, as in the case of the original mutant plant of the Val(r)-2 line used for reconstruction experiments. Spontaneous mutation rates for valine-resistance were below accurately detectable levels, i.e., less than 10(-6) per cell per generation. Induced mutation frequency varied nonlinearily with UV dose from 10(-5) to 5 x 10(-4) resistant clones per surviving colony. Two independent loci (vr2 and vr3) were previously shown to be involved in valine-resistance due to amino acid uptake deficiency. Haploid tobacco plants were produced through anther culture from an F(1) double-heterozygous plant obtained from a cross between the original mutant plant and a wild-type plant. Study of the level of resistance to valine of protoplast-derived cells allowed the classification of these haploid plants in four types: sensitive, resistant and two intermediary resistant types believed to result from the presence of a mutant allele at only one of the two loci involved. The frequencies of UV-induced mutations in cells derived from haploid plants of one of the intermediary types were

  8. Valine-Resistance, a Potential Marker in Plant Cell Genetics. II. Optimization of Uv Mutagenesis and Selection of Valine-Resistant Colonies Derived from Tobacco Mesophyll Protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Grandbastien, M. A.; Bourgin, J. P.; Caboche, M.

    1985-01-01

    The induction and selection of valine-resistant mutants from haploid tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) mesophyll protoplast-derived cells have been studied. Using cells from an original mutant plant obtained previously, we performed reconstruction experiments in order to determine the best conditions for the recovery of resistant cells among a population of sensitive cells. Optimal selective conditions were shown to depend on various factors including cell density, time of addition of valine and seasonal variations affecting the mother plants.—Using cell densities of approximately 10 4 cells/ml, we defined efficient selective conditions: more than 25% of the putative mutant clones selected from UV-mutagenized protoplasts were reproducibly confirmed to be valine resistant. Further characterization of some regenerated mutant plants indicated that valine-resistance was associated with an uptake deficiency, as in the case of the original mutant plant of the Valr-2 line used for reconstruction experiments. Spontaneous mutation rates for valine-resistance were below accurately detectable levels, i.e., less than 10-6 per cell per generation. Induced mutation frequency varied nonlinearily with UV dose from 10-5 to 5 x 10-4 resistant clones per surviving colony. Two independent loci (vr2 and vr3) were previously shown to be involved in valine-resistance due to amino acid uptake deficiency. Haploid tobacco plants were produced through anther culture from an F1 double-heterozygous plant obtained from a cross between the original mutant plant and a wild-type plant. Study of the level of resistance to valine of protoplast-derived cells allowed the classification of these haploid plants in four types: sensitive, resistant and two intermediary resistant types believed to result from the presence of a mutant allele at only one of the two loci involved. The frequencies of UV-induced mutations in cells derived from haploid plants of one of the intermediary types were compared to

  9. Geometry and mechanics of growing bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Zhihong; Pearce, Daniel; Sengupta, Anupam; Giomi, Luca

    Bacterial colonies are abundant on living and non-living surfaces, and are known to mediate a broad range of processes in ecology, medicine and industry. Although extensively researched - from single cells up to the population levels - a comprehensive biophysical picture, highlighting the cell-to-colony dynamics, is still lacking. Here, using numerical and analytical models, we study the mechanics of self-organization leading to the colony morphology of cells growing on a substrate with free boundary. We consider hard rods to mimic the growth of rod-shaped non-motile cells, and show that the colony, as a whole, does not form an ordered nematic phase, nor does it result in a purely disordered (isotropic) phase. Instead, different sizes of domains, in which cells are highly aligned at specific orientations, are found. The distribution of the domain sizes follows an exponential relation - indicating the existence of a characteristic length scale that determines the domain size relative to that of the colony. A continuum theory, based on the hydrodynamics of liquid crystals, is built to account for these phenomena, and is applied to describe the buckling transition from a planar to three-dimensional (3D) colony. The theory supports preliminary experiments conducted with different strains of rod shaped bacterial cells, and reveals that the buckling transition can be regulated by varying the cell stiffness and aspect ratio. This work proposes that, in addition to biochemical pathways, the spatio-temporal organization in microbial colonies is significantly tuned by the biomechanical and geometric properties of the microbes in consideration.

  10. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells with granulocyte colony stimulating factors for autologous transplant in hematologic malignancies: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gabús, Raul; Borelli, Gabriel; Ferrando, Martín; Bódega, Enrique; Citrín, Estela; Jiménez, Constanza Olivera; Álvarez, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2006 the Hematology Service of Hospital Maciel published its experience with peripheral blood progenitor cell harvesting for autologous stem cell transplantation using Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim). After mobilization with a mean filgrastim dose of 78 mcg/Kg, 4.7 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg were obtained by apheresis. Age above 50, multiple myeloma as underlying disease and a malignancy that was not in remission were identified as frequent characteristics among patients showing complex mobilization. Objective The aim of this study was to compare stem cell mobilization using different brands of filgrastim. Methods One hundred and fifty-seven mobilizations performed between 1997 and 2006 were analyzed. This retrospective analysis comparative two groups of patients: those mobilized with different brands of filgrastim (Group A) and those who received Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim) as mobilizing agent (Group B). A cluster analysis technique was used to identify four clusters of individuals with different behaviors differentiated by age, total dose of filgrastim required, number of apheresis and harvested CD34+ cells. Results The mean total dose of filgrastim administered was 105 mcg/Kg, the median number of apheresis was 2 procedures and the mean number of harvested stem cells was 4.98 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg. No significant differences were observed between Groups A and B regarding the number of apheresis, harvested CD34+ cells and number of mobilization failures, however the total dose of filgrastim was significantly lower in Group B. Conclusions Among other factors, the origin of the cytokine used as mobilizing agent is an element to be considered when evaluating CD34+ cell mobilization results. PMID:23049356

  11. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    PubMed

    Rho, Chang Rae; Park, Mi-young; Kang, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml). MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  12. A full genomic characterization of the development of a stable Small Colony Variant cell-type by a clinical Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    PubMed

    Bui, Long M G; Kidd, Stephen P

    2015-12-01

    A key to persistent and recurrent Staphylococcus aureus infections is its ability to adapt to diverse and toxic conditions. This ability includes a switch into a biofilm or to the quasi-dormant Small Colony Variant (SCV). The development and molecular attributes of SCVs have been difficult to study due to their rapid reversion to their parental cell-type. We recently described the unique induction of a matrix-embedded and stable SCV cell-type in a clinical S. aureus strain (WCH-SK2) by growing the cells with limiting conditions for a prolonged timeframe. Here we further study their characteristics. They possessed an increased viability in the presence of antibiotics compared to their non-SCV form. Their stability implied that there had been genetic changes; we therefore determined both the genome sequence of WCH-SK2 and its stable SCV form at a single base resolution, employing Single Molecular Real-Time (SMRT) sequencing that enabled the methylome to also be determined. The genetic features of WCH-SK2 have been identified; the SCCmec type, the pathogenicity and genetic islands and virulence factors. The genetic changes that had occurred in the stable SCV form were identified; most notably being in MgrA, a global regulator, and RsbU, a phosphoserine phosphatase within the regulatory pathway of the sigma factor SigB. There was a shift in the methylomes of the non-SCV and stable SCV forms. We have also shown a similar induction of this cell-type in other S. aureus strains and performed a genetic comparison to these and other S. aureus genomes. We additionally map RNAseq data to the WCH-SK2 genome in a transcriptomic analysis of the parental, SCV and stable SCV cells. The results from this study represent the unique identification of a suite of epigenetic, genetic and transcriptional factors that are implicated in the switch in S. aureus to its persistent SCV form.

  13. Buckling instability in ordered bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Denis; Mather, William; Mondragón-Palomino, Octavio; Orozco-Fuentes, Sirio; Danino, Tal; Hasty, Jeff; Tsimring, Lev S.

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial colonies often exhibit complex spatio-temporal organization. This collective behavior is affected by a multitude of factors ranging from the properties of individual cells (shape, motility, membrane structure) to chemotaxis and other means of cell-cell communication. One of the important but often overlooked mechanisms of spatio-temporal organization is direct mechanical contact among cells in dense colonies such as biofilms. While in natural habitats all these different mechanisms and factors act in concert, one can use laboratory cell cultures to study certain mechanisms in isolation. Recent work demonstrated that growth and ensuing expansion flow of rod-like bacteria Escherichia coli in confined environments leads to orientation of cells along the flow direction and thus to ordering of cells. However, the cell orientational ordering remained imperfect. In this paper we study one mechanism responsible for the persistence of disorder in growing cell populations. We demonstrate experimentally that a growing colony of nematically ordered cells is prone to the buckling instability. Our theoretical analysis and discrete-element simulations suggest that the nature of this instability is related to the anisotropy of the stress tensor in the ordered cell colony.

  14. [A new technic for LE cell formation. Preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Estrada, H; Fernández-Quintero, P; Toro-Pérez, A; Arellando-Blanco, J; Ochoa Díaz-López, H; Tapia-Arizmendi, G

    1976-01-01

    In special designed vials using coverslides glued to segments of polyethilene test tubes of 0.15 ml of fibrin free blood were incubated during 45 min to 37 degrees C in a humid chamber. Blood samples were obtained from patients with disseminated Lupus erythematosus (DLE) and normal subjects (N). Adhered polymorpho-nuclear cells (PNC) to glass were washed with Hank's solution; immediately 0.15 ml of DLE or N serum containing 5X10(6) lymphocytes (L) were added to culture cells and incubated at 37 degrees C during 30 min. Lymphocytes were previously incubated at 37 degrees C during 30 min with either N serum or DLE serum. Thereafter the segment of polyethilene test tube was detached from coverslides and cells attached to glass was washed with Hank's solution and stained with Wright solution. PMN of DLE and N in presence of L of DLE and N incubated with fresh serum of DLE formed 5 to 15% of LE cells. Determining factor for LE cells formation is the serum of DLE. Slides contained only PMN and LE cells which make easy the observation of results. All possible combinations with PMN and DLE serum and N serum allowed inclusion of several negative or positive control groups.

