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Sample records for cell colony formation

  1. Study of budding yeast colony formation and its characterizations by using circular granular cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprianti, D.; Haryanto, F.; Purqon, A.; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Budding yeast can exhibit colony formation in solid substrate. The colony of pathogenic budding yeast can colonize various surfaces of the human body and medical devices. Furthermore, it can form biofilm that resists drug effective therapy. The formation of the colony is affected by the interaction between cells and with its growth media. The cell budding pattern holds an important role in colony expansion. To study this colony growth, the molecular dynamic method was chosen to simulate the interaction between budding yeast cells. Every cell was modelled by circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. Cohesion force, contact force, and Stokes force govern this model to mimic the interaction between cells and with the growth substrate. Characterization was determined by the maximum (L max) and minimum (L min) distances between two cells within the colony and whether two lines that connect the two cells in the maximum and minimum distances intersect each other. Therefore, it can be recognized the colony shape in circular, oval, and irregular shapes. Simulation resulted that colony formation are mostly in oval shape with little branch. It also shows that greater cohesion strength obtains more compact colony formation.

  2. Expression of an accessory cell phenotype by hairy cells during lymphocyte colony formation in agar culture.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; Testa, U; Andre, C; Jouault, H; Reyes, F

    1983-01-01

    Human T lymphocytes require the cooperation of accessory cells to generate lymphocyte colonies in agar culture under PHA stimulation. Various hairy cell enriched fractions, as well as normal monocytes, have been found to be able to initiate colony formation by normal lymphocytes. Leukemic monocytes from CMML patients were also effective, but not the leukemic lymphocytes from CLL patients. The phenotype expressed by HC in agar colonies was further studied using cell surface and enzymatic markers. We have concluded that HC in agar culture in the presence of both normal T lymphocytes and PHA lose the B phenotype that they express in vivo and function like an accessory cell in contrast to normal or leukemic B lymphocytes.

  3. Colony formation and interleukin 2 production by leukaemic human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, A S; Dewar, A E; Seidelin, P H; Murray, R

    1983-01-01

    PHA-induced colony formation and interleukin 2 (IL-2) production were studied in four patients with T cell leukaemia (three cases OKT4+/T helper and one case OKT8+/T cytotoxic suppressor). Cases of T helper cell leukaemia showed colony formation that was comparable to normal purified blood T cells and was not dependent on the addition of conditioned medium, containing IL-2 activity, to cultures. In contrast the T suppressor cell leukaemia formed colonies only when cultures were supplemented with IL-2 containing medium. When IL-2 production by PHA stimulated cells was measured culture supernatants from the three T helper cell leukaemias all showed normal or high levels of activity, when compared to normal blood mononuclear cells, whereas the T suppressor cell leukaemia showed no activity. PMID:6604606

  4. [CFU-HPP colony formation of bone marrow hematopoietic proginitor cells in psoriatic patients and methylation of p16 gene promotor in CFU-HPP colony cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Niu, Xu-Ping; Li, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Ming; Yin, Guo-Hua

    2007-08-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the colony formation of high-proliferative potential colony-forming units (CFU-HPP) from bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells of psoriatic patients and p16 gene promotor methylation in CFU-HPP cells, and to explore the relationship between the colony formation and the methylation status of p16 gene promoter. Bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells from psoriatic patients and normal controls were separated by density gradient centrifugation, and were cultured in methycellulose semi-solid culture medium with SCF, GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-6 for 14 days to measure the colonies of CFU-HPP. The CFU-HPP colony cells were collected and methylation status of p16 gene promoter of CFU-HPP cell DNA modified with sodium bisulfite was detected by the methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). The results showed that in methycellulose semi-solid culture system, the number and the size of CFU-HPP colonies of bone marrow of psoriatic patients were all significantly less than that of normal controls, the positive frequency of p16 gene promoter methylation in CFU-HPP cells was lower than that in CFU-HPP colony cells of normal controls. It is concluded that the colony formation capability of CFU-HPP from bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells in psoriatic patients is lower than that in normal controls, and the lower positive frequency of P16 gene promoter methylation in CFU-HPP cells perhaps closely correlated with lower CFU-HPP colony-forming capability.

  5. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  6. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph A; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation.

  7. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christoph A.; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation.

  8. Enhancement of committed hematopoietic stem cell colony formation by nandrolone decanoate after sublethal whole body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallicchio, V.S.; Chen, M.G.; Watts, T.D.

    1984-11-01

    The ability of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate, to increase committed topoietic stem cell (CFU-gm, CFU-e, and BFU-e) colony formation after sublethal irradiation was evaluated. Immediately after receiving whole body irradiation and on the next two days, each mouse was injected intraperitoneally with nandrolone decanoate (1.25 mg) in propylene glycol. Irradiated control mice received only propylene glycol. Compared to controls, drug-treated mice showed marked peripheral blood leukocytosis and more stable packed red cell volume. Drug-treated mice also demonstrated increased erythropoiesis, as CFU-e/BFU-e concentrations from both marrow (9% to 581%) and spleen (15% to 797%) were elevated. Granulopoiesis was increased similarly, as CFU-gm concentrations from marrow (38% to 685%) and spleen (9% to 373%) were elevated. These results demonstrate that nandrolone decanoate enhances hematopoietic stem cell recovery after sublethal whole body irradiation. This suggests that following hematopoietic suppression, nandrolone decanoate may stimulate the recovery of hematopoiesis at the stem cell level and in peripheral blood.

  9. Abiotic factors in colony formation: effects of nutrition and light on extracellular polysaccharide production and cell aggregates of Microcystis aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang

    2013-07-01

    Colony morphology is important for Microcystis to sustain a competitive advantage in eutrophic lakes. The mechanism of colony formation in Microcystis is currently unclear. Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has been reported to play an important role in cell aggregate formation of some phytoplankton. Microcystis aeruginosa was cultivated under varied abiotic conditions, including different nutrient, light, and temperature conditions, to investigate their effects on EPS production and morphological change. The results show that nutrient concentration and light intensity have great effects on EPS productionin M. aeruginosa. There was a considerable increase in EPS production after M. aeruginosa was cultivated in adjusted culture conditions similar to those present in the field (28.9 mg C/L, 1.98 mg N/L, 0.65 mg P/L, light intensity: 100 μmol/(m2 · s)). These results indicate that abiotic factors might be one of the triggers for colony formation in Microcystis.

  10. Freeze-Drying of Mononuclear Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood Followed by Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Natan, Dity; Nagler, Arnon; Arav, Amir

    2009-01-01

    Background We recently showed that freeze-dried cells stored for 3 years at room temperature can direct embryonic development following cloning. However, viability, as evaluated by membrane integrity of the cells after freeze-drying, was very low; and it was mainly the DNA integrity that was preserved. In the present study, we improved the cells' viability and functionality after freeze-drying. Methodology/Principal Findings We optimized the conditions of directional freezing, i.e. interface velocity and cell concentration, and we added the antioxidant EGCG to the freezing solution. The study was performed on mononuclear cells (MNCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. After freeze-drying, we tested the viability, number of CD34+-presenting cells and ability of the rehydrated hematopoietic stem cells to differentiate into different blood cells in culture. The viability of the MNCs after freeze-drying and rehydration with pure water was 88%–91%. The total number of CD34+-presenting cells and the number of colonies did not change significantly when evaluated before freezing, after freeze-thawing, and after freeze-drying (5.4×104±4.7, 3.49×104±6 and 6.31×104±12.27 cells, respectively, and 31±25.15, 47±45.8 and 23.44±13.3 colonies, respectively). Conclusions This is the first report of nucleated cells which have been dried and then rehydrated with double-distilled water remaining viable, and of hematopoietic stem cells retaining their ability to differentiate into different blood cells. PMID:19381290

  11. Interleukin 18 inhibits osteoclast formation via T cell production of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, N J; Udagawa, N; Elliott, J; Grail, D; Okamura, H; Kurimoto, M; Dunn, A R; Martin, T; Gillespie, M T

    1998-01-01

    IL-18 inhibits osteoclast (OCL) formation in vitro independent of IFN-gamma production, and this was abolished by the addition of neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF. We now establish that IL-18 was unable to inhibit OCL formation in cocultures using GM-CSF-deficient mice (GM-CSF -/-). Reciprocal cocultures using either wild-type osteoblasts with GM-CSF -/- spleen cells or GM-CSF -/- osteoblasts with wild-type spleen cells were examined. Wild-type spleen cells were required to elicit a response to IL-18 indicating that cells of splenic origin were the IL-18 target. As T cells comprise a large proportion of the spleen cell population, the role of T cells in osteoclastogenesis was examined. Total T cells were removed and repleted in various combinations. Addition of wild-type T cells to a GM-CSF -/- coculture restored IL-18 inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Major subsets of T cells, CD4+ and CD8+, were also individually depleted. Addition of either CD4+ or CD8+ wild-type T cells restored IL-18 action in a GM-CSF -/- background, while IL-18 was ineffective when either CD4+ or CD8+ GM-CSF -/- T cells were added to a wild-type coculture. These results highlight the involvement of T cells in IL-18-induced OCL inhibition and provide evidence for a new OCL inhibitory pathway whereby IL-18 inhibits OCL formation due to action upon T cells promoting the release of GM-CSF, which in turn acts upon OCL precursors. PMID:9449693

  12. Murine embryonic stem cells secrete cytokines/growth modulators that enhance cell survival/anti-apoptosis and stimulate colony formation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Graham-Evans, Barbara; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2006-04-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1/CXCL12, released by murine embryonic stem (ES) cells, enhances survival, chemotaxis, and hematopoietic differentiation of murine ES cells. Conditioned medium (CM) from murine ES cells growing in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) was generated while the ES cells were in an undifferentiated Oct-4 expressing state. ES cell-CM enhanced survival of normal murine bone marrow myeloid progenitors (CFU-GM) subjected to delayed growth factor addition in vitro and decreased apoptosis of murine bone marrow c-kit(+)lin- cells. ES CM contained interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-10, IL-11, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (CSF), oncostatin M, stem cell factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, as well as a number of chemokines and other proteins, some of which are known to enhance survival/anti-apoptosis of progenitors. Irradiation of ES cells enhanced release of some proteins and decreased release of others. IL-6, FGF-9, and TNF-alpha, not detected prior to irradiation was found after ES cells were irradiated. ES cell CM also stimulated CFU-GM colony formation. Thus, undifferentiated murine ES cells growing in the presence of LIF produce/release a number of biologically active interleukins, CSFs, chemokines, and other growth modulatory proteins, results which may be of physiological and/or practical significance.

  13. Ferulic acid decreases cell viability and colony formation while inhibiting migration of MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fahrioğlu, Umut; Dodurga, Yavuz; Elmas, Levent; Seçme, Mücahit

    2016-01-15

    Novel and combinatorial treatment methods are becoming sought after entities in cancer treatment and these treatments are even more valuable for pancreatic cancer. The scientists are always on the lookout for new chemicals to help them in their fight against cancer. In this study, we examine the effects of ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound, on gene expression, viability, colony formation and migration/invasion in the cultured MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cell. Cytotoxic effects of FA were determined by using trypan blue dye exclusion test and Cell TiterGlo (CTG) assay. IC50 dose in MIA PaCa-2 cells was detected as 500μM/ml at the 72nd hour. Expression profiles of certain cell cycle and apoptosis genes such as CCND1 (cyclin D1),CDK4, CDK6, RB, p21, p16, p53, caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, caspase-10, Bcl-2, BCL-XL,BID, DR4,DR5,FADD,TRADD,PARP, APAF, Bax, Akt, PTEN, PUMA, NOXA, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1 and TIMP2 were determined by real-time PCR. The effect of FA on cell viability was determined by CellTiter-Glo® Luminescent Cell Viability Assay. Additionally, effects of FA on colony formation and invasion were also investigated. It was observed that FA caused a significant decrease in the expression of CCND1, CDK 4/6, Bcl2 and caspase 8 and 10 in the MIA PaCa-2 cells while causing an increase in the expression of p53, Bax, PTEN caspase 3 and 9. FA was observed to decrease colony formation while inhibiting cell invasion and migration as observed by the BioCoat Matrigel Invasion Chamber guide and colony formation assays. In conclusion, FA is thought to behave as an anti-cancer agent by affecting cell cycle, apoptotic, invasion and colony formation behavior of MIA PaCa-2 cells. Therefore, FA is placed as a strong candidate for further studies aimed at finding a better, more effective treatment approach for pancreatic cancer.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Intestinal Stem Cells Based on Surface Marker Combinations and Colony-Formation Assay

    PubMed Central

    WANG, FENGCHAO; SCOVILLE, DAVID; HE, XI C.; MAHE, MAXIME M.; BOX, ANDREW; PERRY, JOHN M.; SMITH, NICHOLAS R.; LEI, NAN YE; DAVIES, PAIGE S.; FULLER, MEGAN K.; HAUG, JEFFREY S.; MCCLAIN, MELAINIA; GRACZ, ADAM D.; DING, SHENG; STELZNER, MATTHIAS; DUNN, JAMES C. Y.; MAGNESS, SCOTT T.; WONG, MELISSA H.; MARTIN, MARTIN G.; HELMRATH, MICHAEL; LI, LINHENG

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Identification of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) has relied heavily on the use of transgenic reporters in mice, but this approach is limited by mosaic expression patterns and difficult to directly apply to human tissues. We sought to identify reliable surface markers of ISCs and establish a robust functional assay to characterize ISCs from mouse and human tissues. METHODS We used immunohistochemistry, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to analyze intestinal epithelial cells isolated from mouse and human intestinal tissues. We compared different combinations of surface markers among ISCs isolated based on expression of Lgr5–green fluorescent protein. We developed a culture protocol to facilitate the identification of functional ISCs from mice and then tested the assay with human intestinal crypts and putative ISCs. RESULTS CD44+CD24loCD166+ cells, isolated by FACS from mouse small intestine and colon, expressed high levels of stem cell–associated genes. Transit-amplifying cells and progenitor cells were then excluded based on expression of GRP78 or c-Kit. CD44+CD24loCD166+ GRP78lo/− putative stem cells from mouse small intestine included Lgr5-GFPhi and Lgr5-GFPmed/lo cells. Incubation of these cells with the GSK inhibitor CHIR99021 and the E-cadherin stabilizer Thiazovivin resulted in colony formation by 25% to 30% of single-sorted ISCs. CONCLUSIONS We developed a culture protocol to identify putative ISCs from mouse and human tissues based on cell surface markers. CD44+CD24loCD166+, GRP78lo/−, and c-Kit− facilitated identification of putative stem cells from the mouse small intestine and colon, respectively. CD44+CD24−/loCD166+ also identified putative human ISCs. These findings will facilitate functional studies of mouse and human ISCs. PMID:23644405

  15. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  16. Single cell time-lapse analysis reveals that podoplanin enhances cell survival and colony formation capacity of squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Youichi; Kojima, Motohiro; Ochiai, Atsushi; Ishii, Genichiro

    2017-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) are characterized by high clonal expansion capacity. We previously reported that podoplanin is a TIC-specific marker for the human squamous cell carcinoma cell line A431. The aim of this study is to explore the molecular mechanism underlying the high clonal expansion potential of podoplanin-positive A431cells using Fucci imaging. Single podoplanin-positive cells created large colonies at a significantly higher frequency than single podoplanin-negative cells, whereas no difference was observed between the two types of cells with respect to cell cycle status. Conversely, the cell death ratio of progenies derived from podoplanin-positive single cell was significantly lower than that of cells derived from podoplanin-negative cells. Single A431 cells, whose podoplanin expression was suppressed by RNA interference, exhibited increased cell death ratios and decreased frequency of large colony forming. Moreover, the frequency of large colony forming decreased significantly when podoplanin-positive single cells was treated with a ROCK (Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase) inhibitor, whereas no difference was observed in single podoplanin-negative cells. Our current study cleared that high clonal expansion capacity of podoplanin-positive TICs populations was the result of reduced cell death by podoplanin-mediated signaling. Therefore, podoplanin activity may be a therapeutic target in the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:28059107

  17. A new preclinical 3-dimensional agarose colony formation assay.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Yoshinori; Panchabhai, Sonali; Levin, Victor A

    2008-08-01

    The evaluation of new drug treatments and combination treatments for gliomas and other cancers requires a robust means to interrogate wide dose ranges and varying times of drug exposure without stain-inactivation of the cells (colonies). To this end, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) colony formation assay that makes use of GelCount technology, a new cell colony counter for gels and soft agars. We used U251MG, SNB19, and LNZ308 glioma cell lines and MiaPaCa pancreas adenocarcinoma and SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Colonies were grown in a two-tiered agarose that had 0.7% agarose on the bottom and 0.3% agarose on top. We then studied the effects of DFMO, carboplatin, and SAHA over a 3-log dose range and over multiple days of drug exposure. Using GelCount we approximated the area under the curve (AUC) of colony volumes as the sum of colony volumes (microm2xOD) in each plate to calculate IC50 values. Adenocarcinoma colonies were recognized by GelCount scanning at 3-4 days, while it took 6-7 days to detect glioma colonies. The growth rate of MiaPaCa and SW480 cells was rapid, with 100 colonies counted in 5-6 days; glioma cells grew more slowly, with 100 colonies counted in 9-10 days. Reliable log dose versus AUC curves were observed for all drugs studied. In conclusion, the GelCount method that we describe is more quantitative than traditional colony assays and allows precise study of drug effects with respect to both dose and time of exposure using fewer culture plates.

  18. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  19. Interleukin-6 from Ovarian Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Proliferation, Sphere and Colony Formation and Tumorigenesis of an Ovarian Cancer Cell Line SKOV3

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Chu, Tang-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the majority of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) is regarded as extraovarian, with the ovary being the secondary site. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of ovarian mesenchymal stem cells (OvMSCs) and secreted IL-6 in the development of EOC. OvMSCs were derived from normal ovarian stroma. Cell surface markers and differentiation capability were determined. The effects of IL-6 and conditioned medium of OvMSCs on the malignant phenotype of SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells were tested, and the status of STAT3 and ERK phosphorylation was investigated. OvMSCs had similar surface marker profiles as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, i.e., CD44 (+), CD90 (+) and CD45 (-), and was readily inducible to osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. OvMSCs secreted an extremely high level (>2500 pg/ml) of IL-6. Treatment of SKOV3 cells with conditioned media from OvMSCs increased cell proliferation, tumor sphere formation and anchorage independent growth, and resulted in activation of STAT3 but not ERK. Coinjection of OvMSCs with SKOV3 cell enhanced tumorigenesis in NOD-SCID mice. All of these behaviors were blocked by IL-6 receptor blocking antibody administered in vitro or in vivo. The OvMSCs alone injected into mice had no tumor growth after 3 months. By secreting high levels of IL-6, OvMSCs enhance the proliferation, sphere and colony formation and tumorigenesis of SKOV3 cells. PMID:27698921

  20. Inhibition of MEK and GSK3 supports ES cell-like domed colony formation from avian and reptile embryos.

    PubMed

    Nakanoh, Shota; Okazaki, Kenji; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2013-07-01

    As amniotes diversified, mammals may have modified mechanisms of cellular pluripotency along with the acquisition of a placenta. What then defined pluripotent states in the ancestral amniotes? To study the evolutionary background of pluripotency in amniotes, we tested the effects of extracellular effectors on primary culture cells from avian and reptile embryos in serum-free medium. When treated with a combination of a MEK inhibitor and a GSK3 inhibitor (2i condition), chicken early embryos formed domed colonies (DCs), which were morphologically indistinguishable from the colonies formed by mouse and rat naïve embryonic stem cells. However, no DCs formed when cells from further-developed embryos were cultured in the 2i condition, indicating that there is a clear boundary of DC-forming ability at around the stage of primitive streak elongation. Quail embryos at the blastoderm and cleavage stages also formed DCs in the 2i condition, which is consistent with the notion that the appearance of DCs corresponds with the presence of pluripotent cells in embryos. Gecko blastoderms also formed DCs in the 2i condition, but gastrulas did not. ERK activation by bFGF caused an effect opposite to that of the 2i condition, namely, it dispersed colonies of cells even from early embryos in all species examined. These results suggest that the regulation of pluripotency by FGF/ERK signaling may date back at least to the common ancestor of mammals, birds, and reptiles. However, gene expression analysis indicated the possibility that mammalian pluripotency transcription factors function differently in non-mammalian amniotes.

  1. High throughput and automatic colony formation assay based on impedance measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Kao, Chich-Hao; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2017-03-02

    To predict the response of in vivo tumors, in vitro culture of cell colonies was suggested to be a standard assay to achieve high clinical relevance. To describe the responses of cell colonies, the most widely used quantification method is to count the number and size of cell colonies under microscope. That makes the colony formation assay infeasible to be high throughput and automated. In this work, in situ analysis of cell colonies suspended in soft hydrogel was developed based on impedance measurement technique. Cell colonies cultured between a pair of parallel plate electrodes were successfully analyzed by coating a layer of base hydrogel on one side of electrode. Real-time and label-free monitoring of cell colonies was realized during the culture course. Impedance magnitude and phase angle respectively represented the summation effect of colony responses and size of colonies. In addition, dynamic response of drug-treated colonies was demonstrated. High throughput and automatic colony formation assay was realized to facilitate more objective assessments in cancer research. Graphical Abstract High throughput and automatic colony formation assay was realized by in situ impedimetric analysis across a pair of parallel plate electrodes in a culture chamber. Cell colonies suspended in soft hydrogel were cultured under the tested substance and their dynamic response was represented by impedance data.

  2. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene transduction into human lung cancer cells differentially regulates metastasis formations in various organ microenvironments of natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Nishioka, Y; Nokihara, H; Sone, S

    1997-02-15

    We investigated whether local production of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), responsible for migration and activation of monocytes/macrophages at a tumor growth site, affected the metastatic pattern of lung cancer. For this, highly metastatic human squamous (RERF-LC-AI) or small (H69/VP) cell lung carcinoma cells were transduced with the human M-CSF gene inserted into pRc/CMV-MCSF to establish M-CSF-producing clones (MCSF-AI-9-18, MCSF-AI-9-24, and MCSF-VP-5). M-CSF gene transduction had no effect on the expression of surface antigen or on in vitro proliferation. After s.c. injection into SCID mice, the growth rates of M-CSF-producing cells were slower than those of parent or mock-transduced cells. In the metastatic model in SCID mice depleted of natural killer cells, RERF-LC-AI cells formed metastases mainly in the liver and kidneys, whereas H69/VP cells metastasized mainly to the liver and systemic lymph nodes. The numbers of metastatic colonies of MCSF-AI-9-18 and MCSF-AI-9-24 cells in the liver but not the kidneys were significantly reduced. The development of lymph node metastases of MCSF-VP-5 cells was also less than that of parent or mock-transduced cells. Treatment of SCID mice with anti-human M-CSF antibody resulted in a significant increase in liver metastases of their M-CSF gene transfectants. No significant differences were observed in the distributions in mice or in the in vitro invasive potentials of MCSF-AI-9-18 cells and Neo-AI-3 cells. These findings indicate that the antimetastatic effect of M-CSF may be specific to particular organs, suggesting the influence of heterogeneity of organ microenvironments on the metastasis of lung cancer.

  3. NS-018, a selective JAK2 inhibitor, preferentially inhibits CFU-GM colony formation by bone marrow mononuclear cells from high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Junya; Kodama, Ayumi; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Yuji; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Nagoshi, Hisao; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Nakaya, Yohei; Tamura, Ayako; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Naito, Haruna; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    JAK2/STAT signaling promotes survival and expansion of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) clones, but little is known about the potential of JAK2/STAT as a therapeutic target in MDS. We investigated the effect of NS-018, a novel antagonist for JAK2, on the colony-forming ability of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) from high-risk MDS patients. NS-018 decreased colony-forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) colony numbers from MDS-derived BMMNCs in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was significantly more potent than against normal BMMNCs. In addition, NS-018 suppressed the phosphorylation of STAT3 in colony-forming cells from MDS patients. Collectively, NS-018 could be a new therapeutic option for high-risk MDS.

  4. Maintenance and induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation using E-cadherin-Fc substrata without colony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Yuan; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2013-03-01

    Induced embryonic stem (ES) cells are expected to be promising cell resources for the observation of the cell behaviors in developmental biology as well as the implantation in cell treatments in human diseases. A recombinant E-cadherin substratum was developed as a cell recognizable substratum to maintain the ES cells' self-renewal and pluripotency at single cell level. Furthermore, the generation of various cell lineages in different germ layers, including hepatic or neural cells, was achieved on the chimeric protein layer precisely and effectively. The induction and isolation of specific cell population was carried out with the enhancing effect of other artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) in enzyme-free process. The murine ES cell-derived cells showed highly morphological similarities and functional expressions to matured hepatocytes or neural progenitor cells.

  5. Budding yeast colony growth study based on circular granular cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprianti, Devi; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-08-01

    Yeast colony growth can be modelled by using circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. The bud growth angle can be set to regulate cell budding pattern. Cohesion force, contact force and Stokes force were adopted to accommodate the behaviour and interactions among cells. Simulation steps are divided into two steps, the explicit step is due to cell growing and implicit step for the cell rearrangement. Only in explicit step that time change was performed. In this study, we examine the influence of cell diameter growth time and reproduction time combination toward the growth of cell number and colony formation. We find a commutative relation between the cell diameter growth time and reproduction time to the specific growth rate. The greater value of the multiplication of the parameters, the smaller specific growth rate is obtained. It also shows a linear correlation between the specific growth rate and colony diameter growth rate.

  6. Observations on colony formation by the cosmopolitan phytoplankton genus Phaeocystis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verity, Peter G.; Medlin, Linda K.

    2003-12-01

    Few marine phytoplankton have heteromorphic life cycles and also often dominate the ecosystems in which they occur. The class Prymnesiophyceae contains a notable exception: the genus Phaeocystis includes three species that form gelatinous colonies but also occur within their ranges as solitary cells. Phaeocystis antarctica and P. pouchetii are exclusively high latitude taxa, and are notable for regionally tremendous blooms of the colony stage. P. globosa occurs circumglobally, yet its colony blooms primarily are confined to colder waters within its range. Three additional species are warm water forms that have been reported only as solitary cells or loose aggregations that bear little resemblance to the organized colonies of the other taxa. Interpretation of existing data indicates that resource availability (light, temperature and nutrients) by itself is not sufficient to explain this distinction between cold-water colony-forming taxa and warm water solitary cell taxa, nor why colony development in P. globosa is essentially a spatially restricted phenomenon within a much broader geographic range. Colony development by P. globosa in situ has been observed at temperatures ≥20 °C, but only rarely and generally under conditions of seasonally or anthropogenically elevated nutrient supply. Data presented here demonstrate colony development at 20-22 °C in natural plankton communities from oligotrophic waters that were pre-screened through 63 μm mesh (i.e. lacking mesozooplankton and large microzooplankton), but not in unscreened communities containing microzooplankton and >63 μm zooplankton. Reduction of colony proliferation at higher temperatures by mesozooplankton grazing remains as an intriguing possibility that is consistent with available evidence to help explain differences in latitudinal extent of in situ colony development. These data are interpreted within a theoretical framework regarding the potential advantages and disadvantages of the two life cycle

  7. Mixed colony formation in vitro by the heterogeneous compartment of multipotential progenitors in human bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Holyoake, T L; Freshney, M G; Konwalinka, G; Haun, M; Petzer, A; Fitzsimons, E; Lucie, N P; Wright, E G; Pragnell, I B

    1993-02-01

    The physiology of the human haemopoietic primitive progenitor populations can be studied in normal and disease states by clonal in vitro cultures in which the primitive progenitor cells proliferate and differentiate to form mixed colonies. For many applications it is essential that such assays detect a high proportion of primitive progenitor cells. We describe an in vitro assay which detects a high incidence of human CD34+ multipotential progenitor cells. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNC) or selected CD34+ cells were plated at low cell concentrations in semisolid agar cultures with synergizing growth factor combinations. The optimum growth factor combination of conditioned medium from Mia PaCa-2 cells (Mia-CM), recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and recombinant stem cell factor (SCF) supported the formation of macroscopic (> or = mm) colonies (97% of which were multilineage), at an average incidence of 250/10(5) MNC. The colony-forming cells (human colony-forming unit, type A) detected, showed a low cycling status (7.3%) and the macroscopic colonies had a high replating efficiency (46%), reflecting their probable primitive nature. This assay should prove invaluable, for studies on the regulation of proliferation of the multipotential compartment and in studies involving the assessment of these cells in transplantation and neoplastic disease.

  8. Growth dynamics of cancer cell colonies and their comparison with noncancerous cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H.; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth dynamics of HeLa (cervix cancer) cell colonies was studied following both their growth front and the pattern morphology evolutions utilizing large population colonies exhibiting linearly and radially spreading fronts. In both cases, the colony profile fractal dimension was df=1.20±0.05 and the growth fronts displaced at the constant velocity 0.90±0.05 μm min-1. Colonies showed changes in both cell morphology and average size. As time increased, the formation of large cells at the colony front was observed. Accordingly, the heterogeneity of the colony increased and local driving forces that set in began to influence the dynamics of the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough colony fronts resulted in a roughness exponent α = 0.50±0.05, a growth exponent β = 0.32±0.04, and a dynamic exponent z=1.5±0.2. The validity of this set of scaling exponents extended from a lower cutoff lc≈60 μm upward, and the exponents agreed with those predicted by the standard Kardar-Parisi-Zhang continuous equation. HeLa data were compared with those previously reported for Vero cell colonies. The value of df and the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang-type 2D front growth dynamics were similar for colonies of both cell lines. This indicates that the cell colony growth dynamics is independent of the genetic background and the tumorigenic nature of the cells. However, one can distinguish some differences between both cell lines during the growth of colonies that may result from specific cooperative effects and the nature of each biosystem.

  9. 17β-Estradiol regulates cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis by upregulating miR-9 and thus degrades MALAT-1 in osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an estrogen receptor-independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Dengfeng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Jing; Teng, Yi; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Jiao; Li, Yu

    2015-02-20

    In bone, different concentration of estrogen leads to various of physiological processes in osteoblast, such as the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. But little was known about the estrogen effects on osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, OS cell MG-63 was treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) with the presence or absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα), for evaluating the E2 effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis. Consistent with a previous study, high dose of E2 treatment dramatically downregulated expressing level of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1). The observation of upregulation of miR-9 after a high dose of E2 treatment indicated the cause of MALAT-1 reduction. Downregulation of MALAT-1 promoted the combination of SFPQ/PTBP2 complex. It was also observed that the proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis of OS cells were remarkably affected by high dose of E2 treatment, but not by low dose, in an ERα independent manner. Furthermore, the abolishment of the effects on these physiological processes caused by ectopic expression of miR-9 ASOs suggested the necessity of miR-9 in MALAT-1 regulation. Here we found that the high dose of E2 treatment upregulated miR-9 thus posttranscriptionally regulated MALAT-1 RNA level in OS cells, and then the downregulation of MALAT-1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes in the E2-dose dependent and ER-independent ways. - Highlights: • E2 affects osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an Estrogen receptor-independent way. • High dose of E2 treatment upregulates miR-9 which target to MALAT-1 RNA. • Upregulated miR-9 degrades MALAT-1 and thus affects combination of SFPQ/PTBP2. • E2 treatment block cell proliferation, colony formation, mobility, and enhance apoptosis.

  10. Stage-dependent reduction in T colony formation in Hodgkin's disease. Coincidence with monocyte synthesis of prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Bockman, R S

    1980-01-01

    Prostaglandin synthesis and T lymphocyte colony formation have been examined in previously untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease. Mononuclear cells have been isolated from peripheral blood and spleens of these patients. Significant augmentation in prostaglandin E levels were noted in the mononuclear cell cutures from Hodgkin's disease patients compared with controls (1.64 +/- 0.29 vs. 0.39 +/- 0.09 ng/10(6) cells, P < 0.005). Measured prostaglandin E levels increased with advancing stage of disease. Virtually all of the prostaglandins were synthesized by the adherent monocyte cell population. Prostaglandin E was the major product. Clonal expansion of a T lymphocyte precursor cell, which gives rise to colonies > 50 cells, was determined by a layered soft agar method. T colony formation was significantly reduced in patients with stage II, III, and IV disease. There were progressively reduced colony numbers seen with advancing stage of disease (609 +/- 209, 416 +/- 158, 207 +/- 58 compared with normals 2,274 +/- 360 colonies/10(6) cells plated; P < 0.005). The addition of inhibitors of endogenous prostaglandin synthesis resulted in significant augmentation of T colony number. However, a consistent relative decrease in T colony number was seen even when endogenous prostaglandin E synthesis was blocked. It would appear that both the prostaglandin-dependent and independent T colony precursor cells are lost with progressive stage of disease. A causative role of augmented prostaglandin synthesis in this stage-dependent reduction of T colony formation could not be established. PMID:6967491

  11. Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Signaling Suppresses Renal Crystal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazumi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yasui, Takahiro; Naiki, Taku; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Ando, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Kentaro; Kawai, Noriyasu; Tozawa, Keiichi; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported evidence suggesting that migrating macrophages (Mϕs) eliminate renal crystals in hyperoxaluric mice. Mϕs can be inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2), and colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) mediates polarization to the M2Mϕ phenotype. M2Mϕs promote renal tissue repair and regeneration, but it is not clear whether these cells are involved in suppressing renal crystal formation. We investigated the role of M2Mϕs in renal crystal formation during hyperoxaluria using CSF-1–deficient mice, which lack M2Mϕs. Compared with wild-type mice, CSF-1–deficient mice had significantly higher amounts of renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Treatment with recombinant human CSF-1 increased the expression of M2-related genes and markedly decreased the number of renal crystals in both CSF-1–deficient and wild-type mice. Flow cytometry of sorted renal Mϕs showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in a smaller population of CD11b+F4/80+CD163+CD206hi cells, which represent M2-like Mϕs. Additionally, transfusion of M2Mϕs into CSF-1–deficient mice suppressed renal crystal deposition. In vitro phagocytosis assays with calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals showed a higher rate of crystal phagocytosis by M2-polarized Mϕs than M1-polarized Mϕs or renal tubular cells. Gene array profiling showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in disordered M2- and stone-related gene expressions. Collectively, our results provide compelling evidence for a suppressive role of CSF-1 signaling in renal crystal formation. PMID:24578130

  12. The PIM inhibitor AZD1208 synergizes with ruxolitinib to induce apoptosis of ruxolitinib sensitive and resistant JAK2-V617F-driven cells and inhibit colony formation of primary MPN cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzacurati, Lucia; Lambert, Que T.; Pradhan, Anuradha; Griner, Lori N.; Huszar, Dennis; Reuther, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Classical myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are hematopoietic stem cell disorders that exhibit excess mature myeloid cells, bone marrow fibrosis, and risk of leukemic transformation. Aberrant JAK2 signaling plays an etiological role in MPN formation. Because neoplastic cells in patients are largely insensitive to current anti-JAK2 therapies, effective therapies remain needed. Members of the PIM family of serine/threonine kinases are induced by JAK/STAT signaling, regulate hematopoietic stem cell growth, protect hematopoietic cells from apoptosis, and exhibit hematopoietic cell transforming properties. We hypothesized that PIM kinases may offer a therapeutic target for MPNs. We treated JAK2-V617F-dependent MPN model cells as well as primary MPN patient cells with the PIM kinase inhibitors SGI-1776 and AZD1208 and the JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. While MPN model cells were rather insensitive to PIM inhibitors, combination of PIM inhibitors with ruxolitinib led to a synergistic effect on MPN cell growth due to enhanced apoptosis. Importantly, PIM inhibitor mono-therapy inhibited, and AZD1208/ruxolitinib combination therapy synergistically suppressed, colony formation of primary MPN cells. Enhanced apoptosis by combination therapy was associated with activation of BAD, inhibition of downstream components of the mTOR pathway, including p70S6K and S6 protein, and activation of 4EBP1. Importantly, PIM inhibitors re-sensitized ruxolitinib-resistant MPN cells to ruxolitinib by inducing apoptosis. Finally, exogenous expression of PIM1 induced ruxolitinib resistance in MPN model cells. These data indicate that PIMs may play a role in MPNs and that combining PIM and JAK2 kinase inhibitors may offer a more efficacious therapeutic approach for MPNs over JAK2 inhibitor mono-therapy. PMID:26472029

  13. Lymphocyte culture: induction of colonies by conditioned medium from human lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R M; Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The presence of phytohemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in agar is known to stimulate the formation of lymphoid colonies. We now report that similar colonies can be induced in the absence of plant lectins upon addition of filtered and ultracentrifuged conditioned medium (CM) obtained from certain human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Colony formation required at least 6 X 10(5) mononuclear cells per milliliter, and optimum results were obtained at concentrations of 1 X 10(6) cells/ml in the presence of 20% CM (50-500 colonies per 10(6) cells cultured). Individual cells within colonies displayed uniform morphological characteristics of lymphoid cells, and the majority formed rosettes with sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that they were of T-cell type.

  14. Breast cancer cells induce osteoclast formation by stimulating host IL-11 production and downregulating granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Hayley; Tumber, Anthony; Hill, Peter A

    2004-05-01

    Breast cancer cells frequently metastasize to the skeleton, where they induce OCL formation and activity, resulting in extensive bone destruction. However, the mechanisms by which breast cancer cells mediate increased osteolysis remain unclear. To elucidate this point, we investigated how 3 human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7, induce OCL formation using a murine osteoblast-spleen cell coculture system and compared their effects with a human colorectal cancer cell line, HCT-15; a human lung cancer cell line, HT-1080; and a normal human breast cell line, HME. The breast cancer cell lines supported OCL formation only when osteoblasts were present in spleen cell cocultures, whilst the non-breast cancer cell lines and the normal breast cell line, HME, had no effect. Fractionation of BCCM by ultrafiltration established that osteoclastogenic activity was associated with factors having m.w. >3 kDa. Breast cancer cell lines produced primarily PTHrP, with lesser amounts of IL-6, IL-11 and TNF-alpha. The effect of BCCM on OCL formation in osteoblast-spleen cell cocultures was partially prevented by a neutralising antibody to human PTHrP and completely prevented by a neutralising antibody to either murine IL-11 or the murine IL-11 receptor; neutralising antibodies to human IL-6, IL-11 or TNF-alpha were without effect. BCCM or human PTHrP induced an increase in murine osteoblast IL-11 mRNA and protein production, effects that were prevented in the presence of a neutralising antibody to human PTHrP. The osteoclastogenic activity of IL-11 was mediated by enhancing osteoblast production of PGE(2) effects, which were abrogated by an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase. PGE(2) apparently enhanced OCL formation by downregulating GM-CSF production by spleen cells since recombinant murine GM-CSF inhibited OCL formation and a neutralising antibody to murine GM-CSF blocked these inhibitory effects. We conclude that breast cancer cells induce OCL formation by

  15. Two-Dimensionality of Yeast Colony Expansion Accompanied by Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Noorbakhsh, Javad; Adams, Rhys M.; Samaniego-Evans, Joseph; Agollah, Germaine; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Kuzdzal-Fick, Jennie; Mehta, Pankaj; Balázsi, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can form multicellular patterns as they expand on agar plates, a phenotype that requires a functional copy of the FLO11 gene. Although the biochemical and molecular requirements for such patterns have been examined, the mechanisms underlying their formation are not entirely clear. Here we develop quantitative methods to accurately characterize the size, shape, and surface patterns of yeast colonies for various combinations of agar and sugar concentrations. We combine these measurements with mathematical and physical models and find that FLO11 gene constrains cells to grow near the agar surface, causing the formation of larger and more irregular colonies that undergo hierarchical wrinkling. Head-to-head competition assays on agar plates indicate that two-dimensional constraint on the expansion of FLO11 wild type (FLO11) cells confers a fitness advantage over FLO11 knockout (flo11Δ) cells on the agar surface. PMID:25504059

  16. The induction of human peripheral blood lymphoid colonies by conditioned media from human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vesole, D H; Moore, G E

    1980-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from 29 human tumour cell lines and 3 malignant pleural fluids were tested for their ability to stimulate lymphoid colony formation in semi-solid agar; 9 of 14 malignant melanomas, 3 of 6 colonic carcinomas, 2 of 5 ovarian carcinomas, 3 of 4 breast carcinomas and 1 of 3 pleural fluids from breast cancer patients contained colony-stimulating activity (CSA) for human peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) in semi-solid agar. Conditioned media also stimulated PBL proliferation in liquid medium; these effects were dose dependent. With the exception of one pleural fluid, extensive dialysis of CM did not significantly increase colony formation; CM from two tumour cell lines demonstrated a significant decrease in the induction of colony formation after dialysis. PMID:6970165

  17. Dynamics and morphology characteristics of cell colonies with radially spreading growth fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H.; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.

    2011-08-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional (2D) radially spreading growth fronts of Vero cell colonies was investigated utilizing two types of colonies, namely type I starting from clusters with a small number of cells, which initially exhibited arbitrary-shaped rough growth fronts and progressively approached quasicircular ones as the cell population increased; and type II colonies, starting from a relatively large circular three-dimensional (3D) cell cluster. For large cell population colonies, the fractal dimension of the fronts was DF=1.20±0.05. For low cell populations, the mean colony radius increased exponentially with time, but for large ones the constant radial front velocity 0.20±0.02 μm min-1 was reached. Colony spreading was accompanied by changes in both cell morphology and average size, and by the formation of very large cells, some of them multinuclear. Therefore the heterogeneity of colonies increased and local driving forces that set in began to influence the 2D growth front kinetics. The retardation effect related to the exponential to constant radial front velocity transition was assigned to a number of possible interferences including the cell duplication and 3D growth in the bulk of the colony. The dynamic scaling analysis of overhang-corrected rough colony fronts, after arc-radius coordinate system transformation, resulted in roughness exponent α = 0.50±0.05 and growth exponent β = 0.32±0.04, for arc lengths greater than 100 μm. This set of scaling exponents agreed with that predicted by the Kardar, Parisi, and Zhang continuous equation. For arc lengths shorter than 2-3 cell diameters, the value α = 0.85±0.05 would be related to a cell front roughening caused by temporarily membrane deformations occasionally interfered by cell proliferation.

  18. High-Throughput Method for Automated Colony and Cell Counting by Digital Image Analysis Based on Edge Detection

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Counting cells and colonies is an integral part of high-throughput screens and quantitative cellular assays. Due to its subjective and time-intensive nature, manual counting has hindered the adoption of cellular assays such as tumor spheroid formation in high-throughput screens. The objective of this study was to develop an automated method for quick and reliable counting of cells and colonies from digital images. For this purpose, I developed an ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge and a CellProfiler Pipeline Cell Colony Counting, and compared them to other open-source digital methods and manual counts. The ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge is valuable in counting cells and colonies, and measuring their area, volume, morphology, and intensity. In this study, I demonstrate that Cell Colony Edge is superior to other open-source methods, in speed, accuracy and applicability to diverse cellular assays. It can fulfill the need to automate colony/cell counting in high-throughput screens, colony forming assays, and cellular assays. PMID:26848849

  19. High-Throughput Method for Automated Colony and Cell Counting by Digital Image Analysis Based on Edge Detection.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Counting cells and colonies is an integral part of high-throughput screens and quantitative cellular assays. Due to its subjective and time-intensive nature, manual counting has hindered the adoption of cellular assays such as tumor spheroid formation in high-throughput screens. The objective of this study was to develop an automated method for quick and reliable counting of cells and colonies from digital images. For this purpose, I developed an ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge and a CellProfiler Pipeline Cell Colony Counting, and compared them to other open-source digital methods and manual counts. The ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge is valuable in counting cells and colonies, and measuring their area, volume, morphology, and intensity. In this study, I demonstrate that Cell Colony Edge is superior to other open-source methods, in speed, accuracy and applicability to diverse cellular assays. It can fulfill the need to automate colony/cell counting in high-throughput screens, colony forming assays, and cellular assays.

  20. A novel type of colony formation in marine planktonic diatoms revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bosak, Sunčica; Pletikapić, Galja; Hozić, Amela; Svetličić, Vesna; Sarno, Diana; Viličić, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Diatoms have evolved a variety of colonial life forms in which cells are connected by organic threads, mucilage pads or silicate structures. In this study, we provide the first description of a novel strategy of colony formation among marine planktonic diatoms. Bacteriastrum jadranum forms loose but regular chains with distinct heterovalvate terminal cells. The colonial cells and their siliceous projections, the setae, are not in direct contact; instead, they are enclosed within the optically transparent organic matrix. This cell jacket structure was detected by staining procedure with Alcian Blue, which showed that the polysaccharides are predominant matrix constituents and revealed that the jacket reaches the span of the setae. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations showed distinguishable fibrillar network firmly associated with cells. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we were able to visualise and characterise the cell jacket structure at molecular resolution. At nanoscale resolution, the cell jacket appears as a cross-linked fibrillar network organised into a recognisable structure. The circular patches of self-repeating pattern (hexagonal pores with openings of 8-100 nm) are connected through thicker surrounding fibrils and reinforced by branching fibrils. The pore-forming fibrils within the patches are only 0.6-1.6 nm high, the surrounding fibrils connecting patches are 2.0-2.8 nm high, and the branching fibrils are considerably wider but not higher than 4.0 nm. The discovered polysaccharide fibrillar network is highly organised and delicately structured with a monomolecular fibril height of 0.6 nm. We conclude that the Bacteriastrum polysaccharide jacket represents an essential part of the cell, as the conjunction of the polymer network with the frustule appears to be extremely tight and such specific and unique patterns have never been found in self-assembled polysaccharide gel networks, which are usually encountered in the marine

  1. Erythroid colony formation and effect of hemin in vitro in hereditary sideroblastic anemias.

    PubMed

    Partanen, S; Pasanen, A; Juvonen, E; Tenhunen, R; Ruutu, T

    1988-05-01

    Colony formation by erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) and erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E) and the effect of hemin on colony growth was studied in vitro in three Finnish families with hereditary sideroblastic anemia (HSA). Defective activity of heme synthase has been demonstrated in family A and that of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase in family B. No biochemical defect has been recognized so far in family C. CFU-E colony growth was defective in seven of the eight persons studied. The formation of BFU-E colonies was normal in family A and increased in family C, whereas of the two members of family B one showed normal and one decreased BFU-E colony growth. Hemin in 30-120 microM concentration increased significantly both BFU-E (p less than 0.01) and CFU-E (p less than 0.005) colony formation in family C. No effect was seen in family A, and in family B the only effect was normalization of the decreased BFU-E colony growth by the highest hemin concentration in one person. This study indicates that differences exist between families with HSA in erythroid colony formation and in response to hemin in vitro, but the low number of investigated members in each family does not permit a conclusive evaluation of the impact of the carrier versus patient status or of sex on the results.

  2. Giant vesicles "colonies": a model for primitive cell communities.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Paolo; Stano, Pasquale; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2012-07-09

    Current research on the origin of life typically focuses on the self-organisation of molecular components in individual cell-like compartments, thereby bringing about the emergence of self-sustaining minimal cells. This is justified by the fact that single cells are the minimal forms of life. No attempts have been made to investigate the cooperative mechanisms that could derive from the assembly of individual compartments. Here we present a novel experimental approach based on vesicles "colonies" as a model of primitive cell communities. Experiments show that several advantages could have favoured primitive cell colonies when compared with isolated primitive cells. In fact there are two novel unexpected features typical of vesicle colonies, namely solute capture and vesicle fusion, which can be seen as the basic physicochemical mechanisms at the origin of life.

  3. Sequestration and Distribution Characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and Its Role in Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xiangdong; Yan, Ran; Li, Fenxiang; Dai, Wei; Jiao, Kewei; Liu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the sequestration and distribution characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and its role in Microcystis colony formation, M. aeruginosa was exposed to six different Cd(II) concentrations for 10 days. Cd(II) exposure caused hormesis in the growth of M. aeruginosa. Low concentrations of Cd(II) significantly induced formation of small Microcystis colonies (P < 0.05) and increased the intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) and bound extracellular polysaccharide (bEPS) contents of M. aeruginosa significantly (P < 0.05). There was a linear relationship between the amount of Cd(II) sequestrated by algal cells and the amount added to cultures in the rapid adsorption process that occurred during the first 5 min of exposure. After 10 d, M. aeruginosa sequestrated nearly 80% of 0.2 mg L−1 added Cd(II), while >93% of Cd(II) was sequestrated in the groups with lower added concentrations of Cd(II). More than 80% of the sequestrated Cd(II) was bioadsorbed by bEPS. The Pearson correlation coefficients of exterior and interior factors related to colony formation of M. aeruginosa revealed that Cd(II) could stimulate the production of IPS and bEPS via increasing Cd(II) bioaccumulation and bioadsorption. Increased levels of cross-linking between Cd(II) and bEPS stimulated algal cell aggregation, which eventually promoted the formation of Microcystis colonies. PMID:27777956

  4. Sequestration and Distribution Characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and Its Role in Colony Formation.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiangdong; Yan, Ran; Li, Fenxiang; Dai, Wei; Jiao, Kewei; Zhou, Qixing; Liu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the sequestration and distribution characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and its role in Microcystis colony formation, M. aeruginosa was exposed to six different Cd(II) concentrations for 10 days. Cd(II) exposure caused hormesis in the growth of M. aeruginosa. Low concentrations of Cd(II) significantly induced formation of small Microcystis colonies (P < 0.05) and increased the intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) and bound extracellular polysaccharide (bEPS) contents of M. aeruginosa significantly (P < 0.05). There was a linear relationship between the amount of Cd(II) sequestrated by algal cells and the amount added to cultures in the rapid adsorption process that occurred during the first 5 min of exposure. After 10 d, M. aeruginosa sequestrated nearly 80% of 0.2 mg L(-1) added Cd(II), while >93% of Cd(II) was sequestrated in the groups with lower added concentrations of Cd(II). More than 80% of the sequestrated Cd(II) was bioadsorbed by bEPS. The Pearson correlation coefficients of exterior and interior factors related to colony formation of M. aeruginosa revealed that Cd(II) could stimulate the production of IPS and bEPS via increasing Cd(II) bioaccumulation and bioadsorption. Increased levels of cross-linking between Cd(II) and bEPS stimulated algal cell aggregation, which eventually promoted the formation of Microcystis colonies.

  5. Reversible Commitment to Differentiation by Human Multipotent Stromal Cells (MSCs) in Single-Cell Derived Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Ylöstalo, Joni; Bazhanov, Nikolay; Prockop, Darwin J

    2008-01-01

    Objective Human multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) readily form single-cell derived colonies when plated at clonal densities. However, the colonies are heterogeneous since the cells from a colony form new colonies that vary in size and differentiation potential when re-plated at clonal densities. The experiments here tested the hypothesis that the cells in the inner regions of colonies are partially differentiated but the differentiation is reversible. Materials and Methods Cells were separately isolated from the dense inner regions (IN) and less dense outer regions (OUT) of single-cell derived colonies. The cells were then compared by assays of their transcriptomes and proteins, and for clonogenicity and differentiation. Results The IN cells expressed fewer cell-cycle genes and higher levels of genes for extracellular matrix than the OUT cells. When transferred to differentiation medium, differentiation of the colonies occurred primarily in the IN regions. However, the IN cells were indistinguishable from OUT cells when re-plated at clonal densities and assayed for rates of propagation and clonogenicity. Also, the colonies formed by IN cells were similar to colonies formed by OUT cells in that they had distinct IN and OUT regions. Cultures of IN and OUT cells remained indistinguishable through multiple passages (30-75 population doublings), and both cells formed colonies that were looser and less dense as they were expanded. Conclusions The results demonstrated that the cells in the inner region of single-derived colonies are partially differentiated but the differentiation can be reversed by re-plating the cells at clonal densities. PMID:18619725

  6. Longevity of U cells of differentiated yeast colonies grown on respiratory medium depends on active glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Čáp, Michal; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-01-01

    Colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains pass through specific developmental phases when growing on solid respiratory medium. During entry into the so-called alkali phase, in which ammonia signaling is initiated, 2 prominent cell types are formed within the colonies: U cells in upper colony regions, which have a longevity phenotype and activate the expression of a large number of metabolic genes, and L cells in lower regions, which die more quickly and exhibit a starvation phenotype. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of the activities of enzymes of central carbon metabolism in lysates of both cell types and determined several fermentation end products, showing that previously reported expression differences are reflected in the different enzymatic capabilities of each cell type. Hence, U cells, despite being grown on respiratory medium, behave as fermenting cells, whereas L cells rely on respiratory metabolism and possess active gluconeogenesis. Using a spectrum of different inhibitors, we showed that glycolysis is essential for the formation, and particularly, the survival of U cells. We also showed that β-1,3-glucans that are released from the cell walls of L cells are the most likely source of carbohydrates for U cells.

  7. In vitro effects of fluor-hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite on colony formation, DNA damage and mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Jantová, S; Theiszová, M; Letasiová, S; Birosová, L; Palou, T M

    2008-04-30

    The number of biomaterials used in biomedical applications has rapidly increased in the past two decades. Fluorapatite (FA) is one of the inorganic constituents of bone or teeth used for hard-tissue repairs and replacements. Fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) is a new synthetically prepared composite that in its structure contains the same molecular concentration of OH(-) groups and F(-) ions. The aim of this experimental investigation was to evaluate cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of FHA and FA eluates on Chinese hamster V79 cells and to compare them with the effects of hydroxyapatite (HA) eluate. Cytotoxicity of the biomaterials tested was evaluated by use of the cell colony-formation assay and by direct counting of the cells in each colony. Genotoxicity was assessed by single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) and mutagenicity was evaluated by the Hprt gene-mutation assay and in bacterial mutagenicity tests using Salmonella typhimurium TA100. The results show that the highest test concentrations of the biomaterials (100% and 75% eluates) induced very weak inhibition of colony growth (about 10%). On the other hand, the reduction of cell number per colony induced by these concentrations was in the range from 43% to 31%. The comet assay showed that biomaterials induced DNA breaks, which increased with increasing test concentrations in the order HAcell division in V79 cell colonies.

  8. Emergent structures and dynamics of cell colonies by contact inhibition of locomotion.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Bart; Alert, Ricard; Pešek, Jiří; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Ramon, Herman; Vincent, Romaric

    2016-12-20

    Cells in tissues can organize into a broad spectrum of structures according to their function. Drastic changes of organization, such as epithelial-mesenchymal transitions or the formation of spheroidal aggregates, are often associated either to tissue morphogenesis or to cancer progression. Here, we study the organization of cell colonies by means of simulations of self-propelled particles with generic cell-like interactions. The interplay between cell softness, cell-cell adhesion, and contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) yields structures and collective dynamics observed in several existing tissue phenotypes. These include regular distributions of cells, dynamic cell clusters, gel-like networks, collectively migrating monolayers, and 3D aggregates. We give analytical predictions for transitions between noncohesive, cohesive, and 3D cell arrangements. We explicitly show how CIL yields an effective repulsion that promotes cell dispersal, thereby hindering the formation of cohesive tissues. Yet, in continuous monolayers, CIL leads to collective cell motion, ensures tensile intercellular stresses, and opposes cell extrusion. Thus, our work highlights the prominent role of CIL in determining the emergent structures and dynamics of cell colonies.

  9. Emergent structures and dynamics of cell colonies by contact inhibition of locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Bart; Pešek, Jiří; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Ramon, Herman; Vincent, Romaric

    2016-01-01

    Cells in tissues can organize into a broad spectrum of structures according to their function. Drastic changes of organization, such as epithelial–mesenchymal transitions or the formation of spheroidal aggregates, are often associated either to tissue morphogenesis or to cancer progression. Here, we study the organization of cell colonies by means of simulations of self-propelled particles with generic cell-like interactions. The interplay between cell softness, cell–cell adhesion, and contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) yields structures and collective dynamics observed in several existing tissue phenotypes. These include regular distributions of cells, dynamic cell clusters, gel-like networks, collectively migrating monolayers, and 3D aggregates. We give analytical predictions for transitions between noncohesive, cohesive, and 3D cell arrangements. We explicitly show how CIL yields an effective repulsion that promotes cell dispersal, thereby hindering the formation of cohesive tissues. Yet, in continuous monolayers, CIL leads to collective cell motion, ensures tensile intercellular stresses, and opposes cell extrusion. Thus, our work highlights the prominent role of CIL in determining the emergent structures and dynamics of cell colonies. PMID:27930287

  10. Cell Differentiation and Spatial Organization in Yeast Colonies: Role of Cell-Wall Integrity Pathway.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Sarah; Morales, Rita; White, Melissa G; Smith, Keston; Kapros, Tamas; Honigberg, Saul M

    2015-12-01

    Many microbial communities contain organized patterns of cell types, yet relatively little is known about the mechanism or function of this organization. In colonies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sporulation occurs in a highly organized pattern, with a top layer of sporulating cells sharply separated from an underlying layer of nonsporulating cells. A mutant screen identified the Mpk1 and Bck1 kinases of the cell-wall integrity (CWI) pathway as specifically required for sporulation in colonies. The CWI pathway was induced as colonies matured, and a target of this pathway, the Rlm1 transcription factor, was activated specifically in the nonsporulating cell layer, here termed feeder cells. Rlm1 stimulates permeabilization of feeder cells and promotes sporulation in an overlying cell layer through a cell-nonautonomous mechanism. The relative fraction of the colony apportioned to feeder cells depends on nutrient environment, potentially buffering sexual reproduction against suboptimal environments.

  11. A local PDE model of aggregation formation in bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavy-Waddy, Paul-Christopher; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2016-10-01

    We study pattern formation in a model of cyanobacteria motion recently proposed by Galante, Wisen, Bhaya and Levy. By taking a continuum limit of their model, we derive a novel fourth-order nonlinear parabolic PDE equation that governs the behaviour of the model. This PDE is {{u}t}=-{{u}xx}-{{u}xxxx}+α {{≤ft(\\frac{{{u}x}{{u}xx}}{u}\\right)}x} . We then derive the instability thresholds for the onset of pattern formation. We also compute analytically the spatial profiles of the steady state aggregation density. These profiles are shown to be of the form \\text{sec}{{\\text{h}}p} where the exponent p is related to the parameters of the model. Full numerical simulations give a favorable comparison between the continuum and the underlying discrete system, and show that the aggregation profiles are stable above the critical threshold.

  12. Concordant mast cell and basophil production by individual hematopoietic blast colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald; Ng, Ashley P; Baldwin, Tracey M; Di Rago, Ladina; Mifsud, Sandra

    2013-05-28

    Previous studies have shown that mouse bone marrow cells can produce mast cells when stimulated in vitro by stem cell factor (SCF) and interleukin-3 (IL-3). Experiments to define the marrow cells able to generate mast cells showed that the most active subpopulations were the Kit(+) Sca1(-) progenitor cell fraction and the more ancestral Kit(+) Sca1(+) blast colony-forming cell fraction. In clonal cultures, up to 64% of blast colony-forming cells were able to generate mast cells when stimulated by SCF and IL-3, and, of these, the most active were those in the CD34(-) Flt3R(-) long-term repopulating cell fraction. Basophils, identified by the monoclonal antibody mMCP-8 to mouse mast cell serine protease-8, were also produced by 50% of blast colony-forming cells with a strong concordance in the production of both cell types by individual blast colony-forming cells. Enriched populations of marrow-derived basophils were shown to generate variable numbers of mast cells after a further incubation with SCF and IL-3. The data extend the repertoire of lineage-committed cells able to be produced by multipotential hematopoietic blast colony-forming cells and show that basophils and mast cells can have common ancestral cells and that basophils can probably generate mast cells at least under defined in vitro conditions.

  13. Multiscale modeling of bacterial colonies: how pili mediate the dynamics of single cells and cellular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pönisch, Wolfram; Weber, Christoph A.; Juckeland, Guido; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2017-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, gonorrhea. Over the past two decades there has been an alarming increase of reported gonorrhea cases where the bacteria were resistant to the most commonly used antibiotics thus prompting for alternative antimicrobial treatment strategies. The crucial step in this and many other bacterial infections is the formation of microcolonies, agglomerates consisting of up to several thousands of cells. The attachment and motility of cells on solid substrates as well as the cell-cell interactions are primarily mediated by type IV pili, long polymeric filaments protruding from the surface of cells. While the crucial role of pili in the assembly of microcolonies has been well recognized, the exact mechanisms of how they govern the formation and dynamics of microcolonies are still poorly understood. Here, we present a computational model of individual cells with explicit pili dynamics, force generation and pili-pili interactions. We employ the model to study a wide range of biological processes, such as the motility of individual cells on a surface, the heterogeneous cell motility within the large cell aggregates, and the merging dynamics and the self-assembly of microcolonies. The results of numerical simulations highlight the central role of pili generated forces in the formation of bacterial colonies and are in agreement with the available experimental observations. The model can quantify the behavior of multicellular bacterial colonies on biologically relevant temporal and spatial scales and can be easily adjusted to include the geometry and pili characteristics of various bacterial species. Ultimately, the combination of the microbiological experimental approach with the in silico model of bacterial colonies might provide new qualitative and quantitative insights on the development of bacterial infections and thus pave the way to new antimicrobial treatments.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Circulating Lymphatic Endothelial Colony Forming Cells

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Terri A.; Wentz, Breanna L.; Lagunoff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rationale The identification of circulating endothelial progenitor cells has led to speculation regarding their origin as well as their contribution to neovascular development. Two distinct types of endothelium make up the blood and lymphatic vessel system. However, it has yet to be determined whether there are distinct lymphatic-specific circulating endothelial progenitor cells. Objective This study aims to isolate and characterize the cellular properties and global gene expression of lymphatic-specific endothelial progenitor cells. Methods and Results We isolated circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) from whole peripheral blood. These cells are endothelial in nature, as defined by their expression of endothelial markers and their ability to undergo capillary morphogenesis in three-dimensional culture. A subset of isolated colonies express markers of lymphatic endothelium, including VEGFR-3 and Prox-1, with low levels of VEGFR-1, a blood endothelial marker, while the bulk of the isolated cells express high VEGFR-1 levels with low VEGFR-3 and Prox-1 expression. The different isolates have differential responses to VEGF-C, a lymphatic endothelial specific cytokine, strongly suggesting that there are lymphatic specific and blood specific ECFCs. Global analysis of gene expression revealed key differences in the regulation of pathways involved in cellular differentiation between blood and lymphatic-specific ECFCs. Conclusion These data indicate that there are two distinguishable circulating ECFC types, blood and lymphatic, which are likely to have discrete functions during neovascularization. PMID:26597759

  15. Burkholderia cenocepacia ShvR-regulated genes that influence colony morphology, biofilm formation, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Nguyen, David T; Sokol, Pamela A

    2011-08-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that primarily infects cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Previously, we reported that ShvR, a LysR regulator, influences colony morphology, virulence, and biofilm formation and regulates the expression of an adjacent 24-kb genomic region encoding 24 genes. In this study, we report the functional characterization of selected genes in this region. A Tn5 mutant with shiny colony morphology was identified with a polar mutation in BCAS0208, predicted to encode an acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase. Mutagenesis of BCAS0208 and complementation analyses revealed that BCAS0208 is required for rough colony morphology, biofilm formation, and virulence on alfalfa seedlings. It was not possible to complement with BCAS0208 containing a mutation in the catalytic site. BCAS0201, encoding a putative flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent oxidoreductase, and BCAS0207, encoding a putative citrate synthase, do not influence colony morphology but are required for optimum levels of biofilm formation and virulence. Both BCAS0208 and BCAS0201 contribute to pellicle formation, although individual mutations in each of these genes had no appreciable effect on pellicle formation. A mutant with a polar insertion in BCAS0208 was significantly less virulent in a rat model of chronic lung infection as well as in the alfalfa model. Genes in this region were shown to influence utilization of branched-chain fatty acids, tricarboxylic acid cycle substrates, l-arabinose, and branched-chain amino acids. Together, our data show that the ShvR-regulated genes BCAS0208 to BCAS0201 are required for the rough colony morphotype, biofilm and pellicle formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia.

