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Sample records for cell culture assay

  1. Biochemical Assays of Cultured Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subpopulations of human embryonic kidney cells isolated from continuous flow electrophoresis experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas and on STS-8 have been analyzed. These analyses have included plasminogen activator assays involving indirect methodology on fibrin plated and direct methodology using chromogenic substrates. Immunological studies were performed and the conditioned media for erythropoietin activity and human granulocyte colony stimulating (HGCSF) activity was analyzed.

  2. LINE-1 Cultured Cell Retrotransposition Assay.

    PubMed

    Kopera, Huira C; Larson, Peter A; Moldovan, John B; Richardson, Sandra R; Liu, Ying; Moran, John V

    2016-01-01

    The Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition assay has facilitated the discovery and characterization of active (i.e., retrotransposition-competent) LINE-1 sequences from mammalian genomes. In this assay, an engineered LINE-1 containing a retrotransposition reporter cassette is transiently transfected into a cultured cell line. Expression of the reporter cassette, which occurs only after a successful round of retrotransposition, allows the detection and quantification of the LINE-1 retrotransposition efficiency. This assay has yielded insight into the mechanism of LINE-1 retrotransposition. It also has provided a greater understanding of how the cell regulates LINE-1 retrotransposition and how LINE-1 retrotransposition impacts the structure of mammalian genomes. Below, we provide a brief introduction to LINE-1 biology and then detail how the LINE-1 retrotransposition assay is performed in cultured mammalian cells.

  3. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  4. Microcystis aeruginosa toxin: cell culture toxicity, hemolysis, and mutagenicity assays.

    PubMed Central

    Grabow, W O; Du Randt, W C; Prozesky, O W; Scott, W E

    1982-01-01

    Crude toxin was prepared by lyophilization and extraction of toxic Microcystis aeruginosa from four natural sources and a unicellular laboratory culture. The responses of cultures of liver (Mahlavu and PCL/PRF/5), lung (MRC-5), cervix (HeLa), ovary (CHO-K1), and kidney (BGM, MA-104, and Vero) cell lines to these preparations did not differ significantly from one another, indicating that toxicity was not specific for liver cells. The results of a trypan blue staining test showed that the toxin disrupted cell membrane permeability within a few minutes. Human, mouse, rat, sheep, and Muscovy duck erythrocytes were also lysed within a few minutes. Hemolysis was temperature dependent, and the reaction seemed to follow first-order kinetics. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, and Tetrahymena pyriformis were not significantly affected by the toxin. The toxin yielded negative results in Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity assays. Microtiter cell culture, trypan blue, and hemolysis assays for Microcystis toxin are described. The effect of the toxin on mammalian cell cultures was characterized by extensive disintegration of cells and was distinguishable from the effects of E. coli enterotoxin, toxic chemicals, and pesticides. A possible reason for the acute lethal effect of Microcystis toxin, based on cytolytic activity, is discussed. Images PMID:6808921

  5. Development of an Easy and High-Throughput Cell Assay System with a Culture Chip and an Assay Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kanako; Kaji, Noritada; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tokeshi, Manabu; Baba, Yoshinobu

    High throughput cell assay is significantly important in drug screening, assessment of toxicity etc. Cell assay with a microchip is one of the candidates for high throughput cell assay. However, reported cell assay system with the microchip requires expensive apparatus for refluxing medium and investigation of optimum experimental condition for steady data. For an inexpensive, easy and high throughput cell assay, we introduce a new cell assay system combined with a culture chip and an assay chip made of poly(dimethyl siloxane). Cell culture chips enabled cell to proliferate along the microchannel without refluxing medium and permitted to prepare cell patterning easily. Also, assay chips formed concentration gradient inside the chip and allowed the cell assay with different concentrations of drug at the same time. Thus, our developed cell assay system can overcome the problems of the present cell assay and would promote the drug discovery, assessment of toxicity etc.

  6. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays.

    PubMed

    Straub, T M; Hutchison, J R; Bartholomew, R A; Valdez, C O; Valentine, N B; Dohnalkova, A; Ozanich, R M; Bruckner-Lea, C J

    2013-01-01

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that lead to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be (1) of human gastrointestinal origin, (2) expresses apical microvilli, and (3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log(10) increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. In our hands, using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using qRT-PCR that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  7. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-01-10

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that leads to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be 1) of human gastrointestinal origin, 2) expresses apical microvilli, and 3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log10 increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. Using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  8. A cell culture assay for the detection of cardiotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Loew-Friedrich, Iv.; von Bredow, F.; Schoeppe, W. )

    1991-04-01

    An important step in minimizing the number of animal experiments in medical research is the study of in vitro model systems. The authors propose the use of shock protein formation, which is a cellular response to cell-damaging stress as an assay to monitor cardiotoxicity. Isolated and cultured cardiac myocytes were prepared by a trypsin digestion method from 18-day-old fetal mice. These cells respond to typical substances inducing shock protein formation in other cellular systems as well as to known cardiotoxins with the de novo synthesis of shock proteins. Pharmaceuticals relevant in transplant medicine were tested for possible cardiotoxic effects: Cyclosporine A evokes shock protein formation at subtherapeutic concentrations. Azathioprine and methyl-prednisolone exert the same effect but at concentration ranges highly above the therapeutic level. The ability to induce shock protein synthesis obviously seems to be restricted to toxic drugs. The data presented demonstrate that the proposed in vitro model system for cardiotoxicity is animal saving and sensitive.

  9. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  10. Assay of anticancer drugs in tissue culture: cell cultures of biopsies from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D; Freshney, R I; Darling, J L; Thomas, D G; Celik, F

    1983-02-01

    A method has been developed for measuring the drug sensitivity of human gliomas in short-term culture, using scintillation counting or autofluorography. Cell cultures prepared from malignant astrocytomas were treated with anticancer drugs whilst in exponential growth in microtitration plates. After drug treatment and a recovery period, residual viability was measured by [3H] leucine incorporation followed by scintillation counting or by [35S] methionine incorporation and autofluorography in situ. In 5 glioma cell lines tested against 6 drugs, the microtitration method correlated well with monolayer cloning. Although replicate samples of the same tumour showed little variation in chemosensitivity, there was marked variation between the chemosensitivities of cultures derived from the tumours of different patients. However, as variability between replicates was apparent during drug exposure or shortly after, it is important to allow the assay to run as long as possible after drug removal. It is hoped that this assay may provide the basis of a method for the prediction of in vivo chemosensitivity or the screening of potential chemotherapeutic drugs.

  11. Assay of anticancer drugs in tissue culture: cell cultures of biopsies from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, D.; Freshney, R. I.; Darling, J. L.; Thomas, D. G.; Celik, F.

    1983-01-01

    A method has been developed for measuring the drug sensitivity of human gliomas in short-term culture, using scintillation counting or autofluorography. Cell cultures prepared from malignant astrocytomas were treated with anticancer drugs whilst in exponential growth in microtitration plates. After drug treatment and a recovery period, residual viability was measured by [3H] leucine incorporation followed by scintillation counting or by [35S] methionine incorporation and autofluorography in situ. In 5 glioma cell lines tested against 6 drugs, the microtitration method correlated well with monolayer cloning. Although replicate samples of the same tumour showed little variation in chemosensitivity, there was marked variation between the chemosensitivities of cultures derived from the tumours of different patients. However, as variability between replicates was apparent during drug exposure or shortly after, it is important to allow the assay to run as long as possible after drug removal. It is hoped that this assay may provide the basis of a method for the prediction of in vivo chemosensitivity or the screening of potential chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:6297528

  12. Heat-transfer-method-based cell culture quality assay through cell detection by surface imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Eersels, Kasper; van Grinsven, Bart; Khorshid, Mehran; Somers, Veerle; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph; Barth, Stefan; Diliën, Hanne; Bos, Gerard M J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; Cleij, Thomas J; Thoelen, Ronald; De Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick

    2015-02-17

    Previous work has indicated that surface imprinted polymers (SIPs) allow for highly specific cell detection through macromolecular cell imprints. The combination of SIPs with a heat-transfer-based read-out technique has led to the development of a selective, label-free, low-cost, and user-friendly cell detection assay. In this study, the breast cancer cell line ZR-75-1 is used to assess the potential of the platform for monitoring the quality of a cell culture in time. For this purpose, we show that the proposed methodology is able to discriminate between the original cell line (adherent growth, ZR-75-1a) and a descendant cell line (suspension growth, ZR-75-1s). Moreover, ZR-75-1a cells were cultured for a prolonged period of time and analyzed using the heat-transfer method (HTM) at regular time intervals. The results of these experiments demonstrate that the thermal resistance (Rth) signal decays after a certain number of cell culture passages. This can likely be attributed to a compromised quality of the cell culture due to cross-contamination with the ZR-75-1s cell line, a finding that was confirmed by classical STR DNA profiling. The cells do not express the same functional groups on their membrane, resulting in a weaker bond between cell and imprint, enabling cell removal by mechanical friction, provided by flushing the measuring chamber with buffer solution. These findings were further confirmed by HTM and illustrate that the biomimetic sensor platform can be used as an assay for monitoring the quality of cell cultures in time.

  13. Gonococcal and meningococcal pathogenesis as defined by human cell, cell culture, and organ culture assays.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, D S

    1989-01-01

    Human cells, cell cultures, and organ cultures have been extremely useful for studying the events that occur when gonococci and meningococci encounter human mucosal surfaces. The specificity and selectivity of these events for human cells are striking and correlate with the adaptation of these pathogens for survival on human mucous membranes. To colonize these sites, meningococci and gonococci have developed mechanisms to damage local host defenses such as the mucociliary blanket, to attach to epithelial cells, and to invade these cells. Attachment to epithelial cells mediated by pili, and to some types of cells mediated by PIIs, serves to anchor the organism close to sources of nutrition and allows multiplication. Intracellular invasion, possibly initiated by the major porin protein, may provide additional nutritional support and protection from host defenses. Mucosal invasion may also result in access of gonococci and meningococci to the bloodstream, leading to dissemination. Images PMID:2497953

  14. AFBI assay – Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, William H.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2016-01-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  15. Isolation, Culture, Functional Assays, and Immunofluorescence of Myofiber-Associated Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Thomas O; Gadek, Katherine E; Cadwallader, Adam B; Elston, Tiffany L; Olwin, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, regenerate and repair the functional contractile cells in adult skeletal muscle called myofibers. Satellite cells reside in a niche between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers. Isolating single myofibers and their associated satellite cells provides a culture system that partially mimics the in vivo environment. We describe methods for isolating and culturing intact individual myofibers and their associated satellite cells from the mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle. Following dissection and isolation of individual myofibers we provide protocols for myofiber transplantation, satellite cell transfection, immune detection of satellite cell antigens, and assays to examine satellite cell self-renewal and proliferation.

  16. Use of an aqueous soluble tetrazolium/formazan assay for cell growth assays in culture.

    PubMed

    Cory, A H; Owen, T C; Barltrop, J A; Cory, J G

    1991-07-01

    A new tetrazolium analog of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) was evaluated as a substitute for MTT in the microculture screening assay for in vitro cell growth. This new tetrazolium compound, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2- (4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS), in the presence of phenazine methosulfate (PMS), gave a water-soluble formazan product that had an absorbance maximum at 490-500 nm in phosphate-buffered saline. The amount of colored product formed was proportional to the number of cells and the time of incubation of the cells with MTS/PMS. MTS/PMS was reactive in all the cell lines tested which included mouse leukemia L1210 cells, mouse Ehrlich tumor cells, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, and human colon tumor cells (HT-29). HT-29 and 3T3 fibroblasts reduced MTS/PMS more efficiently than they reduced MTT. Comparable to the amount of product formed from MTT, MTS/PMS gave excellent product formation. The IC50 value for pyrazoloimidazole obtained using MTS/PMS was 200 microM; for 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, the IC50 value was 0.9 nM. These values compared very favorably with the IC50 values obtained by direct cell counts. Further, the same IC50 values were obtained when the absorbances of the formazan product in the 96-well plates were determined after different times of incubation.

  17. Radioimmunofocus assay for quantitation of hepatitis A virus in cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, S M; Binn, L N; Marchwicki, R H

    1983-01-01

    A new method is described for the quantitation of hepatitis A virus in cell cultures, based on the immune autoradiographic detection of foci of infected cells (radioimmunofoci) developing beneath an agarose overlay 14 days after the inoculation of petri dish cultures of continuous African green monkey kidney cells (BS-C-1). The number of foci developing in each culture was linearly related to the dose of hepatitis A virus (either HM-175 or PA-21 strain) inoculated. Focus development was prevented by prior incubation of virus with specific antisera, and the specificity of the radiolabeled antibody reaction was confirmed in competitive blocking experiments. This new assay method retains many of the advantages of conventional plaque assays for virus. Compared with existing end-dilution methods for the quantitation of hepatitis A virus, the radioimmunofocus assay offers greatly improved accuracy and comparable sensitivity, yet is relatively rapid and highly conservative of reagents. Images PMID:6306048

  18. Microfluidic cell culture chip with multiplexed medium delivery and efficient cell/scaffold loading mechanisms for high-throughput perfusion 3-dimensional cell culture-based assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song-Bin; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Shih-Siou; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2011-06-01

    This study reports a microfluidic cell culture chip consisting of 48 microbioreactors for high-throughput perfusion 3-dimensional (3-D) cell culture-based assays. Its advantages include the capability for multiplexed and backflow-free medium delivery, and both efficient and high-throughput micro-scale, 3-D cell culture construct loading. In this work, the microfluidic cell culture chip is fabricated using two major processes, specifically, a computer-numerical-controlled (CNC) mold machining process and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replication process. The chip is composed of micropumps, microbioreactors, connecting microchannels and a cell/agarose scaffold loading mechanism. The performance of the new pneumatic micropumps and the cell/agarose scaffold loading mechanism has been experimentally evaluated. The experimental results show that this proposed multiplexed medium-pumping design is able to provide a uniform pumping rate ranging from 1.5 to 298.3 μl hr(-1) without any fluid backflow and the resultant medium contamination. In addition, the simple cell/agarose loading method has been proven to be able to load the 3-D cell culture construct uniformly and efficiently in all 48 microbioreactors investigated. Furthermore, a micro-scale, perfusion, 3-D cell culture-based assay has been successfully demonstrated using this proposed cell culture chip. The experimental results are also compared to a similar evaluation using a conventional static 3-D cell culture with a larger scale culture. It is concluded that the choice of a cell culture format can influence assay results. As a whole, because of the inherent advantages of a miniaturized perfusion 3-D cell culture assay, the cell culture chip not only can provide a stable, well-defined and more biologically-meaningful culture environment, but it also features a low consumption of research resources. Moreover, due to the integrated medium pumping mechanism and the simple cell/agarose loading method, this chip is

  19. Longitudinal multiparameter assay of lymphocyte interactions from onset by microfluidic cell pairing and culture

    PubMed Central

    Dura, Burak; Servos, Mariah M.; Barry, Rachel M.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Dougan, Stephanie K.; Voldman, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Resolving how the early signaling events initiated by cell–cell interactions are transduced into diverse functional outcomes necessitates correlated measurements at various stages. Typical approaches that rely on bulk cocultures and population-wide correlations, however, only reveal these relationships broadly at the population level, not within each individual cell. Here, we present a microfluidics-based cell–cell interaction assay that enables longitudinal investigation of lymphocyte interactions at the single-cell level through microfluidic cell pairing, on-chip culture, and multiparameter assays, and allows recovery of desired cell pairs by micromanipulation for off-chip culture and analyses. Well-defined initiation of interactions enables probing cellular responses from the very onset, permitting single-cell correlation analyses between early signaling dynamics and later-stage functional outcomes within same cells. We demonstrate the utility of this microfluidic assay with natural killer cells interacting with tumor cells, and our findings suggest a possible role for the strength of early calcium signaling in selective coordination of subsequent cytotoxicity and IFN-gamma production. Collectively, our experiments demonstrate that this new approach is well-suited for resolving the relationships between complex immune responses within each individual cell. PMID:27303033

  20. Different sensitivities of cultured mammalian cells towards aphidicolin-enhanced DNA effects in the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Schütz, Petra; Bausinger, Julia

    2016-06-01

    The comet assay in combination with the polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin (APC) has been used to measure DNA excision repair activity, DNA repair kinetics and individual DNA repair capacity. Since APC can enhance genotoxic effects of mutagens measured by the comet assay, this approach has been proposed for increasing the sensitivity of the comet assay in human biomonitoring. The APC-modified comet assay has mainly been performed with human blood and it was shown that it not only enhances the detection of DNA damage repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER) but also damage typically repaired by base excision repair (BER). Recently, we reported that in contrast to blood leukocytes, A549 cells (a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line) seem to be insensitive towards the repair-inhibiting action of APC. To further elucidate the general usefulness of the APC-modified comet assay for studying repair in cultured mammalian cells, we comparatively investigated further cell lines (HeLa, TK6, V79). DNA damage was induced by BPDE (benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide) and MMS (methyl methanesulfonate) in the absence and presence of APC (3 or 15μM). APC was either added for 2h together with the mutagen or cells were pre-incubated for 30min with APC before the mutagen was added. The results indicate that the cell lines tested differ fundamentally with regard to their sensitivity and specificity towards the repair-inhibiting effect of APC. The actual cause for these differences is still unclear but potential molecular explanations are discussed. Irrespective of the underlying mechanism(s), our study revealed practical limitations of the use of the APC-modified comet assay.

  1. Simplification of aggregate culture of human mesenchymal stem cells as a chondrogenic screening assay.

    PubMed

    Welter, Jean F; Solchaga, Luis A; Penick, Kitsie J

    2007-06-01

    Aggregate culture provides a three-dimensional (3-D) environment for differentiating or differentiated cells; it is particularly useful to study in vitro chondrogenesis and cartilage biology. We have recently ported this method from a conical tube-based format to a 96-well plate format for the study of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis. The microplate format has greatly reduced the workload and materials cost, while maintaining reproducible chondrogenic differentiation. A long-term goal is to fully automate aggregate culture--this requires critically identifying all the indispensable steps of the protocol. Robotic laboratory equipment for manipulating microplate assays are commercially available; however centrifugation steps are difficult to implement automatically. We, therefore, tested whether the centrifugation step can be eliminated, thus significantly streamlining the assay workflow. By comparing aggregates prepared from human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hMSCs) that were formed either through centrifugation or through free sedimentation, we found that both methods produce aggregates with similar formation kinetics, and that there was no perceptible difference in the timing of the appearance of markers of chondrogenesis. Thus, it appears safe to eliminate the centrifugation step from the aggregate culture protocol. This results in significant time and effort savings and paves the way for future full automation of the aggregate assay.

  2. Microfluidic assay for simultaneous culture of multiple cell types on surfaces or within hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoojin; Han, Sewoon; Jeon, Jessie S.; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Sudo, Ryo; Kamm, Roger D.; Chung, Seok

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes a simple but robust microfluidic assay combining three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. The microfluidic platform comprises hydrogel incorporating chambers between surface-accessible microchannels. Using this platform, well-defined biochemical and biophysical stimuli can be applied to multiple cell types interacting over distances of <1mm, thereby replicating many aspects of the in vivo microenvironment. Capabilities exist for time-dependent manipulation of flows and concentration gradients as well as high-resolution real-time imaging for observing spatial-temporal single cell behavior, cell-cell communication, cell-matrix interactions and cell population dynamics. These heterotypic cell type assays can be used to study cell survival, proliferation, migration, morphogenesis and differentiation under controlled conditions. Applications include the study of previously unexplored cellular interactions, and have already provided new insights into how biochemical and biophysical factors regulate interactions between populations of different cell types. It takes 3 days to fabricate the system and experiments can run for up to several weeks. PMID:22678430

  3. Comparison of in vitro cell culture and a mouse assay for measuring infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Rochelle, Paul A; Marshall, Marilyn M; Mead, Jan R; Johnson, Anne M; Korich, Dick G; Rosen, Jeffrey S; De Leon, Ricardo

    2002-08-01

    In vitro cell cultures were compared to neonatal mice for measuring the infectivity of five genotype 2 isolates of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocyst doses were enumerated by flow cytometry and delivered to animals and cell monolayers by using standardized procedures. Each dose of oocysts was inoculated into up to nine replicates of 9 to 12 mice or 6 to 10 cell culture wells. Infections were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining in CD-1 mice, by reverse transcriptase PCR in HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells, and by immunofluorescence microscopy in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Infectivity was expressed as a logistic transformation of the proportion of animals or cell culture wells that developed infection at each dose. In most instances, the slopes of the dose-response curves were not significantly different when we compared the infectivity models for each isolate. The 50% infective doses for the different isolates varied depending on the method of calculation but were in the range from 16 to 347 oocysts for CD-1 mice and in the ranges from 27 to 106, 31 to 629, and 13 to 18 oocysts for HCT-8, Caco-2, and MDCK cells, respectively. The average standard deviations for the percentages of infectivity for all replicates of all isolates were 13.9, 11.5, 13.2, and 10.7% for CD-1 mice, HCT-8 cells, Caco-2 cells, and MDCK cells, respectively, demonstrating that the levels of variability were similar in all assays. There was a good correlation between the average infectivity for HCT-8 cells and the results for CD-1 mice across all isolates for untreated oocysts (r = 0.85, n = 25) and for oocysts exposed to ozone and UV light (r = 0.89, n = 29). This study demonstrated that in vitro cell culture was equivalent to the "gold standard," mouse infectivity, for measuring the infectivity of C. parvum and should therefore be considered a practical and accurate alternative for assessing oocyst infectivity and inactivation. However, the high levels of variability displayed by all

  4. Cell viability assays: introduction.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of cell viability plays a fundamental role in all forms of cell culture. Sometimes it is the main purpose of the experiment, such as in toxicity assays. Alternatively, cell viability can be used to -correlate cell behaviour to cell number, providing a more accurate picture of, for example, anabolic -activity. There are wide arrays of cell viability methods which range from the most routine trypan blue dye exclusion assay to highly complex analysis of individual cells, such as using RAMAN microscopy. The cost, speed, and complexity of equipment required will all play a role in determining the assay used. This chapter aims to provide an overview of many of the assays available today.

  5. Clonogenic Assay: Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafehi, Haloom; Orlowski, Christian; Georgiadis, George T.; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C.

    2011-01-01

    The clonogenic (or colony forming) assay has been established for more than 50 years; the original paper describing the technique was published in 19561. Apart from documenting the method, the initial landmark study generated the first radiation-dose response curve for X-ray irradiated mammalian (HeLa) cells in culture1. Basically, the clonogenic assay enables an assessment of the differences in reproductive viability (capacity of cells to produce progeny; i.e. a single cell to form a colony of 50 or more cells) between control untreated cells and cells that have undergone various treatments such as exposure to ionising radiation, various chemical compounds (e.g. cytotoxic agents) or in other cases genetic manipulation. The assay has become the most widely accepted technique in radiation biology and has been widely used for evaluating the radiation sensitivity of different cell lines. Further, the clonogenic assay is commonly used for monitoring the efficacy of radiation modifying compounds and for determining the effects of cytotoxic agents and other anti-cancer therapeutics on colony forming ability, in different cell lines. A typical clonogenic survival experiment using adherent cells lines involves three distinct components, 1) treatment of the cell monolayer in tissue culture flasks, 2) preparation of single cell suspensions and plating an appropriate number of cells in petri dishes and 3) fixing and staining colonies following a relevant incubation period, which could range from 1-3 weeks, depending on the cell line. Here we demonstrate the general procedure for performing the clonogenic assay with adherent cell lines with the use of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (FEP-1811)2. Also, our aims are to describe common features of clonogenic assays including calculation of the plating efficiency and survival fractions after exposure of cells to radiation, and to exemplify modification of radiation-response with the use of a natural antioxidant

  6. RT-PCR and cell culture infectivity assay to detect enteroviruses during drinking water treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Ali, M A; El-Esnawy, N A; Shoaeb, A R; Ibraheim, M; El-Hawaary, S E

    1999-01-01

    In this study, 62 water samples were collected from two water treatment plants (WTPs) in Suez Canal cities (Port Said and Ismaillia) and one plant in Cairo (Giza WTP) in addition to the beginning of the two Nile river branches (Rosetta and Damietta). Viruses were concentrated by adsorption-elution ethod sing 142 mm-diameter nitrocellulose membrane of 0.45 microm pore size and eluted with 3% beef extract at pH 9.5. The concentrated samples were inoculated for 3 successive passages in three cell culture types (Vero, BGM and RD). Enterovirus RNAs in CPE-induced samples were extracted by guanidinium thiocyanate/ phenol/chloroform and heat shock methods and detected by RT-PCR and neutralization test. The results showed that eight samples [14.5% (8/62)] contained enteroviruses most of them were polioviruses [87.5% (7/8)] and coxsackievirus type B2 [12.5% (1/8)]. The three cell cultures were of the same sensitivity to detect the isolated viruses. Also, RT-PCR followed by neutralization assay facilitates and accelerate the results. The guanidinium thiocyanate extraction method was more sensitive than heat shock method. The results turned our attention to review our technology of water treatment and disinfection step in addition to the selection of suitable intake for the drinking water treatment plants.

  7. B cell helper assays.

    PubMed

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  8. The Unreliability of MTT Assay in the Cytotoxic Test of Primary Cultured Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hwa Yeon; Kim, Yona; Park, Hyung Woo; Moon, Hyo Eun; Bae, Seongtae; Kim, JinWook; Kim, Dong Gyu; Paek, Sun Ha

    2015-09-01

    MTT assay is commonly used to assess the cellular cytotoxicity caused by anticancer drugs in glioblastomas. However, there have been some reports insisting that MTT assay exhibited non-specific intracellular reduction of tetrazolium which led to underestimated results of cytotoxicity. Here, we examine whether or not MTT assay can lead to incorrect information regarding alcohol-induced cytotoxicity on immortalized and primary glioblastoma cells. MTT assay was applied to assess the ethanol-induced cytotoxicity at various ethanol concentrations. The cellular cytotoxicity induced by different doses of ethanol was analyzed and compared through several cytotoxic assays. Ethanol-induced cytotoxicity observed through MTT assay on both cell types was shown to be ethanol dose-dependent below a 3% concentration. However, the cytotoxicity was shown to be markedly underestimated only in primary cells at a 5% concentration. RT-PCR and Western Blot showed increased expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins and decreased expressions of anti-apoptotic proteins in an ethanol dose-dependent manner in both cell types. Furthermore, we present a possible mechanism for the unreliable result of MTT assay. A high concentration of ethanol induces more severe membrane damage and increased intracellular concentration of NADH in primary cells which enhances the nonspecific reduction of tetrazolium salt. Together, our findings demonstrate that the cytotoxicity on primary cells could inaccurately be assessed when detected through MTT assay. Therefore, a careful interpretation is needed when one would analyze the cytotoxic results of MTT assay, and it is suggested that other assays must be accompanied to produce more reliable and accurate cytotoxic results on primary glioblastoma cells.

  9. Paired image- and FACS-based toxicity assays for high content screening of spheroid-type tumor cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Trumpi, Kari; Egan, David A; Vellinga, Thomas T; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Kranenburg, Onno

    2015-01-01

    Novel spheroid-type tumor cell cultures directly isolated from patients' tumors preserve tumor characteristics better than traditionally grown cell lines. However, such cultures are not generally used for high-throughput toxicity drug screens. In addition, the assays that are commonly used to assess drug-induced toxicity in such screens usually measure a proxy for cell viability such as mitochondrial activity or ATP-content per culture well, rather than actual cell death. This generates considerable assay-dependent differences in the measured toxicity values. To address this problem we developed a robust method that documents drug-induced toxicity on a per-cell, rather than on a per-well basis. The method involves automated drug dispensing followed by paired image- and FACS-based analysis of cell death and cell cycle changes. We show that the two methods generate toxicity data in 96-well format which are highly concordant. By contrast, the concordance of these methods with frequently used well-based assays was generally poor. The reported method can be implemented on standard automated microscopes and provides a low-cost approach for accurate and reproducible high-throughput toxicity screens in spheroid type cell cultures. Furthermore, the high versatility of both the imaging and FACS platforms allows straightforward adaptation of the high-throughput experimental setup to include fluorescence-based measurement of additional cell biological parameters.

  10. Exploring the dark side of MTT viability assay of cells cultured onto electrospun PLGA-based composite nanofibrous scaffolding materials.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ruiling; Shen, Mingwu; Cao, Xueyan; Guo, Rui; Tian, Xuejiao; Yu, Jianyong; Shi, Xiangyang

    2011-07-21

    One major method used to evaluate the biocompatibility of porous tissue engineering scaffolding materials is MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The MTT cell viability assay is based on the absorbance of the dissolved MTT formazan crystals formed in living cells, which is proportional to the number of viable cells. Due to the strong dye sorption capability of porous scaffolding materials, we propose that the cell viability determined from the MTT assay is likely to give a false negative result. In this study, we aim to explore the effect of the adsorption of MTT formazan on the accuracy of the viability assay of cells cultured onto porous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers, HNTs (halloysite nanotubes)/PLGA, and CNTs (multiwalled carbon nanotubes)/PLGA composite nanofibrous mats. The morphology of electrospun nanofibers and L929 mouse fibroblasts cultured onto the nanofibrous scaffolds were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The viability of cells proliferated for 3 days was evaluated through the MTT assay. In the meantime, the adsorption of MTT formazan onto the same electrospun nanofibers was evaluated and the standard concentration-absorbance curve was obtained in order to quantify the contribution of the adsorbed MTT formazan during the MTT cell viability assay. We show that the PLGA, and the HNTs- or CNTs-doped PLGA nanofibers display appreciable MTT formazan dye sorption, corresponding to 35.6-50.2% deviation from the real cell viability assay data. The better dye sorption capability of the nanofibers leads to further deviation from the real cell viability. Our study gives a general insight into accurate MTT cytotoxicity assessment of various porous tissue engineering scaffolding materials, and may be applicable to other colorimetric assays for analyzing the biological properties of porous scaffolding materials.

  11. Development of quantitative microscopy-based assays for evaluating dynamics of living cultures of mouse spermatogonial stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Heim, Crystal N; Fanslow, Danielle A; Dann, Christina Tenenhaus

    2012-10-01

    Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) self-renewal and differentiation are required for continuous production of spermatozoa and long-term fertility. Studying SSCs in vivo remains challenging because SSCs are rare cells and definitive molecular markers for their identification are lacking. The development of a method for propagating SSCs in vitro greatly facilitated analysis of SSCs. The cultured cells grow as clusters of a dynamic mixture of "true" stem cells and differentiating progenitor cells. Cells in the stem/progenitor culture system share many properties with spermatogonia in vivo; however, to fully exploit it as a model for spermatogonial development, new assays are needed that account for the dynamic heterogeneity inherent in the culture system. Here, assays were developed for quantifying dynamics of cultures of stem/progenitor cells that expressed histone-green fluorescent protein (GFP). First, we built on published results showing that cluster formation in vitro reliably predicts the relative number of SSCs. The GFP-based in vitro cluster assay allows quantification of SSCs with significantly fewer resources than a transplantation assay. Second, we compared the dynamics of differentiation in two experimental paradigms by imaging over a 17-day time frame. Finally, we performed short-term live imaging and observed cell migration, coordinated cell proliferation, and cell death resembling that of spermatogonia in the testes. The methods that we present provide a foundation for the use of fluorescent reporters in future microscopy-based high-throughput screens by using living spermatogonial stem/progenitor cultures applicable to toxicology, contraceptive discovery, and identification of regulators of self-renewal and differentiation.