  15. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qian Peter; Du, Wanqing; Ji, Qinghua; Xue, Boxin; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Yueyao; Lou, Jizhong; Yu, Li; Sun, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro studies also lack physiological relevance. Here, we use lysosomes and autolysosomes, whose sizes range between 100 nm and 1 μm, as model systems to study the size effects on nanotube formation both in vivo and in vitro. Single molecule observations indicate that driven by kinesin motors, small vesicles (100–200 nm) are mainly transported along the tracks while a remarkable portion of large vesicles (500–1000 nm) form nanotubes. This size effect is further confirmed by in vitro reconstitution assays on liposomes and purified lysosomes and autolysosomes. We also apply Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to measure the initiation force for nanotube formation. These results suggest that the size-dependence may be one of the mechanisms for cells to regulate cellular processes involving membrane-deformation, such as the timing of tubulation-mediated vesicle recycling. PMID:27052881

  16. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell.

    PubMed

    Su, Qian Peter; Du, Wanqing; Ji, Qinghua; Xue, Boxin; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Yueyao; Lou, Jizhong; Yu, Li; Sun, Yujie

    2016-04-07

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro studies also lack physiological relevance. Here, we use lysosomes and autolysosomes, whose sizes range between 100 nm and 1 μm, as model systems to study the size effects on nanotube formation both in vivo and in vitro. Single molecule observations indicate that driven by kinesin motors, small vesicles (100-200 nm) are mainly transported along the tracks while a remarkable portion of large vesicles (500-1000 nm) form nanotubes. This size effect is further confirmed by in vitro reconstitution assays on liposomes and purified lysosomes and autolysosomes. We also apply Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to measure the initiation force for nanotube formation. These results suggest that the size-dependence may be one of the mechanisms for cells to regulate cellular processes involving membrane-deformation, such as the timing of tubulation-mediated vesicle recycling.

  17. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  18. Deformed wing virus implicated in overwintering honeybee colony losses.

    PubMed

    Highfield, Andrea C; El Nagar, Aliya; Mackinder, Luke C M; Noël, Laure M-L J; Hall, Matthew J; Martin, Stephen J; Schroeder, Declan C

    2009-11-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses. Recently in the United States, dramatic honeybee losses (colony collapse disorder) have been reported; however, there remains no clear explanation for these colony losses, with parasitic mites, viruses, bacteria, and fungal diseases all being proposed as possible candidates. Common characteristics that most failing colonies share is a lack of overt disease symptoms and the disappearance of workers from what appears to be normally functioning colonies. In this study, we used quantitative PCR to monitor the presence of three honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV), during a 1-year period in 15 asymptomatic, varroa mite-positive honeybee colonies in Southern England, and 3 asymptomatic colonies confirmed to be varroa mite free. All colonies with varroa mites underwent control treatments to ensure that mite populations remained low throughout the study. Despite this, multiple virus infections were detected, yet a significant correlation was observed only between DWV viral load and overwintering colony losses. The long-held view has been that DWV is relatively harmless to the overall health status of honeybee colonies unless it is in association with severe varroa mite infestations. Our findings suggest that DWV can potentially act independently of varroa mites to bring about colony losses. Therefore, DWV may be a major factor in overwintering colony losses.

  19. Case Report: Combination Therapy with Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in a Case of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Derakhshanrad, Nazi; Saberi, Hooshang; Tayebi Meybodi, Keyvan; Taghvaei, Mohammad; Arjmand, Babak; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Kohan, Amir Hassan; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Rahmani, Shahrokh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various neuroregenerative procedures have been recently employed along with neurorehabilitation programs to promote neurological function after Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), and recently most of them have focused on the acute stage of spinal cord injury. In this report, we present a case of acute SCI treated with neuroprotective treatments in conjunction with conventional rehabilitation program. Methods: A case of acute penetrative SCI (gunshot wound), 40 years old, was treated with intrathecal bone marrow derived stem cells and parenteral Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) along with rehabilitation program. The neurological outcomes as well as safety issues have been reported. Results: Assessment with American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), showed neurological improvement, meanwhile he reported neuropathic pain, which was amenable to oral medication. Discussion: In the acute setting, combination therapy of G-CSF and intrathecal Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) was safe in our case as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation programs. Further controlled studies are needed to find possible side effects, and establish net efficacy. PMID:26649168

  20. Defective Self-Renewal and Differentiation of GBA-Deficient Neural Stem Cells Can Be Restored By Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun; Bae, Jae-sung; Jin, Hee Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA), which encodes the lysosomal enzyme glucosylceramidase (GCase). Deficiency in GCase leads to characteristic visceral pathology and lethal neurological manifestations in some patients. Investigations into neurogenesis have suggested that neurodegenerative disorders, such as GD, could be overcome or at least ameliorated by the generation of new neurons. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are potential candidates for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders because of their ability to promote neurogenesis. Our objective was to examine the mechanism of neurogenesis by BM-MSCs in GD. We found that neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from a neuronopathic GD model exhibited decreased ability for self-renewal and neuronal differentiation. Co-culture of GBA-deficient NSCs with BM-MSCs resulted in an enhanced capacity for self-renewal, and an increased ability for differentiation into neurons or oligodendrocytes. Enhanced proliferation and neuronal differentiation of GBA-deficient NSCs was associated with elevated release of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) from BM-MSCs. Our findings suggest that soluble M-CSF derived from BM-MSCs can modulate GBA-deficient NSCs, resulting in their improved proliferation and neuronal differentiation. PMID:26282862

  1. Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor signaling is necessary for microglia viability, unmasking a microglia progenitor cell in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Monica R P; Najafi, Allison R; Koike, Maya A; Dagher, Nabil N; Spangenberg, Elizabeth E; Rice, Rachel A; Kitazawa, Masashi; Matusow, Bernice; Nguyen, Hoa; West, Brian L; Green, Kim N

    2014-04-16

    The colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) is a key regulator of myeloid lineage cells. Genetic loss of the CSF1R blocks the normal population of resident microglia in the brain that originates from the yolk sac during early development. However, the role of CSF1R signaling in microglial homeostasis in the adult brain is largely unknown. To this end, we tested the effects of selective CSF1R inhibitors on microglia in adult mice. Surprisingly, extensive treatment results in elimination of ∼99% of all microglia brain-wide, showing that microglia in the adult brain are physiologically dependent upon CSF1R signaling. Mice depleted of microglia show no behavioral or cognitive abnormalities, revealing that microglia are not necessary for these tasks. Finally, we discovered that the microglia-depleted brain completely repopulates with new microglia within 1 week of inhibitor cessation. Microglial repopulation throughout the CNS occurs through proliferation of nestin-positive cells that then differentiate into microglia.

  2. Epigenetic Regulation of Placenta-Specific 8 Contributes to Altered Function of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Exposed to Intrauterine Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Blue, Emily K; Sheehan, BreAnn M; Nuss, Zia V; Boyle, Frances A; Hocutt, Caleb M; Gohn, Cassandra R; Varberg, Kaela M; McClintick, Jeanette N; Haneline, Laura S

    2015-07-01

    Intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is linked to development of hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes in children. Our previous studies determined that endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from neonates exposed to GDM exhibit impaired function. The current goals were to identify aberrantly expressed genes that contribute to impaired function of GDM-exposed ECFCs and to evaluate for evidence of altered epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Genome-wide mRNA expression analysis was conducted on ECFCs from control and GDM pregnancies. Candidate genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Bisulfite sequencing evaluated DNA methylation of placenta-specific 8 (PLAC8). Proliferation and senescence assays of ECFCs transfected with siRNA to knockdown PLAC8 were performed to determine functional impact. Thirty-eight genes were differentially expressed between control and GDM-exposed ECFCs. PLAC8 was highly expressed in GDM-exposed ECFCs, and PLAC8 expression correlated with maternal hyperglycemia. Methylation status of 17 CpG sites in PLAC8 negatively correlated with mRNA expression. Knockdown of PLAC8 in GDM-exposed ECFCs improved proliferation and senescence defects. This study provides strong evidence in neonatal endothelial progenitor cells that GDM exposure in utero leads to altered gene expression and DNA methylation, suggesting the possibility of altered epigenetic regulation. PMID:25720387

  3. Robotic space colonies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenker, P.; Easter, R.; Rodriguez, G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in these technologies, with a particular focus on experimental state-of-the-art robot work crew system demonstrations at JPL, that are being conducted now to begin to realize the futuristic robotic colony vision.

  4. [Factors affecting plaque formation by Lassa virus in Vero cells].

    PubMed

    Lukashevich, I S; Vasiuchkov, A D; Mar'iankova, R F; Votiakov, V I

    1982-01-01

    The method of Porterfield and Allison was adapted for titration of the infectious activity of Lassa virus by the plaque formation in Vero cells. The virus was cloned, and the effect of the time of adsorption, pH, temperature, as well as polycations (DEAD-dextran, protamine sulphate) dimethylsuphoxide (DMSO), and trypsin added during adsorption or into the agar overlay on the effectiveness of plaque production by Lassa virus (virus titres, plaque size) were studied. The optimal adsorption time was found to be 1 1/2-2 hours, pH 8.0. The number of plaques produced by the virus was approximately similar at 35 degrees C. The substances under study did not enhance the efficacy of plaque formation, on the contrary, DMSO and high concentrations of polycations decreased plaque size.