  16. Colony-forming cell assay for human hematopoietic progenitor cells harvested by a novel continuous-flow cell separation method.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Hiroyuki; Chen, Hong Miao; Okada, Tadashi; Ito, Yoichiro

    2007-06-01

    In order to prove the functional potentiality of cells separated according to their densities by a novel continuous-flow cell separation method, the colony-forming cell (CFC) assay was performed on the harvested cells from peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood. The number of colony-forming unit-granulocyte, erythroid, macrophage, megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM), which are considered to be stem cells, was approximately 3% of colonies developed from the peripheral blood and approximately 4% of colonies from the umbilical cord blood. It appears that this new method could allow us for harvesting of hematopoietic progenitor cells without losing their native ability to proliferate.

  17. Defective transient endogenous spleen colony formation in S1/S1d mice.

    PubMed

    Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Ahmed, A; Sharkis, S J; McKee, A; Sell, K W

    1979-04-01

    WCB6F1 mice of the genotype S1/S1d did not form transient 5-day endogenous spleen colonies following midlethal irradiation, either spontaneously or in response to postirradiation bleeding. Their hematologically normal (+/+) littermates produced colonies equivalent in number and morphologic type to a normal strain (D2B6F1), as evaluated by both macroscopic and microscopic criteria. Bone marrow cells from S1/S1d mice, when transplanted into lethally irradiated +/+ mice, were able to generate equivalent numbers of transient endogenous spleen colonies (TE-CFUs), as compared to that obtained when syngeneic +/+ marrow cells were injected into lethally irradiated +/+ recipients. A defective growth of an early class of hematopoietic progenitor cells, resulting in the clinical course of the S1/S1d anemia is suggested and confirms previous reports on the microenvironmental nature of this abnormality.

  18. Enhancement of ’In Vitro’ Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Formation by Normal Human Serum or Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    the CSA dose - response curve . . .. 10 LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Enhancement of Human and Murine In Vitro Bone Marrow Colony Formation by Normal Hluman...presence of NUS. *-, Dose - response curve for murine bone marrow colony formation using PMUE as a source of CSA. --- Dose - response curve for human...bone marrow colony for- mation using human peripheral blood leukocytes as a source of CSA. o---o Partial dose - response curve for human bone mar- row

  19. Agent Based Modelling Helps in Understanding the Rules by Which Fibroblasts Support Keratinocyte Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; McMinn, Phil; Holcombe, Mike; Smallwood, Rod; MacNeil, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Background Autologous keratincoytes are routinely expanded using irradiated mouse fibroblasts and bovine serum for clinical use. With growing concerns about the safety of these xenobiotic materials, it is desirable to culture keratinocytes in media without animal derived products. An improved understanding of epithelial/mesenchymal interactions could assist in this. Methodology/Principal Findings A keratincyte/fibroblast o-culture model was developed by extending an agent-based keratinocyte colony formation model to include the response of keratinocytes to both fibroblasts and serum. The model was validated by comparison of the in virtuo and in vitro multicellular behaviour of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in single and co-culture in Greens medium. To test the robustness of the model, several properties of the fibroblasts were changed to investigate their influence on the multicellular morphogenesis of keratinocyes and fibroblasts. The model was then used to generate hypotheses to explore the interactions of both proliferative and growth arrested fibroblasts with keratinocytes. The key predictions arising from the model which were confirmed by in vitro experiments were that 1) the ratio of fibroblasts to keratinocytes would critically influence keratinocyte colony expansion, 2) this ratio needed to be optimum at the beginning of the co-culture, 3) proliferative fibroblasts would be more effective than irradiated cells in expanding keratinocytes and 4) in the presence of an adequate number of fibroblasts, keratinocyte expansion would be independent of serum. Conclusions A closely associated computational and biological approach is a powerful tool for understanding complex biological systems such as the interactions between keratinocytes and fibroblasts. The key outcome of this study is the finding that the early addition of a critical ratio of proliferative fibroblasts can give rapid keratinocyte expansion without the use of irradiated mouse fibroblasts and bovine

  20. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  1. High nutrient concentration and temperature alleviated formation of large colonies of Microcystis: Evidence from field investigations and laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zhou, Xiaohua; Chen, Huaimin; Gao, Li; Xiao, Man; Li, Ming

    2016-09-15

    Correlations between Microcystis colony size and environmental factors were investigated in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay of Lake Taihu (China) from 2011 to 2013. Compared with Gonghu Bay, both nutrient concentrations and Microcystis colony sizes were greater in Meiliang Bay. The median colony size (D50: 50% of the total mass of particles smaller than this size) increased from April to August and then decreased until November. In both bays, the average D50 of Microcystis colonies were <100 μm in spring, but colonies within moderate-size (100-500 μm) dominated in summer. The differences in colony size in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay were probably due to horizontal drift driven by the prevailing south wind in summer. Redundancy analysis (RDA) of field data indicated that colony size was negatively related to nutrient concentrations but positively related to air temperature, suggesting that low nutrient concentrations and high air temperature promoted formation of large colonies. To validate the field survey, Microcystis colonies collected from Lake Taihu were cultured at different temperatures (15, 20, 25 and 30 °C) under high and low nutrient concentrations for 9 days. The size of Microcystis colonies significantly decreased when temperature was above 20 °C but had no significant change at 15 °C. The differences in temperature effects on colony formation shown from field and laboratory suggested that the larger colonies in summer were probably due to the longer growth period rather than the higher air temperature and light intensity. In addition, colony size decreased more significantly at high nutrient levels. Therefore, it could be concluded that high nutrient concentration and temperature may alleviate formation of large colonies of Microcystis.

  2. The role of gravity in the nutrition and formation of Bacillus colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzyr, A.; Tirranen, L.; Krylova, T.

    The soil-like substrate is used to cultivate higher plants in man-made closed ecosystems. It allows increasing the closeness of the systems and decreasing the plant solid residues and human wastes. Unusual funnel-shaped bacterial colonies of Bacillus species have been observed during analysis of microflora of plant nutritional solution. The colonies have the following characteristics: a) the diameter of "funnel socket" (the biomass contacting with nutritional agar) is 10.0-15.0 mm; b) the thickness of "funnel socket" is 0.5-2.5 mm; c) the diameter of the middle part of the "funnel spout" (the biomass contacting with the gas phase) is 1,0-1,5 mm; d) the length of the "funnel spout" is 10.0-15.0 mm. In the socket and the middle part of the "funnel spout" there is a gas cavity which is most probably formed by bacterial gas metabolites. It has been shown that: i) the surface of these funnel-shaped colonies of Bacillus species is hydrophobic, as is the surface of other Bacillus species ( . brevis, B. cellulomonos, B. flavus, B.B formosus, B. subtilis); ii) the forms of colonies can be changed by varying the position of the growing biomass in relation to the gravitation forces. The experiment proved that the form of the "funnel sockets" and the length of the "funnel spouts" of the colonies are determined by hydrophobic air-contacting surface layer, which does not leak and stretches under the weight of accumulated water. A hypothesis has been suggested that the gravity force plays the role of a "pump" supplying and holding water within the colony. Thus, the water that comes under the gravity force contains dissolved nutrients and bacterial cells in the hydrophobic layer. These cells that are situated far away from the nutrient agar have no nutrient deficiency. The water accumulated by the colonies might be free water of agar media or it can be produced by metabolic disruption of medium fat. Hence, when growing a colony in agar media the water-soluble nutrient substances

  3. [Significance of the colonial components for the medusa formation and differentiation inPodocoryne carnea M. Sars].

    PubMed

    Brändle, Elisabeth

    1971-09-01

    1. All axial regions of the gonozoid and the medusa buds ofPodocaryne carnea M. Sars incorporate(3)H-thymidine. Medusa buds grow by mitosis and by migration of cells from the colony into the buds. 2. Stolonization inhibits the formation and differentiation of medusa buds: non stolonizing chimerae formed by a gonozoid and an autozoid produce more buds than stolonizing ones. 3. When isolated gonozoids and likewise isolated budding regions are not connected with an nutritive autozoid, the formation and differentiation of medusa buds are restricted. Young medusa buds (stage 3, Frey, 1968) transplanted onto autozoids may differentiate into medusae, while isolated buds of the same stage are transformed into stolons. 4. If the hypostome of the gonozoid is separated from the subhypostomal budding region by ligature and does not regenerate, the young buds already present are resorbed and no new ones are formed. 5. Heads of gonozoids transplanted onto cauli of adult autozoids may induce the formation of medusa buds in the subtentacular axial region. These buds differentiate into normal medusae. 6. Isolated adult autozoids, treated with extract taken from hypostomes of gonozoids, form medusa buds which complete normal differentiation. 7. Treatment of autozoid colonies with extract from gonozoids brings about a standstill of colony growth and resorption of autozoids. After transfer to normal sea-water a compensatory increase in growth and head formation takes place. 8. The results are discussed. It is suggested that an "activator" substance is produced in the hypostome of the gonozoid which induces and maintains the budding region in the subtentacular zone. Furthermore, budding would be dependent on the nutritional state of the gonozoid, food being supplied by the autozoid, and on the extent of inhibition by intensive stolonization.

  4. Umbilical Cord Blood Circulating Progenitor Cells and Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Are Decreased in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Gumina, Diane L; Black, Claudine P; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Winn, Virginia D; Baker, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific disease characterized by the new onset of hypertension and proteinuria. Mothers with PE are known to develop endothelial dysfunction, but its effect on infants has been understudied, as newborns are often asymptomatic. Recent studies indicate that infants born from preeclamptic pregnancies develop endothelial dysfunction including higher blood pressure during childhood and an increased risk of stroke later in life. We hypothesize that PE reduces the number and function of fetal angiogenic progenitor cells and may contribute to this increased risk. We quantified 2 distinct types of angiogenic progenitors, pro-angiogenic circulating progenitor cells (CPCs) and endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), from the umbilical cord blood of preeclamptic pregnancies and normotensive controls. Pro-angiogenic and nonangiogenic CPCs were enumerated via flow cytometry and ECFCs by cell culture. Additionally, we studied the growth, migration, and tube formation of ECFCs from PE and gestational age-matched normotensive control pregnancies. We found that PE resulted in decreased cord blood pro-angiogenic CPCs and ECFCs. Nonangiogenic CPCs were also decreased. Preeclamptic ECFCs demonstrated decreased growth and migration but formed tube-like structures in vitro similar to controls. Our results suggest that the preeclamptic environment alters the number and function of angiogenic progenitor cells and may increase the risk of later vascular disease.

  5. Modulation of colony stimulating factor release and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells by anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, S; Warner, T D; Mitchell, J A

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of the immune response against tumour cells is emerging as a valuable approach for cancer treatment. Some experimental studies have shown that secretion of colony stimulating factors by cancer cells reduces their tumorigenicity and increases their immunogenicity probably by promoting the cytolitic and antigen presenting activities of leukocytes. We have observed that human colon cancer cells (HT-29) are able to secrete granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor when stimulated with cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α). In this study we assessed, for the first time, the effects of several anticancer drugs on colony stimulating factor release or apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Cytokine-induced release of granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor was significantly increased by cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine. Taxol only increased macrophage-colony stimulating factor release while reduced that of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. No changes in colony stimulating factor secretion were observed after treatment with methotrexate. Only cisplatin and taxol induced apoptosis in these cells. Secretion of colony stimulating factors by colon cancer cells may contribute to the immune host response against them. Anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine increase colony stimulating factor secretion by cytokine stimulated cancer cells probably through mechanisms different to those leading to cell apoptosis, an effect that may contribute to their anti-neoplasic action. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1316–1321. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600240 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953891

  6. A simple colony-formation assay in liquid medium, termed 'tadpoling', provides a sensitive measure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability.

    PubMed

    Welch, Aaron Z; Koshland, Douglas E

    2013-12-01

    Here we describe the first high-throughput amenable method of quantifying Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability. Current high-throughput methods of assessing yeast cell viability, such as flow cytometry and SGA analysis, do not measure the percentage viability of a culture but instead measure cell vitality or colony fitness, respectively. We developed a method, called tadpoling, to quantify the percentage viability of a yeast culture, with the ability to detect as few as one viable cell amongst ~10(8) dead cells. The most important feature of this assay is the exploitation of yeast colony formation in liquid medium. Utilizing a microtiter dish, we are able to observe a range of viability of 100% to 0.0001%. Comparison of tadpoling to the traditional plating method to measure yeast culture viability reveals that, for the majority of Saccharomyces species analyzed there is no significant difference between the two methods. In comparison to flow cytometry using propidium iodide, the high-throughput method of measuring yeast culture viability, tadpoling is much more accurate at culture viabilities < 1%. Thus, we show that tadpoling provides an easy, inexpensive, space-saving method, amenable to high-throughput screens, for accurately measuring yeast cell viability.

  7. Generation of colonies of induced trophoblast cells during standard reprogramming of porcine fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ezashi, Toshihiko; Matsuyama, Haruyo; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Roberts, R Michael

    2011-10-01

    During reprogramming of porcine mesenchymal cells with a four-factor (POU5F1/SOX2/KLF4/MYC) mixture of vectors, a fraction of the colonies had an atypical phenotype and arose earlier than the recognizable porcine induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell colonies. Within days after each passage, patches of cells with an epithelial phenotype formed raised domes, particularly under 20% O(2) conditions. Relative to gene expression of the iPS cells, there was up-regulation of genes for transcription factors associated with trophoblast (TR) lineage emergence, e.g., GATA2, PPARG, MSX2, DLX3, HAND1, GCM1, CDX2, ID2, ELF5, TCFAP2C, and TEAD4 and for genes required for synthesis of products more typical of differentiated TR, such as steroids (HSD17B1, CYP11A1, and STAR), pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAG6), and select cytokines (IFND, IFNG, and IL1B). Although POU5F1 was down-regulated relative to that in iPS cells, it was not silenced in the induced TR (iTR) cells over continued passage. Like iPS cells, iTR cells did not senesce on extended passage and displayed high telomerase activity. Upon xenografting into immunodeficient mice, iTR cells formed nonhemorrhagic teratomas composed largely of layers of epithelium expressing TR markers. When cultured under conditions that promoted embryoid body formation, iTR cells formed floating spheres consisting of a single epithelial sheet whose cells were tethered laterally by desmosome-like structures. In conclusion, reprogramming of porcine fibroblasts to iPS cells generates, as a by-product, colonies composed of self-renewing populations of TR cells, possibly containing TR stem cells.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a plasmid DNA from periodontopathogenic bacterium, Eikenella corrodens 1073, which affects pilus formation and colony morphology.

    PubMed

    Azakami, Hiroyuki; Akimichi, Hiromi; Usui, Masakatsu; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Kato, Akio

    2005-05-23

    Eikenella corrodens (Ec) is one of a group of periodontopathogenic bacteria. A plasmid DNA (8.7 kb) isolated from Ec 1073 was designated pMU1. Agarose gel electrophoresis and Southern analysis suggested that pMU1-like plasmids were carried in 2 Ec strains, including 1073, with higher hemagglutination (HA) activity than other strains. We determined the nucleotide sequence of this plasmid and identified 7 ORFs. A homology search revealed that 4 ORFs of pMU1 were homologous to ORFs in pJTPS1, found in a spontaneous avirulent mutant of the phytopathogenic bacterium, Ralstonia solanacearum. pJTPS1 is a putative hypovirulent plasmid, which is thought to control the virulence of R. solanacearum. We also found the ORF to be homologous to the recombinase specific to the type IV pilin gene. We introduced a part of pMU1 into the Ec 23834 strain, which has a pilus structure on its cell surface and forms corroding colonies on solid medium. No pilus structure was observed on the surface of transformants, most of which formed non-corroding colonies. When such transformants (or Ec 1073) were cured of pMU1 with acridine orange, they remained non-foliated and non-corroding. The results suggest that pMU1 might irreversibly affect pilus formation and colony morphology, and might be involved in the pathogenicity and virulence of Ec.

  9. Vibrio cholerae O1 strain TSI-4 produces the exopolysaccharide materials that determine colony morphology, stress resistance, and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Wai, S N; Mizunoe, Y; Takade, A; Kawabata, S I; Yoshida, S I

    1998-10-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 strain TSI-4 (El Tor, Ogawa) can shift to a rugose colony morphology from its normal translucent colony morphology in response to nutrient starvation. We have investigated differences between the rugose and translucent forms of V. cholerae O1 strain TSI-4. Electron microscopic examination of the rugose form of TSI-4 (TSI-4/R) revealed thick, electron-dense exopolysaccharide materials surrounding polycationic ferritin-stained cells, while the ferritin-stained material was absent around the translucent form of TSI-4 (TSI-4/T). The exopolysaccharide produced by V. cholerae TSI-4/R was found to have a composition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, D-mannose, 6-deoxy-D-galactose, and D-galactose (7.4:10.2:2.4:3.0). The expression of an amorphous exopolysaccharide promotes biofilm development under static culture conditions. Biofilm formation by the rugose strain was determined by scanning electron microscopy, and most of the surface of the film was colonized by actively dividing rod cells. The corresponding rugose and translucent strains were compared for stress resistance. By having exopolysaccharide materials, the rugose strains acquired resistance to osmotic and oxidative stress. Our data indicated that an exopolysaccharide material on the surface of the rugose strain promoted biofilm formation and resistance to the effects of two stressing agents.

  10. Pattern formation in a growing bacterial colony facilitated by extra-cellular polymeric substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Mondal, Jagannath; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Self-organization in bacterial colony is quite pervasive and diverse phenomena. Bacteria are known to self-organize into multicellular communities, commonly known as biofilms, in which microbial cells live in close association with a solid surface and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric substances(EPS). In such dense systems mechanical interactions among the structural components can be expected to significantly contribute to the morphological properties. By a simple particle-based simulation model of nonmotile rod-shaped bacterial cells and EPS secreted in a growing colony, we investigate how the combined mechanical effects can give rise naturally spatial heterogeneity observed in a biofilm. In our individual-based simulation model all the components interact mechanically via repulsive forces by pushing each other away as bacterial cells grow and divide consuming diffusing nutrient and produce EPS. We show that mechanical interactions control the collective behavior of the system, particularly, we show that the presence of non-adsorbing EPS leads spontaneous aggregation of bacterial cells by depletion attraction and generates phase separated patterns in a nonequilibrium growing colony.

  11. Colony-forming progenitor cells in the postnatal mouse liver and pancreas give rise to morphologically distinct insulin-expressing colonies in 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Feng, Tao; Chai, Jing; Ghazalli, Nadiah; Gao, Dan; Zerda, Ricardo; Li, Zhuo; Hsu, Jasper; Mahdavi, Alborz; Tirrell, David A; Riggs, Arthur D; Ku, Hsun Teresa

    2014-01-01

    In our previous studies, colony-forming progenitor cells isolated from murine embryonic stem cell-derived cultures were differentiated into morphologically distinct insulin-expressing colonies. These colonies were small and not light-reflective when observed by phase-contrast microscopy (therefore termed "Dark" colonies). A single progenitor cell capable of giving rise to a Dark colony was termed a Dark colony-forming unit (CFU-Dark). The goal of the current study was to test whether endogenous pancreas, and its developmentally related liver, harbored CFU-Dark. Here we show that dissociated single cells from liver and pancreas of one-week-old mice give rise to Dark colonies in methylcellulose-based semisolid culture media containing either Matrigel or laminin hydrogel (an artificial extracellular matrix protein). CFU-Dark comprise approximately 0.1% and 0.03% of the postnatal hepatic and pancreatic cells, respectively. Adult liver also contains CFU-Dark, but at a much lower frequency (~0.003%). Microfluidic qRT-PCR, immunostaining, and electron microscopy analyses of individually handpicked colonies reveal the expression of insulin in many, but not all, Dark colonies. Most pancreatic insulin-positive Dark colonies also express glucagon, whereas liver colonies do not. Liver CFU-Dark require Matrigel, but not laminin hydrogel, to become insulin-positive. In contrast, laminin hydrogel is sufficient to support the development of pancreatic Dark colonies that express insulin. Postnatal liver CFU-Dark display a cell surface marker CD133⁺CD49f(low)CD107b(low) phenotype, while pancreatic CFU-Dark are CD133⁻. Together, these results demonstrate that specific progenitor cells in the postnatal liver and pancreas are capable of developing into insulin-expressing colonies, but they differ in frequency, marker expression, and matrix protein requirements for growth.

  12. Involvement of allelopathy in the formation of monospecific colonies of ferns.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2015-05-01

    Some fern species often dominate plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination of the ferns remains obscure. Many plants secrete a wide range of compounds into the rhizosphere and change the chemical and physical properties of the rhizosphere soil. Through the secretion of compounds, such as allelopathic substances, plants inhibit the germination and growth of neighboring plants to compete more effectively for the resources. Ferns contain a variety of secondary metabolites and some of those compounds are released from the ferns into the rhizosphere soil, either as exudates from living ferns or by decomposition of fern residues in sufficient quantities to affect the germination and growth of neighboring plants as allelopathic substances. Therefore, allelopathic chemical interaction of the ferns with neighboring plants may play an important role in the formation of the monospecific colonies of the ferns.

  13. Phase field simulations of autocatalytic formation of alpha lamellar colonies in Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Bala; Gorti, Sarma; Babu, Suresh Sudharsanam

    2016-09-13

    Here, we present phase field simulations incorporating energy contributions due to thermodynamics, and anisotropic interfacial and strain energies, to demonstrate the nucleation and growth of multiple variants of alpha from beta in Ti-6Al-4V under isothermal conditions. The simulations focused on the effect of thermodynamic driving force and nucleation rate on the morphology of the transformed alpha assuming that the partitioning of V between beta and alpha is negligible for short isothermal holds. The results indicate that a high nucleation rate favors the formation of the basket-weave structure. However, at a lower nucleation rate the simulations show the intragranular nucleation of a colony structure by an autocatalytic nucleation mechanism adjacent to a pre-existing alpha variant. New side-plates of the same variant appear to nucleate progressively and grow to form the colony. The isothermal simulation results are used to offer a possible explanation for the transition from a largely basket weave structure to a colony structure inside narrow layer bands occurring during continuous heating and cooling conditions encountered during laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V.

  14. Phase field simulations of autocatalytic formation of alpha lamellar colonies in Ti-6Al-4V

    DOE PAGES

    Radhakrishnan, Bala; Gorti, Sarma; Babu, Suresh Sudharsanam

    2016-09-13

    Here, we present phase field simulations incorporating energy contributions due to thermodynamics, and anisotropic interfacial and strain energies, to demonstrate the nucleation and growth of multiple variants of alpha from beta in Ti-6Al-4V under isothermal conditions. The simulations focused on the effect of thermodynamic driving force and nucleation rate on the morphology of the transformed alpha assuming that the partitioning of V between beta and alpha is negligible for short isothermal holds. The results indicate that a high nucleation rate favors the formation of the basket-weave structure. However, at a lower nucleation rate the simulations show the intragranular nucleation ofmore » a colony structure by an autocatalytic nucleation mechanism adjacent to a pre-existing alpha variant. New side-plates of the same variant appear to nucleate progressively and grow to form the colony. The isothermal simulation results are used to offer a possible explanation for the transition from a largely basket weave structure to a colony structure inside narrow layer bands occurring during continuous heating and cooling conditions encountered during laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V.« less

  15. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Azevedo, Angela Rita Pontes; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating) influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. Methods Search strategy: four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME) were selected to search relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. Selection Criteria: in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The full text was obtained from publications that met the inclusion criteria. Data collection and analysis: Two reviewers independently extracted data using the keywords: conventional, self-ligating, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans, and systematic review; and independently evaluated the quality of the studies. In case of divergence, the technique of consensus was adopted. Results The search strategy resulted in 1,401 articles. The classification of scientific relevance revealed the high quality of the 6 eligible articles of which outcomes were not unanimous in reporting not only the influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over adhesion and formation of colonies of Streptococcus mutans, but also that other factors such as the quality of the bracket type, the level of individual oral hygiene, bonding and age may have greater influence. Statistical analysis was not feasible because of the heterogeneous methodological design. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no evidence for a possible influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over colony formation and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans. PMID:24713561

  16. Manufacture of Clinical-Grade Human Clonal Mesenchymal Stem Cell Products from Single Colony Forming Unit-Derived Colonies Based on the Subfractionation Culturing Method.

    PubMed

    Yi, TacGhee; Kim, Si-na; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Junghee; Cho, Yun-Kyoung; Shin, Dong-Hee; Tak, Sun-Ji; Moon, Sun-Hwa; Kang, Ji-Eun; Ji, In-Mi; Lim, Huyn-Ja; Lee, Dong-Soon; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Song, Sun U

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell products derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely used in clinical trials, and a few products have been already commercialized. However, the therapeutic effects of clinical-grade MSCs are still controversial owing to mixed results from recent clinical trials. A potential solution to overcome this hurdle may be to use clonal stem cells as the starting cell material to increase the homogeneity of the final stem cell products. We have previously developed an alternative isolation and culture protocol for establishing a population of clonal MSCs (cMSCs) from single colony forming unit (CFU)-derived colonies. In this study, we established a good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible procedure for the clinical-grade production of human bone marrow-derived cMSCs based on the subfractionation culturing method. We optimized the culture procedures to expand and obtain a clonal population of final MSC products from single CFU-derived colonies in a GMP facility. The characterization results of the final cMSC products met our preset criteria. Animal toxicity tests were performed in a good laboratory practice facility, and showed no toxicity or tumor formation in vivo. These tests include single injection toxicity, multiple injection toxicity, biodistribution analysis, and tumorigenicity tests in vivo. No chromosomal abnormalities were detected by in situ karyotyping using oligo-fluorescence in situ hydridization (oligo-FISH), providing evidence of genetic stability of the clinical-grade cMSC products. The manufacture and quality control results indicated that our GMP methodology could produce sufficient clonal population of MSC products from a small amount of bone marrow aspirate to treat a number of patients.

  17. Electrospun Scaffolds: Enhanced Lineage-Specific Differentiation Efficiency of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Engineering Colony Dimensionality Using Electrospun Scaffolds (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 12/2016).

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Maricela; Ico, Gerardo; Low, Karen; Luu, Rebeccah J; Nam, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Electrospun scaffolds provide soft nanofibrous networks pliable by human induced pluripotent stem cells. J. Nam and co-workers show on page 1408 that such compliant scaffolding leads to the formation of stem cell colonies with a distinctive three-dimensional morphology. The morphological modulation resulted in the lineage-specific differentiation, suggesting a potential means to enhance translational applications of the stem cells.

  18. Pure erythropoietic colony and burst formations in serum-free culture and their enhancement by insulin-like growth factor I.

    PubMed

    Akahane, K; Tojo, A; Urabe, A; Takaku, F

    1987-08-01

    Recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) increased human and murine erythropoietic colony formation in serum-free culture. In order to investigate the effects of purified factors such as IGF-I on hemopoietic progenitor cells, we have established a serum-free culture system which supports the clonal growth of CFU-E- and BFU-E-derived colonies. Exogenously supplied ingredients were bovine serum albumin (BSA), transferrin, lipid suspensions, 2-mercaptoethanol, and recombinant human erythropoietin (epo). Among these, BSA and cholesterol were found to be essential ingredients. The optimum concentration of BSA sufficient to grow BFU-E was 3%. Erythroid colony and burst formation of human and murine marrow cells was enhanced twofold (p less than 0.05) by a physiological concentration of recombinant human IGF-I. Potentiation was observed in a dose-dependent manner between 10(-9) and 10(-7) M. A few murine CFU-E colonies were formed in the absence of epo. These results suggest that IGF-I has a supportive effect on the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid precursor cells stimulated by epo and that its action is synergistic with that of epo.

  19. Measuring Survival of Hematopoietic Cancer Cells with the Colony-Forming Assay in Soft Agar.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-08-01

    Colony-forming assays measure the ability of cells in culture to grow and divide into groups. Any cell that has the potential to form a colony may also have the potential to cause cancer or relapse in vivo. Colony-forming assays also provide an indirect measurement of cell death because any cell that is dead or dying will not continue to proliferate. The proliferative capacity of adherent cells such as fibroblasts can be determined by growing cells at low density on culture dishes and counting the number of distinct groups that form over time. Cells that grow in suspension, such as hematopoietic cells, cannot be assayed this way because the cells move freely in the media. Assays to determine the colony-forming ability of hematopoietic cells must therefore be performed in solid matrices that restrict large-scale movement of the cells. One such matrix is soft agar. This protocol describes the use of soft agar to compare the colony-forming ability of untreated hematopoietic cells to the colony-forming ability of hematopoietic cells that have been treated with a cytotoxic agent.

  20. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-based stem cell mobilization in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Cara; Peace, David; Rich, Elizabeth; Van Besien, Koen

    2008-06-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported to exacerbate vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell disease. It has been recommended to avoid its use for stem cell mobilization in this population, yet autologous transplant is the standard of care and at times a life-saving treatment for patients with various hematologic malignancies such as relapsed aggressive lymphoma or multiple myeloma. We report 5 cases of patients with sickle cell disease and related hemoglobinopathies who underwent granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). Three of them developed manageable vaso-occlusive pain symptoms requiring parenteral narcotics alone. The 2 others had no complications. These cases demonstrate that stem cell mobilization using G-CSF, although complicated and not without risk, is feasible in patients with sickle cell syndromes.

  1. Characterization of ectopic colonies that form in widespread areas of the nervous system with neural stem cell transplants into the site of a severe spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Steward, Oswald; Sharp, Kelli G; Yee, Kelly Matsudaira; Hatch, Maya N; Bonner, Joseph F

    2014-10-15

    We reported previously the formation of ectopic colonies in widespread areas of the nervous system after transplantation of fetal neural stem cells (NSCs) into spinal cord transection sites. Here, we characterize the incidence, distribution, and cellular composition of the colonies. NSCs harvested from E14 spinal cords from rats that express GFP were treated with a growth factor cocktail and grafted into the site of a complete spinal cord transection. Two months after transplant, spinal cord and brain tissue were analyzed histologically. Ectopic colonies were found at long distances from the transplant in the central canal of the spinal cord, the surface of the brainstem and spinal cord, and in the fourth ventricle. Colonies were present in 50% of the rats, and most rats had multiple colonies. Axons extended from the colonies into the host CNS. Colonies were strongly positive for nestin, a marker for neural precursors, and contained NeuN-positive cells with processes resembling dendrites, GFAP-positive astrocytes, APC/CC1-positive oligodendrocytes, and Ki-67-positive cells, indicating ongoing proliferation. Stereological analyses revealed an estimated 21,818 cells in a colony in the fourth ventricle, of which 1005 (5%) were Ki-67 positive. Immunostaining for synaptic markers (synaptophysin and VGluT-1) revealed large numbers of synaptophysin-positive puncta within the colonies but fewer VGluT-1 puncta. Continuing expansion of NSC-derived cell masses in confined spaces in the spinal cord and brain could produce symptoms attributable to compression of nearby tissue. It remains to be determined whether other cell types with self-renewing potential can also form colonies.

  2. Quantification of nucleated cells, CD34-positive cells and CFU-GM colonies in single bone marrow samples and bone marrow harvests derived from healthy children.

    PubMed

    Schündeln, Michael M; Walde, Gabriele; Basu, Oliver; Havers, Werner; Kremens, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Little is known regarding bone marrow (BM) cellularity, CD34+ fraction, and CFU-GM colony formation in relation to age and whether healthy children require a reference range distinct from healthy adults. We therefore analyzed a series of single BM aspirates from 45 healthy children who were evaluated as potential BM donors. Thirty-three of these children subsequently donated BM. We quantified the nucleated cell count, fraction of CD34+ cells, and number of CFU-GM colonies in single aspirates and BM harvests. Single aspirates displayed a mean nucleated cell count of 31.3 × 10(6) cells/mL, a mean fraction of 1.17% CD34+ cells, and a mean colony forming potential of 66.6 CFU-GM/10(5) cells. Harvests yielded the same number of nucleated cells but increased numbers of CD34+ cells and CFU-GM compared with single aspirates. The mean nucleated cell count in BM harvests was 31.1 × 10(6) /mL with a mean fraction of 1.95% CD34+ cells and a mean of 112.4 CFU-GM colonies/10(5) cells. The concentration of nucleated cells was elevated compared with reported adult counts, while CD34+ percentage and CFU-GM counts were similar. In this series of healthy children, the fraction of CD34+ cells, CFU-GM colonies, and nucleated cells decreased with age. We did not identify gender specific differences. To our knowledge, this represents the first comprehensive study of CD34+ cell fraction, CFU-GM counts, and nucleated cell numbers in the BM of healthy children. The findings provide valuable information for practical use for BM transplantation and contribute to the understanding of hematopoiesis from birth to adulthood.

  3. Cell-Surface Phenol Soluble Modulins Regulate Staphylococcus aureus Colony Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Kizaki, Hayato; Omae, Yosuke; Tabuchi, Fumiaki; Saito, Yuki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), which are amphipathic small peptides with lytic activity against mammalian cells. We previously reported that PSMα1–4 stimulate S. aureus colony spreading, the phenomenon of S. aureus colony expansion on the surface of soft agar plates, whereas δ-toxin (Hld, PSMγ) inhibits colony-spreading activity. In this study, we revealed the underlying mechanism of the opposing effects of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin in S. aureus colony spreading. PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin are abundant on the S. aureus cell surface, and account for 18% and 8.5% of the total amount of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin, respectively, in S. aureus overnight cultures. Knockout of PSMα1–4 did not affect the amount of cell surface δ-toxin. In contrast, knockout of δ-toxin increased the amount of cell surface PSMα1–4, and decreased the amount of culture supernatant PSMα1–4. The δ-toxin inhibited PSMα3 and PSMα2 binding to the S. aureus cell surface in vitro. A double knockout strain of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin exhibited decreased colony spreading compared with the parent strain. Expression of cell surface PSMα1–4, but not culture supernatant PSMα1–4, restored the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. Expression of δ-toxin on the cell surface or in the culture supernatant did not restore the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. These findings suggest that cell surface PSMα1–4 promote S. aureus colony spreading, whereas δ-toxin suppresses colony-spreading activity by inhibiting PSMα1–4 binding to the S. aureus cell surface. PMID:27723838

  4. The effects of electrospun substrate-mediated cell colony morphology on the self-renewal of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Maricela; Wong, Lauren Y; Echeverria, Cristina; Ico, Gerardo; Low, Karen; Fujimoto, Taylor; Johnson, Jed K; Nam, Jin

    2015-05-01

    The development of xeno-free, chemically defined stem cell culture systems has been a primary focus in the field of regenerative medicine to enhance the clinical application of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). In this regard, various electrospun substrates with diverse physiochemical properties were synthesized utilizing various polymer precursors and surface treatments. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) cultured on these substrates were characterized by their gene and protein expression to determine the effects of the substrate physiochemical properties on the cells' self-renewal, i.e., proliferation and the maintenance of pluripotency. The results showed that surface chemistry significantly affected cell colony formation via governing the colony edge propagation. More importantly, when surface chemistry of the substrates was uniformly controlled by collagen conjugation, the stiffness of substrate was inversely related to the sphericity, a degree of three dimensionality in colony morphology. The differences in sphericity subsequently affected spontaneous differentiation of IPSCs during a long-term culture, implicating that the colony morphology is a deciding factor in the lineage commitment of PSCs. Overall, we show that the capability of controlling IPSC colony morphology by electrospun substrates provides a means to modulate IPSC self-renewal.

  5. Allelopathy is involved in the formation of pure colonies of the fern Gleichenia japonica.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Saito, Yoshihumi; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2013-04-15

    The fern Gleichenia japonica is one of the most widely distributed fern and occurs throughout East to South Asia. The species often dominates plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination has not yet been described. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that allelochemicals are involved in the formation of G. japonica colonies. An aqueous methanol extract of G. japonica inhibited the growth of seedlings of garden cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and timothy (Phleum pratense). Increasing extract concentration increased the inhibition. These results suggest that G. japonica contain allelopathic substances. The extract was then purified by several chromatographies with monitoring the inhibitory activity and two growth inhibitory substances causing the allelopathic effect were isolated. The chemical structures of the two substances were determined by spectral data to be a novel compound 3-O-β-allopyranosyl-13-O-β-fucopyranosyl-3β-hydroxymanool (1) and 18-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-13-epitorreferol (2). These compounds inhibited the shoot and root growth of garden cress, lettuce, alfalfa (Medicago sativa), timothy, ryegrass and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli) at concentrations greater than 0.1-1.0mM. The concentrations required for 50% growth inhibition of root and shoot growth of these test plants ranged from 0.72 to 3.49mM and 0.79 to 3.51mM for compounds 1 and 2, respectively. Concentration of compounds 1 and 2 in soil under the pure colony of G. japonica was 4.9 and 5.7mM, respectively, indicating concentrations over those required for 50% growth inhibition are potentially available under monocultural stands of these ferns. Therefore, these compounds may contribute to the allelopathic effects caused by presence of G. japonica and may thus contribute to the establishment of monocultural stands by this

  6. Hairdressing and nursing: presentation of self and professional formation in colonial Australia.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S

    2001-04-01

    When Lucy Osburn led her team of Nightingale sisters to the Sydney Infirmary in 1868 she knew that a challenge awaited her. Her goal was to transform the colony's only public hospital into a respectable, ordered environment where, according to the Sanitarian view of the universe espoused by Miss Nightingale, the patient would find the resources to heal himself (sic). The prime difficulty was not the filth and disorder of the institution, it was the calibre of the nurses. This paper offers a case study into the issues of presentation of self, institutional shaping and the professional formation of nurses in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The aesthetics of bodily grooming and the class and ethnic issues embedded in the professionalisation of nursing will be discussed. The story of nursing provides an exemplar of the disaggregation of a domain of female expertise. The translation of this expertise to a mass occupation embodied significant difficulties. Not the least of these difficulties was the problem nursing leaders encountered when attempting to instil certain personal attributes and vocational values in non pious common women. It will be argued here that it was the inculcation of a specific set of attributes that created the nurse. It is this persona of the nurse, and the challenge that it presented for colonial nurses in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, that this paper explores.

  7. CKbeta8-1 alters expression of cyclin E in colony forming units-granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM) lineage from human cord blood CD34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Noh, Eui Kyu; Ra, Jae Sun; Lee, Seong Ae; Kwon, Byoung S; Han, In Seob

    2005-12-31

    A C6 beta-chemokine, CKbeta8-1, suppressed the colony formation of CD34+ cells of human cord blood (CB). Molecular mechanisms involved in CKbeta8-1-medicated suppression of colony formation of CD34+ cells are not known. To address this issue, the level of various G1/S cell cycle regulating proteins in CKbeta8-1-treated CD34+ cells were compared with those in untreated CD34+ cells. CKbeta8-1 did not significantly alter the expression of the G1/S cycle regulation proteins (cyclin D1, D3, and E), CDK inhibitor (p27and Rb), and other cell proliferation regulation protein (p53) in CB CD34+ cells. Here we describe an in vitro system in which CB CD34+ cells were committed to a multipotent progenitor lineage of colony forming units-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) by a simple combination of recombinant human (rh) GM-CSF and rhIL-3. In this culture system, we found that cyclin E protein appeared later and disappeared faster in the CKbeta8-1-treated cells than in the control cells during CFU-GM lineage development. These findings suggested that cyclin E may play a role in suppressing the colony formation of CFU-GM by CKbeta8-1.

  8. Parametric analysis of colony morphology of non-labelled live human pluripotent stem cells for cell quality control

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Ryuji; Matsumoto, Megumi; Sasaki, Hiroto; Joto, Risako; Okada, Mai; Ikeda, Yurika; Kanie, Kei; Suga, Mika; Kinehara, Masaki; Yanagihara, Kana; Liu, Yujung; Uchio-Yamada, Kozue; Fukuda, Takayuki; Kii, Hiroaki; Uozumi, Takayuki; Honda, Hiroyuki; Kiyota, Yasujiro; Furue, Miho K

    2016-01-01

    Given the difficulties inherent in maintaining human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in a healthy state, hPSCs should be routinely characterized using several established standard criteria during expansion for research or therapeutic purposes. hPSC colony morphology is typically considered an important criterion, but it is not evaluated quantitatively. Thus, we designed an unbiased method to evaluate hPSC colony morphology. This method involves a combination of automated non-labelled live-cell imaging and the implementation of morphological colony analysis algorithms with multiple parameters. To validate the utility of the quantitative evaluation method, a parent cell line exhibiting typical embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like morphology and an aberrant hPSC subclone demonstrating unusual colony morphology were used as models. According to statistical colony classification based on morphological parameters, colonies containing readily discernible areas of differentiation constituted a major classification cluster and were distinguishable from typical ESC-like colonies; similar results were obtained via classification based on global gene expression profiles. Thus, the morphological features of hPSC colonies are closely associated with cellular characteristics. Our quantitative evaluation method provides a biological definition of ‘hPSC colony morphology’, permits the non-invasive monitoring of hPSC conditions and is particularly useful for detecting variations in hPSC heterogeneity. PMID:27667091

  9. Bionomics and formation of "Bonsai" colonies with long term rearing of Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This laboratory study reports the ability of Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, colonies to survive for at least 9-yr while restricted to a sweater box. Colonies survived by limiting queen size and worker numbers, allowing these bonsai colonies to thrive. Queen physogastr...

  10. Early Developmental Program Shapes Colony Morphology in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mamou, Gideon; Malli Mohan, Ganesh Babu; Rouvinski, Alex; Rosenberg, Alex; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2016-01-01

    Summary When grown on a solid surface, bacteria form highly organized colonies, yet little is known about the earliest stages of colony establishment. Following Bacillus subtilis colony development from a single progenitor cell, a sequence of highly ordered spatiotemporal events was revealed. Colony was initiated by the formation of leading-cell chains, deriving from the colony center and extending in multiple directions, typically in a “Y-shaped” structure. By eradicating particular cells during these early stages, we could influence the shape of the resulting colony and demonstrate that Y-arm extension defines colony size. A mutant in ymdB encoding a phosphodiesterase displayed unordered developmental patterns, indicating a role in guiding these initial events. Finally, we provide evidence that intercellular nanotubes contribute to proper colony formation. In summary, we reveal a “construction plan” for building a colony and provide the initial molecular basis for this process. PMID:26904951

  11. Glycosaminoglycan mimetic improves enrichment and cell functions of human endothelial progenitor cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Fabien; Lavergne, Mélanie; Negroni, Elisa; Ferratge, Ségolène; Carpentier, Gilles; Gilbert-Sirieix, Marie; Siñeriz, Fernando; Uzan, Georges; Albanese, Patricia

    2014-05-01

    Human circulating endothelial progenitor cells isolated from peripheral blood generate in culture cells with features of endothelial cells named late-outgrowth endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC). In adult blood, ECFC display a constant quantitative and qualitative decline during life span. Even after expansion, it is difficult to reach the cell dose required for cell therapy of vascular diseases, thus limiting the clinical use of these cells. Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are components from the extracellular matrix (ECM) that are able to interact and potentiate heparin binding growth factor (HBGF) activities. According to these relevant biological properties of GAG, we designed a GAG mimetic having the capacity to increase the yield of ECFC production from blood and to improve functionality of their endothelial outgrowth. We demonstrate that the addition of [OTR(4131)] mimetic during the isolation process of ECFC from Cord Blood induces a 3 fold increase in the number of colonies. Moreover, addition of [OTR(4131)] to cell culture media improves adhesion, proliferation, migration and self-renewal of ECFC. We provide evidence showing that GAG mimetics may have great interest for cell therapy applied to vascular regeneration therapy and represent an alternative to exogenous growth factor treatments to optimize potential therapeutic properties of ECFC.

  12. Hepatic differentiation of human embryonic stem cells as microscaled multilayered colonies leading to enhanced homogeneity and maturation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rui; Wang, Jingyu; Li, Xiaokang; Jung Jung, Da; Qi, Hao; Kee, Keh Kooi; Du, Yanan

    2014-11-12

    Directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) towards hepatocyte-like cells on planar tissue culture plates has been extensively investigated with great promise to provide alternative cell sources for drug metabolism/toxicity testing. Recently, hepatic differentiation of hESCs in 3D configuration with better mimicry of embryonic liver development represents incremental efforts to improve the differentiation efficiency and cellular maturation. However, most of the present 3D differentiation configurations involved interruptive operations during the multi-staged differentiation process, which might impose unwanted influence on cellular differentiation. Most of the current researches resulted in generation of hepatocytes with high expression of AFP, which is minimally expressed in primary hepatocytes. Here, off-the-shelf micro-stencil arrays are developed to generate adherent multilayered colonies composed of hESCs-derived cells. Uninterrupted cellular differentiation and proliferation is achieved to recapitulate the continuous and multi-stage liver development. Compared with conventional 2D format, the micro-scaled multilayered colonies with uniform and defined sizes constrained within the microwells are composed of more homogenous and mature hepatocyte-like cells with significantly lowered AFP expression and elevated hepatic functions. The multilayered colonies as novel 3D configuration for hepatic differentiation of hESCs represent a significant step toward efficient generation of functional hepatocytes for regenerative medicine and drug discovery.

  13. Tracking of replicative senescence in mesenchymal stem cells by colony-forming unit frequency.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Anne; Hemeda, Hatim; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Long-term culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) has major impact on cellular characteristics and differentiation potential. Numerous clinical trials raise high hopes in regenerative medicine and this necessitates reliable quality control of the cellular products-also with regard to replicative senescence. The maximum number of population doublings before entering the senescent state depends on the cell type, tissue of origin, culture medium as well as cell culture methods. Therefore, it would be valuable to predict the remaining proliferative potential in the course of culture expansion. Here, we describe a refined fibroblastic colony forming unit (CFU-f) assay which can be performed at any passage during culture expansion with simple cell culture techniques. This method is based on limiting dilutions in the 96-well format to determine the proportion of highly proliferative and clonogenic cells. The number of CFU-f declines rapidly during culture expansion. Especially at higher passages the CFU-f frequency correlates very well with the remaining cumulative population doublings. This approach can be used as quality measure to estimate the remaining proliferative potential of MSC in culture.

  14. The sulfated polysaccharide fucoidan rescues senescence of endothelial colony-forming cells for ischemic repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Hun; Choi, Sung Hyun; Asahara, Takayuki; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2015-06-01

    The efficacy of cell therapy using endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) in the treatment of ischemia is limited by the replicative senescence of isolated ECFCs in vitro. Such senescence must therefore be overcome in order for such cell therapies to be clinically applicable. This study aimed to investigate the potential of sulfated polysaccharide fucoidan to rescue ECFCs from cellular senescence and to improve in vivo vascular repair by ECFCs. Fucoidan-preconditioning of senescent ECFCs was shown by flow cytometry to restore the expression of functional ECFC surface markers (CD34, c-Kit, VEGFR2, and CXCR4) and stimulate the in vitro tube formation capacity of ECFCs. Fucoidan also promoted the expression of cell cycle-associated proteins (cyclin E, Cdk2, cyclin D1, and Cdk4) in senescent ECFCs, significantly reversed cellular senescence, and increased the proliferation of ECFCs via the FAK, Akt, and ERK signaling pathways. Fucoidan was found to enhance the survival, proliferation, incorporation, and endothelial differentiation of senescent ECFCs transplanted in ischemic tissues in a murine hind limb ischemia model. Moreover, ECFC-induced functional recovery and limb salvage were markedly improved by fucoidan pretreatment of ECFCs. To our knowledge, the findings of our study are the first to demonstrate that fucoidan enhances the neovasculogenic potential of ECFCs by rescuing them from replicative cellular senescence. Pretreatment of ECFCs with fucoidan may thus provide a novel strategy for the application of senescent stem cells to therapeutic neovascularization.

  15. Morphology and dynamic scaling analysis of cell colonies with linear growth fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Pasquale, M. A.; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.; González, P. H.

    2010-09-01

    The growth of linear cell colony fronts is investigated from the morphology of cell monolayer colonies, the cell size and shape distribution, the front displacement velocity, and the dynamic scaling analysis of front roughness fluctuations. At the early growth stages, colony patterns consist of rather ordered compact domains of small cells, whereas at advanced stages, an uneven distribution of cells sets in, and some large cells and cells exhibiting large filopodia are produced. Colony front profiles exhibit overhangs and behave as fractals with the dimension DF=1.25±0.05 . The colony fronts shift at 0.22±0.02μmmin-1 average constant linear velocity and their roughness (w) increases with time (t) . Dynamic scaling analysis of experimental and overhang-corrected growth profile data shows that w versus system width l log-log plots collapse to a single curve when l exceeds a certain threshold value lo , a width corresponding to the average diameter of few cells. Then, the influence of overhangs on the roughness dynamics becomes negligible, and a growth exponent β=0.33±0.02 is derived. From the structure factor analysis of overhang-corrected profiles, a global roughness exponent αs=0.50±0.05 is obtained. For l>200μm , this set of exponents fulfills the Family-Vicsek relationship. It is consistent with the predictions of the continuous Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model.

  16. Evolution and development of budding by stem cells: ascidian coloniality as a case study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Federico D; Swalla, Billie J

    2012-09-15

    The evolution of budding in metazoans is not well understood on a mechanistic level, but is an important developmental process. We examine the evolution of coloniality in ascidians, contrasting the life histories of solitary and colonial forms with a focus on the cellular and developmental basis of the evolution of budding. Tunicates are an excellent group to study colonial transitions, as all solitary larvae develop with determinant and invariant cleavage patterns, but colonial species show robust developmental flexibility during larval development. We propose that acquiring new stem cell lineages in the larvae may be a preadaptation necessary for the evolution of budding. Brooding in colonial ascidians allows increased egg size, which in turn allows greater flexibility in the specification of cells and cell numbers in late embryonic and pre-metamorphic larval stages. We review hypotheses for changes in stem cell lineages in colonial species, describe what the current data suggest about the evolution of budding, and discuss where we believe further studies will be most fruitful.

  17. Influence of Gelatin-Thrombin Matrix Tissue Sealant on Bacterial Colony Formation and Risk of Pelvic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Michael J.; Vázquez-Torres, Andres; Frank, Daniel N.; McCollister, Bruce D.; Henthorn, Patrick K.; Ir, Diana; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Guy, Michael S.; Anwar, Hiba Q.; Behbakht, Kian

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Gelatin-thrombin matrix (GTM) tissue sealant use was previously identified as an independent predictor of pelvic infection following hysterectomies. We aim to elucidate contributing factors by assessing influence of GTM on bacterial colony formation and characterizing bacteria present at the vaginal cuff. Methods. Escherichia coli was incubated in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and pelvic washings with and without GTM to assess influence on colony formation. Pelvic washings of the vaginal cuff were collected from hysterectomies occurring from June through October 2015. In vitro techniques, 16S rRNA gene qPCR, and 16S amplicon sequencing were performed with washings to characterize bacteria at the vaginal cuff. Results. Mean bacterial colony formation in PBS was greater for E. coli incubated in the presence of GTM (1.48 × 107 CFU/mL) versus without (9.95 × 105 CFU/mL) following 20-hour incubation (p = 0.001). Out of 61 pelvic washings samples, 3 were culture positive (≥5000 CFU/mL) with Enterococcus faecalis. Conclusion. In vitro experiments support a facilitating role of GTM on colony formation of E. coli in PBS. However, given the negative results of surgical site washings following adequate disinfection, the role of GTM in promoting posthysterectomy pelvic infections may be limited. Analysis of pelvic washings revealed presence of E. faecalis, but results were inconclusive. Further studies are recommended. PMID:27199534

  18. Effects of lead(II) on the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and colony formation of cultured Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Shu-lin; Dai, Wei; Xing, Ke-zhing; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of lead(II) on the production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), including bound extracellular polysaccharides (bEPS) and soluble extracellular polysaccharides (sEPS), and the colony formation of Microcystis aeruginosa, cultures of M. aeruginosa were exposed to four concentrations (5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L) of lead(II) for 10 d under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that 5.0 and 10.0 mg/L lead(II) stimulated M. aeruginosa growth throughout the experiment while 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth in the first 2 d exposure and then stimulated it. As compared to the control group, significant increases in the bEPS and sEPS production were observed in 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) treatments (P < 0.05). Large colony formations were not observed throughout the experiment. However, four tested concentrations of lead(II) could significantly promote the formation of small and middle colonies after 10 d exposure (P < 0.05), and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) had the best stimulatory effect. Lead(II) could stimulate bEPS production, which conversely promoted colony formation, suggesting that heavy metals might be contributing to the bloom-forming of M. aeruginosa in natural conditions.

  19. The Legacy of Literacy Practices in Colonial Taiwan. Japanese-Taiwanese-Chinese: Language Interaction and Identity Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heylen, Ann

    2005-01-01

    This paper offers a historical and sociolinguistic interrogation of Taiwanese to demonstrate the significance of language continuum in relation to identity formation. To this end, Taiwanese is discussed as a particular variety of language. Literacy practices in the Japanese colonial period (1895-1945) are contrasted with the precolonial and…

  20. DECREASED LEVEL OF CORD BLOOD CIRCULATING ENDOTHELIAL COLONY-FORMING CELLS IN PREECLAMPSIA

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Hernandez, Rocio; Miranda, Maria L.; Stiefel, Pablo; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Dominguez-Simeon, Maria J.; Villar, Jose; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder associated with increased cardiovascular risk for the offspring. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that participate in the formation of vasculature during development. However, the effect of preeclampsia on fetal levels of ECFCs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether cord blood ECFC abundance and function are altered in preeclampsia. We conducted a prospective cohort study that included women with normal (n=35) and preeclamptic (n=15) pregnancies. We measured ECFC levels in the umbilical cord blood of neonates and characterized ECFC phenotype, cloning-forming ability, proliferation and migration towards VEGF-A and FGF-2, in vitro formation of capillary-like structures, and in vivo vasculogenic ability in immunodeficient mice. We found that the level of cord blood ECFCs was statistically lower in preeclampsia than in control pregnancies (P = .04), a reduction that was independent of other obstetric factors. In addition, cord blood ECFCs from preeclamptic pregnancies required more time to emerge in culture than control ECFCs. However, once derived in culture, ECFC function was deemed normal and highly similar between preeclampsia and control, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. This study demonstrates that preeclampsia affects ECFC abundance in neonates. A reduced level of ECFCs during preeclamptic pregnancies may contribute to an increased risk of developing future cardiovascular events. PMID:24752434

  1. Decreased level of cord blood circulating endothelial colony-forming cells in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Hernandez, Rocio; Miranda, Maria L; Stiefel, Pablo; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Praena-Fernández, Juan M; Dominguez-Simeon, Maria J; Villar, Jose; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2014-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder associated with increased cardiovascular risk for the offspring. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that participate in the formation of vasculature during development. However, the effect of preeclampsia on fetal levels of ECFCs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether cord blood ECFC abundance and function are altered in preeclampsia. We conducted a prospective cohort study that included women with normal (n=35) and preeclamptic (n=15) pregnancies. We measured ECFC levels in the umbilical cord blood of neonates and characterized ECFC phenotype, cloning-forming ability, proliferation, and migration toward vascular endothelial growth factor-A and fibroblast growth factor-2, in vitro formation of capillary-like structures, and in vivo vasculogenic ability in immunodeficient mice. We found that the level of cord blood ECFCs was statistically lower in preeclampsia than in control pregnancies (P=0.04), a reduction that was independent of other obstetric factors. In addition, cord blood ECFCs from preeclamptic pregnancies required more time to emerge in culture than control ECFCs. However, once derived in culture, ECFC function was deemed normal and highly similar between preeclampsia and control, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. This study demonstrates that preeclampsia affects ECFC abundance in neonates. A reduced level of ECFCs during preeclamptic pregnancies may contribute to an increased risk of developing future cardiovascular events.

  2. Highly metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones stimulate bone marrow by secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3 activity.

    PubMed

    McGary, C T; Miele, M E; Welch, D R

    1995-12-01

    Circulating neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte levels rise 50-fold in 13762NF tumor-bearing rats in proportion to the tumor's metastatic potential. Purified tumor-elicited neutrophils enhance metastasis of syngeneic tumor cells when co-injected intravenously; however, circulating and phorbol ester-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils do not. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the source of tumor-elicited neutrophils in metastatic tumor-bearing rats. We examined the bone marrow in rats bearing tumors of poorly, moderately, and highly metastatic cell clones. Marrow from rats with highly metastatic tumors had increased cellularity (100%), myeloid to erythroid ratio (10:1), and megakaryocytes compared with control rats (cellularity, approximately 80%; myeloid to erythroid ratio, 5:1), with marrows from rats with moderately metastatic tumors having intermediate values. This suggested production of a colony-stimulating factor by the metastatic cells. To confirm this, bone marrow colony formation from control and tumor-bearing rats was compared. Colony number increased in proportion to the metastatic potential of the tumor. Conditioned medium from metastatic cells supported growth of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3-dependent 32Dcl3 cell line, but media from nonmetastatic or moderately metastatic cells did not. Antibodies to murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralized 32Dcl3 growth in tumor cell conditioned medium. These results suggest production of a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3-like activity by highly metastatic 13762NF clones and implicate a possible role for colony-stimulating factors in regulating the metastatic potential of mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones.

  3. Role of Vasa, Piwi, and Myc-expressing coelomic cells in gonad regeneration of the colonial tunicate, Botryllus primigenus.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kaz; Sunanaga, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    In the colonial tunicate, Botryllus primigenus Oka, gonads consist of indifferent germline precursor cells, the primordial testis and ovary, and mature gonads, of which the immature gonad components can be reconstructed de novo in vascular buds that arise from the common vascular system, although the mechanism is uncertain. In this study, we investigated how and what kinds of cells regenerated the gonad components. We found that few Vasa-positive cells in the hemocoel entered the growing vascular bud, where their number increased, and finally developed exclusively into female germ cells. Simultaneously, small cell aggregates consisting of Vasa(-) and Vasa(±) cells appeared de novo in the lateral body cavity of developing vascular buds. Double fluorescent in situ hybridization showed that these cell aggregates were both Piwi- and Myc-positive. They could form germline precursor cells and a primordial testis and ovary that strongly expressed Vasa. Myc knockdown by RNA interference conspicuously lowered Piwi expression and resulted in the loss of germline precursor cells without affecting Vasa(+) oocyte formation. Myc may contribute to gonad tissue formation via Piwi maintenance. When human recombinant BMP 4 was injected in the test vessel, coelomic Piwi(+) cells were induced to express Vasa in the blood. We conclude, therefore, that in vascular buds of B. primigenus, female germ cells can develop from homing Vasa(+) cells in the blood, and that other gonad components can arise from coelomic Vasa(-)/Piwi(+)/Myc(+) cells.

  4. The Antiproliferative and Colony-suppressive Activities of STAT3 Inhibitors in Human Cancer Cells Is Compromised Under Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jilai; Xiao, Hui; Wu, Ruohan; Cao, Yang; Li, Chenglong; Xu, Ronald; Pierson, Christopher R; Finlay, Jonathan L; Yang, Fang; Gu, Ning; Lin, Jiayuh

    2017-02-01

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been indicated as a novel cancer drug target, since it plays an important role in diverse oncogenic processes including survival, cell proliferation and migration. Emerging STAT3 inhibitors have demonstrated efficacy in cancer cells and animal tumor models. It is well known that most solid tumors are characterized by hypoxia, but it is not clear if hypoxic conditions affect activity of STAT3 inhibitors. To examine this, two STAT3 inhibitors were tested to investigate their inhibitory efficacy in cancer cells grown under hypoxic conditions compared with those without hypoxia. Cell proliferation, colony formation and western blot assays were performed to examine the differences in the cell viability, proliferation and proteins in the STAT3 pathway. Under hypoxic conditions, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration values for both STAT3 inhibitors were increased compared to normoxic conditions in human pancreatic cancer, medulloblastoma and sarcoma cell lines. In addition, the ability of both STAT3 inhibitors to inhibit colony formation in pancreatic cancer, medulloblastoma and sarcoma cell lines was reduced under hypoxic conditions when compared to cells under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, there was an increase in phosphorylated STAT3 levels in cancer cells under hypoxic conditions, suggesting this may be one of the mechanisms of resistance. In summary, the results presented here provide a novel finding of STAT3 inhibitor activity under hypoxic conditions and indicate that under such low oxygen conditions, the anticancer efficacy of STAT3 inhibitors was indeed hampered. These results highlight the need to develop new therapeutic strategies to overcome the resistance of cancer cells to STAT3 inhibitors under hypoxic conditions.