  12. A Functional Assay to Assess Connexin43 Mediated Cell-to-Cell Communication of Second Messengers in Cultured Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stains, Joseph P.; Civitelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cell-to-cell transfer of small molecules is a fundamental way by which multicellular organisms coordinate function. Recent work has highlighted the complexity of biologic responses downstream of gap junctions. As the connexin-regulated effectors are coming into focus, there is a need to develop functional assays that allow the specific testing of biologically relevant second messengers. Here, we describe a modification of the classic gap junction parachute assay to assess biologically relevant molecules passed though gap junctions. PMID:27207296

  13. Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxicity Assays.

    PubMed

    Adan, Aysun; Kiraz, Yağmur; Baran, Yusuf

    Cell viability is defined as the number of healthy cells in a sample and proliferation of cells is a vital indicator for understanding the mechanisms in action of certain genes, proteins and pathways involved cell survival or death after exposing to toxic agents. Generally, methods used to determine viability are also common for the detection of cell proliferation. Cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays are generally used for drug screening to detect whether the test molecules have effects on cell proliferation or display direct cytotoxic effects. Regardless of the type of cell-based assay being used, it is important to know how many viable cells are remaining at the end of the experiment. There are a variety of assay methods based on various cell functions such as enzyme activity, cell membrane permeability, cell adherence, ATP production, co-enzyme production, and nucleotide uptake activity. These methods could be basically classified into different categories: (I) dye exclusion methods such as trypan blue dye exclusion assay, (II) methods based on metabolic activity, (III) ATP assay, (IV) sulforhodamine B assay, (V) protease viability marker assay, (VI) clonogenic cell survival assay, (VII) DNA synthesis cell proliferation assays and (V) raman micro-spectroscopy. In order to choose the optimal viability assay, the cell type, applied culture conditions, and the specific questions being asked should be considered in detail. This particular review aims to provide an overview of common cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assays together with their own advantages and disadvantages, their methodologies, comparisons and intended purposes.

  14. Culturing of cerebellar granule cells to study neuronal migration: gradient and local perfusion assays.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, Patricia; Jiang, Jian; Yuan, Xiao-bing

    2012-07-01

    Cultures of cerebellar granule cells are a suitable model to analyze the mechanisms governing neuronal migration. In this unit, we describe a protocol to obtain cultures of dissociated granule cells at a low density, where individual cells can be easily observed. In addition, we include a protocol for studying neuronal migration in these cultures, using single, actively migrating cerebellar granule cells. Following this protocol, a factor of interest can be applied either in a gradient concentration by means of a micropipet located near the neuron, or in a homogeneous concentration by locally perfusing a certain region of the neuron. Time-lapse images are taken to analyze changes in the speed and/or directionality of the observed neuron. Overall, the two protocols take more or less a day and a half to perform, and are a useful way to evaluate a certain factor/drug for its chemotactic activity or its capacity to alter migration speed.

  15. GFP-based fluorescence assay for CAG repeat instability in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Santillan, Beatriz A; Moye, Christopher; Mittelman, David; Wilson, John H

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeats can be highly unstable, mutating far more frequently than point mutations. Repeats typically mutate by addition or loss of units of the repeat. CAG repeat expansions in humans trigger neurological diseases that include myotonic dystrophy, Huntington disease, and several spinocerebellar ataxias. In human cells, diverse mechanisms promote CAG repeat instability, and in mice, the mechanisms of instability are varied and tissue-dependent. Dissection of mechanistic complexity and discovery of potential therapeutics necessitates quantitative and scalable screens for repeat mutation. We describe a GFP-based assay for screening modifiers of CAG repeat instability in human cells. The assay exploits an engineered intronic CAG repeat tract that interferes with expression of an inducible GFP minigene. Like the phenotypes of many trinucleotide repeat disorders, we find that GFP function is impaired by repeat expansion, in a length-dependent manner. The intensity of fluorescence varies inversely with repeat length, allowing estimates of repeat tract changes in live cells. We validate the assay using transcription through the repeat and engineered CAG-specific nucleases, which have previously been reported to induce CAG repeat instability. The assay is relatively fast and should be adaptable to large-scale screens of chemical and shRNA libraries.

  16. GFP-Based Fluorescence Assay for CAG Repeat Instability in Cultured Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Santillan, Beatriz A.; Moye, Christopher; Mittelman, David; Wilson, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeats can be highly unstable, mutating far more frequently than point mutations. Repeats typically mutate by addition or loss of units of the repeat. CAG repeat expansions in humans trigger neurological diseases that include myotonic dystrophy, Huntington disease, and several spinocerebellar ataxias. In human cells, diverse mechanisms promote CAG repeat instability, and in mice, the mechanisms of instability are varied and tissue-dependent. Dissection of mechanistic complexity and discovery of potential therapeutics necessitates quantitative and scalable screens for repeat mutation. We describe a GFP-based assay for screening modifiers of CAG repeat instability in human cells. The assay exploits an engineered intronic CAG repeat tract that interferes with expression of an inducible GFP minigene. Like the phenotypes of many trinucleotide repeat disorders, we find that GFP function is impaired by repeat expansion, in a length-dependent manner. The intensity of fluorescence varies inversely with repeat length, allowing estimates of repeat tract changes in live cells. We validate the assay using transcription through the repeat and engineered CAG-specific nucleases, which have previously been reported to induce CAG repeat instability. The assay is relatively fast and should be adaptable to large-scale screens of chemical and shRNA libraries. PMID:25423602

  17. Transformation of BALB/c-3T3 cells: III. Development of a co-culture clonal survival assay for quantification of chemical cytotoxicity in high-density cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Matthews, E J

    1993-07-01

    A co-culture clonal survival assay was developed to measure the cytotoxicity of test chemical treatments to BALB/c-3T3 cells because the standard clonal survival assay using 200 wild type (WT) cells frequently overestimates chemical cytotoxicity when compared with identical treatment doses in high-density cultures. The assay used co-cultures of 3.2 x 10(4) WT cells, the same seeding density used in the transformation assay, and 200 ouabain resistant (OUAr) cells. After a 48-hr test chemical treatment, co-cultured cells were fed with culture medium containing 4 mM ouabain. The test chemical was cytotoxic to an equal percentage of WT and OUAr cells. Ouabain treatments killed the remaining WT cells. Thus, OUAr cells surviving the test chemical treatment measured the relative cloning efficiency (RCE) of all treated cells in the high-density cell co-culture. The co-culture assay succeeded because metabolic cooperation at the OUAr locus was not detected in BALB/c-3T3 cells. Five chemicals induced comparable cytotoxic responses in both assays, including actinomycin D, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, N'-methyl-N-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanidine, dimethyl sulfoxide and sodium chloride. In contrast, chemical cytotoxic responses detected in the standard and co-culture assays differed by > or = 10-fold for 11-aminoundecanoic acid, benzo[a]pyrene, cytosine arabinoside, and 3-methyl-cholanthrene and differed by > 2-fold for 2-acetylaminofluorene and dimethylnitrosamine. Detection of 11-aminoundecanoic acid-induced transformation was shown to be dependent on selecting treatment doses from the co-culture assay data. Thus, this method permits more accurate assessment of both chemical-induced cytotoxicity and transformation.

  18. Polymer-based mesh as supports for multi-layered 3D cell culture and assays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen A; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron D; Ngo, Philip M; Whitesides, George M

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system-Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM)-that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells-layer-by-layer-within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis-(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format.

  19. Metabolic response of environmentally isolated microorganisms to industrial effluents: Use of a newly described cell culture assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferebee, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    An environmental application using a microtiter culture assay to measure the metabolic sensitivity of microorganisms to petrochemical effluents will be tested. The Biomedical Operations and Research Branch at NASA JSC has recently developed a rapid and nondestructive method to measure cell growth and metabolism. Using a colorimetric procedure the uniquely modified assay allows the metabolic kinetics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to be measured. Use of such an assay if adapted for the routine monitoring of waste products, process effluents, and environmentally hazardous substances may prove to be invaluable to the industrial community. The microtiter method as described will be tested using microorganisms isolated from the Galveston Bay aquatic habitat. The microbial isolates will be identified prior to testing using the automated systems available at JSC. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cadmium, and lead will provide control toxic chemicals. The toxicity of industrial effluent from two industrial sites will be tested. An effort will be made to test the efficacy of this assay for measuring toxicity in a mixed culture community.

  20. Polymer-Based Mesh as Supports for Multi-layered 3D Cell Culture and Assays

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen A.; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron; Ngo, Phil M.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system – Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM) – that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells—layer-by-layer—within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis—(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format. PMID:24095253

  1. Specific detection of RT activity in culture supernantants of retrovirus-producing cells, using synthetic DNA as competitor in polymerase enhanced reverse transcriptase assay.

    PubMed

    Voisset, C; Tönjes, R R; Breyton, P; Mandrand, B; Paranhos-Baccalà, G

    2001-05-01

    The polymerase enhanced reverse transcriptase (PERT) assay is a highly sensitive assay for the detection of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity in culture supernatants of retrovirus-producing cells. However, some cellular DNA-dependent DNA polymerases exhibit RT-like activities in this assay. A synthetic DNA competitor which suppresses the RT-like activities of cellular DNA-dependent DNA polymerases was used in a modified PERT assay technique for specific detection of RT activity in culture supernatants of retrovirus-producing cells. We determined the optimum condition of the assay and evaluated its specificity. This improved PERT assay is easy to perform and is able to detect minute amounts of purified RT, as well as RT in crude cell lysates and concentrated culture supernatants.

  2. The statistical performance of an MCF-7 cell culture assay evaluated using generalized linear mixed models and a score test.

    PubMed

    Rey deCastro, B; Neuberg, Donna

    2007-05-30

    Biological assays often utilize experimental designs where observations are replicated at multiple levels, and where each level represents a separate component of the assay's overall variance. Statistical analysis of such data usually ignores these design effects, whereas more sophisticated methods would improve the statistical power of assays. This report evaluates the statistical performance of an in vitro MCF-7 cell proliferation assay (E-SCREEN) by identifying the optimal generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) that accurately represents the assay's experimental design and variance components. Our statistical assessment found that 17beta-oestradiol cell culture assay data were best modelled with a GLMM configured with a reciprocal link function, a gamma error distribution, and three sources of design variation: plate-to-plate; well-to-well, and the interaction between plate-to-plate variation and dose. The gamma-distributed random error of the assay was estimated to have a coefficient of variation (COV) = 3.2 per cent, and a variance component score test described by X. Lin found that each of the three variance components were statistically significant. The optimal GLMM also confirmed the estrogenicity of five weakly oestrogenic polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs 17, 49, 66, 74, and 128). Based on information criteria, the optimal gamma GLMM consistently out-performed equivalent naive normal and log-normal linear models, both with and without random effects terms. Because the gamma GLMM was by far the best model on conceptual and empirical grounds, and requires only trivially more effort to use, we encourage its use and suggest that naive models be avoided when possible.

  3. Bioluminescent high-throughput assay for the bacteria adherence to the tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Brovko, L; Minikh, O; Piekna, A; Griffiths, M W

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this study was develop a rapid high-throughput method for the assessment of the bacterial adhesion to tissue culture cells and test this method by investigation of the adhesion and growth of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Escherichia coli strains in the presence of HeLa human epithelial cells. Fifteen strains of E. coli were transformed with a plasmid carrying the entire lux operon of Photorhabdus luminescens to make them bioluminescent. By using the Time-to-Detection approach and bioluminescence imaging in microplate format, the adherence and growth of bacteria in tissue culture medium in the presence of HeLa cells was monitored. It was observed that Eagle's minimal essential medium (EMEM) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) significantly inhibited growth of E. coli. However, in the presence of HeLa cells the detected growth of E. coli was similar to the growth observed in LB medium. It was established that the initial number of E. coli cells present in the microplate directly correlated with the time necessary for the bioluminescence signal to reach the threshold level, hence allowing the accurate assessment of the adhered cells within 8-10 h. Neither bacterial adherence nor growth kinetics correlated with the pathogenicity of the strain though they were strain-specific. The developed approach provided new information on the interaction of E. coli with epithelial cells and could be used for both pathogenicity research and for the screening of potential therapeutic agents for the ability to minimize pathogen colonization of human tissues.

  4. Inhibitory Activity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Aspartyl Protease Inhibitors against Encephalitozoon intestinalis Evaluated by Cell Culture-Quantitative PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Menotti, Jean; Santillana-Hayat, Maud; Cassinat, Bruno; Sarfati, Claudine; Derouin, Francis; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Immune reconstitution might not be the only factor contributing to the low prevalence of microsporidiosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients treated with protease inhibitors, as these drugs may exert a direct inhibitory effect against fungi and protozoa. In this study, we developed a cell culture-quantitative PCR assay to quantify Encephalitozoon intestinalis growth in U-373-MG human glioblastoma cells and used this assay to evaluate the activities of six HIV aspartyl protease inhibitors against E. intestinalis. A real-time quantitative PCR assay targeted the E. intestinalis small-subunit rRNA gene. HIV aspartyl protease inhibitors were tested over serial concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 10 mg/liter, with albendazole used as a control. Ritonavir, lopinavir, and saquinavir were able to inhibit E. intestinalis growth, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 1.5, 2.2, and 4.6 mg/liter, respectively, whereas amprenavir, indinavir, and nelfinavir had no inhibitory effect. Pepstatin A, a reference aspartyl protease inhibitor, could also inhibit E. intestinalis growth, suggesting that HIV protease inhibitors may act through the inhibition of an E. intestinalis-encoded aspartyl protease. These results showed that some HIV protease inhibitors can inhibit E. intestinalis growth at concentrations that are achievable in vivo and that the real-time quantitative PCR assay that we used is a valuable tool for the in vitro assessment of the activities of drugs against E. intestinalis. PMID:15917534

  5. Visualization and Detection of Infectious Coxsackievirus Replication Using a Combined Cell Culture-Molecular Beacon Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aijun; Salazar, Andre M.; Yates, Marylynn V.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2005-01-01

    Rapid detection of infectious viruses is of central importance for public health risk assessment. By directly visualizing newly synthesized viral RNA with molecular beacons (MBs), we have developed a generalized method for the rapid and sensitive detection of infectious viruses from cell culture. An MB, CVB1, specifically targeting the 5′ noncoding region of the enterovirus genome was designed and synthesized. Introduction of MB CVB1 into permeabilized cells highly infected with coxsackievirus B6 resulted in brightly fluorescent cells that can be easily visualized with a fluorescence microscope. In contrast, no detectable signal was observed with noninfected cells or with nonspecific MBs. The number of fluorescent cells also increased in a dose-responsive manner, enabling the direct quantification of infectious viral dosages by direct counting of fluorescent foci. As little as 1 PFU of infectious coxsackievirus B6 was detected within 6 h postinfection. When combined with nuclease-resistant MBs, this method could be useful not only for the real-time detection of infectious viruses but is also useful to study the life cycle of viral processing in vivo. PMID:16332827

  6. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and cell culture plaque assays to determine resistance of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts to chemical sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Eric N; Augustine, Swinburne A J; Villegas, Leah Fohl; Ware, Michael W; See, Mary Jean; Lindquist, H D Alan; Schaefer, Frank W; Dubey, J P

    2010-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii oocysts are highly resistant to many chemical sanitizers. Methods used to determine oocyst infectivity have relied primarily on mouse, chicken, and feline bioassays. Although considered gold standards, they only provide a qualitative assessment of oocyst viability. In this study, two alternative approaches were developed to quantitate viable T. gondii oocysts following treatment with several common sanitizers. The first is a quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assay targeting the ACT1 and SporoSAG genes to enumerate viable T. gondii oocysts. RT-qPCR C(T) values between Wescodyne(R), acidified ethanol, or heat treated oocysts were not significantly different as compared with untreated controls. By contrast, treatment with formalin or Clorox(R) resulted in a 2-log(10) reduction in C(T) values. An in vitro T. gondii oocyst plaque assay (TOP-assay) was also developed to measure oocyst viability. This assay used a combination of bead milling and bile digestion, followed by culturing the excysted sporozoites in a confluent fibroblast cell monolayer. Results showed that no significant reduction in sporozoite viability was detected in acidified ethanol or Wescodyne(R) treated oocysts while at least a 2-log(10) reduction in plaques formed was observed with Clorox(R) treated oocysts. Moreover, formalin or heat treatment of oocysts resulted in at least a 5-log(10) reduction in plaques formed. This study demonstrates that an mRNA-based PCR viability assay targeting the ACT1 or SporoSAG genes is a relatively rapid technique compared to in vitro and in vivo assays. In addition, the TOP-assay proved very effective and sensitive at quantifying oocyst viability when compared with animal bioassays.

  7. A Simplified, Sensitive Phagocytic Assay for Malaria Cultures Facilitated by Flow Cytometry of Differentially-Stained Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chuu Ling; Rénia, Laurent; Tan, Kevin S. W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Phagocytosis of infected and uninfected erythrocytes is an important feature of malaria infections. Flow cytometry is a useful tool for studying phagocytic uptake of malaria-infected erythrocytes in vitro. However, current approaches are limited by the inability to discriminate between infected and uninfected erythrocytes and a failure to stain the early developmental ring stages of infected erythrocytes. The majority of infected erythrocytes in circulation are of the ring stage and these are therefore important targets to study. Methodology/Principal Findings In vitro P. falciparum cultures comprising infected and uninfected erythrocytes were labeled and exposed to cells derived from the human monocytic THP-1 cell line. Phagocytosis was assayed by flow cytometry. Dual labeling of Plasmodium DNA and erythrocyte cytoplasm with dihydroethidium and CellTrace™ Violet respectively allowed, for the first time, the detection and enumeration of phagocytes with ingested erythrocytes from both early ring- and late schizont-stage P, falciparum cultures. The sensitivity of the method was tested using varying conditions including phagocyte type (monocytes versus macrophages), parasite stage (rings versus schizonts), and negative (incubation with cytochalasin D) and positive (incubation with immune sera) effectors of phagocytosis. The current assay clearly demonstrated uptake of infected and uninfected erythrocytes exposed to phagocytes; the extent of which was dependent on the conditions mentioned. Conclusions We describe a simple, sensitive and rapid method for quantifying phagocytosis of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes, by flow cytometry. This approach can be applied for studying parasite-phagocyte interactions under a variety of conditions. The investigation of phagocytosis of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes can extend from looking solely at late-staged infected erythrocytes to include early-staged ones as well. It does away with the need to purify

  8. Development of a cell culture/ELISA assay to detect anticoagulant rodenticides and its application to analysis of rodenticide treated grain.

    PubMed

    Lawley, Wendy J; Charlton, Andrew J A; Hughson, Elaine J; Grundy, Helen H; Brown, Peter M; Jones, Ainsley

    2006-03-08

    This study describes a generic biological screening assay designed to detect anticoagulant rodenticides based on their inhibitory action on the vitamin K epoxide reductase protein complex, resulting in an accumulation of under-carboxylated prothrombin or proteins induced by vitamin K antagonism (PIVKA-II). A combined cell culture/ELISA assay was optimized to measure PIVKA-II production by the human hepatoma HepG2 cell line cultured in the presence of anticoagulant rodenticides. The specificity and sensitivity of the assay was validated using 41 grain extracts containing representative concentrations of rodenticide or appropriate nonrodenticide control compounds. In all cases, PIVKA-II produced by HepG2 cells in response to grain extracts spiked with rodenticides was detected by ELISA, while PIVKA-II was not detected in supernatants collected from cells exposed to nonrodenticide controls. This represents a novel, class-specific biological assay for the detection of anticoagulant rodenticides present in contaminated grain.

  9. A simple, specific high-throughput enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantitative determination of melatonin in cell culture medium.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Cassone, Vincent M

    2015-09-01

    A simple, specific, high-throughput enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantitative determination of melatonin was developed for directly measuring melatonin in cell culture medium with 10% FBS. This assay adopts a commercial monoclonal melatonin antibody and melatonin-HRP conjugate, so it can be applied in multiple labs rapidly with low cost compared with commercial RIA and ELISA kits. In addition, the procedure is much simpler with only four steps: 1) sample/conjugate incubation, 2) plate washing, 3) TMB color reaction and 4) reading of results. The standards of the assay cover a wide working range from 100 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL. The sensitivity was 68 pg/mL in cell culture medium with 10% FBS and 26 pg/mL in PBS with as little as 25 μL sample volume. The recovery of melatonin from cell culture medium was 101.0%. The principal cross-reacting compound was 5-methoxytryptophol (0.1%). The variation coefficients of the assay, within and between runs, ranged between 6.68% and 15.76% in cell culture medium. The mean linearity of a series diluted cell culture medium sample was 105% (CV=5%), ranging between 98% and 111%, y=5.5263x+0.0646, R(2)=0.99. The assay enables small research and teaching labs to reliably measure this important neurohormone.

  10. A rapid and specific microplate assay for the determination of intra- and extracellular ascorbate in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Lane, Darius J R; Lawen, Alfons

    2014-04-11

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) plays numerous important roles in cellular metabolism, many of which have only come to light in recent years. For instance, within the brain, ascorbate acts in a neuroprotective and neuromodulatory manner that involves ascorbate cycling between neurons and vicinal astrocytes--a relationship that appears to be crucial for brain ascorbate homeostasis. Additionally, emerging evidence strongly suggests that ascorbate has a greatly expanded role in regulating cellular and systemic iron metabolism than is classically recognized. The increasing recognition of the integral role of ascorbate in normal and deregulated cellular and organismal physiology demands a range of medium-throughput and high-sensitivity analytic techniques that can be executed without the need for highly expensive specialist equipment. Here we provide explicit instructions for a medium-throughput, specific and relatively inexpensive microplate assay for the determination of both intra- and extracellular ascorbate in cell culture.

  11. A Rapid and Specific Microplate Assay for the Determination of Intra- and Extracellular Ascorbate in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Darius J. R.; Lawen, Alfons

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) plays numerous important roles in cellular metabolism, many of which have only come to light in recent years. For instance, within the brain, ascorbate acts in a neuroprotective and neuromodulatory manner that involves ascorbate cycling between neurons and vicinal astrocytes - a relationship that appears to be crucial for brain ascorbate homeostasis. Additionally, emerging evidence strongly suggests that ascorbate has a greatly expanded role in regulating cellular and systemic iron metabolism than is classically recognized. The increasing recognition of the integral role of ascorbate in normal and deregulated cellular and organismal physiology demands a range of medium-throughput and high-sensitivity analytic techniques that can be executed without the need for highly expensive specialist equipment. Here we provide explicit instructions for a medium-throughput, specific and relatively inexpensive microplate assay for the determination of both intra- and extracellular ascorbate in cell culture. PMID:24747535

  12. Bioluminescence assay for cell viability.

    PubMed

    Lomakina, G Yu; Modestova, Yu A; Ugarova, N N

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical aspects of the adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay based on the use of the firefly luciferin-luciferase system are considered, as well as its application for assessing cell viability in microbiology, sanitation, medicine, and ecology. Various approaches for the analysis of individual or mixed cultures of microorganisms are presented, and capabilities of the method for investigation of biological processes in live cells including necrosis, apoptosis, as well as for investigation of the dynamics of metabolism are described.

  13. Quantitation of viable Coxiella burnetii in milk using an integrated cell culture-polymerase chain reaction (ICC-PCR) assay.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Diana; Shieh, Y-Carol; Tortorello, Mary; Kukreja, Ankush; Shazer, Arlette; Schlesser, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii has long been considered the most heat resistant pathogen in raw milk, making it the reference pathogen for determining pasteurisation conditions for milk products. New milk formulations and novel non-thermal processes require validation of effectiveness which requires a more practical method for analysis than using the currently used animal model for assessing Coxiella survival. Also, there is an interest in better characterising thermal inactivation of Coxiella in various milk formulations. To avoid the use of the guinea pig model for evaluating Coxiella survival, an Integrated Cell Culture-PCR (ICC-PCR) method was developed for determining Coxiella viability in milk. Vero cell cultures were directly infected from Coxiella-contaminated milk in duplicate 24-well plates. Viability of the Coxiella in milk was shown by a ≥ 0.5 log genome equivalent (ge)/ml increase in the quantity of IS111a gene from the baseline post-infection (day 0) level after 9-11 d propagation. Coxiella in skim, 2%, and whole milk, and half and half successfully infected Vero cells and increased in number by at least 2 logs using a 48-h infection period followed by 9-d propagation time. As few as 125 Coxiella ge/ml in whole milk was shown to infect and propagate at least 2 logs in the optimised ICC-PCR assay, though variable confirmation of propagation was shown for as low as 25 Coxiella ge/ml. Applicability of the ICC-PCR method was further proven in an MPN format to quantitate the number of viable Coxiella remaining in whole milk after 60 °C thermal treatment at 0, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min.

  14. Microdroplet chain array for cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Zhao, Shi-Ping; Lou, Qi; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2016-11-29

    Establishing cell migration assays in multiple different microenvironments is important in the study of tissue repair and regeneration, cancer progression, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. In this work, we developed a miniaturized and massive parallel microfluidic platform for multiple cell migration assays combining the traditional membrane-based cell migration technique and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. Nanoliter-scale droplets are flexibly assembled as building blocks based on a porous membrane to form microdroplet chains with diverse configurations for different assay modes. Multiple operations including in-droplet 2D/3D cell culture, cell co-culture and cell migration induced by a chemoattractant concentration gradient in droplet chains could be flexibly performed with reagent consumption in the nanoliter range for each assay and an assay scale-up to 81 assays in parallel in one microchip. We have applied the present platform to multiple modes of cell migration assays including the accurate cell migration assay, competitive cell migration assay, biomimetic chemotaxis assay, and multifactor cell migration assay based on the organ-on-a-chip concept, for demonstrating its versatility, applicability, and potential in cell migration-related research.

  15. Application of Long-term cultured Interferon-γ Enzyme-linked Immunospot Assay for Assessing Effector and Memory T Cell Responses in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Maggioli, Mayara F.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Whelan, Adam O.; Fosse, James M.; Nonnecke, Brian J.; Waters, W. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled up to 95 % of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a lifetime. In humans, two functionally distinct subsets of memory T cells have been described based on the expression of lymph node homing receptors. Central memory T cells express C-C chemokine receptor 7 and CD45RO and are mainly located in T-cell areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Effector memory T cells express CD45RO, lack CCR7 and display receptors associated with lymphocyte homing to peripheral or inflamed tissues. Effector T cells do not express either CCR7 or CD45RO but upon encounter with antigen produce effector cytokines, such as interferon-γ. Interferon-γ release assays are used for the diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis and detect primarily effector and effector memory T cell responses. Central memory T cell responses by CD4+ T cells to vaccination, on the other hand, may be used to predict vaccine efficacy, as demonstrated with simian immunodeficiency virus infection of non-human primates, tuberculosis in mice, and malaria in humans. Several studies with mice and humans as well as unpublished data on cattle, have demonstrated that interferon-γ ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell responses. With this assay, peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured in decreasing concentration of antigen for 10 to 14 days (long-term culture), allowing effector responses to peak and wane; facilitating central memory T cells to differentiate and expand within the culture. PMID:26275095

  16. An indirect immunofluorescence assay using a cell culture-derived antigen for detection of antibodies to the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, W L; Comer, J A; Sumner, J W; Gingrich-Baker, C; Coughlin, R T; Magnarelli, L A; Olson, J G; Childs, J E

    1997-01-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence assay for the detection of human antibodies to the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) was developed and standardized. Antigen was prepared from a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60) infected with a tick-derived isolate of the HGE agent (USG3). Suitable antigen presentation and preservation of cellular morphology were obtained when infected cells were applied and cultured on the slide, excess medium was removed, and cells were fixed with acetone. Use of a buffer containing bovine serum albumin and goat serum reduced background fluorescence, and use of an immunoglobulin G (gamma-specific) conjugate reduced nonspecific binding. The assay readily detected specific antibody from HGE patients and did not detect antibody from healthy individuals. No significant reactivity was noted in sera from patients with high titers of antibodies to other rickettsial species. We were able to identify antibodies reactive to USG3 antigen in samples from areas where HGE is endemic that had tested negative to other rickettsial agents. Animal sera reactive against Ehrlichia equi or Ehrlichia phagocytophila bound to the HGE antigen, indicating that the assay may be useful for veterinary use. Comparability between two different laboratories was assessed by using coded human sera exchanged between laboratories. Results from the two laboratories were similar, indicating that the assay can be easily integrated into use for routine testing for HGE. The assay was then compared to an assay using horse neutrophils infected with ehrlichiae. The two assays gave comparable results, indicating that the cell culture-derived antigen can be used for testing samples that have been previously tested with E. equi as an antigen. The new assay offers several advantages over other immunofluorescence methods that use animal-derived antigen and is suitable for use in testing for human antibodies to the HGE agent. PMID:9163471

  17. Evolution of DNA strand-breaks in cultured spermatocytes: the Comet Assay reveals differences in normal and gamma-irradiated germ cells.

    PubMed

    Perrin, J; Lussato, D; De Méo, M; Durand, P; Grillo, J-M; Guichaoua, M-R; Botta, A; Bergé-Lefranc, J-L

    2007-02-01

    In reproductive toxicity assessment, in vitro systems can be used to determine mechanisms of action of toxicants. However, they generally investigate the immediate effects of toxicants, on isolated germ cells or spermatozoa. We report here the usefulness of in vitro cultures of rat spermatocytes and Sertoli cells, in conjunction with the Comet Assay to analyze the evolution of DNA strand-breaks and thus to determine DNA damage in germ cells. We compared cultures of normal and gamma-irradiated germ cells. In non-irradiated spermatocytes, the Comet Assay revealed the presence of DNA strand-breaks, which numbers decreased with the duration of the culture, suggesting the involvement of DNA repair mechanisms related to the meiotic recombination. In irradiated cells, the evolution of DNA strand-breaks was strongly modified. Thus our model is able to detect genotoxic lesions and/or DNA repair impairment in cultured spermatocytes. We propose this model as an in vitro tool for the study of genotoxic injuries on spermatocytes.

  18. Assaying the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as a mitogen of immature cells in fetal blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Borrell, A; Jou, J M; Besón, I; Soler, A; Carrió, A; Margarit, E; Caballín, R; Ballesta, F; Fortuny, A

    1999-01-01

    Based on the presence of immature cells in fetal blood, and in an attempt to shorten the cytogenetic reporting time, three simultaneous one-day culture regimes were established in 23 fetal blood samples: (a) the standard phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocytes culture, (b) a culture using the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an alternative mitogen, and (c) an unstimulated culture. Diagnostic success rates achieved by these three methods were as follows: 43 per cent (95 per cent CI: 23-64) (GM-CSF), 30 per cent (95 per cent CI: 12-49) (PHA) and 9 per cent (unstimulated). These three regimes were also assayed in three-day cultures giving 100 per cent diagnostic success rate for the PHA and GM-CSF, and 62 per cent (95 per cent CI: 41-83) for the unstimulated. A moderate correlation was found between the initial concentration of cultured erythroblasts and the metaphase count in one-day GM-CSF-stimulated (r=0.43, p=0.01) and unstimulated (r=0.35, p=0.05) cultures, suggesting that erythroblasts may be in part responsible for the mitotic index observed in these two regime cultures. In conclusion, our experience suggests that immature cells in fetal blood may be successfully cultured for diagnostic purposes.