  5. A microfluidic direct formate fuel cell on paper.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Thomas S; Purohit, Krutarth H; Domalaon, Kryls; Pham, Linda; Burgess, Brianna J; Manorothkul, Natalie; Galvan, Vicente; Sotez, Samantha; Gomez, Frank A; Haan, John L

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first direct formate fuel cell on a paper microfluidic platform. In traditional membrane-less microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs), external pumping consumes power produced by the fuel cell in order to maintain co-laminar flow of the anode stream and oxidant stream to prevent mixing. However, in paper microfluidics, capillary action drives flow while minimizing stream mixing. In this work, we demonstrate a paper MFC that uses formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. Using these materials we achieve a maximum power density of nearly 2.5 mW/mg Pd. In a series configuration, our MFC achieves an open circuit voltage just over 1 V, and in a parallel configuration, short circuit of 20 mA absolute current. We also demonstrate that the MFC does not require continuous flow of fuel and oxidant to produce power. We found that we can pre-saturate the materials on the paper, stop the electrolyte flow, and still produce approximately 0.5 V for 15 min. This type of paper MFC has potential applications in point-of-care diagnostic devices and other electrochemical sensors.

  6. A motif within the N-terminal domain of TSP-1 specifically promotes the proangiogenic activity of endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Dias, Juliana Vieira; Benslimane-Ahmim, Zahia; Egot, Marion; Lokajczyk, Anna; Grelac, Françoise; Galy-Fauroux, Isabelle; Juliano, Luiz; Le-Bonniec, Bernard; Takiya, Cristina Maeda; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Morandi, Verônica; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine

    2012-10-15

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) gives rise to fragments that have both pro- and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The TSP-HepI peptide (2.3 kDa), located in the N-terminal domain of TSP-1, has proangiogenic effects on endothelial cells. We have previously shown that TSP-1 itself exhibits a dual effect on endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) by enhancing their adhesion through its TSP-HepI fragment while reducing their proliferation and differentiation into vascular tubes (tubulogenesis) in vitro. This effect is likely mediated through CD47 binding to the TSP-1 C-terminal domain. Here we investigated the effect of TSP-HepI peptide on the angiogenic properties of ECFC in vitro and in vivo. TSP-HepI peptide potentiated FGF-2-induced neovascularisation by enhancing ECFC chemotaxis and tubulogenesis in a Matrigel plug assay. ECFC exposure to 20 μg/mL of TSP-HepI peptide for 18 h enhanced cell migration (p < 0.001 versus VEGF exposure), upregulated alpha 6-integrin expression, and enhanced their cell adhesion to activated endothelium under physiological shear stress conditions at levels comparable to those of SDF-1α. The adhesion enhancement appeared to be mediated by the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) syndecan-4, as ECFC adhesion was significantly reduced by a syndecan-4-neutralising antibody. ECFC migration and tubulogenesis were stimulated neither by a TSP-HepI peptide with a modified heparin-binding site (S/TSP-HepI) nor when the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) moieties were removed from the ECFC surface by enzymatic treatment. Ex vivo TSP-HepI priming could potentially serve to enhance the effectiveness of therapeutic neovascularisation with ECFC.

  7. Antibiotics and production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. A comparison of cefodizime and ceftriaxone.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Y; Hosni, R; Dagrosa, E E; Gormand, F; Guibert, B; Chabannes, B; Lagarde, M; Perrin-Fayolle, M

    1994-04-01

    Cultured human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) produce both granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 8 (IL-8). The influence of cefodizime (CAS 69739-16-8), a new broad spectrum cephalosporin with immunostimulatory effects, and ceftriaxone on the production of GM-CSF and IL-8 in HBEC primary cultures was investigated. HBEC were isolated from biopsy specimens obtained during fibreoptic bronchoscopy in 12 patients (most frequent diagnosis: chronic bronchitis). Confluent monolayers of HBEC cultured on collagen were incubated for 24 h in a medium without study drugs (spontaneous production) or containing cefodizime or ceftriaxone at the clinically relevant concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 mg/l, with or without tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha, 100 U/ml). GM-CSF and IL-8 were measured in supernatant by ELISA technique. TNF alpha alone led to a significant (p < 0.005) increase in both GM-CSF and IL-8 production. Cefodizime induced a significant (p < 0.05), dose-dependent increase in GM-CSF release. No additive effect of cefodizime with TNF alpha was observed. Cefodizime did not affect IL-8 production and ceftriaxone had no influence on cytokine production. This is the first report of a stimulatory effect of a beta-lactam antibiotic on cytokine production by epithelial cells. GM-CSF production by epithelial cells is an important immunological step for neutrophil and monocyte recruitment and cell priming during lung defence. Previous studies with cefodizime in immunodepressed subjects have shown activation of phagocytosis and phagocytosis-related functions in non-lung phagocytes. An indirect mechanism of action, similar to that indicated by our results, may have been responsible for these stimulatory effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. A motif within the N-terminal domain of TSP-1 specifically promotes the proangiogenic activity of endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Dias, Juliana Vieira; Benslimane-Ahmim, Zahia; Egot, Marion; Lokajczyk, Anna; Grelac, Françoise; Galy-Fauroux, Isabelle; Juliano, Luiz; Le-Bonniec, Bernard; Takiya, Cristina Maeda; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Morandi, Verônica; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine

    2012-10-15

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) gives rise to fragments that have both pro- and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The TSP-HepI peptide (2.3 kDa), located in the N-terminal domain of TSP-1, has proangiogenic effects on endothelial cells. We have previously shown that TSP-1 itself exhibits a dual effect on endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) by enhancing their adhesion through its TSP-HepI fragment while reducing their proliferation and differentiation into vascular tubes (tubulogenesis) in vitro. This effect is likely mediated through CD47 binding to the TSP-1 C-terminal domain. Here we investigated the effect of TSP-HepI peptide on the angiogenic properties of ECFC in vitro and in vivo. TSP-HepI peptide potentiated FGF-2-induced neovascularisation by enhancing ECFC chemotaxis and tubulogenesis in a Matrigel plug assay. ECFC exposure to 20 μg/mL of TSP-HepI peptide for 18 h enhanced cell migration (p < 0.001 versus VEGF exposure), upregulated alpha 6-integrin expression, and enhanced their cell adhesion to activated endothelium under physiological shear stress conditions at levels comparable to those of SDF-1α. The adhesion enhancement appeared to be mediated by the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) syndecan-4, as ECFC adhesion was significantly reduced by a syndecan-4-neutralising antibody. ECFC migration and tubulogenesis were stimulated neither by a TSP-HepI peptide with a modified heparin-binding site (S/TSP-HepI) nor when the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) moieties were removed from the ECFC surface by enzymatic treatment. Ex vivo TSP-HepI priming could potentially serve to enhance the effectiveness of therapeutic neovascularisation with ECFC. PMID:22796565

  9. Constitutive Store-Operated Ca(2+) Entry Leads to Enhanced Nitric Oxide Production and Proliferation in Infantile Hemangioma-Derived Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells.

    PubMed

    Zuccolo, Estella; Bottino, Cinzia; Diofano, Federica; Poletto, Valentina; Codazzi, Alessia Claudia; Mannarino, Savina; Campanelli, Rita; Fois, Gabriella; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Guerra, Germano; Montagna, Daniela; Laforenza, Umberto; Rosti, Vittorio; Massa, Margherita; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-02-15

    Clonal endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been implicated in the aberrant vascular growth that features infantile hemangioma (IH), the most common benign vascular tumor in childhood that may cause ulceration, bleeding, and/or permanent disfigurement. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), truly endothelial EPCs endowed with clonal ability and capable of forming patent vessels in vivo, remodel their Ca(2+) toolkit in tumor-derived patients to acquire an adaptive advantage. Particularly, they upregulate the proangiogenic store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) pathway due to the overexpression of its underlying components, that is, stromal interaction molecule 1 (Stim1), Orai1, and transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1). The present work was undertaken to assess whether and how the Ca(2+) signalosome is altered in IH-ECFCs by employing Ca(2+) and nitric oxide (NO) imaging, real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and functional assays. IH-ECFCs display a lower intracellular Ca(2+) release in response to either pharmacological (i.e., cyclopiazonic acid) or physiological (i.e., ATP and vascular endothelial growth factor) stimulation. Conversely, Stim1, Orai1, and TRPC1 transcripts and proteins are normally expressed in these cells and mediate a constitutive SOCE, which is sensitive to BTP-2, La(3+), and Pyr6 and recharges the intracellular Ca(2+) pool. The resting SOCE in IH-ECFCs is also associated to an increase in their proliferation rate and the basal production of NO compared to normal cells. Likewise, the pharmacological blockade of SOCE and NO synthesis block IH-ECFC growth. Collectively, these data indicate that the constitutive SOCE activation enhances IH-ECFC proliferation by augmenting basal NO production and sheds novel light on the molecular mechanisms of IH. PMID:26654173

  10. Multicellular group formation in response to predators in the alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R M; Bell, T; West, S A

    2016-03-01

    A key step in the evolution of multicellular organisms is the formation of cooperative multicellular groups. It has been suggested that predation pressure may promote multicellular group formation in some algae and bacteria, with cells forming groups to lower their chance of being eaten. We use the green alga Chlorella vulgaris and the protist Tetrahymena thermophila to test whether predation pressure can initiate the formation of colonies. We found that: (1) either predators or just predator exoproducts promote colony formation; (2) higher predator densities cause more colonies to form; and (3) colony formation in this system is facultative, with populations returning to being unicellular when the predation pressure is removed. These results provide empirical support for the hypothesis that predation pressure promotes multicellular group formation. The speed of the reversion of populations to unicellularity suggests that this response is due to phenotypic plasticity and not evolutionary change. PMID:26663204

  11. The formation of ordered nanoclusters controls cadherin anchoring to actin and cell-cell contact fluidity.

    PubMed

    Strale, Pierre-Olivier; Duchesne, Laurence; Peyret, Grégoire; Montel, Lorraine; Nguyen, Thao; Png, Evelyn; Tampé, Robert; Troyanovsky, Sergey; Hénon, Sylvie; Ladoux, Benoit; Mège, René-Marc

    2015-07-20

    Oligomerization of cadherins could provide the stability to ensure tissue cohesion. Cadherins mediate cell-cell adhesion by forming trans-interactions. They form cis-interactions whose role could be essential to stabilize intercellular junctions by shifting cadherin clusters from a fluid to an ordered phase. However, no evidence has been provided so far for cadherin oligomerization in cellulo and for its impact on cell-cell contact stability. Visualizing single cadherins within cell membrane at a nanometric resolution, we show that E-cadherins arrange in ordered clusters, providing the first demonstration of the existence of oligomeric cadherins at cell-cell contacts. Studying the consequences of the disruption of the cis-interface, we show that it is not essential for adherens junction formation. Its disruption, however, increased the mobility of junctional E-cadherin. This destabilization strongly affected E-cadherin anchoring to actin and cell-cell rearrangement during collective cell migration, indicating that the formation of oligomeric clusters controls the anchoring of cadherin to actin and cell-cell contact fluidity.