  5. A Mechanistic Collective Cell Model for Epithelial Colony Growth and Contact Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Aland, Sebastian; Hatzikirou, Haralambos; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2015-01-01

    We present a mechanistic hybrid continuum-discrete model to simulate the dynamics of epithelial cell colonies. Collective cell dynamics are modeled using continuum equations that capture plastic, viscoelastic, and elastic deformations in the clusters while providing single-cell resolution. The continuum equations can be viewed as a coarse-grained version of previously developed discrete models that treat epithelial clusters as a two-dimensional network of vertices or stochastic interacting particles and follow the framework of dynamic density functional theory appropriately modified to account for cell size and shape variability. The discrete component of the model implements cell division and thus influences cell size and shape that couple to the continuum component. The model is validated against recent in vitro studies of epithelial cell colonies using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. In good agreement with experiments, we find that mechanical interactions and constraints on the local expansion of cell size cause inhibition of cell motion and reductive cell division. This leads to successively smaller cells and a transition from exponential to quadratic growth of the colony that is associated with a constant-thickness rim of growing cells at the cluster edge, as well as the emergence of short-range ordering and solid-like behavior. A detailed analysis of the model reveals a scale invariance of the growth and provides insight into the generation of stresses and their influence on the dynamics of the colonies. Compared to previous models, our approach has several advantages: it is independent of dimension, it can be parameterized using classical elastic properties (Poisson’s ratio and Young’s modulus), and it can easily be extended to incorporate multiple cell types and general substrate geometries. PMID:26445436

  6. Identification and enrichment of colony-forming cells from the adult murine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Lepore, D.A.; Roeszler, K.; Wagner, J.; Ross, S.A.; Bauer, K.; Thomas, P.Q. , E-Mail: paul.thomas@mcri.edu.au

    2005-08-01

    Stem and progenitor cells have been identified in many adult tissues including bone marrow, the central nervous system, and skin. While there is direct evidence to indicate the activity of a progenitor cell population in the pituitary gland, this putative subpopulation has not yet been identified. Herein we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel clonogenic cell type in the adult murine pituitary, which we have termed Pituitary Colony-Forming Cells (PCFCs). PCFCs constitute 0.2% of pituitary cells, and generate heterogeneous colonies from single cells. PCFCs exhibit variable proliferative potential, and may exceed 11 population doublings in 14 days. Enrichment of PCFCs to 61.5-fold with 100% recovery can be obtained through the active uptake of the fluorescent dipeptide, {beta}-Ala-Lys-N{epsilon}-AMCA. PCFCs are mostly contained within the large, agranular subpopulation of AMCA{sup +} cells, and constitute 28% of this fraction, corresponding to 140.5-fold enrichment. Interestingly, the AMCA{sup +} population contains rare cells that are GH{sup +} or PRL{sup +}. GH{sup +} cells were also identified in PCFC single cell colonies, suggesting that PCFCs have the potential to differentiate into GH{sup +} cells. Together, these data show that the pituitary contains a rare clonogenic population which may correspond to the somatotrope/lactotrope progenitors suggested by previous experiments.

  7. Isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells from blood samples collected from the jugular and cephalic veins of healthy adult horses.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Ashley N; Seeto, Wen J; Winter, Randolph L; Zhong, Qiao; Lipke, Elizabeth A; Wooldridge, Anne A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate optimal isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from peripheral blood of horses. SAMPLE Jugular and cephalic venous blood samples from 17 adult horses. PROCEDURES Each blood sample was divided; isolation was performed with whole blood adherence (WBA) and density gradient centrifugation (DGC). Isolated cells were characterized by uptake of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL), vascular tubule formation, and expression of endothelial (CD34, CD105, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and von Willebrand factor) and hematopoietic (CD14) cell markers by use of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and flow cytometry. RESULTS Colonies with cobblestone morphology were isolated from 15 of 17 horses. Blood collected from the cephalic vein yielded colonies significantly more often (14/17 horses) than did blood collected from the jugular vein (8/17 horses). Of 14 cephalic blood samples with colonies, 13 were obtained with DGC and 8 with WBA. Of 8 jugular blood samples with colonies, 8 were obtained with DGC and 4 with WBA. Colony frequency (colonies per milliliter of blood) was significantly higher for cephalic blood samples and samples isolated with DGC. Cells formed vascular tubules, had uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL, and expressed endothelial markers by use of IFA and flow cytometry, which confirmed their identity as ECFCs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Maximum yield of ECFCs was obtained for blood samples collected from both the jugular and cephalic veins and use of DGC to isolate cells. Consistent yield of ECFCs from peripheral blood of horses will enable studies to evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic uses.

  8. LitR Is a Repressor of syp Genes and Has a Temperature-Sensitive Regulatory Effect on Biofilm Formation and Colony Morphology in Vibrio (Aliivibrio) salmonicida

    PubMed Central

    Bjelland, Ane Mohn; Ronessen, Maria; Robertsen, Espen; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio (Aliivibrio) salmonicida is the etiological agent of cold water vibriosis, a disease in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) that is kept under control due to an effective vaccine. A seawater temperature below 12°C is normally required for disease development. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density-regulated communication system that bacteria use to coordinate activities involved in colonization and pathogenesis, and we have previously shown that inactivation of the QS master regulator LitR attenuates the V. salmonicida strain LFI1238 in a fish model. We show here that strain LFI1238 and a panel of naturally occurring V. salmonicida strains are poor biofilm producers. Inactivation of litR in the LFI1238 strain enhances medium- and temperature-dependent adhesion, rugose colony morphology, and biofilm formation. Chemical treatment and electron microscopy of the biofilm identified an extracellular matrix consisting mainly of a fibrous network, proteins, and polysaccharides. Further, by microarray analysis of planktonic and biofilm cells, we identified a number of genes regulated by LitR and, among these, were homologues of the Vibrio fischeri symbiosis polysaccharide (syp) genes. The syp genes were regulated by LitR in both planktonic and biofilm lifestyle analyses. Disruption of syp genes in the V. salmonicida ΔlitR mutant alleviated adhesion, rugose colony morphology, and biofilm formation. Hence, LitR is a repressor of syp transcription that is necessary for expression of the phenotypes examined. The regulatory effect of LitR on colony morphology and biofilm formation is temperature sensitive and weak or absent at temperatures above the bacterium's upper threshold for pathogenicity. PMID:24973072

  9. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  10. Cord Blood Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells from Newborns with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher D.; Black, Claudine P.; Ryan, Sharon L.; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Abman, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) are decreased in the cord blood of preterm infants with moderate-to-severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). We quantified ECFC from infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a neonatal disorder with severe lung hypoplasia. Unlike newborns who develop BPD, those with CDH had increased and highly-proliferative cord blood ECFC. PMID:23684109

  11. In vitro culture of mesenchymal lineage cells established from the colonial tunicate Botryllus primigenus.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazuo; Takeoka, Sae; Takahashi, Show; Sunanaga, Takeshi

    2006-03-01

    Body trunks were isolated from juvenile zooids of the Japanese colonial tunicate Botryllus primigenus and cultured in vitro to establish tissue-specific cell lines. Epidermal cells from some explants spread and formed a flat sheet consisting of vacuolated cells. They then dissociated into single cells, and their growth stopped within two weeks. Continuously proliferating cells were established from four explants. After the 20th implantation, nuclear and mitochondrial DNAs were extracted from these cells. The nucleotide sequences of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and mitochondrial large ribosomal RNA (mtlrRNA) completely matched the PCNA and mtlrRNA taken from living colonies of B. primigenus; this shows that the four independently proliferating cells were indeed of the Botryllus origin. One cell line (Bp0306E10) comprised round-shaped cells with a diameter of 8-10 microm. These cells have been cultured in vitro with a doubling time of approximately 24 hours since June, 2003. The BrdU labeling index was approximately 2%. Monoclonal antibodies raised against the cultured cells recognized a 28 kDa polypeptide and stained free mesenchymal cells in vivo. G418-resistant subclonal cells could be established by introducing a tunicate retrotransposon loaded with the neomycin resistance gene into the cells by electroporation. This study is the first to succeed in producing a sustainable cell culture of Botryllus.

  12. Multipotent epithelial cells in the process of regeneration and asexual reproduction in colonial tunicates.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazuo; Sugino, Yasuo; Sunanaga, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Shigeki

    2008-01-01

    The cellular and molecular features of multipotent epithelial cells during regeneration and asexual reproduction in colonial tunicates are described in the present study. The epicardium has been regarded as the endodermal tissue-forming epithelium in the order Enterogona, because only body fragments having the epicardium exhibit the regenerative potential. Epicardial cells in Polycitor proliferus have two peculiar features; they always accompany coelomic undifferentiated cells, and they contain various kinds of organelles in the cytoplasm. During strobilation a large amount of organelles are discarded in the lumen, and then, each tissue-forming cell takes an undifferentiated configuration. Septum cells in the stolon are also multipotent in Enterogona. Free cells with a similar configuration to the septum inhabit the hemocoel. They may provide a pool for epithelial septum cells. At the distal tip of the stolon, septum cells are columnar in shape and apparently undifferentiated. They are the precursor of the stolonial bud. In Pleurogona, the atrial epithelium of endodermal origin is multipotent. In Polyandrocarpa misakiensis, it consists of pigmented squamous cells. The cells have ultrastructurally fine granules in the cytoplasm. During budding, coelomic cells with similar morphology become associated with the atrial epithelium. Then, cells of organ placodes undergo dedifferentiation, enter a cell division cycle, and commence morphogenesis. Retinoic acid-related molecules are involved in this dedifferentiation process of multipotent cells. We conclude that in colonial tunicates two systems support the flexibility of tissue remodeling during regeneration and asexual reproduction; dedifferentiation of epithelial cells and epithelial transformation of coelomic free cells.

  13. Detection of normal B-cell precursors that give rise to colonies producing both kappa and lambda light immunoglobulin chains.

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, H; Paige, C J

    1987-01-01

    The pre-B-cell cloning assay is an in vitro differentiation system in which B-lymphocyte precursors expand and generate colonies containing immunoglobulin-secreting cells. Analysis of surface characteristics, growth requirements, and kinetics suggested that these cells represent early stages of the B-cell differentiation pathway. Here we describe a modification of the assay, which allowed us to determine the differentiative potential of these clonable pre-B cells. Using a nitrocellulose protein-transfer technique, we studied immunoglobulin light chain expression in colonies derived from fetal mouse liver B-cell precursors; in particular, we explored whether the B-cell precursors are already committed to the expression of a particular light chain gene at the initiation of culture. Our results show that fetal liver-derived B-cell progenitors generate colonies in vitro that secrete kappa and lambda light chains at a ratio similar to that found in colonies derived from adult splenic B cells. Further, we document the existence of colonies that are derived from single cells and that simultaneously secrete both types of light chains. This indicates that the progenitors of (kappa + lambda)-producing colonies are light chain-uncommitted at the initiation of culture. These cells are able to rearrange their light chain genes in vitro and differentiate along the B-cell pathway to form colonies secreting both kappa and lambda chains. PMID:3110779

  14. Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels Support Cord-Like Structures from Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Derek; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Bose, Vivek; Luong, Eli

    2011-01-01

    The generation of functional vascular networks has the potential to improve treatment for vascular diseases and to facilitate successful organ transplantation. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have robust proliferative potential and can form vascular networks in vivo. ECFCs are recruited from a bone marrow niche to the site of vascularization, where cues from the extracellular matrix instigate vascular morphogenesis. Although this process has been elucidated using natural matrix, little is known about vascular morphogenesis by ECFCs in synthetic matrix, a xeno-free scaffold that can provide a more controllable and clinically relevant alternative for regenerative medicine. We sought to study hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels as three-dimensional scaffolds for capillary-like structure formation from ECFCs, and to determine the crucial parameters needed to design such synthetic scaffolds. We found that ECFCs express HA-specific receptors and that vascular endothelial growth factor stimulates hyaluronidase expression in ECFCs. Using a well-defined and controllable three-dimensional HA culture system, we were able to decouple the effect of matrix viscoelasticity from changes in adhesion peptide density. We determined that decreasing matrix viscoelasticity, which corresponds to a loose ultrastructure, significantly increases ECFC vascular tube length and area, and that the effect of local delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor within the hydrogel depends on the makeup of the synthetic environment. Collectively, these results set forth initial design criteria that need to be considered in developing vascularized tissue constructs. PMID:21247340

  15. Large-scale time-lapse microscopy of Oct4 expression in human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Halter, Michael; Amelot, Julien; Bajcsy, Peter; Chalfoun, Joe; Vandecreme, Antoine; Mallon, Barbara S; Park, Kye-Yoon; Sista, Subhash; Elliott, John T; Plant, Anne L

    2016-07-01

    Identification and quantification of the characteristics of stem cell preparations is critical for understanding stem cell biology and for the development and manufacturing of stem cell based therapies. We have developed image analysis and visualization software that allows effective use of time-lapse microscopy to provide spatial and dynamic information from large numbers of human embryonic stem cell colonies. To achieve statistically relevant sampling, we examined >680 colonies from 3 different preparations of cells over 5days each, generating a total experimental dataset of 0.9 terabyte (TB). The 0.5 Giga-pixel images at each time point were represented by multi-resolution pyramids and visualized using the Deep Zoom Javascript library extended to support viewing Giga-pixel images over time and extracting data on individual colonies. We present a methodology that enables quantification of variations in nominally-identical preparations and between colonies, correlation of colony characteristics with Oct4 expression, and identification of rare events.

  16. Endothelial cell colony forming units derived from malignant breast diseases are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chen-Pin; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Pan, Huay-Ben; Yen, Yi-Chen; Tseng, Hui-Hwa; Hung, Yu-Ting; Wang, Ssu-Han; Chen, Yu-Lin; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2016-11-24

    Mobilisation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) from the bone marrow is a crucial step in the formation of de novo blood vessels, and levels of peripheral blood EPCs have been shown to be elevated in certain malignant states. Using flow cytometry and a Hill-based colony forming unit (CFU) assay, the present study indicated that higher levels of CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) double-positive EPCs, as well as increased formation of endothelial cell colony-forming units (EC-CFUs) are associated with benign and malignant breast diseases, providing possible indicators for breast disease detection. Gene expression profiles revealed a genetic difference between CD34(+) VEGFR2(+) EPCs and EC-CFUs. Decreased expression of tumour necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) signalling-related genes and inhibition of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-induced signalling were demonstrated in EC-CFUs derived from patients with malignant breast disease in comparison with those from healthy controls. Interestingly, our data provided the first evidence that EC-CFUs derived from patients with malignant breast disease were resistant to TNF-α-induced apoptosis, indicating a plausible target for future therapeutic interventions.

  17. Endothelial cell colony forming units derived from malignant breast diseases are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chen-Pin; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Pan, Huay-Ben; Yen, Yi-Chen; Tseng, Hui-Hwa; Hung, Yu-Ting; Wang, Ssu-Han; Chen, Yu-Lin; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Mobilisation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) from the bone marrow is a crucial step in the formation of de novo blood vessels, and levels of peripheral blood EPCs have been shown to be elevated in certain malignant states. Using flow cytometry and a Hill-based colony forming unit (CFU) assay, the present study indicated that higher levels of CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) double-positive EPCs, as well as increased formation of endothelial cell colony-forming units (EC-CFUs) are associated with benign and malignant breast diseases, providing possible indicators for breast disease detection. Gene expression profiles revealed a genetic difference between CD34+ VEGFR2+ EPCs and EC-CFUs. Decreased expression of tumour necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) signalling-related genes and inhibition of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-induced signalling were demonstrated in EC-CFUs derived from patients with malignant breast disease in comparison with those from healthy controls. Interestingly, our data provided the first evidence that EC-CFUs derived from patients with malignant breast disease were resistant to TNF-α-induced apoptosis, indicating a plausible target for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:27881867

  18. Maternal Body-Mass Index and Cord Blood Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Miranda, Maria L.; Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J.; Stiefel, Pablo; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Bernal-Bermejo, Jose; Jimenez-Jimenez, Luis M.; Villar, Jose; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that are particularly abundant in umbilical cord blood. We sought to determine whether ECFC abundance in cord blood is associated with maternal body-mass index (BMI) in non-pathological pregnancies. Study design We measured the level of ECFCs in the cord blood of neonates (n=27) born from non-obese healthy mothers with non-pathological pregnancies and examined whether ECFC abundance correlated with maternal BMI. We also examined the effect of maternal BMI on ECFC phenotype and function using angiogenic and vasculogenic assays. Results We observed variation in ECFC abundance among subjects and found a positive correlation between pre-pregnancy maternal BMI and ECFC content (r=0.51, P=0.007), which was independent of other obstetric factors. Despite this variation, ECFC phenotype and functionality were deemed normal and highly similar between subjects with maternal BMI <25 kg/m2 and BMI between 25–30 kg/m2, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. Conclusions This study underlines the need to consider maternal BMI as a potential confounding factor for cord blood levels of ECFCs in future comparative studies between healthy and pathological pregnancies. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of progenitor cells that circulate in peripheral blood and can give rise to endothelial cells (1,2), contributing to the formation of new vasculature and the maintenance of vascular integrity (3–5). The mechanisms that regulate the abundance of these cells in vivo remain poorly understood. ECFCs are rare in adult peripheral blood (1,2,10). In contrast, there is an elevated number of these cells in fetal blood during the third trimester of pregnancy (11–13). Emerging evidence indicates that deleterious conditions during fetal life can impair ECFC content and function. For instance, offspring of diabetic mothers have been shown to have

  19. Assessing the potential of colony morphology for dissecting the CFU-F population from human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Gothard, D; Dawson, J I; Oreffo, R O C

    2013-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide an ideal cell source for bone tissue engineering strategies. However, bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) populations that contain MSCs are highly heterogeneous expressing a wide variety of proliferative and differentiation potentials. Current MSC isolation methods employing magnetic-activated and fluorescent-activated cell sorting can be expensive and time consuming and, in the absence of specific MSC markers, fail to generate homogeneous populations. We have investigated the potential of various colony morphology descriptors to provide correlations with cell growth potential. Density-independent colony forming unit-fibroblastic (CFU-F) capacity is a MSC prerequisite and resultant colonies display an array of shapes and sizes that might be representative of cell function. Parent colonies were initially categorised according to their diameter and cell density and grouped before passage for the subsequent assessment of progeny colonies. Whereas significant morphological differences between distinct parent populations indicated a correlation with immunophenotype, enhanced CFU-F capacity was not observed when individual colonies were isolated according to these morphological parameters. Colony circularity, an alternative morphological measure, displayed a strong correlation with subsequent cell growth potential. The current study indicates the potential of morphological descriptors for predicting cell growth rate and suggests new directions for research into dissection of human BMSC CFU-F populations.

  20. Characterization of colony-forming cells in adult human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ozbey, Ozlem; Sahin, Zeliha; Acar, Nuray; Ozcelik, Filiz Tepekoy; Ozenci, Alpay Merter; Koksoy, Sadi; Ustunel, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that adult human articular cartilage contains stem-like cells within the native structure. In this study, we aimed to determine the localization of putative stem cell markers such as CD90, STRO-1, OCT-3/4, CD105 and CD166 in adult human articular cartilage tissue sections and demonstrate the expression of these markers within the expanded surface zone colony-forming (CF) cells and evaluate their differentiation potential. Biopsy samples were either fixed immediately for immunohistochemical analyses or processed for in vitro cell culture. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometry analyses were performed by using CD90, STRO-1, OCT-3/4, CD105 and CD166 antibodies. Isolated colony-forming (CF) cells were further stimulated, by using the appropriate growth factors in their pellet culture, to obtain cartilage, bone and adipose lineages. We observed that the expression of the stem cell markers were in various zones of the human adult cartilage. Flow cytometry results showed that in CF cells the expression of CD90 and CD166 was high, while OCT-3/4 was low. We also determined that CF cells could be stimulated towards cartilage, bone and adipose lineages. The results of this research support the idea that the resident stem-like cells in adult human articular cartilage express these putative stem cell markers, but further experimental investigations are needed to determine the precise localization of these cells.

  1. In Vivo Growing of New Cell Colonies in a Portion of Bone Marrow: Potential Use for Indirect Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manzanedo, Ana; Rodriguez, Fidel; Obeso, Jose A.; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The ability of bone marrow cells (BMCs) to migrate to different organs can be used for indirect cell therapy, a procedure based on the engraftment of therapeutic cells in a different place from where they will finally move to and perform their action and which could be particularly useful for chronic illness where a persistent and long-lasting therapeutic action is required. Thus, establishing a stable colony of engineered BMCs is a requisite for the chronic provision of damaged tissues with engineered cells. Reported here is a procedure for creating such a cell colony in a portion of the bone marrow (BM). The study was performed in C57BL/6j mice and consisted of developing a focal niche in a portion of the bone marrow with focal irradiation so that it could be selectively colonized by BM cells (C57BL/6-FG-VC-GFP mice) injected in the blood stream. Both the arrival of cells coming from the nonirradiated BM (week 1 after irradiation) and the proliferation of cells in the irradiated BM (week 2) prevented the homing of injected cells in the BM niche. However, when BMCs were injected in a time window about 48 h after irradiation they migrated to the BM niche where they established a cell colony able to: 1) survive for a long period of time [the percentage of injected cells increased in the BM from day 30 postinjection (15%) to day 110 postinjection 28%)]; 2) express cell differentiation markers (90% of them were lineage committed 4 weeks after engraftment); and 3) colonize to the blood stream (with 5% and 9% of all blood cells being computed 1 and 3 months after engraftment, respectively). The intravenous injection of BMCs in combination with a previous transitory focal myeloablation is a safe and easy method for creating the long-lasting colony of modified BMCs needed for treating chronic and progressive illness with indirect cell therapy. PMID:26966633

  2. A mathematical description of a growing cell colony based on the mechanical bidomain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auddya, Debabrata; Roth, Bradley J.

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical bidomain model is used to describe a colony of cells growing on a substrate. Analytical expressions are derived for the intracellular and extracellular displacements. Mechanotransduction events are driven by the difference between the displacements in the two spaces, corresponding to the force acting on integrins. The equation for the displacement consists of two terms: one proportional to the radius that is the same in the intracellular and extracellular spaces (the monodomain term) and one that is proportional to a modified Bessel function that is responsible for mechanotransduction (the bidomain term). The model predicts that mechanotransduction occurs within a few length constants of the colony’s edge, and an expression for the length constant contains the intracellular and extracellular shear moduli and the spring constant of the integrins coupling the two spaces. The model predictions are qualitatively consistent with experiments on human embryonic stem cell colonies, in which differentiation is localized near the edge.

  3. Reduced mitotic activity at the periphery of human embryonic stem cell colonies cultured in vitro with mitotically-inactivated murine embryonic fibroblast feeder cells.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Cao, Tong; Liu, Hua; Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil

    2005-01-01

    This study attempted to investigate whether different levels of mitotic activity exist within different physical regions of a human embryonic stem (hES) cell colony. Incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) within newly-synthesized DNA, followed by immunocytochemical staining was used as a means of detecting mitotically-active cells within hES colonies. The results showed rather surprisingly that the highest levels of mitotic activity are primarily concentrated within the central regions of hES colonies, whereas the peripheral regions exhibited reduced levels of cellular proliferation. Two hypothetical mechanisms are therefore proposed for hES colony growth and expansion. Firstly, it is envisaged that the less mitotically-active hES cells at the periphery of the colony are continually migrating outwards, thereby providing space for newly-divided daughter cells within the more mitotically-active central region of the hES colony. Secondly, it is proposed that the newly-divided hES cells within the central region of the colony somehow migrate to the outer periphery. This could possibly explain why the periphery of hES colonies are less mitotically-active, since there would obviously be an extended time-lag before newly-divided daughter cells are ready again for the next cell division. Further investigations need to be carried out to characterize the atypical mechanisms by which hES colonies grow and expand in size.

  4. Recovery of hematopoietic colony-forming cells in irradiated mice pretreated with interleukin 1 (IL-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, G.N.; Neta, R.; Vigneulle, R.M.; Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Data in this report determined the effect of a single injection of recombinant interleukin 1 a (rIL-1) prior to irradiation of B6D2F1 mice on the recovery of colony-forming cells (CFC) at early and late times after sublethal and lethal doses of radiation, Injection of rIL-1 promoted an earlier recovery of mature cells in the blood and CFC in the bone marrow and spleen. For example, 8 days after 6.5-Gy irradiation, the number of CFU-E (colony-forming units erythroid), BFU-E (burst-forming units-erythroid), and GMCFC (granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells) per femur was approximately 1.5-fold higher in rIL-injected mice than in saline-injected mice. Also, 5, 9, and 12 days after irradiation, the number of both day 8 and day 12 CFU-S (colony-forming units-spleen) was almost twofold greater in bone marrow from rIL1-injected mice. The earlier recovery of CFU-S in rIL-1 injected mice was not associated with an increase in the number of CFU-S that survived immediately after irradiation. Also, 7 months after irradiation, the number of CFU-S per femur of both saline-and rIL-1 injected mice was still < 50% of normal values. Data in this report demonstrate that a single injection of rIL-1 prior to irradiation accelerates early hematopoietic recovery in irradiation mice, but does not prevent expression of radiation-induced front-end damage damage to hematopoietic tissues.

  5. Machine Learning Approach to Automated Quality Identification of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Images

    PubMed Central

    Haponen, Markus; Rasku, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this research is on automated identification of the quality of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colony images. iPS cell technology is a contemporary method by which the patient's cells are reprogrammed back to stem cells and are differentiated to any cell type wanted. iPS cell technology will be used in future to patient specific drug screening, disease modeling, and tissue repairing, for instance. However, there are technical challenges before iPS cell technology can be used in practice and one of them is quality control of growing iPSC colonies which is currently done manually but is unfeasible solution in large-scale cultures. The monitoring problem returns to image analysis and classification problem. In this paper, we tackle this problem using machine learning methods such as multiclass Support Vector Machines and several baseline methods together with Scaled Invariant Feature Transformation based features. We perform over 80 test arrangements and do a thorough parameter value search. The best accuracy (62.4%) for classification was obtained by using a k-NN classifier showing improved accuracy compared to earlier studies. PMID:27493680

  6. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  7. Passaging and colony expansion of human pluripotent stem cells by enzyme-free dissociation in chemically defined culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    Beers, Jeanette; Gulbranson, Daniel R.; George, Nicole; Siniscalchi, Lauren I.; Jones, Jeffrey; Thomson, James A.; Chen, Guokai

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes an EDTA-based passaging procedure to be used with chemically defined E8 medium that serves as a tool for basic and translational research into human pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this protocol, passaging one six-well or 10 cm plate of cells takes about 6–7 min. This enzyme-free protocol achieves maximum cell survival without enzyme neutralization, centrifugation, or drug treatment. It also allows for higher throughput, requires minimal material and limits contamination. Here we describe how to produce a consistent E8 medium for routine maintenance and reprogramming and how to incorporate the EDTA-based passaging procedure into human induced PSC (iPSC) derivation, colony expansion, cryopreservation and teratoma formation. This protocol has been successful in routine cell expansion, and efficient for expanding large-volume cultures or a large number of cells with preferential dissociation of PSCs. Effective for all culture stages, this procedure provides a consistent and universal approach to passaging human pluripotent stem cells in E8 medium. PMID:23099485

  8. [Knockdown of Larp4b in Lin(-) cells does not affect the colony forming ability of mouse hematopoietic cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Pang, Ya-Kun; Cheng, Hui; Dong, Fang; Liang, Hao-Yue; Zhang, Ying-Chi; Wang, Xiao-Min; Xu, Jing; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping

    2013-06-01

    Larp4b is a member of the LARP family, which can interact with RNA and generally stimulate the translation of mRNA. Abnormal expression of Larp4b can be found in leukemia patients in our previous study. This study was purposed to detect the relative expression of Larp4b mRNA in different subpopulations of mouse hematopoietic cells, to construct lentivirus vector containing shLarp4b targeting mouse gene Larp4b and to explore its effects on mouse Lin(-) cells infected with shLarp4b by lentivirus. SF-LV-shLarP4b-EGFP and control vectors were constructed and two-plasmid lentivirus packing system was used to transfect 293T cells. After 48 h and 72 h, lentivirus SF-LV-shLarp4b-EGFP was harvested and was used to infect Lin(-) cells. After 48 h, EGFP(+) cells was sorted by flow cytometry (FCM). Meanwhile, semi-quantitative real time-PCR, AnnexinV-PE/7-AAD staining, PI staining and colony forming cell assay (CFC) were performed to determine the expression of Larp4b and its effect on the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The results showed that Larp4b was highly expressed in myeloid cells. SF-LV-shLarp4b-EGFP was successfully constructed according to the restriction endonuclease digestion assay. RT-PCR confirmed that Larp4b was efficiently knockdown in mouse Lin(-) cells. The low expression of Larp4b did not affect the colony forming number, the apoptosis and cell cycle of Lin(-) cells. It is concluded that knockdown of Larp4b in mouse Lin(-) cells do not contribute to the colony forming ability and the growth of Lin(-) cells in vitro. This useful knockdown system will be used to study in vivo Larp4b in future.

  9. Subculture of Germ Cell-Derived Colonies with GATA4-Positive Feeder Cells from Neonatal Pig Testes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Kim, Jin Hoi; Park, Chan Kyu; Do, Jeong Tae; Kim, Jae Hwan; Choi, Young Suk; Kim, Nam Hyung; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Enrichment of spermatogonial stem cells is important for studying their self-renewal and differentiation. Although germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs) have been successfully cultured from neonatal pig testicular cells under 31°C conditions, the short period of in vitro maintenance (<2 months) limited their application to further investigations. To develop a culture method that allows for in vitro maintenance of GDCs for long periods, we subcultured the GDCs with freshly prepared somatic cells from neonatal pig testes as feeder cells. The subcultured GDCs were maintained up to passage 13 with the fresh feeder cells (FFCs) and then frozen. Eight months later, the frozen GDCs could again form the colonies on FFCs as shown in passages 1 to 13. Immunocytochemistry data revealed that the FFCs expressed GATA-binding protein 4 (GATA4), which is also detected in the cells of neonatal testes and total testicular cells, and that the expression of GATA4 was decreased in used old feeder cells. The subcultured GDCs in each passage had germ and stem cell characteristics, and flow cytometric analyses revealed that ~60% of these cells were GFRα-1 positive. In conclusion, neonatal pig testes-derived GDCs can be maintained for long periods with GATA4-expressing testicular somatic cells. PMID:26880974

  10. Error-Correcting Output Codes in Classification of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Images

    PubMed Central

    Haponen, Markus; Rasku, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how well the human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) colony images can be classified using error-correcting output codes (ECOC). Our image dataset includes hiPSC colony images from three classes (bad, semigood, and good) which makes our classification task a multiclass problem. ECOC is a general framework to model multiclass classification problems. We focus on four different coding designs of ECOC and apply to each one of them k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) searching, naïve Bayes, classification tree, and discriminant analysis variants classifiers. We use Scaled Invariant Feature Transformation (SIFT) based features in classification. The best accuracy (62.4%) is obtained with ternary complete ECOC coding design and k-NN classifier (standardized Euclidean distance measure and inverse weighting). The best result is comparable with our earlier research. The quality identification of hiPSC colony images is an essential problem to be solved before hiPSCs can be used in practice in large-scale. ECOC methods examined are promising techniques for solving this challenging problem. PMID:27847810

  11. Relevance of density, size and DNA content of tumour cells to the lung colony assay.

    PubMed Central

    Grdina, D. J.; Hittelman, W. N.; White, R. A.; Meistrich, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    Mouse fibrosarcoma tumours were dissociated and divided into subpopulations of viable cells by centrifugation in linear density gradients of Renografin. Two of these subpopulations, designated Band 2 and Band 4, differed in their clonogenic ability in lung colony assay. The less dense Band 2 cells were significantly more clonogenic than the Band 4 cells (2.9 percent vs 1.4 percent respectively). Each band was further separated on the basis of cell size by centrifugal elutriation. Each size class of cells comprising Band 2 showed higher clonogenic ability than the corresponding size class in Band 4. Thus cell size differences were not responsible for the clonogenic differences between these bands. To determine whether cell-cycle distribution of the tumour cells was responsible for differences in cloning efficiency, flow microfluorometric and premature chromosome condensation methods were utilized. The unseparated and Band 4 populations showed a higher percentage of cells in S and G2 than did the Band 2 populations, but many of the S and G2 tumour cells showed extensive chromosome damage. From this study we conclude that the increased clonogenic ability of the lighter tumour cells is not due to differences in cell size or cell-cycle parameters. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:563726

  12. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein.

    PubMed

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98-99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample.

  13. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H.

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821T, an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98–99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample. PMID:25843055

  14. Acute leukemia after radiotherapy in a patient with Turcot's syndrome. Impaired colony formation in skin fibroblast cultures after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.P.; Little, J.B.; Bech-Hansen, N.T.; Paterson, M.C.; Arlett, C.; Garnick, M.B.; Mayer, R.J.

    1983-02-01

    Colonic polyposis and carcinoma developed in a woman with Turcot's syndrome at the age of 31 years; astrocytoma developed when she was 37. Her brother and sister had died of astrocytoma at the ages of 18 and 33 years, respectively. Progressive neutropenia developed in the patient three months after radiotherapy for her brain tumor and acute myelomonocytic leukemia 19 months after treatment. Three laboratories independently evaluated cultures of her skin fibroblasts for in vitro sensitivity to cell killing (loss of colony-forming ability) by x-rays. Survival assays consistently revealed slight but significant radiosensitivity in an early-passage (six to 10 doublings) fibroblast subculture. A later subculture (21 to 29 doublings) showed no abnormality, a possible effect of selective in vitro loss of radiosensitive cells.

  15. Differentiation-Independent Fluctuation of Pluripotency-Related Transcription Factors and Other Epigenetic Markers in Embryonic Stem Cell Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Šustáčková, Gabriela; Legartová, Soňa; Kozubek, Stanislav; Stixová, Lenka; Pacherník, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) maintain their pluripotency through high expression of pluripotency-related genes. Here, we show that differing levels of Oct4, Nanog, and c-myc proteins among the individual cells of mouse ESC (mESC) colonies and fluctuations in these levels do not disturb mESC pluripotency. Cells with strong expression of Oct4 had low levels of Nanog and c-myc proteins and vice versa. In addition, cells with high levels of Nanog tended to occupy interior regions of mESC colonies. In contrast, peripherally positioned cells within colonies had dense H3K27-trimethylation, especially at the nuclear periphery. We also observed distinct levels of endogenous and exogenous Oct4 in particular cell cycle phases. The highest levels of Oct4 occurred in G2 phase, which correlated with the pKi-67 nuclear pattern. Moreover, the Oct4 protein resided on mitotic chromosomes. We suggest that there must be an endogenous mechanism that prevents the induction of spontaneous differentiation, despite fluctuations in protein levels within an mESC colony. Based on the results presented here, it is likely that cells within a colony support each other in the maintenance of pluripotency. PMID:21609209

  16. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  17. An integrated systems biology approach to understanding the rules of keratinocyte colony formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; McMinn, Phil; Coakley, Simon; Holcombe, Mike; Smallwood, Rod; Macneil, Sheila

    2007-12-22

    Closely coupled in vitro and in virtuo models have been used to explore the self-organization of normal human keratinocytes (NHK). Although it can be observed experimentally, we lack the tools to explore many biological rules that govern NHK self-organization. An agent-based computational model was developed, based on rules derived from literature, which predicts the dynamic multicellular morphogenesis of NHK and of a keratinocyte cell line (HaCat cells) under varying extracellular Ca++ concentrations. The model enables in virtuo exploration of the relative importance of biological rules and was used to test hypotheses in virtuo which were subsequently examined in vitro. Results indicated that cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions were critically important to NHK self-organization. In contrast, cell cycle length and the number of divisions that transit-amplifying cells could undergo proved non-critical to the final organization. Two further hypotheses, to explain the growth behaviour of HaCat cells, were explored in virtuo-an inability to differentiate and a differing sensitivity to extracellular calcium. In vitro experimentation provided some support for both hypotheses. For NHKs, the prediction was made that the position of stem cells would influence the pattern of cell migration post-wounding. This was then confirmed experimentally using a scratch wound model.

  18. Adherent cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture system are qualified dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Gong-Bo; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2010-01-01

    A widely-used method for generating dendritic cell (DC) is to culture bone marrow cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-containing medium for 6-10 days. Usually, non-adherent cells are used as qualified dendritic cells while the adherent ones are discarded as "non-dendritic cells" or macrophages. In this study, we show that the adherent cells are nearly identical to the non-adherent cells in both dendritic cell surface markers expression and main dendritic cell-related functions, hence to prove that these "junk cells" are actually qualified dendritic cells.

  19. Exercise-Induced Norepinephrine Decreases Circulating Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Colony-Forming Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Mangge, Harald; Pekovits, Karin; Fuchs, Robert; Allard, Nathalie; Schinagl, Lukas; Hofmann, Peter; Dohr, Gottfried; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Domej, Wolfgang; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    A recent study showed that ergometry increased circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (CPC) numbers, but reduced hematopoietic colony forming capacity/functionality under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia. Herein we investigated whether an exercise-induced elevated plasma free/bound norepinephrine (NE) concentration could be responsible for directly influencing CPC functionality. Venous blood was taken from ten healthy male subjects (25.3+/−4.4 yrs) before and 4 times after ergometry under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2<0.15). The circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell numbers were correlated with free/bound NE, free/bound epinephrine (EPI), cortisol (Co) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Additionally, the influence of exercise-induced NE and blood lactate (La) on CPC functionality was analyzed in a randomly selected group of subjects (n = 6) in vitro under normoxia by secondary colony-forming unit granulocyte macrophage assays. Concentrations of free NE, EPI, Co and IL-6 were significantly increased post-exercise under normoxia/hypoxia. Ergometry-induced free NE concentrations found in vivo showed a significant impairment of CPC functionality in vitro under normoxia. Thus, ergometry-induced free NE was thought to trigger CPC mobilization 10 minutes post-exercise, but as previously shown impairs CPC proliferative capacity/functionality at the same time. The obtained results suggest that an ergometry-induced free NE concentration has a direct negative effect on CPC functionality. Cortisol may further influence CPC dynamics and functionality. PMID:25180783

  20. Prolonged Growth of a Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Strain Selects for a Stable Small-Colony-Variant Cell Type

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Long M. G.; Hoffmann, Peter; Turnidge, John D.; Zilm, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    An undetermined feature of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is its persistence and then relapse of disease. This has been explained by its switch to alternative lifestyles, mainly as biofilm or small-colony variants (SCVs). Studying the native characteristics of SCVs has been problematic due to their reversion to the parental lifestyle. We have observed that for a number of S. aureus strains as they switch to an SCV lifestyle, there is the formation of an extracellular matrix. We focused our analysis on one strain, WCH-SK2. For bacterial survival in the host, the combination of low nutrients and the prolonged time frame forms a stress that selects for a specific cell type from the population. In this context, we used steady-state growth conditions with low nutrients and a controlled low growth rate for a prolonged time and with methylglyoxal. These conditions induced S. aureus WCH-SK2 into a stable SCV cell type; the cells did not revert after subculturing. Analysis revealed these cells possessed a metabolic and surface profile that was different from those of previously described SCVs or biofilm cells. The extracellular matrix was protein and extracellular DNA but not polysaccharide. The SCV cells induced expression of certain surface proteins (such as Ebh) and synthesis of lantibiotics while downregulating factors that stimulate the immune response (leucocidin, capsule, and carotenoid). Our data reveal cell heterogeneity within an S. aureus population and under conditions that resemble long-term survival in the host have identified a previously unnoticed S. aureus cell type with a distinctive metabolic and molecular profile. PMID:25385795

  1. Effect of leukaemic sera & cell-extracts on splenic colony counts (CFU-S).

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Rusia, U; Agarwal, S; Sood, S K

    1991-08-01

    Sera and leukaemic cell extracts from patients of acute leukaemia were evaluated for their effect on the repopulating ability of the pluripotent stem cells and erythroid differentiation by an in vivo splenic colony count (CFU-S) technique. Normal donor marrow cells of mice were treated with sera and cell extracts from patients of acute leukaemic and healthy controls and injected in the recipient mice. The CFU-S performed on the seventh day to assess repopulating ability of the stem cell showed consistently lower CFU-S counts in the test groups, with leukaemic sera (P less than 0.01) as well as leukaemic cell-extracts (P less than 0.001). The erythroid differentiation assessed by 59Fe uptake by the spleens also showed significantly reduced counts in the two test groups (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.001 respectively). The results indicate that both leukaemic sera and cell-extracts exert a significant suppressive effect on the repopulating ability of the stem cells and on their erythroid differentiation.

  2. Impaired colony-forming capacity of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jeong, Hye-Cheol; Oh, Doyeon; Hwang, Seong-Gyu; Cho, Yong-Wook; Lee, Seon-Ju; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is classified into emphysema and chronic bronchitis, which are thought to result from different pathophysiological pathways. Smoking-induced lung parenchymal destruction and inadequate repair are involved in the pathogenesis of emphysema. In addition, decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and increased endothelial cell apoptosis in the lung may participate in emphysema pathogenesis. As stem cells, circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may play a key role in the maintenance of vascular integrity by replacing and repairing the damaged endothelial cells in the tissues. To determine whether the lack of appropriate repair by circulating EPCs in cases of smoking-induced endothelial cell injury participates in emphysema pathogenesis, we determined the association between the colony-forming or migratory capacity of circulating EPCs and the presence of emphysema in 51 patients with COPD. The patients were divided into emphysema (n = 23) and non-emphysema groups (n = 28) based on high-resolution computed tomography. Twenty-two smokers with normal lung function and 14 normal non-smokers served as controls. Circulating EPCs isolated from patients with emphysema showed significantly lower colony-forming units (CFUs) than those from patients with non-emphysema group, smokers with normal lung function, and normal non-smokers. EPCs from patients with emphysema showed significantly lower migratory capacity than those from normal non-smoking controls (p < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, the EPC-CFU was independently associated with emphysema (OR 0.944, 95% CI = 0.903-0.987, p = 0.011). Thus, impaired functions of circulating EPCs may contribute to the development of emphysema.

  3. Photo catalogue for the classification of cell colonies in the Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay at pH 7.0.

    PubMed

    Maire, Marie-Aline; Rast, Claudine; Vasseur, Paule

    2012-04-11

    This catalogue is a display of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell colony photos representative of the cell transformation assay (CTA) carried out at pH 7.0. It is intended as a visual aid for the identification and the scoring of cell colonies in the conduct of the assay. A proper training from experienced personnel together with the protocol reported in this issue and the present photo catalogue will support method transfer and consistency in the assay results.

  4. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene expression in vascular cells and in experimental and human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, S. K.; Underwood, R.; Hayes, L.; Sherman, M. L.; Kufe, D. W.; Libby, P.

    1992-01-01

    The infiltration of monocytes into the vascular wall and their transformation into lipid-laden foam cells characterizes early atherogenesis. Macrophages are also present in more advanced human atherosclerotic plaques and can produce many mediators that may contribute to lesion formation and progression. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) enhances the proliferation and differentiation of monocyte progenitors and is required for the survival and activation of mature monocytes and macrophages. The authors therefore examined the expression of the MCSF gene in cultured human vascular endothelial (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) as well as in atheromatous lesions from rabbits and humans. Growth arrested EC and SMC contain a low level of MCSF mRNA. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) induced MCSF mRNA accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner in both EC and SMC. These stimuli induced large increases in MCSF mRNA with peak induction between 4-8 hours after treatment. LPS, IL-1 alpha, and TNF alpha stimulated EC and SMC also showed increased fluorescent antibody staining for MCSF protein and released immunoreactive MCSF in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was a less potent inducer of MCSF gene expression and iron-oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) did not increase consistently MCSF mRNA or the synthesis and secretion of immunoreactive protein. Northern analysis of mRNA isolated from the atheromatous aorta of rabbits fed a 1% cholesterol diet for 10 weeks showed elevated MCSF mRNA compared with controls. Immunostaining of atheromatous arterial lesions of rabbits demonstrated MCSF protein in association with intimal SMC as well as macrophages. Furthermore, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of MCSF mRNA in human atheromata showed higher levels than found in nonatherosclerotic arteries and veins. Since the

  5. Cooperation between human fibrocytes and endothelial colony-forming cells increases angiogenesis via the CXCR4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Smadja, David M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Guerin, Coralie L; Bieche, Ivan; Badoual, Cécile; Boscolo, Elisa; Kambouchner, Marianne; Cazes, Aurélie; Mercier, Olaf; Humbert, Marc; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Israël-Biet, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    Fibrotic diseases of the lung are associated with a vascular remodelling process. Fibrocytes (Fy) are a distinct population of blood-borne cells that co-express haematopoietic cell antigens and fibroblast markers, and have been shown to contribute to organ fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes cooperate with endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) to induce angiogenesis. We isolated fibrocytes from blood of patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and characterised them by flow cytometry, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RTQ-PCR), and confocal microscopy. We then investigated the angiogenic interaction between fibrocytes and cord-blood-derived ECFC, both in vitro and in an in vivo Matrigel implant model. Compared to fibroblast culture medium, fibrocyte culture medium increased ECFC proliferation and differentiation via the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. IPF-Fy co-implanted with human ECFC in Matrigel plugs in immunodeficient mice formed functional microvascular beds, whereas fibroblasts did not. Evaluation of implants after two weeks revealed an extensive network of erythrocyte-containing blood vessels. CXCR4 blockade significantly inhibited this blood vessel formation. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by strong CXCR4 expression in vessels close to fibrotic areas in biopsy specimens from patients with IPF, by comparison with control lungs. In conclusion, circulating fibrocytes might contribute to the intense remodelling of the pulmonary vasculature in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  6. Human endothelial colony-forming cells expanded with an improved protocol are a useful endothelial cell source for scaffold-based tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Denecke, Bernd; Horsch, Liska D; Radtke, Stefan; Fischer, Johannes C; Horn, Peter A; Giebel, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    One of the major challenges in tissue engineering is to supply larger three-dimensional (3D) bioengineered tissue transplants with sufficient amounts of nutrients and oxygen and to allow metabolite removal. Consequently, artificial vascularization strategies of such transplants are desired. One strategy focuses on endothelial cells capable of initiating new vessel formation, which are settled on scaffolds commonly used in tissue engineering. A bottleneck in this strategy is to obtain sufficient amounts of endothelial cells, as they can be harvested only in small quantities directly from human tissues. Thus, protocols are required to expand appropriate cells in sufficient amounts without interfering with their capability to settle on scaffold materials and to initiate vessel formation. Here, we analysed whether umbilical cord blood (CB)-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) fulfil these requirements. In a first set of experiments, we showed that marginally expanded ECFCs settle and survive on different scaffold biomaterials. Next, we improved ECFC culture conditions and developed a protocol for ECFC expansion compatible with 'Good Manufacturing Practice' (GMP) standards. We replaced animal sera with human platelet lysates and used a novel type of tissue-culture ware. ECFCs cultured under the new conditions revealed significantly lower apoptosis and increased proliferation rates. Simultaneously, their viability was increased. Since extensively expanded ECFCs could still settle on scaffold biomaterials and were able to form tubular structures in Matrigel assays, we conclude that these ex vivo-expanded ECFCs are a novel, very potent cell source for scaffold-based tissue engineering.

  7. Identification of vitamin B1 metabolism as a tumor-specific radiosensitizing pathway using a high-throughput colony formation screen

    PubMed Central

    Buffa, Francesca M.; Yu, Sheng; Ebner, Daniel V.; Howarth, Alison; Folkes, Lisa K.; Budwal, Balam; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Durrant, Lisa; Muschel, Ruth J.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Higgins, Geoff S.

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation is the gold standard assay for determining reproductive cell death after radiation treatment, since effects on proliferation often do not reflect survival. We have developed a high-throughput radiosensitivity screening method based on clonogenicity and screened a siRNA library against kinases. Thiamine pyrophosphokinase-1 (TPK1), a key component of Vitamin B1/thiamine metabolism, was identified as a target for radiosensitization. TPK1 knockdown caused significant radiosensitization in cancer but not normal tissue cell lines. Other means of blocking this pathway, knockdown of thiamine transporter-1 (THTR1) or treatment with the thiamine analogue pyrithiamine hydrobromide (PyrH) caused significant tumor specific radiosensitization. There was persistent DNA damage in cells irradiated after TPK1 and THTR1 knockdown or PyrH treatment. Thus this screen allowed the identification of thiamine metabolism as a novel radiosensitization target that affects DNA repair. Short-term modulation of thiamine metabolism could be a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor specific radiosensitization. PMID:25788274

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor expression on human transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, M.; Miyakawa, A.; Uchida, A.; Murai, M.; Eguchi, K.; Nakamura, K.; Kubo, A.; Hata, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSFRs) have been confirmed on the cell surfaces of several non-haematopoietic cell types, including bladder cancer cells. This observation has naturally led to the hypothesis that the expression of G-CSFR on these cells may enhance their growth by G-CSF. In this study, the expression of G-CSFR was determined in both established human bladder cancer cell lines and primary bladder cancers. We studied five different human bladder cancer cell lines (KU-1, KU-7, T-24, NBT-2 and KK) and 26 newly diagnosed bladder tumours. G-CSFR mRNA expressions on cultured cell lines were determined using the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Furthermore, the G-CSFR binding experiments on the cultured cell lines were conducted using the Na(125)I-labelled G-CSF ligand-binding assay method. Moreover, the G-CSFR mRNA expressions on primary bladder tumour specimens were assessed using the in situ RT-PCR method. Three out of the five cultured cell lines (KU-1, NBT-2 and KK) exhibited G-CSFR mRNA signals when the RT-PCR method was used. The G-CSFR binding experiments showed an equilibrium dissociation constant (K[d]) of 490 pM for KU-1, 340 pM for NBT-2 and 103 pM for KK cells. With in situ RT-PCR, the tumour cells of 6 out of 26 primary bladder tumour specimens (23.1%) presented positive G-CSFR mRNA signals. Thus, in this study, G-CSFR expression was frequently observed on bladder cancer cells. Therefore, the clinical use of G-CSF for patients with bladder cancer should be selected with great care. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9166942

  9. A cell-based model for quorum sensing in heterogeneous bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Melke, Pontus; Sahlin, Patrik; Levchenko, Andre; Jönsson, Henrik

    2010-06-17

    Although bacteria are unicellular organisms, they have the ability to act in concert by synthesizing and detecting small diffusing autoinducer molecules. The phenomenon, known as quorum sensing, has mainly been proposed to serve as a means for cell-density measurement. Here, we use a cell-based model of growing bacterial microcolonies to investigate a quorum-sensing mechanism at a single cell level. We show that the model indeed predicts a density-dependent behavior, highly dependent on local cell-clustering and the geometry of the space where the colony is evolving. We analyze the molecular network with two positive feedback loops to find the multistability regions and show how the quorum-sensing mechanism depends on different model parameters. Specifically, we show that the switching capability of the network leads to more constraints on parameters in a natural environment where the bacteria themselves produce autoinducer than compared to situations where autoinducer is introduced externally. The cell-based model also allows us to investigate mixed populations, where non-producing cheater cells are shown to have a fitness advantage, but still cannot completely outcompete producer cells. Simulations, therefore, are able to predict the relative fitness of cheater cells from experiments and can also display and account for the paradoxical phenomenon seen in experiments; even though the cheater cells have a fitness advantage in each of the investigated groups, the overall effect is an increase in the fraction of producer cells. The cell-based type of model presented here together with high-resolution experiments will play an integral role in a more explicit and precise comparison of models and experiments, addressing quorum sensing at a cellular resolution.

  10. Prostaglandin E2 regulates macrophage colony stimulating factor secretion by human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Besse, A; Trimoreau, F; Faucher, J L; Praloran, V; Denizot, Y

    1999-07-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate marrow haematopoiesis by secreting growth factors such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) that regulates the proliferation, differentiation and several functions of cells of the mononuclear-phagocytic lineage. By using a specific ELISA we found that their constitutive secretion of M-CSF is enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) markedly reduces in a time- and dose-dependent manner the constitutive and TNF-alpha-induced M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, other lipid mediators such as 12-HETE, 15-HETE, leukotriene B4, leukotriene C4 and lipoxin A4 have no effect. EP2/EP4 selective agonists (11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1) and EP2 agonist (19-OH PGE2) inhibit M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells while an EP1/EP3 agonist (sulprostone) has no effect. Stimulation with PGE2 induces an increase of intracellular cAMP levels in bone marrow stromal cells. cAMP elevating agents (forskolin and cholera toxin) mimic the PGE2-induced inhibition of M-CSF production. In conclusion, PGE2 is a potent regulator of M-CSF production by human bone marrow stromal cells, its effects being mediated via cAMP and PGE receptor EP2/EP4 subtypes.

  11. Enhanced activation of B cells in a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell graft.

    PubMed

    Tayebi, H; Lapierre, V; Saas, P; Lienard, A; Sutton, L; Milpied, N; Attal, M; Cahn, J Y; Kuentz, M; Blaise, D; Hervé, P; Tiberghien, P; Robinet, E

    2001-09-01

    In a randomized study that compared human leucocyte antigen-identical allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) versus bone marrow (BM) transplantation, the expression of activation markers, CD23, CD25 and CD45RO by B cells, was compared in blood before and after G-CSF mobilization and in PBSC versus BM grafts. The fractions of CD23+ and CD25+ B cells were higher in PBSC than in BM grafts. Moreover, we observed a G-CSF-induced increase in B-cell fractions in blood as well as in PBSC grafts when compared with BM grafts. Such an enhanced B-cell activation could contribute to the accelerated kinetics of immuno-haematological reconstitution, the occurrence of acute haemolysis in the ABO minor incompatibility setting, as well as the increased incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease observed after PBSC transplantation.

  12. High proliferative potential endothelial colony-forming cells contribute to hypoxia-induced pulmonary artery vasa vasorum neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Nijmeh, Hala; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Burns, Nana; Ahmad, Aftab; Stenmark, Kurt R; Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia V

    2014-04-01

    Angiogenic expansion of the vasa vasorum (VV) is an important contributor to pulmonary vascular remodeling in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). High proliferative potential endothelial progenitor-like cells have been described in vascular remodeling and angiogenesis in both systemic and pulmonary circulations. However, their role in hypoxia-induced pulmonary artery (PA) VV expansion in PH is not known. We hypothesized that profound PA VV neovascularization observed in a neonatal calf model of hypoxia-induced PH is due to increased numbers of subsets of high proliferative cells within the PA adventitial VV endothelial cells (VVEC). Using a single cell clonogenic assay, we found that high proliferative potential colony-forming cells (HPP-CFC) comprise a markedly higher percentage in VVEC populations isolated from the PA of hypoxic (VVEC-Hx) compared with control (VVEC-Co) calves. VVEC-Hx populations that comprised higher numbers of HPP-CFC also demonstrated markedly higher expression levels of CD31, CD105, and c-kit than VVEC-Co. In addition, significantly higher expression of CD31, CD105, and c-kit was observed in HPP-CFC vs. the VVEC of the control but not of hypoxic animals. HPP-CFC exhibited migratory and tube formation capabilities, two important attributes of angiogenic phenotype. Furthermore, HPP-CFC-Co and some HPP-CFC-Hx exhibited elevated telomerase activity, consistent with their high replicative potential, whereas a number of HPP-CFC-Hx exhibited impaired telomerase activity, suggestive of their senescence state. In conclusion, our data suggest that hypoxia-induced VV expansion involves an emergence of HPP-CFC populations of a distinct phenotype with increased angiogenic capabilities. These cells may serve as a potential target for regulating VVEC neovascularization.

  13. YfiBNR mediates cyclic di-GMP dependent small colony variant formation and persistence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Malone, Jacob G; Jaeger, Tina; Spangler, Christian; Ritz, Daniel; Spang, Anne; Arrieumerlou, Cécile; Kaever, Volkhard; Landmann, Regine; Jenal, Urs

    2010-03-12

    During long-term cystic fibrosis lung infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes genetic adaptation resulting in progressively increased persistence and the generation of adaptive colony morphotypes. This includes small colony variants (SCVs), auto-aggregative, hyper-adherent cells whose appearance correlates with poor lung function and persistence of infection. The SCV morphotype is strongly linked to elevated levels of cyclic-di-GMP, a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that regulates the transition between motile and sessile, cooperative lifestyles. A genetic screen in PA01 for SCV-related loci identified the yfiBNR operon, encoding a tripartite signaling module that regulates c-di-GMP levels in P. aeruginosa. Subsequent analysis determined that YfiN is a membrane-integral diguanylate cyclase whose activity is tightly controlled by YfiR, a small periplasmic protein, and the OmpA/Pal-like outer-membrane lipoprotein YfiB. Exopolysaccharide synthesis was identified as the principal downstream target for YfiBNR, with increased production of Pel and Psl exopolysaccharides responsible for many characteristic SCV behaviors. An yfi-dependent SCV was isolated from the sputum of a CF patient. Consequently, the effect of the SCV morphology on persistence of infection was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using the YfiN-mediated SCV as a representative strain. The SCV strain exhibited strong, exopolysaccharide-dependent resistance to nematode scavenging and macrophage phagocytosis. Furthermore, the SCV strain effectively persisted over many weeks in mouse infection models, despite exhibiting a marked fitness disadvantage in vitro. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics significantly decreased both the number of suppressors arising, and the relative fitness disadvantage of the SCV mutant in vitro, suggesting that the SCV persistence phenotype may play a more important role during antimicrobial chemotherapy. This study establishes YfiBNR as an important

  14. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra; Vorozhko, Valeriya; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Hanigan, Marie H.; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Plafker, Scott M.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-02-05

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

  15. CD44 expression in endothelial colony-forming cells regulates neurovascular trophic effect

    PubMed Central

    Sakimoto, Susumu; Marchetti, Valentina; Aguilar, Edith; Lee, Kelsey; Usui, Yoshihiko; Bucher, Felicitas; Trombley, Jennifer K.; Fallon, Regis; Wagey, Ravenska; Peters, Carrie; Scheppke, Elizabeth L.; Westenskow, Peter D.

    2017-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities are a common component of eye diseases that often lead to vision loss. Vaso-obliteration is associated with inherited retinal degenerations, since photoreceptor atrophy lowers local metabolic demands and vascular support to those regions is no longer required. Given the degree of neurovascular crosstalk in the retina, it may be possible to use one cell type to rescue another cell type in the face of severe stress, such as hypoxia or genetically encoded cell-specific degenerations. Here, we show that intravitreally injected human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) that can be isolated and differentiated from cord blood in xeno-free media collect in the vitreous cavity and rescue vaso-obliteration and neurodegeneration in animal models of retinal disease. Furthermore, we determined that a subset of the ECFCs was more effective at anatomically and functionally preventing retinopathy; these cells expressed high levels of CD44, the hyaluronic acid receptor, and IGFBPs (insulin-like growth factor–binding proteins). Injection of cultured media from ECFCs or only recombinant human IGFBPs also rescued the ischemia phenotype. These results help us to understand the mechanism of ECFC-based therapies for ischemic insults and retinal neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28138561

  16. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases the platelet volume in peripheral stem cell apheresis donors.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Akihiro; Matsui, Keiko; Minami, Ryouta; Uchida, Shuzou; Ueda, Shuji; Nishiura, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the short-term influence of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration on platelet counts and platelet indices in 12 donors (8 males and 4 females; median age 34 years, range 16-49) for peripheral stem cell transplantation using an automated blood cell analyzer. On day 3 (D3) compared with D0, 11 donors with normal laboratory and physical findings showed increases in platelet indices (chi(2) = 12.0, p = 0.0025). Furthermore, mean platelet volume (MPV) was significantly increased (p = 0.04). Also, platelet count decreased, and platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio were increased, but these were not significant. On the contrary, 1 donor with abnormal laboratory findings who had large platelets (MPV 11.4 fl) before G-CSF administration showed decreases in platelet indices (MPV 10.3 fl) on D3, although platelet count (18.2 x 10(4)/microl) decreased after G-CSF administration. G-CSF administration induces an inflammatory process with endothelial cell activation. This is probably the reason why platelet volume increases after G-CSF use. This is the first report showing that G-CSF administration immediately induces increases in large platelets in peripheral stem cell transplant donors before harvest.

  17. Autophagosome formation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Burman, Chloe; Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2010-12-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental intracellular trafficking pathway conserved from yeast to mammals. It is generally thought to play a pro-survival role, and it can be up regulated in response to both external and intracellular factors, including amino acid starvation, growth factor withdrawal, low cellular energy levels, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, hypoxia, oxidative stress, pathogen infection, and organelle damage. During autophagy initiation a portion of the cytosol is surrounded by a flat membrane sheet known as the isolation membrane or phagophore. The isolation membrane then elongates and seals itself to form an autophagosome. The autophagosome fuses with normal endocytic traffic to mature into a late autophagosome, before fusing with lysosomes. The molecular machinery that enables formation of an autophagosome in response to the various autophagy stimuli is almost completely identified in yeast and-thanks to the observed conservation-is also being rapidly elucidated in higher eukaryotes including mammals. What are less clear and currently under intense investigation are the mechanism by which these various autophagy components co-ordinate in order to generate autophagosomes. In this review, we will discuss briefly the fundamental importance of autophagy in various pathophysiological states and we will then review in detail the various players in early autophagy. Our main thesis will be that a conserved group of heteromeric protein complexes and a relatively simple signalling lipid are responsible for the formation of autophagosomes in mammalian cells.

  18. A lineage of diploid platelet-forming cells precedes polyploid megakaryocyte formation in the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Potts, Kathryn S; Sargeant, Tobias J; Markham, John F; Shi, Wei; Biben, Christine; Josefsson, Emma C; Whitehead, Lachlan W; Rogers, Kelly L; Liakhovitskaia, Anna; Smyth, Gordon K; Kile, Benjamin T; Medvinsky, Alexander; Alexander, Warren S; Hilton, Douglas J; Taoudi, Samir

    2014-10-23

    In this study, we test the assumption that the hematopoietic progenitor/colony-forming cells of the embryonic yolk sac (YS), which are endowed with megakaryocytic potential, differentiate into the first platelet-forming cells in vivo. We demonstrate that from embryonic day (E) 8.5 all megakaryocyte (MK) colony-forming cells belong to the conventional hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) compartment. Although these cells are indeed capable of generating polyploid MKs, they are not the source of the first platelet-forming cells. We show that proplatelet formation first occurs in a unique and previously unrecognized lineage of diploid platelet-forming cells, which develop within the YS in parallel to HPCs but can be specified in the E8.5 Runx1-null embryo despite the absence of the progenitor cell lineage.

  19. Synergy of interleukin 1 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: in vivo stimulation of stem-cell recovery and hematopoietic regeneration following 5-fluorouracil treatment of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.A.S.; Warren, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    The human bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 produces hematopoietic growth factors (granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF and GM-CSF)) and hemopoietin 1, which synergizes with CSFs to stimulate colony formation by primitive hematopoietic stem cells in 5-fluorouracil-treated mouse bone marrow. Molecular and functional properties of hemopoietin 1 identified it as identical to interleukin 1..cap alpha.. (IL-1..cap alpha..). When bone marrow cells from 5-fluorouracil-treated mice were cultured in suspension for 7 days with recombinant human IL-1..cap alpha.. and/or G-CSF, it was found that the two factors synergized to enhance recovery of myelopoietic cells and colony-forming cells of both high and low proliferative potential. G-CSF alone did not sustain these populations, but the combination had greater-than-additive stimulating capacity. In vivo, 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) produced profound myelosuppression and delayed neutrophil regeneration for up to 2 weeks in C3H/HeJ mice. Daily administration of recombinant human G-CSF or human IL-1..cap alpha.. accelerated recovery of stem cells, progenitor cells, and blood neutrophils by up to 4 days in 5-fluorouracil-treated C3H/HeJ and B6D2F/sub 1/ mice. The combination of IL-1..cap alpha.. and G-CSF acted synergistically, reducing neutropenia and accelerating recovery of normal neutrophil numbers by up to 7 days. These results indicate the possible therapeutic potential of combination therapy with IL-1 and hematopoietic growth factors such as G-CSF in the treatment of chemotherapy- or radiation-induced myelosuppression.