  19. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assay to measure microtubule dynamics in neuronal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Polson, Craig; Cantone, Joseph L; Wei, Cong; Drexler, Dieter M; Meredith, Jere E

    2014-12-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are highly dynamic polymers composed of α- and β-tubulin heterodimers. Dysregulation of MT dynamics in neurons may be a contributing factor in the progression of various neurodegenerative diseases. We developed a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method to measure the fraction of [(13)C6]leucine-labeled α-tubulin-derived surrogate peptides. Using this approach, we measured the time course of incorporation of [(13)C6]leucine label into the MT and dimer pools isolated from cycling cells and rat primary hippocampal neurons. We found that the MT pool is in rapid equilibrium with the dimer pool in the cycling cells, consistent with rapid MT polymerization/depolymerization during cell proliferation. Conversely, in neurons, we found that labeling of the MT pool was rapid, whereas the dimer pool was delayed. These results suggest that newly synthesized α-tubulin is first incorporated into MTs or complexes that co-sediment with MTs and that appearance of labeled α-tubulin in the dimer pool may be a consequence of MT depolymerization or breakdown. Our results demonstrate that a SILAC-based approach can be used to measure MT dynamics and may have utility for exploring MT dysregulation in various models of neurodegenerative disease.

  20. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells from leukoreduction system chambers after plateletpheresis are functional in an in vitro co-culture assay with intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tiscornia, Inés; Sánchez-Martins, Viviana; Hernández, Ana; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela

    2012-10-31

    The dendritic cells (DC) found in the intestine are involved both in the maintenance of tolerance towards commensal microbiota, and in the generation of protective immune responses against pathogens, thus contributing to gut immune homeostasis. There is an increasing interest in the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics; among their beneficial effects we highlight the modulation of the immune system which is one of their fundamental properties. As these effects are strain-dependent, it is important to have in vitro systems that include DC and intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), which are crucial for intestinal homeostasis, to identify candidates by means of bacterial screening. Obtaining enough human cells, necessary to simultaneously test several bacteria, is a major challenge for researchers. In this study we analyzed the usefulness of the cellular fraction retained in leukoreduction system chambers following plateletpheresis (PP) as a source of DC. We compared the capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from buffy coats (BC) or PP to generate DC using a short differentiation protocol. The functionality of the DC obtained was analyzed in co-cultures together with intestinal epithelial HT-29 cells, stimulating with LPS alone or with two LAB commonly used in the food industry, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii. DC surface markers CD86, HLA-DR and cytokine production were measured. The behavior of DC derived from PP was similar to the behavior observed for DC derived from BC. When we tested the response of DC to bacteria, we found significant differences in cytokine secretion, especially for IL-10, suggesting that the system has the ability to discriminate LAB with different immunomodulatory properties. We also found that DC derived from both sources displayed a similar ability to phagocyte bacteria. In conclusion, we hereby propose a modification of the two-day protocol for obtaining human DC previously described, using

  1. Development of a combined in vitro cell culture--quantitative PCR assay for evaluating the disinfection performance of pulsed light for treating the waterborne enteroparasite Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mary; Stocca, Alessia; Rowan, Neil

    2014-09-01

    Giardia lamblia is a flagellated protozoan parasite that is recognised as a frequent cause of water-borne disease in humans and animals. We report for the first time on the use of a combined in vitro HCT-8 cell culture-quantitative PCR assay for evaluating the efficacy of using pulsed UV light for treating G. lamblia parasites. Findings showed that current methods that are limited to using vital stains before and after cyst excystation are not appropriate for monitoring or evaluating cyst destruction post PUV-treatments. Use of the human ileocecal HCT-8 cell line was superior to that of the human colon Caco-2 cell line for in vitro culture and determining PUV sensitivity of treated cysts. G. lamblia cysts were also shown to be more resistant to PUV irradiation compared to treating similar numbers of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. These observations also show that the use of this HCT-8 cell culture assay may replace use of animal models for determining disinfection performances of PUV for treating both C. parvum and G. lamblia.

  2. Development and optimization of a quantitative cell culture infectivity assay for the microsporidium Encephalitozoon intestinalis and application to ultraviolet light inactivation.

    PubMed

    John, David E; Nwachuku, Nena; Pepper, Ian L; Gerba, Charles P

    2003-02-01

    Microsporidia are unique parasites recognized as a major cause of intestinal illness among immunocompromised patients and occasionally in otherwise healthy hosts. These organisms have been detected in water and are likely transmitted by the fecal-oral route. The most common human pathogenic microsporidia for which cell culture methods have been established is Encephalitozoon intestinalis. This study describes the development of a quantitative cell culture infectivity assay for E. intestinalis and its application to assess inactivation by ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. The method described here employs calcofluor white, a fluorescent brightener that targets the chitin spore wall, to visualize groups of developing spores in order to confirm infectivity. Serial dilutions of the spore suspension were seeded into tissue culture well slides containing RK-13 cells. Slides were then rinsed, fixed in methanol and stained with calcofluor white and examined microscopically. Large masses of developing spores were easily visible on infected cell monolayers. Positive and negative wells at each dilution step were used to quantify the number of infectious spores in the original suspension using a most-probable-number (MPN) statistical analysis. This assay was used to evaluate the disinfecting potential of ultraviolet light on E. intestinalis spores in water. The ultraviolet dose required for a 3-log(10) or 99.9% reduction in the number of infective spores was determined to be 8.43 mW s/cm(2).

  3. Cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Nystrom, Maria L; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-01-01

    A number of in vitro assays have been developed to study tumor cell motility. Historically, assays have been mainly monocellular, where carcinoma cells are studied in isolation. Scratch assays can be used to study the collective and directional movement of populations of cells, whereas two chamber assays lend themselves to the analysis of chemotactic/haptotactic migration and cell invasion. However, an inherent disadvantage of these assays is that they grossly oversimplify the complex process of invasion, lacking the tumor structural architecture and stromal components. Organotypic assays, where tumor cells are grown at an air/liquid interface on gels populated with stromal cells, are a more physiologically relevant method for studying 3-dimensional tumor invasion.

  4. Effects of Fibronectin Coating on Bacterial and Osteoblast Progenitor Cells Adherence in a Co-culture Assay.

    PubMed

    Hindié, Mathilde; Wu, Dongni; Anselme, Karine; Gallet, Olivier; Di Martino, Patrick

    2016-07-06

    Bacterial adherence to the surface of implants functionalized with cell-adhesive biomolecules is a critical first step of infection development. This study was designed to determine how the immobilization of human plasmatic fibronectin (pFN) could impact bacterial and osteoblast cells interaction with the surface during concomitant exposition to the two cell-types. Calibrated suspensions of P. aeruginosa PAOI or S. aureus CIP4.83 bacteria and STRO-1(+)A osteoblast progenitor cells were mixed, co-seeded on glass coverslips coated or not with pFN and incubated at 37 °C. After 3 h of co-culture, the presence of bacteria did not modify the STRO-1(+)A cells adherence to glass. pFN coating significantly enhanced STRO-1(+)A cells, CIP4.83 and PAOI adherence to glass and bacterial interaction with STRO-1(+)A cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observations revealed that cells on the pFN-coated substrate exhibited a greater spreading, better organized network of cytoskeletal filaments, and an increased cellular FN expression than cells on the uncoated substrate. The use of fluorescently labeled pFN showed that adherent STRO-1(+)A cells were able to remodel and to concentrate coated pFN at the cells surface. Thus, the use of FN coating could increase the risk of bacterial adherence to the material surface, acting either directly onto the coating layer or indirectly on adherent osteoblastic cells. This may increase the infection risk in the presence of bacterial contamination.

  5. Comparison of a frozen human foreskin fibroblast cell assay to an enzyme immunoassay and toxigenic culture for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile☆☆☆★

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, Alastair J.; Evans, Natalie E.; Williams, O. Martin; Spencer, Robert C.; Greenwood, Rosemary; Probert, Chris J.

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to validate the Hs27 ReadyCell assay (RCCNA) as an alternative CCNA method compared against a commonly used commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) method and toxigenic culture (TC) reference standard. A total of 860 samples were identified from those submitted to the Health Protection Agency microbiology laboratories over a 30-week period. RCCNA performed much better than EIA when using TC as a gold standard, with sensitivities of 90.8% versus 78.6% and positive predictive value of 87.3% to 81.9%, respectively. The Hs27 Human Foreskin Fibroblast ReadyCells are an easy-to-use and a sensitive CCNA method for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile directly from stool. A turnaround time of up to 48 h for a negative result and possible need for repeat testing make it an unsuitable method to be used in most clinical laboratory setting. PMID:23107315

  6. Identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infection in honey bees: establishment of a medium throughput screening assay based on N. ceranae infected cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae.

  7. Identification of Candidate Agents Active against N. ceranae Infection in Honey Bees: Establishment of a Medium Throughput Screening Assay Based on N. ceranae Infected Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae. PMID:25658121

  8. An optimized microplate assay system for quantitative evaluation of plant cell wall-degrading enzyme activity of fungal culture extracts.

    PubMed

    King, Brian C; Donnelly, Marie K; Bergstrom, Gary C; Walker, Larry P; Gibson, Donna M

    2009-03-01

    Developing enzyme cocktails for cellulosic biomass hydrolysis complementary to current cellulase systems is a critical step needed for economically viable biofuels production. Recent genomic analysis indicates that some plant pathogenic fungi are likely a largely untapped resource in which to prospect for novel hydrolytic enzymes for biomass conversion. In order to develop high throughput screening assays for enzyme bioprospecting, a standardized microplate assay was developed for rapid analysis of polysaccharide hydrolysis by fungal extracts, incorporating biomass substrates. Fungi were grown for 10 days on cellulose- or switchgrass-containing media to produce enzyme extracts for analysis. Reducing sugar released from filter paper, Avicel, corn stalk, switchgrass, carboxymethylcellulose, and arabinoxylan was quantified using a miniaturized colorimetric assay based on 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. Significant interactions were identified among fungal species, growth media composition, assay substrate, and temperature. Within a small sampling of plant pathogenic fungi, some extracts had crude activities comparable to or greater than T. reesei, particularly when assayed at lower temperatures and on biomass substrates. This microplate assay system should prove useful for high-throughput bioprospecting for new sources of novel enzymes for biofuel production.

  9. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  10. Evaluation of a soluble tetrazolium/formazan assay for cell growth and drug sensitivity in culture using human and other tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Scudiero, D A; Shoemaker, R H; Paull, K D; Monks, A; Tierney, S; Nofziger, T H; Currens, M J; Seniff, D; Boyd, M R

    1988-09-01

    We have previously described the application of an automated microculture tetrazolium assay (MTA) involving dimethyl sulfoxide solubilization of cellular-generated 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)-formazan to the in vitro assessment of drug effects on cell growth (M.C. Alley et al., Proc. Am. Assoc. Cancer Res., 27:389, 1986; M.C. Alley et al., Cancer Res. 48:589-601, 1988). There are several inherent disadvantages of this assay, including the safety hazard of personnel exposure to large quantities of dimethyl sulfoxide, the deleterious effects of this solvent on laboratory equipment, and the inefficient metabolism of MTT by some human cell lines. Recognition of these limitations prompted development of possible alternative MTAs utilizing a different tetrazolium reagent, 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino)carbonyl] -2H- tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT), which is metabolically reduced in viable cells to a water-soluble formazan product. This reagent allows direct absorbance readings, therefore eliminating a solubilization step and shortening the microculture growth assay procedure. Most human tumor cell lines examined metabolized XTT less efficiently than MTT; however, the addition of phenazine methosulfate (PMS) markedly enhanced cellular reduction of XTT. In the presence of PMS, the XTT reagent yielded usable absorbance values for growth and drug sensitivity evaluations with a variety of cell lines. Depending on the metabolic reductive capacity of a given cell line, the optimal conditions for a 4-h XTT incubation assay were 50 micrograms of XTT and 0.15 to 0.4 microgram of PMS per well. Drug profiles obtained with representative human tumor cell lines for several standard compounds utilizing the XTT-PMS methodology were similar to the profiles obtained with MTT. Addition of PMS appeared to have little effect on the metabolism of MTT. The new XTT reagent thus provides for a simplified, in vitro cell growth assay

  11. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device...

  12. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device...

  13. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device...

  14. Pressure-driven microfluidic perfusion culture device for integrated dose-response assays.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Cell-based assays are widely used in the various stages of drug discovery. Advances in microfluidic systems over the past two decades have enabled them to become a powerful tool for cell-based assays to achieve both reliability and high throughput. The interface between the micro-world and macro-world is important in industrial assay processes. Therefore, microfluidic cell-based assays using pressure-driven liquid handling are an ideal platform for integrated assays. The aim of this article is to review recent advancements in microfluidic cell-based assays focusing on a pressure-driven perfusion culture device. Here, we review the development of microfluidic cell-based assay devices and discuss the techniques involved in designing a microfluidic network, device fabrication, liquid and cell manipulation, and detection schemes for pressure-driven perfusion culture devices. Finally, we describe recent progress in semiautomatic and reliable pressure-driven microfluidic cell-based assays.

  15. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Justus, Calvin R; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V

    2014-06-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup.

  16. The importance of the microenvironment in breast cancer progression: recapitulation of mammary tumorigenesis using a unique human mammary epithelial cell model and a three-dimensional culture assay

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, V.M.; Fischer, A.H.; Peterson, O.W.; Bissell, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dominant regulator of tissue development and homeostasis. “Designer microenvironments” in culture and in vivo model systems have shown that the ECM regulates growth, differentiation, and apoptosis in murine and human mammary epithelial cells (MEC) through a hierarchy of transcriptional events involving the intricate interplay between soluble and physical signaling pathways. Furthermore, these studies have shown that these pathways direct and in turn are influenced by the tissue structure. Tissue structure is directed by the cooperative interactions of the cell–cell and cell–ECM pathways and can be modified by stromal factors. Not surprisingly then, loss of tissue structure and alterations in ECM components are associated with the appearance and dissemination of breast tumors, and malignancy is associated with perturbations in cell adhesion, changes in adhesion molecules, and a stromal reaction. Several lines of evidence now support the contention that the pathogenesis of breast cancer is determined (at least in part) by the dynamic interplay between the ductal epithelial cells, the microenvironment, and the tissue structure (acini). Thus, to understand the mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis, the role of the microenvironment (ECM as well as the stromal cells) with respect to tissue structure should be considered and studied. Towards this goal, we have established a unique human MEC model of tumorigenesis, which in concert with a three-dimensional assay, recapitulates many of the genetic and morphological changes observed in breast cancer in vivo. We are currently using this system to understand the role of the microenvironment and tissue structure in breast cancer progression. PMID:9164652

  17. Polyalkoxybenzenes from plants. 5. Parsley seed extract in synthesis of azapodophyllotoxins featuring strong tubulin destabilizing activity in the sea urchin embryo and cell culture assays.

    PubMed

    Semenova, Marina N; Kiselyov, Alex S; Tsyganov, Dmitry V; Konyushkin, Leonid D; Firgang, Sergei I; Semenov, Roman V; Malyshev, Oleg R; Raihstat, Mikhail M; Fuchs, Fabian; Stielow, Anne; Lantow, Margareta; Philchenkov, Alex A; Zavelevich, Michael P; Zefirov, Nikolay S; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Semenov, Victor V

    2011-10-27

    A series of 4-azapodophyllotoxin derivatives with modified rings B and E have been synthesized using allylpolyalkoxybenzenes from parsley seed oil. The targeted molecules were evaluated in vivo in a phenotypic sea urchin embryo assay for antimitotic and tubulin destabilizing activity. The most active compounds identified by the in vivo sea urchin embryo assay featured myristicin-derived ring E. These molecules were determined to be more potent than podophyllotoxin. Cytotoxic effects of selected molecules were further confirmed and evaluated by conventional assays with A549 and Jurkat human leukemic T-cell lines including cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, cellular microtubule disruption, and induction of apoptosis. The ring B modification yielded 6-OMe substituted molecule as the most active compound. Finally, in Jurkat cells, compound induced caspase-dependent apoptosis mediated by the apical caspases-2 and -9 and not caspase-8, implying the involvement of the intrinsic caspase-9-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  18. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity) is disclosed. Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. Mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics, are also disclosed.

  19. Sequence homologies between Mycoplasma and Chlamydia spp. lead to false-positive results in chlamydial cell cultures tested for mycoplasma contamination with a commercial PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Maass, Viola; Kern, Jan Marco; Poeckl, Matthias; Maass, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Mycoplasma contamination is a frequent problem in chlamydial cell culture. After obtaining contradictory contamination results, we compared three commercial PCR kits for mycoplasma detection. One kit signaled contamination in mycoplasma-free Chlamydia pneumoniae cultures. Sequencing of cloned PCR products revealed primer homology with the chlamydial genome as the basis of this false-positive result.

  20. Comparison of a new gold immunochromatographic assay for the rapid diagnosis of the novel influenza A (H7N9) virus with cell culture and a real-time reverse-transcription PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Jin, Changzhong; Wu, Nanping; Peng, Xiaorong; Yao, Hangping; Lu, Xiangyun; Chen, Yu; Wu, Haibo; Xie, Tiansheng; Cheng, Linfang; Liu, Fumin; Kang, Keren; Tang, Shixing; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-01-01

    We assessed a colloidal gold immunochromatographic assay (GICA) for rapid detection of influenza A (H7N9) and compared it with reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and viral culture. Samples from 35 H7N9 infected patients were collected, including 45 throat swab samples, 56 sputum samples, and 39 feces samples. All samples were tested by GICA, viral culture, and RT-PCR. GICA specifically reacted with recombinant HA proteins, virus lysates, and clinical samples from H7 subtype viruses. Compared with RT-PCR, GICA demonstrated low sensitivity (33.33%) but high specificity (97.56%). The positive rate of GICA tests for samples collected in the period from 8 to 21 days after contact with poultry was much higher than those for samples collected before or after this period. Compared with viral culture, GICA showed sensitivity of 91.67% and specificity of 82.03%. Sputum specimens were more likely to test positive for H7N9 virus than samples from throat swabs and feces. The GICA-based H7 test is a reliable, rapid, and convenient method for the screening and diagnosis of influenza A (H7N9) disease, especially for the sputum specimens with high viral load. It may be helpful in managing H7N9 epidemics and preliminary diagnosis in early stages in resource-limited settings.

  1. A sensitive real-time PCR based assay to estimate the impact of amino acid substitutions on the competitive replication fitness of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Holte, Sarah; Rao, Ushnal; McClure, Jan; Konopa, Philip; Swain, J Victor; Lanxon-Cookson, Erinn; Kim, Moon; Chen, Lennie; Mullins, James I

    2013-04-01

    Fixation of mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), such as those conferring drug resistance and immune escape, can result in a change in replication fitness. To assess these changes, a real-time TaqMan PCR detection assay and statistical methods for data analysis were developed to estimate sensitively relative viral fitness in competitive viral replication experiments in cell culture. Chimeric viruses with the gene of interest in an HIV-1NL4-3 backbone were constructed in two forms, vifA (native vif gene in NL4-3) and vifB (vif gene with six synonymous nucleotide differences from vifA). Subsequently, mutations of interest were introduced into the chimeric viruses in NL4-3VifA backbones, and the mutants were competed against the chimera with the isogenic viral sequence in the NL4-3VifB backbone in cell culture. In order to assess subtle fitness differences, culture supernatants were sampled longitudinally, and the viruses differentially quantified using vifA- and vifB-specific primers in real-time PCR assays. Based on an exponential net growth model, the growth rate of each virus was determined and the fitness cost of the mutation(s) distinguishing the two viruses represented as the net growth rate difference between the mutant and the native variants. Using this assay, the fitness impact of eight amino acid substitutions was quantitated at highly conserved sites in HIV-1 Gag and Env.

  2. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  3. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics.

  4. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  5. Direct Detection and Identification of Enteroviruses from Faeces of Healthy Nigerian Children Using a Cell-Culture Independent RT-Seminested PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Adewumi, Moses Olubusuyi; Coker, Bamidele Atinuke; Nudamajo, Felix Yasha; Adeniji, Johnson Adekunle

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a cell-culture independent protocol for detection of enteroviruses from clinical specimen was recommended by the WHO for surveillance alongside the previously established protocols. Here, we investigated whether this new protocol will show the same enterovirus diversity landscape as the established cell-culture dependent protocols. Faecal samples were collected from sixty apparently healthy children in Ibadan, Nigeria. Samples were resuspended in phosphate buffered saline, RNA was extracted, and the VP1 gene was amplified using WHO recommended RT-snPCR protocol. Amplicons were sequenced and sequences subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Fifteen (25%) of the 60 samples yielded the expected band size. Of the 15 amplicons sequenced, 12 were exploitable. The remaining 3 had electropherograms with multiple peaks and were unexploitable. Eleven of the 12 exploitable sequences were identified as Coxsackievirus A1 (CVA1), CVA3, CVA4, CVA8, CVA20, echovirus 32 (E32), enterovirus 71 (EV71), EVB80, and EVC99. Subsequently, the last exploitable sequence was identified as enterobacteriophage baseplate gene by nucleotide BLAST. The results of this study document the first description of molecular sequence data on CVA1, CVA8, and E32 strains present in Nigeria. The result further showed that species A enteroviruses were more commonly detected in the region when cell-culture bias is bypassed. PMID:27087810

  6. Direct Detection and Identification of Enteroviruses from Faeces of Healthy Nigerian Children Using a Cell-Culture Independent RT-Seminested PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Faleye, Temitope Oluwasegun Cephas; Adewumi, Moses Olubusuyi; Coker, Bamidele Atinuke; Nudamajo, Felix Yasha; Adeniji, Johnson Adekunle

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a cell-culture independent protocol for detection of enteroviruses from clinical specimen was recommended by the WHO for surveillance alongside the previously established protocols. Here, we investigated whether this new protocol will show the same enterovirus diversity landscape as the established cell-culture dependent protocols. Faecal samples were collected from sixty apparently healthy children in Ibadan, Nigeria. Samples were resuspended in phosphate buffered saline, RNA was extracted, and the VP1 gene was amplified using WHO recommended RT-snPCR protocol. Amplicons were sequenced and sequences subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Fifteen (25%) of the 60 samples yielded the expected band size. Of the 15 amplicons sequenced, 12 were exploitable. The remaining 3 had electropherograms with multiple peaks and were unexploitable. Eleven of the 12 exploitable sequences were identified as Coxsackievirus A1 (CVA1), CVA3, CVA4, CVA8, CVA20, echovirus 32 (E32), enterovirus 71 (EV71), EVB80, and EVC99. Subsequently, the last exploitable sequence was identified as enterobacteriophage baseplate gene by nucleotide BLAST. The results of this study document the first description of molecular sequence data on CVA1, CVA8, and E32 strains present in Nigeria. The result further showed that species A enteroviruses were more commonly detected in the region when cell-culture bias is bypassed.

  7. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nina; Walzl, Angelika; Unger, Christine; Rosner, Margit; Krupitza, Georg; Hengstschläger, Markus; Dolznig, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Determining the migratory and invasive capacity of tumor and stromal cells and clarifying the underlying mechanisms is most relevant for novel strategies in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, drug development and treatment. Here we shortly summarize the different modes of cell travelling and review in vitro methods, which can be used to evaluate migration and invasion. We provide a concise summary of established migration/invasion assays described in the literature, list advantages, limitations and drawbacks, give a tabular overview for convenience and depict the basic principles of the assays graphically. In many cases particular research problems and specific cell types do not leave a choice for a broad variety of usable assays. However, for most standard applications using adherent cells, based on our experience we suggest to use exclusion zone assays to evaluate migration/invasion. We substantiate our choice by demonstrating that the advantages outbalance the drawbacks e.g. the simple setup, the easy readout, the kinetic analysis, the evaluation of cell morphology and the feasibility to perform the assay with standard laboratory equipment. Finally, innovative 3D migration and invasion models including heterotypic cell interactions are discussed. These methods recapitulate the in vivo situation most closely. Results obtained with these assays have already shed new light on cancer cell spreading and potentially will uncover unknown mechanisms.

  8. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  9. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... monitor the effects of the administration of certain antimicrobial drugs. (b) Classification. Class I... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  10. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... monitor the effects of the administration of certain antimicrobial drugs. (b) Classification. Class I... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  11. Development and validation of a sensitive assay for the quantification of imatinib using LC/LC-MS/MS in human whole blood and cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Klawitter, Jelena; Zhang, Yan Ling; Klawitter, Jost; Anderson, Nora; Serkova, Natalie J.; Christians, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    We developed and validated a semi-automated LC/LC-MS/MS assay for the quantification of imatinib in human whole blood and leukemia cells. After protein precipitation, samples were injected into the HPLC system and trapped onto the enrichment column (flow 5 mL/min); extracts were back-flushed onto the analytical column. Ion transitions [M + H]+ of imatinib (m/z = 494.3 → 394.3) and its internal standard trazodone (372.5 → 176.3) were monitored. The range of reliable response was 0.03–75 ng/mL. The inter-day precisions were: 8.4% (0.03 ng/mL), 7.2% (0.1 ng/mL), 6.5% (1 ng/mL), 8.2% (10 ng/mL) and 4.3% (75 ng/mL) with no interference from ion suppression. Autosampler stability was 24 hs and samples were stable over three freeze–thaw cycles. This semi-automated method is simple with only one manual step, uses a commercially available internal standard, and has proven to be robust in larger studies. PMID:19517424

  12. Optimization of NRU assay in primary cultures of Eisenia fetida for metal toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Irizar, Amaia; Duarte, Daniel; Guilhermino, Lucia; Marigómez, Ionan; Soto, Manu

    2014-09-01

    Coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of lumbricids, have received special attention for ecotoxicological studies due to their sensibility to pollutants. Their in vitro responses are commonly quantified after in vivo exposure to real or spiked soils. Alternatively, quantifications of in vitro responses after in vitro exposure are being studied. Within this framework, the present study aimed at optimizing the neutral red uptake (NRU) assay in primary culture of Eisenia fetida coelomocytes for its application in soil toxicity testing. Optimized assay conditions were: earthworm depuration for 24 h before retrieving coelomocytes by electric extrusion; 2 × 10(5) seeded cells/well (200 µl) for the NRU assay and incubation for 1 h with neutral red dye. Supplementation of the culture medium with serum was not compatible with the NRU assay, but coelomocytes could be maintained with high viability for 3 days in a serum-free medium without replenishment. Thus, primary cultures were used for 24 h in vitro toxicity testing after exposure to different concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni and Pb (ranging from 0.1 to 100 μg/ml). Primary cultures were sensitive to metals, the viability declining in a dose-dependent manner. The toxicity rank was, from high to low, Pb > Ni > Cd > Cu. Therefore, it can be concluded that the NRU assay in coelomocytes in primary cultures provides a sensitive and prompt response after in vitro exposure to metals.

  13. Fluorometric assay for red blood cell antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.B.; Lambermont, M.; Strosberg, A.D.; Wybran, J.

    1981-03-01

    A fluorometric assay is described for the detection of red blood cell antibodies. The assay reveals as little as 600 molecules of bound, fluoroesceinated rabbit anti-human IgG antibodies per erythrocyte. Eleven patients with possible autoimmune erythrocyte disorder and negative direct antiglobulin test were studied by the fluorometric assay. The outcome of the fluorometric assay was compared with that of the human allogeneic rosette test. Results obtained by the two methods were in complete agreement. Five of the patients were shown to possess unexpectedly high levels of erythrocyte-bound IgG in spite of a negative, direct antiglobulin test. These findings and the validity of the fluorometric assay are discussed.

  14. Quantum-dot-based cell motility assay.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weiwei; Pellegrino, Teresa; Parak, Wolfgang J; Boudreau, Rosanne; Le Gros, Mark A; Gerion, Daniele; Alivisatos, A Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2005-06-28

    Because of their favorable physical and photochemical properties, colloidal CdSe/ZnS-semiconductor nanocrystals (commonly known as quantum dots) have enormous potential for use in biological imaging. In this report, we present an assay that uses quantum dots as markers to quantify cell motility. Cells that are seeded onto a homogeneous layer of quantum dots engulf and absorb the nanocrystals and, as a consequence, leave behind a fluorescence-free trail. By subsequently determining the ratio of cell area to fluorescence-free track area, we show that it is possible to differentiate between invasive and noninvasive cancer cells. Because this assay uses simple fluorescence detection, requires no significant data processing, and can be used in live-cell studies, it has the potential to be a powerful new tool for discriminating between invasive and noninvasive cancer cell lines or for studying cell signaling events involved in migration.

  15. [Study of diphtheria anatoxins in immunochemical and tissue culture assays].

    PubMed

    Gal'vidis, I A; Sviridov, V V

    2007-01-01

    Equine diphtheria antitoxins from different manufacturers were studied. Their immunochemical interaction with diphtheria toxin, toxoid, and antigens of Corynebacterium diphtheriae in ELISA and immunoblotting assays as well as biological activity in CHO cell assay were compared. The discovered differences between antitoxin samples with stated equal activity in IU/ml point to heterogeneity of antigen composition in preparations used for immunization. Mentioned methods allow to standardize antitoxins basing on their biological activity and immunochemical characteristics.

  16. Basic cell culture.

    PubMed

    Pollard, J W

    1990-01-01

    This article will describe the basic techniques required for successful cell culture. It will also act to introduce some of the other chapters in this volume. It is not intended, as this volume is not, to describe the establishment of a tissue culture laboratory, nor to provide a historical or theoretical survey of cell culture. There are several books that adequately cover these areas, including the now somewhat dated but still valuable volume by Paul (1), the multi-authored Methods in Enzymology volume edited by Jakoby and Pastan (2), and the new edition of Freshney (3). Instead, this chapter's focus will be on the techniques for establishing primary rodent cell cultures from embryos and adult skin, maintaining and subculturing these fibro-blasts and their transformed derivatives, and the isolation of genetically pure strains. The cells described are all derived from Chinese hamsters since, to date, these cells, have proved to be the most useful for somatic cell genetics (4,5). The techniques, however, are generally applicable to most fibroblastic cell types.

  17. Quantification of Dehalospirillum multivorans in Mixed-Culture Biofilms with an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bauer-Kreisel, P.; Eisenbeis, M.; Scholz-Muramatsu, H.

    1996-01-01

    A fast, highly selective and sensitive method to quantify specific biomasses in mixed-culture biofilms is described. It consists of detachment of a biofilm from its support material, resolution of the detached biofilm flocs in order to separate the enclosed cells and antigens, and quantification of specific biomass by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:16535389

  18. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  19. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  20. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc. has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc. is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  1. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  2. Application of long-term cultured interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assay for assessing effector and memory T cell responses in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled, up to 95% of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a l...

  3. A reporter assay for target validation in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Pollio, G; Roncarati, R; Seredenina, T; Terstappen, G C; Caricasole, A

    2008-07-15

    The deposition of beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta42 and Abeta40) in neuritic plaques is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and genes modulating their brain levels and neuronal effects could result in future disease modifying therapies. The causal association of candidate targets with AD is of paramount importance in current drug discovery, as a lack of efficacy of many candidate drugs is often due to inadequate validation of their pharmacological target. In Alzheimer's as well as in other neurodegenerative diseases, in vitro target validation is hampered by the difficulty of transfecting primary neuronal cultures and assaying the effects of genes on neuronal viability. Here we describe a rapid, sensitive and simple reporter-based assay for the validation of genes putatively associated with Abeta-mediated neurotoxicity, which can in principle be extended to the validation of targets in the context of other neuronal insults. The assay is suitable for the generation of robust and reproducible data in primary neuronal cultures allowing the dissection at a molecular level of complex pathways activated by the toxic insult in a cellular context that more closely represents the real disease situation.