  12. Notch1-Dll4 signalling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-03-13

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct 'leader' phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving the leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here we use single-cell gene expression analysis and computational modelling to show that the leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signalling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signalling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration.

  13. Formation of nanofilms on cell surfaces to improve the insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amemiya, Yosuke; Kawano, Keiko; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the insertion efficiency of nanoneedles into fibroblast and neural cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofilms formed on cell surfaces improved the insertion efficiency of nanoneedles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofilms improved the insertion efficiency even in Y27632-treated cells. -- Abstract: A nanoneedle, an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip etched to 200 nm in diameter and 10 {mu}m in length, can be inserted into cells with the aid of an AFM and has been used to introduce functional molecules into cells and to analyze intracellular information with minimal cell damage. However, some cell lines have shown low insertion efficiency of the nanoneedle. Improvement in the insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into such cells is a significant issue for nanoneedle-based cell manipulation and analysis. Here, we have formed nanofilms composed of extracellular matrix molecules on cell surfaces and found that the formation of the nanofilms improved insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into fibroblast and neural cells. The nanofilms were shown to improve insertion efficiency even in cells in which the formation of actin stress fibers was inhibited by the ROCK inhibitor Y27632, suggesting that the nanofilms with the mesh structure directly contributed to the improved insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle.

  14. Determination of infectious retrovirus concentration from colony-forming assay with quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Jik; Hung, Gene; Anderson, W French; Peng, Ching-An; Yu, Hong

    2003-05-01

    The colony formation assay is the most commonly used titration method for defining the concentration of replication-incompetent murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vectors. However, titer varies with target cell type and number, transduction time, and concentration of polycation (e.g., Polybrene). Moreover, because most of the viruses cannot encounter target cells due to Brownian motion, their short half-lives, and the requirement for target cell division for activity, the actual infectious retrovirus concentration in the collected supernatant is higher than the viral titer. Here we correlate the physical viral particle concentration with the infectious virus concentration and colony formation titer with the help of a mathematical model. Ecotropic murine leukemia retrovirus supernatant, collected from the GP+E86/LNCX retroviral vector producer cell line, was concentrated by centrifugation and further purified by a sucrose density gradient. The physical concentration of purified viral vectors was determined by direct particle counting with an electron microscope. The concentrations of fresh and concentrated supernatant were determined by a quantitative reverse transcriptase activity assay. Titration of all supernatants by neomycin-resistant colony formation assay was also performed. There were 767 +/- 517 physical viral particles per infectious CFU in the crude viral supernatant. However, the infectious viral concentration determined by mathematical simulation was 143 viral particles per infectious unit, which is more consistent with the concentration determined by particle counting in purified viral solution. Our results suggest that the mathematical model can be used to extract a more accurate and reliable concentration of infectious retrovirus.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms for Vascular Development and Secondary Cell Wall Formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung Hyun; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem, and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls (SCWs) that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and SCW biosynthesis has seen rapid progress due to the importance of these processes to plant biology and to the biofuel industry. Plant hormones, transcriptional regulators and peptide signaling regulate procambium/cambium proliferation, vascular patterning, and xylem differentiation. Transcriptional regulatory pathways play a pivot role in SCW biosynthesis. Although most of these discoveries are derived from research in Arabidopsis, many genes have shown conserved functions in biofuel feedstock species. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of vascular development and SCW formation and discuss potential biotechnological uses. PMID:27047525

  16. Molecular Mechanisms for Vascular Development and Secondary Cell Wall Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Hyun; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem, and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls (SCWs) that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and SCW biosynthesis has seen rapid progress due to the importance of these processes to plant biology and to the biofuel industry. Plant hormones, transcriptional regulators and peptide signaling regulate procambium/cambium proliferation, vascular patterning, and xylem differentiation. Transcriptional regulatory pathways play a pivot role in SCW biosynthesis. Although most of these discoveries are derived from research in Arabidopsis, many genes have shown conserved functions in biofuel feedstock species. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of vascular development and SCW formation and discuss potential biotechnological uses. PMID:27047525

  17. Plerixafor on-demand combined with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: significant improvement in peripheral blood stem cells mobilization and harvest with no increase in costs.

    PubMed

    Milone, Giuseppe; Martino, Massimo; Spadaro, Andrea; Leotta, Salvatore; Di Marco, Annalia; Scalzulli, Potito; Cupri, Alessandra; Di Martina, Valentina; Schinocca, Elena; Spina, Eleonora; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To date, no prospective study on Plerixafor 'on-demand' in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported. We present an interim analysis of the first prospective study in which Plerixafor was administered on-demand in patients affected by multiple myeloma and lymphoma who received high dose cyclophosphamide or DHAP (dexamethasone, cytarabine, cisplatin) plus G-CSF to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). One hundred and two patients were evaluable for response. A cohort of 240 patients receiving the same mobilizing chemotherapy was retrospectively studied. Failure to mobilize CD34(+) cells in peripheral blood was reduced by 'on-demand' strategy compared to conventional mobilization; from 13·0 to 3·0% (P = 0·004). Failure to harvest CD34(+) cells 2 × 10(6) /kg decreased from 20·9 to 4·0% (P = 0·0001). The on-demand Plerixafor strategy also resulted in a lower rate of mobilization failure (P = 0·03) and harvest failure (P = 0·0008) when compared to a 'bias-adjusted set of controls'. Evaluation of economic costs of the two strategies showed that the overall cost of the two treatments were comparable when salvage mobilizations were taken into account. When in combination with cyclophosphamide or DHAP plus G-CSF, the 'on-demand' use of Plerixafor showed, in comparison to conventionally treated patients, a significant improvement in mobilization of PBSC with no increase in overall cost. PMID:24138497

  18. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex. PMID:27668216

  19. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex.

  20. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Oliva, María A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex. PMID:27668216

  1. Cadmium stimulates osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation in mouse bone marrow cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Tatsuro; Takata, Masakazu; Miyata, Masaki; Nagai, Miyuki; Sugure, Akemi; Kozuka, Hiroshi; Kuze, Shougo )

    1991-08-01

    Most of cadmium (Cd)-treated animals have been reported to show osteoporosis-like changes in bones. This suggests that Cd may promote bone loss by a direct action on bone. It was found that Cd stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2}(PGE{sub 2}) production in the osteoblast-like cell, MC3T3-E1. Therefore, Cd stimulates bone resorption by increasing PGE{sub 2} production. Recently, several bone marrow cell culture systems have been developed for examining the formation of osteoclast-like multinucleated cells in vitro. As osteoblasts produce PGE{sub 2} by Cd-induced cyclooxygenase and may play an important role in osteoclast formation, the present study was undertaken to clarify the possibility that Cd might stimulate osteoclast formation in a mouse bone marrow culture system.

  2. Unrelated donor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning: the effect of postgrafting mycophenolate mofetil dosing.

    PubMed

    Maris, Michael B; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E; Maloney, David G; Shizuru, Judith A; Agura, Edward; Kliem, Constanze; Pulsipher, Michael; Maziarz, Richard T; McSweeney, Peter A; Wade, James; Langston, Amelia A; Chauncey, Thomas R; Bruno, Benedetto; Blume, Karl G; Storb, Rainer

    2006-04-01

    We previously reported results in 71 patients with advanced hematologic malignancies given HLA-matched unrelated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cell (G-PBMC) grafts after fludarabine 90 mg/m(2), 2 Gy of total body irradiation, and postgrafting mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) 15 mg/kg twice daily and cyclosporine 6.25 mg/kg twice daily orally. Graft rejection was 15%; the cumulative probability of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 52%. According to MMF pharmacokinetic studies, which showed a short half-life of its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid, we increased MMF dosing from 15 mg/kg twice daily to 15 mg/kg 3 times daily to increase immunosuppression and reduce the incidence of both graft rejection and acute GVHD. Among 103 patients so treated, graft rejection occurred in 5%, whereas acute GVHD remained at 53%. Outcomes were compared with results of previous G-PBMC recipients given MMF twice daily. Infection rates were slightly higher with MMF 3 times daily than with MMF twice daily. Nevertheless, 2-year nonrelapse mortality and overall and progression-free survivals were similar for MMF 3-times-daily and twice-daily patients (19%, 58%, and 49% versus 20%, 48%, and 37%, respectively). Nonmyeloablative conditioning with postgrafting cyclosporine and MMF given 3 times daily allowed 95% durable engraftment of unrelated donor G-PBMC grafts.

  3. Effects of acoustic and EHF impulses on multipotent stromal cells during formation of bone marrow containing heterotopic organs in tissue engineered constructions.