  20. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jarel K; Zivkovic, Lada; Fisher, John P; Yoder, Mervin C; Brey, Eric M

    2015-09-18

    Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC), within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating.

  1. Growth of a radiation-transformed clone of C3H 1OT1/2 cells into melanin-producing colonies

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.G.; Raaphorst, G.P.; Lobreau, A.U.; Azzam, E.I.; Vadasz, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    When R25, a radiation-transformed clone of C3H 1OT1/2 cells, was plated in soft agarose, a fraction of the colonies became pigmented. The morphologies of the white and dark colonies and their cells were compared by optical, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The transformed R25 cells had apparently differentiated into melanin-producing cells in the soft agarose, with the white colonies containing actively growing cells having only a few melanosomes, and the dark colonies being made up of stationary-phase cells filled with electronopaque melanosomes. Exposure of the R25 cells to 4.0 Gy of X-rays decreased the percentage of dark colonies, while exposure to 1% DMSO had no effect.

  2. Enhancement of erythroid colony growth by triiodothyronine in cell cultures from bone marrow of normal and anemic rats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Malgor, L A; Valsecia, M E; Verges, E G; de Markowsky, E E

    1995-01-01

    In order to make a contribution in clarifying the role of thyroid hormones on modulation of erythropoiesis and to gain a further insight on the effects of these hormones in the anemia of chronic renal failure (CRF), we studied the action of triiodo-1-thyronine (LT3) and DT3, a dextrorotary non-calorigenic isomer of T3 on late (CFU-E) and early (BFU-E) committed erythroid precursor cells from bone marrow of normal and anemic uremic rats. Cultures were prepared using the methylcellulose technique containing a standard dose (182 mU/ml) of erythropoietin (Ep), LT3 and DT3 in doses of 0.5 and 1.5 micrograms/ml. Thyroid hormones were added to cultures in the absence of Ep. Our results demonstrated that LT3 and DT3 produced a direct and significant stimulation of CFU-E formation and a moderate increase of BFU-E. A dose-correlation was apparent in cultures containing thyroid hormones. DT3 was somewhat less active than LT3. As expected, Ep also produced a significant increase in erythroid colony formation, mainly CFU-E. It is notheworthy that the effects of LT3, DT3 and Ep on erythroid colony growth were significantly higher in marrow cultures from anemic rats with CRF, indicating an increased proliferative cell kinetics of committed erythroid cells in response to these drugs.

  3. CD34 expression modulates tube-forming capacity and barrier properties of peripheral blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs).

    PubMed

    Tasev, Dimitar; Konijnenberg, Lara S F; Amado-Azevedo, Joana; van Wijhe, Michiel H; Koolwijk, Pieter; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) are grown from circulating CD34(+) progenitors present in adult peripheral blood, but during in vitro expansion part of the cells lose CD34. To evaluate whether the regulation of CD34 characterizes the angiogenic phenotypical features of PB-ECFCs, we investigated the properties of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs with respect to their ability to form capillary-like tubes in 3D fibrin matrices, tip-cell gene expression, and barrier integrity. Selection of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs from subcultured ECFCs was accomplished by magnetic sorting (FACS: CD34(+): 95 % pos; CD34(-): 99 % neg). Both fractions proliferated at same rate, while CD34(+) ECFCs exhibited higher tube-forming capacity and tip-cell gene expression than CD3(4-) cells. However, during cell culture CD34(-) cells re-expressed CD34. Cell-seeding density, cell-cell contact formation, and serum supplements modulated CD34 expression. CD34 expression in ECFCs was strongly suppressed by newborn calf serum. Stimulation with FGF-2, VEGF, or HGF prepared in medium supplemented with 3 % albumin did not change CD34 mRNA or surface expression. Silencing of CD34 with siRNA resulted in strengthening of cell-cell contacts and increased barrier function of ECFC monolayers as measured by ECIS. Furthermore, CD34 siRNA reduced tube formation by ECFC, but did not affect tip-cell gene expression. These findings demonstrate that CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells are different phenotypes of similar cells and that CD34 (1) can be regulated in ECFC; (2) is positively involved in capillary-like sprout formation; (3) is associated but not causally related to tip-cell gene expression; and (4) can affect endothelial barrier function.

  4. Growth of human hemopoietic colonies in response to recombinant gibbon interleukin 3: comparison with human recombinant granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, H.A.; Yamasaki, K.; Jamal, N.; Minden, M.M.; Yang, Y.C.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.

    1987-10-01

    Supernatants of COS-1 cells transfected with gibbon cDNA encoding interleukin 3 (IL-3) with homology to sequences for human IL-3 were tested for ability to promote growth of various human hemopoietic progenitors. The effect of these supernatants as a source of recombinant IL-3 was compared to that of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as well as to that of medium conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes. The frequency of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies in cultures containing the COS-1 cell supernatant was equivalent to the frequency observed in the controls and significantly higher than found in cultures plated with recombinant GM-CSF. G-CSF did not support the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. In contrast, growth of granulocyte-macrophage colonies was best supported with GM-CSF, while recombinant IL-3 yielded colonies at lower or at best equivalent frequency. The simultaneous addition of higher concentrations of GM-CSF to cultures containing IL-3 in optimal amounts did not enhance the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. However, the frequency of such colonies and bursts increased with GM-CSF when cultures were plated with suboptimal concentrations of IL-3. Growth of colonies within the granulocyte-macrophage lineage is optimally supported by GM-CSF and does not increase with further addition of IL-3.

  5. Endothelial colony forming cells ameliorate endothelial dysfunction via secreted factors following ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Collett, Jason A; Mehrotra, Purvi; Crone, Allison; Shelley, W Christopher; Yoder, Mervin C; Basile, David P

    2017-02-22

    Damage to endothelial cells contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI) by leading to impaired perfusion. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are endothelial precursor cells with high proliferative capacity, pro-angiogenic activity, and in vivo vessel forming potential. We hypothesized that ECFCs may ameliorate the degree of AKI and/or promote repair of the renal vasculature following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Rat pulmonary microvascular ECs (PMVEC) with high proliferative potential were compared with pulmonary artery ECs (PAEC) with low proliferative potential in rats subjected to renal I/R. PMVEC administration reduced renal injury and hastened recovery as indicated by serum creatinine and tubular injury scores, while PAEC did not. Vehicle-treated control animals showed consistent reductions in renal medullary blood flow (MBF) within 2 hours of reperfusion, while PMVEC protected against loss in MBF as measured by laser Doppler. Interestingly, PMVEC mediated protection occurred in the absence of homing to the kidney. Conditioned medium (CM) from human cultured cord blood ECFC also conveyed beneficial effects against I/R injury and loss of MBF. Moreover, ECFC-CM significantly reduced the expression of adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and p-selectin, and decreased the number of differentiated lymphocytes typically recruited into the kidney following renal ischemia. Taken together, these data suggest that ECFC secrete factors that preserve renal function post ischemia, in part, by preserving microvascular function.

  6. Proteomic analysis of oxidative modification in endothelial colony-forming cells treated by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jun; Liu, Ying; Chang, Ming; Sun, Chong-Ling; Li, Da-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Hu, Lin-Sen

    2012-06-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) which circulate in the peripheral blood and reside in blood vessels are proven to promote the repair of damaged endothelium and improve the function of endothelial cells after vascular injury. Recently, EPCs have been extensively studied as risk biomarkers and a potential therapeutic tool for cardiovascular disease. It is known that oxidative stress is one of the most important pathogenetic factors impairing endothelial function. During the repair process after endothelial injury, EPCs are exposed to oxidative stress. In this study, we treated endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) as an oxidative stress model and observed the changes in cytology and morphology of ECFCs. In addition, we investigated the alterations in oxidative levels of proteins associated with H₂O₂-induced morphological and cytological changes in ECFCs by proteomic analysis of oxidative modification. The results showed that H₂O₂ treatment led to a decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis and impaired tube-forming ability of ECFCs in a dose-dependent manner. Five proteins with upregulated oxidative levels were identified successfully. The upregulated oxidative levels of these five proteins may be responsible for the dysfunction of ECFCs under oxidative stress. Our results may provide some novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of oxidative stress action on ECFCs.

  7. The use of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in volunteer unrelated hemopoietic stem cell donors.

    PubMed

    Pamphilon, Derwood; Nacheva, Elisabeth; Navarrete, Cristina; Madrigal, Alejandro; Goldman, John

    2008-07-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used for the mobilization of hemopoietic stem cells in healthy donors. It has a number of common side effects such as bone pain, which resolve rapidly after administration is discontinued. Recent publications have raised concern that it might act as a trigger for the development of hematologic malignancy in susceptible individuals, possibly by causing genomic instability, but to date there is no evidence that healthy volunteer donors who receive G-CSF are at any increased risk. Ongoing studies aim to confirm whether or not G-CSF can cause chromosomal abnormalities in healthy donors. In the UK, the British Bone Marrow Registry and Anthony Nolan Trust give G-CSF to donors who have agreed to donate peripheral blood stem cells. It is recommended by the UK Registries at present that all stem cell donors are given updated information explaining the current uncertainties with regard to the use of G-CSF before they give informed consent to its administration. This information is based on a statement agreed by the World Marrow Donor Association for use by individual donor registries. Further, it is our current practice that all donors who have received G-CSF, as well as marrow donors who do not, should be under regular review for at least 10 years to allow the occurrence of any long-term adverse events to be documented.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca(2+) Handling and Apoptotic Resistance in Tumor-Derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Valentina; Dragoni, Silvia; Lim, Dmitry; Biggiogera, Marco; Aronica, Adele; Cinelli, Mariapia; De Luca, Antonio; Rosti, Vittorio; Porta, Camillo; Guerra, Germano; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Truly endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be mobilized from bone marrow to support the vascular network of growing tumors, thereby sustaining the metastatic switch. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) are the only EPC subtype belonging to the endothelial phenotype and capable of incorporating within neovessels. The intracellular Ca(2+) machinery plays a key role in ECFC activation and is remodeled in renal cellular carcinoma-derived ECFCs (RCC-ECFCs). Particularly, RCC-ECFCs seems to undergo a drop in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]ER ). This feature is remarkable when considering that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3 )-dependent ER-to-mitochondria Ca(2+) transfer regulates the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Herein, we sought to assess whether: (1) the [Ca(2+) ]ER and the InsP3 -induced ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) shuttle are reduced in RCC-ECFCs; and (2) the dysregulation of ER Ca(2+) handling leads to apoptosis resistance in tumor-derived cells. RCC-ECFCs displayed a reduction both in [Ca(2+) ]ER and in the InsP3 -dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, while they expressed normal levels of Bcl-2 and Bak. The decrease in [Ca(2+) ]ER was associated to a remarkable ER expansion in RCC-ECFCs, which is a hallmark of ER stress, and did not depend on the remodeling of the Ca(2+) -transporting and the ER Ca(2+) -storing systems. As expected, RCC-ECFCs were less sensitive to rapamycin- and thapsigargin-induced apoptosis; however, buffering intracellular Ca(2+) levels with BAPTA dampened apoptosis in both cell types. Finally, store-operated Ca(2+) entry was seemingly uncoupled from the apoptotic machinery in RCC-ECFCs. Thus, the chronic underfilling of the ER Ca(2+) pool could confer a survival advantage to RCC-ECFCs and underpin RCC resistance to pharmacological treatment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2260-2271, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Gender differences in circulating endothelial progenitor cell colony-forming capacity and migratory activity in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Hoetzer, Greta L; MacEneaney, Owen J; Irmiger, Heather M; Keith, Rebecca; Van Guilder, Gary P; Stauffer, Brian L; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    Middle-aged women have a lower prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular events compared with men. The mechanisms responsible for this gender-specific difference are unclear. Numeric and functional impairments of bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are associated with increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality. It is currently unknown whether there are gender-related differences in EPC number and function in middle-aged adults. We tested the hypothesis that EPCs isolated from middle-aged women demonstrate greater colony-forming capacity and migratory activity compared with men of similar age. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 50 sedentary adults, 25 men (59 +/- 1 years of age) and 25 women (58 +/- 1 years of age). Mononuclear cells were isolated and preplated for 2 days, and nonadherent cells were further cultured for 7 days to determine EPC colony-forming units. Migratory activity of EPCs was determined using a modified Boyden chamber. The number of EPC colony-forming units was significantly higher (approximately 150%) in samples collected from women (16 +/- 3) compared with that collected from men (7 +/- 1). In addition, EPC migration (relative fluorescent units) was approximately 40% greater in women (729 +/- 74) than in men (530 +/- 67). In conclusion, these results demonstrate that EPC colony-forming capacity and migratory activity are higher in middle-aged women than in men.

  10. Role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in human granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Song; Zhang, Zhifen; Xia, Li-Xia; Huang, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) has been proved to have a positive role in the follicular development. We investigated its effect on human granulosa cells and found that M-CSF could stimulate the production of E2. The production of FSH receptors was enhanced by M-CSF in vitro in a dose-dependent manner with or without the addition of tamoxifen (p <0.05). Correspondingly, FSH was also able to coordinate the expression of M-CSF and its receptor (p <0.05). That maybe important to maintain the level of Nppc and the meiotic arrest of the oocyte. The protein p-JAK2 and p-STAT3 in JAK/STAT-signaling pathway elevated after the influence of M-CSF (p < 0.05). These results suggest that M-CSF has a role in regulating the response of granulosa cells to gonadotropins. Its function is associated with JAK/STAT-signaling pathway.

  11. Effect of adrenalectomy on recipients of allogeneic lymphocytes on inactivation of endogenous colony-forming cells in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Semenkov, V.F.

    1985-06-01

    This paper presents a study of the killer functions of lymph node cells directed against endogenous colony-forming cells in adrenalectomized recipients in a genetic system with one-way incompatibility: parental line - F/sub 1/ hybrid. Mice were irradiated with Co 60 gamma rays on the EGO-2 apparatus with dose rate from 200 to 250 R/min. The results were subjected to statistical analysis by Student's test. It can be tentatively suggested that the killer action of T lymphocytes on endogenous colonies was intensified in adrenal-ectomized recipients with endogenous hypocorticism, as a result of cooperation with the cortisol-sensitive subpopulation of T helper cells, of a change in the properties of the antigen-recognizing receptors, or an increase in the sensitivity of target cells to the killer action of T lymphocytes.

  12. Endothelial colony forming cells and mesenchymal progenitor cells form blood vessels and increase blood flow in ischemic muscle.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyu-Tae; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Kuppermann, David; Melero-Martin, Juan M; Bischoff, Joyce

    2017-04-10

    Here we investigated whether endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) and mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPC) form vascular networks and restore blood flow in ischemic skeletal muscle, and whether host myeloid cells play a role. ECFC + MPC, ECFC alone, MPC alone, or vehicle alone were injected into the hind limb ischemic muscle one day after ligation of femoral artery and vein. At day 5, hind limbs injected with ECFC + MPC showed greater blood flow recovery compared with ECFC, MPC, or vehicle. Tail vein injection of human endothelial specific Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I demonstrated an increased number of perfused human vessels in ECFC + MPC compared with ECFC. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed ECFC persisted for 14 days in ECFC + MPC-injected hind limbs. Flow cytometric analysis of ischemic muscles at day 2 revealed increased myeloid lineage cells in ECFC + MPC-injected muscles compared to vehicle-injected muscles. Neutrophils declined by day 7, while the number of myeloid cells, macrophages, and monocytes did not. Systemic myeloid cell depletion with anti-Gr-1 antibody blocked the improved blood flow observed with ECFC + MPC and reduced ECFC and MPC retention. Our data suggest that ECFC + MPC delivery could be used to reestablish blood flow in ischemic tissues, and this may be enhanced by coordinated recruitment of host myeloid cells.

  13. Characterization of the Maize Stalk Rot Pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum and the Effect of Fungicides on Their Mycelial Growth and Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Han, Joon-Hee; Lee, Ju Kyong; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2014-01-01

    Maize is a socioeconomically important crop in many countries. Recently, a high incidence of stalk rot disease has been reported in several maize fields in Gangwon province. In this report, we show that maize stalk rot is associated with the fungal pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum. Since no fungicides are available to control these pathogens on maize plants, we selected six fungicides (tebuconazole, difenoconazole, fluquinconazole, azoxystrobin, prochloraz and kresoxim-methyl) and examined their effectiveness against the two pathogens. The in vitro antifungal effects of the six fungicides on mycelial growth and colony formation were investigated. Based on the inhibition of mycelial growth, the most toxic fungicide was tebuconazole with 50% effective concentrations (EC50) of <0.1 μg/ml and EC90 values of 0.9 μg/ml for both pathogens, while the least toxic fungicide was azoxystrobin with EC50 values of 0.7 and 0.5 μg/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, and EC90 values of >3,000 μg/ml for both pathogens. Based on the inhibition of colony formation by the two pathogens, kresoxim-methyl was the most toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.01 μg/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, whereas azoxystrobin was the least toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations >3,000 μg/ml for both pathogens. PMID:25506304

  14. Granulocyte, granulocyte–macrophage, and macrophage colony-stimulating factors can stimulate the invasive capacity of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pei, X-H; Nakanishi, Y; Takayama, K; Bai, F; Hara, N

    1999-01-01

    We and other researchers have previously found that colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), which generally include granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), promote invasion by lung cancer cells. In the present study, we studied the effects of these CSFs on gelatinase production, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) production and their activity in human lung cancer cells. Gelatin zymographs of conditioned media derived from human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines revealed two major bands of gelatinase activity at 68 and 92 kDa, which were characterized as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 respectively. Treatment with CSFs increased the 68- and 92-kDa activity and converted some of a 92-kDa proenzyme to an 82-kDa enzyme that was consistent with an active form of the MMP-9. Plasminogen activator zymographs of the conditioned media from the cancer cells showed that CSF treatment resulted in an increase in a 48–55 kDa plasminogen-dependent gelatinolytic activity that was characterized as human uPA. The conditioned medium from the cancer cells treated with CSFs stimulated the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, providing a direct demonstration of the ability of enhanced uPA to increase plasmin-dependent proteolysis. The enhanced invasive behaviour of the cancer cells stimulated by CSFs was well correlated with the increase in MMPs and uPA activities. These data suggest that the enhanced production of extracellular matrix-degrading proteinases by the cancer cells in response to CSF treatment may represent a biochemical mechanism which promotes the invasive behaviour of the cancer cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408691

  15. Selection of Small-Colony Variants of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Nonphagocytic Eucaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cano, David A.; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; Martínez-Moya, Marina; Casadesús, Josep; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella enterica strains are enteropathogenic bacteria that survive and proliferate within vacuolar compartments of epithelial and phagocytic cells. Recently, it has been reported that fibroblast cells are capable of restricting S. enterica serovar Typhimurium intracellular growth. Here, we show that prolonged residence of bacteria in the intracellular environment of fibroblasts results in the appearance of genetically stable small-colony variants (SCV). A total of 103 SCV isolates, obtained from four independent infections, were subjected to phenotypic analysis. The following phenotypes were observed: (i) δ-aminolevulinic acid auxotrophy; (ii) requirement for acetate or succinate for growth in glucose minimal medium; (iii) auxotrophy for aromatic amino acids; and (iv) reduced growth rate under aerobic conditions not linked to nutrient auxotrophy. The exact mutations responsible for the SCV phenotype in three representative isolates were mapped in the lpd, hemL, and aroD genes, which code for dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, glutamate-1-semyaldehyde aminotransferase, and 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase, respectively. The lpd, hemL, and aroD mutants had intracellular persistence rates in fibroblasts that were 3 to 4 logs higher than that of the parental strain and decreased susceptibility to aminoglycoside antibiotics. All three of these SCV isolates were attenuated in the BALB/c murine typhoid model. Complementation with lpd+, hem+, and aroD+ genes restored the levels of intracellular persistence and antibiotic susceptibility to levels of the wild-type strain. However, virulence was not exhibited by any of the complemented strains. Altogether, our data demonstrate that similar to what it has been reported for SCV isolates of other pathogens, S. enterica SCV display enhanced intracellular persistence in eucaryotic cells and are impaired in the ability to cause overt disease. In addition, they also suggest that S. enterica SCV may be favored in vivo. PMID:12819049

  16. Tomatidine inhibits replication of Staphylococcus aureus small-colony variants in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gabriel; Gattuso, Mariza; Grondin, Gilles; Marsault, Éric; Bouarab, Kamal; Malouin, François

    2011-05-01

    Small-colony variants (SCVs) often are associated with chronic Staphylococcus aureus infections, such as those encountered by cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We report here that tomatidine, the aglycon form of the plant secondary metabolite tomatine, has a potent growth inhibitory activity against SCVs (MIC of 0.12 μg/ml), whereas the growth of normal S. aureus strains was not significantly altered by tomatidine (MIC, >16 μg/ml). The specific action of tomatidine was bacteriostatic for SCVs and was clearly associated with their dysfunctional electron transport system, as the presence of the electron transport inhibitor 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO) caused normal S. aureus strains to become susceptible to tomatidine. Inversely, the complementation of SCVs' respiratory deficiency conferred resistance to tomatidine. Tomatidine provoked a general reduction of macromolecular biosynthesis but more specifically affected the incorporation of radiolabeled leucine in proteins of HQNO-treated S. aureus at a concentration corresponding to the MIC against SCVs. Furthermore, tomatidine inhibited the intracellular replication of a clinical SCV in polarized CF-like epithelial cells. Our results suggest that tomatidine eventually will find some use in combination therapy with other traditional antibiotics to eliminate persistent forms of S. aureus.

  17. Biosimilar granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor for healthy donor stem cell mobilization: need we be afraid?

    PubMed

    Bonig, Halvard; Becker, Petra S; Schwebig, Arnd; Turner, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    Biosimilars are approved biologics with comparable quality, safety, and efficacy to a reference product. Unlike generics, which are chemically manufactured copies of small-molecule drugs with relatively simple chemical structures, the biosimilar designation is applied to drugs that are produced by living organisms, implying much more difficult to control manufacturing and purification procedures. To account for these complexities, the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the US Food and Drug Administration, the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration, and other regulatory authorities have devised and implemented specific, markedly more demanding pathways for the evaluation and approval of biosimilars. To date, several biosimilars have been approved, including versions of somatropin, erythropoietin, and granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and several biosimilar monoclonal antibodies are currently in development. The reference G-CSF product (Neupogen, Amgen) has been used for many years for prevention and treatment of neutropenia and also for mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). However, concerns have been raised about the safety and efficacy of biosimilar G-CSF during PBSC mobilization procedures, especially in healthy donors. This article reviews the available evidence on the use of biosimilar G-CSF in this setting. Aggregate clinical evidence supports the assessment by the EMA of biosimilar and originator G-CSF as highly biologically similar, with respect to desired and undesired effects.

  18. Ionizing Radiation Induces Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Aggregation Through JNK-Dependent Activation of CD36 Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Ikuo; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sumi, Tadateru; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Irradiated arteries of cancer patients can be associated with atherosclerosis-like lesions containing cholesterol-laden macrophages (foam cells). Endothelial cell damage by irradiation does not completely explain the foam cell formation. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced foam cell formation. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood monocytes were activated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with varying doses of IR in vitro in the absence of endothelial cells. Scavenger receptor expression and foam cell formation of IR-treated macrophages were investigated in the presence or absence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. We also assessed the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human monocytes (macrophages) for the foam cell formation. Results: We found that IR treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human peripheral blood monocytes resulted in the enhanced expression of CD36 scavenger receptors and that cholesterol accumulated in the irradiated macrophages with resultant foam cell formation in the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, when cultured on collagen gels, human macrophages formed large foam cell aggregates in response to IR. Antibodies against CD36 inhibited the IR-induced foam cell formation and aggregation, indicating that the IR-induced foam cell formation and the subsequent aggregation are dependent on functional CD36. In addition, we found that IR of human macrophages resulted in c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition suppressed IR-induced CD36 expression and the subsequent foam cell formation and aggregation. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that IR-induced foam cell formation is mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent CD36 activation.

  19. The Self-Identity Protein IdsD Is Communicated between Cells in Swarming Proteus mirabilis Colonies.

    PubMed

    Saak, Christina C; Gibbs, Karine A

    2016-12-15

    Proteus mirabilis is a social bacterium that is capable of self (kin) versus nonself recognition. Swarming colonies of this bacterium expand outward on surfaces to centimeter-scale distances due to the collective motility of individual cells. Colonies of genetically distinct populations remain separate, while those of identical populations merge. Ids proteins are essential for this recognition behavior. Two of these proteins, IdsD and IdsE, encode identity information for each strain. These two proteins bind in vitro in an allele-restrictive manner. IdsD-IdsE binding is correlated with the merging of populations, whereas a lack of binding is correlated with the separation of populations. Key questions remained about the in vivo interactions of IdsD and IdsE, specifically, whether IdsD and IdsE bind within single cells or whether IdsD-IdsE interactions occur across neighboring cells and, if so, which of the two proteins is exchanged. Here we demonstrate that IdsD must originate from another cell to communicate identity and that this nonresident IdsD interacts with IdsE resident in the recipient cell. Furthermore, we show that unbound IdsD in recipient cells does not cause cell death and instead appears to contribute to a restriction in the expansion radius of the swarming colony. We conclude that P. mirabilis communicates IdsD between neighboring cells for nonlethal kin recognition, which suggests that the Ids proteins constitute a type of cell-cell communication.

  20. Order and instabilities in dense bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimring, Lev

    2012-02-01

    The structure of cell colonies is governed by the interplay of many physical and biological factors, ranging from properties of surrounding media to cell-cell communication and gene expression in individual cells. The biomechanical interactions arising from the growth and division of individual cells in confined environments are ubiquitous, yet little work has focused on this fundamental aspect of colony formation. By combining experimental observations of growing monolayers of non-motile strain of bacteria Escherichia coli in a shallow microfluidic chemostat with discrete-element simulations and continuous theory, we demonstrate that expansion of a dense colony leads to rapid orientational alignment of rod-like cells. However, in larger colonies, anisotropic compression may lead to buckling instability which breaks perfect nematic order. Furthermore, we found that in shallow cavities feedback between cell growth and mobility in a confined environment leads to a novel cell streaming instability. Joint work with W. Mather, D. Volfson, O. Mondrag'on-Palomino, T. Danino, S. Cookson, and J. Hasty (UCSD) and D. Boyer, S. Orozco-Fuentes (UNAM, Mexico).

  1. Cell proliferation dynamics of somatic and germline tissues during zooidal life span in the colonial tunicate Botryllus primigenus.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazuo; Tachibana, Miki; Sunanaga, Takeshi

    2008-07-01

    Botryllus primigenus is a colonial tunicate in which three successive generations develop synchronously. To identify proliferation centers and possible adult stem cells during asexual reproduction, somatic and germline cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). In the youngest generation, multipotent epithelial cells exhibited an average labeling index (LI) of 30% 24 hr after BrdU injection. In the middle generation, the LI of organ rudiments decreased gradually and reached zero by the beginning of the eldest generation. Exceptionally, cells of specialized tissues such as the pharyngeal inner longitudinal vessel and the posterior end of the endostyle continued DNA synthesis and mitosis even in the eldest generation. Proliferating somatic and germline cells of younger generations expressed a Botryllus myc homolog (BpMyc), but adult tissues did not. This result strongly suggests that in B. primigenus undifferentiated progenitor cells are discernible from possible adult stem cells by the presence or absence of BpMyc.

  2. Dynamics of Superoxide Production and Decay in Natural Trichodesmium Colonies from the Sargasso Sea: Implications for Cell Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C. M.; Buchwald, C.; Diaz, J. M.; Dyhrman, S.; Van Mooy, B. A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key players in the biogeochemistry of the ocean, where they serve a critical role in the cycling of carbon and metals. Research in the past decade has introduced phytoplankton and, most recently, heterotrophic bacteria as significant sources of ROS, including superoxide, within both photic and aphotic regions of the ocean. ROS are both beneficial and detrimental to life. For instance, superoxide is a vital inter- and intra-cellular signaling molecule, yet at high concentrations it induces lipid peroxidation and initiates programmed cell death (PCD). In fact, superoxide has been implicated in PCD in the nitrogen-fixing diazotroph Trichodesmium, presumably leading to the demise of blooms within oligotrophic marine systems. Here, we explore the rates of superoxide production and decay by natural Trichodesmium populations obtained from various surface waters in the Sargasso Sea. We investigate also the role of light and colony density and morphology (puff v. raft) on superoxide fluxes. We find that Trichodesmium colonies produce extracellular superoxide at extremely high rates in the dark that are on par with those of the toxic raphidophyte Chattonella. The rates of superoxide production, however, rapidly decline with increasing cell density pointing to a role for superoxide in cell signaling in these organisms. We also find extremely rapid extracellular superoxide degradation by Trichodesmium. Together, this likely reflects a need for these organisms to maintain ROS at levels that will support signaling but below the threshold level that triggers PCD or oxidative damage. We also show differences in the effect of light on superoxide fluxes as a function of Trichodesmium colony morphology, suggesting differences in either colony physiology or associated bacterial symbionts. These findings point to complex physiological, ecological, and physical influences on ROS dynamics in phytoplankton that require further exploration.

  3. Interleukin 3 perfusion in W/Wv mice allows the development of macroscopic hematopoietic spleen colonies and restores cutaneous mast cell number

    SciTech Connect

    Ody, C.; Kindler, V.; Vassalli, P. )

    1990-07-01

    The genetically anemic W/Wv mice are characterized by the inability of their bone marrow cells to form macroscopic pluripotent hematopoietic colonies in the spleen of irradiated recipients upon transfer (colony-forming units). Furthermore, they almost totally lack mast cells, notably in the skin. In the present study, we have tested the effect of recombinant murine interleukin 3 (rmIL-3) on W/Wv mice hematopoiesis. Transfer of W/Wv bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated recipients perfused with rmIL-3 is followed by the appearance of macroscopic spleen colonies. Moreover, perfusion of rmIL-3 in W/Wv mice: (a) restores almost normal total numbers of hematopoietic precursors (colony-forming cells), but without modification of anemia; and (b) leads to the appearance of a normal number of mastocytes in the skin.

  4. Direct formate fuel cells: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Chen, R.

    2016-07-01

    Direct formate fuel cells (DFFC), which convert the chemical energy stored in formate directly into electricity, are recently attracting more attention, primarily because of the use of the carbon-neutral fuel and the low-cost electrocatalytic and membrane materials. As an emerging energy technology, the DFFC has made a rapid progress in recent years (currently, the state-of-the-art power density is 591 mW cm-2 at 60 °C). This article provides a review of past research on the development of this type of fuel cell, including the working principle, mechanisms and materials of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formate, singe-cell designs and performance, as well as innovative system designs. In addition, future perspectives with regard to the development of this fuel cell system are also highlighted.

  5. Cooperatively Generated Stresslet Flows Supply Fresh Fluid to Multicellular Choanoflagellate Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Marcus; Dayel, Mark J.; Pepper, Rachel E.; Koehl, M. A. R.

    2013-05-01

    The flagellated protozoan Salpingoeca rosetta is one of the closest relatives of multicellular animals. Unicellular S. rosetta can be induced to form multicellular colonies, but colonies swim more slowly than individual cells so the advantages conferred by colony formation are uncertain. Here we use theoretical models to show that hydrodynamic cooperation between cells can increase the fluid supply to the colony, an important predictor of feeding rate. Our results suggest that hydrodynamic benefits may have been an important selective factor in the evolution of early multicellular animals.

  6. Dynamic scaling analysis of two-dimensional cell colony fronts in a gel medium: a biological system approaching a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality.

    PubMed

    Huergo, M A C; Muzzio, N E; Pasquale, M A; Pedro González, P H; Bolzán, A E; Arvia, A J

    2014-08-01

    The interfacial two-dimensional spreading dynamics of quasilinear Vero cell colony fronts in methylcellulose (MC)-containing culture medium, under a constant average front displacement velocity regime, was investigated. Under comparable experimental conditions, the average colony front displacement velocity becomes lower than that reported for a standard culture medium. Initially, the presence of MC in the medium hinders both the colony spreading, due to a gradual change in the average size and shape of cells and their distribution in the colony, and the cell motility in the gelled medium. Furthermore, at longer culture times enlarged cells appear at random in the border region of the colony. These cells behave as obstacles (pinning sites) for the displacement of smaller cells towards the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough fronts yields the set of exponents α=0.63±0.04,β=0.75±0.05, and z=0.84±0.05, which is close to that expected for a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model.

  7. Dynamic scaling analysis of two-dimensional cell colony fronts in a gel medium: A biological system approaching a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Muzzio, N. E.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H. Pedro; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.

    2014-08-01

    The interfacial two-dimensional spreading dynamics of quasilinear Vero cell colony fronts in methylcellulose (MC)-containing culture medium, under a constant average front displacement velocity regime, was investigated. Under comparable experimental conditions, the average colony front displacement velocity becomes lower than that reported for a standard culture medium. Initially, the presence of MC in the medium hinders both the colony spreading, due to a gradual change in the average size and shape of cells and their distribution in the colony, and the cell motility in the gelled medium. Furthermore, at longer culture times enlarged cells appear at random in the border region of the colony. These cells behave as obstacles (pinning sites) for the displacement of smaller cells towards the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough fronts yields the set of exponents α =0.63±0.04,β =0.75±0.05, and z =0.84±0.05, which is close to that expected for a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model.

  8. Colony Size of Phaeocystis Antarctica (Prymnesiophyceae) as Influenced by Zooplankton Grazers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haptophyte Phaeocystis antarctica is a dominant phytoplankton species in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, and exists as solitary cells and mucilaginous colonies that differ by several orders of magnitude in size. Recent studies with P. globosa suggested that colony formation and enl...

  9. Prospective surface marker-based isolation and expansion of fetal endothelial colony-forming cells from human term placenta.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jatin; Seppanen, Elke; Chong, Mark S K; Yeo, Julie S L; Teo, Erin Y L; Chan, Jerry K Y; Fisk, Nicholas M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2013-11-01

    The term placenta is a highly vascularized tissue and is usually discarded upon birth. Our objective was to isolate clinically relevant quantities of fetal endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from human term placenta and to compare them to the well-established donor-matched umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived ECFCs. A sorting strategy was devised to enrich for CD45-CD34+CD31Lo cells prior to primary plating to obtain pure placental ECFCs (PL-ECFCs) upon culture. UCB-ECFCs were derived using a well-described assay. PL-ECFCs were fetal in origin and expressed the same cell surface markers as UCB-ECFCs. Most importantly, a single term placenta could yield as many ECFCs as 27 UCB donors. PL-ECFCs and UCB-ECFCs had similar in vitro and in vivo vessel forming capacities and restored mouse hind limb ischemia in similar proportions. Gene expression profiles were only minimally divergent between PL-ECFCs and UCB-ECFCs, probably reflecting a vascular source versus a circulating source. Finally, PL-ECFCs and UCB-ECFCs displayed similar hierarchies between high and low proliferative colonies. We report a robust strategy to isolate ECFCs from human term placentas based on their cell surface expression. This yielded much larger quantities of ECFCs than UCB, but the cells were comparable in immunophenotype, gene expression, and in vivo functional ability. We conclude that PL-ECFCs have significant bio-banking and clinical translatability potential.

  10. Differential spheroid formation by oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carlin; Lee, Casey; Atakilit, Amha; Siu, Amanda; Ramos, Daniel M

    2014-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) make up 96% of all oral cancers. Most laboratory SCC studies grow cells as a monolayer, which does not accurately represent the disease in vivo. We used a more relevant multicellular spheroid (MCS) model to study this disease. The SCC9β6KDFyn cell line, which expresses full-length β6 and a kinase dead Fyn formed the largest MCS. Cell adhesive properties are dynamic and N-cadherin was increased in the largest MCS. c-Raf mediates the survival of tumor cells and was consistently expressed both in monolayers and in the MCS by SCC9β6D1 cells which lack the β6 cytoplasmic tail and, do not activate Fyn. SCC9β6KDFyn cells also express high levels of c-Raf when grown as spheroids in which Fyn suppression stimulates MCS formation. Tumor microenvironment and growth patterns modulate cell behavior and suppression of Fyn kinase may promote MCS growth.

  11. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M.; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A.; Patmanidi, Alexandra L.; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell–induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable. PMID:25915587

  12. Combination of stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilizes the highest number of primitive haemopoietic progenitors as shown by pre-colony-forming unit (pre-CFU) assay.

    PubMed

    Horsfall, M J; Hui, C H; To, L B; Begley, C G; Basser, R L; Simmons, P J

    2000-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with poor prognosis carcinoma of the breast underwent peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization using five different regimens. The yields of primitive haemopoietic progenitors were quantified by a recently described pre-colony-forming unit (pre-CFU) assay using limiting dilution analysis (LDA). Results of days 14 and 35 pre-CFU were also correlated with conventional CD34+ cell enumeration, CFU-GM (granulocyte-macrophage) and long-term culture-initiating cell (LTCIC) assays. The yield of pre-CFUs with the combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF) was significantly higher than with G-CSF alone, cyclophosphamide (Cyclo) and granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-3 and GM-CSF, or Cyclo alone. No significant correlation between neutrophil engraftment and pre-CFU could be demonstrated. Furthermore, CFU-GM was shown to bear a stronger correlation with pre-CFU and LTCIC than CD34+ cell measurement; thus, CFU-GM remains a useful biological tool for haemopoietic stem cell assay. We conclude that the combination of G-CSF and SCF mobilizes the highest number of pre-CFUs as measured by functional pre-CFU assay, which provides an alternative measurement of primitive haemopoietic progenitors to the LTCIC assay.

  13. Diatom Cell Size, Coloniality and Motility: Trade-Offs between Temperature, Salinity and Nutrient Supply with Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Filip; Norberg, Jon; Snoeijs, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    Reduction in body size has been proposed as a universal response of organisms, both to warming and to decreased salinity. However, it is still controversial if size reduction is caused by temperature or salinity on their own, or if other factors interfere as well. We used natural benthic diatom communities to explore how “body size” (cells and colonies) and motility change along temperature (2–26°C) and salinity (0.5–7.8) gradients in the brackish Baltic Sea. Fourth-corner analysis confirmed that small cell and colony sizes were associated with high temperature in summer. Average community cell volume decreased linearly with 2.2% per °C. However, cells were larger with artificial warming when nutrient concentrations were high in the cold season. Average community cell volume increased by 5.2% per °C of artificial warming from 0 to 8.5°C and simultaneously there was a selection for motility, which probably helped to optimize growth rates by trade-offs between nutrient supply and irradiation. Along the Baltic Sea salinity gradient cell size decreased with decreasing salinity, apparently mediated by nutrient stoichiometry. Altogether, our results suggest that climate change in this century may polarize seasonality by creating two new niches, with elevated temperature at high nutrient concentrations in the cold season (increasing cell size) and elevated temperature at low nutrient concentrations in the warm season (decreasing cell size). Higher temperature in summer and lower salinity by increased land-runoff are expected to decrease the average cell size of primary producers, which is likely to affect the transfer of energy to higher trophic levels. PMID:25279720

  14. Associative memory cells: Formation, function and perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin-Hui; Cui, Shan

    2017-01-01

    Associative learning and memory are common activities in life, and their cellular infrastructures constitute the basis of cognitive processes. Although neuronal plasticity emerges after memory formation, basic units and their working principles for the storage and retrieval of associated signals remain to be revealed. Current reports indicate that associative memory cells, through their mutual synapse innervations among the co-activated sensory cortices, are recruited to fulfill the integration, storage and retrieval of multiple associated signals, and serve associative thinking and logical reasoning. In this review, we aim to summarize associative memory cells in their formation, features and functional impacts.

  15. Successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells in children with cancer using plerixafor (Mozobil) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Avramova, Boryana E; Yordanova, Maya N; Konstantinov, Dobrin N; Bobev, Dragan G

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation in three children with malignant diseases by using plerixafor (Mozobil; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) after failed previous mobilizations. A median sixfold increase in the number of circulating CD34+ cells after plerixafor treatment as compared with the baseline level was observed. An optimal CD34+ cell count for transplantation with one or two leukapheresis sessions was achieved. Mobilization using plerixafor was found to be safe with no adverse events. Therefore, the combination of G-CSF and plerixafor in children results in effective increases in peripheral CD34+ cell counts and reduces the risk of mobilization failure.

  16. Successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells in children with cancer using plerixafor (Mozobil™) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Avramova, Boryana E; Yordanova, Maya N; Konstantinov, Dobrin N; Bobev, Dragan G

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation in three children with malignant diseases by using plerixafor (Mozobil™; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) after failed previous mobilizations. A median sixfold increase in the number of circulating CD34+ cells after plerixafor treatment as compared with the baseline level was observed. An optimal CD34+ cell count for transplantation with one or two leukapheresis sessions was achieved. Mobilization using plerixafor was found to be safe with no adverse events. Therefore, the combination of G-CSF and plerixafor in children results in effective increases in peripheral CD34+ cell counts and reduces the risk of mobilization failure. PMID:21966213

  17. Presence of Calcium Lowers the Expansion of Bacillus subtilis Colony Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mhatre, Eisha; Sundaram, Anandaroopan; Hölscher, Theresa; Mühlstädt, Mike; Bossert, Jörg; Kovács, Ákos T.

    2017-01-01

    Robust colony formation by Bacillus subtilis is recognized as one of the sessile, multicellular lifestyles of this bacterium. Numerous pathways and genes are responsible for the architecturally complex colony structure development. Cells in the biofilm colony secrete extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) and protein components (TasA and the hydrophobin BslA) that hold them together and provide a protective hydrophobic shield. Cells also secrete surfactin with antimicrobial as well as surface tension reducing properties that aid cells to colonize the solid surface. Depending on the environmental conditions, these secreted components of the colony biofilm can also promote the flagellum-independent surface spreading of B. subtilis, called sliding. In this study, we emphasize the influence of Ca2+ in the medium on colony expansion of B. subtilis. Interestingly, the availability of Ca2+ has no major impact on the induction of complex colony morphology. However, in the absence of this divalent ion, peripheral cells of the colony expand radially at later stages of development, causing colony size to increase. We demonstrate that the secreted extracellular compounds, EPS, BslA, and surfactin facilitate colony expansion after biofilm maturation. We propose that Ca2+ hinders biofilm colony expansion by modifying the amphiphilic properties of surfactin. PMID:28212310

  18. OpenCFU, a new free and open-source software to count cell colonies and other circular objects.

    PubMed

    Geissmann, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    Counting circular objects such as cell colonies is an important source of information for biologists. Although this task is often time-consuming and subjective, it is still predominantly performed manually. The aim of the present work is to provide a new tool to enumerate circular objects from digital pictures and video streams. Here, I demonstrate that the created program, OpenCFU, is very robust, accurate and fast. In addition, it provides control over the processing parameters and is implemented in an intuitive and modern interface. OpenCFU is a cross-platform and open-source software freely available at http://opencfu.sourceforge.net.

  19. Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from CD4+ T Cells Contributes to Control of a Blood-Borne Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Gabrielly L.; Anidi, Chioma; Hamburger, Rebecca; Pham, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of leukocyte population size and activation state is crucial for an effective immune response. In malaria, Plasmodium parasites elicit robust host expansion of macrophages and monocytes, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that myeloid expansion during P. chabaudi infection is dependent upon both CD4+ T cells and the cytokine Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (MCSF). Single-cell RNA-Seq analysis on antigen-experienced T cells revealed robust expression of Csf1, the gene encoding MCSF, in a sub-population of CD4+ T cells with distinct transcriptional and surface phenotypes. Selective deletion of Csf1 in CD4+ cells during P. chabaudi infection diminished proliferation and activation of certain myeloid subsets, most notably lymph node-resident CD169+ macrophages, and resulted in increased parasite burden and impaired recovery of infected mice. Depletion of CD169+ macrophages during infection also led to increased parasitemia and significant host mortality, confirming a previously unappreciated role for these cells in control of P. chabaudi. This work establishes the CD4+ T cell as a physiologically relevant source of MCSF in vivo; probes the complexity of the CD4+ T cell response during type 1 infection; and delineates a novel mechanism by which T helper cells regulate myeloid cells to limit growth of a blood-borne intracellular pathogen. PMID:27923070

  20. Contribution of Vascular Cells to Neointimal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Falei; Wang, Dong; Xu, Kang; Wang, Jixian; Zhang, Zhijun; Yang, Li; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Li, Song

    2017-01-01

    The de-differentiation and proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are widely accepted as the major contributor to vascular remodeling. However, recent studies indicate that vascular stem cells (VSCs) also play an important role, but their relative contribution remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used genetic lineage tracing approach to further investigate the contribution of SMCs and VSCs to neointimal thickening in response to endothelium denudation injury or artery ligation. In vitro and in vivo analysis of MYH11-cre/Rosa-loxP-RFP mouse artery showed that SMCs proliferated at a much slower rate than non-SMCs. Upon denudation or ligation injury, two distinct types of neointima were identified: Type-I neointimal cells mainly involved SMCs, while Type II mainly involved non-SMCs. Using Sox10-cre/Rosa-loxP-LacZ mice, we found that Sox10+ cells were one of the cell sources in neointima. In addition, lineage tracing using Tie2-cre/Rosa-LoxP-RFP showed that endothelial cells also contributed to the neointimal formation, but rarely transdifferentiated into mesenchymal lineages. These results provide a novel insight into the contribution of vascular cells to neointima formation, and have significant impact on the development of more effective therapies that target specific vascular cell types. PMID:28060852

  1. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  2. Kinetics of human hemopoietic cells after in vivo administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Aglietta, M; Piacibello, W; Sanavio, F; Stacchini, A; Aprá, F; Schena, M; Mossetti, C; Carnino, F; Caligaris-Cappio, F; Gavosto, F

    1989-01-01

    The kinetic changes induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on hemopoietic cells were assessed in physiological conditions by administering GM-CSF (8 micrograms/kg per d) for 3 d to nine patients with solid tumors and normal bone marrow (BM), before chemotherapy. GM-CSF increased the number of circulating granulocytes and monocytes; platelets, erythrocytes, lymphocyte number, and subsets were unmodified. GM-CSF increased the percentage of BM S phase BFU-E (from 32 +/- 7 to 79 +/- 16%), day 14 colony-forming unit granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) (from 43 +/- 20 to 82 +/- 11%) and day 7 CFU-GM (from 41 +/- 14 to 56 +/- 20%). The percentage of BM myeloblasts, promyelocytes, and myelocytes in S phase increased from 26 +/- 14 to 41 +/- 6%, and that of erythroblasts increased from 25 +/- 12 to 30 +/- 12%. This suggests that GM-CSF activates both erythroid and granulomonopoietic progenitors but that, among the morphologically recognizable BM precursors, only the granulomonopoietic lineage is a direct target of the molecule. GM-CSF increased the birth rate of cycling cells from 1.3 to 3.4 cells %/h and decreased the duration of the S phase from 14.3 to 9.1 h and the cell cycle time from 86 to 26 h. After treatment discontinuation, the number of circulating granulocytes and monocytes rapidly fell. The proportion of S phase BM cells dropped to values lower than pretreatment levels, suggesting a period of relative refractoriness to cell cycle-active antineoplastic agents. PMID:2643633

  3. Expression of protease-activated receptor 1 and 2 and anti-tubulogenic activity of protease-activated receptor 1 in human endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Tiago M; Vara, Dina S; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Pula, Giordano

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are obtained from the culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (hPBMNC) fractions and are characterised by high proliferative and pro-vasculogenic potential, which makes them of great interest for cell therapy. Here, we describe the detection of protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and 2 amongst the surface proteins expressed in ECFCs. Both receptors are functionally coupled to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, which become activated and phosphorylated in response to selective PAR1- or PAR2-activating peptides. Specific stimulation of PAR1, but not PAR2, significantly inhibits capillary-like tube formation by ECFCs in vitro, suggesting that tubulogenesis is negatively regulated by proteases able to stimulate PAR1 (e.g. thrombin). The activation of ERKs is not involved in the regulation of tubulogenesis in vitro, as suggested by use of the MEK inhibitor PD98059 and by the fact that PAR2 stimulation activates ERKs without affecting capillary tube formation. Both qPCR and immunoblotting showed a significant downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor 2 (VEGFR2) in response to PAR1 stimulation. Moreover, the addition of VEGF (50-100 ng/ml) but not basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) (25-100 ng/ml) rescued tube formation by ECFCs treated with PAR1-activating peptide. Therefore, we propose that reduction of VEGF responsiveness resulting from down-regulation of VEGFR2 is underlying the anti-tubulogenic effect of PAR1 activation. Although the role of PAR2 remains elusive, this study sheds new light on the regulation of the vasculogenic activity of ECFCs and suggests a potential link between adult vasculogenesis and the coagulation cascade.

  4. Continuum Theory of Dislocations: Cell Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limkumnerd, Surachate; Sethna, James P.

    2005-03-01

    Line-like topological defects inside metals are called dislocations. These dislocations in late stages of hardening form patterns called cell structures. We are developing a mesoscale theory for the formation of cell structures that systematically derives the order parameter fields and evolution laws from the conserved topological Burgers vector density or the Nye dislocation tensor. (In classical plasticity theories, describing scales large compared to these cells, one normally bypasses the complicated motions of the dislocations by supplying yield surface and plastic hardening function in order to determine the evolution of state variables.) Using Landau approach and a closure approximation, an evolution equation for the dislocation density tensor is obtained by employing simple symmetry arguments and the constraint that the elastic energy must decrease with time at fixed stress. The evolution laws lead to singularity formation at finite times, which we expect will be related to the formation of cell walls. Implementation of finite difference simulations using the upwind scheme and the results in one and higher dimensions will be discussed.

  5. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  6. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  7. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  8. Density of founder cells affects spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kovács, Akos T

    2014-10-01

    In nature, most bacteria live in surface-attached sedentary communities known as biofilms. Biofilms are often studied with respect to bacterial interactions. Many cells inhabiting biofilms are assumed to express 'cooperative traits', like the secretion of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). These traits can enhance biofilm-related properties, such as stress resilience or colony expansion, while being costly to the cells that express them. In well-mixed populations cooperation is difficult to achieve, because non-cooperative individuals can reap the benefits of cooperation without having to pay the costs. The physical process of biofilm growth can, however, result in the spatial segregation of cooperative from non-cooperative individuals. This segregation can prevent non-cooperative cells from exploiting cooperative neighbors. Here we examine the interaction between spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. We show, experimentally and by mathematical modeling, that the density of cells at the onset of biofilm growth affects pattern formation during biofilm growth. At low initial cell densities, co-cultured strains strongly segregate in space, whereas spatial segregation does not occur at high initial cell densities. As a consequence, EPS-producing cells have a competitive advantage over non-cooperative mutants when biofilms are initiated at a low density of founder cells, whereas EPS-deficient cells have an advantage at high cell densities. These results underline the importance of spatial pattern formation for competition among bacterial strains and the evolution of microbial cooperation.

  9. Identification and characterization of receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on human placenta and trophoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uzumaki, Hiroya; Okabe, Tetsuro; Sasaki, Norio; Hagiwara, Koichi; Takaku, Fumimaro; Tobita, Masahito; Yasukawa, Kaoru ); Ito, Seiga ); Umezawa, Yoshimi )

    1989-12-01

    Since radioiodination of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is difficult, the authors synthesized a mutein of human G-CSF that retains full biological activity and receptor-binding capacity for at least 2 weeks after radioiodination. Receptors for human G-CSF were characterized in the plasma membrane fraction from the human term placenta (human placental membranes) and trophoblastic cells by using the {sup 125}I-labeled mutein of human G-CSF (KW-2228). The specific binding of {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 to placental membranes was pH-dependent, with maximal specific binding at pH 7.8; it increased linearly with protein to 3.7 mg of protein per ml and was both time- and temperature-dependent, with maximal binding at 4{degree}C after a 24-hr incubation. When the authors examined the ability of hematopoietic growth factors to inhibit {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 binding, they found that KW-2228 and intact human G-CSF ihibited {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 binding, whereas erythropoietin or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor did not. Scatchard analysis revealed a single receptor type. The human G-CSF receptors on human placental membranes were shown to consist of two molecular species that could be specifically cross-linked to {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228. Human trophoblastic cells, T3M-3, also possessed a single receptor for G-CSF. They have identified the receptor for human G-CSF on human placental membranes and trophoblastic cells.

  10. Catheter colonization and abscess formation due to Staphylococcus epidermidis with normal and small-colony-variant phenotype is mouse strain dependent.

    PubMed

    Sander, Gunnar; Börner, Tina; Kriegeskorte, André; von Eiff, Christof; Becker, Karsten; Mahabir, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) form a thick, multilayered biofilm on foreign bodies and are a major cause of nosocomial implant-associated infections. Although foreign body infection models are well-established, limited in vivo data are available for CoNS with small-colony-variant (SCV) phenotype described as causative agents in implant-associated infections. Therefore, we investigated the impact of the Staphylococcus epidermidis phenotype on colonization of implanted PVC catheters and abscess formation in three different mouse strains. Following introduction of a catheter subcutaneously in each flank of 8- to 12-week-old inbred C57BL/6JCrl (B6J), outbred Crl:CD1(ICR) (CD-1), and inbred BALB/cAnNCrl (BALB/c) male mice, doses of S. epidermidis O-47 wild type, its hemB mutant with stable SCV phenotype, or its complemented mutant at concentrations of 10(6) to 10(9) colony forming units (CFUs) were gently spread onto each catheter. On day 7, mice were sacrificed and the size of the abscesses as well as bacterial colonization was determined. A total of 11,500 CFUs of the complemented mutant adhered to the catheter in BALB/c followed by 9,960 CFUs and 9,900 CFUs from S. epidermidis wild type in BALB/c and CD-1, respectively. SCV colonization was highest in CD-1 with 9,500 CFUs, whereas SCVs were not detected in B6J. The minimum dose that led to colonization or abscess formation in all mouse strains was 10(7) or 10(8) CFUs of the normal phenotype, respectively. A minimum dose of 10(8) or 10(9) CFU of the hemB mutant with stable SCV phenotype led to colonization only or abscess formation, respectively. The largest abscesses were detected in BALB/c inoculated with wild type bacteria or SCV (64 mm(2) vs. 28 mm(2)). Our results indicate that colonization and abscess formation by different phenotypes of S. epidermidis in a foreign body infection model is most effective in inbred BALB/c followed by outbred CD-1 and inbred B6J mice.

  11. Do two different stem cell grafts: G-CSF stimulated and unstimulated bone marrow differ according to hematopoietic colony forming capacity?

    PubMed

    Özgüner, Meltem; Azık, Mehmet Fatih; Tavil, Betül; Bozkaya, Ikbal; Köksal, Yasin; Canal, Elif; Uçkan, Duygu; Tunç, Bahattin

    2014-06-01

    The study was designed to compare colony forming capacity of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulated bone marrow (G-BM) with standard unstimulated bone marrow (U-BM) of healthy donors of pediatric patients. CFU-Assay results of 26 healthy donors of pediatric patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were analyzed retrospectively. 13 of donors received 10 μg/kg per day of G-CSF as a single injection for 3 consecutive days and other 13 of donors had unstimulated BM. Colony forming capacity of hematopoietic stem cells evaluated with Colony Forming Unit-Assay (CFU-Assay) with in semi-solid agar culture medium after 14-18 days of culture period. CFU-Assay results of G-BM and U-BM (expressed as means) were; Burst Forming Unit-Erythroid (BFU-E): 15.20 × 10(4)/kg and 8.38 × 10(4)/kg, Colony Forming Unit-Granulocyte Macrophage (CFU-GM): 10.35 × 10(4)/kg and 5.67 × 10(4)/kg, Colony Forming Unit-Erythroid (CFU-E): 0.59 × 10(4)/kg and 0.33 × 10(4)/kg, CFU-Granulocyte Erythroid Macrophage Megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM): 0.52 × 10(4)/kg and 0.53 × 10(4)/kg respectively. BFU-E and CFU-GM capacity of G-BM was increased and statistically significantly different than standard U-BM (p ⩽ 0.01). In conclusion, increased colony forming capacity of hematopoietic stem cells of G-BM when compared with standard unstimulated BM could be a major advantage for transplantation.

  12. Intravenous Administration of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Overexpressing Integrin β1 Augments Angiogenesis in Ischemic Legs.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuko; Takemura, Genzou; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Okada, Hideshi; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Kawamura, Itta; Watanabe, Takatomo; Morishita, Kentaro; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Miyazaki, Nagisa; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Masanori; Mikami, Atsushi; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2016-02-01

    When injected directly into ischemic tissue in patients with peripheral artery disease, the reparative capacity of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) appears to be limited by their poor survival. We, therefore, attempted to improve the survival of transplanted EPCs through intravenous injection and gene modification. We anticipated that overexpression of integrin β1 will enable injected EPCs to home to ischemic tissue, which abundantly express extracellular matrix proteins, the ligands for integrins. In addition, integrin β1 has an independent angiogenesis-stimulating function. Human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs; late-outgrowth EPCs) were transduced using a lentiviral vector encoding integrin β1 (ITGB1) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). We then locally or systemically injected phosphate-buffered saline or the genetically modified ECFCs (GFP-ECFCs or ITGB1-ECFCs; 1 × 10(5) cells each) into NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull mice whose right femoral arteries had been occluded 24 hours earlier. Upregulation of extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, was apparent in the ischemic legs. Four weeks later, blood perfusion of the ischemic limb was significantly augmented only in the ITGB1-ECFC group. Scanning electron microscopy of vascular casts revealed increases in the perfused blood vessels in the ischemic legs of mice in the ITGB1-ECFC group and significant increases in the density of both capillaries and arterioles. Transplanted ECFC-derived vessels accounted for 28% ± 4.2% of the vessels in the ITGB1-ECFC group, with no cell fusion. Intravenous administration of ECFCs engineered to home to ischemic tissue appears to efficiently mediate therapeutic angiogenesis in a mouse model of peripheral artery disease. Significance: The intravenous administration of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) genetically modified to overexpress integrin β1 effectively stimulated angiogenesis in ischemic mouse hindlimbs. Transplanted ECFCs were

  13. Intravenous Administration of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Overexpressing Integrin β1 Augments Angiogenesis in Ischemic Legs

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Kazuko; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Okada, Hideshi; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Kawamura, Itta; Watanabe, Takatomo; Morishita, Kentaro; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Miyazaki, Nagisa; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Masanori; Mikami, Atsushi; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    When injected directly into ischemic tissue in patients with peripheral artery disease, the reparative capacity of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) appears to be limited by their poor survival. We, therefore, attempted to improve the survival of transplanted EPCs through intravenous injection and gene modification. We anticipated that overexpression of integrin β1 will enable injected EPCs to home to ischemic tissue, which abundantly express extracellular matrix proteins, the ligands for integrins. In addition, integrin β1 has an independent angiogenesis-stimulating function. Human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs; late-outgrowth EPCs) were transduced using a lentiviral vector encoding integrin β1 (ITGB1) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). We then locally or systemically injected phosphate-buffered saline or the genetically modified ECFCs (GFP-ECFCs or ITGB1-ECFCs; 1 × 105 cells each) into NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull mice whose right femoral arteries had been occluded 24 hours earlier. Upregulation of extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, was apparent in the ischemic legs. Four weeks later, blood perfusion of the ischemic limb was significantly augmented only in the ITGB1-ECFC group. Scanning electron microscopy of vascular casts revealed increases in the perfused blood vessels in the ischemic legs of mice in the ITGB1-ECFC group and significant increases in the density of both capillaries and arterioles. Transplanted ECFC-derived vessels accounted for 28% ± 4.2% of the vessels in the ITGB1-ECFC group, with no cell fusion. Intravenous administration of ECFCs engineered to home to ischemic tissue appears to efficiently mediate therapeutic angiogenesis in a mouse model of peripheral artery disease. Significance The intravenous administration of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) genetically modified to overexpress integrin β1 effectively stimulated angiogenesis in ischemic mouse hindlimbs. Transplanted ECFCs were observed

  14. Downregulation of ROS-FIG inhibits cell proliferation, colony‑formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gang; Hu, Chenghuan; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Feizhou; Huang, Wei; Xu, Hongbo; Nie, Wanpin

    2014-09-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is the second most common primary liver cancer with poor responsiveness to existing drug therapies. Therefore, novel treatment strategies against ICC are required to improve survival. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of fused-in-glioblastoma-c-ros-oncogene1 (FIG-ROS) fusion gene in ICC. ROS was positively expressed in ICC tissues and HUCCT1 cells. Plasmids expressing ROS- and FIG-specific shRNAs were constructed and transfected into HUCCT1 cells. The results showed that single transfection of ROS- or FIG-specific shRNA inhibited HUCCT1 cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis. Moreover, the co-inhibition of ROS- and FIG-specific shRNA exhibited stronger effects on HUCCT1 cell proliferation, apoptosis, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, when compared to single inhibition of ROS and FIG. Furthermore, findings of this study suggested that the AKT signaling pathway was involved in the ROS-FIG-mediated biological processes of HUCCT1 cells. In summary, the results suggest that FIG-ROS plays an oncogenic role in ICC. Additionally, ROS1-6290 and FIG-363 segments may become effective therapeutic targets for ICC harboring ROS-FIG fusion protein.

  15. Collagen-IV supported embryoid bodies formation and differentiation from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Taru Sharma, G.; Dubey, Pawan K.; Verma, Om Prakash; Pratheesh, M.D.; Nath, Amar; Sai Kumar, G.