  4. Expanding the available assays: adapting and validating In-Cell Westerns in microfluidic devices for cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Paguirigan, Amy L; Puccinelli, John P; Su, Xiaojing; Beebe, David J

    2010-10-01

    Microfluidic methods for cellular studies can significantly reduce costs due to reduced reagent and biological specimen requirements compared with many traditional culture techniques. However, current types of readouts are limited and this lack of suitable readouts for microfluidic cultures has significantly hindered the application of microfluidics for cell-based assays. The In-Cell Western (ICW) technique uses quantitative immunocytochemistry and a laser scanner to provide an in situ measure of protein quantities in cells grown in microfluidic channels of arbitrary geometries. The use of ICWs in microfluidic channels was validated by a detailed comparison with current macroscale methods and shown to have excellent correlation. Transforming growth factor-β-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of an epithelial cell line was used as an example for further validation of the technique as a readout for soluble-factor-based assays performed in high-throughput microfluidic channels. The use of passive pumping for sample delivery and laser scanning for analysis opens the door to high-throughput quantitative microfluidic cell-based assays that integrate seamlessly with existing high-throughput infrastructure.

  5. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Culture Media Using Acridan Lumigen PS-3 Assay

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Benedict; McGlashan, Susan R.; Shaikh, Shamim B.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated continuously during aerobic metabolism. ROS are highly reactive molecules and in excessive amounts, can lead to protein and DNA oxidation, protein cross-linking, and cell death. Cell-culture models provide a valuable tool in understanding the mechanisms that lead to cell death. Accumulation of ROS within cells and/or their release into the culture media are highly cell type-specific. The ability to estimate ROS levels in the culture media is an important step in understanding the mechanisms contributing to disease processes. In this paper, we describe the optimization of a simple method to estimate ROS levels in the culture media using the Acridan Lumigen PS-3 reagent provided in the Amersham ECL Plus kit (GE Healthcare, UK). We have shown that the Acridan Lumigen PS-3 assay generates ROS-specific chemiluminescence in fresh as well as media stored at −20°C, in as little as 10–20 μl of samples. The method was able to detect the dose (of stimulants)- and time (acute and chronic)-dependent changes in ROS levels in media collected from various cell types. Our results suggest that the kit reagents, PBS buffer, and various media did not contribute significantly to the overall chemiluminescence generated in the assay; however, we suggest that the unused medium specific for each cell type should be used as blanks and final readings of test samples normalized against these readings. As this method uses commonly available laboratory equipment and commercially available reagents, we believe this assay is convenient, economical, and specific in estimating ROS released extracellularly into the culture media. PMID:21966257

  6. Measurement of reactive oxygen species in the culture media using Acridan Lumigen PS-3 assay.

    PubMed

    Uy, Benedict; McGlashan, Susan R; Shaikh, Shamim B

    2011-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated continuously during aerobic metabolism. ROS are highly reactive molecules and in excessive amounts, can lead to protein and DNA oxidation, protein cross-linking, and cell death. Cell-culture models provide a valuable tool in understanding the mechanisms that lead to cell death. Accumulation of ROS within cells and/or their release into the culture media are highly cell type-specific. The ability to estimate ROS levels in the culture media is an important step in understanding the mechanisms contributing to disease processes. In this paper, we describe the optimization of a simple method to estimate ROS levels in the culture media using the Acridan Lumigen PS-3 reagent provided in the Amersham ECL Plus kit (GE Healthcare, UK). We have shown that the Acridan Lumigen PS-3 assay generates ROS-specific chemiluminescence in fresh as well as media stored at -20°C, in as little as 10-20 μl of samples. The method was able to detect the dose (of stimulants)- and time (acute and chronic)-dependent changes in ROS levels in media collected from various cell types. Our results suggest that the kit reagents, PBS buffer, and various media did not contribute significantly to the overall chemiluminescence generated in the assay; however, we suggest that the unused medium specific for each cell type should be used as blanks and final readings of test samples normalized against these readings. As this method uses commonly available laboratory equipment and commercially available reagents, we believe this assay is convenient, economical, and specific in estimating ROS released extracellularly into the culture media.

  7. Acquisition of susceptibility to hepatitis C virus replication in HepG2 cells by fusion with primary human hepatocytes: establishment of a quantitative assay for hepatitis C virus infectivity in a cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Yasui, K; Mukaigawa, J; Katsume, A; Kohara, M; Mitamura, K

    2001-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates in human and chimpanzee hepatocytes. To characterize the nature of HCV and evaluate antiviral agents, the development of an HCV replication system in a cell culture is essential. We developed a cell line derived from human hepatocytes by fusing them with a hepatoblastoma cell line, HepG2, and obtained several clones. When we tested the clones for their ability to support HCV replication by nested RT-PCR, we found 1 clone (IMY-N9) that was more susceptible to HCV replication than HepG2. The negative-strand HCV RNA was detected in IMY-N9 by strand-specific RT-PCR, and viral RNA was identified in culture supernatant during the culture. Then we monitored HCV RNA titers in IMY-N9 and HepG2, respectively, by real-time detection PCR throughout the culture. A significant increase in the HCV RNA titer was observed only in IMY-N9. Serial passages of HCV culture supernatant were shown in the culture system. Furthermore, we tested several infectious materials for viral infectivity by monitoring HCV RNA titers and/or 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) of HCV on IMY-N9. In each material, HCV showed various growth patterns and a different TCID50 even though the PCR titer in each material was identical. The results showed that HCV in each material served various growth patterns and different TCID50 even though PCR titer in each material was identical. This cell line is useful for estimating viral activity and for studying cellular factors that may be necessary to HCV replication in human hepatocytes.

  8. Oxygen Control For Bioreactors And In-vitro Cell Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nock, V.; Blaikie, R. J.; David, T.

    2009-07-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is an important parameter in biomedical and cell-culture applications. Several studies have found cell survival and function to be intimately linked to oxygen concentration. Laminar flow, as observed in microfluidic devices, provides an ideal environment to manipulate and control concentration gradients. In this paper we demonstrate the first characterization of integrated fluorescence-based oxygen sensors for DO measurement within a cell-culture bioreactor device. Solid-state PtOEPK/PS sensor patterns were integrated into the PDMS-based bioreactor and calibrated for detection of DO concentration with a superimposed layer of collagen and Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells. The sensor signal of the layer subjacent to the cells was found to follow a Stern-Volmer model and the intensity ratio was measured to I0/I100 = 3.9 after 3 days in culture. The device provides a novel tool for the control and spatially-resolved measurement of oxygen levels in cellular assays and cell-culture applications.

  9. The induction of suppressor cells in mixed leucocyte cultures and in mixed leucocyte-non-lymphoid cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Pawelec, G

    1980-01-01

    X-ray resistant porcine suppressor T cells expressing Ia-like antigens were obtained from mixed cultures of leucocytes and tissue cells (cultured kidney cells, liver cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts or X-irradiated leucocytes), and were assayed by their ability to suppress lymphocyte proliferation in a second mixed culture. All tissues tested induced suppressor cells although quantitative differences existed between them. Suppressor cell induction was under genetic control by at least two loci, one of which was within the major histocompatibility (MHC) complex. Suppressor cell function was restricted by the MHC type of the responding cell but not the stimulating cell in the second culture. PMID:6445866

  10. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  11. Enzyme capture assay for rapid identification of Escherichia coli in blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S W; Wu, J J; Chang, T C

    1994-01-01

    An enzyme capture assay (ECA) for rapid identification of Escherichia coli in blood cultures by using beta-D-glucuronidase as a marker was developed. Microdilution plates coated with antiglucuronidase were used to capture this enzyme from the cell lysates of blood cultures which showed growth of gram-negative bacteria. The assay, using 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide as a fluorogenic substrate, had a detection limit of 0.1 ng/ml (3 x 10(-13) M) for the enzyme; this was approximately equal to a cell concentration of 10(6) CFU of E. coli per ml. Among 212 blood cultures showing growth of gram-negative bacteria, 77 specimens were found to contain E. coli by conventional culture procedures and 73 samples were positive by ECA. Among the 135 blood cultures from which E. coli was not isolated, ECA gave one false-positive (Salmonella enteritidis) reaction. Thus, the sensitivity and specificity for the identification of E. coli in blood cultures by ECA were 94.8% (73/77) and 99.3% (134/135), respectively. From the finding of positive growth in the culture bottle, the assay can be completed within 4 h. In view of the high rate of isolation of E. coli from bacteremic patients, the test can be performed in parallel with conventional culture protocols; this may shorten the identification time for E. coli, and proper antimicrobial treatments may be started 24 h earlier than when results of conventional identification systems are used. PMID:8077387

  12. Selection and Separation of Viable Cells Based on a Cell-Lethal Assay

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Herman, Annadele; Phillips, Colleen; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    A method to select and separate viable cells based on the results of a cell-lethal assay was developed. Cells were plated on an array of culture sites with each site composed of closely spaced, releasable micropallets. Clonal colonies spanning multiple micropallets on individual culture sites were established within 72 h of plating. Adjacent sites were widely spaced with 100% of the colonies remaining sequestered on a single culture site during expansion. A laser-based method mechanically released a micropallet underlying a colony to segment the colony into two genetically identical colonies. One portion of the segmented colony was collected with 90% efficiency while viability of both fractions was 100%. The segmented colonies released from the array were fixed and subjected to immunofluorescence staining of intracellular phospho-ERK kinase to identify colonies that were highly resistant or sensitive to phorbol ester-induced activation of ERK. These resistant and sensitive cells were then matched to the corresponding viable colonies on the array. Sensitive and resistant colonies on the array were released and cultured. When these cultured cells were reanalyzed for phorbol ester-induced ERK activity, the cells retained the sensitive or resistant phenotype of the originally screened subcolony. Thus cells were separated and collected based using the result of a cell-lethal assay as selection criteria. These microarrays enabling clonal colony segmentation permitted sampling and manipulation of the colonies at very early times and at small cell numbers to reduce reagent, time and manpower requirements. PMID:21142138

  13. A multicellular spheroid array to realize spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a chip.

    PubMed

    Torisawa, Yu-suke; Takagi, Airi; Nashimoto, Yuji; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel multicellular spheroid culture system that facilitates the easy preparation and culture of a spheroid microarray for the long-term monitoring of cellular activity. A spheroid culture device with an array of pyramid-like microholes was constructed in a silicon chip that was equipped with elastomeric microchannels. A cell suspension was introduced via the microfluidic channel into the microstructure that comprised silicon microholes and elastomeric microwells. A single spheroid can be formed and localized precisely within each microstructure. Since the culture medium could be replaced via the microchannels, a long-term culture (of approximately 2 weeks) is available on the chip. Measurement of albumin production in the hepatoma cell line (HepG2) showed that the liver-specific functions were maintained for 2 weeks. Based on the cellular respiratory activity, the cellular viability of the spheroid array on the chip was evaluated using scanning electrochemical microscopy. Responses to four different chemical stimulations were simultaneously detected on the same chip, thus demonstrating that each channel could be evaluated independently under various stimulation conditions. Our spheroid culture system facilitated the understanding of spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a single chip, thus functioning as a useful drug-screening device for cancer and liver cells.

  14. Modification of the diphenylamine assay for cell quantification in three-dimensional biodegradable polymeric scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Pham, Edward A; Ho, Won Jin; Kamei, Daniel T; Wu, Benjamin M

    2010-02-01

    As three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems gain popularity in biomedical research, reliable assays for cell proliferation within 3D matrices become more important. Although many cell quantification techniques have been established for cells cultured on nondegradable plastic culture dishes and cells suspended in media, it is becoming increasingly clear that cell quantification after prolonged culture in 3D polymeric scaffolds imposes unique challenges because the added presence of polymeric materials may contribute to background signal via various mechanisms including autofluorescence, diffusion gradients, and sequestering effects. Thus, additional steps are required to ensure complete isolation of cells from the 3D scaffold. The diphenylamine assay isolates cellular DNA, degrades the polymeric matrix materials, and reacts with the DNA to yield a colorimetric response. Thus, we report here a practical modification of the diphenylamine assay and show that the assay quantifies cells in 3D polyester scaffolds reliably and reproducibly as long as the necessary amount of the acidic working reagent is present. Our study also demonstrates that the sensitivity of the assay can be optimized by controlling the dimensions of the sampling volume. Overall, the DPA assay offers an attractive solution for challenges associated with 3D cell quantification.

  15. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  20. A neuronal and astrocyte co-culture assay for high content analysis of neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Anderl, Janet L; Redpath, Stella; Ball, Andrew J

    2009-05-05

    High Content Analysis (HCA) assays combine cells and detection reagents with automated imaging and powerful image analysis algorithms, allowing measurement of multiple cellular phenotypes within a single assay. In this study, we utilized HCA to develop a novel assay for neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicity assessment represents an important part of drug safety evaluation, as well as being a significant focus of environmental protection efforts. Additionally, neurotoxicity is also a well-accepted in vitro marker of the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Recently, the application of HCA to neuronal screening has been reported. By labeling neuronal cells with betaIII-tubulin, HCA assays can provide high-throughput, non-subjective, quantitative measurements of parameters such as neuronal number, neurite count and neurite length, all of which can indicate neurotoxic effects. However, the role of astrocytes remains unexplored in these models. Astrocytes have an integral role in the maintenance of central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis, and are associated with both neuroprotection and neurodegradation when they are activated in response to toxic substances or disease states. GFAP is an intermediate filament protein expressed predominantly in the astrocytes of the CNS. Astrocytic activation (gliosis) leads to the upregulation of GFAP, commonly accompanied by astrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy. This process of reactive gliosis has been proposed as an early marker of damage to the nervous system. The traditional method for GFAP quantitation is by immunoassay. This approach is limited by an inability to provide information on cellular localization, morphology and cell number. We determined that HCA could be used to overcome these limitations and to simultaneously measure multiple features associated with gliosis - changes in GFAP expression, astrocyte hypertrophy, and astrocyte proliferation - within a single assay. In co-culture

  1. Heterochronic Pellet Assay to Test Cell-cell Communication in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Nobuhiko; Zinyk, Dawn; Ringuette, Randy; Wallace, Valerie; Schuurmans, Carol

    2017-01-01

    All seven retinal cell types that make up the mature retina are generated from a common, multipotent pool of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) (Wallace, 2011). One way that RPCs know when sufficient numbers of particular cell-types have been generated is through negative feedback signals, which are emitted by differentiated cells and must reach threshold levels to block additional differentiation of that cell type. A key assay to assess whether negative feedback signals are emitted by differentiated cells is a heterochronic pellet assay in which early stage RPCs are dissociated and labeled with BrdU, then mixed with a 20-fold excess of dissociated differentiated cells. The combined cells are then re-aggregated and cultured as a pellet on a membrane for 7–10 days in vitro. During this time frame, RPCs will differentiate, and the fate of the BrdU+ RPCs can be assessed using cell type-specific markers. Investigators who developed this pellet assay initially demonstrated that neonatal RPCs give rise to rods on an accelerated schedule compared to embryonic RPCs when the two cell types are mixed together (Watanabe and Raff, 1990; Watanabe et al., 1997). We have used this assay to demonstrate that sonic hedgehog (Shh), which we found acts as a negative regulator of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) differentiation, promotes RPC proliferation (Jensen and Wallace, 1997; Ringuette et al., 2014). More recently we modified the heterochronic pellet assay to assess the role of feedback signals for retinal amacrine cells, identifying transforming growth factor β2 (Tgfβ2) as a negative feedback signal, and Pten as a modulator of the Tgfβ2 response (Ma et al., 2007; Tachibana et al., 2016). This assay can be adapted to other lineages and tissues to assess cell-cell interactions between two different cell-types (heterotypic) in either an isochronic or heterochronic manner.

  2. Rapid, targeted and culture-free viral infectivity assay in drop-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Rotem, Assaf; Zhang, Huidan; Chang, Connie B; Basu, Anindita; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Koehler, Stephan A; Ren, Yukun; Lin, Jeffrey S; Pipas, James M; Feldman, Andrew B; Wobus, Christiane E; Weitz, David A

    2015-10-07

    A key viral property is infectivity, and its accurate measurement is crucial for the understanding of viral evolution, disease and treatment. Currently viral infectivity is measured using plaque assays, which involve prolonged culturing of host cells, and whose measurement is unable to differentiate between specific strains and is prone to low number fluctuation. We developed a rapid, targeted and culture-free infectivity assay using high-throughput drop-based microfluidics. Single infectious viruses are incubated in a large number of picoliter drops with host cells for one viral replication cycle followed by in-drop gene-specific amplification to detect infection events. Using murine noroviruses (MNV) as a model system, we measure their infectivity and determine the efficacy of a neutralizing antibody for different variants of MNV. Our results are comparable to traditional plaque-based assays and plaque reduction neutralization tests. However, the fast, low-cost, highly accurate genomic-based assay promises to be a superior method for drug screening and isolation of resistant viral strains. Moreover our technique can be adapted to measuring the infectivity of other pathogens, such as bacteria and fungi.

  3. Cell culture's spider silk road.

    PubMed

    Perkel, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    A number of synthetic and natural materials have been tried in cell culture and tissue engineering applications in recent years. Now Jeffrey Perkel takes a look at one new culture component that might surprise you-spider silk.

  4. Characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells: potency assay development.

    PubMed

    Hematti, Peiman

    2016-04-01

    Based on their many different mechanisms of action, presumed immune-privileged status, and relative ease of production, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are under intensive clinical investigation for treating a wide range of degenerative, inflammatory, and immunologic disorders. Identification of relevant and robust potency assays is not only a regulatory requirement, but it is also the basis for producing and delivering a product that is consistent, safe, and ultimately an effective therapy. Although development of an appropriate potency assay is one of the most challenging issues in cell-based therapies, it is of paramount importance in the process of developing and testing cellular products. Regardless of the many different tissue sources and methods used in culture expansion of MSCs, they possess many of the same morphologic, cell surface markers, and differentiation characteristics. However, MSC products with similar phenotypic characteristics could still have major differences in their biologic and functional attributes. Understanding the different mechanisms of action and establishment of relevant potency assays is of pivotal importance in allowing investigators and regulatory agencies to compare MSCs used in different clinical trials.

  5. Quantitative determination of urea concentrations in cell culture medium

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Robert J.X.; Kwan, Peggy; Olszewski, Kellen L.; Llinas, Manuel; Huang, Shu-Gui

    2009-01-01

    Urea is the major nitrogenous end product of protein metabolism in mammals. Here, we describe a quantitative, sensitive method for urea determination using a modified Jung reagent. This assay is specific for urea and is unaffected by ammonia, a common interferent in tissue and cell cultures. We demonstrate that this convenient colorimetric microplate-based, room temperature assay can be applied to determine urea synthesis in cell culture. PMID:19448747

  6. Quantitative determination of urea concentrations in cell culture medium.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Robert J X; Kwan, Peggy; Olszewski, Kellen L; Llinas, Manuel; Huang, Shu-Gui

    2009-06-01

    Urea is the major nitrogenous end product of protein metabolism in mammals. Here, we describe a quantitative, sensitive method for urea determination using a modified Jung reagent. This assay is specific for urea and is unaffected by ammonia, a common interferent in tissue and cell cultures. We demonstrate that this convenient colorimetric microplate-based, room temperature assay can be applied to determine urea synthesis in cell culture.

  7. The extended cell panel assay characterizes the relationship of prion strains RML, 79A, and 139A and reveals conversion of 139A to 79A-like prions in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Oelschlegel, Anja M; Fallahi, Mohammad; Ortiz-Umpierre, Shannon; Weissmann, Charles

    2012-05-01

    Three commonly used isolates of murine prions, 79A, 139A, and RML, were derived from the so-called Chandler isolate, which was obtained by propagating prions from scrapie-infected goat brain in mice. RML is widely believed to be identical with 139A; however, using the extended cell panel assay (ECPA), we here show that 139A and RML isolates are distinct, while 79A and RML could not be distinguished. We undertook to clone 79A and 139A prions by endpoint dilution in murine neuroblastoma-derived PK1 cells. Cloned 79A prions, when returned to mouse brain, were unchanged and indistinguishable from RML by ECPA. However, 139A-derived clones, when returned to brain, yielded prions distinct from 139A and similar to 79A and RML. Thus, when 139A prions were transferred to PK1 cells, 79A/RML-like prions, either present as a minor component in the brain 139A population or generated by mutation in the cells, were selected and, after being returned to brain, were the major if not only component of the population.

  8. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways.

  9. Assay of immunoglobulins in supernatants of lymphoid cell lines by conventional laser nephelometry.

    PubMed

    Virella, G; Muñoz, J; Robinson, J E; Goust, J M

    1979-03-01

    An adaptation of the nephelometric assay for serum immunoglobulins has been developed for detection and quantitation of extracellular immunoglobulins in cultures of lymphoblastoid cell lines. This assay employs the standard equipment for laser nephelometry and commercial reagents for immunoglobulin quantitation. By adjusting dilutions of controls and sample volumes of culture supernatants, amounts of IgG and IgM below 1 microgram/ml can be detected in culture supernatants. At concentrations between 1 and 4 microgram/ml, day-to-day and within-run variations for IgM assays were 16 and 11% respectively. The possibility of measuring immunoglobulins secreted by cell lines by conventional laser nephelometry opens several areas of application in the study of the functional activity of B cells and of cell-cell interactions.

  10. A simple electronic volume cell sorter for clonogenicity assays.

    PubMed

    Freyer, J P; Wilder, M E; Schor, P L; Coulter, J; Raju, M R

    1989-05-01

    A single-parameter electronic volume flow cell sorter that can be easily and inexpensively constructed using existing technology is described. The instrument is designed for ease and flexibility of operation, including such features as a large open area for recovering sorted cells into a variety of dishes or vessels; a remote, electrically activated fluidics system; a mechanism for heating or cooling samples during sorting; a simple arrangement for monitoring and adjusting the sorting control parameters; and an interface to a standard IBM personal computer for data acquisition, analysis, and control of the sorting windows. Several researchers in our laboratory now routinely use this sorter for plating precise numbers of cells directly into culture dishes in an aseptic manner for clonogenicity assays. The instrument can sort cells at rates of up to approximately 2,000 per second with greater than 80% sorting efficiency and no cytotoxicity. An advantage of this system is that the sorting windows can be set to exclude acellular debris and include either the entire cell volume distribution or a subset thereof. Applications of the instrument are detailed, including 1) precise cell plating for low-dose survival studies, 2) separation of cells into age compartments, and 3) rapid inoculation of single cells into multiwell dishes for cloning studies. Advantages of this technology for cell survival studies are detailed, along with some limitations to its applicability.

  11. An acid phosphatase assay for quantifying the growth of adherent and nonadherent cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, T T; Sinai, P; Kain, S R

    1996-10-01

    We describe an acid phosphatase assay for determination of cell growth based on quantification of cytosolic acid phosphatase activity. The assay is based on the hydrolysis of the p-nitrophenyl phosphate by intracellular acid phosphatases in viable cells to produce p-nitrophenol. For all cell types examined, absorbance of p-nitrophenol at 405 nm is directly proportional to the cell number in the range of 10(3)-10(5) cells. The assay can quantify as few as 1000 cells per well in 96-well microtiter plates. The acid phosphatase assay was used to count various adherent and nonadherent cells, including human tumors, L6, and HT-2 cells. We also demonstrate the utility of this assay for analysis of growth factor and cytokine bioactivity on mammalian cells in culture. In comparison to [3H]thymidine incorporation, the acid phosphatase assay has similar sensitivity but a wider linear response range. The method also shows higher sensitivity and reproducibility in comparison to cell proliferation assays based on the reduction of tetrazolium salts. Because of the ease of use, sensitivity, and low cost, the acid phosphatase method is especially suited to applications where a large number of samples are assayed.

  12. In vitro assays for cobblestone area-forming cells, LTC-IC, and CFU-C.

    PubMed

    van Os, Ronald P; Dethmers-Ausema, Bertien; de Haan, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Various assays exist that measure the function of hematopoietic stemcells (HSCs). In this chapter, in vitro assays are described that measure the frequency of progenitors (colony-forming unit in culture; CFU-C), stem cells (long-term culture-initiating cell; LTC-IC), or both (cobblestone area-forming cell assay; CAFC). These assays measure the potential of a test cell population retrospectively, i.e., at the time its activity is evident when the stem cell itself is often not detectable anymore. Although the in vitro LTC-IC and CAFC assays have been shown to correlate with in vivo activity, in vivo transplantation assays, where it can be shown that cells possess the ability to indefinitely repopulate all blood lineages, are the ultimate proof for HSC activity. Nevertheless, these in vitro assays provide an excellent method to screen for stem cell activity of a putative stem cell population or for screening the effect of a certain treatment on HSCs.

  13. Standardization and validation of Vero cell assay for potency estimation of diphtheria antitoxin serum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Kanwar, Sarika; Bansal, Vivek; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2009-10-01

    Diphtheria toxin has the capacity to block protein synthesis in cultured mammalian cells, and thus causing cell death. This capacity of diphtheria toxin was utilized for in-vitro neutralization test to determine antibody titer, using Vero cells, which have been found to be susceptible to diphtheria toxin. In the present study, a Vero cell assay was standardized and validated for potency estimation of diphtheria antitoxin serum (DATS). The results obtained by Vero cell assay were compared with in-vivo biological assay. High degree of correlation (+0.98) was found between in-vivo biological assay and in-vitro Vero cell assay. The assay has also been found to be effective in determining the rising antibody titer in the equines inducted in DATS production. The present study indicated that although biological assays hold the key for final potency estimations till date but in the future scenario in-vitro Vero cell assay may be a good alternative to in-vivo biological assay.

  14. Human cell chips: adapting DNA microarray spotting technology to cell-based imaging assays.

    PubMed

    Hart, Traver; Zhao, Alice; Garg, Ankit; Bolusani, Swetha; Marcotte, Edward M

    2009-10-28

    Here we describe human spotted cell chips, a technology for determining cellular state across arrays of cells subjected to chemical or genetic perturbation. Cells are grown and treated under standard tissue culture conditions before being fixed and printed onto replicate glass slides, effectively decoupling the experimental conditions from the assay technique. Each slide is then probed using immunofluorescence or other optical reporter and assayed by automated microscopy. We show potential applications of the cell chip by assaying HeLa and A549 samples for changes in target protein abundance (of the dsRNA-activated protein kinase PKR), subcellular localization (nuclear translocation of NFkappaB) and activation state (phosphorylation of STAT1 and of the p38 and JNK stress kinases) in response to treatment by several chemical effectors (anisomycin, TNFalpha, and interferon), and we demonstrate scalability by printing a chip with approximately 4,700 discrete samples of HeLa cells. Coupling this technology to high-throughput methods for culturing and treating cell lines could enable researchers to examine the impact of exogenous effectors on the same population of experimentally treated cells across multiple reporter targets potentially representing a variety of molecular systems, thus producing a highly multiplexed dataset with minimized experimental variance and at reduced reagent cost compared to alternative techniques. The ability to prepare and store chips also allows researchers to follow up on observations gleaned from initial screens with maximal repeatability.

  15. Polydimethylsiloxane SlipChip for mammalian cell culture applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Wen; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2015-11-07

    This paper reports a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SlipChip for in vitro cell culture applications, multiple-treatment assays, cell co-cultures, and cytokine detection assays. The PDMS SlipChip is composed of two PDMS layers with microfluidic channels on each surface that are separated by a thin silicone fluid (Si-fluid) layer. The integration of Si-fluid enables the two PDMS layers to be slid to different positions; therefore, the channel patterns can be re-arranged for various applications. The SlipChip design significantly reduces the complexity of sample handling, transportation, and treatment processes. To apply the developed SlipChip for cell culture applications, human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549) and lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) were cultured to examine the biocompatibility of the developed PDMS SlipChip. Moreover, embryonic pluripotent stem cells (ES-D3) were also cultured in the device to evaluate the retention of their stemness in the device. The experimental results show that cell morphology, viability and proliferation are not affected when the cells are cultured in the SlipChip, indicating that the device is highly compatible with mammalian cell culture. In addition, the stemness of the ES-D3 cells was highly retained after they were cultured in the device, suggesting the feasibility of using the SlipChip for stem cell research. Various cell experiments, such as simultaneous triple staining of cells and co-culture of MRC-5 with A549 cells, were also performed to demonstrate the functionalities of the PDMS SlipChip. Furthermore, we used a cytokine detection assay to evaluate the effect of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) treatment on the cytokine secretion of A549 cells using the SlipChip. The developed PDMS SlipChip provides a straightforward and effective platform for various on-chip in vitro cell cultures and consequent analysis, which is promising for a number of cell biology studies and biomedical applications.

  16. Development of a Drosophila cell-based error correction assay.

    PubMed

    Salemi, Jeffrey D; McGilvray, Philip T; Maresca, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Accurate transmission of the genome through cell division requires microtubules from opposing spindle poles to interact with protein super-structures called kinetochores that assemble on each sister chromatid. Most kinetochores establish erroneous attachments that are destabilized through a process called error correction. Failure to correct improper kinetochore-microtubule (kt-MT) interactions before anaphase onset results in chromosomal instability (CIN), which has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor adaptation. Thus, it is important to characterize the molecular basis of error correction to better comprehend how CIN occurs and how it can be modulated. An error correction assay has been previously developed in cultured mammalian cells in which incorrect kt-MT attachments are created through the induction of monopolar spindle assembly via chemical inhibition of kinesin-5. Error correction is then monitored following inhibitor wash out. Implementing the error correction assay in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells would be valuable because kt-MT attachments are easily visualized and the cells are highly amenable to RNAi and high-throughput screening. However, Drosophila kinesin-5 (Klp61F) is unaffected by available small molecule inhibitors. To overcome this limitation, we have rendered S2 cells susceptible to kinesin-5 inhibitors by functionally replacing Klp61F with human kinesin-5 (Eg5). Eg5 expression rescued the assembly of monopolar spindles typically caused by Klp61F depletion. Eg5-mediated bipoles collapsed into monopoles due, in part, to kinesin-14 (Ncd) activity when treated with the kinesin-5 inhibitor S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC). Furthermore, bipolar spindles reassembled and error correction was observed after STLC wash out. Importantly, error correction in Eg5-expressing S2 cells was dependent on the well-established error correction kinase Aurora B. This system provides a powerful new cell-based platform for studying error correction and CIN.

  17. Atraumatic Pulsatile Leukocyte Circulation for Long-Term In Vitro Dynamic Culture and Adhesion Assays.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Giulia; Stoiber, Martin; Pfeiffer, Dagmar; Schima, Heinrich

    2015-11-01

    Low flow rate pumping of cell suspensions finds current applications in bioreactors for short-term dynamic cell culture and adhesion assays. The aim of this study was to develop an atraumatic pump and hemodynamically adapted test circuit to allow operating periods of at least several hours. A computer-controlled mini-pump (MP) was constructed based on non-occlusive local compression of an elastic tube with commercial bi-leaflet valves directing the pulsatile flow into a compliant circuit. Cell damage and activation in the system were tested with whole blood in comparison with a set with a conventional peristaltic pump (PP). Activation of circulating THP-1 monocytes was tested by measuring the expression of CD54 (ICAM-1). Additionally, monocyte-endothelial interactions were monitored using a parallel-plate flow chamber with an artificial stenosis. The system required a priming volume of only 20 mL, delivering a peak pulsatile flow of up to 35 mL/min. After 8 h, blood hemolysis was significantly lower for MP with 11 ± 3 mg/dL compared with PP with 100 ± 16 mg/dL. CD142 (tissue factor) expression on blood monocytes was 50% lower for MP. With MP, THP-1 cells could be pumped for extended periods (17 h), with no enhanced expression of CD54 permitting the long-term co-culture of THP-1 with endothelial cells and the analysis of flow pattern effects on cell adhesion. A low-damage assay setup was developed, which allows the pulsatile flow of THP-1 cells and investigation of their interaction with other cells or surfaces for extended periods of time.