    PubMed

    Chaikhalyan, R K; Yusupov, V I; Gorskaya, Yu F; Kuralesova, A I; Gerasimov, Yu V; Sviridov, A P; Tambiev, A Kh; Vorob'eva, N N; Shishkova, A G Grosheva V V; Moskvina, I L; Bagratashvili, V N

    2015-03-01

    We studied the effects of physical factors (acoustic impulses of laser-induced hydrodynamics, AILIH, and EHF-radiation) on the formation of heterotopic bone marrow organs. Suspension of precipitated mouse bone marrow cells was exposed to AILIH and EHF or their combinations (AILIH+EHF, EHF+AILIH). The developed tissue engineering constructions (gelatin sponges containing 107 nucleated bone marrow cells exposed to physical factors) were transplanted under the renal capsule of syngeneic mice. Analysis of newly formed hemopoietic organs was performed after 3 and 5 months. The total amount of hemopoietic cells, number of multipotent stromal cells, efficiency of colony formation from these cells, and weight of bone capsule of the transplants were measured. Microscopic study showed that 5-month transplants were significantly larger than 3-month transplants and contained 3-fold more hemopoietic cells (20-fold in the AILIH+EHF group). The number of multipotent stromal cells was maximum in EHF+AILIH group (by 2.2 times higher than in the control) and minimum in AILIH+EHF group. Exposure to EHF+AILIH had most pronounced effect on the formation of the bone marrow transplants. The weight of bone capsules more rapidly increased in gelatin sponges of 3-month transplants of EHF+AILIH and AILIH groups. These data suggest that the studied physical factors can be used for acceleration of rehabilitation process.

  4. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  5. Amplification and over-expression of MAP3K3 gene in human breast cancer promotes formation and survival of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yihui; Ge, Ningling; Wang, Xiaosong; Sun, Wenjing; Mao, Renfang; Bu, Wen; Creighton, Chad J; Zheng, Pingju; Vasudevan, Sanjeev; An, Lei; Yang, Jinshu; Zhao, Yi-Jue; Zhang, Huiyuan; Li, Xiao-Nan; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Leung, Eastwood; Lu, Yong-Jie; Gray, Joe W; Schiff, Rachel; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Osborne, C Kent; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Gene amplifications in the 17q chromosomal region are observed frequently in breast cancers. An integrative bioinformatics analysis of this region nominated the MAP3K 3 gene as a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. This gene encodes mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 3 (MAP3K3/MEKK3), which has not yet been reported to be associated with cancer-causing genetic aberrations. We found that MAP3K3 was amplified in approximately 8–20% of breast cancers. Knockdown of MAP3K3 expression significantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in MAP3K3-amplified breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 but not in MAP3K3 non-amplified breast cancer cells. Knockdown of MAP3K3 expression in MAP3K3-amplified breast cancer cells sensitized breast cancer cells to apoptotic induction by TNFα and TRAIL, as well as doxorubicin, VP-16 and fluorouracil, three commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs for treating breast cancer. In addition, ectopic expression of MAP3K3, in collaboration with Ras, induced colony formation in both primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts and immortalized human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). Combined, these results suggest that MAP3K3 contributes to breast carcinogenesis and may endow resistance of breast cancer cells to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Therefore, MAP3K3 may be a valuable therapeutic target in patients with MAP3K3-amplified breast cancers, and blocking MAP3K3 kinase activity with a small molecule inhibitor may sensitize MAP3K3-amplified breast cancer cells to chemotherapy. PMID:24122835

  6. [Diverse morphological types of dormant cells and conditions for their formation in Azospirillum brasilense].

    PubMed

    Muliukin, A L; Suzina, N E; Pogorelova, A Iu; Antoniuk, L P; Duda, V I; El'-Registan, G I

    2009-01-01

    Differences in generation of dormant forms (DF) were revealed between two strains of non-sporeforming gram-negative bacteria Azospirillum brasilense, Sp7 (non-endophytic) and Sp245 (endophytic strain). In post-stationary ageing bacterial cultures grown in a synthetic medium with a fivefold decreased initial nitrogen content, strain Sp7 formed two types of cyst-like resting cells (CRC). Strain Sp245 did not form such types of DF under the same conditions. CRC of the first type were formed in strain Sp245 only under phosphorus deficiency (C > P). The endophytic strain was also shown to form structurally differentiated cells under complete starvation, i.e. at a transfer of early stationary cultures, grown in the media with C > N unbalance, to saline solution (pH 7.2). These DF had a complex structure similar to that of azotobacter cysts. The CRC, which are generated by both azospirilla strains and belong to distinct morphological types, possessed the following major features: absence of division; specific ultrastructural organization; long-term maintenance of viability (for 4 months and more); higher heat resistance (50-60 degrees C, 10 min) as compared with vegetative cells, i.e. the important criteria for dormant prokaryotic forms. However, CRC of non-endophytic strain Sp7 had higher heat resistance (50, 55, 60 degrees C). The viability maintenance and the portion of heat-resistant cells depended on the conditions of maturation and storage of CRC populations. Long-term storage (for 4 months and more) of azospirilla DF populations at -20 degrees C was optimal for maintenance of their colony-forming ability (57% of the CFU number in stationary cultures), whereas the largest percentage of heat-resistant cells was in CRC suspensions incubated in a spent culture medium (but not in saline solution) at room temperature. The data on the intraspecies diversity of azospirilla DF demonstrate the relation between certain type DF formation to the type of interaction (non

  7. Identification of a c-di-GMP-regulated polysaccharide locus governing stress resistance and biofilm and rugose colony formation in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yunzhi; Rowe-Magnus, Dean A

    2010-03-01

    As an etiological agent of bacterial sepsis and wound infections, Vibrio vulnificus is unique among the Vibrionaceae. Its continued environmental persistence and transmission are bolstered by its ability to colonize shellfish, form biofilms on various marine biotic surfaces, and generate a morphologically and physiologically distinct rugose (R) variant that yields profuse biofilms. Here, we identify a c-di-GMP-regulated locus (brp, for biofilm and rugose polysaccharide) and two transcription factors (BrpR and BrpT) that regulate these physiological responses. Disruption of glycosyltransferases within the locus or either regulator abated the inducing effect of c-di-GMP on biofilm formation, rugosity, and stress resistance. The same lesions, or depletion of intracellular c-di-GMP levels, abrogated these phenotypes in the R variant. The parental and brp mutant strains formed only scant monolayers on glass surfaces and oyster shells, and although the R variant formed expansive biofilms, these were of limited depth. Dramatic vertical expansion of the biofilm structure was observed in the parental strain and R variant, but not the brp mutants, when intracellular c-di-GMP levels were elevated. Hence, the brp-encoded polysaccharide is important for surface colonization and stress resistance in V. vulnificus, and its expression may control how the bacteria switch from a planktonic lifestyle to colonizing shellfish to invading human tissue.

  8. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Expressed by Recombinant Respiratory Syncytial Virus Attenuates Viral Replication and Increases the Level of Pulmonary Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bukreyev, Alexander; Belyakov, Igor M.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Murphy, Brian R.; Collins, Peter L.

    2001-01-01

    An obstacle to developing a vaccine against human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is that natural infection typically does not confer solid immunity to reinfection. To investigate methods to augment the immune response, recombinant RSV (rRSV) was constructed that expresses murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) from a transcription cassette inserted into the G-F intergenic region. Replication of rRSV/mGM-CSF in the upper and lower respiratory tracts of BALB/c mice was reduced 23- to 74- and 5- to 588-fold, respectively, compared to that of the parental rRSV. Despite this strong attenuation of replication, the level of RSV-specific serum antibodies induced by rRSV/mGM-CSF was comparable to, or marginally higher than, that of the parental rRSV. The induction of RSV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was moderately reduced during the initial infection, which might be a consequence of reduced antigen expression. Mice infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF had elevated levels of pulmonary mRNA for gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin 12 (IL-12) p40 compared to animals infected by wild-type rRSV. Elevated synthesis of IFN-γ could account for the restriction of RSV replication, as was observed previously with an IFN-γ-expressing rRSV. The accumulation of total pulmonary mononuclear cells and total CD4+ T lymphocytes was accelerated in animals infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF compared to that in animals infected with the control virus, and the level of IFN-γ-positive or IL-4-positive pulmonary CD4+ cells was elevated approximately twofold. The number of pulmonary lymphoid and myeloid dendritic cells and macrophages was increased up to fourfold in mice infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF compared to those infected with the parental rRSV, and the mean expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, a marker of activation, was significantly increased in the two subsets of dendritic cells. Enhanced antigen presentation likely accounts for the

  9. Regulation of pluripotency of inner cell mass and growth and differentiation of trophectoderm of the bovine embryo by colony stimulating factor 2.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Kyle B; Khan, Firdous A; Sakatani, Miki; Moss, James I; Ozawa, Manabu; Ealy, Alan D; Hansen, Peter J

    2013-12-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 2 (CSF2) enhances competence of the bovine embryo to establish and maintain pregnancy after the embryo is transferred into a recipient. Mechanisms involved could include regulation of lineage commitment, growth, or differentiation of the inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE). Experiments were conducted to evaluate regulation by CSF2 of pluripotency of the ICM and differentiation and growth of the TE. Embryos were cultured with 10 ng/ml recombinant bovine CSF2 or a vehicle control from Days 5 to 7 or 6 to 8 postinsemination. CSF2 increased the number of putative zygotes that developed to blastocysts when the percent of embryos becoming blastocysts in the control group was low but decreased blastocyst yield when blastocyst development in controls was high. ICM isolated from blastocysts by lysing the trophectoderm using antibody and complement via immunosurgery were more likely to survive passage when cultured on mitomycin C-treated fetal fibroblasts if derived from blastocysts treated with CSF2 than if from control blastocysts. There was little effect of CSF2 on characteristics of TE outgrowths from blastocysts. The exception was a decrease in outgrowth size for embryos treated with CSF2 from Days 5 to 7 and an increase in expression of CDX2 when treatment was from Days 6 to 8. Expression of the receptor subunit gene CSF2RA increased from the zygote stage to the 9-16 cell stage before decreasing to the blastocyst stage. In contrast, CSF2RB was undetectable at all stages. In conclusion, CSF2 improves competence of the ICM to survive in a pluripotent state and alters TE outgrowths. Actions of CSF2 occur through a signaling pathway that is likely to be independent of CSF2RB.