    2012-08-03

    Graphical abstract: EBs formation, characterization and expression of germinal layers marker genes of in vivo developed teratoma using four different types of extracellular matrices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV matrix is found cytocompatible for EBs formation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Established 3D microenvironment for ES cells development and differentiation into three germ layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV may be useful as promising candidate for ES cells based therapeutic applications. -- Abstract: Embryoid bodies (EBs) are used as in vitro model to study early extraembryonic tissue formation and differentiation. In this study, a novel method using three dimensional extracellular matrices for in vitro generation of EBs from buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells and its differentiation potential by teratoma formation was successfully established. In vitro derived inner cell masses (ICMs) of hatched buffalo blastocyst were cultured on buffalo fetal fibroblast feeder layer for primary cell colony formation. For generation of EBs, pluripotent ES cells were seeded onto four different types of extracellular matrices viz; collagen-IV, laminin, fibronectin and matrigel using undifferentiating ES cell culture medium. After 5 days of culture, ESCs gradually grew into aggregates and formed simple EBs having circular structures. Twenty-six days later, they formed cystic EBs over collagen matrix with higher EBs formation and greater proliferation rate as compared to other extracellular matrices. Studies involving histological observations, fluorescence microscopy and RT-PCR analysis of the in vivo developed teratoma revealed that presence of all the three germ layer derivatives viz. ectoderm (NCAM), mesoderm (Flk-1) and endoderm (AFP). In conclusion, the method described here demonstrates a simple and cost-effective way of generating EBs from buffalo ES cells. Collagen-IV matrix was found cytocompatible as it

  16. Biologic Activity of Autologous, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Secreting Alveolar Soft Parts Sarcoma and Clear Cell Sarcoma Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, John; Fisher, David E.; Demetri, George D.; Neuberg, Donna; Allsop, Stephen A.; Fonseca, Catia; Nakazaki, Yukoh; Nemer, David; Raut, Chandrajit P.; George, Suzanne; Morgan, Jeffrey A.; Wagner, Andrew J.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ritz, Jerome; Lezcano, Cecilia; Mihm, Martin; Canning, Christine; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Alveolar soft parts sarcoma (ASPS) and clear cell sarcoma (CCS) are rare mesenchymal malignancies driven by chromosomal translocations that activate members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) family. However, in contrast to malignant melanoma, little is known about their immunogenicity. To learn more about the host response to ASPS and CCS, we conducted a phase I clinical trial of vaccination with irradiated, autologous sarcoma cells engineered by adenoviral mediated gene transfer to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Experimental Design Metastatic tumors from ASPS and CCS patients were resected, processed to single cell suspensions, transduced with a replication defective adenoviral vector encoding GM-CSF, and irradiated. Immunizations were administered subcutaneously and intradermally weekly times three and then every other week. Results Vaccines were successfully manufactured for 11 of the 12 enrolled patients. Eleven subjects received from 3 to 13 immunizations. Toxicities were restricted to grade 1–2 skin reactions at inoculation sites. Vaccination elicited local dendritic cell infiltrates and stimulated T cell mediated delayed type-hypersensitivity reactions to irradiated, autologous tumor cells. Antibody responses to tissue-type plasminogen activator (tTPA) and angiopoietins-1/2 were detected. Tumor biopsies showed programmed death-1 (PD-1) positive CD8+ T cells in association with PD ligand-1 (PD-L1) expressing sarcoma cells. No tumor regressions were observed. Conclusions Vaccination with irradiated, GM-CSF secreting autologous sarcoma cell vaccines is feasible, safe, and biologically active. Concurrent targeting of angiogenic cytokines and antagonism of the PD-1 negative regulatory pathway might intensify immune-mediated tumor destruction. PMID:25805798

  17. Weekly CODE chemotherapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for relapsed or refractory small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Tsuchiya, S; Minato, K; Sunaga, N; Ishihara, S I; Makimoto, T; Naruse, I; Hoshino, H; Watanabe, S; Saitoh, R; Mori, M

    2000-01-01

    We used cisplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide (CODE) plus recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) weekly for salvage chemotherapy in relapsed or refractory small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We reviewed the medical charts of patients between January 1993 and December 1996 at the National Nishi-Gunma Hospital. Twenty patients were treated with salvage chemotherapy. The overall response rate was 55.0%. The median survival time of extensive disease patients from the start of CODE therapy was 23 weeks and the 1-year survival rate was 21.0%. Toxicities were severe, especially in myelosuppression. CODE could be selected as a salvage therapy for chemotherapy- relapsed SCLC cases.

  18. PAK6 targets to cell–cell adhesions through its N-terminus in a Cdc42-dependent manner to drive epithelial colony escape

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Elizabeth M.; Sun, Xiaowen; Olberding, Jordan R.; Ha, Byung Hak; Boggon, Titus J.; Calderwood, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The six serine/threonine kinases in the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family are important regulators of cell adhesion, motility and survival. PAK6, which is overexpressed in prostate cancer, was recently reported to localize to cell–cell adhesions and to drive epithelial cell colony escape. Here we report that PAK6 targeting to cell–cell adhesions occurs through its N-terminus, requiring both its Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) domain and an adjacent polybasic region for maximal targeting efficiency. We find PAK6 localization to cell–cell adhesions is Cdc42-dependent, as Cdc42 knockdown inhibits PAK6 targeting to cell–cell adhesions. We further find the ability of PAK6 to drive epithelial cell colony escape requires kinase activity and is disrupted by mutations that perturb PAK6 cell–cell adhesion targeting. Finally, we demonstrate that all type II PAKs (PAK4, PAK5 and PAK6) target to cell–cell adhesions, albeit to differing extents, but PAK1 (a type I PAK) does not. Notably, the ability of a PAK isoform to drive epithelial colony escape correlates with its targeting to cell–cell adhesions. We conclude that PAKs have a broader role in the regulation of cell–cell adhesions than previously appreciated. PMID:26598554

  19. Inhibition of the colony-stimulating-factor-1 receptor affects the resistance of lung cancer cells to cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Pass, Harvey I.; Lavilla, Carmencita; Canino, Claudia; Goparaju, Chandra; Preiss, Jordan; Noreen, Samrah; Blandino, Giovanni; Cioce, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we show that multiple lung cancer cell lines contain cisplatin resistant cell subpopulations expressing the Colony-Stimulating-Factor-Receptor-1 (CSF-1R) and surviving chemotherapy-induced stress. By exploiting siRNA-mediated knock down in vitro and the use of an investigational CSF-1R TKI (JNJ-40346527) in vitro and in vivo, we show that expression and function of the receptor are required for the clonogenicity and chemoresistance of the cell lines. Thus, inhibition of the kinase activity of the receptor reduced the levels of EMT-associated genes, stem cell markers and chemoresistance genes. Additionally, the number of high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) expressing cells was reduced, consequent to the lack of cisplatin-induced increase of ALDH isoforms. This affected the collective chemoresistance of the treated cultures. Treatment of tumor bearing mice with JNJ-40346527, at pharmacologically relevant doses, produced strong chemo-sensitizing effects in vivo. These anticancer effects correlated with a reduced number of CSF-1Rpos cells, in tumors excised from the treated mice. Depletion of the CD45pos cells within the treated tumors did not, apparently, play a major role in mediating the therapeutic response to the TKI. Thus, lung cancer cells express a functional CSF-1 and CSF-1R duo which mediates pro-tumorigenic effects in vivo and in vitro and can be targeted in a therapeutically relevant way. These observations complement the already known role for the CSF-1R at mediating the pro-tumorigenic properties of tumor-infiltrating immune components. PMID:27486763

  20. Production of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by gateway technology and transgenic rice cell culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Kuo; Huang, Li-Fen; Ho, Shin-Lon; Liao, Chun-Yu; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Ying-Hui; Yu, Su-May; Lu, Chung-An

    2012-05-01

    To establish a production platform for recombinant proteins in rice suspension cells, we first constructed a Gateway-compatible binary T-DNA destination vector. It provided a reliable and effective method for the rapid directional cloning of target genes into plant cells through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We used the approach to produce mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) in a rice suspension cell system. The promoter for the αAmy3 amylase gene, which is induced strongly by sugar depletion, drove the expression of mGM-CSF. The resulting recombinant protein was fused with the αAmy3 signal peptide and was secreted into the culture medium. The production of rice-derived mGM-CSF (rmGM-CSF) was scaled up successfully in a 2-L bioreactor, in which the highest yield of rmGM-CSF was 24.6 mg/L. Due to post-translational glycosylation, the molecular weight of rmGM-CSF was larger than that of recombinant mGM-CSF produced in Escherichia coli. The rmGM-CSF was bioactive and could stimulate the proliferation of a murine myeloblastic leukemia cell line, NSF-60.

  1. Pinning-depinning transition in a stochastic growth model for the evolution of cell colony fronts in a disordered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglia, Belén; Albano, Ezequiel V.; Guisoni, Nara

    2016-11-01

    We study a stochastic lattice model for cell colony growth, which takes into account proliferation, diffusion, and rotation of cells, in a culture medium with quenched disorder. The medium is composed of sites that inhibit any possible change in the internal state of the cells, representing the disorder, as well as by active medium sites that do not interfere with the cell dynamics. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we find that the velocity of the growing interface, which is taken as the order parameter of the model, strongly depends on the density of active medium sites (ρA). In fact, the model presents a (continuous) second-order pinning-depinning transition at a certain critical value of ρAcrit, such as, for ρA>ρAcrit , the interface moves freely across the disordered medium, but for ρA<ρAcrit the interface becomes irreversible pinned by the disorder. By determining the relevant critical exponents, our study reveals that within the depinned phase the interface can be rationalized in terms of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, but when approaching the critical threshold, the nonlinear term of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation tends to vanish and then the pinned interface belongs to the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson universality class.

  2. Pinning-depinning transition in a stochastic growth model for the evolution of cell colony fronts in a disordered medium.

    PubMed

    Moglia, Belén; Albano, Ezequiel V; Guisoni, Nara

    2016-11-01

    We study a stochastic lattice model for cell colony growth, which takes into account proliferation, diffusion, and rotation of cells, in a culture medium with quenched disorder. The medium is composed of sites that inhibit any possible change in the internal state of the cells, representing the disorder, as well as by active medium sites that do not interfere with the cell dynamics. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we find that the velocity of the growing interface, which is taken as the order parameter of the model, strongly depends on the density of active medium sites (ρ_{A}). In fact, the model presents a (continuous) second-order pinning-depinning transition at a certain critical value of ρ_{A}^{crit}, such as, for ρ_{A}>ρ_{A}^{crit}, the interface moves freely across the disordered medium, but for ρ_{A}<ρ_{A}^{crit} the interface becomes irreversible pinned by the disorder. By determining the relevant critical exponents, our study reveals that within the depinned phase the interface can be rationalized in terms of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, but when approaching the critical threshold, the nonlinear term of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation tends to vanish and then the pinned interface belongs to the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson universality class.

  3. An optimized colony forming assay for low-dose-radiation cell survival measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu J.; Sutherland B.; Hu W.; Ding N.; Ye C.; Usikalu M.; Li S.; Hu B.; Zhou G.

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a simple and reliable method to quantify the cell survival of low-dose irradiations. Two crucial factors were considered, the same number of cells plated in each flask and an appropriate interval between cell plating and irradiation. For the former, we optimized cell harvest with trypsin, diluted cells in one container, and directly seeded cells on the bottom of flasks in a low density before irradiation. Reproducible plating efficiency was obtained. For the latter, we plated cells on the bottom of flasks and then monitored the processing of attachment, cell cycle variations, and the plating efficiency after exposure to 20 cGy of X-rays. The results showed that a period of 4.5 h to 7.5 h after plating was suitable for further treatment. In order to confirm the reliability and feasibility of our method, we also measured the survival curves of these M059K and M059J glioma cell lines by following the optimized protocol and obtained consistent results reported by others with cell sorting system. In conclusion, we successfully developed a reliable and simple way to measure the survival fractions of human cells exposed to low dose irradiation, which might be helpful for the studies on low-dose radiation biology.

  4. Vaccination with Irradiated Autologous Melanoma Cells Engineered to Secrete Human Granulocyte--Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Generates Potent Antitumor Immunity in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soiffer, Robert; Lynch, Thomas; Mihm, Martin; Jung, Ken; Rhuda, Catherine; Schmollinger, Jan C.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Liebster, Laura; Lam, Prudence; Mentzer, Steven; Singer, Samuel; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Duda, Rosemary; Sober, Arthur; Bhan, Atul; Daley, John; Neuberg, Donna; Parry, Gordon; Rokovich, Joseph; Richards, Laurie; Drayer, Jan; Berns, Anton; Clift, Shirley; Cohen, Lawrence K.; Mulligan, Richard C.; Dranoff, Glenn

    1998-10-01

    We conducted a Phase I clinical trial investigating the biologic activity of vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete human granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic melanoma. Immunization sites were intensely infiltrated with T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages, and eosinophils in all 21 evaluable patients. Although metastatic lesions resected before vaccination were minimally infiltrated with cells of the immune system in all patients, metastatic lesions resected after vaccination were densely infiltrated with T lymphocytes and plasma cells and showed extensive tumor destruction (at least 80%), fibrosis, and edema in 11 of 16 patients examined. Antimelanoma cytotoxic T cell and antibody responses were associated with tumor destruction. These results demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent antitumor immunity in humans with metastatic melanoma.

  5. Pattern formation in cell membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis; Hategan, A.; Sengupta, K.; Sackmann, E.

    2004-03-01

    Strong adhesion of highly active cells often nucleates focal adhesions or related structures that are, over time, reinforced by cytoskeleton (actin, etc.). Red cells lack such complex adhesion systems, but they are shown here to also exhibit complex spatial patterns within an adhesive contact zone. While strong adhesion and spreading of the red cell to a dense poly-L-lysine surface appears complete in < 1 s by reflective interference microscopy, over longer times of 10-15 min or more distinct patterns in fluorescently labeled membrane components emerge. The fluorescent lipid Fl-PE (fluorescein phosphoethanolamine), in particular, is seen to diffuse and reorganize (eg. worm-like domains of <500 nm) within the contact zone, independent of whether the cell is intact or ruptured. Lipid patterns are accompanied by visible perturbations in band 3 distribution and weaker perturbations in membrane skeleton actin. Although fluorescent poly-L-lysine is shown to be uniform under cells, pressing down on the membrane quenches the lipid patterns and reveals the topographical basis for pattern formation. Regions of strong contact are thus separated by regions where the membrane is more distant from the surface.

  6. Stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exhibit therapeutic effects in a mouse model of CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Gonzalez-Toledo, Maria E; Fagan, Austin; Duan, Wei-Ming; Liu, Yanying; Zhang, Siyuan; Li, Bin; Piao, Chun-Shu; Nelson, Lila; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a Notch3 dominant mutation-induced cerebral small vascular disease, is characterized by progressive degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) of small arteries in the brain, leading to recurrent ischemic stroke, vascular dementia and death. To date, no treatment can stop or delay the progression of this disease. Herein, we determined the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (SCF+G-CSF) in a mouse model of CADASIL carrying the human mutant Notch3 gene. SCF+G-CSF was subcutaneously administered for 5 days and repeated 4 times with 1-4 month intervals. We found through water maze testing that SCF+G-CSF treatment improved cognitive function. SCF+G-CSF also attenuated vSMC degeneration in small arteries, increased cerebral blood vascular density, and inhibited apoptosis in CADASIL mice. We also discovered that loss of cerebral capillary endothelial cells and neural stem cells/neural progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) occurred in CADASIL mice. SCF+G-CSF treatment inhibited the CADASIL-induced cell loss in the endothelia and NSCs/NPCs and promoted neurogenesis. In an in vitro model of apoptosis, SCF+G-CSF prevented apoptotic cell death in vSMCs through AKT signaling and by inhibiting caspase-3 activity. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF restricts the pathological progression of CADASIL. This study offers new insights into developing therapeutic strategies for CADASIL.

  7. Spontaneous emergence of large-scale cell cycle synchronization in amoeba colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, David; Franck, Carl

    2014-06-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. Here we show that cell populations grown on a substrate spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state.

  8. Novel solar cells in a wire format.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Qiu, Longbin; Yang, Zhibin; Peng, Huisheng

    2013-06-21

    Photovoltaic devices in a wire format have recently attracted increasing attention as, compared with the conventional planar structure, they show unique and promising advantages. For instance, they are light-weight and can be easily woven into clothes or integrated into other structures, which enable applications in electronic textiles and various complex devices. In this tutorial review, the recent advancement in photovoltaic wires including both dye-sensitized and polymer solar cells are described. Two main architectures based on a single core-sheath fiber and twisted fibers are carefully illustrated with an emphasis on the comparison of various substrates which have been focused in past development. The current challenge including low energy conversion efficiency and low stability and future direction of the wire-shaped cell have been finally summarized.

  9. Treatment of complete spinal cord injury patients by autologous bone marrow cell transplantation and administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Chun; Shim, Yoo Shik; Ha, Yoon; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Park, So Ra; Choi, Byung Hyune; Park, Hyun Seon

    2005-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow cells into the injured spinal cord has been found to improve neurologic functions in experimental animal studies. However, it is unclear whether bone marrow cells can similarly improve the neurologic functions of complete spinal cord injury (SCI) in human patients. To address this issue, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of autologous bone marrow cell transplantation (BMT) in conjunction with the administration of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in six complete SCI patients. BMT in the injury site (1.1 x 10(6) cells/microL in a total of 1.8 mL) and subcutaneous GM-CSF administration were performed on five patients. One patient was treated with GM-CSF only. The follow-up periods were from 6 to 18 months, depending on the patients. Sensory improvements were noted immediately after the operations. Sensory recovery in the sacral segment was noted mainly 3 weeks to 7 months postoperatively. Significant motor improvements were noted 3 to 7 months postoperatively. Four patients showed neurologic improvements in their American Spiral Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades (from A to C). One patient improved to AIS grade B from A and the last patient remained in AIS grade A. No immediate worsening of neurologic symptoms was found. Side effects of GMCSF treatment such as a fever (>38 degrees C) and myalgia were noted. Serious complications increasing mortality and morbidity were not found. The follow-up study with magnetic resonance imaging 4-6 months after injury showed slight enhancement within the zone of BMT. Syrinx formation was not definitely found. BMT and GM-CSF administration represent a safe protocol to efficiently manage SCI patients, especially those with acute complete injury. To demonstrate the full therapeutic value of this protocol, long-term and more comprehensive case-control clinical studies are required.

  10. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) transiently suppresses mitogen-stimulated T-cell proliferative response

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, E; García-Castro, I; Esquivel, F; Hornedo, J; Cortes-Funes, H; Solovera, J; Alvarez-Mon, M

    1999-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulation factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that selectively promotes growth and maturation of neutrophils and may modulate the cytokine response to inflammatory stimuli. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of G-CSF on ex vivo peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) functions. Ten patients with breast cancer were included in a clinical trial in which r-metHuG-CSF was administrered daily for 5 days to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells. Ten healthy women were also included as controls. Our data show that G-CSF treatment induces an increase in peripheral blood leucocyte, neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. We have found a modulation in the percentages of CD19+, CD45+CD14+, CD4+CD45RA+ and CD4+CD45RO+ cells in PBMC fractions during G-CSF treatment. We have also found a significant reduction in the proliferative response of PBMC to mitogenic stimulation that reverted 14 days after the fifth and the last dose of G-CSF. Furthermore, it was not associated with significant changes in the pattern of cytokine production. The mechanism of this immunoregulatory effect is probably indirect since G-CSF receptor has not been found in T lymphocytes. This mechanism and its potential clinical applications remain to be elucidated. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10390001

  11. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Kátia Aparecida de Brito; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 μg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 – patients who received a single daily dose of 10 μg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 – patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3%) for Group 10 and 36 (24.7%) for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1–7) leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59) were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1–3) and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95). A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001). Conclusions To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed. PMID:26041417

  12. Branching instability in expanding bacterial colonies

    PubMed Central

    Giverso, Chiara; Verani, Marco; Ciarletta, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Self-organization in developing living organisms relies on the capability of cells to duplicate and perform a collective motion inside the surrounding environment. Chemical and mechanical interactions coordinate such a cooperative behaviour, driving the dynamical evolution of the macroscopic system. In this work, we perform an analytical and computational analysis to study pattern formation during the spreading of an initially circular bacterial colony on a Petri dish. The continuous mathematical model addresses the growth and the chemotactic migration of the living monolayer, together with the diffusion and consumption of nutrients in the agar. The governing equations contain four dimensionless parameters, accounting for the interplay among the chemotactic response, the bacteria–substrate interaction and the experimental geometry. The spreading colony is found to be always linearly unstable to perturbations of the interface, whereas branching instability arises in finite-element numerical simulations. The typical length scales of such fingers, which align in the radial direction and later undergo further branching, are controlled by the size parameters of the problem, whereas the emergence of branching is favoured if the diffusion is dominant on the chemotaxis. The model is able to predict the experimental morphologies, confirming that compact (resp. branched) patterns arise for fast (resp. slow) expanding colonies. Such results, while providing new insights into pattern selection in bacterial colonies, may finally have important applications for designing controlled patterns. PMID:25652464

  13. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    polyelectrolyte layer functioning as the surface dipole formation layer to provide better electrical contact with the photoactive layer. Due to the effectiveness of the conjugated polyelectrolyte layer, performance improvement was also observed. Furthermore, other issues regarding the semi-transparent tandem solar cells (e.g., photocurrent matching, exterior color tuning, and transparency tuning) are all explored to optimize best performance. In Chapter 5 and 6, the architectures of double- and triple-junction tandem solar cells are explored. Theoretically, triple-junction tandem solar cells with three photoactive absorbers with cascaded energy bandgaps have the potential to achieve higher performance, in comparison with double-junction tandem solar cells. Such expectations can be ascribed to the minimized carrier thermalization loss and further improved light absorption. However, the design of triple-junction solar cells often involves sophisticated multiple layer deposition as well as substantial optimization. Therefore, there is a lack of successful demonstrations of triple-junction solar cells outperforming the double-junction counterparts. To solve the incompatible issues related to the layer deposition in the fabrication, we proposed a novel architecture of inverted-structure tandem solar cells with newly designed interconnecting layers. Our design of interconnecting layers does not only focus on maintaining the orthogonal solution processing advantages, but also provides an excellent compatibility in the energy level alignment to allow different absorber materials to be used. Furthermore, we also explored the light management inside the double- and triple-junction tandem solar cells. The study of light management was carried out through optical simulation method based transfer matrix formalism. The intention is to obtain a balanced photocurrent output from each subcells inside the tandem solar cell, thus the minimal recombination loss at the contact of interconnecting

  14. Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor protects against apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial damage in ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF), also known as nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD+ biosynthesis pathway, plays a brain and neuronal protective role in ischemic stroke. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism of its neuroprotective effect after ischemia in the primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Using apoptotic cell death assay, fluorescent imaging, molecular biology, mitochondrial biogenesis measurements and Western blotting analysis, our results show that the overexpression of PBEF in neurons can significantly promote neuronal survival, reduce the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to nuclei and inhibit the activation of capase-3 after glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. We further found that the overexpression of PBEF can suppress glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, the loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and the reduction of PGC-1 and NRF-1 expressions. Furthermore, these beneficial effects by PBEF are dependent on its enzymatic activity of NAD+ synthesis. In summary, our study demonstrated that PBEF ameliorates ischemia-induced neuronal death through inhibiting caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic signaling pathways and suppressing mitochondrial damage and dysfunction. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of PBEF, and helps to identify potential targets for ischemic stroke therapy. PMID:27576732

  15. X-ray-induced chromosome damage in live mammalian cells, and improved measurements of its effects on their colony-forming ability.

    PubMed

    Joshi, G P; Nelson, W J; Revell, S H; Shaw, C A

    1982-02-01

    We have improved the precision of the technique described by Grote et al. (1981 a,b) for the observation of the radiation responses of live cultured mammalian cells with an incubated phase-contrast microscope: the colony-forming abilities of single cells obtained by selective detachment of mitoses (instead of cell pairs as previously) may now be followed individually and may be directly compared with chromosome damage detected after post-radiation mitosis (M1). An X-ray dose of 1.4 Gy to diploid Syrian hamster cells (BHK 21 C13) in G1 had no effect on cell ability to reach M1. If chromosome fragment loss was then detected (as micronuclei) in the daughter-cell pair then colony-forming ability nearly always deteriorated, and either a stop-growth (79 per cent) or a slow-growth (21 per cent) colony resulted; but chromosomal bridges which persisted beyond M1 broke during interphase 1 and themselves caused no detectable cell damage additional to that attributable to the micronuclei which accompanied them.

  16. Flow cytometric method for in situ preparation of standard materials of a small defined number of microbial cells with colony-forming potentiality.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hideaki; Nakano, Koichiro; Takatani, Norimasa; Yoshida, Tomonori; Igimi, Shizunobu; Saito, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    Standard materials of a small defined number of cells with colony-forming potentiality are essential for the rational validation of food microbiological methods. An in situ flow cytometric method using viable staining with 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and tryptic soy agar (TSA) was previously proposed and its feasibility was demonstrated with five strains. In this study, this method was applied to 16 strains to support its broad applicability. The cell sorting gate was previously determined based on the CFDA stainability alone. Now the structural properties of cells designated by forward and side-scattering intensities have been introduced as the second gating criteria. Under the optimum gate condition, 100 cells have been selected and sorted on TSA. Consequently, a 95% or higher colony-forming rate has been attained for every strain. A successful application to microaerophilic Campylobacter spp. is especially of great importance because it suggests further broader applicability.

  17. [NVP-BEZ235 inhibits proliferation and colony-forming capability of CD34(+)CD38(-) human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying-Ying; Hu, Liang-Shan; Han, Hui-Juan; Song, Chao-Yang; Huang, Yu-Xian; Guo, Kun-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    This study was aimed to explore the effect of NVP-BEZ235, a dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, on proliferation, cell cycle and colony forming capability of CD34(+)CD38(-) human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) KG1a cells. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CD34 and CD38 on the surface of human AML KG1a cells; Trypan blue assay was used to analyze the effect of NVP-BEZ235 at various concentrations on proliferation of KG1a cells; flow cytometry was performed to examine the cell cycle of KG1a cells after NVP-BEZ235 treatment; Soft agar colony-forming experiment was used to detect the colony forming ability of KG1a cells treated with NVP-BEZ235 at various concentrations. The results indicated that the percentage of CD34(+)CD38(-) AML KG1a cells was (98.02 ± 0.72)%. NVP-BEZ235 (0.125 - 1 µmol/L) inhibited the proliferation of KG1a cells in a time-and dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05) and the 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) at 24 h and 48 h were 0.597 µmol/L and 0.102 µmol/L, respectively. KG1a cells were arrested at G0/G1 phase after treating with 0.5 µmol/L NVP-BEZ235 for 24 h, it was significantly higher than that of control group (83.2 ± 3.80)% vs (43.47 ± 9.60)% (P < 0.05). KG1a cells treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0 - 1 µmol/L) for 14 d and 21 d, the number of colony decreased respectively from (375.67 ± 21.46) per 2500 KG1a cells and (706.33 ± 87.31) per 2500 KG1a cells to 0, with statistical significance (P < 0.05). It is concluded that NVP-BEZ235 can inhibit proliferation and colony-forming capability of CD34(+)CD38(-) human AML KG1a cells.

  18. Formative cell divisions: principal determinants of plant morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Smolarkiewicz, Michalina; Dhonukshe, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    Formative cell divisions utilizing precise rotations of cell division planes generate and spatially place asymmetric daughters to produce different cell layers. Therefore, by shaping tissues and organs, formative cell divisions dictate multicellular morphogenesis. In animal formative cell divisions, the orientation of the mitotic spindle and cell division planes relies on intrinsic and extrinsic cortical polarity cues. Plants lack known key players from animals, and cell division planes are determined prior to the mitotic spindle stage. Therefore, it appears that plants have evolved specialized mechanisms to execute formative cell divisions. Despite their profound influence on plant architecture, molecular players and cellular mechanisms regulating formative divisions in plants are not well understood. This is because formative cell divisions in plants have been difficult to track owing to their submerged positions and imprecise timings of occurrence. However, by identifying a spatiotemporally inducible cell division plane switch system applicable for advanced microscopy techniques, recent studies have begun to uncover molecular modules and mechanisms for formative cell divisions. The identified molecular modules comprise developmentally triggered transcriptional cascades feeding onto microtubule regulators that now allow dissection of the hierarchy of the events at better spatiotemporal resolutions. Here, we survey the current advances in understanding of formative cell divisions in plants in the context of embryogenesis, stem cell functionality and post-embryonic organ formation.

  19. Contact formation in gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments were performed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are explained by invoking this mechanism.

  20. The effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes from renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Steger, G. G.; Kaboo, R.; deKernion, J. B.; Figlin, R.; Belldegrun, A.

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce specific and non-specific anti-tumour cytotoxicity and also stimulates the proliferation and function of peripheral lymphocytes and thymocytes. GM-CSF and interleukin 2 (IL-2) act synergistically on peripheral lymphocytes for the induction of a highly effective cytotoxic cell population. Thus, the goal of our investigation was to study the effects of GM-CSF upon expansion, proliferation and in vitro killing activity of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). TILs from seven consecutive tumours were cultured with GM-CSF (500 or 1000 nmol ml-1) without IL-2 supplementation, with suboptimal doses of IL-2 (8 and 40 U ml-1) plus GM-CSF (1000 nmol ml-1), and with a dose of IL-2 (400 U ml-1) which sufficed alone to induce TIL development plus GM-CSF (500 or 1000 nmol ml-1). GM-CSF alone or together with suboptimal doses of IL-2 was not able to induce or facilitate TIL development in these cultures. When GM-CSF at both concentrations studied was added to optimal doses of IL-2 the resulting TIL populations proliferated significantly better and faster (+66%), resulting in a higher cell yield (+24%) at the time of maximal expansion of the TIL cultures. The length of the culture periods of TILs was not affected by GM-CSF when compared with the control cultures supplemented with IL-2 alone. In vitro killing activity of TIL populations stimulated with IL-2 and GM-CSF remained unspecific, but lysis of the autologous tumour targets as well as the allogeneic renal tumour targets was significantly enhanced (+138%) as compared with the corresponding control TILs stimulated with IL-2 alone. Lysis of the natural killer (NK)-sensitive control cell line K562 and the NK-resistant Daudi cell line remained unchanged even though FACS analysis of TILs cultured with IL-2 and 1000 nmol of GM-CSF demonstrated a significantly higher proportion of cells expressing the CD56

  1. Carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 silencing results in the inhibition of tumor formation ability in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FU, HONGBING; YANG, DEJUN; WANG, CHANGMING; XU, JIAPENG; WANG, WEIMIN; YAN, RONGLIN; CAI, QINGPING

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), one of the most malignant types of cancer, is the second greatest cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Novel therapeutic targets for GC treatment are therefore urgently required. Carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (CTDP1) has a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression. However, to the best of our knowledge, the role of CTDP1 in GC has not previously been explored. In the present study, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to detect CTDP1 messenger RNA expression in various GC cell lines. CTDP1 was subsequently silenced in GC cells by lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) infection, and the effects of CTDP1 inhibition on cell proliferation were evaluated by cell number counting, cell cycle analysis with propidium iodide staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, apoptotic rate with Annexin V staining and FACS analysis, as well as colony formation assay in GC cells. The results revealed that CTDP1 was highly expressed in certain GC cell lines and lentivirus-mediated siRNA infection was able to effectively silence CTDP1 expression in GC cells. CTDP1 inhibition decreased cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and increased cell apoptosis in GC cells. Furthermore, the colony formation ability of GC cells was also suppressed by silencing CTDP1. Taken together these results indicated that CTDP1 has a significant role in the tumor formation ability of GC cells and is a novel and promising therapeutic target for the treatment of GC. PMID:26722269

  2. Stem cells are units of natural selection for tissue formation, for germline development, and in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Irving L

    2015-07-21

    It is obvious that natural selection operates at the level of individuals and collections of individuals. Nearly two decades ago we showed that in multi-individual colonies of protochordate colonial tunicates sharing a blood circulation, there exists an exchange of somatic stem cells and germline stem cells, resulting in somatic chimeras and stem cell competitions for gonadal niches. Stem cells are unlike other cells in the body in that they alone self-renew, so that they form clones that are perpetuated for the life of the organism. Stem cell competitions have allowed the emergence of competitive somatic and germline stem cell clones. Highly successful germline stem cells usually outcompete less successful competitors both in the gonads of the genotype partner from which they arise and in the gonads of the natural parabiotic partners. Therefore, natural selection also operates at the level of germline stem cell clones. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri the formation of natural parabionts is prevented by a single-locus highly polymorphic histocompatibility gene called Botryllus histocompatibility factor. This limits germline stem cell predation to kin, as the locus has hundreds of alleles. We show that in mice germline stem cells compete for gonad niches, and in mice and humans, blood-forming stem cells also compete for bone marrow niches. We show that the clonal progression from blood-forming stem cells to acute leukemias by successive genetic and epigenetic events in blood stem cells also involves competition and selection between clones and propose that this is a general theme in cancer.

  3. Self-Organization of Stem Cell Colonies and of Early Mammalian Embryos: Recent Experiments Shed New Light on the Role of Autonomy vs. External Instructions in Basic Body Plan Development

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Hans-Werner

    2016-01-01

    “Organoids”, i.e., complex structures that can develop when pluripotent or multipotent stem cells are maintained in three-dimensional cultures, have become a new area of interest in stem cell research. Hopes have grown that when focussing experimentally on the mechanisms behind this type of in vitro morphogenesis, research aiming at tissue and organ replacements can be boosted. Processes leading to the formation of organoids in vitro are now often addressed as self-organization, a term referring to the formation of complex tissue architecture in groups of cells without depending on specific instruction provided by other cells or tissues. The present article focuses on recent reports using the term self-organization in the context of studies on embryogenesis, specifically addressing pattern formation processes in human blastocysts attaching in vitro, or in colonies of pluripotent stem cells (“gastruloids”). These morphogenetic processes are of particular interest because, during development in vivo, they lead to basic body plan formation and individuation. Since improved methodologies like those employed by the cited authors became available, early embryonic pattern formation/self-organization appears to evolve now as a research topic of its own. This review discusses concepts concerning the involved mechanisms, focussing on autonomy of basic body plan development vs. dependence on external signals, as possibly provided by implantation in the uterus, and it addresses biological differences between an early mammalian embryo, e.g., a morula, and a cluster of pluripotent stem cells. It is concluded that, apart from being of considerable biological interest, the described type of research needs to be contemplated carefully with regard to ethical implications when performed with human cells. PMID:27792143

  4. Self-Organization of Stem Cell Colonies and of Early Mammalian Embryos: Recent Experiments Shed New Light on the Role of Autonomy vs. External Instructions in Basic Body Plan Development.

    PubMed

    Denker, Hans-Werner

    2016-10-25

    "Organoids", i.e., complex structures that can develop when pluripotent or multipotent stem cells are maintained in three-dimensional cultures, have become a new area of interest in stem cell research. Hopes have grown that when focussing experimentally on the mechanisms behind this type of in vitro morphogenesis, research aiming at tissue and organ replacements can be boosted. Processes leading to the formation of organoids in vitro are now often addressed as self-organization, a term referring to the formation of complex tissue architecture in groups of cells without depending on specific instruction provided by other cells or tissues. The present article focuses on recent reports using the term self-organization in the context of studies on embryogenesis, specifically addressing pattern formation processes in human blastocysts attaching in vitro, or in colonies of pluripotent stem cells ("gastruloids"). These morphogenetic processes are of particular interest because, during development in vivo, they lead to basic body plan formation and individuation. Since improved methodologies like those employed by the cited authors became available, early embryonic pattern formation/self-organization appears to evolve now as a research topic of its own. This review discusses concepts concerning the involved mechanisms, focussing on autonomy of basic body plan development vs. dependence on external signals, as possibly provided by implantation in the uterus, and it addresses biological differences between an early mammalian embryo, e.g., a morula, and a cluster of pluripotent stem cells. It is concluded that, apart from being of considerable biological interest, the described type of research needs to be contemplated carefully with regard to ethical implications when performed with human cells.

  5. Theoretical size controls of the giant Phaeocystis globosa colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Smith, Walker O.; Tang, Kam W.; Doan, Nhu Hai; Nguyen, Ngoc Lam

    2015-06-01

    An unusual characteristic of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Phaeocystis globosa is its ability to form colonies of strikingly large size-up to 3 cm in diameter. The large size and the presence of a mucoid envelope are believed to contribute to the formation of dense blooms in Southeast Asia. We collected colonies of different sizes in shallow coastal waters of Viet Nam and conducted a series of measurements and experiments on individual colonies. Using these empirical data, we developed a simple carbon-based model to predict the growth and maximal size of P. globosa colonies. Our model suggests that growth of a colony from 0.2 cm to 1.4 cm (the maximal size in our samples) would take 16 days. This number, however, is strongly influenced by the maximal photosynthetic rate and other physiological parameters used in the model. The model also returns a specific growth rate of 0.30 d-1 for colonial cells, comparable to satellite estimates, but lower than have been measured for unicellular P. globosa in batch culture at similar temperatures. We attribute this low growth rate to not only the model uncertainties, but factors such as self-shading and diffusive limitation of nutrient uptake.

  6. Promoting the selection and maintenance of fetal liver stem/progenitor cell colonies by layer-by-layer polypeptide tethered supported lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Chi; Liu, Yung-Chiang; Tsai, Hsuan-Ang; Shen, Chia-Ning; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2014-12-10

    In this study, we designed and constructed a series of layer-by-layer polypeptide adsorbed supported lipid bilayer (SLB) films as a novel and label-free platform for the isolation and maintenance of rare populated stem cells. In particular, four alternative layers of anionic poly-l-glutamic acid and cationic poly-l-lysine were sequentially deposited on an anionic SLB. We found that the fetal liver stem/progenitor cells from the primary culture were selected and formed colonies on all layer-by-layer polypeptide adsorbed SLB surfaces, regardless of the number of alternative layers and the net charges on those layers. Interestingly, these isolated stem/progenitor cells formed colonies which were maintained for an 8 day observation period. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation measurements showed that all SLB-polypeptide films were protein resistant with serum levels significantly lower than those on the polypeptide multilayer films without an underlying SLB. We suggest the fluidic SLB promotes selective binding while minimizing the cell-surface interaction due to its nonfouling nature, thus limiting stem cell colonies from spreading.

  7. The combination of stem cell factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for chronic stroke treatment in aged animals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke occurs more frequently in the elderly population and presents the number one leading cause of persistent disability worldwide. Lack of effective treatment to enhance brain repair and improve functional restoration in chronic stroke, the recovery phase of stroke, is a challenging medical problem to be solved in stroke research. Our early study has revealed the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (SCF+G-CSF) on chronic stroke in young animals. However, whether this treatment is effective and safe to the aged population remains to be determined. Methods Cortical brain ischemia was produced in aged C57BL mice or aged spontaneously hypertensive rats. SCF+G-CSF or equal volume of vehicle solution was subcutaneously injected for 7 days beginning at 3–4 months after induction of cortical brain ischemia. Using the approaches of biochemistry assays, flow cytometry, pathology, and evaluation of functional outcome, several doses of SCF+G-CSF have been examined for their safety and efficiency on chronic stroke in aged animals. Results All tested doses did not show acute or chronic toxicity in the aged animals. Additionally, SCF+G-CSF treatment in chronic stroke of aged animals mobilized bone marrow stem cells and improved functional outcome in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions SCF+G-CSF treatment is a safe and effective approach to chronic stroke in the aged condition. This study provides important information needed for developing a new therapeutic strategy to improve the health of older adults with chronic stroke. PMID:23254113

  8. Design of Recombinant Stem Cell Factor macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Fusion Proteins and their Biological Activity In Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Yang, Jie; Wang, Yuelang; Zhan, Chenyang; Zang, Yuhui; Qin, Junchuan

    2005-05-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) can act in synergistic way to promote the growth of mononuclear phagocytes. SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were designed on the computer using the Homology and Biopolymer modules of the software packages InsightII. Several existing crystal structures were used as templates to generate models of the complexes of receptor with fusion protein. The structure rationality of the fusion protein incorporated a series of flexible linker peptide was analyzed on InsightII system. Then, a suitable peptide GGGGSGGGGSGG was chosen for the fusion protein. Two recombinant SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were generated by construction of a plasmid in which the coding regions of human SCF (1-165aa) and M-CSF (1-149aa) cDNA were connected by this linker peptide coding sequence followed by subsequent expression in insect cell. The results of Western blot and activity analysis showed that these two recombinant fusion proteins existed as a dimer with a molecular weight of 84 KD under non-reducing conditions and a monomer of 42 KD at reducing condition. The results of cell proliferation assays showed that each fusion protein induced a dose-dependent proliferative response. At equimolar concentration, SCF/M-CSF was about 20 times more potent than the standard monomeric SCF in stimulating TF-1 cell line growth, while M-CSF/SCF was 10 times of monomeric SCF. No activity difference of M-CSF/SCF or SCF/M-CSF to M-CSF (at same molar) was found in stimulating the HL-60 cell linear growth. The synergistic effect of SCF and M-CSF moieties in the fusion proteins was demonstrated by the result of clonogenic assay performed with human bone mononuclear, in which both SCF/M-CSF and M-CSF/SCF induced much higher number of CFU-M than equimolar amount of SCF or M-CSF or that of two cytokines mixture.

  9. Vitrified canine testicular cells allow the formation of spermatogonial stem cells and seminiferous tubules following their xenotransplantation into nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Kim, Dong Hoon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Do, Jung Tae; Park, Chankyu; Kim, Jae Hwan; Choi, Young Suk; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Malinois (BM), one of the excellent military dog breeds in South Korea, is usually castrated before sexual maturation. Therefore, the transfer of their genetic features to the next generation is difficult. To overcome this, testicular cells from 4-month-old BMs were frozen. Testicular cells were thawed after 3 months and cultured in StemPro-34 medium. Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) characteristics were determined by the transplantation of the cultured germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs) into empty testes, containing only several endogenous SSCs and Sertoli cells, of immunodeficient mice, 4 weeks after busulfan treatment. Following the implantation, the transplanted cells localized in the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules, and ultimately colonized the recipient testes. Xenotransplantation of GDCs together with testicular somatic cells conjugated with extracellular matrix (ECM), led to the formation of de novo seminiferous tubules. These seminiferous tubules were mostly composed of Sertoli cells. Some germ cells were localized in the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules. This study revealed that BM-derived SSCs, obtained from the castrated testes, might be a valuable tool for the transfer of BM genetic features to the next generation. PMID:26907750

  10. Steroids and hematopoiesis. II. The effect of steroids on in vitro erythroid colony growth: evidence for different target cells for different classes of steroids.

    PubMed

    Singer, J W; Adamson, J W

    1976-06-01

    Androgenic steroids and their non-androgenic 5beta-H metabolites enhance the number of colonies of hemoglobin synthesizing cells grown from rat bone marrow in response to a standard (0.25 unit/ml) concentration of erythropoietin. The target cells for two steroids were found to be different. Cells influenced by the androgen, fluoxymesterone (fluoxy), resembled cells responding to erythropoietin in their cycle characteristics, as measured by tritiated thymidine suicide, and in their physical characteristics, as determined by velocity sedimentation gradient separation. Cells responding to etiocholanolone (etio) had a much lower tritiated thymidine suicide rate and different sedimentation velocities. Preincubation of marrow cells with etio for two hours was sufficient to enhance erythroid colony growth by 84%, whereas a similar incubation with fluoxy produced no increment. These studies demonstrate that different classes of steroids may influence in vitro erythropoiesis by acting on distinct populations of marrow cells. Fluoxymesterone appears to act through cells already committed to respond to erythropoietin, while etiocholanolone appears to act on a separate, perhaps more primitive population of marrow cells.

  11. Granulocyte-Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promotes CD34+ Cell Migration Via a Matrix Metalloproteinase-2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Adriana López; Ribeiro-Fleury, Tatiana; Chabot, Valérie; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Langonné, Alain; Hérault, Olivier; Charbord, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) can be mobilized into the circulation using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), for graft collection in view of hematopoietic transplantation. This process has been related to bone marrow (BM) release of serine proteases and of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Yet, the role of these mediators in HSC egress from their niches remains questionable, because they are produced by nonstromal cells (mainly neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages) that are not a part of the niche. We show here that the G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) is expressed by human BM mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs), and that G-CSF prestimulation of MSCs enhances the in vitro trans-stromal migration of CD34+ cells. Zymography analysis indicates that pro-MMP-2 (but not pro-MMP-9) is expressed in MSCs, and that G-CSF treatment increases its expression and induces its activation at the cell membrane. We further demonstrate that G-CSF-stimulated migration depends on G-CSFR expression and is mediated by a mechanism that involves MMPs. These results suggest a molecular model whereby G-CSF infusion may drive, by the direct action on MSCs, HSPC egress from BM niches via synthesis and activation of MMPs. In this model, MMP-2 instead of MMP-9 is implicated, which constitutes a major difference with mouse mobilization models. PMID:22651889

  12. Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor induces Nampt-dependent translocation of the insulin receptor out of lipid microdomains in A549 lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qianyi; Jia, Song Hui; Parodo, Jean; Ai, Yuhang; Marshall, John C

    2015-02-15

    Pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) is a highly conserved pleiotropic protein reported to be an alternate ligand for the insulin receptor (IR). We sought to clarify the relationship between PBEF and insulin signaling by evaluating the effects of PBEF on the localization of the IRβ chain to lipid rafts in A549 epithelial cells. We isolated lipid rafts from A549 cells and detected the IR by immunoprecipitation from raft fractions or whole cell lysates. Cells were treated with rPBEF, its enzymatic product nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), or the Nampt inhibitor daporinad to study the effect of PBEF on IRβ movement. We used coimmunoprecipitation studies in cells transfected with PBEF and IRβ constructs to detect interactions between PBEF, the IRβ, and caveolin-1 (Cav-1). PBEF was present in both lipid raft and nonraft fractions, whereas the IR was found only in lipid raft fractions of resting A549 cells. The IR-, PBEF-, and Cav-1-coimmunoprecipitated rPBEF treatment resulted in the movement of IRβ- and tyrosine-phosphorylated Cav-1 from lipid rafts to nonrafts, an effect that could be blocked by daporinad, suggesting that this effect was facilitated by the Nampt activity of PBEF. The addition of PBEF to insulin-treated cells resulted in reduced Akt phosphorylation of both Ser⁴⁷³ and Thr³⁰⁸. We conclude that PBEF can inhibit insulin signaling through the IR by Nampt-dependent promotion of IR translocation into the nonraft domains of A549 epithelial cells. PBEF-induced alterations in the spatial geometry of the IR provide a mechanistic explanation for insulin resistance in inflammatory states associated with upregulation of PBEF.

  13. Stage-dependent suppression of the formation of dentin-resorbing multinuclear cells with migration inhibitory factor in vitro

    PubMed Central

    KIKUIRI, TAKASHI; YOSHIMURA, YOSHITAKA; TABATA, FUTOSHI; HASEGAWA, TOMOKAZU; NISHIHIRA, JUN; SHIRAKAWA, TETSUO

    2012-01-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a crucial mediator of immune responses and is known to play a pivotal role in cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we assessed whether MIF exerts regulatory effects on osteoclast formation in bone marrow cells and, if so, by what mechanism. Bone marrow cells were either co-cultured with MC3T3-E1 cells or cultured with macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the soluble form of the receptor activator of the nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). Under the influence of MIF, the formation of osteoclastic multinuclear cells was examined. The number of multinuclear TRAP-positive cells formed in the co-culture was significantly reduced when MIF (≥0.1 μg/ml) was exogenously applied during the third and fourth days of the 6-day cultivation period. MIF affected neither the number of mononuclear TRAP-positive cells induced with M-CSF and RANKL, nor the expression of RANKL and osteoprotegerin in MC3T3-E1 cells. TRAP-positive cells cultured on dentin slices with MIF showed lower dentin-resorbing activity than those cultured without MIF. These results suggest that MIF has no regulatory roles in the differentiation of bone marrow cells to mononuclear TRAP-positive cells, but has inhibitory effects on the formation of mature osteoclasts by preventing cell fusion, which may eventually interfere with the osteoclast-mediated dentin resorption. PMID:22969841

  14. In vitro assessment of bone marrow endothelial colonies (CFU-En) in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Campioni, D; Punturieri, M; Moretti, S; Dabusti, M; Spanedda, R; Castoldi, G

    2003-12-01

    The distribution and functional characteristics of in vitro bone marrow (BM) endothelial colonies (CFU-En) were studied in 70 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients in different phases of the disease to explore the association between CFU-En growth and angiogenesis, and between the number of CFU-En and the presence of hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells. The mean number of CFU-En/10(6) BM mononuclear cells seen in remission patients was significantly higher than that seen in newly diagnosed patients (P=0.04), and in normal subjects (P=0.008). Patients with low-grade NHL in remission displayed a higher CFU-En value compared with high-grade NHL (P=0.04). In the autograft group (40 patients), a significant reduction of CFU-En number was detected in the first 4-6 months after transplantation. In remission patients, the CFU-En number positively correlated with the incidence of BM colony-forming unit granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) (P=0.013) and CFU-multilineage (CFU-GEMM) hematopoietic colonies (P=0.044). These in vitro data show that CFU-En numbers increase following standard-dose chemotherapy, thus providing a rationale for further investigating the effects of different cytostatic drugs on BM endothelial cells growth and function.

  15. Antibodies binding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor produced by cord blood-derived B cell lines immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Revoltella, R P; Laricchia Robbio, L; Liberati, A M; Reato, G; Foa, R; Funaro, A; Vinante, F; Pizzolo, G

    2000-09-15

    We detected natural antibodies (auto-Abs) binding human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in umbilical cord blood (CB) (23 of 94 samples screened) and peripheral blood of women at the end of pregnancy (6 of 42 samples tested). To demonstrate that Abs detected in CB were produced by the fetus, CB mononuclear cells were infected with Epstein-Barr virus in vitro. Ten cell lines producing constitutively anti-recombinant human GM-CSF (rhGM-CSF) Abs were isolated and characterized. These cells displayed a male karyotype, an early activated B cell phenotype, coexpressed surface IgM and IgD, and secreted only IgM with prevailing lambda clonal restriction. Specific cell surface binding of biotinylated rhGM-CSF and high-level anti-rhGM-CSF IgM Ab production were typical features of early cell cultures. In late cell passages the frequency of more undifferentiated B cells increased. Serum Abs of either maternal or fetal origin or Abs produced in culture did not affect the granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating activity of rhGM-CSF from bone marrow progenitors in soft agar, suggesting that the Abs produced were nonneutralizing.

  16. Herbal medicine "sho-saiko-to" induces in vitro granulocyte colony-stimulating factor production on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashiki, M; Asakawa, M; Kayaba, Y; Kosaka, Y; Nishimura, A

    1992-01-01

    The herbal medicine "Sho-saiko-to (Xiao-Chai-Hu-Tang)" has been used in China for about 3000 years for the treatment of pyretic diseases. This medicine is now available as one of the prescribing drugs approved by the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan, and has also been widely used for patients with chronic viral liver disease as one of biological response modifiers in the field of Japan's Western Medicine. However, its mode of action has not been fully described. In the present in vitro study, we added "Sho-saiko-to" (TJ-9, Tsumura, Tokyo) to the culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from healthy volunteers, and observed a dose-dependent increase in the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The same experiment was conducted using other herbal medicines "Dai-saiko-to" (TJ-8) and "Saiko-keishi-to" (TJ-10) which showed similar effects, or "Sho-seiryu-to" (TJ-19) which consists of very different compounds and shows different efficacy. The increases of G-CSF production were similar when "Sho-saiko-to" (TJ-9) or one of the 2 reference drugs (TJ-8 and 10) was added, whereas the increase when the control drug "Sho-seiryu-to" (TJ-19) was added, was quite small. This result shows that G-CSF induction is not a common effect of herbal medicines, but a specific effect of TJ-8, 9, and 10. Among these 3 drugs the increase produced by "Sho-saiko-to" was the largest. Based on this result, we conclude that administration of "Sho-saiko-to" may be useful not only for the treatment of chronic liver disease, but also for malignant diseases and acute infectious diseases where G-CSF is efficacious.

  17. Adrenaline administration promotes the efficiency of granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mediated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Cao, Jiang; Song, Xuguang; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Yong; Xu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    A high dose of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), but G-CSF is relatively inefficient and may cause adverse effects. Recently, adrenaline has been found to play important roles in HSPC mobilization. In this study, we explored whether adrenaline combined with G-CSF could induce HSPC mobilization in a mouse model. Mice were treated with adrenaline and either a high or low dose of G-CSF alone or in combination. Peripheral blood HSPC counts were evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of bone marrow SDF-1 were measured by ELISA, the transcription of CXCR4 and SDF-1 was measured by real-time RT-PCR, and CXCR4 protein was detected by Western blot. Our results showed that adrenaline alone fails to mobilize HSPCs into the peripheral blood; however, when G-CSF and adrenaline are combined, the WBC counts and percentages of HSPCs are significantly higher compared to those in mice that received G-CSF alone. The combined use of adrenaline and G-CSF not only accelerated HSPC mobilization, but also enabled the efficient mobilization of HSPCs into the peripheral blood at lower doses of G-CSF. Adrenaline/G-CSF treatment also extensively downregulated levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in mouse bone marrow. These results demonstrated that adrenaline combined with G-CSF can induce HSPC mobilization by down-regulating the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis, indicating that the use of adrenaline may enable the use of reduced dosages or durations of G-CSF treatment, minimizing G-CSF-associated complications.

  18. Contribution of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to the acute mobilization of endothelial precursor cells by vascular disrupting agents.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Yuval; Tang, Terence; Woloszynek, Jill; Daenen, Laura G; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Cai, Shi-Rong; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Voest, Emile E; Chaplin, David J; Smythe, Jon; Harris, Adrian; Nathan, Paul; Judson, Ian; Rustin, Gordon; Bertolini, Francesco; Link, Daniel C; Kerbel, Robert S

    2009-10-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDA) cause acute shutdown of abnormal established tumor vasculature, followed by massive intratumoral hypoxia and necrosis. However, a viable rim of tumor tissue invariably remains from which tumor regrowth rapidly resumes. We have recently shown that an acute systemic mobilization and homing of bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial precursor (CEP) cells could promote tumor regrowth following treatment with either a VDA or certain chemotherapy drugs. The molecular mediators of this systemic reactive host process are unknown. Here, we show that following treatment of mice with OXi-4503, a second-generation potent prodrug derivative of combretastatin-A4 phosphate, rapid increases in circulating plasma vascular endothelial growth factor, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels are detected. With the aim of determining whether G-CSF is involved in VDA-induced CEP mobilization, mutant G-CSF-R(-/-) mice were treated with OXi-4503. We found that as opposed to wild-type controls, G-CSF-R(-/-) mice failed to mobilize CEPs or show induction of SDF-1 plasma levels. Furthermore, Lewis lung carcinomas grown in such mice treated with OXi-4503 showed greater levels of necrosis compared with tumors treated in wild-type mice. Evidence for rapid elevations in circulating plasma G-CSF, vascular endothelial growth factor, and SDF-1 were also observed in patients with VDA (combretastatin-A4 phosphate)-treated cancer. These results highlight the possible effect of drug-induced G-CSF on tumor regrowth following certain cytotoxic drug therapies, in this case using a VDA, and hence G-CSF as a possible therapeutic target.

  19. Vimentin is necessary for colony growth of human diploid keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Castro-Muñozledo, Federico; Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Hernández-Quintero, Miriam; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2015-01-01

    The role of vimentin (Vim) in diploid epithelial cells is not well known. To understand its biological function, we cultured human epidermal keratinocytes under conditions that support migration, proliferation, stratification and terminal differentiation. We identified a keratinocyte subpopulation that shows a p63(+)/α5β1(bright) phenotype and displays Vim intermediate filaments (IFs) besides their keratin IF network. These cells were mainly located at the proliferative/migratory rim of the growing colonies; but also, they were scarce and scattered or formed small groups of basal cells in confluent stratified epithelia. Stimulation of cells with EGF and wounding experiments in confluent arrested epithelia increased the number of Vim(+) keratinocytes in an extent higher to the expected for a cell population doubling. BrdU labeling demonstrated that most of the proliferative cells located at the migratory border of the colony have Vim, in contrast with proliferative cells located at the basal layer at the center of big colonies which lacked of Vim IFs, suggesting that Vim expression was not solely linked to proliferation. Therefore, we silenced Vim mRNA in the cultured keratinocytes and observed an inhibition of colony growth. Such results, together with long-term cultivation assays which showed that Vim might be associated to pattern formation in cultured epithelia, suggest that Vim expression is essential for a highly motile phenotype, which is necessary for keratinocyte colony growth and possibly for development and wound healing. Vim(+)/p63(+)/α5β1(bright) epithelial cells may play a significant physiological role in embryonic morphogenetic movements; wound healing and other pathologies such as carcinomas and hyperproliferative diseases.

  20. Mechanical dissociation of human embryonic stem cell colonies by manual scraping after collagenase treatment is much more detrimental to cellular viability than is trypsinization with gentle pipetting.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Liu, Hua; Ge, Zigang; Cao, Tong

    2007-05-01

    Because hESC (human embryonic stem cells) are 'social cells' that require co-operative interactions and intimate physical contact with each other, it is absolutely essential to dissociate hESC colonies into cellular clumps rather than into a single-cell suspension during serial passage. The present study compared two commonly used protocols for dissociating hESC colonies. The first protocol involved mild enzymatic treatment with collagenase type IV (1 mg/ml) for approx. 5-10 min, prior to mechanical dissociation into cellular clumps through manual scraping with a plastic pipette tip. The second protocol involved a short duration of exposure (2-3 min) to low concentrations of trypsin (0.05%), followed by gentle pipetting. The MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] assay was used to compare the recovery of viable cells after dissociating hESC colonies with these two protocols, before and after conventional freeze-thawing with 10% (v/v) DMSO. Besides undifferentiated hESC, the randomly differentiated fibroblastic progenies of hESC at various passages (P0-P4), together with an immortalized cell line (CRL-1486), were also utilized to compare the two protocols. The results demonstrated that the second protocol (trypsinization with gentle pipetting) is much less detrimental to cellular viability than is the first protocol (collagenase treatment with scratching). This in turn translated to higher freeze-thaw survival rates. It is hypothesized that scratching after collagenase treatment (first protocol) somehow induces physical damage to the cells, thereby leading to a lower recovery of viable cells, both before and after freeze-thawing.

  1. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor produced in lesioned peripheral nerves induces the up-regulation of cell surface expression of MAC-2 by macrophages and Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is followed by Wallerian degeneration which is characterized by cellular and molecular events that turn the degenerating nerve into a tissue that supports nerve regeneration. One of these is the removal, by phagocytosis, of myelin that contains molecules which inhibit regeneration. We have recently documented that the scavenger macrophage and Schwann cells express the galactose- specific lectin MAC-2 which is significant to myelin phagocytosis. In the present study we provide evidence for a mechanism leading to the augmented expression of cell surface MAC-2. Nerve lesion causes noneuronal cells, primarily fibroblasts, to produce the cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In turn, GM- CSF induces Schwann cells and macrophages to up-regulate surface expression of MAC-2. The proposed mechanism is based on the following novel observations. GM-CSF mRNA was detected by PCR in in vitro and in vivo degenerating nerves, but not in intact nerves. The GM-CSF molecule was detected by ELISA in medium conditioned by in vitro and in vivo degenerating peripheral nerves as of the 4th h after injury. GM-CSF activity was demonstrated by two independent bioassays, and repressed by activity blocking antibodies. Significant levels of GM-CSF were produced by nerve derived fibroblasts, but neither by Schwann cells nor by nerve derived macrophages. Mouse rGM-CSF enhanced MAC-2 production in nerve explants, and up-regulated cell surface expression of MAC-2 by Schwann cells and macrophages. Interleukin-1 beta up-regulated GM-CSF production thus suggesting that injury induced GM-CSF production may be mediated by interleukin-1 beta. Our findings highlight the fact that fibroblasts, by producing GM-CSF and thereby affecting macrophage and Schwann function, play a significant role in the cascade of molecular events and cellular interactions of Wallerian degeneration. PMID:8601605

  2. Changes in numbers and types of mast cell colony-forming cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice after injection of distilled water: evidence that mast cells suppress differentiation of bone marrow-derived precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakura, Y.; Kuriu, A.; Waki, N.; Nakano, T.; Asai, H.; Yonezawa, T.; Kitamura, Y.

    1988-03-01

    Two different types of cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice produce mast cell colonies in methylcellulose. Large mast cell colonies are produced by bone marrow-derived precursors resembling lymphoid cells by light microscopy (L-CFU-Mast), whereas medium and small mast cell colonies are produced by morphologically identifiable mast cells (M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast, respectively). In the present study we eradicated peritoneal mast cells by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of distilled water. The regeneration process was investigated to clarify the relationship between L-CFU-Mast, M-CFU-Mast, and S-CFU-Mast. After injection of distilled water, M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast disappeared, but L-CFU-Mast increased, and then M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast appeared, suggesting the presence of a hierarchic relationship. When purified peritoneal mast cells were injected two days after the water injection, the L-CFU-Mast did not increase. In the peritoneal cavity of WBB6F1-+/+ mice that had been lethally irradiated and rescued by bone marrow cells of C57BL/6-bgJ/bgJ (beige, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice, L-CFU-Mast were of bgJ/bgJ type, but M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast were of +/+ type. The injection of distilled water to the radiation chimeras resulted in the development of bgJ/bgJ-type M-CFU-Mast and then S-CFU-Mast. The presence of mast cells appeared to suppress the recruitment of L-CFU-Mast from the bloodstream and to inhibit the differentiation of L-CFU-Mast to M-CFU-Mast.

  3. Identification of a complex genetic network underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae colony morphology

    PubMed Central

    Voordeckers, Karin; De Maeyer, Dries; Zande, Elisa; Vinces, Marcelo D; Meert, Wim; Cloots, Lore; Ryan, Owen; Marchal, Kathleen; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    When grown on solid substrates, different microorganisms often form colonies with very specific morphologies. Whereas the pioneers of microbiology often used colony morphology to discriminate between species and strains, the phenomenon has not received much attention recently. In this study, we use a genome-wide assay in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify all genes that affect colony morphology. We show that several major signalling cascades, including the MAPK, TORC, SNF1 and RIM101 pathways play a role, indicating that morphological changes are a reaction to changing environments. Other genes that affect colony morphology are involved in protein sorting and epigenetic regulation. Interestingly, the screen reveals only few genes that are likely to play a direct role in establishing colony morphology, with one notable example being FLO11, a gene encoding a cell-surface adhesin that has already been implicated in colony morphology, biofilm formation, and invasive and pseudohyphal growth. Using a series of modified promoters for fine-tuning FLO11 expression, we confirm the central role of Flo11 and show that differences in FLO11 expression result in distinct colony morphologies. Together, our results provide a first comprehensive look at the complex genetic network that underlies the diversity in the morphologies of yeast colonies. PMID:22882838

  4. Formation of multilayer aggregates of mammalian cells by dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Anil; Buckle, Anne-Marie; Markx, Gerard H.