  18. High density cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  19. The Molecular Bacterial Load Assay Replaces Solid Culture for Measuring Early Bactericidal Response to Antituberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mtafya, Bariki; Phillips, Patrick P. J.; Hoelscher, Michael; Ntinginya, Elias N.; Kohlenberg, Anke; Rachow, Andrea; Rojas-Ponce, Gabriel; McHugh, Timothy D.; Heinrich, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the use of the molecular bacterial load (MBL) assay, for measuring viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum, in comparison with solid agar and liquid culture. The MBL assay provides early information on the rate of decline in bacterial load and has technical advantages over culture in either form. PMID:24871215

  20. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

  1. Cell migration and invasion assays as tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hulkower, Keren I; Herber, Renee L

    2011-03-11

    Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screening process. This article will review the effective use of several principle formats for studying cell motility: scratch assays, transmembrane assays, microfluidic devices and cell exclusion zone assays.

  2. A dual-color luciferase assay system reveals circadian resetting of cultured fibroblasts by co-cultured adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Ikeda, Masaaki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms of various organs and tissues are synchronized by pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal glands can synchronize circadian rhythms in other tissues. Many hormones show circadian rhythms in their plasma concentrations; however, whether organs outside the SCN can serve as master synchronizers to entrain circadian rhythms in target tissues is not well understood. To further delineate the function of the adrenal glands and the interactions of circadian rhythms in putative master synchronizing organs and their target tissues, here we report a simple co-culture system using a dual-color luciferase assay to monitor circadian rhythms separately in various explanted tissues and fibroblasts. In this system, circadian rhythms of organs and target cells were simultaneously tracked by the green-emitting beetle luciferase from Pyrearinus termitilluminans (ELuc) and the red-emitting beetle luciferase from Phrixothrix hirtus (SLR), respectively. We obtained tissues from the adrenal glands, thyroid glands, and lungs of transgenic mice that expressed ELuc under control of the promoter from a canonical clock gene, mBmal1. The tissues were co-cultured with Rat-1 fibroblasts as representative target cells expressing SLR under control of the mBmal1 promoter. Amplitudes of the circadian rhythms of Rat-1 fibroblasts were potentiated when the fibroblasts were co-cultured with adrenal gland tissue, but not when co-cultured with thyroid gland or lung tissue. The phases of Rat-1 fibroblasts were reset by application of adrenal gland tissue, whereas the phases of adrenal gland tissue were not influenced by Rat-1 fibroblasts. Furthermore, the effect of the adrenal gland tissue on the fibroblasts was blocked by application of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist. These results demonstrate that glucocorticoids are strong circadian synchronizers for fibroblasts and that this co-culture

  3. Rapid dissociation of HIV-1 from cultured cells severely limits infectivity assays, causes the inactivation ascribed to entry inhibitors, and masks the inherently high level of infectivity of virions.

    PubMed

    Platt, Emily J; Kozak, Susan L; Durnin, James P; Hope, Thomas J; Kabat, David

    2010-03-01

    By using immunofluorescence microscopy to observe and analyze freshly made HIV-1 virions adsorbed onto cells, we found that they are inherently highly infectious, rather than predominantly defective as previously suggested. Surprisingly, polycations enhance titers 20- to 30-fold by stabilizing adsorption and preventing a previously undescribed process of rapid dissociation, strongly implying that infectivity assays for many viruses are limited not only by inefficient virus diffusion onto cells but also by a postattachment race between entry and dissociation. This kinetic competition underlies inhibitory effects of CCR5 antagonists and explains why adaptive HIV-1 mutations overcome many cell entry limitations by accelerating entry.

  4. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Haisler, William L; Timm, David M; Gage, Jacob A; Tseng, Hubert; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-10-01

    Recently, biomedical research has moved toward cell culture in three dimensions to better recapitulate native cellular environments. This protocol describes one method for 3D culture, the magnetic levitation method (MLM), in which cells bind with a magnetic nanoparticle assembly overnight to render them magnetic. When resuspended in medium, an external magnetic field levitates and concentrates cells at the air-liquid interface, where they aggregate to form larger 3D cultures. The resulting cultures are dense, can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) and can be analyzed similarly to the other culture systems using techniques such as immunohistochemical analysis (IHC), western blotting and other biochemical assays. This protocol details the MLM and other associated techniques (cell culture, imaging and IHC) adapted for the MLM. The MLM requires 45 min of working time over 2 d to create 3D cultures that can be cultured in the long term (>7 d).

  5. Assessment of cell viability in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Aras, Mandar A; Hartnett, Karen A; Aizenman, Elias

    2008-07-01

    This unit contains five protocols for assaying cell viability in vitro using primary neuronal cultures, including a novel method for use with transfected neurons. Three of the assays are based on the principle that cell death cascades alter membrane permeability. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay measures the amount of the cytoplasmic enzyme released into the bathing medium, while the trypan blue and propidium iodide assays measure the ability of cells to exclude dye from their cytoplasm. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay measures the mitochondrial activity of viable cells by quantifying the conversion of the tetrazolium salt to its formazan product. Finally, the fifth assay details the measurement of luciferase expression as an indication of neuronal viability within a relatively small population of transfected neurons.

  6. Principles of cancer cell culture.

    PubMed

    Cree, Ian A

    2011-01-01

    The basics of cell culture are now relatively common, though it was not always so. The pioneers of cell culture would envy our simple access to manufactured plastics, media and equipment for such studies. The prerequisites for cell culture are a well lit and suitably ventilated laboratory with a laminar flow hood (Class II), CO(2) incubator, benchtop centrifuge, microscope, plasticware (flasks and plates) and a supply of media with or without serum supplements. Not only can all of this be ordered easily over the internet, but large numbers of well-characterised cell lines are available from libraries maintained to a very high standard allowing the researcher to commence experiments rapidly and economically. Attention to safety and disposal is important, and maintenance of equipment remains essential. This chapter should enable researchers with little prior knowledge to set up a suitable laboratory to do basic cell culture, but there is still no substitute for experience within an existing well-run laboratory.

  7. A Novel Collagen Dot Assay for Monitoring Cancer Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Alford, Vincent M; Roth, Eric; Zhang, Qian; Cao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical determinant of cancer invasion and metastasis. Drugs targeting cancer cell migration have been hindered due to the lack of effective assays for monitoring cancer cell migration. Here we describe a novel method to microscopically monitor cell migration in a quantitative fashion. This assay can be used to study genes involved in cancer cell migration, as well as screening anticancer drugs that target this cellular process.

  8. A ring barrier-based migration assay to assess cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Das, Asha M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2015-06-01

    Cell migration is a key feature of virtually every biological process, and it can be studied in a variety of ways. Here we outline a protocol for the in vitro study of cell migration using a ring barrier-based assay. A 'barrier' is inserted in the culture chamber, which prevents cells from entering a defined area. Cells of interest are seeded around this barrier, and after the formation of a peripheral monolayer the barrier is removed and migration into the cell-free area is monitored. This assay is highly reproducible and convenient to perform, and it allows the deduction of several parameters of migration, including total and effective migration, velocity and cell polarization. An advantage of this assay over the conventional scratch assay is that the cells move over an unaltered and virgin surface, and thus the effect of matrix components on cell migration can be studied. In addition, the cells are not harmed at the onset of the assay. Through computer automation, four individual barrier assays can be monitored at the same time. The procedure can be used in a 12-well standard plate allowing higher throughput, or it can be modified to perform invasion assays. The basic procedure takes 2-3 d to complete.

  9. Automated cell-based assay for screening of aquaporin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mola, Maria Grazia; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Spray, David C; Frigeri, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    Aquaporins form water channels that play major roles in a variety of physiological processes so that altered expression or function may underlie pathological conditions. In order to identify compounds that modulate aquaporin function, we have implemented a functional assay based on rapid measurement of osmotically induced cell volume changes to screen several libraries of diverse drugs. The time course of fluorescence changes in calcein-loaded cells was analyzed during an osmotic challenge using a 96-multiwell fluorescence plate reader. This system was validated using astrocyte primary cultures and fibroblasts that strongly express endogenous AQP4 and AQP1 proteins, respectively, as well as AQP4-transfected cells. We screened 3575 compounds, including 418 FDA-approved and commercially available drugs, for their effect on AQP-mediated water transport. Primary screening yielded 10 compounds that affected water transport activity in both astrocytes and AQP4-transfected cells and 42 compounds that altered cell volume regulation in astrocytes. Selected drugs were then analyzed on AQP1-expressing erythrocytes and AQP4-expressing membrane vesicles by stopped-flow light scattering. Four molecules of the National Cancer Institute's chemical library (NSC164914, NSC670229, NSC168597, NSC301460) were identified that differentially affected both AQP4 and AQP1 mediated water transport, with EC50 values between 20 and 50 microM. This fluorescence microplate reader-based assay may, thus, provide a platform for high-throughput screening which, when coupled to a secondary evaluation to confirm target specificity, should allow discovery of AQP-specific compounds for novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of water balance disorders.

  10. Automated Cell-Based Assay for Screening of Aquaporin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mola, Maria Grazia; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Spray, David C.; Frigeri, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Aquaporins form water channels that play major roles in a variety of physiological processes so that altered expression or function may underlie pathological conditions. In order to identify compounds that modulate aquaporin function, we have implemented a functional assay based on rapid measurement of osmotically induced cell volume changes to screen several libraries of diverse drugs. The time course of fluorescence changes in calcein-loaded cells was analyzed during an osmotic challenge using a 96-multiwell fluorescence plate reader. This system was validated using astrocyte primary cultures and fibroblasts that strongly express endogenous AQP4 and AQP1 proteins, respectively, as well as AQP4-transfected cells. We screened 3575 compounds, including 418 FDA-approved and commercially available drugs, for their effect on AQP-mediated water transport. Primary screening yielded 10 compounds that affected water transport activity in both astrocytes and AQP4-transfected cells and 42 compounds that altered cell volume regulation in astrocytes. Selected drugs were then analyzed on AQP1-expressing erythrocytes and AQP4-expressing membrane vesicles by stopped-flow light scattering. Four molecules of the National Cancer Institute's chemical library (NSC164914, NSC670229, NSC168597, NSC301460) were identified that differentially affected both AQP4 and AQP1 mediated water transport, with EC50 values between 20 and 50 μM. This fluorescence microplate reader-based assay may, thus, provide a platform for high-throughput screening which, when coupled to a secondary evaluation to confirm target specificity, should allow discovery of AQP-specific compounds for novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of water balance disorders. PMID:19705854

  11. Measuring Survival of Hematopoietic Cancer Cells with the Colony-Forming Assay in Soft Agar.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-08-01

    Colony-forming assays measure the ability of cells in culture to grow and divide into groups. Any cell that has the potential to form a colony may also have the potential to cause cancer or relapse in vivo. Colony-forming assays also provide an indirect measurement of cell death because any cell that is dead or dying will not continue to proliferate. The proliferative capacity of adherent cells such as fibroblasts can be determined by growing cells at low density on culture dishes and counting the number of distinct groups that form over time. Cells that grow in suspension, such as hematopoietic cells, cannot be assayed this way because the cells move freely in the media. Assays to determine the colony-forming ability of hematopoietic cells must therefore be performed in solid matrices that restrict large-scale movement of the cells. One such matrix is soft agar. This protocol describes the use of soft agar to compare the colony-forming ability of untreated hematopoietic cells to the colony-forming ability of hematopoietic cells that have been treated with a cytotoxic agent.

  12. High cell density attenuates reactive oxygen species: implications for in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dennis P; Yahav, Jonathan; Sperandeo, Michael; Maloney, Lauren; McTigue, Monica; Lin, Fubao; Clark, Richard A F

    2012-01-01

    In vitro cell-based assays are an essential and universally used step in elucidation of biological processes as well as in drug development. However, results obtained depend on the validity of protocols used. This statement certainly pertains to in vitro assays of oxidative stress. The holy grail of in vitro models is reliability and predictability of outcomes that relate to a single variable like addition of hydrogen peroxide or xanthine oxidase. Without such validated outcomes, comparison of results among different laboratories is not possible. Achieving this goal requires a thorough understanding of the complex interplay between the cells, their environment, and the experimental assays. Furthermore, as this knowledge is attained, it must be disseminated and used to update and standardize existing protocols. Here, we confirm and extend the effect of pyruvate and cell density on in vitro oxidative stress assays. Cell viability was assessed using a colorimetric assay measuring the reduction of a tetrazolium salt (XTT) into a colored formazan dye. Extracellular hydrogen peroxide concentrations were measured using the foxp3 assay. We confirmed a previously reported finding that pyruvate, a common ingredient in cell culture media, acts as an extracellular scavenger of reactive oxygen species. We also demonstrated that cell density directly correlates with resistance to oxidative stress in tissue culture. It is theorized that the protective effect due to cell density predominantly relates to intracellular factors such as reduced glutathione and extracellular factors such as catalase.

  13. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shengjuan; Bergen, Werner G.; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V.

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  14. Neutral red uptake assay for the estimation of cell viability/cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Guillermo; del Peso, Ana; Zurita, Jorge L

    2008-01-01

    The neutral red uptake assay provides a quantitative estimation of the number of viable cells in a culture. It is one of the most used cytotoxicity tests with many biomedical and environmental applications. It is based on the ability of viable cells to incorporate and bind the supravital dye neutral red in the lysosomes. Most primary cells and cell lines from diverse origin may be successfully used. Cells are seeded in 96-well tissue culture plates and are treated for the appropriate period. The plates are then incubated for 2 h with a medium containing neutral red. The cells are subsequently washed, the dye is extracted in each well and the absorbance is read using a spectrophotometer. The procedure is cheaper and more sensitive than other cytotoxicity tests (tetrazolium salts, enzyme leakage or protein content). Once the cells have been treated, the assay can be completed in <3 h.

  15. Use of immunochromatographic assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from liquid culture

    PubMed Central

    Považan, Anika; Vukelić, Anka; Savković, Tijana; Kurucin, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    A new, simple immunochromatographic assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in liquid cultures has been developed. The principle of the assay is binding of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex specific antigen to the monoclonal antibody conjugated on the test strip. The aim of this study is evaluation of the performance of immunochromatographic assay in identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in primary positive liquid cultures of BacT/Alert automated system. A total of 159 primary positive liquid cultures were tested using the immunochromatographic assay (BD MGIT TBc ID) and the conventional subculture, followed by identification using biochemical tests. Of 159 positive liquid cultures, using the conventional method, Mycobacterium tuberculos is was identified in 119 (74.8%), nontuberculous mycobacteria were found in 4 (2.5%), 14 (8.8%) cultures were contaminated and 22 (13.8%) cultures were found to be negative. Using the immunochromatographic assay, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was detected in 118 (74.2%) liquid cultures, and 41 (25.8%) tests were negative. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the test were 98.3%; 97.5%; 99.15%; 95.12%, respectively. The value of kappa test was 0.950, and McNemar test was 1.00. The immunochromatographic assay is a simple and rapid test which represents a suitable alternative to the conventional subculture method for the primary identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in liquid cultures of BacT/Alert automated system. PMID:22364301

  16. Electrical lysis of cells for detergent-free droplet assays

    PubMed Central

    Tran, T. M.; Abate, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient lysis is critical when analyzing single cells in microfluidic droplets, but existing methods utilize detergents that can interfere with the assays to be performed. We demonstrate robust cell lysis without the use of detergents or other chemicals. In our method, cells are exposed to electric field immediately before encapsulation in droplets, resulting in cell lysis. We characterize lysis efficiency as a function of control parameters and demonstrate compatibility with enzymatic assays by measuring the catalysis of β-glucosidase, an important cellulase used in the conversion of biomass to biofuel. Our method enables assays in microfluidic droplets that are incompatible with detergents. PMID:27051471

  17. Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq.) extract exhibits atropine-sensitive activity in a cultured cardiomyocyte assay.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Satin; Long, Shannon R; Proteau, Philip J; Filtz, Theresa M

    2009-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) plant extract is used as a herbal alternative medicine for the prevention and treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it was shown that hawthorn extract preparations caused negative chronotropic effects in a cultured neonatal murine cardiomyocyte assay, independent of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade. The aim of this study was to further characterize the effect of hawthorn extract to decrease the contraction rate of cultured cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis that hawthorn is acting via muscarinic receptors, the effect of hawthorn extract on atrial versus ventricular cardiomyocytes in culture was evaluated. As would be expected for activation of muscarinic receptors, hawthorn extract had a greater effect in atrial cells. Atrial and/or ventricular cardiomyocytes were then treated with hawthorn extract in the presence of atropine or himbacine. Changes in the contraction rate of cultured cardiomyocytes revealed that both muscarinic antagonists significantly attenuated the negative chronotropic activity of hawthorn extract. Using quinuclidinyl benzilate, L-[benzylic-4,4'-(3)H] ([(3)H]-QNB) as a radioligand antagonist, the effect of a partially purified hawthorn extract fraction to inhibit muscarinic receptor binding was quantified. Hawthorn extract fraction 3 dose-dependently inhibited [(3)H]-QNB binding to mouse heart membranes. Taken together, these findings suggest that decreased contraction frequency by hawthorn extracts in neonatal murine cardiomyocytes may be mediated via muscarinic receptor activation.

  18. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shengjuan; Bergen, Werner G; Hausman, Gary J; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V

    2013-04-12

    Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  19. Dead cell counts during serum cultivation are underestimated by the fluorescent live/dead assay.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengda; Cui, Zhanfeng; Urban, Jill

    2011-05-01

    The live/dead fluorescent assay provides a quick method for assessing the proportion of live and dead cells in cell culture systems or tissues and is widely used. Dead cells are detected by the fluorescence produced when propidium iodide (PI) binds to DNA; PI and similar molecules are excluded from live cells but can penetrate dead cells because of their loss of membrane integrity. Here we investigated the effect of serum in the culture medium on the reliability of the method. We assessed viability of chondrocytes with/without serum using both a live/dead assay kit and also trypan blue staining. We found that after 2 days of culture, the DNA-binding dye PI could no longer detect dead cells if serum was present but they were readily detected in serum-free medium or if an inhibitor to DNase I was added to the serum-containing medium. Dead cells could be detected by trypan blue staining in all cultures. Hence dead cells are no longer detected as the DNase I present in serum degrades their DNA. DNA-binding dyes may thus not give a reliable estimate of the number of dead cells in systems that have been cultured in the presence of serum for several days.

  20. New flow cytometric assays for monitoring cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zaritskaya, Liubov; Shurin, Michael R; Sayers, Thomas J; Malyguine, Anatoli M

    2010-06-01

    The exact immunologic responses after vaccination that result in effective antitumor immunity have not yet been fully elucidated and the data from ex vivo T-cell assays have not yet defined adequate surrogate markers for clinical efficacy. A more detailed knowledge of the specific immune responses that correlate with positive clinical outcomes should help to develop better or novel strategies to effectively activate the immune system against tumors. Furthermore, clinically relevant material is often limited and, thus, precludes the ability to perform multiple assays. The two main assays currently used to monitor lymphocyte-mediated cytoxicity in cancer patients are the (51)Cr-release assay and IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. The former has a number of disadvantages, including low sensitivity, poor labeling and high spontaneous release of isotope from some tumor target cells. Additional problems with the (51)Cr-release assay include difficulty in obtaining autologous tumor targets, and biohazard and disposal problems for the isotope. The ELISpot assays do not directly measure cytotoxic activity and are, therefore, a surrogate marker of cyotoxic capacity of effector T cells. Furthermore, they do not assess cytotoxicity mediated by the production of the TNF family of death ligands by the cytotoxic cells. Therefore, assays that allow for the simultaneous measurement of several parameters may be more advantageous for clinical monitoring. In this respect, multifactor flow cytometry-based assays are a valid addition to the currently available immunologic monitoring assays. Use of these assays will enable detection and enumeration of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and their specific effector functions and any correlations with clinical responses. Comprehensive, multifactor analysis of effector cell responses after vaccination may help to detect factors that determine the success or failure of a vaccine and its immunological potency.

  1. Tenascin-C regulates proliferation and migration of cultured astrocytes in a scratch wound assay.

    PubMed

    Nishio, T; Kawaguchi, S; Yamamoto, M; Iseda, T; Kawasaki, T; Hase, T

    2005-01-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC), an extracellular matrix glycoprotein, is involved in tissue morphogenesis like embryogenesis, wound healing or tumorigenesis. Astrocytes are known to play major roles in wound healing in the CNS. To elucidate the roles of TNC in wound closure by astrocytes, we have examined the morphological changes of cultured astrocytes in a scratch wound assay and measured the content of soluble TNC released into the medium. We have also localized the expression of TNC mRNA, TNC, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin and integrin beta1. After wounding, glial cells rapidly released the largest TNC isoform and proliferated in the border zones. Subsequently, they became polarized with unidirectional processes and finally migrated toward the denuded area. The proliferating border zone cells and pre-migratory cells intensely expressed TNC mRNA, TNC-, vimentin-, GFAP- and integrin beta1-like immunoreactivity, while the migratory cells showed generally reduced expression except the front. Exogenous TNC enhanced cell proliferation and migration, while functional blocking with anti-TNC or anti-integrin beta1 antibody reduced both of them. These results suggest that mechanical injury induces boundary astrocytes to produce and release TNC that promotes cell proliferation and migration via integrin beta1 in an autocrine/paracrine fashion.

  2. Aseptic technique for cell culture.

    PubMed

    Coté, R J

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes some of the ways that a laboratory can deal with the constant threat of microbial contamination in cell cultures. A protocol on aseptic technique is described first. This catch-all term universally appears in any set of instructions pertaining to procedures in which noncontaminating conditions must be maintained. In reality, aseptic technique encompasses all aspects of environmental control, personal hygiene, equipment and media sterilization, and associated quality control procedures needed to ensure that a procedure is, indeed, performed with aseptic, noncontaminating technique. Although cell culture can theoretically be carried out on an open bench in a low-traffic area, most cell culture work is carried out using a horizontal laminar-flow clean bench or a vertical laminar-flow biosafety cabinet. Both are described here.

  3. Inhibition of neuronal cell-cell adhesion measured by the microscopic aggregation assay and impedance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiertz, R. W. F.; Marani, E.; Rutten, W. L. C.

    2010-10-01

    Microscopic aggregation assay and impedance sensing (IS) were used to monitor a change in in vitro neuron-neuron adhesion in response to blocking of cell adhesion molecules. By blocking neuron-neuron adhesion, migration and aggregation of neuronal cells can be inhibited. This leads to better control of spatial arrangement of cells in culture. In the literature N-CAM, L1 and N-cadherin proteins are pointed out as main regulators of neuronal adhesion. In this study, these three main cell adhesion molecules were used to inhibit neuron-to-neuron adhesion and aggregation. Both soluble extracellular domains and antigen antibodies were added to these adhesion molecules. They were investigated for their blocking ability in neuronal cultures. First, in a 96 h aggregation assay on a low-adhesive substrate, the effect of inhibition of the three proteins on aggregation of cortical neurons was investigated optically. Both L1 antibody and L1 protein had no effect on the degree of aggregation. An N-cadherin antibody however was shown to be effective in aggregation inhibition at concentrations of 1 and 3 µg ml-1. Up to 96 h no aggregation occurred. A similar effect was achieved by the N-cadherin protein, although less distinct. N-CAM blocking revealed no inhibition of aggregation. Second, results from IS corresponded to those of the aggregation assays. In these experiments neuron-neuron adhesion was also inhibited by blocking N-CAM L1 and N-cadherin. Cortical neurons were cultured in small wells containing circular 100 µm diameter gold electrodes, so small changes in cell-cell interactions in monolayers of neurons could be monitored by IS. Impedances of neuron-covered electrodes were significantly lower in the presence of the N-cadherin antibody and protein at concentrations of 1, 3 and 10 µg ml-1, indicating a less profound binding between adjacent neurons. Results from the aggregation assays and impedance measurements demonstrate the applicability of blocking cell adhesion

  4. Reference cells and ploidy in the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Collins, Andrew; Graupner, Anne; Gutzkow, Kristine B; Olsen, Ann-Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the comet assay single cells are analyzed with respect to their level of DNA damage. Discrimination of the individual cell or cell type based on DNA content, with concomitant scoring of the DNA damage, is useful since this may allow analysis of mixtures of cells. Different cells can then be characterized based on their ploidy, cell cycle stage, or genome size. We here describe two applications of such a cell type-specific comet assay: (i) Testicular cell suspensions, analyzed on the basis of their ploidy during spermatogenesis; and (ii) reference cells in the form of fish erythrocytes which can be included as internal standards to correct for inter-assay variations. With standard fluorochromes used in the comet assay, the total staining signal from each cell - whether damaged or undamaged - was found to be associated with the cell's DNA content. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity of single cells is straightforward since these data are available in scoring systems based on image analysis. The analysis of testicular cell suspensions provides information on cell type specific composition, susceptibility to genotoxicants, and DNA repair. Internal reference cells, either untreated or carrying defined numbers of lesions induced by ionizing radiation, are useful for investigation of experimental factors that can cause variation in comet assay results, and for routine inclusion in experiments to facilitate standardization of methods, and comparison of comet assay data obtained in different experiments or in different laboratories. They can also be used - in combination with a reference curve - to quantify the DNA lesions induced by a certain treatment. Fish cells of a range of genome sizes, both greater and smaller than human, are suitable for this purpose, and they are inexpensive.

  5. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  6. Ocular irritation reversibility assessment for personal care products using a porcine corneal culture assay.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Douglas A; Avalos, Javier; Kaufman, Lewis E; Simion, F Anthony; Cerven, Daniel R

    2011-04-01

    Personal care product manufacturers have used a broad spectrum of alternative ocular irritation assays during the past two decades because these tests do not require the use of live animals, they provide reliable predictive data, and they are relatively inexpensive to conduct. To complement these assays, the ex vivo Porcine Corneal Opacity Reversibility Assay (PorCORA) was recently developed using a corneal culture model to predict reversibility of ocular irritants. Three commercially available consumer products (a shampoo, a hair color glaze, and a hair colorant system containing 12% hydrogen peroxide) were each tested in two PorCORA study replicates in order to assess potential ocular damage reversibility for surfactant-, propylene carbonate-, and peroxide-based formulations, respectively. Under the exaggerated, in vitro study conditions, the surfactant-based shampoo may cause irreversible porcine corneal damage (histological changes in the epithelial squamous cell and/or basal cell layers), whereas the hair color glaze and 12% hydrogen peroxide product caused fully reversible ocular irritation (microscopic changes only in the superficial squamous cell layer). The hair color glaze and peroxide product results correlate with established in vivo data for similar compounds, but the shampoo results contradicted previous BCOP results (expected to be only a mild irritant). Therefore, although the PorCORA protocol shows promise in predicting the extent and reversibility of potential ocular damage caused by accidental consumer eye exposure to personal care products, the contradictory results for the surfactant-based shampoo indicate that more extensive validation testing of the PorCORA is necessary to definitively establish the protocol's reliability as a Draize test replacement.

  7. Cell culture compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yiao, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6 (SEQ ID NO:1 encodes the full length endoglucanase; SEQ ID NO:4 encodes the mature form), and the corresponding endoglucanase VI amino acid sequence ("EGVI"; SEQ ID NO:3 is the signal sequence; SEQ ID NO:2 is the mature sequence). The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  8. Use of a soluble tetrazolium/formazan assay for chicken cells.

    PubMed

    Tajima, T; Hironao, T; Kajikawa, T; Kawamura, H

    1992-12-01

    We evaluated a soluble tetrazolium/formazan assay using 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino)-carbonyl ]-2H- tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) for chicken cell growth. Fifty microliter of solution containing 1 mg/ml of XTT and 0.025 mM phenazine methosulfate was added to the cells in a well of 96-well microplate. After 4 hr incubation at 37 degrees C, the absorbance was measured at 490 nm. Under this condition, absorbances were well correlated with cell number of Marek's disease tumor cells and chicken embryo fibroblasts. Proliferation of chicken lymphocytes stimulated with mitogens was also effectively measured. The formazan of XTT is water-soluble and can be quantitated in culture medium without the necessity for extraction with organic solvents. Thus XTT assay is simple and useful for the quantity assay with chicken cells.

  9. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted by conditioned medium

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Cai, Changzu; Yu, Zhilong; Pang, Yuhong; Zhou, Ying; Qian, Lili; Wei, Wensheng; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    It is technically challenging to investigate the function of secreted protein in real time by supply of conditioned medium that contains secreted protein of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) and its receptor, and eventually leads to cell lethality. To monitor the dynamic interplay between these components in live cells, we use an integrated microfluidic device to perform the cell viability assays with real-time controlled culture microenvironment in parallel. Conditioned medium, which contains the secreted proteins from specific cell lines, can be continuously pumped towards the cells that exposed to toxin. The exogenous DKK1 secreted from distant cells is able to rescue the sensitivity to toxin for those DKK1-knocked-down cells. This high-throughput assay allows us to precisely quantify the dynamic interaction between key components that cause cell death, and provide independent evidence of the function of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. PMID:25731605

  10. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility assays in paper-based portable culture devices.

    PubMed

    Deiss, Frédérique; Funes-Huacca, Maribel E; Bal, Jasmin; Tjhung, Katrina F; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-01-07

    To detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria in areas remote from microbiology laboratories, we designed portable culture devices performing an analogue of the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion test inside patterned papers embedded in tape. We quantified the antibiotic susceptibility of several strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium by measuring blue-colored zones of inhibited growth.

  12. HEPES inhibits the conversion of prion protein in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Delmouly, Karine; Belondrade, Maxime; Casanova, Danielle; Milhavet, Ollivier; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2011-05-01

    HEPES is a well-known buffering reagent used in cell-culture medium. Interestingly, this compound is also responsible for significant modifications of biological parameters such as uptake of organic molecules, alteration of oxidative stress mechanisms or inhibition of ion channels. While using cell-culture medium supplemented with HEPES on prion-infected cells, it was noticed that there was a significant concentration-dependent inhibition of accumulation of the abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)). This effect was present only in live cells and was thought to be related to modification of the PrP environment or biology. These results could modify the interpretation of cell-culture assays of prion therapeutic agents, as well as of previous cell biology results obtained in the field using HEPES buffers. This inhibitory effect of HEPES could also be exploited to prevent contamination or propagation of prions in cell culture.

  13. A novel in vitro assay for murine haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eckmann, L; Freshney, M; Wright, E G; Sproul, A; Wilkie, N; Pragnell, I B

    1988-12-01

    Study of the biology of haematopoietic stem cells is crucially dependent on the availability of suitable in vitro assays. Existing assays have suffered from the fact that they detect small subcompartments of the total stem cell compartment. This limits experiments where it is required to assay a high proportion of stem cells, e.g. the enumeration of stem cell numbers under varying conditions or the identification and purification of stem cell regulators. We describe an in vitro assay which shows macroscopic colony formation and limited self-renewal capacity in vitro. The detected cell (CFU-A) has a low cycling status in normal bone marrow (NBM) and responds to known stem cell regulators. The incidence (100-200 per 10(5) in NBM), the proliferative characteristics under stress and some of the physical properties are similar to stem cells detected by colony formation after transplantation into lethally irradiated recipients (CFU-S). These data indicate that our assay detects a high proportion of haematopoietic stem cells in vitro. This will facilitate experiments on stem cell behaviour which have previously been difficult to conduct.

  14. A novel in vitro assay for murine haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, L.; Freshney, M.; Wright, E. G.; Sproul, A.; Wilkie, N.; Pragnell, I. B.