  10. Stem cell mobilisation by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Long-term results of the REVIVAL-2 trial.

    PubMed

    Steppich, Birgit; Hadamitzky, Martin; Ibrahim, Tareq; Groha, Philip; Schunkert, Heribert; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Kastrati, Adnan; Ott, Ilka

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilises cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood. Previous preclinical and early clinical trials may suggest that treatment with G-CSF leads to improved myocardial perfusion and function in acute or chronic ischaemic heart disease. In the REVIVAL-2 study we found that stem cell mobilisation by G-CSF does not influence infarct size, left ventricular function and coronary restenosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) that underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention. The objective of the present analysis was to assess the impact of G-CSF treatment on seven-year clinical outcomes from the REVIVAL-2 trial. In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled REVIVAL-2 study, 114 patients with the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction were enrolled five days after successful reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were assigned to receive 10 µg/kg G-CSF (n=56) or placebo (n=58) for five days. The primary endpoint for this long-term outcome analysis was the composite of death, myocardial infarction or stroke seven years after randomisation. The endpoint occurred in 14.3 % of patients in the G-CSF group versus 17.2 % assigned to placebo (p=0.67). The combined incidence of death or myocardial infarction occurred in 14.3 % of the patients assigned to G-CSF and 15.5 % of the patients assigned to placebo (p=0.85). In conclusion, these long-term follow-up data show that G-CSF does not improve clinical outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  11. DICER Regulates the Formation and Maintenance of Cell-Cell Junctions in the Mouse Seminiferous Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Hanna Maria; Yadav, Ram Prakash; Da Ros, Matteo; Chalmel, Frédéric; Zimmermann, Céline; Toppari, Jorma; Nef, Serge; Kotaja, Noora

    2015-12-01

    The endonuclease DICER that processes micro-RNAs and small interfering RNAs is essential for normal spermatogenesis and male fertility. We previously showed that the deletion of Dicer1 gene in postnatal spermatogonia in mice using Ngn3 promoter-driven Cre expression caused severe defects in the morphogenesis of haploid spermatid to mature spermatozoon, including problems in cell polarization and nuclear elongation. In this study, we further analyzed the same mouse model and revealed that absence of functional DICER in differentiating male germ cells induces disorganization of the cell-cell junctions in the seminiferous epithelium. We detected discontinuous and irregular apical ectoplasmic specializations between elongating spermatids and Sertoli cells. The defective anchoring of spermatids to Sertoli cells caused a premature release of spermatids into the lumen. Our findings may help also explain the abnormal elongation process of remaining spermatids because these junctions and the correct positioning of germ cells in the epithelium are critically important for the progression of spermiogenesis. Interestingly, cell adhesion-related genes were generally upregulated in Dicer1 knockout germ cells. Claudin 5 ( Cldn5 ) was among the most upregulated genes and we show that the polarized localization of CLAUDIN5 in the apical ectoplasmic specializations was lost in Dicer1 knockout spermatids. Our results suggest that DICER-dependent pathways control the formation and organization of cell-cell junctions in the seminiferous epithelium via the regulation of cell adhesion-related genes. PMID:26510868

  12. Carbon onions as nanoscopic pressure cells for diamond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banhart, F.; Ajayan, P. M.

    1996-08-01

    SPHERICAL particles of carbon consisting of concentric graphite-like shells ('carbon onions') can be formed by electron irradiation of graphitic carbon materials1,2. Here we report that, when such particles are heated to ~700 °C and irradiated with electrons, their cores can be transformed to diamond. Under these conditions the spacing between layers in the carbon onions decreases from 0.31 in the outer shells (slightly less than the 0.34-nm layer spacing of graphite) to about 0.22 nm in the core, indicating considerable compression towards the particle centres. We find that this compression allows diamond to nucleate-in effect the carbon onions act as nanoscopic pressure cells for diamond formation.

  13. Myosin II-mediated cell shape changes and cell intercalation contribute to primitive streak formation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Sang, Helen M.; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; MacDonald, Michael P; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2016-01-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves large scale highly coordinated flows of over 100.000 cells in the epiblast. These large scale tissue flows and deformations can be correlated with specific anisotropic cell behaviours in the forming mesendoderm through a combined light-sheet microscopy and computational analysis. Relevant behaviours include apical contraction, elongation along the apical-basal axis followed by ingression as well as asynchronous directional cell intercalation of small groups of mesendoderm cells. Cell intercalation is associated with sequential, directional contraction of apical junctions, the onset, localisation and direction of which correlate strongly with the appearance of active Myosin II cables in aligned apical junctions in neighbouring cells. Use of a class specific Myosin inhibitors and gene specific knockdowns show that apical contraction and intercalation are Myosin II dependent and also reveal critical roles for Myosin I and Myosin V family members in the assembly of junctional Myosin II cables. PMID:25812521

  14. Human germ cell formation in xenotransplants of induced pluripotent stem cells carrying X chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Antonia A; Chiang, H Rosaria; Sukhwani, Meena; Orwig, Kyle E; Reijo Pera, Renee A

    2014-09-22

    Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial loss of the second sex chromosome and is characterized by spontaneous fetal loss in >90% of conceptions. Survivors possess an array of somatic and germline clinical characteristics. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer an opportunity for insight into genetic requirements of the X chromosome linked to Turner syndrome. We derived iPSCs from Turner syndrome and control individuals and examined germ cell development as a function of X chromosome composition. We demonstrate that two X chromosomes are not necessary for reprogramming or maintenance of pluripotency and that there are minimal differences in gene expression, at the single cell level, linked to X chromosome aneuploidies. Formation of germ cells, as assessed in vivo through a murine xenotransplantation model, indicated that undifferentiated iPSCs, independent of X chromosome composition, are capable of forming germ-cell-like cells (GCLCs) in vivo. In combination with clinical data regarding infertility in women with X chromosome aneuploidies, results suggest that two intact X chromosomes are not required for human germ cell formation, qualitatively or quantitatively, but rather are likely to be required for maintenance of human germ cells to adulthood.

  15. An improved alkaline direct formate paper microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Tang, Catherine; Sotez, Samantha; Mendez, Alex; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Purohit, Krutarth; Pham, Linda; Haan, John; Gomez, Frank A

    2016-02-01

    Paper-based microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs) are a potential replacement for traditional FCs and batteries due to their low cost, portability, and simplicity to operate. In MFCs, separate solutions of fuel and oxidant migrate through paper due to capillary action and laminar flow and, upon contact with each other and catalyst, produce electricity. In the present work, we describe an improved microfluidic paper-based direct formate FC (DFFC) employing formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. The dimensions of the lateral column, current collectors, and cathode were optimized. A maximum power density of 2.53 mW/cm(2) was achieved with a DFFC of surface area 3.0 cm(2) , steel mesh as current collector, 5% carbon to paint mass ratio for cathode electrode and, 30% hydrogen peroxide. The longevity of the MFC's detailed herein is greater than eight hours with continuous flow of streams. In a series configuration, the MFCs generate sufficient energy to power light-emitting diodes and a handheld calculator. PMID:26572774

  16. An improved alkaline direct formate paper microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Tang, Catherine; Sotez, Samantha; Mendez, Alex; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Purohit, Krutarth; Pham, Linda; Haan, John; Gomez, Frank A

    2016-02-01

    Paper-based microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs) are a potential replacement for traditional FCs and batteries due to their low cost, portability, and simplicity to operate. In MFCs, separate solutions of fuel and oxidant migrate through paper due to capillary action and laminar flow and, upon contact with each other and catalyst, produce electricity. In the present work, we describe an improved microfluidic paper-based direct formate FC (DFFC) employing formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. The dimensions of the lateral column, current collectors, and cathode were optimized. A maximum power density of 2.53 mW/cm(2) was achieved with a DFFC of surface area 3.0 cm(2) , steel mesh as current collector, 5% carbon to paint mass ratio for cathode electrode and, 30% hydrogen peroxide. The longevity of the MFC's detailed herein is greater than eight hours with continuous flow of streams. In a series configuration, the MFCs generate sufficient energy to power light-emitting diodes and a handheld calculator.

  17. Membrane tether formation from outer hair cells with optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Anvari, Bahman; Takashima, Masayoshi; Brecht, Peter; Torres, Jorge H; Brownell, William E

    2002-01-01

    Optical tweezers were used to characterize the mechanical properties of the outer hair cell (OHC) plasma membrane by pulling tethers with 4.5-microm polystyrene beads. Tether formation force and tether force were measured in static and dynamic conditions. A greater force was required for tether formations from OHC lateral wall (499 +/- 152 pN) than from OHC basal end (142 +/- 49 pN). The difference in the force required to pull tethers is consistent with an extensive cytoskeletal framework associated with the lateral wall known as the cortical lattice. The apparent plasma membrane stiffness, estimated under the static conditions by measuring tether force at different tether length, was 3.71 pN/microm for OHC lateral wall and 4.57 pN/microm for OHC basal end. The effective membrane viscosity was measured by pulling tethers at different rates while continuously recording the tether force, and estimated in the range of 2.39 to 5.25 pN x s/microm. The viscous force most likely results from the viscous interactions between plasma membrane lipids and the OHC cortical lattice and/or integral membrane proteins. The information these studies provide on the mechanical properties of the OHC lateral wall is important for understanding the mechanism of OHC electromotility. PMID:11867454

  18. [Formation of spontaneous and immune rosettes by the cells of the thymus and other formations of the rabbit lymphoid system].