    2006-09-01

    The formation of aggregates of mammalian cells at interdigitated oppositely castellated electrodes by positive dielectrophoresis was investigated. It is shown that, by using a constant small flow of fresh sorbitol iso-osmotic buffer through the chamber to remove ions leaking from the cells, a high positive DEP force can be maintained throughout the formation of the aggregates. Flow-rate dependent optima were found in the aggregate height as a function of the electrode size. It is shown that at low flow rates the creation of aggregates of mammalian cells with heights over 150 µm is feasible using relatively low voltages (20 Vpk-pk, 1 MHz). The formation of layered aggregates of two specialized cell types—stromal cells and Jurkat T lymphocytes—is demonstrated. The work confirms that dielectrophoresis can be reliably used for the formation of aggregates with three-dimensional architectures, which could be used as artificial microniches for the study of interactions between cells.

  5. Tumor-tropic endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) loaded with near-infrared sensitive Au nanoparticles: A "cellular stove" approach to the photoablation of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Giancarlo; Zoppi, Angela; Olmi, Roberto; Trigari, Silvana; Traversi, Rita; Severi, Mirko; Bani, Daniele; Bianchini, Francesca; Torre, Eugenio; Margheri, Francesca; Chillà, Anastasia; Biagioni, Alessio; Calorini, Lido; Laurenzana, Anna; Fibbi, Gabriella; Del Rosso, Mario

    2016-06-28

    In the photothermal treatments (PTs) of tumor, the localization of a high number of near-infrared (NIR) absorbing gold nanoparticles in the tumor mass is still a challenging issue. Here, we propose a promising strategy to deliver therapeutic chitosan-coated gold nanoparticles to tumor cells as hidden cargo of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs) endowed with an innate tumor-tropism. Remarkably, ECFC gold enrichement doesn't affect cell viability and preserves the endothelial lineage characteristics such as capillary morphogenesis and cell migration. We demonstrate that heavily Au-doped ECFCs are able to efficiently warm up the tumor environment, and kill the cancer cells via hyperthermic heating both in vitro as well as in vivo. Thus, we show an excellent thermotransductive property of gold enriched ECFCs and their capability to kill melanoma cells at moderate NIR light intensities.

  6. Tumor-tropic endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) loaded with near-infrared sensitive Au nanoparticles: A “cellular stove” approach to the photoablation of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Margheri, Giancarlo; Zoppi, Angela; Olmi, Roberto; Trigari, Silvana; Traversi, Rita; Severi, Mirko; Bani, Daniele; Bianchini, Francesca; Torre, Eugenio; Margheri, Francesca; Chillà, Anastasia; Biagioni, Alessio; Calorini, Lido; Laurenzana, Anna; Fibbi, Gabriella; Rosso, Mario Del

    2016-01-01

    In the photothermal treatments (PTs) of tumor, the localization of a high number of near-infrared (NIR) absorbing gold nanoparticles in the tumor mass is still a challenging issue. Here, we propose a promising strategy to deliver therapeutic chitosan-coated gold nanoparticles to tumor cells as hidden cargo of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs) endowed with an innate tumor-tropism. Remarkably, ECFC gold enrichement doesn't affect cell viability and preserves the endothelial lineage characteristics such as capillary morphogenesis and cell migration. We demonstrate that heavily Au-doped ECFCs are able to efficiently warm up the tumor environment, and kill the cancer cells via hyperthermic heating both in vitro as well as in vivo. Thus, we show an excellent thermotransductive property of gold enriched ECFCs and their capability to kill melanoma cells at moderate NIR light intensities. PMID:27223433

  7. Inhibition of osteoclast formation by 3-methylcholanthrene, a ligand for arylhydrocarbon receptor: suppression of osteoclast differentiation factor in osteogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Naruse, M; Otsuka, E; Naruse, M; Ishihara, Y; Miyagawa-Tomita, S; Hagiwara, H

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), a ligand for arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), on osteoclastogenesis. Osteoclast-like cells, in cocultures with mouse spleen cells and clonal osteogenic stromal ST2 cells, are formed from spleen cells by a combination of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) produced by ST2 cells in response to 1alpha,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D(3). 3MC dose-dependently inhibited the formation of mono- and multinuclear osteoclast-like cells. However, 3MC did not inhibit the formation of osteoclast-like cells from mouse spleen cells which was supported by the exogenous soluble RANKL and M-CSF. 3MC did not affect the formation of an actin ring and pits on slices of dentine by osteoclast-like cells, both of which are typical indices of osteoclast activity. These results suggest that 3MC affects osteoclast-supporting cells such as ST2 cells but not osteoclast precursor cells and mature osteoclastic cells. When we measured the expression levels of RANKL mRNA in ST2 cells, 3MC dose-dependently decreased the level of this mRNA. However, 3MC did not affect levels of mRNAs for osteoprotegerin (OPG), M-CSF, and the receptor of 1alpha,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D(3) in ST2 cells. Furthermore, soluble RANKL was able to counteract the inhibitory effect of 3MC on the formation of osteoclast-like cells. Our findings indicate that 3MC inhibits osteoclastogenesis via the inhibition of RANKL expression in osteoblastic cells.

  8. Formation and cultivation of medaka primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Yi, Meisheng; Hong, Yunhan

    2014-07-01

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) formation is pivotal for fertility. Mammalian PGCs are epigenetically induced without the need for maternal factors and can also be derived in culture from pluripotent stem cells. In egg-laying animals such as Drosophila and zebrafish, PGCs are specified by maternal germ plasm factors without the need for inducing factors. In these organisms, PGC formation and cultivation in vitro from indeterminate embryonic cells have not been possible. Here, we report PGC formation and cultivation in vitro from blastomeres dissociated from midblastula embryos (MBEs) of the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes). PGCs were identified by using germ-cell-specific green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression from a transgene under the control of the vasa promoter. Embryo perturbation was exploited to study PGC formation in vivo, and dissociated MBE cells were cultivated under various conditions to study PGC formation in vitro. Perturbation of somatic development did not prevent PGC formation in live embryos. Dissociated MBE blastomeres formed PGCs in the absence of normal somatic structures and of known inducing factors. Most importantly, under culture conditions conducive to stem cell derivation, some dissociated MBE blastomeres produced GFP-positive PGC-like cells. These GFP-positive cells contained genuine PGCs, as they expressed PGC markers and migrated into the embryonic gonad to generate germline chimeras. Our data thus provide evidence for PGC preformation in medaka and demonstrate, for the first time, that PGC formation and derivation can be obtained in culture from early embryos of medaka as a lower vertebrate model.

  9. Macrophage production during murine listeriosis: colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) and CSF-1-binding cells in genetically resistant and susceptible mice.

    PubMed Central

    Cheers, C; Stanley, E R

    1988-01-01

    The concentration of the macrophage-specific colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1) and the numbers of bone marrow and spleen cells with specific receptors for that factor have been investigated in a number of mouse strains under normal conditions and after infection with the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. The CSF-1 concentration in serum and tissue was markedly elevated in infected mice, the degree of stimulation reflecting the dose of L. monocytogenes. The CSF-1 titer did not correlate with genetic resistance or susceptibility of the mice to L. monocytogenes. In contrast to the effect of lipopolysaccharide, Listeria infection was able to increase the level of CSF-1 in the lipopolysaccharide nonresponder strain C3H/HeJ. In line with earlier findings on colony-forming cells, cells bearing receptors for CSF-1 in uninfected susceptible BALB/cJ mice were only half those in resistant C57BL/6J mice. After infection the majority of these cells disappeared from the bone marrow and spleen cells of both resistant and susceptible mice. The number of CSF-1 receptor-bearing cells in the normal bone marrow may determine the degree of resistance to L. monocytogenes. PMID:3262588

  10. Evaluation of a biosimilar granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim XM02) for peripheral blood stem cell mobilization and transplantation: a single center experience in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Hideaki; Hotta, Masaaki; Nakanishi, Takahisa; Fujita, Shinya; Nakaya, Aya; Satake, Atsushi; Ito, Tomoki; Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Nomura, Shosaku

    2017-01-01

    Background Biosimilar granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has recently been introduced into clinical practice. G-CSFs are used to mobilize CD34+ cells and accelerate engraftment after transplantation. However, in Asia, particularly in Japan, data for peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization by this biosimilar G-CSF are currently lacking. Therefore, the clinical efficacy and safety of biosimilar G-CSF for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation needs to be evaluated in a Japanese context. Materials and methods The subjects included two groups of patients with malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. All patients received chemotherapy priming for the mobilization of PBSCs. All patients were treated with chemotherapy followed by the administration of either the biosimilar G-CSF, filgrastim XM02 (FBNK), or the originators, filgrastim, or lenograstim. Results There were no significant differences among FBNK, filgrastim, and lenograstim treatments in the numbers of CD34+ cells in harvested PBSCs, the scores for granulocyte/macrophage colony forming units, or for malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients evaluated as separate or combined cohorts. In addition, there were no significant differences in safety, side effects, complications, or the time to engraftment after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conclusion Biosimilar FBNK shows the same efficacy and safety as originator G-CSFs for facilitating bone marrow recovery in Japanese malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. In addition, it is less expensive than the originators, reducing hospitalization costs. PMID:28182150

  11. The effects of vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor and colony-stimulating factor-1 on hematopoietic cells in normal and osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Benis, K A; Schneider, G B

    1996-10-15

    Osteopetrosis is a heterogeneous group of bone disorders characterized by the failure of osteoclasts to resorb bone and by several immunological defects including macrophage dysfunction. Two compounds, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) were used in the present study to evaluate their effects on the peritoneal population of cells and on cells within the bone marrow microenvironment in normal and incisors absent (ia) osteopetrotic rats. Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that administration of DBP-MAF to newborn ia animals results in a substantial increase in bone marrow cavity size due to upregulated osteoclast function. To study the effects of these compounds on the macrophage/osteoclast precursors, DBP-MAF, CSF-1, and the combination of these compounds were given to newborn ia and normal littermate animals. Both the normal and mutant phenotypes responded similarly when treated with these compounds. Rats exhibited a profound shift toward the macrophage lineage from the neutrophil lineage when compared with vehicle-treated control animals after treatment with these compounds. In the in vivo peritoneal lavage study, animals received injections of CSF-1, DBP-MAF or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 over a 4-week period. The various types of cells in the peritoneal cavity were then enumerated. The in vitro study consisted of cells isolated from the bone marrow microenvironment and cultured on feeder layers of CSF-1, DBP-MAF, or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 for colony enumeration. The increase in macrophage numbers at the expense of neutrophil numbers could be seen in both the in vivo and in vitro experiments. The macrophage/osteoclast and neutrophil lineages have a common precursor, the granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC). With the addition of CSF-1, the GM-CFC precursor may be induced into the macrophage/osteoclast lineage rather than the granulocyte lineage. This increased pool of cells in the

  12. Erythropoietin Pretreatment of Transplanted Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Enhances Recovery in a Cerebral Ischemia Model by Increasing Their Homing Ability: A SPECT/CT Study.

    PubMed

    Garrigue, Philippe; Hache, Guillaume; Bennis, Youssef; Brige, Pauline; Stalin, Jimmy; Pellegrini, Lionel; Velly, Lionel; Orlandi, Francesca; Castaldi, Elena; Dignat-George, Françoise; Sabatier, Florence; Guillet, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are promising candidates for cell therapy of ischemic diseases, as less than 10% of patients with an ischemic stroke are eligible for thrombolysis. We previously reported that erythropoietin priming of ECFCs increased their in vitro and in vivo angiogenic properties in mice with hindlimb ischemia. The present study used SPECT/CT to evaluate whether priming of ECFCs with erythropoietin could enhance their homing to the ischemic site after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by reperfusion in rats and potentiate their protective or regenerative effect on blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, cerebral apoptosis, and cerebral blood flow (CBF).

  13. Lipocalin-2 inhibits osteoclast formation by suppressing the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Yoon, Kyung-Ae; Gwon, Mi-Ri; Jin Seong, Sook; Suk, Kyoungho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2015-06-10

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily and plays a critical role in the regulation of various physiological processes, such as inflammation and obesity. In this study, we report that LCN2 negatively modulates the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast precursors, resulting in impaired osteoclast formation. The overexpression of LCN2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages or the addition of recombinant LCN2 protein inhibits the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts. LCN2 suppresses macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced proliferation of osteoclast precursor cells without affecting their apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, LCN2 decreases the expression of the M-CSF receptor, c-Fms, and subsequently blocks its downstream signaling cascades. In addition, LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and attenuates the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), which are important modulators in osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, LCN2 inhibits NF-κB signaling pathways, as demonstrated by the suppression of IκBα phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of p65, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Thus, LCN2 is an anti-osteoclastogenic molecule that exerts its effects by retarding the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells. - Highlights: • LCN2 expression is regulated during osteoclast development. • LCN2 suppresses M-CSF-mediated osteoclast precursor proliferation. • LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

  14. Closure of supporting cell scar formations requires dynamic actin mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hordichok, Andrew J.; Steyger, Peter S.

    2007-01-01

    In many vertebrate inner ear sensory epithelia, dying sensory hair cells are extruded, and the apices of surrounding supporting cells converge to re-seal the epithelial barrier between the electrochemically-distinct endolymph and perilymph. These cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Dynamic microtubular mechanisms have been proposed for hair cell extrusion; while contractile actomyosin-based mechanisms are required for cellular extrusion and closure in epithelial monolayers. The hypothesis that cytoskeletal mechanisms are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation was tested using bullfrog saccules incubated with gentamicin (6 hours), and allowed to recover (18 hours). Explants were then fixed, labeled for actin and cytokeratins, and viewed with confocal microscopy. To block dynamic cytoskeletal processes, disruption agents for microtubules (colchicine, paclitaxel) myosin (Y-27632, ML-9) or actin (cytochalasin D, latrunculin A) were added during treatment and recovery. Microtubule disruption agents had no effect on hair cell extrusion or supporting cell scar formation. Myosin disruption agents appeared to slow down scar formation but not hair cell extrusion. Actin disruption agents blocked scar formation, and largely prevented hair cell extrusion. These data suggest that actin-based cytoskeletal processes are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation in bullfrog saccules. PMID:17716843

  15. Sucrose-mediated giant cell formation in the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K G; McDonald, I J

    1976-03-01

    Growth of Neisseria perflava, Neisseria cinerea, and Neisseria sicca strain Kirkland in media supplemented with sucrose (0.5 to 5.0% w/v) resulted in the formation of giant cells. Response to sucrose was specific in that a variety of other carbohydrates did not mediate giant cell formation. Giant cells appeared only under growth conditions and did not lyse upon transfer to medium lacking sucrose or upon resuspension in hypotonic media. Reversion of giant to normal cells occurred when giant cells were used as inocula and allowed to multiply in media lacking sucrose.

  16. A Kinetic Model for Cell Damage Caused by Oligomer Formation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liu; Huang, Ya-Jing; Yong, Wen-An

    2015-10-06

    It is well known that the formation of amyloid fiber may cause invertible damage to cells, although the underlying mechanism has not been fully understood. In this article, a microscopic model considering the detailed processes of amyloid formation and cell damage is constructed based on four simple assumptions, one of which is that cell damage is raised by oligomers rather than mature fibrils. By taking the maximum entropy principle, this microscopic model in the form of infinite mass-action equations together with two reaction-convection partial differential equations (PDEs) has been greatly coarse-grained into a macroscopic system consisting of only five ordinary differential equations (ODEs). With this simple model, the effects of primary nucleation, elongation, fragmentation, and protein and seeds concentration on amyloid formation and cell damage have been extensively explored and compared with experiments. We hope that our results will provide new insights into the quantitative linkage between amyloid formation and cell damage.

  17. Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor DNA cationic-lipid complexed autologous tumour cell vaccination in the treatment of canine B-cell multicentric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Turek, M M; Thamm, D H; Mitzey, A; Kurzman, I D; Huelsmeyer, M K; Dubielzig, R R; Vail, D M

    2007-12-01

    This study describes the development of an human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor DNA cationic-lipid complexed autologous tumour cell vaccine (hGM-CSF CLDC ATCV) and its implementation, following a chemotherapy treatment protocol, in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial in pet dogs with naturally occurring lymphoma. We hypothesized that the use of this vaccine would result in an antitumour immune response leading to improved first remission duration and overall survival in dogs with B-cell lymphoma when compared with chemotherapy alone. Immune stimulation generated by hGM-CSF CLDC ATCV was assessed by means of surrogate in vivo analysis (delayed-type hypersensitivity [DTH]) as well as an ex vivo cellular assay (lymphocyte proliferation assay). The vaccine approach considered in the current report did not result in clinically improved outcomes. A small measure of immunomodulation was documented by DTH and several modifications to the approach are suggested. This report illustrates the feasibility of clinical trials with vaccine strategies using companion animals with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  18. Lysobacter enzymogenes Uses Two Distinct Cell-Cell Signaling Systems for Differential Regulation of Secondary-Metabolite Biosynthesis and Colony Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Guoliang; Wang, Yulan; Liu, Yiru; Xu, Feifei; He, Ya-Wen; Du, Liangcheng; Venturi, Vittorio; Fan, Jiaqin; Hu, Baishi

    2013-01-01

    Lysobacter enzymogenes is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium that is emerging as a potentially novel biological control agent and a new source of bioactive secondary metabolites, such as the heat-stable antifungal factor (HSAF) and photoprotective polyene pigments. Thus far, the regulatory mechanism(s) for biosynthesis of these bioactive secondary metabolites remains largely unknown in L. enzymogenes. In the present study, the diffusible signal factor (DSF) and diffusible factor (DF)-mediated cell-cell signaling systems were identified for the first time from L. enzymogenes. The results show that both Rpf/DSF and DF signaling systems played critical roles in modulating HSAF biosynthesis in L. enzymogenes. Rpf/DSF signaling and DF signaling played negative and positive effects in polyene pigment production, respectively, with DF playing a more important role in regulating this phenotype. Interestingly, only Rpf/DSF, but not the DF signaling system, regulated colony morphology of L. enzymgenes. Both Rpf/DSF and DF signaling systems were involved in the modulation of expression of genes with diverse functions in L. enzymogenes, and their own regulons exhibited only a few loci that were regulated by both systems. These findings unveil for the first time new roles of the Rpf/DSF and DF signaling systems in secondary metabolite biosynthesis of L. enzymogenes. PMID:23974132

  19. Rat granulocyte colony-forming unit (CFU-G) assay for the assessment of drug-induced hematotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Matsumura-Takeda, K; Kotosai, K; Ozaki, A; Hara, H; Yamashita, S

    2002-06-01

    To assess the drug-induced hematotoxicity to granulocyte progenitors, we established a modified colony-forming assay using rat bone marrow cells (BMCs). In the presence of various colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), rat BMCs were disseminated on methylcellulose at a concentration of 1.3 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) (5 x 10(4) cells/0.5 ml/well in a 12-well plate). Mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) stimulated the formation of almost all macrophage colonies. Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) alone or in combination with mouse interleukin-3 (mIL-3) did not significantly effect on the number of rat colony-forming units in culture (CFU-C). When BMCs were seeded at 5.2 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) (5 x 10(5) cells/1 ml/dish in a 35-mm dish), hG-CSF increased the number of the colonies in a dose-dependent manner, and resulted in about 50 colonies at 50 ng/ml. The constituent cells of the colonies were identified as neutrophils. Under these conditions, the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on granulocyte colony-forming units (CFU-G) were examined in rats and mice. The inhibitory effect of 5-FU on rat CFU-G was similar to the effect on mouse CFU-G. These results indicate that the rat CFU-G induced by hG-CSF is capable of being used for the evaluation of drug-induced hematotoxicity.

  20. Priming of endothelial colony-forming cells in a mesenchymal niche improves engraftment and vasculogenic potential by initiating mesenchymal transition orchestrated by NOTCH signaling.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Abbas; Patel, Jatin; Wong, Ho Yi; Donovan, Prudence; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Fisk, Nicholas M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2017-02-01

    The prospect of using endothelial progenitors is currently hampered by their low engraftment upon transplantation. We report that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), independent of source and age, improve the engraftment of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs). MSC coculture altered ECFC appearance to an elongated mesenchymal morphology with reduced proliferation. ECFC primed via MSC contact had reduced self-renewal potential, but improved capacity to form tube structures in vitro and engraftment in vivo Primed ECFCs displayed major differences in transcriptome compared to ECFCs never exposed to MSCs, affecting genes involved in the cell cycle, up-regulating of genes influencing mesenchymal transition, adhesion, extracellular matrix. Inhibition of NOTCH signaling, a potential upstream regulator of mesenchymal transition, in large part modulated this gene expression pattern and functionally reversed the mesenchymal morphology of ECFCs. The collective results showed that primed ECFCs survive better and undergo a mesenchymal transition that is dependent on NOTCH signaling, resulting in significantly increased vasculogenic potential.-Shafiee, A., Patel, J., Wong, H. Y., Donovan, P., Hutmacher, D. W., Fisk, N. M., Khosrotehrani, K. Priming of endothelial colony-forming cells in a mesenchymal niche improves engraftment and vasculogenic potential by initiating mesenchymal transition orchestrated by NOTCH signaling.

  1. T Cell–Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Contributes to Dry Eye Disease Pathogenesis by Promoting CD11b+ Myeloid Cell Maturation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, Thomas H.; Ding, Julia; Dana, Reza; Chauhan, Sunil K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Growing evidence suggests that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) contributes to T helper 17 (Th17) cell–associated immunoinflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of T cell–derived GM-CSF on CD11b+ myeloid cell function in dry eye disease (DED). Methods In a murine model of DED, quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA were used to measure GM-CSF expression at the ocular surface, and flow cytometry was used to enumerate GM-CSF producing Th17 cells. A granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralizing antibody was used topically in vivo and in an in vitro culture system to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in recruiting and maturing CD11b+ cells. Clinical disease severity was evaluated after topical administration of GM-CSF neutralizing antibody. Results In dry eye disease, GM-CSF is significantly upregulated at the ocular surface and the frequency of GM-CSF producing Th17 cells is significantly increased in the draining lymph nodes. In vitro neutralization of GM-CSF from CD4+ T cells derived from DED mice suppresses major histocompatibility complex II expression by CD11b+ cells and CD11b+ cell migration. Topical neutralization of GM-CSF in a murine model of DED suppresses CD11b+ maturation and migration, as well as Th17 cell induction, yielding a reduction in clinical signs of disease. Conclusions T helper 17 cell–derived GM-CSF contributes to DED pathogenesis by promoting CD11b+ cell activation and migration to the ocular surface. PMID:28241321

  2. Membrane tether formation from blebbing cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dai, J; Sheetz, M P

    1999-01-01

    Membrane tension has been proposed to be important in regulating cell functions such as endocytosis and cell motility. The apparent membrane tension has been calculated from tether forces measured with laser tweezers. Both membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion and membrane tension contribute to the tether force. Separation of the plasma membrane from the cytoskeleton occurs in membrane blebs, which could remove the membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion term. In renal epithelial cells, tether forces are significantly lower on blebs than on membranes that are supported by cytoskeleton. Furthermore, the tether forces are equal on apical and basolateral blebs. In contrast, tether forces from membranes supported by the cytoskeleton are greater in apical than in basolateral regions, which is consistent with the greater apparent cytoskeletal density in the apical region. We suggest that the tether force on blebs primarily contains only the membrane tension term and that the membrane tension may be uniform over the cell surface. Additional support for this hypothesis comes from observations of melanoma cells that spontaneously bleb. In melanoma cells, tether forces on blebs are proportional to the radius of the bleb, and as large blebs form, there are spikes in the tether force in other cell regions. We suggest that an internal osmotic pressure inflates the blebs, and the pressure calculated from the Law of Laplace is similar to independent measurements of intracellular pressures. When the membrane tension term is subtracted from the apparent membrane tension over the cytoskeleton, the membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion term can be estimated. In both cell systems, membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion was the major factor in generating the tether force. PMID:10585959

  3. Foam cell formation by particulate matter (PM) exposure: a review.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Long, Jimin; Ji, Yuejia; Chen, Gui; Shen, Yuexin; Gong, Yu; Li, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that exposure of particulate matter (PM) from traffic vehicles, e.g., diesel exhaust particles (DEP), was associated with adverse vascular effects, e.g., acceleration of atherosclerotic plaque progression. By analogy, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) could also induce similar effects. The formation of lipid laden foam cells, derived predominately from macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), is closely associated with the development of atherosclerosis and adverse vascular effects. We reviewed current studies about particle exposure-induced lipid laden foam cell formation. In vivo studies using animal models have shown that exposure of air pollution by PM promoted lipid accumulation in alveolar macrophages or foam cells in plaques, which was likely associated with pulmonary inflammation or systemic oxidative stress, but not blood lipid profile. In support of these findings, in vitro studies showed that direct exposure of cultured macrophages to DEP or NP exposure, with or without further exposure to external lipids, promoted intracellular lipid accumulation. The mechanisms remained unknown. Although a number studies found increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) or an adaptive response to oxidative stress, the exact role of oxidative stress in mediating particle-induced foam cell formation requires future research. There is currently lack of reports concerning VSMC as a source for foam cells induced by particle exposure. In the future, it is necessary to explore the role of foam cell formation in particle exposure-induced atherosclerosis development. In addition, the formation of VSMC derived foam cells by particle exposure may also need extensive studies.

  4. Chloride influx provokes lamellipodium formation in microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Zierler, Susanna; Frei, Eva; Grissmer, Stephan; Kerschbaum, Hubert H

    2008-01-01

    Lamellipodium extension and retraction is the driving force for cell migration. Although several studies document that activation of chloride channels are essential in cell migration, little is known about their contribution in lamellipodium formation. To address this question, we characterized chloride channels and transporters by whole cell recording and RT-PCR, respectively, as well as quantified lamellipodium formation in murine primary microglial cells as well as the microglial cell-line, BV-2, using time-lapse microscopy. The repertoire of chloride conducting pathways in BV-2 cells included, swelling-activated chloride channels as well as the KCl cotransporters, KCC1, KCC2, KCC3, and KCC4. Swelling-activated chloride channels were either activated by a hypoosmotic solution or by a high KCl saline, which promotes K(+) and Cl(-) influx instead of efflux by KCCs. Conductance through swelling-activated chloride channels was completely blocked by flufenamic acid (200 microM), SITS (1 mM) and DIOA (10 microM). By exposing primary microglial cells or BV-2 cells to a high KCl saline, we observed a local swelling, which developed into a prominent lamellipodium. Blockade of chloride influx by flufenamic acid (200 microM) or DIOA (10 microM) as well as incubation of cells in a chloride-free high K(+) saline suppressed formation of a lamellipodium. We assume that local swellings, established by an increase in chloride influx, are a general principle in formation of lamellipodia in eukaryotic cells.

  5. The Amana Colonies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilja, Marilyn

    Designed for use in Iowa elementary schools, this unit introduces students to Iowa's Amana Colonies. Four lessons cover the history and cultural heritage of the colonies, daily life in historical times, daily life in modern times, and the colonies as a corporate museum. Throughout the lessons, emphasis is placed on the values and organization of…

  6. Suppression of T cell-induced osteoclast formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Genistein and coumestrol prevent activated T cell induced osteoclast formation. •Anti-TNF neutralising antibodies prevent the pro-osteoclastic effect of activated T cells. •Phytoestrogens inhibit T cell derived TNF alpha and inflammatory cytokine production. •Phytoestrogens have a broader range of anti-osteoclastic actions than other anti-resorptives. -- Abstract: Inhibition of T cell derived cytokine production could help suppress osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory skeletal disorders. Bisphosphonates are typically prescribed to prevent inflammatory bone loss but are not tolerated by all patients and are associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In light of this other anti-resorptives such as phytoestrogens are being considered. However the effect of phytoestrogens on T cell-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. The effect of genistein and coumestrol on activated T cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and cytokine production was therefore examined. Concentrations of genistein and coumestrol (10{sup −7} M) previously shown to directly inhibit osteoclast formation also suppressed the formation of TRAP positive osteoclast induced by con A activated T cells, which was dependent on inhibition of T cell derived TNF-α. While both reduced osteoclast formation their mechanism of action differed. The anti-osteoclastic effect of coumestrol was associated with a dual effect on con A induced T cell proliferation and activation; 10{sup −7} M coumestrol significantly reducing T cell number (0.36) and TNF-α (0.47), IL-1β (0.23) and IL-6 (0.35) expression, whereas genistein (10{sup −7} M) had no effect on T cell number but a more pronounced effect on T cell differentiation reducing expression of TNF-α (0.49), IL-1β (0.52), IL-6 (0.71) and RANKL (0.71). Phytoestrogens therefore prevent the pro-osteoclastic action of T cells suggesting they may have a role in the control of inflammatory bone loss.

  7. Hypersaline conditions induce changes in cell-wall melanization and colony structure in a halophilic and a xerophilic black yeast species of the genus Trimmatostroma.

    PubMed

    Kogej, Tina; Gorbushina, Anna A; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2006-06-01

    Melanized yeast-like meristematic fungi are characteristic inhabitants of highly stressed environments and are rare eukaryotic extremophiles. Therefore, they are attractive organisms for studies of adaptations. In this study we compared two meristematic species of the genus Trimmatostroma on media of differing water potentials isolated from distinct water-stressed environments: T. salinum from the hypersaline water of a solar saltern, and T. abietis from a marble monument in Crimea. The morphology and melanization of both isolates in response to sodium chloride-induced water stress were investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. We describe and compare the colony form and structure, ultrastructure, and degree of cell-wall melanization of both species in reaction to salinity and to inhibited melanin synthesis. The halophilic T. salinum responded to changed salinity conditions on the level of individual cell ultrastructure and degree of cell wall melanization, whereas the xerophilic rock-inhabiting T. abietis responded with modification of its colony structure. Surprisingly, both the halophilic and the xerophilic Trimmatostroma species were able to adapt to hypersaline growth conditions, although their growth patterns show distinct adaptation of each species to their natural ecological niches.

  8. Signaling events in pathogen-induced macrophage foam cell formation.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yazdani B; Mekasha, Samrawit; He, Xianbao; Gibson, Frank C; Ingalls, Robin R

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage foam cell formation is a key event in atherosclerosis. Several triggers induce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake by macrophages to create foam cells, including infections with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Chlamydia pneumoniae, two pathogens that have been linked to atherosclerosis. While gene regulation during foam cell formation has been examined, comparative investigations to identify shared and specific pathogen-elicited molecular events relevant to foam cell formation are not well documented. We infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages with P. gingivalis or C. pneumoniae in the presence of LDL to induce foam cell formation, and examined gene expression using an atherosclerosis pathway targeted plate array. We found over 30 genes were significantly induced in response to both pathogens, including PPAR family members that are broadly important in atherosclerosis and matrix remodeling genes that may play a role in plaque development and stability. Six genes mainly involved in lipid transport were significantly downregulated. The response overall was remarkably similar and few genes were regulated in a pathogen-specific manner. Despite very divergent lifestyles, P. gingivalis and C. pneumoniae activate similar gene expression profiles during foam cell formation that may ultimately serve as targets for modulating infection-elicited foam cell burden, and progression of atherosclerosis.

  9. The Formation of Germ Cell for Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivaldi, Silvia; Scaratti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to analyze the process of "germ cell" formation by framing it as an opportunity for promoting organizational learning and transformation. The paper aims to specifically answer two research questions: Why does the "germ cell" have a pivotal role in organization's transformation? and Which…

  10. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Veronica R.; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2014-01-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but 1 patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 106/kilogram of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 106/kilogram of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 106/kilogram of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non- hematologic toxic effects were observed. PMID:23749720

  11. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Veronica R; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2013-09-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but one patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 10(6) /kg of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non-hematologic toxic effects were observed.

  12. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves B-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice.

    PubMed

    Huston, Marshall W; Riegman, Adriaan R A; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg(-/-) mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin(-)) cells or Il2rg(-/-) Lin(-) cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning.

  13. Pretransplant Mobilization with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Improves B-Cell Reconstitution by Lentiviral Vector Gene Therapy in SCID-X1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Marshall W.; Riegman, Adriaan R.A.; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg−/− mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin−) cells or Il2rg−/− Lin− cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  14. Chemokine Ligand 5 (CCL5) Derived from Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells (ECFCs) Mediates Recruitment of Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells (SPCs) toward Critical Vascular Locations in Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phi, Ji Hoon; Suzuki, Naoko; Moon, Youn Joo; Park, Ae Kyung; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Choi, Seung-Ah; Chong, Sangjoon; Shirane, Reizo; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2017-01-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of moyamoya disease (MMD) are still obscure. Previous studies indicated that angiogenic chemokines may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recently, it was discovered that peripheral blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SPCs) have defective functions in MMD patients. Therefore, the interaction of ECFCs and SPCs, the precursors of two crucial cellular components of vascular walls, with some paracrine molecules is an intriguing subject. In this study, co-culture of ECFCs and SPCs from MMD patients and healthy normal subjects revealed that MMD ECFCs, not SPCs, are responsible for the defective functions of both ECFCs and SPCs. Enhanced migration of SPCs toward MMD ECFCs supported the role for some chemokines secreted by MMD ECFCs. Expression arrays of MMD and normal ECFCs suggested that several candidate cytokines differentially produced by MMD ECFCs. We selected chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 6 (CXCR6), interleukin-8 (IL8), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), and CCL5 for study, based on the relatively higher expression of these ligands in MMD ECFCs and their cognate receptors in MMD SPCs. Migration assays showed that only CCL5 significantly augmented the migration activities of SPCs toward ECFCs. Treatment with siRNA for the CCL5 receptor (CCR5) abrogated the effect, confirming that CCL5 is responsible for the interaction of MMD ECFCs and SPCs. These data indicate that ECFCs, not SPCs, are the major players in MMD pathogenesis and that the chemokine CCL5 mediates the interactions. It can be hypothesized that in MMD patients, defective ECFCs direct aberrant SPC recruitment to critical vascular locations through the action of CCL5. PMID:28072843

  15. Regulation of Inflammatory Cytokine Expression in Pulmonary Epithelial Cells by Pre-B-cell Colony-enhancing Factor via a Nonenzymatic and AP-1-dependent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Li, Hailong; Cepeda, Javier; Xia, Yue; Kempf, Jessica A.; Ye, Hong; Zhang, Li Qin; Ye, Shui Qing

    2009-01-01

    Although our previous studies found Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) as a highly up-regulated gene in acute lung injury that could stimulate expressions of other inflammatory cytokines, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Growing evidence indicates that PBEF is a nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase involved in the mammalian salvage pathway of NAD synthesis. This study was designed to determine whether the effect of PBEF to stimulate expressions of inflammatory cytokines depends on its enzymatic activity. We prepared two human PBEF mutant (H247E and H247A) recombinant proteins and overexpressing constructs for their overexpressions in A549 cells and confirmed that enzymatic activities of both mutants were nearly or completely abolished. Two mutants stimulated interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression at both the mRNA level and protein level just as equally effective as the wild-type PBEF did. These effects were due to the increased transcription, not the mRNA stability, of the IL-8 gene. Reporter gene assays and gel shift experiments indicated that AP-1 transcription factor is required to mediate these effects. SB203580, a p38 MAPK pathway inhibitor, and JNK inhibitor 1 can attenuate these effects. Both PBEF mutants similarly stimulated the expression of two other inflammatory cytokines: IL-16 and CCR3. These results indicate that PBEF stimulated expression of IL-8, IL-16, and CCR3 via its non-enzymatic activity. This effect is AP-1-dependent, in part via the p38 MAPK pathway and the JNK pathway. This finding reveals a new insight, which may manifest a novel role of PBEF in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury and other inflammatory disorders. PMID:19654329

  16. Distinct Growth Strategies of Soil Bacteria as Revealed by Large-Scale Colony Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Ernebjerg, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of microbial ecology has been significantly furthered in recent years by advances in sequencing techniques, but comprehensive surveys of the phenotypic characteristics of environmental bacteria remain rare. Such phenotypic data are crucial for understanding the microbial strategies for growth and the diversity of microbial ecosystems. Here, we describe a high-throughput measurement of the growth of thousands of bacterial colonies using an array of flat-bed scanners coupled with automated image analysis. We used this system to investigate the growth properties of members of a microbial community from untreated soil. The system provides high-quality measurements of the number of CFU, colony growth rates, and appearance times, allowing us to directly study the distribution of these properties in mixed environmental samples. We find that soil bacteria display a wide range of growth strategies which can be grouped into several clusters that cannot be reduced to any of the classical dichotomous divisions of soil bacteria, e.g., into copiotophs and oligotrophs. We also find that, at early times, cells are most likely to form colonies when other, nearby colonies are present but not too dense. This maximization of culturability at intermediate plating densities suggests that the previously observed tendency for high density to lead to fewer colonies is partly offset by the induction of colony formation caused by interactions between microbes. These results suggest new types of growth classification of soil bacteria and potential effects of species interactions on colony growth. PMID:22194284

  17. Cell-fusion method to visualize interphase nuclear pore formation.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Funakoshi, Tomoko; Imamoto, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the nucleus is a complex and sophisticated organelle that organizes genomic DNA to support essential cellular functions. The nuclear surface contains many nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), channels for macromolecular transport between the cytoplasm and nucleus. It is well known that the number of NPCs almost doubles during interphase in cycling cells. However, the mechanism of NPC formation is poorly understood, presumably because a practical system for analysis does not exist. The most difficult obstacle in the visualization of interphase NPC formation is that NPCs already exist after nuclear envelope formation, and these existing NPCs interfere with the observation of nascent NPCs. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a novel system using the cell-fusion technique (heterokaryon method), previously also used to analyze the shuttling of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, to visualize the newly synthesized interphase NPCs. In addition, we used a photobleaching approach that validated the cell-fusion method. We recently used these methods to demonstrate the role of cyclin-dependent protein kinases and of Pom121 in interphase NPC formation in cycling human cells. Here, we describe the details of the cell-fusion approach and compare the system with other NPC formation visualization methods.

  18. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces indirect angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Phillips, G D; Aukerman, S L; Whitehead, R A; Knighton, D R

    1993-01-01

    The cytokine macrophage colony-stimulating factor was implanted in the rabbit cornea over a wide dose range (1 ng to 100 microg) to assay its angiogenic activity in vivo. Neovascularization occurred in a dose-dependent manner, and maximum angiogenesis occurred only with 100 microg. Histologic analysis revealed that the corneas were free of inflammation at the lower doses, but had slight inflammation at 50 and 100 microg. Nonspecific esterase staining of frozen sections and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the inflammatory cells were predominantly macrophages, with very few neutrophils present. This association of capillary formation with inflammation suggests an indirect mechanism of angiogenesis. The lack of neutrophils within the inflammatory cell infiltrate demonstrates that indirect angiogenesis can proceed without the local presence of neutrophils. This distinguishes macrophage colony-stimulating factor from other indirect-acting angiogenesis factors that have been identified to date.

  19. Antitumor protection from the murine T-cell leukemia/lymphoma EL4 by the continuous subcutaneous coadministration of recombinant macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Vallera, D A; Taylor, P A; Aukerman, S L; Blazar, B R

    1993-09-15

    Combined continuous s.c. coadministration of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) plus interleukin-2 (IL-2) by osmotic pump protected mice given i.v. injections of a lethal dose of EL4 T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Antitumor protection was significantly greater than that afforded by treatment with either cytokine alone. Since neither IL-2 receptors nor M-CSF receptors were expressed on EL4, the antitumor effect was likely attributed to murine effector cells. To determine how M-CSF+IL-2 provided this effect, we performed immunophenotypic and functional analyses as well as in vivo depletion studies of putative antitumor effector cells. Splenic phenotyping experiments revealed that the highest levels of macrophages and natural killer cells were observed in mice given the cytokine combination rather than either M-CSF or IL-2 alone. In vivo depletion of natural killer cells ablated the antitumor protective effect of M-CSF and IL-2. T-cells were also important for M-CSF+IL-2 efficacy, since adult thymectomy/T-cell depletion significantly inhibited the ability of cytokine coadministration to protect against EL4. Coadministration of the 2 cytokines significantly elevated in vivo levels of CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD3+NK1.1+ T-cells, and CD3+CD25+ (activated) T-cells, and elevated anti-EL4 cytotoxic T-cell activity measured in vitro. Although WBC counts and fluorescence-activated cell sorter studies showed that M-CSF+IL-2 treatment significantly elevated neutrophils, s.c. delivery of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor at doses sufficient to induce neutrophilia was unable to confer anti-EL4 protection. These studies indicate that macrophages, T-cells, and natural killer cells are all important in the M-CSF+IL-2 anti-EL4 response. The superior antitumor effect of this cytokine combination along with the ability of M-CSF to diminish the toxicity of IL-2 in this model suggests that further investigations into the clinical potential of this combination treatment are warranted.

  20. Nanopore formation in neuroblastoma cells following ultrashort electric pulse exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Payne, Jason A.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrashort or nanosecond electrical pulses (USEP) cause repairable damage to the plasma membranes of cells through formation of nanopores. These nanopores are able to pass small ions such as sodium, calcium, and potassium, but remain impermeable to larger molecules like trypan blue and propidium iodide. What remains uncertain is whether generation of nanopores by ultrashort electrical pulses can inhibit action potentials in excitable cells. In this paper, we explored the sensitivity of excitable cells to USEP using Calcium Green AM 1 ester fluorescence to measure calcium uptake indicative of nanopore formation in the plasma membrane. We determined the threshold for nanopore formation in neuroblastoma cells for three pulse parameters (amplitude, pulse width, and pulse number). Measurement of such thresholds will guide future studies to determine if USEP can inhibit action potentials without causing irreversible membrane damage.

  1. The role of Cbln1 on Purkinje cell synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Okabe, Shigeo; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2014-06-01

    Cbln1 is a glycoprotein which belongs to the C1q family. In the cerebellum, Cbln1 is produced and secreted from granule cells and works as a strong synapse organizer between Purkinje cells and parallel fibers, the axons of the granule cells. In this update article, we will describe the molecular mechanisms by which Cbln1 induces synapse formation and will review our findings on the axonal structural changes which occur specifically during this process. We will also describe our recent finding that Cbln1 has a suppressive role in inhibitory synapse formation between Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons. Our results have revealed that Cbln1 plays an essential role to establish parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses and to regulate balance between excitatory and inhibitory input on Purkinje cells.

  2. Enhanced product formation in continuous fermentations with microbial cell recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, D.N.; Young, M.D.

    1981-02-01

    The effect of partial recycle of microbial cells on the operation of a chemostat has been investigated for two fermentations. Stable steady states with and without partial cell recycle were obtained for the conversion of d-sorbitol to L-sorbose by Gluconobacter oxydans subsp. suboxydans 1916B and for the conversion of glucose to 2-ketogluconic acid by Serratia marcescens NRRl B-486. The employment of partial cell recycle dramatically increased product formation rates for both fermentations.

  3. Structurally specific heparan sulfates support primitive human hematopoiesis by formation of a multimolecular stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Oegema, T R; Brazil, J J; Dudek, A Z; Slungaard, A; Verfaillie, C M

    1998-12-15

    Stem cell localization, conservation, and differentiation is believed to occur in niches in the marrow stromal microenvironment. Our recent observation that long-term in vitro human hematopoiesis requires a stromal heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) led us to hypothesize that such HSPG may orchestrate the formation of the stem cell niche. We compared the structure and function of HS from M2-10B4, a hematopoiesis-supportive cell line, with HS from a nonsupportive cell line, FHS-173-We. Long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) maintenance was enhanced by PG from supportive cells but not by PG from nonsupportive cells (P <.005). The supportive HS were significantly larger and more highly sulfated than the nonsupportive HS. Specifically, supportive HS contained higher 6-O-sulfation on the glucosamine residues. In agreement with these observations, purified 6-O-sulfated heparin and highly 6-O-sulfated bovine kidney HS similarly maintained LTC-IC. In contrast, completely desulfated heparin, N-sulfated heparin, and unmodified heparin did not support LTC-IC maintenance. Moreover, the supportive HS promoted LTC-IC maintenance but not differentiation of CD34(+)/HLA-DR- cells into colony-forming cells (CFCs) and mature blood cells. The supportive HS but not the nonsupportive HS bound both cytokines and matrix components critical for hematopoiesis, including interleukin-3 (IL-3), macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1), and thrombospondin (TSP). Significantly more CD34(+) cells adhered directly to immobilized O-sulfated heparin than to N-sulfated or desulfated heparin. Thus, hematopoiesis-supportive stromal HSPG possessing large, highly 6-O-sulfated HS mediate the juxtaposition of hematopoietic progenitors with stromal cells, specific growth-promoting (IL-3) and growth-inhibitory (MIP-1 and platelet factor 4 [PF4]) cytokines, and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as TSP. We conclude that the structural specificity of stromal HSPG that determines the selective

  4. Germ cell formation from embryonic stem cells and the use of somatic cell nuclei in oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Emanuele; Forabosco, Antonino; Schlessinger, David

    2011-03-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have remarkable properties of pluripotency and self-renewal, along with the retention of chromosomal integrity. Germ cells function as a kind of "transgenerational stem cells," transmitting genetic information from one generation to the next. The formation of putative primordial germ cells (PGCs) and germ cells from mouse and human ESCs (hESCs) has, in fact, been shown, and the apparent derivation of functional mouse male gametes has also been described. Additionally, investigators have successfully reprogrammed somatic nuclei into a pluripotent state by inserting them into ESCs or oocytes. This would enable the generation of ESCs genetically identical to the somatic cell donor and their use in cell therapy. However, these methodologies are still inefficient and their mechanisms poorly understood. Until full comprehension of these processes is obtained, clinical applications remain remote. Nevertheless, they represent promising tools in the future, enhancing methods of therapeutic cloning and infertility treatment.

  5. Cardiomyocyte Formation by Skeletal Muscle-Derived Multi-Myogenic Stem Cells after Transplantation into Infarcted Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Akatsuka, Akira; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Iwaguro, Hideki; Iwasaki, Hiroto; Oyamada, Akira; Asahara, Takayuki

    2008-01-01

    Background Cellular cardiomyoplasty for myocardial infarction has been developed using various cell types. However, complete differentiation and/or trans-differentiation into cardiomyocytes have never occurred in these transplant studies, whereas functional contributions were reported. Methods and Results Skeletal muscle interstitium-derived CD34+/CD45− (Sk-34) cells were purified from green fluorescent protein transgenic mice by flowcytometory. Cardiac differentiation of Sk-34 cells was examined by in vitro clonal culture and co-culture with embryonic cardiomyocytes, and in vivo transplantation into a nude rat myocardial infarction (MI) model (left ventricle). Lower relative expression of cardiomyogenic transcription factors, such as GATA-4, Nkx2-5, Isl-1, Mef2 and Hand2, was seen in clonal cell culture. However, vigorous expression of these factors was seen on co-culture with embryonic cardiomyocytes, together with formation of gap-junctions and synchronous contraction following sphere-like colony formation. At 4 weeks after transplantation of freshly isolated Sk-34 cells, donor cells exhibited typical cardiomyocyte structure with formation of gap-junctions, as well as intercalated discs and desmosomes, between donor and recipient and/or donor and donor cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis detecting the rat and mouse genomic DNA and immunoelectron microscopy using anti-GFP revealed donor-derived cells. Transplanted Sk-34 cells were incorporated into infarcted portions of recipient muscles and contributed to cardiac reconstitution. Significant improvement in left ventricular function, as evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography and micro-tip conductance catheter, was also observed. Conclusions and Significance Skeletal muscle-derived multipotent Sk-34 cells that can give rise to skeletal and smooth muscle cells as reported previously, also give rise to cardiac muscle cells as multi-myogenic stem cells, and thus are a potential source for

  6. Pulp stem cells: implication in reparative dentin formation.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova-Nakov, Sasha; Baudry, Anne; Harichane, Yassine; Kellermann, Odile; Goldberg, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Many dental pulp stem cells are neural crest derivatives essential for lifelong maintenance of tooth functions and homeostasis as well as tooth repair. These cells may be directly implicated in the healing process or indirectly involved in cell-to-cell diffusion of paracrine messages to resident (pulpoblasts) or nonresident cells (migrating mesenchymal cells). The identity of the pulp progenitors and the mechanisms sustaining their regenerative capacity remain largely unknown. Taking advantage of the A4 cell line, a multipotent stem cell derived from the molar pulp of mouse embryo, we investigated the capacity of these pulp-derived precursors to induce in vivo the formation of a reparative dentin-like structure upon implantation within the pulp of a rodent incisor or a first maxillary molar after surgical exposure. One month after the pulp injury alone, a nonmineralized fibrous matrix filled the mesial part of the coronal pulp chamber. Upon A4 cell implantation, a mineralized osteodentin was formed in the implantation site without affecting the structure and vitality of the residual pulp in the central and distal parts of the pulp chamber. These results show that dental pulp stem cells can induce the formation of reparative dentin and therefore constitute a useful tool for pulp therapies. Finally, reparative dentin was also built up when A4 progenitors were performed by alginate beads, suggesting that alginate is a suitable carrier for cell implantation in teeth.

  7. Proximal tubule-derived Colony Stimulating Factor-1 mediates polarization of renal macrophages and dendritic cells, and recovery in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinqiu; Chang, Jian; Yao, Bing; Niu, Aolei; Kelly, Emily; Breeggemann, Matthew C.; Abboud Werner, Sherry L.; Harris, Raymond C.; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrating cells play an important role in both the development of and recovery from acute kidney injury (AKI). Macrophages and renal dendritic cells are of particular interest because they can exhibit distinctly different functional phenotypes, broadly characterized as proinflammatory (M1) or tissue reparative (M2). Resident renal macrophages and dendritic cells participate in recovery from AKI in response to either ischemia/reperfusion or a model of selective proximal tubule injury induced by diphtheria toxin-induced apoptosis in transgenic mice expressing the human diphtheria toxin receptor on proximal tubule cells. Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) is an important factor mediating the recovery from AKI, and CSF-1 can stimulate macrophage and dendritic cell proliferation and polarization during the recovery phase of AKI. The kidney, and specifically the proximal tubule, is a major source of intrarenal CSF-1 production in response to AKI. We induced selective deletion of proximal tubule CSF-1 to determine its role in expansion and proliferation of renal macrophages and dendritic cells and in recovery from AKI. In both models of AKI, there was decreased M2 polarization, delayed functional and structural recovery and increased tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Thus, intrarenal CSF-1 is an important mediator of macrophage/dendritic cell polarization and recovery from AKI. PMID:26422503

  8. Activation of Natural Killer Cells in Patients with Chronic Bone and Joint Infection due to Staphylococci Expressing or Not the Small Colony Variant Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Viel, Sébastien; Rouzaire, Paul; Laurent, Frédéric; Walzer, Thierry; Bienvenu, Jacques; Valour, Florent; Chidiac, Christian; Ferry, Tristan; Group, The Lyon BJI Study

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bone and joint infections (BJI) are devastating diseases. Relapses are frequently observed, as some pathogens, especially staphylococci, can persist intracellularly by expressing a particular phenotype called small colony variant (SCV). As natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes specialized in the killing of host cells infected by intracellular pathogens, we studied NK cells of patients with chronic BJI due to staphylococci expressing or not SCVs (10 patients in both groups). Controls were patients infected with other bacteria without detectable expression of SCVs, and healthy volunteers. NK cell phenotype was evaluated from PBMCs by flow cytometry. Degranulation capacity was evaluated after stimulation with K562 cells in vitro. We found that NK cells were activated in terms of CD69 expression, loss of CD16 and perforin, in all infected patients in comparison with healthy volunteers, independently of the SCV phenotype. Peripheral NK cells in patients with chronic BJI display signs of recent activation and degranulation in vivo in response to CD16-mediated signals, regardless of the type of bacteria involved. This could involve a universal capacity of isolates responsible for chronic BJI to produce undetectable SCVs in vivo, which might be a target of future intervention. PMID:26464851

  9. Formation of a cylindrical bridge in cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citron, Daniel; Schmidt, Laura E.; Reichl, Elizabeth; Ren, Yixin; Robinson, Douglas; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2007-11-01

    In nature, the shape transition associated with the division of a mother cell into two daughter cells proceeds via a variety of routes. In the cylinder-thinning route, which has been observed in Dictyostelium and most animal cells, the mother cell first forms a broad bridge-like region, also known as a furrow, between two daughter cells. The furrow then rapidly evolves into a cylindrical bridge, which thins and eventually severs the mother cell into two. The fundamental mechanism underlying this division route is not understood. Recent experiments on Dictyostelium found that, while the cylinder-thinning route persists even when key actin cross-linking proteins are missing, it is disrupted by the removal of force-generating myosin-II proteins. Other measurements revealed that mutant cells lacking myosin-II have a much more uniform tension over the cell surface than wild-type cells. This suggests that tension variation may be important. Here we use a fluid model, previously shown to reproduce the thinning dynamics [Zhang & Robinson, PNAS 102, 7186 (2005)], to test this idea. Consistent with the experiments, the model shows that the cylinder formation process occurs regardless of the exact viscoelastic properties of the cell. In contrast to the experiments, a tension variation in the model hinders, rather then expedites, the cylinder formation.

  10. Cell Adhesion in Epidermal Development and Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Lechler, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell adhesions are necessary for structural integrity and barrier formation of the epidermis. Here, we discuss insights from genetic and cell biological studies into the roles of individual cell–cell junctions and their composite proteins in regulating epidermal development and function. In addition to individual adhesive functions, we will discuss emerging ideas on mechanosensation/transduction of junctions in the epidermis, noncanonical roles for adhesion proteins, and crosstalk/interdependencies between the junctional systems. These studies have revealed that cell adhesion proteins are connected to many aspects of tissue physiology including growth control, differentiation, and inflammation. PMID:25733147

  11. Effects of tumor vaccine expressing Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor and interleukin-18 fusion on cancer cells and its possible application for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Rok; Park, Young Kyu; Shin, Boo Ahn; Park, Hae-Ryoung

    2017-01-01

    To access antitumor effects of a combined Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-18 (IL-18), cDNA fusion of murine GM-CSF and mature IL-18 (GMIL-18) was constructed and transfected in mammalian cells. GMIL-18 fusion protein was highly secreted and displayed bifunctional activities, possessing immune response initiation and cytokine roles, including IFN-γ induction in mouse splenocytes and increased proliferation of GM-CSF-dependent cells, M-NSF-60. The GMIL-18 secreting tumor vaccine was generated and it strongly stimulated differentiation of dendrite cells (DCs) and effusive CD8(+) and CD4(+) cell infiltration into tumor mice. Moreover, growth of CT26 mouse colon cancer cells was significantly retarded by GMIL-18 (CT26GMIL-18), but not by CT26GM-CSF- or CT26IL-18. The efficiency of prophylactic vaccination was greater than that of therapeutic vaccination in terms of tumor size and its inhibitory role in proliferation. In micrometastasis analysis of tumor models, γ-ray irradiated GMIL-18 tumor vaccine showed a smaller number of liver-meta tumor nodules in mouse liver cells. We concluded that bifunctional GMIL-18 fusion protein could be applied as an immune therapy for cancer treatments.

  12. Modeling cell-death patterning during biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2013-12-01

    Self-organization by bacterial cells often leads to the formation of a highly complex spatially-structured biofilm. In such a bacterial biofilm, cells adhere to each other and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular matrix (ECM). Bacillus substilis bacteria utilize localized cell-death patterns which focuses mechanical forces to form wrinkled sheet-like structures in three dimensions. A most intriguing feature underlying this biofilm formation is that vertical buckling and ridge location is biased to occur in region of high cell-death. Here we present a spatially extended model to investigate the role of the bacterial secreted ECM during the biofilm formation and the self-organization of cell-death. Using this reaction-diffusion model we show that the interaction between the cell's motion and the ECM concentration gives rise to a self-trapping instability, leading to variety of cell-death patterns. The resultant spot patterns generated by our model are shown to be in semi-quantitative agreement with recent experimental observation.

  13. Aggregation of red blood cells: From rouleaux to clot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Steffen, Patrick; Svetina, Saša

    2013-06-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the adhesion mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the adhesion strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life-saving in the case of wound healing, but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  14. In vitro myelin formation using embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kerman, Bilal E.; Kim, Hyung Joon; Padmanabhan, Krishnan; Mei, Arianna; Georges, Shereen; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.; Jappelli, Roberto; Chandross, Karen J.; August, Paul; Gage, Fred H.

    2015-01-01

    Myelination in the central nervous system is the process by which oligodendrocytes form myelin sheaths around the axons of neurons. Myelination enables neurons to transmit information more quickly and more efficiently and allows for more complex brain functions; yet, remarkably, the underlying mechanism by which myelination occurs is still not fully understood. A reliable in vitro assay is essential to dissect oligodendrocyte and myelin biology. Hence, we developed a protocol to generate myelinating oligodendrocytes from mouse embryonic stem cells and established a myelin formation assay with embryonic stem cell-derived neurons in microfluidic devices. Myelin formation was quantified using a custom semi-automated method that is suitable for larger scale analysis. Finally, early myelination was followed in real time over several days and the results have led us to propose a new model for myelin formation. PMID:26015546

  15. Open-cell cloud formation over the Bahamas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    What atmospheric scientists refer to as open cell cloud formation is a regular occurrence on the back side of a low-pressure system or cyclone in the mid-latitudes. In the Northern Hemisphere, a low-pressure system will draw in surrounding air and spin it counterclockwise. That means that on the back side of the low-pressure center, cold air will be drawn in from the north, and on the front side, warm air will be drawn up from latitudes closer to the equator. This movement of an air mass is called advection, and when cold air advection occurs over warmer waters, open cell cloud formations often result. This MODIS image shows open cell cloud formation over the Atlantic Ocean off the southeast coast of the United States on February 19, 2002. This particular formation is the result of a low-pressure system sitting out in the North Atlantic Ocean a few hundred miles east of Massachusetts. (The low can be seen as the comma-shaped figure in the GOES-8 Infrared image from February 19, 2002.) Cold air is being drawn down from the north on the western side of the low and the open cell cumulus clouds begin to form as the cold air passes over the warmer Caribbean waters. For another look at the scene, check out the MODIS Direct Broadcast Image from the University of Wisconsin. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  16. Solvent effect on columnar formation in solar-cell geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Sosa-Vargas, L.; Takanishi, Y.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, Y. W.; Yamamoto, J.; Labardi, M.; Lagerwall, J. P. F.; Shimizu, Y.; Scalia, G.

    2016-03-01

    The efficiency of the conduction of photocurrent in discotic liquid crystals is known to depend on the quality of the columnar organization. Solvents have shown to be able to influence the formation of wire structures on substrates promoting very long and ordered wired formations or bulkier structures depending on the affinity of the solvent with parts of the molecular structure of discotics. Here we present a study on the effect of solvents when the liquid crystal is confined between two substrates with the columns running perpendicular to them, geometry used in solar cells. We focused on toluene and dodecane, solvents that have shown to promote on substrates the formation of aligned and long nanowires and bulk large and isolated fibers, respectively. The phase transition behavior indicates that toluene does not interfere with the columnar formation while dodecane strongly influence increasing the disorder in the structure.

  17. Social Studies; Colonial America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Paul S.

    Students in grades seven through nine will examine and analyze the political organization, social structure, economic life, and values of the American Colonial period in this quinmester arranged American Studies course. Since the thirteen English Colonies effected the United States development, many of our nations foundations in government,…

  18. Formation and maintenance of nitrogen-fixing cell patterns in filamentous cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-García, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria forming one-dimensional filaments are paradigmatic model organisms of the transition between unicellular and multicellular living forms. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions, in filaments of the genus Anabaena, some cells differentiate into heterocysts, which lose the possibility to divide but are able to fix environmental nitrogen for the colony. These heterocysts form a quasiregular pattern in the filament, representing a prototype of patterning and morphogenesis in prokaryotes. Recent years have seen advances in the identification of the molecular mechanism regulating this pattern. We use these data to build a theory on heterocyst pattern formation, for which both genetic regulation and the effects of cell division and filament growth are key components. The theory is based on the interplay of three generic mechanisms: local autoactivation, early long-range inhibition, and late long-range inhibition. These mechanisms can be identified with the dynamics of hetR, patS, and hetN expression. Our theory reproduces quantitatively the experimental dynamics of pattern formation and maintenance for wild type and mutants. We find that hetN alone is not enough to play the role as the late inhibitory mechanism: a second mechanism, hypothetically the products of nitrogen fixation supplied by heterocysts, must also play a role in late long-range inhibition. The preponderance of even intervals between heterocysts arises naturally as a result of the interplay between the timescales of genetic regulation and cell division. We also find that a purely stochastic initiation of the pattern, without a two-stage process, is enough to reproduce experimental observations. PMID:27162328

  19. Inhibitory Effects of Salinomycin on Cell Survival, Colony Growth, Migration, and Invasion of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer A549 and LNM35: Involvement of NAG-1.

    PubMed

    Arafat, Kholoud; Iratni, Rabah; Takahashi, Takashi; Parekh, Khatija; Al Dhaheri, Yusra; Adrian, Thomas E; Attoub, Samir

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for oncologists and pharmacologists is to develop more potent and less toxic drugs that will decrease the tumor growth and improve the survival of lung cancer patients. Salinomycin is a polyether antibiotic used to kill gram-positive bacteria including mycobacteria, protozoans such as plasmodium falciparum, and the parasites responsible for the poultry disease coccidiosis. This old agent is now a serious anti-cancer drug candidate that selectively inhibits the growth of cancer stem cells. We investigated the impact of salinomycin on survival, colony growth, migration and invasion of the differentiated human non-small cell lung cancer lines LNM35 and A549. Salinomycin caused concentration- and time-dependent reduction in viability of LNM35 and A549 cells through a caspase 3/7-associated cell death pathway. Similarly, salinomycin (2.5-5 µM for 7 days) significantly decreased the growth of LNM35 and A549 colonies in soft agar. Metastasis is the main cause of death related to lung cancer. In this context, salinomycin induced a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We also demonstrated for the first time that salinomycin induced a marked increase in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein NAG-1 leading to the inhibition of lung cancer cell invasion but not cell survival. These findings identify salinomycin as a promising novel therapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  20. Disruption of the pdhB pyruvate dehydrogenase [corrected] gene affects colony morphology, in vitro growth and cell invasiveness of Mycoplasma agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shivanand; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of available substrates, the metabolic potential and the growth rates of bacteria can play significant roles in their pathogenicity. This study concentrates on Mycoplasma agalactiae, which causes significant economic losses through its contribution to contagious agalactia in small ruminants by as yet unknown mechanisms. This lack of knowledge is primarily due to its fastidious growth requirements and the scarcity of genetic tools available for its manipulation and analysis. Transposon mutagenesis of M. agalactiae type strain PG2 resulted in several disruptions throughout the genome. A mutant defective in growth in vitro was found to have a transposon insertion in the pdhB gene, which encodes a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This growth difference was quite significant during the actively dividing logarithmic phase but a gradual recovery was observed as the cells approached stationary phase. The mutant also exhibited a different and smaller colony morphology compared to the wild type strain PG2. For complementation, pdhAB was cloned downstream of a strong vpma promoter and upstream of a lacZ reporter gene in a newly constructed complementation vector. When transformed with this vector the pdhB mutant recovered its normal growth and colony morphology. Interestingly, the pdhB mutant also had significantly reduced invasiveness in HeLa cells, as revealed by double immunofluorescence staining. This deficiency was recovered in the complemented strain, which had invasiveness comparable to that of PG2. Taken together, these data indicate that pyruvate dehydrogenase might be an important player in infection with and colonization by M. agalactiae.