    1988-01-01

    Study of the biology of haematopoietic stem cells is crucially dependent on the availability of suitable in vitro assays. Existing assays have suffered from the fact that they detect small subcompartments of the total stem cell compartment. This limits experiments where it is required to assay a high proportion of stem cells, e.g. the enumeration of stem cell numbers under varying conditions or the identification and purification of stem cell regulators. We describe an in vitro assay which shows macroscopic colony formation and limited self-renewal capacity in vitro. The detected cell (CFU-A) has a low cycling status in normal bone marrow (NBM) and responds to known stem cell regulators. The incidence (100-200 per 10(5) in NBM), the proliferative characteristics under stress and some of the physical properties are similar to stem cells detected by colony formation after transplantation into lethally irradiated recipients (CFU-S). These data indicate that our assay detects a high proportion of haematopoietic stem cells in vitro. This will facilitate experiments on stem cell behaviour which have previously been difficult to conduct. PMID:3254725

  15. Multiwell cell culture plate format with integrated microfluidic perfusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domansky, Karel; Inman, Walker; Serdy, Jim; Griffith, Linda G.

    2006-01-01

    A new cell culture analog has been developed. It is based on the standard multiwell cell culture plate format but it provides perfused three-dimensional cell culture capability. The new capability is achieved by integrating microfluidic valves and pumps into the plate. The system provides a means to conduct high throughput assays for target validation and predictive toxicology in the drug discovery and development process. It can be also used for evaluation of long-term exposure to drugs or environmental agents or as a model to study viral hepatitis, cancer metastasis, and other diseases and pathological conditions.

  16. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  17. Cell-based resorption assays for bone graft substitutes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyang; Egaña, José T; Reckhenrich, Ann K; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Lohmeyer, Jörn A; Schantz, Jan Thorsten; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F

    2012-01-01

    The clinical utilization of resorbable bone substitutes has been growing rapidly during the last decade, creating a rising demand for new resorbable biomaterials. An ideal resorbable bone substitute should not only function as a load-bearing material but also integrate into the local bone remodeling process. This means that these bone substitutes need to undergo controlled resorption and then be replaced by newly formed bone structures. Thus the assessment of resorbability is an important first step in predicting the in vivo clinical function of bone substitute biomaterials. Compared with in vivo assays, cell-based assays are relatively easy, reproducible, inexpensive and do not involve the suffering of animals. Moreover, the discovery of RANKL and M-CSF for osteoclastic differentiation has made the differentiation and cultivation of human osteoclasts possible and, as a result, human cell-based bone substitute resorption assays have been developed. In addition, the evolution of microscopy technology allows advanced analyses of the resorption pits on biomaterials. The aim of the current review is to give a concise update on in vitro cell-based resorption assays for analyzing bone substitute resorption. For this purpose models using different cells from different species are compared. Several popular two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical methods used for resorption assays are described. The limitations and advantages of the current ISO degradation assay in comparison with cell-based assays are discussed.

  18. Time-stretch microscopy on a DVD for high-throughput imaging cell-based assay.

    PubMed

    Tang, Anson H L; Yeung, P; Chan, Godfrey C F; Chan, Barbara P; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2017-02-01

    Cell-based assay based on time-stretch imaging is recognized to be well-suited for high-throughput phenotypic screening. However, this ultrafast imaging technique has primarily been limited to suspension-cell assay, leaving a wide range of solid-substrate assay formats uncharted. Moreover, time-stretch imaging is generally restricted to intrinsic biophysical phenotyping, but lacks the biomolecular signatures of the cells. To address these challenges, we develop a spinning time-stretch imaging assay platform based on the functionalized digital versatile disc (DVD). We demonstrate that adherent cell culture and biochemically-specific cell-capture can now be assayed with time-stretch microscopy, thanks to the high-speed DVD spinning motion that naturally enables on-the-fly cellular imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate of >10MHz. As scanning the whole DVD at such a high speed enables ultra-large field-of-view imaging, it could be favorable for scaling both the assay throughput and content as demanded in many applications, e.g. drug discovery, and rare cancer cell screening.

  19. Time-stretch microscopy on a DVD for high-throughput imaging cell-based assay

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Anson H. L.; Yeung, P.; Chan, Godfrey C. F.; Chan, Barbara P.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2017-01-01

    Cell-based assay based on time-stretch imaging is recognized to be well-suited for high-throughput phenotypic screening. However, this ultrafast imaging technique has primarily been limited to suspension-cell assay, leaving a wide range of solid-substrate assay formats uncharted. Moreover, time-stretch imaging is generally restricted to intrinsic biophysical phenotyping, but lacks the biomolecular signatures of the cells. To address these challenges, we develop a spinning time-stretch imaging assay platform based on the functionalized digital versatile disc (DVD). We demonstrate that adherent cell culture and biochemically-specific cell-capture can now be assayed with time-stretch microscopy, thanks to the high-speed DVD spinning motion that naturally enables on-the-fly cellular imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate of >10MHz. As scanning the whole DVD at such a high speed enables ultra-large field-of-view imaging, it could be favorable for scaling both the assay throughput and content as demanded in many applications, e.g. drug discovery, and rare cancer cell screening. PMID:28270973

  20. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells) or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes. Over a 30 year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been little employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases. PMID:25506353

  1. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells) or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes. Over a 30 year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been little employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases.

  2. Interspecific in vitro assay for the chimera-forming ability of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hideki; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Umino, Ayumi; Sato, Hideyuki; Hamanaka, Sanae; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Nishimura, Ken; Ohtaka, Manami; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2015-09-15

    Functional assay limitations are an emerging issue in characterizing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). With rodent PSCs, chimera formation using pre-implantation embryos is the gold-standard assay of pluripotency (competence of progeny to differentiate into all three germ layers). In human PSCs (hPSCs), however, this can only be monitored via teratoma formation or in vitro differentiation, as ethical concerns preclude generation of human-human or human-animal chimeras. To circumvent this issue, we developed a functional assay utilizing interspecific blastocyst injection and in vitro culture (interspecies in vitro chimera assay) that enables the development and observation of embryos up to headfold stage. The assay uses mouse pre-implantation embryos and rat, monkey and human PSCs to create interspecies chimeras cultured in vitro to the early egg-cylinder stage. Intra- and interspecific chimera assays with rodent PSC lines were performed to confirm the consistency of results in vitro and in vivo. The behavior of chimeras developed in vitro appeared to recapitulate that of chimeras developed in vivo; that is, PSC-derived cells survived and were integrated into the epiblast of egg-cylinder-stage embryos. This indicates that the interspecific in vitro chimera assay is useful in evaluating the chimera-forming ability of rodent PSCs. However, when human induced PSCs (both conventional and naïve-like types) were injected into mouse embryos and cultured, some human cells survived but were segregated; unlike epiblast-stage rodent PSCs, they never integrated into the epiblast of egg-cylinder-stage embryos. These data suggest that the mouse-human interspecies in vitro chimera assay does not accurately reflect the early developmental potential/process of hPSCs. The use of evolutionarily more closely related species as host embryos might be necessary to evaluate the developmental potency of hPSCs.

  3. A simple colony-formation assay in liquid medium, termed 'tadpoling', provides a sensitive measure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability.

    PubMed

    Welch, Aaron Z; Koshland, Douglas E

    2013-12-01

    Here we describe the first high-throughput amenable method of quantifying Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability. Current high-throughput methods of assessing yeast cell viability, such as flow cytometry and SGA analysis, do not measure the percentage viability of a culture but instead measure cell vitality or colony fitness, respectively. We developed a method, called tadpoling, to quantify the percentage viability of a yeast culture, with the ability to detect as few as one viable cell amongst ~10(8) dead cells. The most important feature of this assay is the exploitation of yeast colony formation in liquid medium. Utilizing a microtiter dish, we are able to observe a range of viability of 100% to 0.0001%. Comparison of tadpoling to the traditional plating method to measure yeast culture viability reveals that, for the majority of Saccharomyces species analyzed there is no significant difference between the two methods. In comparison to flow cytometry using propidium iodide, the high-throughput method of measuring yeast culture viability, tadpoling is much more accurate at culture viabilities < 1%. Thus, we show that tadpoling provides an easy, inexpensive, space-saving method, amenable to high-throughput screens, for accurately measuring yeast cell viability.

  4. Logistic Proliferation of Cells in Scratch Assays is Delayed.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wang; Shah, Esha T; Penington, Catherine J; McCue, Scott W; Maini, Philip K; Simpson, Matthew J

    2017-03-23

    Scratch assays are used to study how a population of cells re-colonises a vacant region on a two-dimensional substrate after a cell monolayer is scratched. These experiments are used in many applications including drug design for the treatment of cancer and chronic wounds. To provide insights into the mechanisms that drive scratch assays, solutions of continuum reaction-diffusion models have been calibrated to data from scratch assays. These models typically include a logistic source term to describe carrying capacity-limited proliferation; however, the choice of using a logistic source term is often made without examining whether it is valid. Here we study the proliferation of PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a scratch assay. All experimental results for the scratch assay are compared with equivalent results from a proliferation assay where the cell monolayer is not scratched. Visual inspection of the time evolution of the cell density away from the location of the scratch reveals a series of sigmoid curves that could be naively calibrated to the solution of the logistic growth model. However, careful analysis of the per capita growth rate as a function of density reveals several key differences between the proliferation of cells in scratch and proliferation assays. Our findings suggest that the logistic growth model is valid for the entire duration of the proliferation assay. On the other hand, guided by data, we suggest that there are two phases of proliferation in a scratch assay; at short time, we have a disturbance phase where proliferation is not logistic, and this is followed by a growth phase where proliferation appears to be logistic. These two phases are observed across a large number of experiments performed at different initial cell densities. Overall our study shows that simply calibrating the solution of a continuum model to a scratch assay might produce misleading parameter estimates, and this issue can be resolved by making a distinction between the

  5. Are in vitro estimates of cell diffusivity and cell proliferation rate sensitive to assay geometry?

    PubMed

    Treloar, Katrina K; Simpson, Matthew J; McElwain, D L Sean; Baker, Ruth E

    2014-09-07

    Cells respond to various biochemical and physical cues during wound-healing and tumour progression. in vitro assays used to study these processes are typically conducted in one particular geometry and it is unclear how the assay geometry affects the capacity of cell populations to spread, or whether the relevant mechanisms, such as cell motility and cell proliferation, are somehow sensitive to the geometry of the assay. In this work we use a circular barrier assay to characterise the spreading of cell populations in two different geometries. Assay 1 describes a tumour-like geometry where a cell population spreads outwards into an open space. Assay 2 describes a wound-like geometry where a cell population spreads inwards to close a void. We use a combination of discrete and continuum mathematical models and automated image processing methods to obtain independent estimates of the effective cell diffusivity, D, and the effective cell proliferation rate, λ. Using our parameterised mathematical model we confirm that our estimates of D and λ accurately predict the time-evolution of the location of the leading edge and the cell density profiles for both assay 1 and assay 2. Our work suggests that the effective cell diffusivity is up to 50% lower for assay 2 compared to assay 1, whereas the effective cell proliferation rate is up to 30% lower for assay 2 compared to assay 1.

  6. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies.

  7. One-step seeding of neural stem cells with vitronectin-supplemented medium for high throughput screening assays

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Sheng; Li, Rong; Long, Yan; Titus, Steve; Zhao, Jinghua; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Human neuronal cells differentiated from induced pluripotent cells have emerged as a new model system for the study of disease pathophysiology and evaluation of drug efficacy. Differentiated neuronal cells are more similar in genetics and biological content to the human brain cells than other animal disease models. However, culture of neuronal cells in assay plates requires a labor-intensive procedure of plate pre-coating, hampering its applications in high throughput screening (HTS). We developed a simplified method with one-step seeding of neural stem cells in assay plates by supplementing the medium with a recombinant human vitronectin (VTN), thus avoiding plate pre-coating. Robust results were obtained from cell viability, calcium response, and neurite outgrowth assays using this new method. Our data demonstrate that this approach greatly simplifies high throughput assays using neuronal cells differentiated from human stem cells for translational research. PMID:27647668

  8. [³H]serotonin release assay using antigen-stimulated rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF) is elevated in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune states in conjunction with increased accumulation of mast cells. Mast cells, which are of hematopoietic lineage, and NGF appear to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. Mast cells themselves are capable of producing and responding to NGF. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation and culture of peritoneal-derived rat mast cells, together with a [(3)H]serotonin release assay which is useful in assessing the effects of antigens and neurotrophic factors on mast-cell activation.

  9. Using a medium-throughput comet assay to evaluate the global DNA methylation status of single cells.

    PubMed

    Lewies, Angélique; Van Dyk, Etresia; Wentzel, Johannes F; Pretorius, Pieter J

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a simple and cost effective technique, commonly used to analyze and quantify DNA damage in individual cells. The versatility of the comet assay allows introduction of various modifications to the basic technique. The difference in the methylation sensitivity of the isoschizomeric restriction enzymes HpaII and MspI are used to demonstrate the ability of the comet assay to measure the global DNA methylation level of individual cells when using cell cultures. In the experiments described here, a medium-throughput comet assay and methylation sensitive comet assay are combined to produce a methylation sensitive medium-throughput comet assay to measure changes in the global DNA methylation pattern in individual cells under various growth conditions.

  10. Culture of murine aortic explants in 3-dimensional extracellular matrix: a novel, miniaturized assay of angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reed, May J; Karres, Nathan; Eyman, Daniel; Vernon, Robert B

    2007-05-01

    Assays of angiogenesis in vitro are critical to the study of vascular morphogenesis and to the evaluation of therapeutic compounds that promote or inhibit vascular growth. Culture of explanted aortic segments from rats or mice in a 3-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the most effective ways to generate capillary-like endothelial sprouts in vitro. We have modified the classic aortic explant model by placing the aortic segments from mice within small (5.6 mm diameter, 30 microl volume) lenticular hydrogels of type I collagen supported at the edge by nylon mesh rings. This method of culture, referred to as the "miniature ring-supported gel" (MRSG) assay, optimizes handling, cytological staining, and conventional imaging of the specimen and permits use of minimal volumes of reagents in a 96-well tissue culture format. We have used the MRSG assay to quantify the impaired angiogenic response of aged mice relative to young mice and to show that aged mice have significantly decreased sprout formation, but have similar levels of invasion of vascular smooth muscle cells into the supportive ECM. The MRSG assay, which combines low volume, physically robust gels in conjunction with mouse aortic segments, may prove to be a highly useful tool in studies of the process and control of vascular growth.

  11. A bioluminescent caspase-1 activity assay rapidly monitors inflammasome activation in cells.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Martha; Moehring, Danielle; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Núñez, Gabriel; Callaway, Justin; Ting, Jenny; Scurria, Mike; Ugo, Tim; Bernad, Laurent; Cali, James; Lazar, Dan

    2017-03-04

    Inflammasomes are protein complexes induced by diverse inflammatory stimuli that activate caspase-1, resulting in the processing and release of cytokines, IL-1β and IL-18, and pyroptosis, an immunogenic form of cell death. To provide a homogeneous method for detecting caspase-1 activity, we developed a bioluminescent, plate-based assay that combines a substrate, Z-WEHD-aminoluciferin, with a thermostable luciferase in an optimized lytic reagent added directly to cultured cells. Assay specificity for caspase-1 is conferred by inclusion of a proteasome inhibitor in the lytic reagent and by use of a caspase-1 inhibitor to confirm activity. This approach enables a specific and rapid determination of caspase-1 activation. Caspase-1 activity is stable in the reagent thereby providing assay convenience and flexibility. Using this assay system, caspase-1 activation has been determined in THP-1 cells following treatment with α-hemolysin, LPS, nigericin, gramicidin, MSU, R848, Pam3CSK4, and flagellin. Caspase-1 activation has also been demonstrated in treated J774A.1 mouse macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from mice, as well as in human primary monocytes. Caspase-1 activity was not detected in treated BMDMs derived from Casp1(-/-) mice, further confirming the specificity of the assay. Caspase-1 activity can be measured directly in cultured cells using the lytic reagent, or caspase-1 activity released into medium can be monitored by assay of transferred supernatant. The caspase-1 assay can be multiplexed with other assays to monitor additional parameters from the same cells, such as IL-1β release or cell death. The caspase-1 assay in combination with a sensitive real-time monitor of cell death allows one to accurately establish pyroptosis. This assay system provides a rapid, convenient, and flexible method to specifically and quantitatively monitor caspase-1 activation in cells in a plate-based format. This will allow a more efficient and effective

  12. A Cell-Based Assay to Assess Hemichannel Function

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Srinivasan; Fiori, Mariana C.; Cuello, Luis G.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2017-01-01

    Activation of connexin hemichannels is involved in the pathophysiology of disorders that include deafness, stroke, and cardiac infarct. This aspect makes hemichannels an attractive therapeutic target. Unfortunately, most available inhibitors are not selective or isoform specific, which hampers their translational application. The absence of a battery of useful inhibitors is due in part to the absence of simple screening assays for the discovery of hemichannel-active drugs. Here, we present an assay that we have recently developed to assess hemichannel function. The assay is based on the expression of functional human connexins in a genetically modified bacterial strain deficient in K+ uptake. These modified cells do not grow in low-K+ medium, but functional expression of connexin hemichannels allows K+ uptake and growth. This cell-growth-based assay is simple, robust, and easily scalable to high-throughput multi-well platforms. PMID:28356896

  13. Role of recombinant human erythropoietin loading chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles in busulfan-induced genotoxicity: Analysis of DNA fragmentation via comet assay in cultured HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi-Barghi, Nasrin; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Etebari, Mahmoud; Jafarian Dehkordi, Abbas

    2016-10-01

    -treatment conditions, significantly decreased the level of DNA damage induced by busulfan, measured with the comet assay, in HepG2 cells compared to the regular rhEPO group.

  14. Hormonal modulation of brain tumour growth: a cell culture study.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, N; Zibera, C; Butti, G; Assietti, R; Sica, G; Scerrati, M; Iacopino, F; Roselli, R; Paoletti, P; Robustelli della Cuna, G

    1989-01-01

    Tissue samples derived from two neuroepithelial tumours and five meningiomas were obtained at surgery from seven patients and cultured in order to study the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and testosterone acetate (TA) on cell proliferation. Glucocorticoid and androgen receptors (GR, AR) were determined both on tissue samples (7 cases) and on five out of the seven cell cultures obtained by tumours. GR and AR were present respectively in 5 and in 4 out of the tumour specimens assayed and in 4/5 and 2/3 of the tested cell cultures. DEX activity on cell growth was tested on six cell cultures. Four of them showed a significant growth inhibition at the highest drug concentration. On the contrary, a significant growth stimulation was observed in four out of the five cultures, where GR were present, using low hormone concentrations. Treatment with pharmacological doses of TA caused a significant cytotoxicity in all the tested cultures. Low TA concentrations inhibited cell growth in one out of the two cell cultures which contained AR, but were ineffective in cultures lacking AR. Our preliminary results suggest a possible role in growth regulation by DEX and TA in intracranial tumours, on the basis of the presence of specific hormone receptors.

  15. Tracking the Invasion of Small Numbers of Cells in Paper-Based Assays with Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Truong, Andrew S; Lochbaum, Christian A; Boyce, Matthew W; Lockett, Matthew R

    2015-11-17

    Paper-based scaffolds are an attractive material for culturing mammalian cells in a three-dimensional environment. There are a number of previously published studies, which utilize these scaffolds to generate models of aortic valves, cardiac ischemia and reperfusion, and solid tumors. These models have largely relied on fluorescence imaging and microscopy to quantify cells in the scaffolds. We present here a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method, capable of quantifying multiple cell types in a single culture with the aid of DNA barcodes: unique sequences of DNA introduced to the genome of individual cells or cell types through lentiviral transduction. PCR-based methods are highly specific and are amenable to high-throughput and multiplexed analyses. To validate this method, we engineered two different breast cancer lines to constitutively express either a green or red fluorescent protein. These cells lines allowed us to directly compare the ability of fluorescence imaging (of the fluorescent proteins) and qPCR (of the unique DNA sequences of the fluorescent proteins) to quantify known numbers of cells in the paper based-scaffolds. We also used both methods to quantify the distribution of these breast cell lines in homotypic and heterotypic invasion assays. In the paper-based invasion assays, a single sheet of paper containing cells suspended in a hydrogel was sandwiched between sheets of paper containing only hydrogel. The stack was incubated, and the cells invaded the adjacent layers. The individual sheets of the invasion assay were then destacked and the number of cells in each layer quantified. Our results show both methods can accurately detect cell populations of greater than 500 cells. The qPCR method can repeatedly and accurately detect as few as 50 cells, allowing small populations of highly invasive cells to be detected and differentiated from other cell types.

  16. Chick Heart Invasion Assay for Testing the Invasiveness of Cancer Cells and the Activity of Potentially Anti-invasive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bracke, Marc E; Roman, Bart I; Stevens, Christian V; Mus, Liselot M; Parmar, Virinder S; De Wever, Olivier; Mareel, Marc M

    2015-06-06

    The goal of the chick heart assay is to offer a relevant organ culture method to study tumor invasion in three dimensions. The assay can distinguish between invasive and non-invasive cells, and enables study of the effects of test compounds on tumor invasion. Cancer cells - either as aggregates or single cells - are confronted with fragments of embryonic chick heart. After organ culture in suspension for a few days or weeks the confronting cultures are fixed and embedded in paraffin for histological analysis. The three-dimensional interaction between the cancer cells and the normal tissue is then reconstructed from serial sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin or after immunohistochemical staining for epitopes in the heart tissue or the confronting cancer cells. The assay is consistent with the recent concept that cancer invasion is the result of molecular interactions between the cancer cells and their neighbouring stromal host elements (myofibroblasts, endothelial cells, extracellular matrix components, etc.). Here, this stromal environment is offered to the cancer cells as a living tissue fragment. Supporting aspects to the relevance of the assay are multiple. Invasion in the assay is in accordance with the criteria of cancer invasion: progressive occupation and replacement in time and space of the host tissue, and invasiveness and non-invasiveness in vivo of the confronting cells generally correlates with the outcome of the assay. Furthermore, the invasion pattern of cells in vivo, as defined by pathologists, is reflected in the histological images in the assay. Quantitative structure-activity relation (QSAR) analysis of the results obtained with numerous potentially anti-invasive organic congener compounds allowed the study of structure-activity relations for flavonoids and chalcones, and known anti-metastatic drugs used in the clinic (e.g., microtubule inhibitors) inhibit invasion in the assay as well. However, the assay does not take into account

  17. A novel in vitro survival assay of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Masanori; Takahashi, Masayuki; Nakasono, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    The microcolony assay developed by Withers and Elkind has been a gold standard to assess the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to high (≥8 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation (IR), but is not applicable in cases of exposure to lower doses. Here, we developed a novel in vitro assay that enables assessment of the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower IR doses. The assay includes in vitro culture of small intestinal stem cells, which allows the stem cells to develop into epithelial organoids containing all four differentiated cell types of the small intestine. We used Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2/ROSA26-tdTomato mice to identify Lgr5(+) stem cells and their progeny. Enzymatically dissociated single crypt cells from the duodenum and jejunum of mice were irradiated with 7.25, 29, 101, 304, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mGy of X-rays immediately after plating, and the number of organoids was counted on Day 12. Organoid-forming efficiency of irradiated cells relative to that of unirradiated controls was defined as the surviving fraction of stem cells. We observed a significant decrease in the surviving fraction of stem cells at ≥1000 mGy. Moreover, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses and passage of the organoids revealed that proliferation of stem cells surviving IR is significantly potentiated. Together, the present study demonstrates that the in vitro assay is useful for quantitatively assessing the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower doses of IR as compared with previous examinations using the microcolony assay.

  18. Microscopy assays for evaluation of mast cell migration and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bambousková, Monika; Hájková, Zuzana; Dráber, Pavel; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to mast cell migration and chemotaxis is the long-term goal in mast cell research and is essential for comprehension of mast cell function in health and disease. Various techniques have been developed in recent decades for in vitro and in vivo assessment of mast cell motility and chemotaxis. In this chapter three microscopy assays facilitating real-time quantification of mast cell chemotaxis and migration are described, focusing on individual cell tracking and data analysis.

  19. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  20. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  1. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  2. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  3. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  4. Spatial Chemical Stimulation Control in Microenvironment by Microfluidic Probe Integrated Device for Cell-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Horayama, Masayuki; Shinha, Kenta; Kabayama, Kazuya; Fujii, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    Cell—cell interactions play an important role in the development and function of multicellular organisms. To investigate these interactions in detail, it is necessary to evaluate the behavior of a cell population when the minimum number of cells in the population is stimulated by some chemical factors. We propose a microfluidic device integrated with microfluidic probe (MFP) functionality; this device is capable of imparting a chemical stimulus to cells within a microenvironment, for cell-based assays. The device contains MFP channels at the walls of the cell culture microchannels, and it can control a localized chemical stimulation area at the scale of a single cell to a few cells using MFP fluid control in a microspace. The results of a finite element method-based simulation indicated that it is possible to control the chemical stimulation area at the scale of a single cell to a few cells by optimizing the MFP channel apex width and the flow ratio. In addition, localized cell staining was demonstrated successfully using a spatial chemical stimulus. We confirmed the device functionality as a novel cell-based assay tool. We succeeded in performing localized cell collection using this method, which suggested that the single cell analysis of a cell monolayer that is subjected to a specific chemical stimulus is possible. The method proposed in this paper can contribute significantly to the fields of cell biology and drug development. PMID:27930750

  5. Hydroxyethyl disulfide as an efficient metabolic assay for cell viability in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Donglan; Ward, Kathleen M.; Prendergast, George C.; Ayene, Iraimoudi S.

    2012-01-01

    Cell viability assays have a variety of well known practical and technical limitations. All the available approaches have disadvantages, such as non-linearity, high background and cumbersome protocols. Several commonly used tetrazolium chemicals rely upon generation of a colored formazan product formed by mitochondrial reduction of these compounds via phenazine methosulfate (PMS). However, sensitivity is inherently limited because their reduction relies on mitochondrial bioreduction and cellular transport of PMS, as well as accessibility to tetrazolium chemicals. In this study, we identify hydroxethyldisulfide (HEDS) as an inexpensive probe that can measure cellular metabolic activity without the need of PMS. In tissue culture medium, HEDS accurately quantitated metabolically active live cells in a linear manner superior to tetrazolium based and other assays. Cell toxicity produced by chemotherapeutics (cisplatin, etoposide), oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, acetaminophen), toxins (Phenyl arsine oxide, arsenite) or ionizing radiation was rapidly determined by the HEDS assay. We found that HEDS was superior to other commonly used assays for cell viability determinations in its solubility, membrane permeability, and intracellular conversion to a metabolic reporter that is readily transported into the extracellular medium. Our findings establish the use of HEDS in a simple, rapid and low cost assay to accurately quantify viable cells. PMID:22321380

  6. Hydroxyethyl disulfide as an efficient metabolic assay for cell viability in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Donglan; Ward, Kathleen M; Prendergast, George C; Ayene, Iraimoudi S

    2012-06-01

    Cell viability assays have a variety of well known practical and technical limitations. All the available approaches have disadvantages, such as non-linearity, high background and cumbersome protocols. Several commonly used tetrazolium chemicals rely upon generation of a colored formazan product formed by mitochondrial reduction of these compounds via phenazine methosulfate (PMS). However, sensitivity is inherently limited because their reduction relies on mitochondrial bioreduction and cellular transport of PMS, as well as accessibility to tetrazolium chemicals. In this study, we identify hydroxethyldisulfide (HEDS) as an inexpensive probe that can measure cellular metabolic activity without the need of PMS. In tissue culture medium, HEDS accurately quantitated metabolically active live cells in a linear manner superior to tetrazolium based and other assays. Cell toxicity produced by chemotherapeutics (cisplatin, etoposide), oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, acetaminophen), toxins (phenyl arsine oxide, arsenite) or ionizing radiation was rapidly determined by the HEDS assay. We found that HEDS was superior to other commonly used assays for cell viability determinations in its solubility, membrane permeability, and intracellular conversion to a metabolic reporter that is readily transported into the extracellular medium. Our findings establish the use of HEDS in a simple, rapid and low cost assay to accurately quantify viable cells.

  7. A Morphological identification cell cytotoxicity assay using cytoplasm-localized fluorescent probe (CLFP) to distinguish living and dead cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Fangfang; Shen, Zhengwei; Wen, Hui; Chen, Jialing; Zhang, Xiang; Lin, Ping; Yin, Dali; Cui, Huaqing; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2017-01-08

    Cell cytotoxicity assays include cell activity assays and morphological identification assays. Currently, all frequently used cytotoxicity assays belong to cell activity assays but suffer from detection limitations. Morphological identification of cell death remains as the gold standard, although the method is difficult to scale up. At present there is no generally accepted morphological identification based cell cytotoxicity assay. In this study, we applied previous developed cell cytoplasm-localized fluorescent probe (CLFP) to display cell morphologies. Under fluorescence microscopy, the fluorescence morphology and intensity of living cells are distinct from dead cells. Based on these characters we extracted the images of living cells from series of samples via computational analysis. Thus, a novel cell morphological identification cytotoxicity assay (CLFP assay) is developed. The performance of the CLFP assay was similar to cell activity assay (MTT assay), but the accuracy of the CLFP assay was superior when measuring the cytotoxicity of active compounds.

  8. Radiometric macrophage culture assay for rapid evaluation of antileprosy activity of rifampin

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, A.; Seshadri, P.S.; Prasad, H.K.; Sathish, M.; Nath, I.

    1983-10-01

    The antileprosy effect of rifampin was evaluated by a newly developed rapid in vitro assay wherein 31 human-derived strains and 1 armadillo-derived strain of Mycobacterium leprae were maintained for 2 and 3 weeks, respectively, in murine and human macrophages in the presence of (3H)thymidine. Of these strains, 27 showed significant incorporation of the radiolabel in cultures of live bacilli as compared with control cultures of heat-killed bacilli of the same strain. Consistent and significant inhibition of (3H)thymidine uptake was observed in M. leprae resident cultures with 3 to 200 ng of rifampin per ml as compared with similar cultures without the drug. In general, an increase in percent inhibition was seen from 3 to 20 ng/ml, with marginal increases at 40, 50, and 100 ng/ml. M. leprae strains appear to be remarkably susceptible to this drug in the in vitro assay.

  9. Screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals with MELN cells, an ER-transactivation assay combined with cytotoxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Berckmans, P; Leppens, H; Vangenechten, C; Witters, H

    2007-10-01

    There is growing concern that some chemicals can cause endocrine disrupting effects to wild animals and humans. Therefore a rapid and reliable screening assay to assess the activity of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is required. These EDCs can act at multiple sites. Most studied mechanism is direct interaction with the hormone receptors, e.g. estrogen receptor. In this study the luciferase reporter gene assay using transgenic human MELN cells was used. Since cytotoxicity of the chemicals can decrease the luminescent signal in the transactivation assays, a cytotoxicity assay must be implemented. Mostly the neutral red (NR) assay is performed in parallel with the estrogenicity assay. To increase the reliability and cost-efficiency of the test, a method to measure estrogenicity and cytotoxicity in the same cell culture plate instead of in parallel plates was developed and evaluated. Therefore the NR-assay was compared with the CytoTox-ONE homogeneous membrane integrity assay. The latter measures LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) leakage based on a fluorometric method. For all compounds tested, the CytoTox-ONE test showed comparable curves and EC50-values to those obtained by the NR-assay. So the CytoTox-ONE kit, which seemed more sensitive than measurements of LDH-leakage based on a colorimetric method, is recommended to test cytotoxicity to MELN cells, with the advantage to use the same cells for ER-transactivation measurements. The chemicals tested in the optimised MELN assay showed estrogenic potencies comparable to those reported for several other transactivation assays.