    PubMed

    Grinevich, Iu A

    1975-11-01

    Only T1--RFC (rosette-forming cells) are revealed in the thymus of nonimmunized rabbits. Their number is 2--2.5 times less than in the palatine tonsils, submaxillary lymph nodes and the spleen. T2--RFC are present in these lymphoid formations. There is an increase in the T1--RFC in the thymus after the intravenous immunization of rabbits with sheep erythrocytes. In other lymphoid formations the correlation of the population of cells of the thymus origin altered as a result of increase in the number of T2--RFC. B--RFC accumulated in considerable amounts. Dynamics of T2 and B--RFC accumulation in the lymphoid formations corresponded to the highest antibody titres in the rabbit blood. In the formation of primary immune response the amount of the T1 and T2-RFC in the formations of rabbit lymphoid system depended on the dose of the antigen. PMID:1221703

  19. Hyaluronan cable formation by ocular trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying Ying; Keller, Kate E

    2015-10-01

    :polycytidylic acid (polyI:C), a potent inducer of HA cables, and outflow rates were monitored for 72 h. PolyI:C had no significant effect on outflow resistance in porcine anterior segments perfused at physiological pressure. Collectively, HAS gene expression, HA concentration and configuration are differentially modified in response to several treatments that induce ECM remodeling in TM cells. In ocular TM cells, our data suggests that the most important determinant of HA cable formation appears to be the ratio of HA chains produced by the different HAS genes. However, the act of rearranging pericellular HA into cable-like structures does not appear to influence aqueous outflow resistance.

  20. Hyaluronan cable formation by ocular trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying Ying; Keller, Kate E

    2015-10-01

    :polycytidylic acid (polyI:C), a potent inducer of HA cables, and outflow rates were monitored for 72 h. PolyI:C had no significant effect on outflow resistance in porcine anterior segments perfused at physiological pressure. Collectively, HAS gene expression, HA concentration and configuration are differentially modified in response to several treatments that induce ECM remodeling in TM cells. In ocular TM cells, our data suggests that the most important determinant of HA cable formation appears to be the ratio of HA chains produced by the different HAS genes. However, the act of rearranging pericellular HA into cable-like structures does not appear to influence aqueous outflow resistance. PMID:26247678

  1. Sailing to the Colonies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dorothy S.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a class activity designed to foster an understanding of rules, develop analytical skills, and introduce students to early colonial history. Divides the class into groups who are sailing to the New World, and presents them with ethical and practical problems to be solved on board the ship. (RW)

  2. [Visiting the Amana Colonies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "The Goldfinch: Iowa History for Young People" focuses upon the Amana Colonies, which were home to many German immigrants in the 19th century, and which retain much of their ethnic heritage today. The articles and activities included in this issue are "Amana Today"; "No Black Buggies in Amana"; "Visiting Tante Marie and Onkel…

  3. Hemp, an mbt domain-containing protein, plays essential roles in hematopoietic stem cell function and skeletal formation

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hiroaki; Takubo, Keiyo; Oda, Hideaki; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Tazaki, Tatsuya; Yamasaki, Norimasa; Miyazaki, Kazuko; Moore, Kateri A.; Honda, Zen-ichiro; Suda, Toshio; Lemischka, Ihor R.

    2011-01-01

    To clarify the molecular pathways governing hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development, we screened a fetal liver (FL) HSC cDNA library and identified a unique gene, hematopoietic expressed mammalian polycomb (hemp), encoding a protein with a zinc-finger domain and four malignant brain tumor (mbt) repeats. To investigate its biological role, we generated mice lacking Hemp (hemp−/−). Hemp−/− mice exhibited a variety of skeletal malformations and died soon after birth. In the FL, hemp was preferentially expressed in the HSC and early progenitor cell fractions, and analyses of fetal hematopoiesis revealed that the number of FL mononuclear cells, including HSCs, was reduced markedly in hemp−/− embryos, especially during early development. In addition, colony-forming and competitive repopulation assays demonstrated that the proliferative and reconstitution abilities of hemp−/− FL HSCs were significantly impaired. Microarray analysis revealed alterations in the expression levels of several genes implicated in hematopoietic development and differentiation in hemp−/− FL HSCs. These results demonstrate that Hemp, an mbt-containing protein, plays essential roles in HSC function and skeletal formation. It is also hypothesized that Hemp might be involved in certain congenital diseases, such as Klippel-Feil anomaly. PMID:21252303

  4. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate Synthetase 1 Knockdown Suppresses Tumor Formation of Glioma CD133+ Cells Through Upregulating Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Yan, Zhongjie; Cao, Xuhua; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yang, Liang

    2016-10-01

    Relapse is the main cause of mortality in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Treatment options involve surgical resection followed by a combination of radiotheraphy and chemotherapy with temozolomide. Several genes and genetic pathways have been identified to contribute to therapeutic resistance, giving rise to recurrence of the malignancy. In the last decades, glioma stem cells (GSCs) with the capacity of self-renewal have been demonstrated to maintain tumor propagation and treatment resistance. Here, we isolated CD133-positive (CD133+) and CD133-negative (CD133-) cells from glioblastoma U98G and U87MG cell lines. The role of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRPS1), which catalyzes the first step of the synthesis of nucleotide, in proliferation and apoptosis was investigated. We found that PRPS1 had a remarkable effect on cell proliferation and sphere formation in both CD133+ and CD133- cells. Compared to CD133- cells, CD133+ cells exhibited more significant results in cell apoptosis assay. CD133+ T98G and U87MG cells were used in xenograft mouse model of tumor formation. Interestingly, the mice implanted with PRPS1 knockdown T98G or U87MG stem cells exhibited prolonged survival time and reduced tumor volume. By immunostaining caspase-3 in tumor tissues of these mice, we demonstrated that the apoptotic activities in tumor cells were positively correlated to the survival time but negatively correlated to PRPS1 expression. Our results indicate that PRPS1 plays an important role in proliferation and apoptosis in GSCs and provide new clues for potential PRPS1-targeted therapy in GBM treatment. PMID:27343059

  5. Membrane electrolytic cell for minimizing hypochlorite and chlorate formation

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, D. L.; Justice, D. D.; Woodard Jr., K. E.

    1985-07-09

    An electrolytic cell for the electrolysis of an alkali metal chloride brine is comprised of an anode compartment and a cathode compartment separated by a cation exchange membrane. The anode is comprised of an unflattened expanded structure of a valve metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, tantalum, niobium, and alloys thereof. At least one side of the anode has as the electrochemically active surface an electrodeposited layer of a valve metal oxide. A plurality of cracks traverse the electrodeposited layer and a coating of a platinum metal group oxide covers the electrodeposited layer and substantially fills the cracks. The cationic exchange membrane is comprised of a laminated structure having a first surface adapted to contact an anolyte in which the ion exchange groups are predominately sulfonic acid groups. The first surface is also in contact with the electrochemically active surface of the anode. A second surface of the cation exchange membrane, adapted to contact a catholyte, has ion exchange groups which are predominately carboxylic acid groups. The cathode positioned in the cathode compartment is spaced apart from the cation exchange membrane. The cell operates with both a low chlorine overvoltage and a low oxygen overvoltage. During electrolysis of alkali metal chloride brines, the formation of hypochlorite and chlorate ions is minimized and the alkali metal hydroxides produced have low chlorate concentrations and are suitable for use without further treatment in chlorate-sensitive applications. Spent brine treatment is simplified and at reduced costs.

  6. Graft monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cell content predicts the risk of acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic transplantation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vendramin, Antonio; Gimondi, Silvia; Bermema, Anisa; Longoni, Paolo; Rizzitano, Sara; Corradini, Paolo; Carniti, Cristiana

    2014-12-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are powerful immunomodulatory cells that in mice play a role in infectious and inflammatory disorders, including acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Their relevance in clinical acute GVHD is poorly known. We analyzed whether granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration, used to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells, affected the frequency of MDSCs in the peripheral blood stem cell grafts of 60 unrelated donors. In addition, we evaluated whether the MDSC content in the peripheral blood stem cell grafts affected the occurrence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing unrelated donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Systemic treatment with G-CSF induces an expansion of myeloid cells displaying the phenotype of monocytic MDSCs (Lin(low/neg)HLA-DR(-)CD11b(+)CD33(+)CD14(+)) with the ability to suppress alloreactive T cells in vitro, therefore meeting the definition of MDSCs. Monocytic MDSC dose was the only graft parameter to predict acute GVHD. The cumulative incidence of acute GVHD at 180 days after transplantation for recipients receiving monocytic MDSC doses below and above the median was 63% and 22%, respectively (P = .02). The number of monocytic MDSCs infused did not impact the relapse rate or the transplant-related mortality rate (P > .05). Although further prospective studies involving larger sample size are needed to validate the exact monocytic MDSC graft dose that protects from acute GVHD, our results strongly suggest the modulation of G-CSF might be used to affect monocytic MDSCs graft cell doses for prevention of acute GVHD.

  7. Polymer Solar Cells: Solubility Controls Fiber Network Formation.

    PubMed

    van Franeker, Jacobus J; Heintges, Gaël H L; Schaefer, Charley; Portale, Giuseppe; Li, Weiwei; Wienk, Martijn M; van der Schoot, Paul; Janssen, René A J

    2015-09-16

    The photoactive layer of polymer solar cells is commonly processed from a four-component solution, containing a semiconducting polymer and a fullerene derivative dissolved in a solvent-cosolvent mixture. The nanoscale dimensions of the polymer-fullerene morphology that is formed upon drying determines the solar cell performance, but the fundamental processes that govern the size of the phase-separated polymer and fullerene domains are poorly understood. Here, we investigate morphology formation of an alternating copolymer of diketopyrrolopyrrole and a thiophene-phenyl-thiophene oligomer (PDPPTPT) with relatively long 2-decyltetradecyl (DT) side chains blended with [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester. During solvent evaporation the polymer crystallizes into a fibrous network. The typical width of these fibers is analyzed by quantification of transmission electron microscopic images, and is mainly determined by the solubility of the polymer in the cosolvent and the molecular weight of the polymer. A higher molecular weight corresponds to a lower solubility and film processing results in a smaller fiber width. Surprisingly, the fiber width is not related to the drying rate or the amount of cosolvent. We have made solar cells with fiber widths ranging from 28 to 68 nm and found an inverse relation between fiber width and photocurrent. Finally, by mixing two cosolvents, we develop a ternary solvent system to tune the fiber width. We propose a model based on nucleation-and-growth which can explain these measurements. Our results show that the width of the semicrystalline polymer fibers is not the result of a frozen dynamical state, but determined by the nucleation induced by the polymer solubility.