  1. Colletotrichum higginsianum Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase ChMK1: Role in Growth, Cell Wall Integrity, Colony Melanization, and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Nancong; Yang, Guogen; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. To facilitate the efficient control of anthracnose disease, it will be important to understand the mechanism by which the cruciferous crops and C. higginsianum interact. A key step in understanding this interaction is characterizing the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway of C. higginsianum. MAPK plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. In this study, a Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK gene, ChMK1, from C. higginsianum was analyzed. The results showed that the Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK ChMK1 plays a significant role in cell wall integrity. Targeted deletion of ChMK1 resulted in a hypersensitivity to cell wall inhibitors, reduced conidiation and albinistic colonies. Further, the deletion mutant was also unable to form melanized appressorium, a specialized infection structure that is necessary for successful infection. Therefore, the deletion mutant loses pathogenicity on A. thaliana leaves, demonstrating that ChMK1 plays an essential role in the early infection step. In addition, the ChMK1 deletion mutant showed an attenuated growth rate that is different from that of its homolog in Colletotrichum lagenarium, indicating the diverse roles that Fus3/Kss1-related MAPKs plays in phytopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the expression level of three melanin synthesis associated genes were clearly decreased in the albinistic ChMK1 mutant compared to that of the wild type strain, suggesting that ChMK1 is also required for colony melanization in C. higginsianum. PMID:27536296

  2. [Nuclear heterogeneity and proliferative capacity of human adipose derived MSC-like cells].

    PubMed

    Lavrov, A V; Smirnichina, S A

    2010-01-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) are MSC-like cells which could be easily used for regenerative medicine. Here, the morphology and proliferative capacity of human ADSCs is discribed. ADSCs were analyzed after one month of cultivation at a density of 10 cells/cm2. 21 colonies were counted. Few atypical cells (huge nuclei and cytoplasm) were found in 9 out of 17 colonies analyzed. ANOVA demonstrated that colonies also differed (P = 0.0025) in nuclei dimensions and scatter in the dimensions in each colony. Nuclei dimensions and cell density logarithms correlated in reverse proportion (-0.7; P = 0.002). Thus, ADSCs were heterogeneous and represented two types of cells: small highly proliferative and large low proliferative cells. Cell heterogeneity observed in some colonies might be due to cells registered at different cell cycle phases. Stable and typical morphology, colony-formation capability and high proliferative capacity of cells indicate visceral adipose tissue as a rich source of ADSCs.

  3. Multiwell cell culture plate format with integrated microfluidic perfusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domansky, Karel; Inman, Walker; Serdy, Jim; Griffith, Linda G.

    2006-01-01

    A new cell culture analog has been developed. It is based on the standard multiwell cell culture plate format but it provides perfused three-dimensional cell culture capability. The new capability is achieved by integrating microfluidic valves and pumps into the plate. The system provides a means to conduct high throughput assays for target validation and predictive toxicology in the drug discovery and development process. It can be also used for evaluation of long-term exposure to drugs or environmental agents or as a model to study viral hepatitis, cancer metastasis, and other diseases and pathological conditions.

  4. Local administration of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces local accumulation of dendritic cells and antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and enhances dendritic cell cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jong; Song, Liwen; Yang, Ming-Chieh; Mao, Chih-Ping; Yang, Benjamin; Yang, Andrew; Jeang, Jessica; Peng, Shiwen; Wu, T-C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2015-03-24

    Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment strategy for the control of HPV-associated malignancies. Various therapeutic HPV vaccines have elicited potent antigen-specific CD8+ T cell mediated antitumor immune responses in preclinical models and are currently being tested in several clinical trials. Recent evidence indicates the importance of local immune activation, and higher number of immune cells in the site of lesion correlates with positive prognosis. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) has been reported to posses the ability to induce migration of antigen presentation cells and CD8+ T cells. Therefore, in the current study, we employ a combination of systemic therapeutic HPV DNA vaccination with local GMCSF application in the TC-1 tumor model. We show that intramuscular vaccination with CRT/E7 DNA followed by GMCSF intravaginal administration effectively controls cervicovaginal TC-1 tumors in mice. Furthermore, we observe an increase in the accumulation of E7-specific CD8+ T cells and dendritic cells in vaginal tumors following the combination treatment. In addition, we show that GMCSF induces activation and maturation in dendritic cells and promotes antigen cross-presentation. Our results support the clinical translation of the combination treatment of systemic therapeutic vaccination followed by local GMCSF administration as an effective strategy for tumor treatment.

  5. Polydatin Inhibits Formation of Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Liu, Meixia; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Wengao; Liu, Longtao

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, a Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. Polydatin, one of the major active ingredients in Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, has been recently shown to possess extensive cardiovascular pharmacological activities. In present study, we examined the effects of Polydatin on the formation of peritoneal macrophage-derived foam cells in Apolipoprotein E gene knockout mice (ApoE−/−) and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Peritoneal macrophages were collected from ApoE−/− mice and cultured in vitro. These cells sequentially were divided into four groups: Control group, Model group, Lovastatin group, and Polydatin group. Our results demonstrated that Polydatin significantly inhibits the formation of foam cells derived from peritoneal macrophages. Further studies indicated that Polydatin regulates the metabolism of intracellular lipid and possesses anti-inflammatory effects, which may be regulated through the PPAR-γ signaling pathways. PMID:26557864

  6. Effect of Periodic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Administration on Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Different Monocyte Subsets in Pediatric Patients with Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Grubczak, Kamil; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Miklasz, Paula; Singh, Paulina; Radzikowska, Urszula; Kulak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by progressive muscle dysfunction. There is a large body of evidence indicating that angiogenesis is impaired in muscles of MD patients. Therefore, induction of dystrophic muscle revascularization should become a novel approach aimed at diminishing the extent of myocyte damage. Recently, we and others demonstrated that administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) resulted in clinical improvement of patients with neuromuscular disorders. To date, however, the exact mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects of G-CSF have not been fully understood. Here we used flow cytometry to quantitate numbers of CD34+ cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and different monocyte subsets in peripheral blood of pediatric MD patients treated with repetitive courses of G-CSF administration. We showed that repetitive cycles of G-CSF administration induced efficient mobilization of above-mentioned cells including cells with proangiogenic potential. These findings contribute to better understanding the beneficial clinical effects of G-CSF in pediatric MD patients. PMID:26770204

  7. Immunotherapy against metastatic bladder cancer by combined administration of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-2 surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Hua, Rui; Liu, Li; Zhan, Xiaomin; Chen, Simei; Quan, Song; Chu, Qing-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Tong

    2017-02-16

    In previous studies, it has been shown that the granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin-2 (IL-2) surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells (MCSCs) vaccine could induce a specific antitumor immunity and against bladder cancer in mice model respectively. However, whether combined administration of GM-CSF and IL-2 could produce specific immune responses to cancer stem cells (CSCs) was uncertain. MCSCs were established and characterized. GM-CSF and IL-2 MCSCs vaccines were prepared and bioactivity was evaluated. The therapeutic, protective, specific, and memorial immune response animal experiments were designed. Tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes assay, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry assay were performed to indentify whether vaccine caused an antitumor immunity. Streptavidin (SA)-GM-CSF and SA-IL-2 MCSCs vaccines were prepared successfully. Such vaccines inhibited the volume of tumor and prolonged the survival of the mice in animal experiments. The express of IgG or IFN-c, the portion of dendritic cells, CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells were highest in the combined vaccines group than the SA-GM-CSF vaccine group, the SA-IL-2 vaccine group, the MCSCs group and the PBS group. The combined of GM-CSF and IL-2 vaccines could induce better antitumor immunity than a vaccine alone.

  8. Expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in male germ cells: GM-CSF enhances sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Lourdes T; Rauch, M Cecilia; Mansilla, Alejandra; Zambrano, Angara; Brito, Mónica; Werner, Enrique; Alfaro, Víctor; Cox, José F; Concha, Ilona I

    2003-10-01

    The granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine capable of stimulating proliferation, maturation and function of hematopoietic cells. Receptors for this cytokine are composed of two subunits, alpha and beta, and are expressed on myeloid progenitors and mature mononuclear phagocytes, monocytes, eosinophils and neutrophils, as well as in other nonhematopietic cells. We have recently demonstrated that bull spermatozoa express functional GM-CSF receptors that signal for increased glucose and Vitamin C uptake. In this study, we analyzed the expression of GM-CSF in bovine and human germ cells and its influence in bovine sperm motility. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), in situ hybridization and immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that adult bovine and human testes expressed GM-CSF. In addition, immunolocalization studies confirmed the presence of GM-CSF in the germ cell line in bovine and human testes. Computer-assisted evaluation of patterns of sperm motility demonstrated that the addition of GM-CSF enhances several parameters of sperm motility in the presence of glucose or fructose substrates.

  9. Dolomitized cells within chert of the Permian Assistência Formation, Paraná Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calça, Cléber P.; Fairchild, Thomas R.; Cavalazzi, Barbara; Hachiro, Jorge; Petri, Setembrino; Huila, Manuel Fernando Gonzalez; Toma, Henrique E.; Araki, Koiti

    2016-04-01

    Dolomitic microscopic structures in the form of microspheres, "horseshoe- shaped" objects, and thin botryoidal crusts found within microfossiliferous chert within stromatolites of the Evaporite Bed (EB) of the Permian Assistência Formation, Irati Subgroup, Paraná Basin, Brazil, have been investigated by means of optical microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometry and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The microspheres were identified as dolomitized coccoidal cyanobacteria based on similarity in size, spheroidal and paired hemispheroidal morphologies and colonial habit to co-occurring silicified organic-walled cyanobacteria embedded within the same microfabric and rock samples. The co-occurrence of dolomite, pyrite framboids, and abundant dispersed carbonaceous material and silicified cells is consistent with a hypersaline depositional environment with abundant cyanobacterial mats and elevated Mg2 +/Ca2 + ratios and reducing conditions with active anoxic microbial processes near the water-(bio)sediment interface. The abundance of extracellular polymeric substances facilitated anoxic microbial processes (sulfate reduction), providing essential conditions for possible primary microbially induced dolomitization. In most of the dolomitized cells dolomite occurs only as an external layer; in fully dolomitized cells magnesium is richest in the outermost layer. Presumably, the dolomitization process was favored by the presence of anoxic microbial degraders and negatively charged functional groups at the surface of the cyanobacterial cells. Botryoidal dolomite rims of silica-filled fenestrae formed by a similar process and inherited the botryoidal morphology of the cell as originally lining the fenestrae. Silicification interrupted the dolomitization of the largely organic biosediment, mostly by permineralization, but locally by substitution, thereby preserving not only dolomitic microspheres, but also huge numbers of structurally

  10. The role of Kupffer cells in glucan-induced granuloma formation in the liver of mice depleted of blood monocytes by administration of strontium-89

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, M.; Takahashi, K. )

    1991-05-01

    In order to elucidate the role of Kupffer cells in granuloma formation in the liver of mice under a condition of severe monocytopenia induced by administration of strontium-89, granulomas were produced by particulate glucan injection and examined histopathologically, immunohistochemically, by ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography, and in culture experiments. Hepatic granulomas were smaller, less numerous, and more irregularly shaped in the monocytopenic mice than in the control mice. The granulomas were composed of multinuclear giant cells, epithelioid cells, Kupffer cells, and T lymphocytes, but not monocytes or granulocytes. Kupffer cells were heavily labeled with ({sup 3}H)thymidine in the monocytopenic mice, particularly just before the stage of granuloma formation, and then clustered in the liver sinusoids. At 8 days, they formed granulomas, transformed into epithelioid cells, and transformed further into multinuclear giant cells. Although the culture of liver cell suspensions prepared from the livers of monocytopenic mice sustained diffuse proliferation of macrophages on a monolayer of mouse stromal cell line (ST2), no monocyte/macrophage colonies were formed. From these results, it is reasonable to conclude that Kupffer cells alone are activated in a condition without a supply of monocytes from peripheral blood; proliferate and cluster in the hepatic sinusoids; transform into peroxidase-negative macrophages, epithelioid cells, and multinuclear giant cells; and participate in granuloma formation in loco together with T lymphocytes.

  11. Plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for first-line steady-state autologous peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in lymphoma and multiple myeloma: results of the prospective PREDICT trial

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Nigel; Douglas, Kenny; Ho, Anthony D.; Mohty, Mohamad; Carlson, Kristina; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Milone, Giuseppe; Pareja, Macarena Ortiz; Shaheen, Daniel; Willemsen, Arnold; Whitaker, Nicky; Chabannon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, the combination of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is approved for the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells for autologous transplantation in patients with lymphoma and myeloma whose cells mobilize poorly. The purpose of this study was to further assess the safety and efficacy of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for front-line mobilization in European patients with lymphoma or myeloma. In this multicenter, open label, single-arm study, patients received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (10 μg/kg/day) subcutaneously for 4 days; on the evening of day 4 they were given plerixafor (0.24 mg/kg) subcutaneously. Patients underwent apheresis on day 5 after a morning dose of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. The primary study objective was to confirm the safety of mobilization with plerixafor. Secondary objectives included assessment of efficacy (apheresis yield, time to engraftment). The combination of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was used to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells in 118 patients (90 with myeloma, 25 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 3 with Hodgkin's disease). Treatment-emergent plerixafor-related adverse events were reported in 24 patients. Most adverse events occurred within 1 hour after injection, were grade 1 or 2 in severity and included gastrointestinal disorders or injection-site reactions. The minimum cell yield (≥2×106 CD34+ cells/kg) was harvested in 98% of patients with myeloma and in 80% of those with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a median of one apheresis. The optimum cell dose (≥5×106 CD34+ cells/kg for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or ≥6×106 CD34+ cells/kg for myeloma) was harvested in 89% of myeloma patients and 48% of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients. In this prospective, multicenter European study, mobilization with plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor allowed the majority of patients with myeloma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma to undergo transplantation with

  12. Graphene-Induced Pore Formation on Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Guangxin; Zhang, Yuanzhao; Luan, Binquan; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Zhou, Royce W.; Yang, Zaixing; Zhao, Lin; Xu, Jiaying; Luo, Judong; Zhou, Ruhong

    2017-02-01

    Examining interactions between nanomaterials and cell membranes can expose underlying mechanisms of nanomaterial cytotoxicity and guide the design of safer nanomedical technologies. Recently, graphene has been shown to exhibit potential toxicity to cells; however, the molecular processes driving its lethal properties have yet to be fully characterized. We here demonstrate that graphene nanosheets (both pristine and oxidized) can produce holes (pores) in the membranes of A549 and Raw264.7 cells, substantially reducing cell viability. Electron micrographs offer clear evidence of pores created on cell membranes. Our molecular dynamics simulations reveal that multiple graphene nanosheets can cooperate to extract large numbers of phospholipids from the membrane bilayer. Strong dispersion interactions between graphene and lipid-tail carbons result in greatly depleted lipid density within confined regions of the membrane, ultimately leading to the formation of water-permeable pores. This cooperative lipid extraction mechanism for membrane perforation represents another distinct process that contributes to the molecular basis of graphene cytotoxicity.

  13. Stromal cells in chronic inflammation and tertiary lymphoid organ formation.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Christopher D; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Bénézech, Cecile; Caamaño, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is an unstable state. It either resolves or persists. Why inflammation persists and the factors that define tissue tropism remain obscure. Increasing evidence suggests that tissue-resident stromal cells not only provide positional memory but also actively regulate the differential accumulation of inflammatory cells within inflamed tissues. Furthermore, at many sites of chronic inflammation, structures that mimic secondary lymphoid tissues are observed, suggesting that chronic inflammation and lymphoid tissue formation share common activation programs. Similarly, blood and lymphatic endothelial cells contribute to tissue homeostasis and disease persistence in chronic inflammation. This review highlights our increasing understanding of the role of stromal cells in inflammation and summarizes the novel immunological role that stromal cells exert in the persistence of inflammatory diseases.

  14. Characterization of Commercial Li-ion Cells in Pouch Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The li-ion pouch design cells exhibit similar behavior under off-nominal conditions as those in metal cans that do not have the internal safety devices. Safety should be well characterized before batteries are designed. Some of the li-ion pouch cell designs studied in this program reacted most violently to overcharge conditions at the medium rates but were tolerant to overcharge at very low rates. Some pouch cell designs have higher tolerance to vacuum exposures than some others. A comparison of the pouch material itself does not show a correlation between this tolerance and the number of layers or composition of the pouch indicating that this is a property of the electrode stack design inside the pouch. Reduced pressure (8 to 10 psi) test environments show that the extent of capacity degradation under reduced pressure environments is much less than that observed under vacuum conditions. Lithium-ion Pouch format cells are not necessarily true polymer cells.

  15. Phenotypic and genetic differences between opaque and translucent colonies of Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chen; Jin, Xie; Chaoqun, Hu

    2009-01-01

    Many pathogens undergo phase variation between rugose and smooth colony morphology or between opaque and translucent colony morphology, which is mainly due to the variation in the surface polysaccharides. In this study, Vibrio alginolyticus ZJ-51 displayed phase variation between opaque, rugose colonies (Op) and translucent, smooth colonies (Tr). Unlike the vibrios reported previously, Tr cells of ZJ-51 enhanced biofilm formation and motility, but they did not differ from Op cells in the quantity of surface polysaccharides produced. Real time PCR was used to analyze the expression of the genes involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis, flagellar synthesis, and the AI-2 quorum-sensing system. The results revealed that the K-antigen capsule gene cluster (which consists of homologs to the cpsA-K in Vibrio parahaemolyticus) and O-antigen polysaccharide gene cluster (which contains homologs to the wza-wzb-wzc) were significantly more transcribed in Tr cells. The AI-2 quorum-sensing genes showed enhanced expression in the Tr variant which also exhibited greater expression of genes associated with polar flagellar biosynthesis. These results suggest that colony phase variation might affect the virulence and survival ability in the stressful environment inhabited by V. alginolyticus.

  16. Expression of interleukin-34 and colony stimulating factor-1 in the stimulated periodontal ligament cells with tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Mutsuki; Ohyama, Hideki; Kato-Kogoe, Nahoko; Yamada, Naoko; Yamanegi, Koji; Nishiura, Hiroshi; Hirano, Hirotugu; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Nakasho, Keiji

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) directly and indirectly plays a crucial role in osteoclastogenesis. However, the indirect effects of TNF-α on colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R)-mediated osteoclastogenesis achieved via periodontal ligament (PDL) cells are not fully understood. We herein examined the potency of osteoclast differentiation and maturation induced by fivefold supernatants in the stimulated human PDL cells with a physiologically high concentration (10 ng/mL) of recombinant TNF-α to human peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages in the simultaneous presence of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand. The number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells with multiple nuclei, but not those with a single nucleus, was decreased by approximately 50% by neutralization with rabbit IgG against either interleukin-34 (IL-34) or CSF-1. Small and large amounts of IL34 and CSF1 transcripts were measured in the stimulated PDL cells using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The corresponding amounts of proteins to IL34 and CSF1 transcripts were observed in the stimulated PDL cells on immunohistochemical staining or Western blotting. Moreover, 0.13 ng/mL of IL-34 and 5.0 ng/mL of CSF-1 were measured in the supernatants of the stimulated PDL cells using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IL-34 derived from the stimulated PDL cells with TNF-α appeared to synergistically function with CSF-1 in the CSF-1R-mediated maturation of osteoclastogenesis.

  17. Identification of a Colonial Chordate Histocompatibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Newman, Aaron M.; Corey, Daniel M.; Sahoo, Debashis; Pushkarev, Dmitry; Neff, Norma F.; Passarelli, Benedetto; Koh, Winston; Ishizuka, Katherine J.; Palmeri, Karla J.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Keasar, Chen; Fan, H. Christina; Mantalas, Gary L.; Sinha, Rahul; Penland, Lolita; Quake, Stephen R.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2013-01-01

    Histocompatibility is the basis by which multicellular organisms of the same species distinguish self from non-self. Relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying histocompatibility reactions in lower organisms. Botryllus schlosseri is a colonial urochordate, a sister group of vertebrates, that exhibits a genetically determined natural transplantation reaction, whereby self-recognition between colonies leads to formation of parabionts with a common vasculature, whereas rejection occurs between incompatible colonies. Using genetically defined lines, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and genomics, we identified a single gene that encodes self/non-self and determines “graft” outcomes in this organism. This gene is significantly upregulated in colonies poised to undergo fusion or rejection, is highly expressed in the vasculature, and is functionally linked to histocompatibility outcomes. These findings establish a platform for advancing the science of allorecognition. PMID:23888037

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor inhibits CXCR4/SDF-1α signaling and overcomes stromal-mediated drug resistance in the HL-60 cell line.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xianfu; Zhong, Hua; Wan, Haixia; Zhong, Jihua; Chen, Fangyuan

    2016-07-01

    Combining cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has demonstrated marked efficacy in the treatment of elderly and relapsed/refractory patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the role of G-CSF remains poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the ability of G-CSF to overcome stromal-mediated drug resistance and the underlying molecular mechanism. Two types of co-culture models were established in the HS-5 human bone marrow/stromal and HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cell lines, in order to imitate the interactions between stromal and leukemia cells in vitro, which is mediated by the stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α signaling axis. In the present study, HL-60 cells were attracted and adhered to HS-5 cells using migration assay and flow cytometry, respectively; however, these interactions were inhibited by treatment with G-CSF and/or the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) antagonist, AMD3100. Co-culture with HS-5 cells, including direct and indirect contact, protected HL-60 cells against spontaneous apoptosis or drug-induced apoptosis; however, these protective effects were disrupted by treatment with G-CSF and/or AMD3100. Notably, G-CSF and/or AMD3100 did not alter cell viability or apoptosis when HL-60 cells were cultured with medium alone. In addition, G-CSF significantly reduced the expression levels of surface CXCR4 protein, total CXCR4 protein and CXCR4 mRNA, and significantly upregulated the expression of microRNA (miR)-146a. Conversely, AMD3100 significantly reduced surface CXCR4 expression levels, but not the total CXCR4, CXCR4 mRNA or miR-146a expression levels. The results of the present study suggested that interfering with the CXCR4/SDF-1α signaling axis via G-CSF inhibited the migration and adhesion of HL-60 cells to HS-5 cells and eliminated HS5 cell-mediated protective effects. Furthermore, G-CSF administration reduced CXCR4 expression levels by upregulating the expression of

  19. Induction of platelet formation from megakaryocytoid cells by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Battinelli, E; Willoughby, S R; Foxall, T; Valeri, C R; Loscalzo, J

    2001-12-04

    Although the growth factors that regulate megakaryocytopoiesis are well known, the molecular determinants of platelet formation from mature megakaryocytes remain poorly understood. Morphological changes in megakaryocytes associated with platelet formation and removal of senescent megakaryocytes are suggestive of an apoptotic process. Previously, we have established that nitric oxide (NO) can induce apoptosis in megakaryocytoid cell lines. To determine whether there is an association between NO-induced apoptosis and platelet production, we exposed Meg-01 cells to S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) with or without thrombopoeitin (TPO) pretreatment and used flow cytometry and electron microscopy to assess platelet-sized particle formation. Meg-01 cells treated with TPO alone produced few platelet-sized particles (<3% of total counts), whereas treatment with GSNO alone produced a significant percentage of platelet-sized particles (22 +/- 4% of total counts); when combined with TPO pretreatment, however, GSNO led to a marked increase in platelet-sized particle production (48 +/- 3% of total counts). Electron microscopy confirmed that Meg-01 cells treated with TPO and GSNO yielded platelet-sized particles with morphological features specific for platelet forms. The platelet-sized particle population appears to be functional, because addition of calcium, fibrinogen, and thrombin receptor-activating peptide led to aggregation. These results demonstrate that NO facilitates platelet production, thereby establishing the essential role of NO in megakaryocyte development and thrombopoiesis.

  20. ERBB3 is required for metastasis formation of melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, S; Preziosi, M; Rothberg, P G; Zeitouni, N; Corson, N; Xu, L

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is curable when it is at an early phase but is lethal once it becomes metastatic. The recent development of BRAFV600E inhibitors (BIs) showed great promise in treating metastatic melanoma, but resistance developed quickly in the treated patients, and these inhibitors are not effective on melanomas that express wild-type BRAF. Alternative therapeutic strategies for metastatic melanoma are urgently needed. Here we report that ERBB3, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, is required for the formation of lung metastasis from both the BI-sensitive melanoma cell line, MA-2, and the BI-resistant melanoma cell line, 451Lu-R. Further analyses revealed that ERBB3 does not affect the initial seeding of melanoma cells in lung but is required for their further development into overt metastases, indicating that ERBB3 might be essential for the survival of melanoma cells after they reach the lung. Consistent with this, the ERBB3 ligand, NRG1, is highly expressed in mouse lungs and induces ERBB3-depdnent phosphorylation of AKT in both MA-2 and 451Lu-R cells in vitro. These findings suggest that ERBB3 may serve as a target for treating metastatic melanomas that are resistant to BIs. In support of this, administration of the pan-ERBB inhibitor, canertinib, significantly suppresses the metastasis formation of BI-resistant melanoma cell lines. PMID:25000258

  1. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Induces Osteoblast Inhibition by B Lymphocytes and Osteoclast Activation by T Lymphocytes during Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sidan; Li, Tianshou; Chen, Yongbing; Nie, Yinchao; Li, Changhong; Liu, Lanting; Li, Qiaochuan; Qiu, Lugui

    2015-08-01

    In the bone marrow (BM), hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in specialized niches near osteoblast cells at the endosteum. HSPCs that egress to peripheral blood are widely used for transplant, and mobilization is most commonly performed with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, the cellular targets of G-CSF that initiate the mobilization cascade and bone remodeling are not completely understood. Here, we examined whether T and B lymphocytes modulate the bone niche and influence HSPC mobilization. We used T and B defective mice to show that G-CSF-induced mobilization of HSPCs correlated with B lymphocytes but poorly with T lymphocytes. In addition, we found that defective B lymphocytes prevent G-CSF-mediated osteoblast disruption, and further study showed BM osteoblasts were reduced coincident with mobilization, induced by elevated expression of dickkopf1 of BM B lymphocytes. BM T cells were also involved in G-CSF-induced osteoclast activation by regulating the Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κ B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG) axis. These data provide evidence that BM B and T lymphocytes play a role in G-CSF-induced HSPC mobilization by regulating bone remodeling.

  2. Drugs elevating extracellular adenosine promote regeneration of haematopoietic progenitor cells in severely myelosuppressed mice: their comparison and joint effects with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Vacek, Antonín; Weiterova, Lenka; Holá, Jirina; Vácha, Jirí

    2002-01-01

    We tested capabilities of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine and of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) given alone or in combination to modulate regeneration from severe myelosuppression resulting from combined exposure of mice to ionizing radiation and carboplatin. Elevation of extracellular adenosine was induced by joint administration of dipyridamole (DP), a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), serving as an adenosine prodrug. DP+AMP, G-CSF or all these drugs in combination were administered in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on day 3 after induction of myelosuppression. Comparable enhancements of haematopoietic regeneration due to elevation of extracellular adenosine or to action of G-CSF were demonstrated as shown by elevated numbers of haematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes/macrophages (GM-CFC) and erythrocytes (BFU-E) in the bone marrow and spleen in early time intervals after termination of the drug treatment, i.e. on days 7 and 10 after induction of myelosuppression. Coadministration of all the drugs further potentiated the restoration of progenitor cell pools in the haematopoietic organs. The effects of the drug treatments on progenitor cells were reflected in the peripheral blood in later time intervals of days 15 and 20 after induction of myelosuppression, especially as significantly elevated numbers of granulocytes and less pronounced elevation of lymphocytes and erythrocytes. The results substantiate the potential of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine for clinical utilization in myelosuppressive states, e.g. those accompanying oncological radio- and chemotherapy.

  3. Modulation of MHC class II transport and lysosome distribution by macrophage-colony stimulating factor in human dendritic cells derived from monocytes.

    PubMed

    Baron, C; Raposo, G; Scholl, S M; Bausinger, H; Tenza, D; Bohbot, A; Pouillart, P; Goud, B; Hanau, D; Salamero, J

    2001-03-01

    The macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) has been already shown to affect the function of dendritic cells (DC). Therefore, the differentiation of dendritic cells into macrophages (M(PHI)) might represent a pathway which could inhibit the immune response initiated by DC. Because Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules (MHC-II) are crucial for DC function, we asked whether M-CSF may influence the intracellular transport of MHC-II in monocyte derived DC. We found that, at early stages, M-CSF induced first a rapid redistribution of MHC-II from the MHC-II containing compartments (MIIC) to the plasma membrane and second an increase in MHC-II synthesis as observed with LPS or TNF-(alpha). These processes were associated with the sorting of MHC-II from lysosomal membranes which underwent a drastic structural reorganization. However, in contrast to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-(alpha) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), M-CSF neither potentiated the allostimulatory function of DC nor allowed the stabilization of MHC-II at the cell surface, but rather increased MHC-II turnover. We conclude that the rapid modulation of MHC-II transport and distribution may participate in the inhibitory effect of M-CSF on DC function and differentiation.

  4. Effect of supercooling and cell volume on intracellular ice formation.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Richelle C; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular ice formation (IIF) has been linked to death of cells cryopreserved in suspension. It has been assumed that cells can be supercooled by 2 to 10°C before IIF occurs, but measurements of the degree of supercooling that cells can tolerate are often confounded by changing extracellular temperature and solutions of different osmolality (which affect the cell volume). The purpose of this study was to examine how the incidence of IIF in the absence of cryoprotectants is affected by the degree of supercooling and cell volume. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were suspended in isotonic (300 mOsm) and hypertonic (∼600 to 700 mOsm) solutions and exposed to supercooling ranging from 2 to 10°C before extracellular ice was nucleated. The number of cells undergoing IIF was examined in a cryostage (based on the darkening of cells upon intracellular freezing ("flashing")) as a function of the degree of supercooling, and cell survival post-thaw was assessed using a membrane integrity assay. We found that while the incidence of IIF increased with supercooling in both isotonic and hypertonic solutions, it was higher in the isotonic solution at any given degree of supercooling. Since cells in hypertonic solution were shrunken due to water efflux, we hypothesized that the difference in IIF behavior could be attributed to the decreased volume of cells in the hypertonic solution. Our results confirm that cells with a smaller diameter before extracellular ice nucleation have a decreased probability of IIF and suggest that cell volume could play a more significant role in the incidence of IIF than the extracellular ice nucleation temperature.

  5. Geometry and mechanics of growing bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Zhihong; Pearce, Daniel; Sengupta, Anupam; Giomi, Luca

    Bacterial colonies are abundant on living and non-living surfaces, and are known to mediate a broad range of processes in ecology, medicine and industry. Although extensively researched - from single cells up to the population levels - a comprehensive biophysical picture, highlighting the cell-to-colony dynamics, is still lacking. Here, using numerical and analytical models, we study the mechanics of self-organization leading to the colony morphology of cells growing on a substrate with free boundary. We consider hard rods to mimic the growth of rod-shaped non-motile cells, and show that the colony, as a whole, does not form an ordered nematic phase, nor does it result in a purely disordered (isotropic) phase. Instead, different sizes of domains, in which cells are highly aligned at specific orientations, are found. The distribution of the domain sizes follows an exponential relation - indicating the existence of a characteristic length scale that determines the domain size relative to that of the colony. A continuum theory, based on the hydrodynamics of liquid crystals, is built to account for these phenomena, and is applied to describe the buckling transition from a planar to three-dimensional (3D) colony. The theory supports preliminary experiments conducted with different strains of rod shaped bacterial cells, and reveals that the buckling transition can be regulated by varying the cell stiffness and aspect ratio. This work proposes that, in addition to biochemical pathways, the spatio-temporal organization in microbial colonies is significantly tuned by the biomechanical and geometric properties of the microbes in consideration.

  6. Autolysis and autoaggregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa colony morphology mutants.

    PubMed

    D'Argenio, David A; Calfee, M Worth; Rainey, Paul B; Pesci, Everett C

    2002-12-01

    Two distinctive colony morphologies were noted in a collection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposon insertion mutants. One set of mutants formed wrinkled colonies of autoaggregating cells. Suppressor analysis of a subset of these mutants showed that this was due to the action of the regulator WspR and linked this regulator (and the chemosensory pathway to which it belongs) to genes that encode a putative fimbrial adhesin required for biofilm formation. WspR homologs, related in part by a shared GGDEF domain, regulate cell surface factors, including aggregative fimbriae and exopolysaccharides, in diverse bacteria. The second set of distinctive insertion mutants formed colonies that lysed at their center. Strains with the most pronounced lysis overproduced the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), an extracellular signal that interacts with quorum sensing. Autolysis was suppressed by mutation of genes required for PQS biosynthesis, and in one suppressed mutant, autolysis was restored by addition of synthetic PQS. The mechanism of autolysis may involve activation of the endogenous prophage and phage-related pyocins in the genome of strain PAO1. The fact that PQS levels correlated with autolysis suggests a fine balance in natural populations of P. aeruginosa between survival of the many and persistence of the few.

  7. Botryllus schlosseri (Tunicata) whole colony irradiation: Do senescent zooid resorption and immunological resorption involve similar recognition events

    SciTech Connect

    Rinkevich, B.; Weissman, I.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri undergoes cyclic blastogenesis where feeding zooids are senescened and resorbed and a new generation of zooids takes over the colony. When non-identical colonies come into direct contact, they either reject each other or fuse. Fusion is usually followed by the resorption of one of the partners in the chimera (immunological resorption). The striking morphological similarities between the two resorption phenomena suggest that both may involve tissue destruction following self-nonself recognition events. Here we attempt to modify these two events by whole colony gamma irradiation assays. Three sets of experiments were performed: (1) different doses of whole colony irradiation for determination of irradiation effects (110 colonies); (2) pairs of irradiated-nonirradiated isografts of clonal replicates for the potential of reconstruction of the irradiated partners (23 pairs); (3) chimeras of irradiated-nonirradiated partners for analysis of resorption hierarchy. Mortality increased with the irradiation dose. All colonies exposed to more than 5,000 rads died within 19 days, while no colony died below 2,000 rads. The average mortality periods, in days, for doses of 6,000-8,000, 5,000, and 2,500-4,000 rads were 14.4 +/- 3.1 (n = 24), 19.8 +/- 6.0 (n = 15), and 19.6 + 5.1 (n = 22), respectively. Younger colonies (3-6 months old) may survive radiation better than older ones (more than 13 months). Many morphological alterations were recorded in irradiated colonies: ampullar contraction and/or dilation, accumulation of pigment cells within ampullae, abnormal bleeding from blood vessels, sluggish blood circulation, necrotic zones, reduction in bud number, and irregularities in zooid and system structures. With doses of 3,000-4,000 rads and above, irradiation arrested the formation of new buds and interrupted normal takeover.

  8. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells with granulocyte colony stimulating factors for autologous transplant in hematologic malignancies: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gabús, Raul; Borelli, Gabriel; Ferrando, Martín; Bódega, Enrique; Citrín, Estela; Jiménez, Constanza Olivera; Álvarez, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2006 the Hematology Service of Hospital Maciel published its experience with peripheral blood progenitor cell harvesting for autologous stem cell transplantation using Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim). After mobilization with a mean filgrastim dose of 78 mcg/Kg, 4.7 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg were obtained by apheresis. Age above 50, multiple myeloma as underlying disease and a malignancy that was not in remission were identified as frequent characteristics among patients showing complex mobilization. Objective The aim of this study was to compare stem cell mobilization using different brands of filgrastim. Methods One hundred and fifty-seven mobilizations performed between 1997 and 2006 were analyzed. This retrospective analysis comparative two groups of patients: those mobilized with different brands of filgrastim (Group A) and those who received Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim) as mobilizing agent (Group B). A cluster analysis technique was used to identify four clusters of individuals with different behaviors differentiated by age, total dose of filgrastim required, number of apheresis and harvested CD34+ cells. Results The mean total dose of filgrastim administered was 105 mcg/Kg, the median number of apheresis was 2 procedures and the mean number of harvested stem cells was 4.98 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg. No significant differences were observed between Groups A and B regarding the number of apheresis, harvested CD34+ cells and number of mobilization failures, however the total dose of filgrastim was significantly lower in Group B. Conclusions Among other factors, the origin of the cytokine used as mobilizing agent is an element to be considered when evaluating CD34+ cell mobilization results. PMID:23049356

  9. A hydrodynamic microchip for formation of continuous cell chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Zhang, Wei; Tang, Shi-Yang; Nasabi, Mahyar; Soffe, Rebecca; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Mitchell, Arnan

    2014-05-01

    Here, we demonstrate the unique features of a hydrodynamic based microchip for creating continuous chains of model yeast cells. The system consists of a disk shaped microfluidic structure, containing narrow orifices that connect the main channel to an array of spoke channels. Negative pressure provided by a syringe pump draws fluid from the main channel through the narrow orifices. After cleaning process, a thin layer of water is left between the glass substrate and the polydimethylsiloxane microchip, enabling leakage beneath the channel walls. A mechanical clamp is used to adjust the operation of the microchip. Relaxing the clamp allows leakage of liquid beneath the walls in a controllable fashion, leading to formation of a long cell chain evenly distributed along the channel wall. The unique features of the microchip are demonstrated by creating long chains of yeast cells and model 15 μm polystyrene particles along the side wall and analysing the hydrogen peroxide induced death of patterned cells.

  10. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes.

  11. Pyrintegrin Induces Soft Tissue Formation by Transplanted or Endogenous Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Bhranti S.; Chen, Mo; Suzuki, Takahiro; Embree, Mildred; Kong, Kimi; Lee, Chang H.; He, Ling; Xiang, Lusai; Ahn, Jeffrey A.; Ding, Sheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2017-01-01

    Focal adipose deficiency, such as lipoatrophy, lumpectomy or facial trauma, is a formidable challenge in reconstructive medicine, and yet scarcely investigated in experimental studies. Here, we report that Pyrintegrin (Ptn), a 2,4-disubstituted pyrimidine known to promote embryonic stem cells survival, is robustly adipogenic and induces postnatal adipose tissue formation in vivo of transplanted adipose stem/progenitor cells (ASCs) and recruited endogenous cells. In vitro, Ptn stimulated human adipose tissue derived ASCs to differentiate into lipid-laden adipocytes by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α (C/EBPα), with differentiated cells increasingly secreting adiponectin, leptin, glycerol and total triglycerides. Ptn-primed human ASCs seeded in 3D-bioprinted biomaterial scaffolds yielded newly formed adipose tissue that expressed human PPARγ, when transplanted into the dorsum of athymic mice. Remarkably, Ptn-adsorbed 3D scaffolds implanted in the inguinal fat pad had enhanced adipose tissue formation, suggesting Ptn’s ability to induce in situ adipogenesis of endogenous cells. Ptn promoted adipogenesis by upregulating PPARγ and C/EBPα not only in adipogenesis induction medium, but also in chemically defined medium specifically for osteogenesis, and concurrently attenuated Runx2 and Osx via BMP-mediated SMAD1/5 phosphorylation. These findings suggest Ptn’s novel role as an adipogenesis inducer with a therapeutic potential in soft tissue reconstruction and augmentation. PMID:28128224

  12. Exocytosis of macrophage lysosomes leads to digestion of apoptotic adipocytes and foam cell formation[S

    PubMed Central

    Haka, Abigail S.; Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria C.; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Falcone, Domenick J.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Many types of apoptotic cells are phagocytosed and digested by macrophages. Adipocytes can be hundreds of times larger than macrophages, so they are too large to be digested by conventional phagocytic processes. The nature of the interaction between macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes has not been studied in detail. We describe a cellular process, termed exophagy, that is important for macrophage clearance of dead adipocytes and adipose tissue homeostasis. Using mouse models of obesity, human tissue, and a cell culture model, we show that macrophages form hydrolytic extracellular compartments at points of contact with dead adipocytes using local actin polymerization. These compartments are acidic and contain lysosomal enzymes delivered by exocytosis. Uptake and complete degradation of adipocyte fragments, which are released by extracellular hydrolysis, leads to macrophage foam cell formation. Exophagy-mediated foam cell formation is a highly efficient means by which macrophages internalize large amounts of lipid, which may ultimately overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the macrophage. This process provides a mechanism for degradation of objects, such as dead adipocytes, that are too large to be phagocytosed by macrophages. PMID:27044658

  13. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  14. Deformed wing virus implicated in overwintering honeybee colony losses.

    PubMed

    Highfield, Andrea C; El Nagar, Aliya; Mackinder, Luke C M; Noël, Laure M-L J; Hall, Matthew J; Martin, Stephen J; Schroeder, Declan C

    2009-11-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses. Recently in the United States, dramatic honeybee losses (colony collapse disorder) have been reported; however, there remains no clear explanation for these colony losses, with parasitic mites, viruses, bacteria, and fungal diseases all being proposed as possible candidates. Common characteristics that most failing colonies share is a lack of overt disease symptoms and the disappearance of workers from what appears to be normally functioning colonies. In this study, we used quantitative PCR to monitor the presence of three honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV), during a 1-year period in 15 asymptomatic, varroa mite-positive honeybee colonies in Southern England, and 3 asymptomatic colonies confirmed to be varroa mite free. All colonies with varroa mites underwent control treatments to ensure that mite populations remained low throughout the study. Despite this, multiple virus infections were detected, yet a significant correlation was observed only between DWV viral load and overwintering colony losses. The long-held view has been that DWV is relatively harmless to the overall health status of honeybee colonies unless it is in association with severe varroa mite infestations. Our findings suggest that DWV can potentially act independently of varroa mites to bring about colony losses. Therefore, DWV may be a major factor in overwintering colony losses.

  15. Deformed Wing Virus Implicated in Overwintering Honeybee Colony Losses ▿

    PubMed Central

    Highfield, Andrea C.; El Nagar, Aliya; Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Noël, Laure M.-L. J.; Hall, Matthew J.; Martin, Stephen J.; Schroeder, Declan C.

    2009-01-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses. Recently in the United States, dramatic honeybee losses (colony collapse disorder) have been reported; however, there remains no clear explanation for these colony losses, with parasitic mites, viruses, bacteria, and fungal diseases all being proposed as possible candidates. Common characteristics that most failing colonies share is a lack of overt disease symptoms and the disappearance of workers from what appears to be normally functioning colonies. In this study, we used quantitative PCR to monitor the presence of three honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV), during a 1-year period in 15 asymptomatic, varroa mite-positive honeybee colonies in Southern England, and 3 asymptomatic colonies confirmed to be varroa mite free. All colonies with varroa mites underwent control treatments to ensure that mite populations remained low throughout the study. Despite this, multiple virus infections were detected, yet a significant correlation was observed only between DWV viral load and overwintering colony losses. The long-held view has been that DWV is relatively harmless to the overall health status of honeybee colonies unless it is in association with severe varroa mite infestations. Our findings suggest that DWV can potentially act independently of varroa mites to bring about colony losses. Therefore, DWV may be a major factor in overwintering colony losses. PMID:19783750

  16. Induction of Monocyte Chemoattractant Proteins in Macrophages via the Production of Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor by Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Teizo; Imamichi, Tomozumi; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Sato, Miwa; Li, Liangzhu; Matsukawa, Akihiro; Wang, Ji Ming

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. We previously reported that in 4T1 murine breast cancer, non-tumor stromal cells, including macrophages, were the major source of MCP-1. In the present study, we analyzed the potential mechanisms by which MCP-1 is upregulated in macrophages infiltrating 4T1 tumors. We found that cell-free culture supernatants of 4T1 cells (4T1-sup) markedly upregulated MCP-1 production by peritoneal inflammatory macrophages. 4T1-sup also upregulated other MCPs, such as MCP-3/CCL7 and MCP-5/CCL12, but modestly upregulated neutrophil chemotactic chemokines, such as KC/CXCL1 or MIP-2/CXCL2. Physicochemical analysis indicated that an approximately 2–3 kDa 4T1 cell product was responsible for the capacity of 4T1-sup to upregulate MCP-1 expression by macrophages. A neutralizing antibody against granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but not macrophage CSF, almost completely abrogated MCP-1-inducing activity of 4T1-sup, and recombinant GM-CSF potently upregulated MCP-1 production by macrophages. The expression levels of GM-CSF in 4T1 tumors in vivo were higher than other tumors, such as Lewis lung carcinoma. Treatment of mice with anti-GM-CSF antibody significantly reduced the growth of 4T1 tumors at the injection sites but did not reduce MCP-1 production or lung metastasis in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that 4T1 cells have the capacity to directly upregulate MCP-1 production by macrophages by releasing GM-CSF; however, other mechanisms are also involved in increased MCP-1 levels in the 4T1 tumor microenvironment. PMID:26834744

  17. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Chang Rae; Park, Mi-young; Kang, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml). MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration. PMID:26376304

  18. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    PubMed

    Rho, Chang Rae; Park, Mi-young; Kang, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml). MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  19. Post-UV colony-forming ability of normal fibroblast strains and of the xeroderma pigmentosum group G strain

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, S.F.; Tarone, R.E.; Moshell, A.N.; Ganges, M.B.; Robbins, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    In xeroderma pigmentosum, an inherited disorder of defective DNA repair, post-uv colony-forming ability of fibroblasts from patients in complementation groups A through F correlates with the patients' neurological status. The first xeroderma pigmentosum patient assigned to the recently discovered group G had the neurological abnormalities of XP. Researchers have determined the post-uv colony-forming ability of cultured fibroblasts from this patient and from 5 more control donors. Log-phase fibroblasts were irradiated with 254 nm uv light from a germicidal lamp, trypsinized, and replated at known densities. After 2 to 4 weeks' incubation the cells were fixed, stained and scored for colony formation. The strains' post-uv colony-forming ability curves were obtained by plotting the log of the percent remaining post-uv colony-forming ability as a function of the uv dose. The post-uv colony-forming ability of 2 of the 5 new normal strains was in the previously defined control donor zone, but that of the other 3 extended down to the level of the most resistant xeroderma pigmentosum strain. The post-uv colony-forming ability curve of the group G fibroblasts was not significantly different from the curves of the group D fibroblast strains from patients with clinical histories similar to that of the group G patient.

  20. Case Report: Combination Therapy with Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in a Case of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Derakhshanrad, Nazi; Saberi, Hooshang; Tayebi Meybodi, Keyvan; Taghvaei, Mohammad; Arjmand, Babak; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Kohan, Amir Hassan; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Rahmani, Shahrokh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various neuroregenerative procedures have been recently employed along with neurorehabilitation programs to promote neurological function after Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), and recently most of them have focused on the acute stage of spinal cord injury. In this report, we present a case of acute SCI treated with neuroprotective treatments in conjunction with conventional rehabilitation program. Methods: A case of acute penetrative SCI (gunshot wound), 40 years old, was treated with intrathecal bone marrow derived stem cells and parenteral Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) along with rehabilitation program. The neurological outcomes as well as safety issues have been reported. Results: Assessment with American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), showed neurological improvement, meanwhile he reported neuropathic pain, which was amenable to oral medication. Discussion: In the acute setting, combination therapy of G-CSF and intrathecal Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) was safe in our case as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation programs. Further controlled studies are needed to find possible side effects, and establish net efficacy. PMID:26649168

  1. A Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimer with an Embedded Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Domain Induces Enhanced Antibody and T Cell Responses*

    PubMed Central

    van Montfort, Thijs; Melchers, Mark; Isik, Gözde; Menis, Sergey; Huang, Po-Ssu; Matthews, Katie; Michael, Elizabeth; Berkhout, Ben; Schief, William R.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2011-01-01

    An effective HIV-1 vaccine should ideally induce strong humoral and cellular immune responses that provide sterilizing immunity over a prolonged period. Current HIV-1 vaccines have failed in inducing such immunity. The viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) can be targeted by neutralizing antibodies to block infection, but several Env properties limit the ability to induce an antibody response of sufficient quantity and quality. We hypothesized that Env immunogenicity could be improved by embedding an immunostimulatory protein domain within its sequence. A stabilized Env trimer was therefore engineered with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) inserted into the V1V2 domain of gp120. Probing with neutralizing antibodies showed that both the Env and GM-CSF components of the chimeric protein were folded correctly. Furthermore, the embedded GM-CSF domain was functional as a cytokine in vitro. Mouse immunization studies demonstrated that chimeric EnvGM-CSF enhanced Env-specific antibody and T cell responses compared with wild-type Env. Collectively, these results show that targeting and activation of immune cells using engineered cytokine domains within the protein can improve the immunogenicity of Env subunit vaccines. PMID:21515681

  2. Severe Hypoxemia in a Healthy Donor for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation after Only the First Administration of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Keita; Doki, Noriko; Senoo, Yasushi; Najima, Yuho; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Haraguchi, Kyoko; Okuyama, Yoshiki; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-01-01

    Background Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) in healthy donors. A few reports have shown that some healthy donors developed acute respiratory distress syndrome or capillary leak syndrome after more than several rounds of G-CSF administration or leukapheresis. Case Report We report the case of a healthy donor for allogeneic stem cell transplantation who developed severe hypoxemia 1 h after only the first administration of G-CSF. The donor was administered 10 μg/kg G-CSF (lenograstim) subcutaneously for PBSC mobilization. 1 h after the first administration of G-CSF, the donor suddenly presented with dry cough and dyspnea. The oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2) in the room air was 88%. An electrocardiogram and chest radiography revealed no abnormalities. We excluded other causes of severe hypoxemia and diagnosed the donor with hypoxemia due to G-CSF administration, which was subsequently terminated. The donor was administered 2 l/min oxygen via a nasal cannula and 100 mg hydrocortisone intravenously. He subsequently recovered, and SpO2 in the room air returned to 98% 10 h after hypoxemia. Conclusion These respiratory symptoms might be related to anaphylactoid or hypersensitivity reaction. The donors should be observed for at least 1 h after the first administration of G-CSF. PMID:27994532

  3. Defective Self-Renewal and Differentiation of GBA-Deficient Neural Stem Cells Can Be Restored By Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun; Bae, Jae-sung; Jin, Hee Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA), which encodes the lysosomal enzyme glucosylceramidase (GCase). Deficiency in GCase leads to characteristic visceral pathology and lethal neurological manifestations in some patients. Investigations into neurogenesis have suggested that neurodegenerative disorders, such as GD, could be overcome or at least ameliorated by the generation of new neurons. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are potential candidates for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders because of their ability to promote neurogenesis. Our objective was to examine the mechanism of neurogenesis by BM-MSCs in GD. We found that neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from a neuronopathic GD model exhibited decreased ability for self-renewal and neuronal differentiation. Co-culture of GBA-deficient NSCs with BM-MSCs resulted in an enhanced capacity for self-renewal, and an increased ability for differentiation into neurons or oligodendrocytes. Enhanced proliferation and neuronal differentiation of GBA-deficient NSCs was associated with elevated release of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) from BM-MSCs. Our findings suggest that soluble M-CSF derived from BM-MSCs can modulate GBA-deficient NSCs, resulting in their improved proliferation and neuronal differentiation. PMID:26282862

  4. Assaying the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as a mitogen of immature cells in fetal blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Borrell, A; Jou, J M; Besón, I; Soler, A; Carrió, A; Margarit, E; Caballín, R; Ballesta, F; Fortuny, A

    1999-01-01

    Based on the presence of immature cells in fetal blood, and in an attempt to shorten the cytogenetic reporting time, three simultaneous one-day culture regimes were established in 23 fetal blood samples: (a) the standard phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocytes culture, (b) a culture using the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an alternative mitogen, and (c) an unstimulated culture. Diagnostic success rates achieved by these three methods were as follows: 43 per cent (95 per cent CI: 23-64) (GM-CSF), 30 per cent (95 per cent CI: 12-49) (PHA) and 9 per cent (unstimulated). These three regimes were also assayed in three-day cultures giving 100 per cent diagnostic success rate for the PHA and GM-CSF, and 62 per cent (95 per cent CI: 41-83) for the unstimulated. A moderate correlation was found between the initial concentration of cultured erythroblasts and the metaphase count in one-day GM-CSF-stimulated (r=0.43, p=0.01) and unstimulated (r=0.35, p=0.05) cultures, suggesting that erythroblasts may be in part responsible for the mitotic index observed in these two regime cultures. In conclusion, our experience suggests that immature cells in fetal blood may be successfully cultured for diagnostic purposes.

  5. Impaired tumor growth in colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)-deficient, macrophage-deficient op/op mouse: evidence for a role of CSF-1-dependent macrophages in formation of tumor stroma.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, A; Szenajch, J; Ostrowska, G; Wojtowicz, A; Wojtowicz, K; Kruszewski, A A; Maruszynski, M; Aukerman, S L; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W

    1996-01-03

    Macrophages have been suggested to play a major role in the immune response to cancer. They have also been suggested to stimulate the formation of tumor stroma and to promote tumor vascularization. The availability of the op/op mouse, which has no endogenous colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) and which possesses a profound macrophage deficiency, provides a new model to verify these notions. Subcutaneous growth of transplantable Lewis lung cancer (LLC) is markedly impaired in the op/op mice compared with normal littermates. Treatment of tumor-bearing op/op mice with human recombinant CSF-1 corrects this impairment. Histological analysis of tumors grown in op/op and normal mice revealed marked differences. Tumors grown in op/op mice display a decreased mitotic index and pronounced necrosis, particularly hemorrhagic. Moreover, particularly in the op/op tumors, peculiar sinusoid-like abortive vessels (not filled with blood) have been observed. These tumors, in contrast to tumors grown in normal mice, are almost deprived of regular arteries and veins. In contrast to tumors grown in normal mice, they exhibit almost no Sirius red-stained collagenous fibers and Gomori silver-stained reticular fibers. Our data suggest that the CSF-1-dependent macrophage subpopulation missing in op/op mice plays a primary role in supporting tumor stroma formation and tumor vascularization in murine LLC tumors.

  6. Emitter formation in dendritic web silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R. B.; Alexander, P.; Fonash, S. J.; Singh, R.

    1984-01-01

    The use of liquid dopants and liquid masks for p-n junction formation in dendritic web solar cells was investigated and found to be equivalent to the use of gaseous dopants and CVD SiO2 masks previously used. This results in a projected cost reduction of 0.02 1980$/Watt for a 25 MW/year production line, and makes possible junction formation processes having a higher throughput than more conventional processes. The effect of a low-energy (0.4 keV) hydrogen ion implant on dendritic web solar cells was also investigated. Such an implant was observed to improve Voc and Jsc substantially. Measurements of internal quantum efficiency suggest that it is the base of the cell, rather than the emitter, which benefits from the hydrogen implant. The diffusion length for electrons in the p-type base increased from 53 microns to 150 microns in one case, with dendritic web cell efficiency being boosted to 15.2 percent. The mechanism by which low-energy hydrogen ions can penetrate deeply into the silicon to effect the observed improvement is not known at this time.

  7. Polyphenols action against oxidative stress formation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Łuczaj, Wojciech; Zapora, Ewa; Szczepański, Marek; Wnuczko, Krzysztof; Skrzydlewska, Elzbieta

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), theaflavins (TFs) and black tea extract (BTE) on oxidative stress formation as well as on antioxidant system of human vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were incubated for 0,5 h with 100 mM tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) for oxidative stress formation. The influence of EGCG, TFs, and BTE on oxidative stress and antioxidant system parameters was investigated by the pre-incubation for 2 h with 50 mg/mL of each compound. Half hour exposure to t-BHP caused statistically significant decrease in GSH-Px activity and in the content of GSH, vitamin A, vitamin E as well as tryptophan. Moreover, pretreatment of cells with t-BHP caused statistically significant increase in activities of Cu,Zn-SOD, GSSG-R and in the level of MDA and dityrosine. Pretreated with t-BHP endothelial cells, subjected to EGCG, TFs and black tea extract, are partially protected against oxidative activity of t-BHP causing statistically significant increase in GSH-Px activity, GSH and tryptophan level and decrease in MDA and dityrosine level in comparison with HUVEC pretreated with t-BHP group. These results indicate the beneficial effect of tea polyphenolic compounds on HUVEC antioxidant abilities and, in consequence, their protective effect in cell components.

  8. Platelet lysate and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor serve safe and accelerated expansion of human bone marrow stromal cells for stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Saito, Hisayasu; Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Autologous human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) should be expanded in the animal serum-free condition within clinically relevant periods in order to secure safe and effective cell therapy for ischemic stroke. This study was aimed to assess whether the hBMSCs enhance their proliferation capacity and provide beneficial effect in the infarct brain when cultured with platelet lysate (PL) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). The hBMSCs were cultured in the fetal calf serum (FCS)-, PL-, or PL/G-CSF-containing medium. Cell growth kinetics was analyzed. The hBMSCs-PL, hBMSC-PL/G-CSF, or vehicle was stereotactically transplanted into the ipsilateral striatum of the rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion 7 days after the insult. Motor function was assessed for 8 weeks, and the fate of transplanted hBMSCs was examined using immunohistochemistry. As the results, the hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF showed more enhanced proliferation than the hBMSCs-FCS and hBMSCs-PL. Transplantation of hBMSCs expanded with the PL- or PL/G-CSF-containing medium equally promoted functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. Histological analysis revealed that there were no significant differences in their migration, survival, and neural differentiation in the infarct brain between the hBMSCs-PL and hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF. These findings strongly suggest that the combination of PL and G-CSF may accelerate hBMSC expansion and serve safe cell therapy for patients with ischemic stroke at clinically relevant timing.

  9. Anti-tumor effects of recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor, alone or in combination with local irradiation, in mice inoculated with Lewis lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Shen, R N; Lin, Z H; Aukerman, S L; Ralph, P; Broxmeyer, H E

    1991-01-02

    Recombinant human (rhu) macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) was evaluated for efficacy, either alone or in combination with local X-irradiation (LR), in mice inoculated subcutaneously (s.c.) with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. The size of the primary tumor and numbers of lung metastases, 21 days after tumor inoculation and 15 days after the start of treatment, were reduced by 87% in tumor-bearing mice treated with 20 micrograms/dose M-CSF s.c. twice a day for 5 days. LR (800 cGy) to the tumor once a week for 2 weeks had a moderate anti-tumor effect and enhanced the anti-tumor effect of M-CSF. Hematological parameters, including nucleated cellularity in peripheral blood, femoral marrow, spleen and peritoneal exudate, as well as marrow and splenic granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells, and numbers of splenic Thy 1.2+ cell and peritoneal mast cells, were perturbed in LLC-bearing mice, and were influenced by treatment with M-CSF and LR. Treatment with M-CSF plus LR, but not with either agent alone, was associated with a significant, although slight, enhancement in survival time for LLC-bearing mice. Inability to obtain a better survival-enhancing effect appeared to be related to the limited treatment, since the anti-tumor effects of M-CSF were more notable early on in disease progression and were related to the dose of M-CSF used. The effects of M-CSF were most probably indirect ones on the host immune system. M-CSF, in combination with LR, may be of benefit in the treatment of human tumors that have metastatic potential.

  10. Feeding, Swimming and Navigation of Colonial Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkegaard, Julius; Bouillant, Ambre; Marron, Alan; Leptos, Kyriacos; Goldstein, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Animals are multicellular in nature, but evolved from unicellular organisms. In the closest relatives of animals, the choanoflagellates, the unicellular species Salpincgoeca rosetta has the ability to form colonies, resembling true multicellularity. In this work we use a combination of experiments, theory, and simulations to understand the physical differences that arise from feeding, swimming and navigating as colonies instead of as single cells. We show that the feeding efficiency decreases with colony size for distinct reasons in the small and large Péclet number limits, and we find that swimming as a colony changes the conventional active random walks of microorganism to stochastic helices, but that this does not hinder effective navigation towards chemoattractants.

  11. Alterations in T cell-derived colony-stimulating factors associated with GVH-induced immune deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, F.T.; Pluznik, D.H.; Shearer, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    Injection of parental C57BL/10 spleen cells into unirradiated immune-competent (B10 x B10.BR)F1 hosts has been demonstrated to produce a graft-vs.-host-induced immune deficiency in T cell-mediated functions, including mitogen or alloantigen stimulated proliferation or cytotoxic T cell generation. The production of T cell-derived lymphokines affecting hematopoiesis was also altered during GVH. During the first two weeks of GVH, IL-3 and particularly GM-CSF were produced spontaneously; in subsequent weeks, the spontaneous production dropped to normal or subnormal levels. CSF content in concanavalin A-stimulated splenic supernatants was reduced at weeks 1-2, and declined to less than 5% of normal levels by 3-4 weeks of GVH. This decline in CSF content was correlated with a decrease in immune function as assessed by concanavalin A-stimulated IL-2 production and by generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Concurrent with the recovery of immune function during GVH weeks 8-15, mitogen-stimulated production of CSF returned to normal levels. In addition to the decrease in CSF production identified in acute suppressive GVH, CSF content in concanavalin A-stimulated splenic supernatants was also decreased in chronic stimulatory GVH, generated in the strain combination (B6 x B6bm1)F1----(B6bm1 x B6bm12)F1. This decrease in CSF production correlated with a decrease in self-restricted T helper cell function. Finally, a decrease in both immune function and CSF production capacity was observed in the acute GVH following allogeneic (minor histocompatibility loci) bone marrow transplantation into irradiated hosts.