  10. Dissection and culture of mouse dopaminergic and striatal explants in three-dimensional collagen matrix assays.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ewoud R E; Morello, Francesca; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2012-03-23

    Midbrain dopamine (mdDA) neurons project via the medial forebrain bundle towards several areas in the telencephalon, including the striatum(1). Reciprocally, medium spiny neurons in the striatum that give rise to the striatonigral (direct) pathway innervate the substantia nigra(2). The development of these axon tracts is dependent upon the combinatorial actions of a plethora of axon growth and guidance cues including molecules that are released by neurites or by (intermediate) target regions(3,4). These soluble factors can be studied in vitro by culturing mdDA and/or striatal explants in a collagen matrix which provides a three-dimensional substrate for the axons mimicking the extracellular environment. In addition, the collagen matrix allows for the formation of relatively stable gradients of proteins released by other explants or cells placed in the vicinity (e.g. see references 5 and 6). Here we describe methods for the purification of rat tail collagen, microdissection of dopaminergic and striatal explants, their culture in collagen gels and subsequent immunohistochemical and quantitative analysis. First, the brains of E14.5 mouse embryos are isolated and dopaminergic and striatal explants are microdissected. These explants are then (co)cultured in collagen gels on coverslips for 48 to 72 hours in vitro. Subsequently, axonal projections are visualized using neuronal markers (e.g. tyrosine hydroxylase, DARPP32, or βIII tubulin) and axon growth and attractive or repulsive axon responses are quantified. This neuronal preparation is a useful tool for in vitro studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of mesostriatal and striatonigral axon growth and guidance during development. Using this assay, it is also possible to assess other (intermediate) targets for dopaminergic and striatal axons or to test specific molecular cues.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Acholeplasma laidlawii, a Common Contaminant of Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2017-02-02

    Mollicutes are important cell culture contaminants which may eventually affect the results of biological assays or affect their interpretation. Acholeplasma laidlawii is one of the most frequent contaminants of cell cultures. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of A. laidlawii strain MDBK/IPV, recovered from Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Acholeplasma laidlawii, a Common Contaminant of Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mollicutes are important cell culture contaminants which may eventually affect the results of biological assays or affect their interpretation. Acholeplasma laidlawii is one of the most frequent contaminants of cell cultures. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of A. laidlawii strain MDBK/IPV, recovered from Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. PMID:28153907

  13. Transgenic rodent assay for quantifying male germ cell mutant frequency.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jason M; Beal, Marc A; Gingerich, John D; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R; Yauk, Carole L; Marchetti, Francesco

    2014-08-06

    De novo mutations arise mostly in the male germline and may contribute to adverse health outcomes in subsequent generations. Traditional methods for assessing the induction of germ cell mutations require the use of large numbers of animals, making them impractical. As such, germ cell mutagenicity is rarely assessed during chemical testing and risk assessment. Herein, we describe an in vivo male germ cell mutation assay using a transgenic rodent model that is based on a recently approved Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. This method uses an in vitro positive selection assay to measure in vivo mutations induced in a transgenic λgt10 vector bearing a reporter gene directly in the germ cells of exposed males. We further describe how the detection of mutations in the transgene recovered from germ cells can be used to characterize the stage-specific sensitivity of the various spermatogenic cell types to mutagen exposure by controlling three experimental parameters: the duration of exposure (administration time), the time between exposure and sample collection (sampling time), and the cell population collected for analysis. Because a large number of germ cells can be assayed from a single male, this method has superior sensitivity compared with traditional methods, requires fewer animals and therefore much less time and resources.

  14. Transgenic Rodent Assay for Quantifying Male Germ Cell Mutant Frequency

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Jason M.; Beal, Marc A.; Gingerich, John D.; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R.; Yauk, Carole L.; Marchetti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    De novo mutations arise mostly in the male germline and may contribute to adverse health outcomes in subsequent generations. Traditional methods for assessing the induction of germ cell mutations require the use of large numbers of animals, making them impractical. As such, germ cell mutagenicity is rarely assessed during chemical testing and risk assessment. Herein, we describe an in vivo male germ cell mutation assay using a transgenic rodent model that is based on a recently approved Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. This method uses an in vitro positive selection assay to measure in vivo mutations induced in a transgenic λgt10 vector bearing a reporter gene directly in the germ cells of exposed males. We further describe how the detection of mutations in the transgene recovered from germ cells can be used to characterize the stage-specific sensitivity of the various spermatogenic cell types to mutagen exposure by controlling three experimental parameters: the duration of exposure (administration time), the time between exposure and sample collection (sampling time), and the cell population collected for analysis. Because a large number of germ cells can be assayed from a single male, this method has superior sensitivity compared with traditional methods, requires fewer animals and therefore much less time and resources. PMID:25145276

  15. Basic techniques in mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Katy; May, Kristin M

    2015-03-02

    Cultured mammalian cells are used extensively in cell biology studies. It requires a number of special skills in order to be able to preserve the structure, function, behavior, and biology of the cells in culture. This unit describes the basic skills required to maintain and preserve cell cultures: maintaining aseptic technique, preparing media with the appropriate characteristics, passaging, freezing and storage, recovering frozen stocks, and counting viable cells.

  16. Influence of three laser wavelengths on human fibroblasts cell culture.

    PubMed

    Crisan, Bogdan; Soritau, Olga; Baciut, Mihaela; Campian, Radu; Crisan, Liana; Baciut, Grigore

    2013-02-01

    Although experimental studies in vitro and vivo have been numerous, the effect of laser wavelength irradiation on human fibroblast cell culture is poorly understood. This emphasizes the need of additional cellular and molecular research into laser influence with low energy and power. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of three different laser wavelengths on the human skin fibroblasts cell culture. We wanted to evaluate if near infrared lasers had any influence in healing of wounds by stimulating mitochondrial activity of fibroblasts. The cells were irradiated using 830-, 980- and 2,940-nm laser wavelengths. The irradiated cells were incubated and their mitochondrial activity was assessed by the MTT assay at 24, 48 and 72 h. Simultaneously, an apoptosis assay was assessed on the irradiated fibroblasts. It can be concluded that laser light of the near-infrared region (830 and 980 nm) influences fibroblasts mitochondrial activity compared to the 2,940-nm wavelength which produces apoptosis.

  17. Mammosphere culture of cancer stem cells in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadin, Katayoon; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    It is known that tumor-initiating cells with stem-like properties will form spherical colonies - termed mammospheres - when cultured in serum-free media on low-attachment substrates. Currently this assay is performed in commercially available 96-well trays with low-attachment surfaces. Here we report a novel microsystem that features on-chip mammosphere culture on low attachment surfaces. We have cultured mammospheres in this microsystem from well-studied human breast cancer cell lines. To enable the long-term culture of these unattached cells, we have integrated diffusion-based delivery columns that provide zero-convection delivery of reagents, such as fresh media, staining agents, or drugs. The multi-layer system consists of parallel cell-culture chambers on top of a low-attachment surface, connected vertically with a microfluidic reagent delivery layer. This design incorporates a reagent reservoir, which is necessary to reduce evaporation from the cell culture micro-chambers. The development of this microsystem will lead to the integration of mammosphere culture with other microfluidic functions, including circulating tumor cell recovery and high throughput drug screening. This will enable the cancer research community to achieve a much greater understanding of these tumor initiating cancer stem cells.

  18. Isolating single cells in a neurosphere assay using inertial microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Nathamgari, S. Shiva P.; Dong, Biqin; Zhou, Fan; Kang, Wonmo; Giraldo-Vela, Juan P.; McGuire, Tammy; McNaughton, Rebecca L.; Sun, Cheng; Kessler, John A.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-01-01

    Sphere forming assays are routinely used for in vitro propagation and differentiation of stem cells. Because the stem cell clusters can become heterogeneous and polyclonal, they must first be dissociated into a single cell suspension for further clonal analysis or differentiation studies. The dissociated population is marred by the presence of doublets, triplets and semi-cleaved/intact clusters which makes identification and further analysis of differentiation pathways difficult. In this work, we use inertial microfluidics to separate the single cells and clusters in a population of chemically dissociated neurospheres. In contrast to previous microfluidic sorting technologies which operated at high flow rates, we implement the spiral microfluidic channel in a novel focusing regime that occurs at lower flow rates. In this regime, the curvature-induced Dean’s force focuses the smaller, single cells towards the inner wall and the larger clusters towards the center. We further demonstrate that sorting in this low flow rate (and hence low shear stress) regime yields a high percentage (> 90%) of viable cells and preserves multipotency by differentiating the sorted neural stem cell population into neurons and astrocytes. The modularity of the device allows easy integration with other lab-on-a-chip devices for upstream mechanical dissociation and downstream high-throughput clonal analysis, localized electroporation and sampling. Although demonstrated in the case of the neurosphere assay, the method is equally applicable to other sphere forming assays. PMID:26511875

  19. Cell-Based Assay Design for High-Content Screening of Drug Candidates.

    PubMed

    Nierode, Gregory; Kwon, Paul S; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kwon, Seok-Joon

    2016-02-01

    To reduce attrition in drug development, it is crucial to consider the development and implementation of translational phenotypic assays as well as decipher diverse molecular mechanisms of action for new molecular entities. High-throughput fluorescence and confocal microscopes with advanced analysis software have simplified the simultaneous identification and quantification of various cellular processes through what is now referred to as highcontent screening (HCS). HCS permits automated identification of modifiers of accessible and biologically relevant targets and can thus be used to detect gene interactions or identify toxic pathways of drug candidates to improve drug discovery and development processes. In this review, we summarize several HCS-compatible, biochemical, and molecular biology-driven assays, including immunohistochemistry, RNAi, reporter gene assay, CRISPR-Cas9 system, and protein-protein interactions to assess a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, morphological changes, protein expression, localization, post-translational modifications, and protein-protein interactions. These cell-based assay methods can be applied to not only 2D cell culture but also 3D cell culture systems in a high-throughput manner.

  20. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  1. A Caco-2 cell-based quantitative antioxidant activity assay for antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hongxia; Liu, Dong; Yu, Xiangying; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Yan

    2015-05-15

    A Caco-2 cell-based antioxidant activity (CAA) assay for quantitative evaluation of antioxidants was developed by optimizing seeding density and culture time of Caco-2 cells, incubation time and concentration of fluorescent probe (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, DCFH-DA), incubation way and incubation time of antioxidants (pure phytochemicals) and DCFH-DA with cells, and detection time of fluorescence. Results showed that the CAA assay was of good reproducibility and could be used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of antioxidants at the following conditions: seeding density of 5 × 10(4)/well, cell culture time of 24h, co-incubation of 60 μM DCFH-DA and pure phytochemicals with Caco-2 cells for 20 min and fluorescence recorded for 90 min. Additionally, a significant correlation was observed between CAA values and rat plasma ORAC values following the intake of antioxidants for selected pure phytochemicals (R(2) = 0.815, p < 0.01), demonstrating the good biological relevance of CAA assay.

  2. Miniaturisation and validation of a cell-based assay for screening of Ca2+ channel modulators.

    PubMed

    Tammela, Päivi; Vuorela, Pia

    2004-06-30

    Voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs) play a significant role in the regulation of intracellular calcium concentrations in cardiovascular, neuronal and skeletal tissues. Therefore, physiologically relevant screening methods for calcium channel modulators are required. A 45Ca2+ uptake assay based on clonal rat pituitary cell line GH4C1, possessing L-type VOCCs, was miniaturised into a 96-well plate format. The assay was validated by known Ca2+ channel blockers, verapamil and nimodipine (IC50 values 3.4 and 0.007 microM, respectively) and by a set of natural compounds and their synthetic derivatives. The results were consistent with our previous data and demonstrated the reliability of the assay. The signal-to-background ratio was 3.9 +/- 0.4, signal-to-noise ratio 10.3 +/- 2.3, Z' factor 0.59 +/- 0.10, and day-to-day variability in positive control values 5%. Furthermore, experiments were also made on a Biomek FX workstation to evaluate the suitability of the assay for automation. With minor modifications the assay is applicable, e.g. for studying possible Ca2+ channel activators in detail. The established 96-well plate assay modification for screening of calcium channel modulators reduces considerably the time, labour and resources needed for cell culture and experiments, and has significant advantages in terms of automation suitability and overall cost-efficiency.

  3. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  4. Cell-based assay protocol for the prognostic prediction of idiopathic scoliosis using cellular dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akoume, Marie-Yvonne; Franco, Anita; Moreau, Alain

    2013-10-16

    This protocol details the experimental and analytical procedure for a cell-based assay developed in our laboratory as a functional test to predict the prognosis of idiopathic scoliosis in asymptomatic and affected children. The assay consists of the evaluation of the functional status of Gi and Gs proteins in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by cellular dielectric spectroscopy (CDS), using an automated CDS-based instrument, and the classification of children into three functional groups (FG1, FG2, FG3) with respect to the profile of imbalance between the degree of response to Gi and Gs proteins stimulation. The classification is further confirmed by the differential effect of osteopontin (OPN) on response to Gi stimulation among groups and the severe progression of disease is referenced by FG2. Approximately, a volume of 10 ml of blood is required to extract PBMCs by Ficoll-gradient and cells are then stored in liquid nitrogen. The adequate number of PBMCs to perform the assay is obtained after two days of cell culture. Essentially, cells are first incubated with phytohemmaglutinin (PHA). After 24 hr incubation, medium is replaced by a PHA-free culture medium for an additional 24 hr prior to cell seeding and OPN treatment. Cells are then spectroscopically screened for their responses to somatostatin and isoproterenol, which respectively activate Gi and Gs proteins through their cognate receptors. Both somatostatin and isoproterenol are simultaneously injected with an integrated fluidics system and the cells' responses are monitored for 15 min. The assay can be performed with fresh or frozen PBMCs and the procedure is completed within 4 days.

  5. Culture and differentiation of mouse tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    You, Yingjian; Brody, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Airway epithelial cell biology has been greatly advanced by studies of genetically defined and modified mice; however it is often difficult to isolate, manipulate, and assay epithelial cell-specific responses in vivo. In vitro proliferation and differentiation of mouse airway epithelial cells are made possible by a high-fidelity system for primary culture of mouse tracheal epithelial cells described in this chapter. Using this method, epithelial cells purified from mouse tracheas proliferate in growth factor-enriched medium. Subsequent culture in defined medium and the use of the air-liquid interface condition result in the development of well-differentiated epithelia composed of ciliated and non-ciliated cells with characteristics of native airways. Methods are also provided for manipulation of differentiation and analysis of differentiation and gene expression. These approaches allow the assessment of global responses and those of specific cell subpopulations within the airway epithelium.

  6. In vitro osteogenesis assays: influence of the primary cell source on alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Hoemann, C D; El-Gabalawy, H; McKee, M D

    2009-06-01

    In trabecular bone fracture repair in vivo, osteogenesis occurs through endochondral ossification under hypoxic conditions, or through woven bone deposition in the vicinity of blood vessels. In vitro osteogenesis assays are routinely used to test osteoblastic responses to drugs, hormones, and biomaterials for bone and cartilage repair applications. These cell culture models recapitulate events that occur in woven bone synthesis, and are carried out using primary osteoblasts, osteoblast precursors such as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs), or various osteoblast cell lines. With time in culture, cell differentiation is typically assessed by examining levels of alkaline phosphatase activity (an early osteoblast marker) and by evaluating the assembly of a collagen (type I)-containing fibrillar extracellular matrix that mineralizes. In this review, we have made a comparative analysis of published osteogenic assays using calvarial cells, calvaria-derived cell lines, and bone marrow stromal cells. In all of these cell types, alkaline phosphatase activity shows similar progression over time using a variety of osteogenic and mineralizing media conditions; however, levels of alkaline phosphatase activity are not proportional to observed mineralization levels.

  7. Highly Sensitive Assay for Measurement of Arenavirus-cell Attachment.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Joseph P; Botten, Jason

    2016-03-02

    Arenaviruses are a family of enveloped RNA viruses that cause severe human disease. The first step in the arenavirus life cycle is attachment of viral particles to host cells. While virus-cell attachment can be measured through the use of virions labeled with biotin, radioactive isotopes, or fluorescent dyes, these approaches typically require high multiplicities of infection (MOI) to enable detection of bound virus. We describe a quantitative (q)RT-PCR-based assay that measures Junin virus strain Candid 1 attachment via quantitation of virion-packaged viral genomic RNA. This assay has several advantages including its extreme sensitivity and ability to measure attachment over a large dynamic range of MOIs without the need to purify or label input virus. Importantly, this approach can be easily tailored for use with other viruses through the use of virus-specific qRT-PCR reagents. Further, this assay can be modified to permit measurement of particle endocytosis and genome uncoating. In conclusion, we describe a simple, yet robust assay for highly sensitive measurement of arenavirus-cell attachment.

  8. Critical elements in the development of cell therapy potency assays for ischemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Porat, Yael; Abraham, Eytan; Karnieli, Ohad; Nahum, Sagi; Woda, Juliana; Zylberberg, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    A successful potency assay for a cell therapy product (CTP) used in the treatment of ischemic conditions should quantitatively measure relevant biological properties that predict therapeutic activity. This is especially challenging because of numerous degrees of complexity stemming from factors that include a multifactorial complex mechanism of action, cell source, inherent cell characteristics, culture method, administration mode and the in vivo conditions to which the cells are exposed. The expected biological function of a CTP encompasses complex interactions that range from a biochemical, metabolic or immunological activity to structural replacement of damaged tissue or organ. Therefore, the requirements for full characterization of the active substance with respect to biological function could be taxing. Moreover, the specific mechanism of action is often difficult to pinpoint to a specific molecular entity; rather, it is more dependent on the functionality of the cellular components acting in a in a multifactorial fashion. In the case of ischemic conditions, the cell therapy mechanism of action can vary from angiogenesis, vasculogenesis and arteriogenesis that may activate different pathways and clinical outcomes. The CTP cellular attributes with relation to the suggested mechanism of action can be used for the development of quantitative and reproducible analytical potency assays. CTPs selected and released on the basis of such potency assays should have the highest probability of providing meaningful clinical benefit for patients. This White Paper will discuss and give examples for key elements in the development of a potency assay for treatment of ischemic disorders treated by the use of CTPs.

  9. Microfluidic titer plate for stratified 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Trietsch, Sebastiaan J; Israëls, Guido D; Joore, Jos; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vulto, Paul

    2013-09-21

    Human tissues and organs are inherently heterogeneous. Their functionality is determined by the interplay between different cell types, their secondary architecture, vascular system and gradients of signaling molecules and metabolites. Here we propose a stratified 3D cell culture platform, in which adjacent lanes of gels and liquids are patterned by phaseguides to capture this tissue heterogeneity. We demonstrate 3D cell culture of HepG2 hepatocytes under continuous perfusion, a rifampicin toxicity assay and co-culture with fibroblasts. 4T1 breast cancer cells are used to demonstrate invasion and aggregation models. The platform is incorporated in a microtiter plate format that renders it fully compatible with automation and high-content screening equipment. The extended functionality, ease of handling and full compatibility to standard equipment is an important step towards adoption of Organ-on-a-Chip technology for screening in an industrial setting.

  10. Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Geffert, Sandara K.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype miniature bioreactor system is designed to serve as a laboratory benchtop cell-culturing system that minimizes the need for relatively expensive equipment and reagents and can be operated under computer control, thereby reducing the time and effort required of human investigators and reducing uncertainty in results. The system includes a bioreactor, a fluid-handling subsystem, a chamber wherein the bioreactor is maintained in a controlled atmosphere at a controlled temperature, and associated control subsystems. The system can be used to culture both anchorage-dependent and suspension cells, which can be either prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Cells can be cultured for extended periods of time in this system, and samples of cells can be extracted and analyzed at specified intervals. By integrating this system with one or more microanalytical instrument(s), one can construct a complete automated analytical system that can be tailored to perform one or more of a large variety of assays.

  11. Implementation and Use of State-of-the-Art, Cell-Based In Vitro Assays.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    The impressive advances in the generation and interpretation of functional omics data have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the (patho-)physiology of many biological systems and led to a massive increase in the number of specific targets and phenotypes to investigate in both basic and applied research. The obvious complexity revealed by these studies represents a major challenge to the research community and asks for improved target characterisation strategies with the help of reliable, high-quality assays. Thus, the use of living cells has become an integral part of many research activities because the cellular context more closely represents target-specific interrelations and activity patterns. Although still predominant, the use of traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture models has been gradually complemented by studies based on three-dimensional (3D) spheroid (Sutherland 1988) and other 3D tissue culture systems (Santos et al. 2012; Matsusaki et al. 2014) in an attempt to employ model systems more closely representing the microenvironment of cells in the body. Hence, quite a variety of state-of-the-art cell culture models are available for the generation of novel chemical probes or the identification of starting points for drug development in translational research and pharma drug discovery. In order to cope with these information-rich formats and their increasing technical complexity, cell-based assay development has become a scientific research topic in its own right and is used to ensure the provision of significant, reliable and high-quality data outlasting any discussions related to the current "irreproducibility epidemic" (Dolgin 2014; Prinz et al. 2011; Schatz 2014). At the same time the use of cells in microplate assay formats has become state of the art and greatly facilitates rigorous cell-based assay development by providing the researcher with the opportunity to address the multitude of factors affecting the actual

  12. A hybrid microfluidic platform for cell-based assays via diffusive and convective trans-membrane perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Vereshchagina, Elizaveta; Mc Glade, Declan; Glynn, Macdara; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel 3D hybrid assembly of a polymer microfluidic chip with polycarbonate track-etched membrane (PCTEM) enabling membrane-supported cell culture. Two chip designs have been developed to establish either diffusive or convective reagent delivery using the integrated PCTEM. While it is well suited to a range of cell-based assays, we specifically employ this platform for the screening of a common antitumor chemotoxic agent (mitomycin C – MMC) on the HL60 myeloid leukemia cell line. The toxic activity of MMC is based on the generation of severe DNA damage in the cells. Using either mode of operation, the HL60 cells were cultured on-chip before, during, and after exposure to MMC at concentrations ranging from 0 to 50 μM. Cell viability was analysed off-chip by the trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The results of the on-chip viability assay were found to be consistent with those obtained off-chip and indicated ca. 40% cell survival at MMC concentration of 50 μM. The catalogue of capabilities of the here described cell assay platform comprises of (i) the culturing of cells either under shear-free conditions or under induced through-membrane flows, (ii) the tight time control of the reagent exposure, (iii) the straightforward assembly of devices, (iv) the flexibility on the choice of the membrane, and, prospectively, (v) the amenability for large-scale parallelization. PMID:24404021

  13. Autoradiographic assay of mutants resistant to diphtheria toxin in mammalian cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ronen, A.; Gingerich, J.D.; Duncan, A.M.V.; Heddle, J.A.

    1984-10-01

    Diptheria toxin kills mammalian cells by ribosylating elongation factor 2, a protein factor necessary for protein synthesis. The frequency of cells able to form colonies in the presence of the toxin can be used as an assay for mutation to diphtheria toxin resistance. Resistance to diphtheria toxin can also be detected autoradiographically in cells exposed to (/sup 3/H)leucine after treatment with the toxin. In cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells, the frequency of such resistant cells is increased by exposure of the cells to ..gamma..-rays, ultraviolet light, ethylnitrosourea, mitomycin c, ethidium bromide, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The resistant cells form discrete microcolonies if they are allowed to divide several times before intoxication which indicates that they are genuine mutants. The assay is potentially adaptable to any cell population that can be intoxicated with diphtheria toxin and labeled with (/sup 3/H)leucine, whether or not the cells can form colonies. It may be useful, therefore, for measuring mutation rates in slowly growing or nondividing cell populations such as breast, brain, and liver, as well as in cells that do divide but cannot be readily cloned, such as the colonic epithelium. 23 references, 6 figures.

  14. Nanopatterned Extracellular Matrices Enable Cell-Based Assays with a Mass Spectrometric Readout.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Maria D; Mirkin, Chad A; Mrksich, Milan

    2017-03-08

    Cell-based assays are finding wider use in evaluating compounds in primary screens for drug development, yet it is still challenging to measure enzymatic activities as an end point in a cell-based assay. This paper reports a strategy that combines state-of-the-art cantilever free polymer pen lithography (PPL) with self-assembled monolayer laser desorption-ionization (SAMDI) mass spectrometry to guide cell localization and measure cellular enzymatic activities. Experiments are conducted with a 384 spot array, in which each spot is composed of ∼400 nanoarrays and each array has a 10 × 10 arrangement of 750 nm features that present extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins surrounded by an immobilized phosphopeptide. Cells attach to the individual nanoarrays, where they can be cultured and treated with small molecules, after which the media is removed and the cells are lysed. Phosphatase enzymes in the proximal lysate can then act on the immobilized phosphopeptide substrate to convert it to the dephosphorylated form. After the lysate is removed, the array is analyzed by SAMDI mass spectrometry to identify the extent of dephosphorylation and, therefore, the amount of enzyme activity in the cell. This novel approach of using nanopatterning to mediate cell adhesion and SAMDI to record enzyme activities in the proximal lysate will enable a broad range of cellular assays for applications in drug discovery and research not possible with conventional strategies.

  15. Assessment of in vitro lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell activity against renal cancer cell lines and its suppression by serum factor using crystal violet assay.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, H; Yoshida, O

    1989-01-01

    Lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell activity against renal cancer cell lines was assessed in vitro using a crystal violet assay. A standard 4-h 51chromium release assay and a 48-h crystal violet assay showed that both natural killer-susceptible (NC65) and -resistant (ACHN) renal cancer cell lines were sensitive to LAK cells which had been generated by a 3-day incubation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2). Optimal LAK activity was generated by a 5-day culture of PBMC with 1 U rIL-2/ml. LAK activity was enhanced by the presence of IL-2 in the crystal violet assay system, while it was suppressed by fresh autologous serum. The suppressive effect was found in serum from both normal donors and patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, suggesting that non-specific suppressive factor(s) affecting LAK cell activity were present in human sera.

  16. Cell Culture as an Alternative in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Roland M.

    1990-01-01

    Programs that are intended to inform and provide "hands-on" experience for students and to facilitate the introduction of cell culture-based laboratory exercises into the high school and college laboratory are examined. The components of the CellServ Program and the Cell Culture Toxicology Training Programs are described. (KR)

  17. Cell culture techniques in honey bee research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell culture techniques are indispensable in most if not all life science disciplines to date. Wherever cell culture models are lacking scientific development is hampered. Unfortunately this has been and still is the case in honey bee research because permanent honey bee cell lines have not yet been...

  18. Particle-induced cell migration assay (PICMA): A new in vitro assay for inflammatory particle effects based on permanent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Götz A; Schremmer, Isabell; Rostek, Alexander; Loza, Kateryna; Rosenkranz, Nina; Brüning, Thomas; Epple, Matthias; Bünger, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is a decisive pathophysiologic mechanism of particle toxicity and accumulation of neutrophils in the lung is believed to be a crucial step in this process. This study describes an in vitro model for investigations of the chemotactic attraction of neutrophils in response to particles using permanent cell lines. We challenged NR8383 rat macrophages with particles that were characterized concerning chemical nature, crystallinity, and size distribution in the dry state and in the culture medium. The cell supernatants were used to investigate migration of differentiated human leukemia cells (dHL-60 cells). The dose range for the tests was determined using an impedance-based Real-Time Cell Analyzer. The challenge of NR8383 cells with 32-96 μg cm(-2) coarse and nanosized particles resulted in cell supernatants which induced strong and dose-dependent migration of dHL-60 cells. Quartz caused the strongest effects - exceeding the positive control "fetal calf serum" (FCS) several-fold, followed by silica, rutile, carbon black, and anatase. BaSO4 served as inert control and induced no cell migration. Particles caused NR8383 cells to secrete chemotactic compounds. The assay clearly distinguished between the particles of different inflammatory potential in a highly reproducible way. Specificity of the test is suggested by negative results with BaSO4.

  19. Scaling and automation of a high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chip.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Heng; Chen, Yu-Chih; Brien, Riley; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-10-07

    Recent research suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are the key subpopulation for tumor relapse and metastasis. Due to cancer plasticity in surface antigen and enzymatic activity markers, functional tumorsphere assays are promising alternatives for CSC identification. To reliably quantify rare CSCs (1-5%), thousands of single-cell suspension cultures are required. While microfluidics is a powerful tool in handling single cells, previous works provide limited throughput and lack automatic data analysis capability required for high-throughput studies. In this study, we present the scaling and automation of high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chips, facilitating the tracking of up to ∼10 000 cells on a chip with ∼76.5% capture rate. The presented cell capture scheme guarantees sampling a representative population from the bulk cells. To analyze thousands of single-cells with a variety of fluorescent intensities, a highly adaptable analysis program was developed for cell/sphere counting and size measurement. Using a Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)) coating on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a suspension culture environment was created to test a controversial hypothesis: whether larger or smaller cells are more stem-like defined by the capability to form single-cell-derived spheres. Different cell lines showed different correlations between sphere formation rate and initial cell size, suggesting heterogeneity in pathway regulation among breast cancer cell lines. More interestingly, by monitoring hundreds of spheres, we identified heterogeneity in sphere growth dynamics, indicating the cellular heterogeneity even within CSCs. These preliminary results highlight the power of unprecedented high-throughput and automation in CSC studies.

  20. Development of a simplified and convenient assay for cell-mediated immunity to the mumps virus.

    PubMed

    Otani, Naruhito; Shima, Masayuki; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Okuno, Toshiomi

    2014-09-01

    Because methods for measuring cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to the mumps virus are expensive, time-consuming, and technically demanding, the role of CMI in mumps virus infection remains unclear. To address this issue, we report here the development of a simplified method for measuring mumps virus-specific CMI that is suitable for use in diverse laboratory and clinical settings. A mumps vaccine was cultured with whole blood, and interferon (IFN)-γ released into the culture supernatant was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IFN-γ production in blood from vaccinated subjects markedly increased in response to the vaccine and decreased before the antibody titer decreased in some cases, suggesting that this assay may be used as a simple surrogate method for measuring CMI specific for the mumps virus.

  1. Assessment of environmental contamination associated with a mammalian cell transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Sansone, E B; Losikoff, A M; Lebherz, W B; Poiley, J A

    1981-09-01

    To estimate worker exposures to, and environmental contamination from, test chemicals and organic solvents used in an in vitro assay to assess the carcinogenic potential of chemicals, sodium fluorescein, a noncarcinogenic fluorescent material, was dissolved in tissue culture medium used to maintain early passage hamster embryo cells. Personal an environmental samples were taken over a 14-d period. The assay was performed according to standard procedures in a ventilated glove box or laminar flow safety cabinet. Considerably more than 99% of the chemical contamination found was recovered from the interiors of the glove box and hood and from disposable equipment. Contamination outside the containment units (less than 1 microgram) resulted from intralaboratory transport of chemicals, treated cultures, and contaminated equipment. We conclude that the standard operating particles and procedures provided adequate safeguards for personnel and the environment.

  2. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  3. Multielectrode Array (MEA) Assay for Profiling Electrophysiological Drug Effects in Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Clements, Mike

    2016-05-04

    More relevant and reliable preclinical cardiotoxicity tests are required to improve drug safety and reduce the cost of drug development. Human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hSC-CMs) provide a potential model for the development of superior assays for preclinical drug safety screening. One such hSC-CM assay that has shown significant potential for enabling more predictive drug cardiac risk assessment is the MEA assay. The Multi-electrode Array (MEA) assay is an electrophysiology-based technique that uses microelectrodes embedded in the culture surface of each well to measure fluctuations in extracellular field potential (FP) generated from spontaneously beating hSC-CMs. Perturbations to the recorded FP waveform can be used as an unbiased method of predicting the identity of ion channel(s) impacted on drug exposure. Here, a higher throughput MEA assay using hSC-CMs in 48-well MEA plates is described for profiling compound-induced effects on cardiomyocyte electrophysiology. Techniques for preparing hSC-CM monolayers in MEA plates and methods to contextualize MEA assay experimental results are also covered. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Assay for inorganic pyrophosphate in chondrocyte culture using anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography and radioactive orthophosphate labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Prins, A.P.; Kiljan, E.; v.d. Stadt, R.J.; v.d. Korst, J.K.