  8. Self-organization and advective transport in the cell polarity formation for asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    Anterior-Posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which depends not only on the several genetic process but also biochemical and biophysical interactions. The mechanism of AP formation of Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is characterized into the three processes: (i) membrane association and dissociation of posterior and anterior proteins, (ii) diffusion into the membrane and cytosol, and (iii) active cortical and cytoplasmic flows induced by the contraction of the acto-myosin cortex. We explored the mechanism of symmetry breaking and AP polarity formation using self-recruitment model of posterior proteins. We found that the AP polarity pattern is established over wide range in the total mass of polarity proteins and the diffusion ratio in the cytosol to the membrane. We also showed that the advective transport in both membrane and cytosol during the establishment phase affects optimal time interval of establishment and positioning of the posterior domain, and plays a role to increase the robustness in the AP polarity formation by reducing the number of posterior domains for the sensitivity of initial conditions. We also demonstrated that a proper ratio of the total mass to cell size robustly regulate the length scale of the posterior domain.

  9. Spheroid Formation of Hepatocarcinoma Cells in Microwells: Experiments and Monte Carlo Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Tabaei, Seyed R.; Park, Jae Hyeok; Na, Kyuhwan; Chung, Seok; Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of spherical aggregates during the growth of cell population has long been observed under various conditions. We observed the formation of such aggregates during proliferation of Huh-7.5 cells, a human hepatocarcinoma cell line, in a microfabricated low-adhesion microwell system (SpheroFilm; formed of mass-producible silicone elastomer) on the length scales up to 500 μm. The cell proliferation was also tracked with immunofluorescence staining of F-actin and cell proliferation marker Ki-67. Meanwhile, our complementary 3D Monte Carlo simulations, taking cell diffusion and division, cell-cell and cell-scaffold adhesion, and gravity into account, illustrate the role of these factors in the formation of spheroids. Taken together, our experimental and simulation results provide an integrative view of the process of spheroid formation for Huh-7.5 cells. PMID:27571565

  10. Spheroid Formation of Hepatocarcinoma Cells in Microwells: Experiments and Monte Carlo Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Kim, Myung Hee; Tabaei, Seyed R; Park, Jae Hyeok; Na, Kyuhwan; Chung, Seok; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    The formation of spherical aggregates during the growth of cell population has long been observed under various conditions. We observed the formation of such aggregates during proliferation of Huh-7.5 cells, a human hepatocarcinoma cell line, in a microfabricated low-adhesion microwell system (SpheroFilm; formed of mass-producible silicone elastomer) on the length scales up to 500 μm. The cell proliferation was also tracked with immunofluorescence staining of F-actin and cell proliferation marker Ki-67. Meanwhile, our complementary 3D Monte Carlo simulations, taking cell diffusion and division, cell-cell and cell-scaffold adhesion, and gravity into account, illustrate the role of these factors in the formation of spheroids. Taken together, our experimental and simulation results provide an integrative view of the process of spheroid formation for Huh-7.5 cells. PMID:27571565

  11. Pattern formation in discrete cell tissues under long range filopodia-based direct cell to cell contact.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulos, Georgios; Painter, Kevin J

    2016-03-01

    Pattern formation via direct cell to cell contact has received considerable attention over the years. In particular the lateral-inhibition mechanism observed in the Notch signalling pathway can generate a regular periodic pattern of differential cell activity, and has been proposed to explain the emergence of patterns in various tissues and organs. The majority of models of this system have focussed on short-range contacts: a cell signals only to its nearest neighbours and the resulting patterns tend to be of fine-scale "salt and pepper" nature. The capacity of certain cells to extend signalling filopodia (cytonemes) over multiple cell lengths, however, inserts a long-range or non-local component into this process. Here we explore how long range signalling can impact on pattern formation. Specifically, we extend a standard model for Notch-like lateral inhibition to include cytoneme-mediated signalling, and investigate how pattern formation depends on the spatial distribution of signal from the signalling cell. We show that a variety of patterns can be obtained, ranging from a sparse pattern of single isolated cells to larger clusters or stripes.

  12. Laser-induced speckle scatter patterns in Bacillus colonies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Huisung; Singh, Atul K.; Bhunia, Arun K.; Bae, Euiwon

    2014-01-01

    Label-free bacterial colony phenotyping technology called BARDOT (Bacterial Rapid Detection using Optical scattering Technology) provided successful classification of several different bacteria at the genus, species, and serovar level. Recent experiments with colonies of Bacillus species provided strikingly different characteristics of elastic light scatter (ELS) patterns, which were comprised of random speckles compared to other bacteria, which are dominated by concentric rings and spokes. Since this laser-based optical sensor interrogates the whole volume of the colony, 3-D information of micro- and macro-structures are all encoded in the far-field scatter patterns. Here, we present a theoretical model explaining the underlying mechanism of the speckle formation by the colonies from Bacillus species. Except for Bacillus polymyxa, all Bacillus spp. produced random bright spots on the imaging plane, which presumably dependent on the cellular and molecular organization and content within the colony. Our scatter model-based analysis revealed that colony spread resulting in variable surface roughness can modify the wavefront of the scatter field. As the center diameter of the Bacillus spp. colony grew from 500 to 900 μm, average speckles area decreased two-fold and the number of small speckles increased seven-fold. In conclusion, as Bacillus colony grows, the average speckle size in the scatter pattern decreases and the number of smaller speckle increases due to the swarming growth characteristics of bacteria within the colony. PMID:25352840

  13. Automatic counting and classification of bacterial colonies using hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection and counting of bacterial colonies on agar plates is a routine microbiology practice to get a rough estimate of the number of viable cells in a sample. There have been a variety of different automatic colony counting systems and software algorithms mainly based on color or gray-scale pictu...

  14. Lateral inhibition-induced pattern formation controlled by the size and geometry of the cell.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-09-01

    Pattern formation in development biology is one of the fundamental processes by which cells change their functions. It is based on the communication of cells via intra- and intercellular dynamics of biochemicals. Thus, the cell is directly involved in biochemical interactions. However, many theoretical approaches describing biochemical pattern formation have usually neglected the cell's role or have simplified the subcellular process without considering cellular aspects despite the cell being the environment where biochemicals interact. On the other hand, recent experimental observations suggest that a change in the physical conditions of cell-to-cell contact can result in a change in cell fate and tissue patterning in a lateral inhibition system. Here we develop a mathematical model by which biochemical dynamics can be directly observed with explicitly expressed cell structure and geometry in higher dimensions, and reconsider pattern formation by lateral inhibition of the Notch-Delta signaling pathway. We explore how the physical characteristic of cell, such as cell geometry or size, influences the biochemical pattern formation in a multi-cellular system. Our results suggest that a property based on cell geometry can be a novel mechanism for symmetry breaking inducing cell asymmetry. We show that cell volume can critically influence cell fate determination and pattern formation at the tissue level, and the surface area of the cell-to-cell contact can directly affect the spatial range of patterning.

  15. [Enhanced control of proliferation in telomerized cells].

    PubMed

    Egorov, E E; Moldaver, M V; Vishniakova, Kh S; Terekhov, S M; Dashinimaev, E B; Cheglakov, I B; Toropygin, I Iu; Iarygin, K N; Chumakov, P M; Korochkin, L I; Antonova, G A; Rybalkina, E Iu; Saburina, I N; Burnaevskiĭ, N S; Zelenin, A V

    2007-01-01

    Clones of telomerized fibroblasts of adult human skin have earlier been obtained. It was shown that despite their fast growth in mass cultures, these cells poorly form colonies. Conditioned medium, antioxidants, and reduced partial oxygen pressure enhanced their colony formation, but not to the level characteristic of the initial cells. The conditioned medium of telomerized cells enhanced colony formation to a much greater extent than that of the initial cells. A study of proteome of the telomerized fibroblasts has revealed changes in the activities of tens of genes. A general trend consists in weakening and increased lability of the cytoskeleton and in activation of the mechanisms controlling protein degradation. However, these changes are not very pronounced. During the formation of immortal telomerized cells, selection takes place, which appears to determine changes in the expression of some genes. It was proposed that a decrease in the capacity of telomerized cells for colony formation is due to increased requirements of these cells to cell-cell contacts. The rate of cell growth reached that characteristic of mass cultures only in the largest colonies. In this respect, the telomerized fibroblasts resembled stem cells: they are capable of self-maintenance, but "escape" to differentiation in the absence of the corresponding microenvironment (niche), which is represented by other fibroblasts. Non-dividing cells in the test of colony formation should be regarded as differentiated cells, since they have no features of degradation, preserve their viability, actively move, grow, phagocytized debris, etc. It was also shown that telomerization did not prevent differentiation of myoblasts and human neural stem cells. Thus, the results obtained suggest the existence of normal mechanisms underlying the regulation of proliferation in the telomerized cells, which opens possibilities of their use in cell therapy, especially in the case of autotransplantation to senior people

  16. Interordinal chimera formation between medaka and zebrafish for analyzing stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ni; Chen, Songlin; Ge, Ruowen; Song, Jianxing; Yi, Meisheng; Hong, Yunhan

    2012-08-10

    Chimera formation is a standard test for pluripotency of stem cells in vivo. Interspecific chimera formation between distantly related organisms offers also an att