  12. Molecular mechanism of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Mishina, Masayoshi; Uemura, Takeshi; Yasumura, Misato; Yoshida, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum receives two excitatory afferents, the climbing fiber (CF) and the mossy fiber-parallel fiber (PF) pathway, both converging onto Purkinje cells (PCs) that are the sole neurons sending outputs from the cerebellar cortex. Glutamate receptor δ2 (GluRδ2) is expressed selectively in cerebellar PCs and localized exclusively at the PF-PC synapses. We found that a significant number of PC spines lack synaptic contacts with PF terminals and some of residual PF-PC synapses show mismatching between pre- and postsynaptic specializations in conventional and conditional GluRδ2 knockout mice. Studies with mutant mice revealed that in addition to PF-PC synapse formation, GluRδ2 is essential for synaptic plasticity, motor learning, and the restriction of CF territory. GluRδ2 regulates synapse formation through the amino-terminal domain, while the control of synaptic plasticity, motor learning, and CF territory is mediated through the carboxyl-terminal domain. Thus, GluRδ2 is the molecule that bridges synapse formation and motor learning. We found that the trans-synaptic interaction of postsynaptic GluRδ2 and presynaptic neurexins (NRXNs) through cerebellin 1 (Cbln1) mediates PF-PC synapse formation. The synaptogenic triad is composed of one molecule of tetrameric GluRδ2, two molecules of hexameric Cbln1 and four molecules of monomeric NRXN. Thus, GluRδ2 triggers synapse formation by clustering four NRXNs. These findings provide a molecular insight into the mechanism of synapse formation in the brain.

  13. Combination Therapy of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells and Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Reduces Histopathological and Motor Impairments in an Experimental Model of Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Sandra A.; Tajiri, Naoki; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Sanberg, Paul R.; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Song, Shijie; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with neuro-inflammation, debilitating sensory-motor deficits, and learning and memory impairments. Cell-based therapies are currently being investigated in treating neurotrauma due to their ability to secrete neurotrophic factors and anti-inflammatory cytokines that can regulate the hostile milieu associated with chronic neuroinflammation found in TBI. In tandem, the stimulation and mobilization of endogenous stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow through granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) poses as an attractive therapeutic intervention for chronic TBI. Here, we tested the potential of a combined therapy of human umbilical cord blood cells (hUCB) and G-CSF at the acute stage of TBI to counteract the progressive secondary effects of chronic TBI using the controlled cortical impact model. Four different groups of adult Sprague Dawley rats were treated with saline alone, G-CSF+saline, hUCB+saline or hUCB+G-CSF, 7-days post CCI moderate TBI. Eight weeks after TBI, brains were harvested to analyze hippocampal cell loss, neuroinflammatory response, and neurogenesis by using immunohistochemical techniques. Results revealed that the rats exposed to TBI treated with saline exhibited widespread neuroinflammation, impaired endogenous neurogenesis in DG and SVZ, and severe hippocampal cell loss. hUCB monotherapy suppressed neuroinflammation, nearly normalized the neurogenesis, and reduced hippocampal cell loss compared to saline alone. G-CSF monotherapy produced partial and short-lived benefits characterized by low levels of neuroinflammation in striatum, DG, SVZ, and corpus callosum and fornix, a modest neurogenesis, and a moderate reduction of hippocampal cells loss. On the other hand, combined therapy of hUCB+G-CSF displayed synergistic effects that robustly dampened neuroinflammation, while enhancing endogenous neurogenesis and reducing hippocampal cell loss. Vigorous and long-lasting recovery of motor function

  14. Schwann Cells in Neuromuscular Junction Formation and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Arnab; Li, Lei; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Xiong, Wen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a tripartite synapse that is formed by motor nerve terminals, postjunctional muscle membranes, and terminal Schwann cells (TSCs) that cover the nerve-muscle contact. NMJ formation requires intimate communications among the three different components. Unlike nerve-muscle interaction, which has been well characterized, less is known about the role of SCs in NMJ formation and maintenance. We show that SCs in mice lead nerve terminals to prepatterned AChRs. Ablating SCs at E8.5 (i.e., prior nerve arrival at the clusters) had little effect on aneural AChR clusters at E13.5, suggesting that SCs may not be necessary for aneural clusters. SC ablation at E12.5, a time when phrenic nerves approach muscle fibers, resulted in smaller and fewer nerve-induced AChR clusters; however, SC ablation at E15.5 reduced AChR cluster size but had no effect on cluster density, suggesting that SCs are involved in AChR cluster maturation. Miniature endplate potential amplitude, but not frequency, was reduced when SCs were ablated at E15.5, suggesting that postsynaptic alterations may occur ahead of presynaptic deficits. Finally, ablation of SCs at P30, after NMJ maturation, led to NMJ fragmentation and neuromuscular transmission deficits. Miniature endplate potential amplitude was reduced 3 d after SC ablation, but both amplitude and frequency were reduced 6 d after. Together, these results indicate that SCs are not only required for NMJ formation, but also necessary for its maintenance; and postsynaptic function and structure appeared to be more sensitive to SC ablation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) are critical for survival and daily functioning. Defects in NMJ formation during development or maintenance in adulthood result in debilitating neuromuscular disorders. The role of Schwann cells (SCs) in NMJ formation and maintenance was not well understood. We genetically ablated SCs during development and after NMJ formation to

  15. Biological surface engineering: a simple system for cell pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Yan, L; Altman, M; Lässle, M; Nugent, H; Frankel, F; Lauffenburger, D A; Whitesides, G M; Rich, A

    1999-07-01

    Biological surface engineering using synthetic biological materials has a great potential for advances in our understanding of complex biological phenomena. We developed a simple system to engineer biologically relevant surfaces using a combination of self-assembling oligopeptide monolayers and microcontact printing (muCP). We designed and synthesized two oligopeptides containing a cell adhesion motif (RADS)n (n = 2 and 3) at the N-terminus, followed by an oligo(alanine) linker and a cysteine residue at the C-terminus. The thiol group of cysteine allows the oligopeptides to attach covalently onto a gold-coated surface to form monolayers. We then microfabricated a variety of surface patterns using the cell adhesion peptides in combination with hexa-ethylene glycol thiolate which resist non-specific adsorption of proteins and cells. The resulting patterns consist of areas either supporting or inhibiting cell adhesion, thus they are capable of aligning cells in a well-defined manner, leading to specific cell array and pattern formations.

  16. Identification and characterization of a highly motile and antibiotic refractory subpopulation involved in the expansion of swarming colonies of Paenibacillus vortex.

    PubMed

    Roth, Dalit; Finkelshtein, Alin; Ingham, Colin; Helman, Yael; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Brodsky, Leonid; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2013-09-01

    Bacteria often use sophisticated cooperative behaviours, such as the development of complex colonies, elaborate biofilms and advanced dispersal strategies, to cope with the harsh and variable conditions of natural habitats, including the presence of antibiotics. Paenibacillus vortex uses swarming motility and cell-to-cell communication to form complex, structured colonies. The modular organization of P. vortex colony has been found to facilitate its dispersal on agar surfaces. The current study reveals that the complex structure of the colony is generated by the coexistence and transition between two morphotypes--'builders' and 'explorers'--with distinct functions in colony formation. Here, we focused on the explorers, which are highly motile and spearhead colonial expansion. Explorers are characterized by high expression levels of flagellar genes, such as flagellin (hag), motA, fliI, flgK and sigD, hyperflagellation, decrease in ATP (adenosine-5'-triphosphate) levels, and increased resistance to antibiotics. Their tolerance to many antibiotics gives them the advantage of translocation through antibiotics-containing areas. This work gives new insights on the importance of cell differentiation and task distribution in colony morphogenesis and adaptation to antibiotics.

  17. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  18. Multimodal Approaches for Regenerative Stroke Therapies: Combination of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells is Not Superior to G-CSF Alone.

    PubMed

    Balseanu, Adrian Tudor; Buga, Ana-Maria; Catalin, Bogdan; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Boltze, Johannes; Zagrean, Ana-Maria; Reymann, Klaus; Schaebitz, Wolf; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    Attractive therapeutic strategies to enhance post-stroke recovery of aged brains include methods of cellular therapy that can enhance the endogenous restorative mechanisms of the injured brain. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable to test the efficacy of cell therapy in the microenvironment of aged brains that is generally refractory to regeneration. In particular, stem cells from the bone marrow allow an autologous transplantation approach that can be translated in the near future to the clinical practice. Such a bone marrow-derived therapy includes the grafting of stem cells as well as the delayed induction of endogenous stem cell mobilization and homing by the stem cell mobilizer granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We tested the hypothesis that grafting of bone marrow-derived pre-differentiated mesenchymal cells (BM-MSCs) in G-CSF-treated animals improves the long-term functional outcome in aged rodents. To this end, G-CSF alone (50 μg/kg) or in combination with a single dose (10(6) cells) of rat BM MSCs was administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats at 6 h after transient occlusion (90 min) of the middle cerebral artery. Infarct volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 3 and 48 days post-stroke and additionally by immunhistochemistry at day 56. Functional recovery was tested during the entire post-stroke survival period of 56 days. Daily treatment for post-stroke aged rats with G-CSF led to a robust and consistent improvement of neurological function after 28 days. The combination therapy also led to robust angiogenesis in the formerly infarct core and beyond in the "islet of regeneration." However, G-CSF + BM MSCs may not impact at all on the spatial reference-memory task or infarct volume and therefore did not further improve the post-stroke recovery. We suggest that in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies would have to be

  19. Granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor produced by recombinant avian poxviruses enriches the regional lymph nodes with antigen-presenting cells and acts as an immunoadjuvant.

    PubMed

    Kass, E; Panicali, D L; Mazzara, G; Schlom, J; Greiner, J W

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant avian poxviruses [fowlpox and canarypox (ALVAC)], restricted for replication in nonavian cell substrates and expressing granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (avipox-GM-CSF), were evaluated for their ability to enrich an immunization site with antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and, in turn, function as biological vaccine adjuvants. Avipox-GM-CSF administered as a single s.c. injection significantly enhanced the percentage and absolute number of APCs in the regional lymph nodes that drain the injection site. Both the magnitude and duration of the cellular and phenotypic increases within the lymph nodes induced by the avipox-GM-CSF viruses were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those measured in mice treated with four daily injections of recombinant GM-CSF protein. Temporal studies revealed that the APC enrichment of regional lymph nodes was sustained for 21-28 days after injection of the recombinant avipox virus expressing GM-CSF and, moreover, three injections of the recombinant virus could be given without any appreciable loss of in vivo bioactivity. Mice expressing human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a transgene (CEA.Tg) developed CEA-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity after being immunized with avipox-CEA. The coadministration of recombinant avipox viruses expressing CEA and GM-CSF significantly enhanced CEA-specific host immunity with an accompanying immunotherapeutic response in tumor-bearing CEA.Tg mice. The optimal use of avipox-GM-CSF, in terms of dose and dose schedule, especially when used with different immunogens, remains to be determined. Nonetheless, the present findings demonstrate: (a) the effective delivery of GM-CSF to an immunization site using a recombinant avian poxvirus; (b) the compatibility of delivering an antigen and GM-CSF in replication-defective viruses to enhance antigen-specific immunity; and (c) the combined use of recombinant avipox viruses expressing CEA and GM-CSF to generate antitumor

  20. Plerixafor on-demand combined with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: significant improvement in peripheral blood stem cells mobilization and harvest with no increase in costs.

    PubMed

    Milone, Giuseppe; Martino, Massimo; Spadaro, Andrea; Leotta, Salvatore; Di Marco, Annalia; Scalzulli, Potito; Cupri, Alessandra; Di Martina, Valentina; Schinocca, Elena; Spina, Eleonora; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To date, no prospective study on Plerixafor 'on-demand' in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported. We present an interim analysis of the first prospective study in which Plerixafor was administered on-demand in patients affected by multiple myeloma and lymphoma who received high dose cyclophosphamide or DHAP (dexamethasone, cytarabine, cisplatin) plus G-CSF to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). One hundred and two patients were evaluable for response. A cohort of 240 patients receiving the same mobilizing chemotherapy was retrospectively studied. Failure to mobilize CD34(+) cells in peripheral blood was reduced by 'on-demand' strategy compared to conventional mobilization; from 13·0 to 3·0% (P = 0·004). Failure to harvest CD34(+) cells 2 × 10(6) /kg decreased from 20·9 to 4·0% (P = 0·0001). The on-demand Plerixafor strategy also resulted in a lower rate of mobilization failure (P = 0·03) and harvest failure (P = 0·0008) when compared to a 'bias-adjusted set of controls'. Evaluation of economic costs of the two strategies showed that the overall cost of the two treatments were comparable when salvage mobilizations were taken into account. When in combination with cyclophosphamide or DHAP plus G-CSF, the 'on-demand' use of Plerixafor showed, in comparison to conventionally treated patients, a significant improvement in mobilization of PBSC with no increase in overall cost.

  1. A microfluidic direct formate fuel cell on paper.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Thomas S; Purohit, Krutarth H; Domalaon, Kryls; Pham, Linda; Burgess, Brianna J; Manorothkul, Natalie; Galvan, Vicente; Sotez, Samantha; Gomez, Frank A; Haan, John L

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first direct formate fuel cell on a paper microfluidic platform. In traditional membrane-less microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs), external pumping consumes power produced by the fuel cell in order to maintain co-laminar flow of the anode stream and oxidant stream to prevent mixing. However, in paper microfluidics, capillary action drives flow while minimizing stream mixing. In this work, we demonstrate a paper MFC that uses formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. Using these materials we achieve a maximum power density of nearly 2.5 mW/mg Pd. In a series configuration, our MFC achieves an open circuit voltage just over 1 V, and in a parallel configuration, short circuit of 20 mA absolute current. We also demonstrate that the MFC does not require continuous flow of fuel and oxidant to produce power. We found that we can pre-saturate the materials on the paper, stop the electrolyte flow, and still produce approximately 0.5 V for 15 min. This type of paper MFC has potential applications in point-of-care diagnostic devices and other electrochemical sensors.

  2. Rapidly Developing Yeast Microcolonies Differentiate in a Similar Way to Aging Giant Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Váchová, Libuše; Hatáková, Ladislava; Čáp, Michal; Pokorná, Michaela; Palková, Zdena

    2013-01-01

    During their development and aging on solid substrates, yeast giant colonies produce ammonia, which acts as a quorum sensing molecule. Ammonia production is connected with alkalization of the surrounding medium and with extensive reprogramming of cell metabolism. In addition, ammonia signaling is important for both horizontal (colony centre versus colony margin) and vertical (upper versus lower cell layers) colony differentiations. The centre of an aging differentiated giant colony is thus composed of two major cell subpopulations, the subpopulation of long-living, metabolically active and stress-resistant cells that form the upper layers of the colony and the subpopulation of stress-sensitive starving cells in the colony interior. Here, we show that microcolonies originating from one cell pass through similar developmental phases as giant colonies. Microcolony differentiation is linked to ammonia signaling, and cells similar to the upper and lower cells of aged giant colonies are formed even in relatively young microcolonies. A comparison of the properties of these cells revealed a number of features that are similar in microcolonies and giant colonies as well as a few that are only typical of chronologically aged giant colonies. These findings show that colony age per se is not crucial for colony differentiation. PMID:23970946

  3. Graphene-Induced Pore Formation on Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Guangxin; Zhang, Yuanzhao; Luan, Binquan; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Zhou, Royce W.; Yang, Zaixing; Zhao, Lin; Xu, Jiaying; Luo, Judong; Zhou, Ruhong

    2017-01-01

    Examining interactions between nanomaterials and cell membranes can expose underlying mechanisms of nanomaterial cytotoxicity and guide the design of safer nanomedical technologies. Recently, graphene has been shown to exhibit potential toxicity to cells; however, the molecular processes driving its lethal properties have yet to be fully characterized. We here demonstrate that graphene nanosheets (both pristine and oxidized) can produce holes (pores) in the membranes of A549 and Raw264.7 cells, substantially reducing cell viability. Electron micrographs offer clear evidence of pores created on cell membranes. Our molecular dynamics simulations reveal that multiple graphene nanosheets can cooperate to extract large numbers of phospholipids from the membrane bilayer. Strong dispersion interactions between graphene and lipid-tail carbons result in greatly depleted lipid density within confined regions of the membrane, ultimately leading to the formation of water-permeable pores. This cooperative lipid extraction mechanism for membrane perforation represents another distinct process that contributes to the molecular basis of graphene cytotoxicity. PMID:28218295

  4. Notch1-Dll4 signalling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-03-13

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct 'leader' phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving the leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here we use single-cell gene expression analysis and computational modelling to show that the leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signalling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signalling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration.

  5. Notch1-Dll4 signaling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-01-01

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct “leader” phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here, we use single cell gene expression analysis and computational modeling to show that leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signaling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signaling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration. PMID:25766473

  6. Formation of nanofilms on cell surfaces to improve the insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amemiya, Yosuke; Kawano, Keiko; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the insertion efficiency of nanoneedles into fibroblast and neural cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofilms formed on cell surfaces improved the insertion efficiency of nanoneedles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofilms improved the insertion efficiency even in Y27632-treated cells. -- Abstract: A nanoneedle, an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip etched to 200 nm in diameter and 10 {mu}m in length, can be inserted into cells with the aid of an AFM and has been used to introduce functional molecules into cells and to analyze intracellular information with minimal cell damage. However, some cell lines have shown low insertion efficiency of the nanoneedle. Improvement in the insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into such cells is a significant issue for nanoneedle-based cell manipulation and analysis. Here, we have formed nanofilms composed of extracellular matrix molecules on cell surfaces and found that the formation of the nanofilms improved insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into fibroblast and neural cells. The nanofilms were shown to improve insertion efficiency even in cells in which the formation of actin stress fibers was inhibited by the ROCK inhibitor Y27632, suggesting that the nanofilms with the mesh structure directly contributed to the improved insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle.

  7. Regulation of pluripotency of inner cell mass and growth and differentiation of trophectoderm of the bovine embryo by colony stimulating factor 2.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Kyle B; Khan, Firdous A; Sakatani, Miki; Moss, James I; Ozawa, Manabu; Ealy, Alan D; Hansen, Peter J

    2013-12-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 2 (CSF2) enhances competence of the bovine embryo to establish and maintain pregnancy after the embryo is transferred into a recipient. Mechanisms involved could include regulation of lineage commitment, growth, or differentiation of the inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE). Experiments were conducted to evaluate regulation by CSF2 of pluripotency of the ICM and differentiation and growth of the TE. Embryos were cultured with 10 ng/ml recombinant bovine CSF2 or a vehicle control from Days 5 to 7 or 6 to 8 postinsemination. CSF2 increased the number of putative zygotes that developed to blastocysts when the percent of embryos becoming blastocysts in the control group was low but decreased blastocyst yield when blastocyst development in controls was high. ICM isolated from blastocysts by lysing the trophectoderm using antibody and complement via immunosurgery were more likely to survive passage when cultured on mitomycin C-treated fetal fibroblasts if derived from blastocysts treated with CSF2 than if from control blastocysts. There was little effect of CSF2 on characteristics of TE outgrowths from blastocysts. The exception was a decrease in outgrowth size for embryos treated with CSF2 from Days 5 to 7 and an increase in expression of CDX2 when treatment was from Days 6 to 8. Expression of the receptor subunit gene CSF2RA increased from the zygote stage to the 9-16 cell stage before decreasing to the blastocyst stage. In contrast, CSF2RB was undetectable at all stages. In conclusion, CSF2 improves competence of the ICM to survive in a pluripotent state and alters TE outgrowths. Actions of CSF2 occur through a signaling pathway that is likely to be independent of CSF2RB.

  8. Immunomodulation of Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang on in vitro granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, S T; Yang, S L; Hsieh, C C; Yang, M D; Wang, T F; Lin, J G

    2000-11-01

    Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang (BZYQT) is a Chinese medicine, and has been used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. At present, we still do not fully understand the effects of BZYQT on the cellular physiology. Present in vitro study demonstrated that BZYQT is capable of increasing granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in healthy volunteers and patients with HCC. The productions of G-CSF and TNF-alpha by PBMC of volunteers were significantly stimulated by more than 125 microg/ml of BZYQT. G-CSF levels stimulated by PBMC of healthy volunteers were higher than in PBMC of the HCC patients when more than 625 microg/ml of BZYQT was administrated. The reason may be due to the impaired immunologic reactivity of mononuclear cells in HCC patients. However, the production levels of TNF-alpha in HCC patients can be stimulated to levels as high as those in healthy volunteers. When adding high concentration (3.125 mg/ml) of BZYQT to the cultured PBMC, the increments of G-CSF and TNF-alpha production decreased although there were no obvious changes in the number of metabolic active PBMC changed. TNF-alpha andG-CSF are known to play important roles in the biological defensive mechanism. These findings show that BZYQT is a unique formula for the stimulation of PBMC to produce G-CSF and TNF-alpha. Administration of BZYQT may be beneficial for patients with HCC to modulate these cytokines.

  9. Stem cell mobilisation by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Long-term results of the REVIVAL-2 trial.

    PubMed

    Steppich, Birgit; Hadamitzky, Martin; Ibrahim, Tareq; Groha, Philip; Schunkert, Heribert; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Kastrati, Adnan; Ott, Ilka

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilises cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood. Previous preclinical and early clinical trials may suggest that treatment with G-CSF leads to improved myocardial perfusion and function in acute or chronic ischaemic heart disease. In the REVIVAL-2 study we found that stem cell mobilisation by G-CSF does not influence infarct size, left ventricular function and coronary restenosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) that underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention. The objective of the present analysis was to assess the impact of G-CSF treatment on seven-year clinical outcomes from the REVIVAL-2 trial. In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled REVIVAL-2 study, 114 patients with the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction were enrolled five days after successful reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were assigned to receive 10 µg/kg G-CSF (n=56) or placebo (n=58) for five days. The primary endpoint for this long-term outcome analysis was the composite of death, myocardial infarction or stroke seven years after randomisation. The endpoint occurred in 14.3 % of patients in the G-CSF group versus 17.2 % assigned to placebo (p=0.67). The combined incidence of death or myocardial infarction occurred in 14.3 % of the patients assigned to G-CSF and 15.5 % of the patients assigned to placebo (p=0.85). In conclusion, these long-term follow-up data show that G-CSF does not improve clinical outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  10. Renal epithelial cell-derived monocyte colony stimulating factor as a local informant of renal injury and means of monocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kimberly A; Kampen, Robert L; Hoffmann, Steven C; Eldaif, Shady M; Kirk, Allan D

    2009-07-01

    Monocyte accumulation in renal allografts is associated with allograft dysfunction. As monocyte influx occurs acutely following reperfusion, we investigated the effect of ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) on monocyte colony stimulating factor (m-CSF), a key cytokine in monocyte recruitment. We hypothesized that renal tubule epithelial cells (RTECs) could produce m-CSF in response to IRI, which could in turn promote monocyte activation. Real time PCR was used to measure levels of intragraft m-CSF transcripts in patients during IRI and clinical rejection. Also, m-CSF production by RTECs following IRI simulation in vitro was measured using ELISA. Monocyte expression of CD40 and CD80 was then analyzed using flow cytometry following co-culture with supernatants of RTECs after IRI. Monocyte expression of CD40, CD80 and HLA-DR was then examined following treatment with rh-m-CSF (10, 36, and 100 ng/ml), as was monocyte size and granularity. We found that intragraft m-CSF transcription was significantly increased postreperfusion (P = 0.002) and during clinical rejection (P = 0.002). We also found that RTECs produced m-CSF in response to IRI in vitro (P = 0.036). Monocytes co-cultured with the supernatants of postischemic RTECs became activated as evidenced by increased expression of CD40 and CD80. Also, monocytes treated with recombinant m-CSF assumed an activated phenotype exhibiting increased size, granularity and expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR, and demonstrating enhanced phagocytic activity. Taken together, we suggest that renal tubular cell derived m-CSF is a stimulus for monocyte activation and may be an important target for control of IRI-associated immune activation.

  11. Fabric-based alkaline direct formate microfluidic fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Domalaon, Kryls; Tang, Catherine; Mendez, Alex; Bernal, Franky; Purohit, Krutarth; Pham, Linda; Haan, John; Gomez, Frank A

    2017-01-12

    Fabric-based microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs) serve as a novel, cost-efficient alternative to traditional FCs and batteries, since fluids naturally travel across fabric via capillary action, eliminating the need for an external pump and lowering production and operation costs. Building on previous research with Y-shaped paper-based MFCs, fabric-based MFCs mitigate fragility and durability issues caused by long periods of fuel immersion. In this study, we describe a microfluidic fabric-based direct formate fuel cell, with 5 M potassium formate and 30% hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. Using a two-strip, stacked design, the optimized parameters include the type of encasement, the barrier, and the fabric type. Surface contact of the fabric and laminate sheet expedited flow and respective chemical reactions. The maximum current (22.83 mA/cm(2) ) and power (4.40 mW/cm(2) ) densities achieved with a 65% cotton/35% polyester blend material are a respective 8.7% and 32% higher than previous studies with Y-shaped paper-based MFCs. In series configuration, the MFCs generate sufficient energy to power a handheld calculator, a thermometer, and a spectrum of light-emitting diodes.

  12. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Oliva, María A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex.

  13. Entombed pollen: A new condition in honey bee colonies associated with increased risk of colony mortality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe a new phenomenon, entombed pollen, which is highly associated with increased colony mortality. Entombed pollen appears as sunken, wax-covered cells amidst “normal”, uncapped cells of stored pollen, and the pollen contained within these cells is brick red in color. There appears to b...

  14. Cadmium stimulates osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation in mouse bone marrow cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Tatsuro; Takata, Masakazu; Miyata, Masaki; Nagai, Miyuki; Sugure, Akemi; Kozuka, Hiroshi; Kuze, Shougo )

    1991-08-01

    Most of cadmium (Cd)-treated animals have been reported to show osteoporosis-like changes in bones. This suggests that Cd may promote bone loss by a direct action on bone. It was found that Cd stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2}(PGE{sub 2}) production in the osteoblast-like cell, MC3T3-E1. Therefore, Cd stimulates bone resorption by increasing PGE{sub 2} production. Recently, several bone marrow cell culture systems have been developed for examining the formation of osteoclast-like multinucleated cells in vitro. As osteoblasts produce PGE{sub 2} by Cd-induced cyclooxygenase and may play an important role in osteoclast formation, the present study was undertaken to clarify the possibility that Cd might stimulate osteoclast formation in a mouse bone marrow culture system.

  15. Colony Collapse Disorder

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In CCD, the majority of worker bees in a colony disappear and leave behind a queen, plenty of food and a few nurse bees to care for remaining immature bees and the queen. EPA and USDA are working to understand and resolve this problem.

  16. [Visiting the Amana Colonies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "The Goldfinch: Iowa History for Young People" focuses upon the Amana Colonies, which were home to many German immigrants in the 19th century, and which retain much of their ethnic heritage today. The articles and activities included in this issue are "Amana Today"; "No Black Buggies in Amana";…

  17. Effect of recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor in irradiated murine recipients of T-cell-depleted allogeneic or non-depleted syngeneic bone marrow transplants.

    PubMed

    Blazar, B R; Aukerman, S L; Vallera, D A

    1992-03-15

    Recombinant macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rM-CSF), which reacts exclusively with cells of monocyte lineage, was evaluated in the murine bone marrow (BM) transplant setting for in vivo effects on recipient survival, hematologic recovery, and engraftment. Two types of fully allogeneic donors were selected based on the expression (BALB/c), or lack of expression (DBA/1), of hybrid hematopoietic histocompatibility (Hh1) antigens. These antigens are established targets for monocyte and/or natural killer (NK) cell-mediated graft rejection. Irradiated C57BL/6 mice were used as recipients for all experiments. Recipients of T-cell-depleted (TCD) BALB/c BM and a 14-day continuous subcutaneous infusion of 16.8 micrograms/d rM-CSF (n = 30) showed a significant decrease in donor cell engraftment as compared with recipients of donor BM administered pumps delivering saline. These mice administered rM-CSF also displayed significantly reduced levels of circulating leukocytes (predominantly lymphocytes) on day 14 posttransplant (compared with saline controls). Neither engraftment effects nor leukocyte effects were observed when C57BL/6 recipients were administered Hh1 nonexpressing TCD DBA/1 BM cells (n = 30), suggesting that the monocyte/macrophage population is important in long-term alloengraftment in certain donor-recipient strain combinations in which donor Hh1 antigens can serve as target antigens for host effector cells, but are not important in strain combinations in which they are not recognized. Circulating tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) levels measured at two time periods during rM-CSF infusion were not elevated. Thus, the reduction in alloengraftment is not likely to be directly related to TNF alpha. However, in vivo elimination of NK cells in the BALB/c into C57BL/6 model prevented the impairment of engraftment mediated by rM-CSF. Thus, rM-CSF-mediated inhibition of alloengraftment is contingent on the presence of host NK cells with antidonor reactivity

  18. Generation of Small Colony Variants in Biofilms by Escherichia coli Harboring a Conjugative F Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Eida, Hiroaki; Ishii, Satoshi; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Okabe, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    A conjugative F plasmid induces mature biofilm formation by Escherichia coli by promoting F-pili-mediated cell-cell interactions and increasing the expression of biofilm-related genes. We herein demonstrated another function for the F plasmid in E. coli biofilms; it contributes to the emergence of genetic and phenotypic variations by spontaneous mutations. Small colony variants (SCVs) were more frequently generated in a continuous flow-cell biofilm than in the planktonic state of E. coli harboring the F plasmid. E. coli SCVs represented typical phenotypic changes such as slower growth, less biofilm formation, and greater resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics than the parent strain. Genomic and complementation analyses indicated that the small colony phenotype was caused by the insertion of Tn1000, which was originally localized in the F plasmid, into the hemB gene. Furthermore, the Tn1000 insertion was removed from hemB in the revertant, which showed a normal colony phenotype. This study revealed that the F plasmid has the potential to increase genetic variations not only by horizontal gene transfer via F pili, but also by site-specific recombination within a single cell. PMID:28302951

  19. Diclofenac in Arabidopsis cells: Rapid formation of conjugates.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuguo; Ye, Qingfu; Zhang, Jianbo; Richards, Jaben; Borchardt, Dan; Gan, Jay

    2017-03-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) are continuously introduced into the soil-plant system, through practices such as agronomic use of reclaimed water and biosolids containing these trace contaminants. Plants may accumulate PPCPs from soil, serving as a conduit for human exposure. Metabolism likely controls the final accumulation of PPCPs in plants, but is in general poorly understood for emerging contaminants. In this study, we used diclofenac as a model compound, and employed (14)C tracing, and time-of-flight (TOF) and triple quadruple (QqQ) mass spectrometers to unravel its metabolism pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana cells. We further validated the primary metabolites in Arabidopsis seedlings. Diclofenac was quickly taken up into A. thaliana cells. Phase I metabolism involved hydroxylation and successive oxidation and cyclization reactions. However, Phase I metabolites did not accumulate appreciably; they were instead rapidly conjugated with sulfate, glucose, and glutamic acid through Phase II metabolism. In particular, diclofenac parent was directly conjugated with glutamic acid, with acyl-glutamatyl-diclofenac accounting for >70% of the extractable metabolites after 120-h incubation. In addition, at the end of incubation, >40% of the spiked diclofenac was in the non-extractable form, suggesting extensive sequestration into cell matter. The rapid formation of non-extractable residue and dominance of diclofenac-glutamate conjugate uncover previously unknown metabolism pathways for diclofenac. In particular, the rapid conjugation of parent highlights the need to consider conjugates of emerging contaminants in higher plants, and their biological activity and human health implications.

  20. Mechanical roles of apical constriction, cell elongation, and cell migration during neural tube formation in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Yasue, Naoko; Tateo, Itsuki; Adachi, Taiji; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-12-01

    Neural tube closure is an important and necessary process during the development of the central nervous system. The formation of the neural tube structure from a flat sheet of neural epithelium requires several cell morphogenetic events and tissue dynamics to account for the mechanics of tissue deformation. Cell elongation changes cuboidal cells into columnar cells, and apical constriction then causes them to adopt apically narrow, wedge-like shapes. In addition, the neural plate in Xenopus is stratified, and the non-neural cells in the deep layer (deep cells) pull the overlying superficial cells, eventually bringing the two layers of cells to the midline. Thus, neural tube closure appears to be a complex event in which these three physical events are considered to play key mechanical roles. To test whether these three physical events are mechanically sufficient to drive neural tube formation, we employed a three-dimensional vertex model and used it to simulate the process of neural tube closure. The results suggest that apical constriction cued the bending of the neural plate by pursing the circumference of the apical surface of the neural cells. Neural cell elongation in concert with apical constriction further narrowed the apical surface of the cells and drove the rapid folding of the neural plate, but was insufficient for complete neural tube closure. Migration of the deep cells provided the additional tissue deformation necessary for closure. To validate the model, apical constriction and cell elongation were inhibited in Xenopus laevis embryos. The resulting cell and tissue shapes resembled the corresponding simulation results.

  1. The effect of ammonia on the O-linked glycosylation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor produced by chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, D.C.; Goochee, C.F.

    1995-07-05

    Ammonium ion concentrations ranging from 0 to 10 mM are shown to significantly reduce the sialylation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) produced by recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells. Specifically, the degree of completion of the final reaction in the O-linked glycosylation pathway, the addition of sialic acid in an {alpha}(2,6) linkage to N-acetylgalactosamine, is reduced by NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentrations of as low as 2 mM. The effect of ammonia on sialylation is rapid, sustained, and does not affect the secretion rate of G-CSF. Additionally, the effect can be mimicked using the weak base chloroquine, suggesting that the effect is related to the weak base characteristics of ammonia. In support of this hypothesis, experiments using brefeldin A suggest that the addition of sialic acid in an {alpha}(2,6) linkage to N-acetylgalactosamine occurs in the trans-Golgi compartment prior to the trans-Golgi network, which would be expected under normal conditions to have a slightly acidic pH in the range from 6.5 to 6.75. Ammonium ion concentrations of 10mM would be expected to reduce significantly the differences in pH between acidic intracellular compartments and the cytoplasm. The pH-activity profile for the CHO O-linked {alpha}(2,6)sialytransferase using monosialylated G-CSF as a substrate reveals a twofold decrease in enzymatic activity across the pH range from 6.75 to 7.0. Mathematical modeling of this sialylation reaction supports the hypothesis that this twofold decrease in sialyltransferase activity resulting from an ammonia-induced increase in trans-Golgi pH could produce the observed decrease in G-CSF sialylation.

  2. Calcineurin potentiates activation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene in T cells: involvement of the conserved lymphokine element 0.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, A; Masuda, E S; Naito, Y; Tokumitsu, H; Arai, K; Arai, N

    1994-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) are produced by stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore (A23187) in human T cell leukemia Jurkat cells. The expression of GM-CSF and IL-2 is inhibited by immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506. Earlier studies on the IL-2 gene expression showed that overexpression of calcineurin (CN), a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, can stimulate transcription from the IL-2 promoter through the NF-AT-binding site. In this study, we obtained evidence that transfection of the cDNAs for CN A (catalytic) and CN B (regulatory) subunits also augments transcription from the GM-CSF promoter and recovers the transcription inhibited by CsA. The constitutively active type of the CN A subunit, which lacks the auto-inhibitory and calmodulin-binding domains, acts in synergy with PMA to activate transcription from the GM-CSF promoter. We also found that the active CN partially replaces calcium ionophore in synergy with PMA to induce expression of endogenous GM-CSF and IL-2. By multimerizing the regulatory elements of the GM-CSF promoter, we found that one of the target sites for the CN action is the conserved lymphokine element 0 (CLE0), located at positions between -54 and -40. Mobility shift assays showed that the CLE0 sequence has an AP1-binding site and is associated with an NF-AT-like factor, termed NF-CLE0 gamma. NF-CLE0 gamma binding is induced by PMA/A23187 and is inhibited by treatment with CsA. These results suggest that CN is involved in the coordinated induction of the GM-CSF and IL-2 genes and that the CLE0 sequence of the GM-CSF gene is a functional analogue of the NF-AT-binding site in the IL-2 promoter, which mediates signals downstream of T cell activation. Images PMID:8186461

  3. Different tolerances to chemical contaminants between unicellular and colonial morph of Microcystis aeruginosa: excluding the differences among different strains.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Nkrumah, Philip Nti; Peng, Qiang

    2015-03-21

    In order to ascertain the different tolerances to chemical contaminants in one strain of Microcystis with different morphology, unicellular and colonial Microcystis in one strain was obtained from different conditions of light intensity and temperature. The samples were divided into 8 groups including control (no chemical addition), CuSO4, chloromycetin, and linear alkylbenzene sulfonatelas (LAS) treatments. The cell density, cell viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malonaldehyde of Microcystis were analyzed. It was observed that cell density of both unicellular and colonial Microcystis increased from the beginning to day-5 in the control and the CuSO4 treatments. However, the growth of Microcystis was significantly inhibited in the culture with chloromycetin and LAS treatments. Notably, the inhibition rate was significantly high in unicellular Microcystis relative to the colonial Microcystis. The esterase activity in all the treatments decreased dramatically relating to the control. In addition, the esterase activity in colonial Microcystis was significantly higher than that of the unicellular Microcystis in all the treatments. Although there were no significant differences in activities of SOD between the two morphologies in the control treatments, in all the other treatments, significant differences were observed. The results proved that colony formation of Microcystis could be considered as a strategy in response to chemical stress.

  4. ZO-1 controls endothelial adherens junctions, cell-cell tension, angiogenesis, and barrier formation.

    PubMed

    Tornavaca, Olga; Chia, Minghao; Dufton, Neil; Almagro, Lourdes Osuna; Conway, Daniel E; Randi, Anna M; Schwartz, Martin A; Matter, Karl; Balda, Maria S

    2015-03-16

    Intercellular junctions are crucial for mechanotransduction, but whether tight junctions contribute to the regulation of cell-cell tension and adherens junctions is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the tight junction protein ZO-1 regulates tension acting on VE-cadherin-based adherens junctions, cell migration, and barrier formation of primary endothelial cells, as well as angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. ZO-1 depletion led to tight junction disruption, redistribution of active myosin II from junctions to stress fibers, reduced tension on VE-cadherin and loss of junctional mechanotransducers such as vinculin and PAK2, and induced vinculin dissociation from the α-catenin-VE-cadherin complex. Claudin-5 depletion only mimicked ZO-1 effects on barrier formation, whereas the effects on mechanotransducers were rescued by inhibition of ROCK and phenocopied by JAM-A, JACOP, or p114RhoGEF down-regulation. ZO-1 was required for junctional recruitment of JACOP, which, in turn, recruited p114RhoGEF. ZO-1 is thus a central regulator of VE-cadherin-dependent endothelial junctions that orchestrates the spatial actomyosin organization, tuning cell-cell tension, migration, angiogenesis, and barrier formation.

  5. Carbon onions as nanoscopic pressure cells for diamond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banhart, F.; Ajayan, P. M.

    1996-08-01

    SPHERICAL particles of carbon consisting of concentric graphite-like shells ('carbon onions') can be formed by electron irradiation of graphitic carbon materials1,2. Here we report that, when such particles are heated to ~700 °C and irradiated with electrons, their cores can be transformed to diamond. Under these conditions the spacing between layers in the carbon onions decreases from 0.31 in the outer shells (slightly less than the 0.34-nm layer spacing of graphite) to about 0.22 nm in the core, indicating considerable compression towards the particle centres. We find that this compression allows diamond to nucleate-in effect the carbon onions act as nanoscopic pressure cells for diamond formation.

  6. Light induced polaron formation in perovskite solar cell devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirch, Amanda; Nie, Wanyi; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Tsai, Hsinhan; Chhowalla, Manish; Alam, Muhammad; Sfeir, Matthew; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky; Crochet, Jared; Gupta, Gautum; Mohite, Aditya; Tretiak, Sergei

    The need for a low-cost, clean, and abundant source of energy has generated large amounts of research in solution processed solar cell materials. The lead halide perovskite has rapidly developed as a serious candidate for the active layer of photovoltaic devices. The efficiencies of devices made with this material have increased from 3.5% to over 20% in around 5 years. Despite the remarkable progress associated with perovskite materials, there are still fundamental questions regarding their lack of photo-stability over prolonged solar irradiation that need to be addressed. Recent experiments on photo-degradation under constant illumination have found fast self-healing by resting the device in the dark for less than 1 minute. Density functional theory and symmetry analysis show that localized charge states couple to local structural lattice distortions and methyl ammonium quasistatic configurations. Once translational symmetry is lost, additional bonding configurations become symmetry allowed, triggering localized charges in the vicinity over time under constant illumination, thus seeding the formation of macroscopic charged domains and preventing efficient charge extraction. Here we present an in-depth study of polaron formation and binding energy at the atomistic level.

  7. Membrane tether formation from outer hair cells with optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Anvari, Bahman; Takashima, Masayoshi; Brecht, Peter; Torres, Jorge H; Brownell, William E

    2002-01-01

    Optical tweezers were used to characterize the mechanical properties of the outer hair cell (OHC) plasma membrane by pulling tethers with 4.5-microm polystyrene beads. Tether formation force and tether force were measured in static and dynamic conditions. A greater force was required for tether formations from OHC lateral wall (499 +/- 152 pN) than from OHC basal end (142 +/- 49 pN). The difference in the force required to pull tethers is consistent with an extensive cytoskeletal framework associated with the lateral wall known as the cortical lattice. The apparent plasma membrane stiffness, estimated under the static conditions by measuring tether force at different tether length, was 3.71 pN/microm for OHC lateral wall and 4.57 pN/microm for OHC basal end. The effective membrane viscosity was measured by pulling tethers at different rates while continuously recording the tether force, and estimated in the range of 2.39 to 5.25 pN x s/microm. The viscous force most likely results from the viscous interactions between plasma membrane lipids and the OHC cortical lattice and/or integral membrane proteins. The information these studies provide on the mechanical properties of the OHC lateral wall is important for understanding the mechanism of OHC electromotility. PMID:11867454

  8. An improved alkaline direct formate paper microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Tang, Catherine; Sotez, Samantha; Mendez, Alex; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Purohit, Krutarth; Pham, Linda; Haan, John; Gomez, Frank A

    2016-02-01

    Paper-based microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs) are a potential replacement for traditional FCs and batteries due to their low cost, portability, and simplicity to operate. In MFCs, separate solutions of fuel and oxidant migrate through paper due to capillary action and laminar flow and, upon contact with each other and catalyst, produce electricity. In the present work, we describe an improved microfluidic paper-based direct formate FC (DFFC) employing formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. The dimensions of the lateral column, current collectors, and cathode were optimized. A maximum power density of 2.53 mW/cm(2) was achieved with a DFFC of surface area 3.0 cm(2) , steel mesh as current collector, 5% carbon to paint mass ratio for cathode electrode and, 30% hydrogen peroxide. The longevity of the MFC's detailed herein is greater than eight hours with continuous flow of streams. In a series configuration, the MFCs generate sufficient energy to power light-emitting diodes and a handheld calculator.

  9. Human germ cell formation in xenotransplants of induced pluripotent stem cells carrying X chromosome aneuploidies

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Antonia A.; Chiang, H. Rosaria; Sukhwani, Meena; Orwig, Kyle E.; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2014-01-01

    Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial loss of the second sex chromosome and is characterized by spontaneous fetal loss in >90% of conceptions. Survivors possess an array of somatic and germline clinical characteristics. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer an opportunity for insight into genetic requirements of the X chromosome linked to Turner syndrome. We derived iPSCs from Turner syndrome and control individuals and examined germ cell development as a function of X chromosome composition. We demonstrate that two X chromosomes are not necessary for reprogramming or maintenance of pluripotency and that there are minimal differences in gene expression, at the single cell level, linked to X chromosome aneuploidies. Formation of germ cells, as assessed in vivo through a murine xenotransplantation model, indicated that undifferentiated iPSCs, independent of X chromosome composition, are capable of forming germ-cell-like cells (GCLCs) in vivo. In combination with clinical data regarding infertility in women with X chromosome aneuploidies, results suggest that two intact X chromosomes are not required for human germ cell formation, qualitatively or quantitatively, but rather are likely to be required for maintenance of human germ cells to adulthood. PMID:25242416

  10. Human germ cell formation in xenotransplants of induced pluripotent stem cells carrying X chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Antonia A; Chiang, H Rosaria; Sukhwani, Meena; Orwig, Kyle E; Reijo Pera, Renee A

    2014-09-22

    Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial loss of the second sex chromosome and is characterized by spontaneous fetal loss in >90% of conceptions. Survivors possess an array of somatic and germline clinical characteristics. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer an opportunity for insight into genetic requirements of the X chromosome linked to Turner syndrome. We derived iPSCs from Turner syndrome and control individuals and examined germ cell development as a function of X chromosome composition. We demonstrate that two X chromosomes are not necessary for reprogramming or maintenance of pluripotency and that there are minimal differences in gene expression, at the single cell level, linked to X chromosome aneuploidies. Formation of germ cells, as assessed in vivo through a murine xenotransplantation model, indicated that undifferentiated iPSCs, independent of X chromosome composition, are capable of forming germ-cell-like cells (GCLCs) in vivo. In combination with clinical data regarding infertility in women with X chromosome aneuploidies, results suggest that two intact X chromosomes are not required for human germ cell formation, qualitatively or quantitatively, but rather are likely to be required for maintenance of human germ cells to adulthood.

  11. Increased human hybridoma formation by electrofusion of human B cells with heteromyeloma SPAM-8 cells.

    PubMed

    Panova, I; Gustafsson, B

    1995-06-01

    A fusion protocol was designed for the optimal production of hybridomas following electrofusion of human B cells with cells of the heteromyeloma fusion partner SPAM-8. Peripheral blood lymphocytes showed an average fusion efficiency of 0.4 x 10(-4) whereas Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells showed fusion efficiencies ranging from 6.2 x 10(-4) to 9.0 x 10(-4). Similar results were obtained with bone marrow-derived lymphocytes. Trypsin treatment of the cells prior to electrofusion further increased the fusion efficiency to 12.3 x 10(-4). In comparison, conventional polyethylene glycol-induced fusion resulted in a fusion efficiency of 0.8 x 10(-4). Thus, electrofusion of human B cells with SPAM-8 heteromyeloma cells introduced a 15-fold increase in hybridoma formation as compared to the conventional fusion method.

  12. Myosin II-mediated cell shape changes and cell intercalation contribute to primitive streak formation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Sang, Helen M.; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; MacDonald, Michael P; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2016-01-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves large scale highly coordinated flows of over 100.000 cells in the epiblast. These large scale tissue flows and deformations can be correlated with specific anisotropic cell behaviours in the forming mesendoderm through a combined light-sheet microscopy and computational analysis. Relevant behaviours include apical contraction, elongation along the apical-basal axis followed by ingression as well as asynchronous directional cell intercalation of small groups of mesendoderm cells. Cell intercalation is associated with sequential, directional contraction of apical junctions, the onset, localisation and direction of which correlate strongly with the appearance of active Myosin II cables in aligned apical junctions in neighbouring cells. Use of a class specific Myosin inhibitors and gene specific knockdowns show that apical contraction and intercalation are Myosin II dependent and also reveal critical roles for Myosin I and Myosin V family members in the assembly of junctional Myosin II cables. PMID:25812521

  13. Dynamic Network Formation Using Ant Colony Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    global solver into a distributed solver where each network node independently assigned their network links. 1.3 Methodology Previous research into...the solution to the network topology is generated at the node level 10 and then consolidated and evaluated at a global level to properly evaluate...application. The specific MILP tool was XPRESS -MP which employs the dual simplex, primal simplex, or the Newton Barrier method to solve the relaxed linear

  14. Automatic counting and classification of bacterial colonies using hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection and counting of bacterial colonies on agar plates is a routine microbiology practice to get a rough estimate of the number of viable cells in a sample. There have been a variety of different automatic colony counting systems and software algorithms mainly based on color or gray-scale pictu...

  15. Increased presence of anti-HLA antibodies early after allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation compared with bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Valérie; Aupérin, Anne; Tayebi, Hakim; Chabod, Jacqueline; Saas, Philippe; Michalet, Mauricette; François, Sylvie; Garban, Frédéric; Giraud, Christine; Tramalloni, Dominique; Oubouzar, Nadia; Blaise, Didier; Kuentz, Matthieu; Robinet, Eric; Tiberghien, Pierre

    2002-08-15

    We have recently shown that the use of allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (PBHSCT), as compared with bone marrow transplantation (BMT), is associated with increased titers of antibodies (Abs) directed against red blood cell ABO antigens. To further evaluate the influence of a G-CSF-mobilized PBHSCT graft on alloimmune Ab responses, we examined the frequency of anti-HLA Abs after transplantation in the setting of the same randomized study, comparing PBHSCT with BMT in adults. Anti-HLA Ab presence was determined by complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay (CDC) and flow cytometry in the recipient before and 30 days after transplantation as well as in the donor before graft donation. The use of PBHSCT was significantly associated with increased detection of anti-HLA immunoglobulin G (IgG) Abs early after transplantation as evidenced by flow cytometry (11 of 24 versus 4 of 27 transplant recipients, P =.03) and, less so, by CDC (5 of 24 versus 1 of 27 transplant recipients, P =.09). The difference between PBHSCT and BMT was further heightened when analysis was restricted to anti-HLA IgG Ab-negative donor/recipient pairs. In such a setting, early anti-HLA Ab was never detected after BMT but was repeatedly detected after PBHSCT (flow cytometry, 6 of 18 versus 0 of 17 transplant recipients, P =.02; CDC, 4 of 23 versus 0 of 26 transplant recipients, P =.04). Importantly, the PBHSCT-associated increase in anti-HLA Ab detection was observed despite a reduction in the median number of platelet-transfusion episodes per patient in PBHSC transplant versus BM transplant recipients (3 platelet-transfusion episodes [range, 1-21] in PBHSCT group vs 6 platelet-transfusion episodes [range, 3-33] in the BMT group; P =.02). In conclusion, this study strongly suggests that G-CSF-mobilized PBHSCT results in an increased incidence of circulating anti-HLA Abs and further confirms that the use of such a

  16. Cartilage formation in the CELLS 'double bubble' hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, P. J.; Arizpe, Jorge; Montufar-Solis, Dina

    1991-01-01

    The CELLS experiment scheduled to be flown on the first International Microgravity Laboratory is designed to study the effect of microgravity on the cartilage formation, by measuring parameters of growth in a differentiating cartilage cell culture. This paper investigates the conditions for this experiment by studying cartilage differentiation in the 'bubble exchange' hardware with the 'double bubble' design in which the bubbles are joined by a flange which also overlays the gasket. Four types of double bubbles (or double gas permeable membranes) were tested: injection-molded bubbles 0.01- and 0.005-in. thick, and compression molded bubbles 0.015- and 0.01-in. thick. It was found that double bubble membranes of 0.005- and 0.010-in. thickness supported cartilage differentiation, while the 0.015-in. bubbles did not. It was also found that nodule count, used in this study as a parameter, is not the best measure of the amount of cartilage differentiation.

  17. Membrane electrolytic cell for minimizing hypochlorite and chlorate formation

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, D. L.; Justice, D. D.; Woodard Jr., K. E.

    1985-07-09

    An electrolytic cell for the electrolysis of an alkali metal chloride brine is comprised of an anode compartment and a cathode compartment separated by a cation exchange membrane. The anode is comprised of an unflattened expanded structure of a valve metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, tantalum, niobium, and alloys thereof. At least one side of the anode has as the electrochemically active surface an electrodeposited layer of a valve metal oxide. A plurality of cracks traverse the electrodeposited layer and a coating of a platinum metal group oxide covers the electrodeposited layer and substantially fills the cracks. The cationic exchange membrane is comprised of a laminated structure having a first surface adapted to contact an anolyte in which the ion exchange groups are predominately sulfonic acid groups. The first surface is also in contact with the electrochemically active surface of the anode. A second surface of the cation exchange membrane, adapted to contact a catholyte, has ion exchange groups which are predominately carboxylic acid groups. The cathode positioned in the cathode compartment is spaced apart from the cation exchange membrane. The cell operates with both a low chlorine overvoltage and a low oxygen overvoltage. During electrolysis of alkali metal chloride brines, the formation of hypochlorite and chlorate ions is minimized and the alkali metal hydroxides produced have low chlorate concentrations and are suitable for use without further treatment in chlorate-sensitive applications. Spent brine treatment is simplified and at reduced costs.

  18. Quantitative analysis of mRNA transcripts of Hox, SHH, PTCH, Wnt, and Fzd genes in canine hematopoietic progenitor cells and various in vitro colonies differentiated from the cells.

    PubMed

    Ide, Kaori; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Momoi, Yasuyuki; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Homeobox (Hox), Sonic hedgehog (SHH), and Wingless-type MMTV integration site family (Wnt) are known to modulate the self-renewal and expansion of hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells in humans and mice. Frizzled (Fzd) and Patched1 (PTCH1) represent the receptors of Wnt and SHH, respectively. In this study, the amounts of mRNA transcripts of the genes associated with the self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells, HoxB3, HoxB4, HoxA10, Wnt5a, Wnt2b, Fzd1, Fzd6, SHH, and PTCH1, were measured in canine unfractionated bone marrow cells, CD34-enriched cells, and various colony-forming units in culture (CFU-C). Partial cDNA sequences of these 9 canine genes were determined in this study. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was employed to indicate their relative amounts of mRNA transcripts. Amounts of mRNA transcripts of HoxB3, HoxA10, PTCH1, and Wnt5a genes in canine CD34-enriched cell fraction were significantly larger than those in the CD34-depleted cell fraction. Amounts of mRNA transcripts of HoxB3, HoxA10, PTCH1, Wnt5a, and Wnt2b genes in various CFU-C cells were significantly smaller than those in the seeded CD34-enriched cell fraction. These results suggested important roles of the products of these genes in self-renewal, expansion, and survival of hematopoietic progenitor cells in dogs as shown in humans and rodents.

  19. Effect of cell-substratum interaction on hemicyst formation by MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Rabito, C A; Tchao, R; Valentich, J; Leighton, J

    1980-06-01

    On impermeable substrata MDCK cells, a cell line derived from normal dog kidney, forms a confluent monolayer that is studded with numerous hemicysts. Previous studies with this cell line suggest that thes hemicysts develop as a result of active fluid accumulation between cell sheet and substratum. However, the formation of hemicysts as a multifocal phenomenon is still unexplained. The results presented here show that the hemicysts are not only expressions of active transport of solutes and water, but also of cell-substratum interaction. The increase in number and size of the hemicyst produced by dbcAMP may be explained by a decrease in the adhesive strength to substrata produced by this compound. Moreover, when the strength of the cell-substratum adhesion was increased the number of hemicysts was reduced or abolished. On the contrary, when this strength was reduced, larger hemicysts occurred, covering practically all the area available for growth. Results from cinematographic time lapse studies, showing that 90% of the area of the monolayer is able to produce hemicysts, also suggest that hemicyst formation as a multifocal phenomenon is more an expression of local variations in cell-substratum interaction than of regional changes in transepithelial active transport.

  20. Polymer Solar Cells: Solubility Controls Fiber Network Formation.

    PubMed

    van Franeker, Jacobus J; Heintges, Gaël H L; Schaefer, Charley; Portale, Giuseppe; Li, Weiwei; Wienk, Martijn M; van der Schoot, Paul; Janssen, René A J

    2015-09-16

    The photoactive layer of polymer solar cells is commonly processed from a four-component solution, containing a semiconducting polymer and a fullerene derivative dissolved in a solvent-cosolvent mixture. The nanoscale dimensions of the polymer-fullerene morphology that is formed upon drying determines the solar cell performance, but the fundamental processes that govern the size of the phase-separated polymer and fullerene domains are poorly understood. Here, we investigate morphology formation of an alternating copolymer of diketopyrrolopyrrole and a thiophene-phenyl-thiophene oligomer (PDPPTPT) with relatively long 2-decyltetradecyl (DT) side chains blended with [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester. During solvent evaporation the polymer crystallizes into a fibrous network. The typical width of these fibers is analyzed by quantification of transmission electron microscopic images, and is mainly determined by the solubility of the polymer in the cosolvent and the molecular weight of the polymer. A higher molecular weight corresponds to a lower solubility and film processing results in a smaller fiber width. Surprisingly, the fiber width is not related to the drying rate or the amount of cosolvent. We have made solar cells with fiber widths ranging from 28 to 68 nm and found an inverse relation between fiber width and photocurrent. Finally, by mixing two cosolvents, we develop a ternary solvent system to tune the fiber width. We propose a model based on nucleation-and-growth which can explain these measurements. Our results show that the width of the semicrystalline polymer fibers is not the result of a frozen dynamical state, but determined by the nucleation induced by the polymer solubility.

  1. Spheroid Formation of Hepatocarcinoma Cells in Microwells: Experiments and Monte Carlo Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Tabaei, Seyed R.; Park, Jae Hyeok; Na, Kyuhwan; Chung, Seok; Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of spherical aggregates during the growth of cell population has long been observed under various conditions. We observed the formation of such aggregates during proliferation of Huh-7.5 cells, a human hepatocarcinoma cell line, in a microfabricated low-adhesion microwell system (SpheroFilm; formed of mass-producible silicone elastomer) on the length scales up to 500 μm. The cell proliferation was also tracked with immunofluorescence staining of F-actin and cell proliferation marker Ki-67. Meanwhile, our complementary 3D Monte Carlo simulations, taking cell diffusion and division, cell-cell and cell-scaffold adhesion, and gravity into account, illustrate the role of these factors in the formation of spheroids. Taken together, our experimental and simulation results provide an integrative view of the process of spheroid formation for Huh-7.5 cells. PMID:27571565

  2. Self-organization and advective transport in the cell polarity formation for asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-07

    Anterior-Posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which depends not only on the several genetic process but also biochemical and biophysical interactions. The mechanism of AP formation of Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is characterized into the three processes: (i) membrane association and dissociation of posterior and anterior proteins, (ii) diffusion into the membrane and cytosol, and (iii) active cortical and cytoplasmic flows induced by the contraction of the acto-myosin cortex. We explored the mechanism of symmetry breaking and AP polarity formation using self-recruitment model of posterior proteins. We found that the AP polarity pattern is established over wide range in the total mass of polarity proteins and the diffusion ratio in the cytosol to the membrane. We also showed that the advective transport in both membrane and cytosol during the establishment phase affects optimal time interval of establishment and positioning of the posterior domain, and plays a role to increase the robustness in the AP polarity formation by reducing the number of posterior domains for the sensitivity of initial conditions. We also demonstrated that a proper ratio of the total mass to cell size robustly regulate the length scale of the posterior domain.

  3. In vivo differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into neural stem cells by chimera formation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun Woo; Hong, Yean Ju; Kim, Jong Soo; Song, Hyuk; Cho, Ssang Gu; Bae, Hojae; Kim, Changsung; Byun, Sung June; Do, Jeong Tae

    2017-01-01

    Like embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can differentiate into all three germ layers in an in vitro system. Here, we developed a new technology for obtaining neural stem cells (NSCs) from iPSCs through chimera formation, in an in vivo environment. iPSCs contributed to the neural lineage in the chimera, which could be efficiently purified and directly cultured as NSCs in vitro. The iPSC-derived, in vivo-differentiated NSCs expressed NSC markers, and their gene-expression pattern more closely resembled that of fetal brain-derived NSCs than in vitro-differentiated NSCs. This system could be applied for differentiating pluripotent stem cells into specialized cell types whose differentiation protocols are not well established. PMID:28141814

  4. Graft-versus-host reaction and immune function. IV. B cell functional defect associated with a depletion of splenic colony-forming units in marrow of graft-versus-host-reactive mice

    SciTech Connect

    Seddik, M.; Seemayer, T.A.; Lapp, W.S.

    1986-02-01

    Studies were conducted to determine whether a functional B cell defect occurred in the bone marrow of mice experiencing a GVH reaction (GVHBM). GVH reactions were induced in AxCBA F1 adult mice by an injection of A strain lymphoid cells. The GVH reaction was confirmed by immunosuppression and thymus histology. At various intervals after GVH induction, GVHBM was tested for its ability to restore B cell function in adult thymectomized irradiated mice reconstituted with normal thymocytes. GVHBM cells obtained seven days after GVH induction restored but slightly the plaque forming cell (PFC) response to sheep erythrocytes and the mitogen response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GVHBM cells obtained 10 days or later failed to reconstitute the PFC or LPS responses. GVHBM cells suppressed neither the T or B cell function of normal spleen cells nor the LPS mitogen response of normal bone marrow cells. In addition, the splenic colony-forming units (CFU-s) in GVHBM were slightly decreased by day 10 after GVH induction and markedly depressed by day 22 after GVH induction. These results suggest that the GVH reaction may affect two different events in B cell differentiation. The early decrease in functional B cells that occurs before there is any change in the CFU-s population suggests a direct effect on B cell production, whereas the later absence of functional B cells could be due to the marked decline in stem cell production (CFU-s).

  5. Colony image acquisition and genetic segmentation algorithm and colony analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.

    2012-01-01

    Colony anaysis is used in a large number of engineerings such as food, dairy, beverages, hygiene, environmental monitoring, water, toxicology, sterility testing. In order to reduce laboring and increase analysis acuracy, many researchers and developers have made efforts for image analysis systems. The main problems in the systems are image acquisition, image segmentation and image analysis. In this paper, to acquire colony images with good quality, an illumination box was constructed. In the box, the distances between lights and dishe, camra lens and lights, and camera lens and dishe are adjusted optimally. In image segmentation, It is based on a genetic approach that allow one to consider the segmentation problem as a global optimization,. After image pre-processing and image segmentation, the colony analyses are perfomed. The colony image analysis consists of (1) basic colony parameter measurements; (2) colony size analysis; (3) colony shape analysis; and (4) colony surface measurements. All the above visual colony parameters can be selected and combined together, used to make a new engineeing parameters. The colony analysis can be applied into different applications.

  6. Patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast colonies via magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tenório, Rômulo P; Barros, Wilson

    2017-01-23

    We report the use of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods to observe pattern formation in colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results indicate substantial signal loss localized in specific regions of the colony rendering useful imaging contrast. This imaging contrast is recognizable as being due to discontinuities in magnetic susceptibility (χ) between different spatial regions. At the microscopic pixel level, the local variations in the magnetic susceptibility (Δχ) induce a loss in the NMR signal, which was quantified via T2 and T2* maps, permitting estimation of Δχ values for different regions of the colony. Interestingly the typical petal/wrinkling patterns present in the colony have a high degree of correlation with the estimated susceptibility distribution. We conclude that the presence of magnetic susceptibility inclusions, together with their spatial arrangement within the colony, may be a potential cause of the susceptibility distribution and therefore the contrast observed on the images.