    1986-02-01

    A method is described for determination of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) in cell culture medium and in rabbit articular chondrocytes grown in the presence of radioactive orthophosphate (/sup 32/Pi). Intra- and extracellular /sup 32/PPi formed was measured using high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separation of the PPi from orthophosphate (Pi) and other phosphate-containing compounds. The chromatographic separation on a weak anion-exchange column is based on the extent to which various phosphate compounds form complexes with Mg2+ at low pH and the rate at which such formation occurs. These complexes are eluted more readily than the uncomplexed compounds. Best results were obtained using a simultaneous gradient of Mg2+ ions and ionic strength. In this case separation of small amounts of PPi from a large excess of Pi was possible without prior removal of Pi or extraction of the PPi fraction. The assay is also useful for measurement of inorganic pyrophosphatase activity. The sensitivity of the assay depends on the specific activity of the added /sup 32/Pi and on the culture conditions, but is comparable with the most sensitive of the enzymatic assays. Sample preparation, particularly deproteinization, proved to be of importance. The losses of PPi which occur during procedures of this sort due to hydrolysis and coprecipitation were quantitated.

  5. Adult neural stem cells from the subventricular zone: a review of the neurosphere assay.

    PubMed

    Gil-Perotín, Sara; Duran-Moreno, María; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Ramírez, Mónica; García-Belda, Paula; García-Verdugo, José Manuel

    2013-09-01

    The possibility of obtaining large numbers of cells with potential to become functional neurons implies a great advance in regenerative medicine. A source of cells for therapy is the subventricular zone (SVZ) where adult neural stem cells (NSCs) retain the ability to proliferate, self-renew, and differentiate into several mature cell types. The neurosphere assay, a method to isolate, maintain, and expand these cells has been extensively utilized by research groups to analyze the biological properties of aNSCs and to graft into injured brains from animal models. In this review we briefly describe the neurosphere assay and its limitations, the methods to optimize culture conditions, the identity and the morphology of aNSC-derived neurospheres (including new ultrastructural data). The controversy regarding the identity and "stemness" of cells within the neurosphere is revised. The fine morphology of neurospheres, described thoroughly, allows for phenotypical characterization of cells in the neurospheres and may reveal slight changes that indirectly inform about cell integrity, cell damage, or oncogenic transformation. Along this review we largely highlight the critical points that researchers have to keep in mind before extrapolating results or translating experimental transplantation of neurosphere-derived cells to the clinical setting.

  6. In situ single cell detection via microfluidic magnetic bead assay

    PubMed Central

    KC, Pawan; Zhang, Ge; Zhe, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    We present a single cell detection device based on magnetic bead assay and micro Coulter counters. This device consists of two successive micro Coulter counters, coupled with a high gradient magnetic field generated by an external magnet. The device can identify single cells in terms of the transit time difference of the cell through the two micro Coulter counters. Target cells are conjugated with magnetic beads via specific antibody and antigen binding. A target cell traveling through the two Coulter counters interacts with the magnetic field, and have a longer transit time at the 1st counter than that at the 2nd counter. In comparison, a non-target cell has no interaction with the magnetic field, and hence has nearly the same transit times through the two counters. Each cell passing through the two counters generates two consecutive voltage pulses one after the other; the pulse widths and magnitudes indicating the cell’s transit times through the counters and the cell’s size respectively. Thus, by measuring the pulse widths (transit times) of each cell through the two counters, each single target cell can be differentiated from non-target cells even if they have similar sizes. We experimentally proved that the target human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and non-target rat adipose-derived stem cells (rASCs) have significant different transit time distribution, from which we can determine the recognition regions for both cell groups quantitatively. We further demonstrated that within a mixed cell population of rASCs and HUVECs, HUVECs can be detected in situ and the measured HUVECs ratios agree well with the pre-set ratios. With the simple device structure and easy sample preparation, this method is expected to enable single cell detection in a continuous flow and can be applied to facilitate general cell detection applications such as stem cell identification and enumeration. PMID:28222140

  7. Quantitative analysis of cell proliferation by a dye dilution assay: Application to cell lines and cocultures.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soobin; Kim, Seol-Hee; Seo, Yuri; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Lee, Ji Youn

    2017-04-04

    Cell proliferation represents one of the most fundamental processes in biological systems, thus the quantitative analysis of cell proliferation is important in many biological applications such as drug screening, production of biologics, and assessment of cytotoxicity. Conventional proliferation assays mainly quantify cell number based on a calibration curve of a homogeneous cell population, and therefore are not applicable for the analysis of cocultured cells. Moreover, these assays measure cell proliferation indirectly, based on cellular metabolic activity or DNA content. To overcome these shortcomings, a dye dilution assay employing fluorescent cell tracking dyes that are retained within cells was applied and was diluted proportionally by subsequent cell divisions. Here, it was demonstrated that this assay could be implemented to quantitatively analyze the cell proliferation of different types of cell lines, and to concurrently analyze the proliferation of two types of cell lines in coculture by utilizing cell tracking dyes with different spectral characteristics. The mean division time estimated by the dye dilution assay is compared with the population doubling time obtained from conventional methods and values from literature. Additionally, dye transfer between cocultured cells was investigated and it was found that it is a characteristic of the cells rather than a characteristic of the dye. It was suggested that this method can be easily combined with other flow cytometric analyses of cellular properties, providing valuable information on cell status under diverse conditions. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  8. A microwell cell culture platform for the aggregation of pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Abigail B; Lin, Chien-Chi; Anseth, Kristi S

    2012-08-01

    Cell-cell contact between pancreatic β-cells is important for maintaining survival and normal insulin secretion. Various techniques have been developed to promote cell-cell contact between β-cells, but a simple yet robust method that affords precise control over three-dimensional (3D) β-cell cluster size has not been demonstrated. To address this need, we developed a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwell platform using photolithography. This microwell cell-culture platform promotes the formation of 3D β-cell aggregates of defined sizes from 25 to 210 μm in diameter. Using this platform, mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) β-cells formed aggregates with cell-cell adherin junctions. These naturally formed cell aggregates with controllable sizes can be removed from the microwells for macroencapsulation, implantation, or other biological assays. When removed and subsequently encapsulated in PEG hydrogels, the aggregated cell clusters demonstrated improved cellular viability (>90%) over 7 days in culture, while the β-cells encapsulated as single cells maintained only 20% viability. Aggregated MIN6 cells also exhibited more than fourfold higher insulin secretion in response to a glucose challenge compared with encapsulated single β-cells. Further, the cell aggregates stained positively for E-cadherin, indicative of the formation of cell junctions. Using this hydrogel microwell cell-culture method, viable and functional β-cell aggregates of specific sizes were created, providing a platform from which other biologically relevant questions may be answered.

  9. Identification of unsafe human induced pluripotent stem cell lines using a robust surrogate assay for pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Juan Carlos; Ho, Mirabelle S H; Wang, Bei; Zhou, Qi; Wolvetang, Ernst; Mason, Elizabeth; Wells, Christine A; Kolle, Gabriel; Grimmond, Sean M; Bertoncello, Ivan; O'Brien, Carmel; Laslett, Andrew L

    2013-08-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) have the potential to generate healthy cells and tissues for the study and medical treatment of a large number of diseases. The utility of putative hiPSC-based therapies is constrained by a lack of robust quality-control assays that address the stability of the cells or their capacity to form teratomas after differentiation. Here we report that virally derived hiPSC, but not human embryonic stem cells (hESC) or hiPSC derived using episomal nonintegrating vectors, exhibit a propensity to revert to a pluripotent phenotype following differentiation. This instability was revealed using our published method to identify pluripotent cells undergoing very early-stage differentiation in standard hESC cultures, by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) based on expression of the cell surface markers TG30 (CD9) and GCTM-2. Differentiated cells cultured post-FACS fractionation from virally derived hiPSC lines reacquired immunoreactivity to TG30 (CD9) and GCTM-2, formed stem cell-like colonies, and re-expressed canonical pluripotency markers. Furthermore, differentiated cells from pluripotency-reverting hiPSC lines generated teratomas in immunocompromised mice, raising concerns about their safety in downstream applications. In contrast, differentiated cell populations from hESC and episomally derived hiPSC did not show any of these abnormalities. Our assays may be used to identify "unsafe" hiPSC cell lines and this information should be considered when selecting hiPSC lines for clinical use and indicate that experiments using these "unsafe" hiPSC lines should be interpreted carefully.

  10. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  11. Air pollutant production by algal cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The production of phytotoxic air pollutants by cultures of Chlorella vulgaris and Euglena gracilis is considered. Algal and plant culture systems, a fumigation system, and ethylene, ethane, cyanide, and nitrogen oxides assays are discussed. Bean, tobacco, mustard green, cantaloupe and wheat plants all showed injury when fumigated with algal gases for 4 hours. Only coleus plants showed any resistance to the gases. It is found that a closed or recycled air effluent system does not produce plant injury from algal air pollutants.

  12. A novel honeycomb cell assay kit designed for evaluating horizontal cell migration in response to functionalized self-assembling peptide hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Fengyi; Lu, Jiaju; Wang, Xiumei

    2017-03-01

    A clear understanding on cell migration behaviors contributes to designing novel biomaterials in tissue engineering and elucidating related tissue regeneration processes. Many traditional evaluation methods on cell migration including scratch assay and transwell migration assay possess all kinds of limitations. In this study, a novel honeycomb cell assay kit was designed and made of photosensitive resin by 3D printing. This kit has seven hexagonal culture chambers so that it can evaluate the horizontal cell migration behavior in response to six surrounding environments simultaneously, eliminating the effect of gravity on cells. Here this cell assay kit was successfully applied to evaluate endothelial cell migration cultured on self-assembling peptide (SAP) RADA (AcN-RADARADARADARADA-CONH2) nanofiber hydrogel toward different functionalized SAP hydrogels. Our results indicated that the functionalized RADA hydrogels with different concentration of bioactive motifs of KLT or PRG could induce cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. The total number and migration distance of endothelial cells on functionalized SAP hydrogels significantly increased with increasing concentration of bioactive motif PRG or KLT. Therefore, the honeycomb cell assay kit provides a simple, efficient and convenient tool to investigate cell migration behavior in response to multi-environments simultaneously.

  13. A novel honeycomb cell assay kit designed for evaluating horizontal cell migration in response to functionalized self-assembling peptide hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Fengyi; Lu, Jiaju; Wang, Xiumei

    2017-01-01

    A clear understanding on cell migration behaviors contributes to designing novel biomaterials in tissue engineering and elucidating related tissue regeneration processes. Many traditional evaluation methods on cell migration including scratch assay and transwell migration assay possess all kinds of limitations. In this study, a novel honeycomb cell assay kit was designed and made of photosensitive resin by 3D printing. This kit has seven hexagonal culture chambers so that it can evaluate the horizontal cell migration behavior in response to six surrounding environments simultaneously, eliminating the effect of gravity on cells. Here this cell assay kit was successfully applied to evaluate endothelial cell migration cultured on self-assembling peptide (SAP) RADA (AcN-RADARADARADARADA-CONH2) nanofiber hydrogel toward different functionalized SAP hydrogels. Our results indicated that the functionalized RADA hydrogels with different concentration of bioactive motifs of KLT or PRG could induce cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. The total number and migration distance of endothelial cells on functionalized SAP hydrogels significantly increased with increasing concentration of bioactive motif PRG or KLT. Therefore, the honeycomb cell assay kit provides a simple, efficient and convenient tool to investigate cell migration behavior in response to multi-environments simultaneously.

  14. Comparison of the illumigene Mycoplasma DNA Amplification Assay and Culture for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Amy E.; Duffy, Lynn B.

    2014-01-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) system, the illumigene Mycoplasma DNA amplification assay (Meridian Bioscience, Inc., Cincinnati, OH) was evaluated to determine its analytical sensitivity, specificity, and clinical application in comparison to historic culture in a collection of archived respiratory specimens. The illumigene limit of detection was ≤88 CFU/reaction for 10 Mycoplasma pneumoniae reference strains. This assay correctly identified 36 M. pneumoniae reference strains and clinical isolates from various geographic origins, including both of the main subtypes. No cross-reactions were detected with other mycoplasmas, ureaplasmas, other bacterial species, viruses, yeasts, or human DNA. Among 214 respiratory specimens previously cultured for M. pneumoniae, when real-time PCR with bidirectional sequencing of the PCR products was used to resolve discrepancies, the sensitivity was 22 of 22 (100%) and the specificity was 190 of 192 (99%). This commercial LAMP assay is a useful rapid method for detecting M. pneumoniae in clinical specimens. Additional prospective clinical trials with direct comparison to culture and PCR are warranted. PMID:24430454

  15. Buccal Micronucleus Cytome Assay in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Naga, Mallika Bokka Sri Satya; Gour, Shreya; Nallagutta, Nalini; Velidandla, Surekha; Manikya, Sangameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sickle Cell Anaemia (SCA) is a commonly inherited blood disorder preceded by episodes of pain, chronic haemolytic anaemia and severe infections. The underlying phenomenon which causes this disease is the point mutation in the haemoglobin beta gene (Hbβ) found on chromosome 11 p. Increased oxidative stress leads to DNA damage. DNA damage occurring in such conditions can be studied by the buccal micronucleus cytome assay, which is a minimally invasive method for studying chromosomal instability, cell death and regenerative potential of human buccal tissue. Aim To evaluate genomic instability in patients with sickle cell disease by buccal micronucleus cytome assay. Materials and Methods The study included 40 sickle cell anemia patients (Group A) and 40 age and sex matched controls (Group B). Buccal swabs were collected and stained with Papanicolaou (PAP). Number of cells with micronucleus, binuclei, nuclear bud, pyknosis and karyolysis were counted in two groups as parameters for the evaluation of genome stability. Results All the analysis was done using t-test. A p-value of <0.001 was considered statistically significant. There was a statistically significant increase in micronuclei number in SCA patients when compared with controls. Karyolytic (un-nucleated) cell number in Group A was more than to those of the controls. Conclusion The results might suggest that patients with sickle cell anaemia have genome instability which is represented by the presence of micronuclei in the somatic cells. Presence of apoptotic cells might only indicate the bodily damage to the tissue as a result of the disease. PMID:27504413

  16. Progesterone metabolism in cultured amniotic fluid cells.

    PubMed

    Beling, C G; Cederqvist, L L

    1978-01-01

    Amniotic fluid cells obtained by amnicentesis at 16-20 weeks' gestation were grown in culture until a confluent monolayer of cell had been formed. Radiolabeled pregnenolone, progesterone and 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone were added to the cell cultures; steroid metabolites which formed after 24 and 48 hours of incubation were identified. Incubation of the cell cultures with pregnenolone-3H resulted in the formation of progesterone, 17alpha-progesterone and 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone. A significant amount of progesterone was identified after incubating the cell cultures with 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone. The results indicate that 3 beta-ol-dehydrogenase, 17 alpha-hydroxylase and 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes are present in cultured amniotic fluid cells obtained at 16-20 weeks' gestation.

  17. Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Adhesive-tape soft lithography for patterning mammalian cells: application to wound-healing assays.

    PubMed

    Shrirao, Anil B; Hussain, Ali; Cho, Cheul H; Perez-Castillejos, Raquel

    2012-09-13

    This paper introduces a benchtop method for patterning mammalian cells-i.e., for culturing cells at specific locations-on planar substrates. Compared with standard cell culture techniques, which do not allow the control of what areas of a monolayer are populated by one type of cell or another, techniques of cell patterning open new routes to cell biology. Researchers interested in cell patterning, however, are often times hindered by limited access to photolithographic capabilities. This paper shows how cells can be patterned easily with sub-millimeter precision using a non-photolithographic technique that is based on the use of office adhesive tape and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). This method is fast (~4 h to go from a layout to have the cells patterned in the shape of such layout) and only requires materials and tools readily available in a conventional biomedical laboratory. A wound-healing assay is presented here that illustrates the potential of the technique (which we call tape-based soft lithography) for patterning mammalian cells and studying biologically significant questions such as collective cellular migration.

  19. A rapid, quantitative assay for measuring alkaline phosphatase activity in osteoblastic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sabokbar, A; Millett, P J; Myer, B; Rushton, N

    1994-10-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is the most widely recognized biochemical marker for osteoblast activity. Although its precise function is poorly understood, it is believed to play a role in skeletal mineralization. The aim of this study was to develop an assay suitable for measuring the activity of this enzyme in microtiter plate format. Using the well-characterized osteoblast-like cell line Saos-2, this paper describes an optimized biochemical assay suitable for measuring ALP activity in tissue culture samples. We have determined that a p-nitrophenyl phosphate substrate concentration of 9 mM provides highest enzyme activities. We have found that cell concentration, and hence enzyme concentration, affects both the kinetics and precision of the assay. We also tested several methods of enzyme solubilization and found that freeze-thawing the membrane fractions twice at -70 degrees C/37 degrees C or freeze-thawing once with sonication yielded highest enzyme activities. The activity of the enzyme decreased by 10% after 7 days storage. This assay provides a sensitive and reproducible method that is ideally suited for measuring ALP activity in isolated osteoblastic cells, although sample preparation and storage can influence results.

  20. Comparison of Y1 mouse adrenal cell and coagglutination assays for detection of Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, P A; Daly, C M

    1989-01-01

    A commercial coagglutination assay (COA; Phadebact LT-ETEC) was compared with a Y1 mouse adrenal cell assay for detecting the heat labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli. Of four different media evaluated for use with the COA, only one (modified blood agar) gave a positive result with all strains known to produce heat labile enterotoxin. With modified blood agar, the COA detected 74 (85%) of 87 such strains. Eighty six strains negative by cell culture assay were also negative by COA, and one strain positive by COA could not be confirmed by cell culture. The Phadebact LT-ETEC kit provides a simple, sensitive, and economical method for detecting E coli heat labile enterotoxin. PMID:2668342

  1. An ELISA assay for cytochrome P4501A in fish liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brueschweiler, B.J.; Fent, K. |; Wuergler, F.E. |

    1996-04-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measuring cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) expression in vitro in fish hepatoma cells is described. Cells were cultured as monolayers in 96-microwell cell culture plates and exposed to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners 77, 105, 153, and 169; 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), and {beta}-naphthoflavone (BNF) for 3 d. Relative CYP1A protein content, CYP1A enzymatic activity, and total protein content were determined directly within the wells. At low concentrations of PCB 77, PCB 169, and 3-MC, the ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity was induced, but it was inhibited at high concentrations of these compounds. However, CYP1A protein content measured in an ELISA performed with intact cells increased monotonically in response to the concentration. No CYP1A induction was observed for PCB 105 and PCB 153. Because comparison between EROD activity and CYP1A amount gives information about the catalytic efficiency of CYP1A in the cells, this noncompetitive, solid-phase ELISA is recommended as a complementary method to the EROD assay. This novel ELISA method may be an accurate in vitro technique for a rapid and sensitive screening of CYP1A-inducible compounds.

  2. Embryonic Stem Cells: Isolation, Characterization and Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells isolated from the mammalian blastocyst. Traditionally, these cells have been derived and cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) supportive layers, which allow their continuous growth in an undifferentiated state. However, for any future industrial or clinical application hESCs should be cultured in reproducible, defined, and xeno-free culture system, where exposure to animal pathogens is prevented. From their derivation in 1998 the methods for culturing hESCs were significantly improved. This chapter wills discuss hESC characterization and the basic methods for their derivation and maintenance.

  3. In vitro BALB/3T3 cell transformation assay of nonoxynol-9 and 1,4-dioxane.

    PubMed

    Sheu, C W; Moreland, F M; Lee, J K; Dunkel, V C

    1988-01-01

    The spermicidal surfactant nonoxynol-9 (Igepal CO-630, GAF Corp.) and a potential impurity, 1,4-dioxane, were tested in the in vitro cell transformation assay using BALB/3T3 cells. Two treatment periods, 48 hr and 13 days, were used. Nonoxynol-9, tested at levels up to 10 micrograms/ml, did not induce transformation, whereas dioxane was very active in the induction of type III foci in the cultured BALB/3T3 cells.

  4. Nanopillar based electrochemical biosensor for monitoring microfluidic based cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadharan, Rajan

    In-vitro assays using cultured cells have been widely performed for studying many aspects of cell biology and cell physiology. These assays also form the basis of cell based sensing. Presently, analysis procedures on cell cultures are done using techniques that are not integrated with the cell culture system. This approach makes continuous and real-time in-vitro measurements difficult. It is well known that the availability of continuous online measurements for extended periods of time will help provide a better understanding and will give better insight into cell physiological events. With this motivation we developed a highly sensitive, selective and stable microfluidic electrochemical glucose biosensor to make continuous glucose measurements in cell culture media. The performance of the microfluidic biosensor was enhanced by adding 3D nanopillars to the electrode surfaces. The microfluidic glucose biosensor consisted of three electrodes---Enzyme electrode, Working electrode, and Counter electrode. All these electrodes were enhanced with nanopillars and were optimized in their respective own ways to obtain an effective and stable biosensing device in cell culture media. For example, the 'Enzyme electrode' was optimized for enzyme immobilization via either a polypyrrole-based or a self-assembled-monolayer-based immobilization method, and the 'Working electrode' was modified with Prussian Blue or electropolymerized Neutral Red to reduce the working potential and also the interference from other interacting electro-active species. The complete microfluidic biosensor was tested for its ability to monitor glucose concentration changes in cell culture media. The significance of this work is multifold. First, the developed device may find applications in continuous and real-time measurements of glucose concentrations in in-vitro cell cultures. Second, the development of a microfluidic biosensor will bring technical know-how toward constructing continuous glucose

  5. Effects of several salt marsh plants on mouse spleen and thymus cell proliferation using mtt assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngwan; Lee, Hee-Jung; Kim, You Ah; Youn, Hyun Joo; Lee, Burm-Jong

    2005-12-01

    In the present study, we have tested the effects of 21 salt marsh plants on cell proliferation of mouse immune cells (spleen and thymus) using MTT assay in culture. The methanolic extracts of six salt marsh plants ( Rosa rugosa, Ixeris tamagawaensis, Artemisia capillaris, Tetragonia tetragonoides, Erigeron annus, and Glehnia littoralis) showed very powerful suppressive effects of mouse immune cell death and significant activities of cell proliferation in vitro. Especially, the methanolic extract of Rosa rugosa was found to have fifteen times compared to the control treatment, demonstrating that Rosa rugosa may have a potent stimulation effect on immune cell proliferation. These results suggest that several salt marsh plants including Rosa rugosa could be useful for further study as an immunomodulating agent.

  6. Clonogenic assay allows for selection of a primitive mammary epithelial cell population in bovine.

    PubMed

    Martignani, Eugenio; Cravero, Diego; Miretti, Silvia; Accornero, Paolo; Baratta, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Adult mammary stem cells have been identified in several species including the bovine. They are responsible for the development of the gland and for cyclic remodeling during estrous cycles and pregnancy. Epithelial cell subpopulations exist within the mammary gland. We and others showed previously that the Colony Forming Cell (CFC) assay can be used to detect lineage-restricted mammary progenitors. We carried out CFCs with bovine mammary cells and manually separated colonies with specific morphologies associated with either a luminal or a myoepithelial phenotype. Expression of specific markers was assessed by immunocytochemistry or by flow cytometry to confirm that the manual separation resulted in isolation of phenotipically different cells. When transplanted in recipient immunodeficient mice, we found that only myoepithelial-like colonies gave rise to outgrowths that resembled bovine mammary alveoli, thus proving that adult stem cells were maintained during culture and segregated with myoepithelial cells. After recovery of the cells from the transplanted mice and subsequent progenitor content analysis, we found a tendency to detect a higher progenitor frequency when myoepithelial-like colonies were transplanted. We here demonstrate that bovine adult mammary stem cells can be sustained in short-term culture and that they can be enriched by manually selecting for basal-like morphology.

  7. Ex Vivo Assay of Electrical Stimulation to Rat Sciatic Nerves: Cell Behaviors and Growth Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhiyong; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Wang, Dingkun; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Zhang, Ze

    2016-06-01

    Neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration are known to benefit from electrical stimulation. However, how neuritis and their surroundings react to electrical field is difficult to replicate by monolayer cell culture. In this work freshly harvested rat sciatic nerves were cultured and exposed to two types of electrical field, after which time the nerve tissues were immunohistologically stained and the expression of neurotrophic factors and cytokines were evaluated. ELISA assay was used to confirm the production of specific proteins. All cell populations survived the 48 h culture with little necrosis. Electrical stimulation was found to accelerate Wallerian degeneration and help Schwann cells to switch into migratory phenotype. Inductive electrical stimulation was shown to upregulate the secretion of multiple neurotrophic factors. Cellular distribution in nerve tissue was altered upon the application of an electrical field. This work thus presents an ex vivo model to study denervated axon in well controlled electrical field, bridging monolayer cell culture and animal experiment. It also demonstrated the critical role of electrical field distribution in regulating cellular activities.

  8. Dynamic culture improves cell reprogramming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sia, Junren; Sun, Raymond; Chu, Julia; Li, Song

    2016-06-01

    Cell reprogramming to pluripotency is an inefficient process and various approaches have been devised to improve the yield of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the effect of biophysical factors on cell reprogramming is not well understood. Here we showed that, for the first time, dynamic culture with orbital shaking significantly improved the reprogramming efficiency in adherent cells. Manipulating the viscosity of the culture medium suggested that the improved efficiency is mainly attributed to convective mixing rather than hydrodynamic shear stress. Temporal studies demonstrated that the enhancement of reprogramming efficiency required the dynamic culture in the middle but not early phase. In the early phase, fibroblasts had a high proliferation rate, but as the culture became over-confluent in the middle phase, expression of p57 was upregulated to inhibit cell proliferation and consequently, cell reprogramming. Subjecting the over confluent culture to orbital shaking prevented the upregulation of p57, thus improving reprogramming efficiency. Seeding cells at low densities to avoid over-confluency resulted in a lower efficiency, and optimal reprogramming efficiency was attained at a high seeding density with dynamic culture. Our findings provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of how dynamic culture condition regulate cell reprogramming, and will have broad impact on cell engineering for regenerative medicine and disease modeling.

  9. Interdependence of initial cell density, drug concentration and exposure time revealed by real-time impedance spectroscopic cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Caviglia, C; Zór, K; Canepa, S; Carminati, M; Larsen, L B; Raiteri, R; Andresen, T L; Heiskanen, A; Emnéus, J

    2015-05-21

    We investigated the combined effect of the initial cell density (12,500, 35,000, 75,000, and 100,000 cells cm(-2)) and concentration of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin on HeLa cells by performing time-dependent cytotoxicity assays using real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A correlation between the rate of cell death and the initial cell seeding density was found at 2.5 μM doxorubicin concentration, whereas this was not observed at 5 or 100 μM. By sensing the changes in the cell-substrate interaction using impedance spectroscopy under static conditions, the onset of cytotoxicity was observed 5 h earlier than when using a standard colorimetric end-point assay (MTS) which measures changes in the mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, with the MTS assay no cytotoxicity was observed after 15 h of incubation with 2.5 μM doxorubicin, whereas the impedance showed at this time point cell viability that was below 25%. These results indicate that impedance detection reveals cytotoxic events undetectable when using the MTS assay, highlighting the importance of combining impedance detection with traditional drug toxicity assays towards a more in depth understanding of the effect of anti-cancer drugs on in vitro assays. Moreover, the detection of doxorubicin induced toxicity determined with impedance under static conditions proved to be 6 times faster than in perfusion culture.

  10. Assay of anti-cancer drugs in tissue culture: conditions affecting their ability to incorporate 3H-leucine after drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Freshney, R I; Paul, J; Kane, I M

    1975-01-01

    An attempt has been made to construct an assay potentially suitable for use with primary cultures of human tumours to measure the survival of exponentially growing monolayer cultures after exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs. Cell survival was assessed using their protein synthetic capacity after removal of drugs. HeLa cells were employed to avoid the ingerent variability and heterogeneity of primary cultures from human tumours, and an assay has been constructed using microtitration trays to provide large numbers of replicate cultures without the requirement of a large number cells. An increase in the duration of the exposure to drug increased sensitivity in nearly all cases examined. Similarly, an increase in the period of culture following drug removal produced increased sensitivity to alkylating agents but allowed recovery from exposure to certain cycle-dependent drugs. Some of the drugs used were shown to be unstable under culture conditions and vinblastine was actively metabolized, although this instability was not necessarily reflected in the time course of the drug's effect. Mustine sensitivity was shown to be reduced by an increase in cell density at a level where density limitation of 3H-thymidine incorporation becomes apparent. These variations and possible methods of minimizing their effects are discussed.

  11. Assay of anti-cancer drugs in tissue culture: conditions affecting their ability to incorporate 3H-leucine after drug treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Freshney, R. I.; Paul, J.; Kane, I. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt has been made to construct an assay potentially suitable for use with primary cultures of human tumours to measure the survival of exponentially growing monolayer cultures after exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs. Cell survival was assessed using their protein synthetic capacity after removal of drugs. HeLa cells were employed to avoid the ingerent variability and heterogeneity of primary cultures from human tumours, and an assay has been constructed using microtitration trays to provide large numbers of replicate cultures without the requirement of a large number cells. An increase in the duration of the exposure to drug increased sensitivity in nearly all cases examined. Similarly, an increase in the period of culture following drug removal produced increased sensitivity to alkylating agents but allowed recovery from exposure to certain cycle-dependent drugs. Some of the drugs used were shown to be unstable under culture conditions and vinblastine was actively metabolized, although this instability was not necessarily reflected in the time course of the drug's effect. Mustine sensitivity was shown to be reduced by an increase in cell density at a level where density limitation of 3H-thymidine incorporation becomes apparent. These variations and possible methods of minimizing their effects are discussed. PMID:1156513

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates skin wound healing: An in vitro study of fibroblast and keratinocyte scratch assays

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.N.M.; Wright, K.T.; Fuller, H.R.; MacNeil, S.; Johnson, W.E.B.

    2010-04-15

    We have used in vitro scratch assays to examine the relative contribution of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the wound repair process and to test the influence of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) secreted factors on both skin cell types. Scratch assays were established using single cell and co-cultures of L929 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes, with wound closure monitored via time-lapse microscopy. Both in serum supplemented and serum free conditions, wound closure was faster in L929 fibroblast than HaCaT keratinocyte scratch assays, and in co-culture the L929 fibroblasts lead the way in closing the scratches. MSC-CM generated under serum free conditions significantly enhanced the wound closure rate of both skin cell types separately and in co-culture, whereas conditioned medium from L929 or HaCaT cultures had no significant effect. This enhancement of wound closure in the presence of MSC-CM was due to accelerated cell migration rather than increased cell proliferation. A number of wound healing mediators were identified in MSC-CM, including TGF-{beta}1, the chemokines IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES, and collagen type I, fibronectin, SPARC and IGFBP-7. This study suggests that the trophic activity of MSC may play a role in skin wound closure by affecting both dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte migration, along with a contribution to the formation of extracellular matrix.

  13. Use of a human plaque-forming cell assay to study peripheral blood bursa-equivalent cell activation and excessive suppressor cell activity in humoral immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Herrod, H G; Buckley, R H

    1979-01-01

    A plaque assay that detects human mononuclear blood cells producing immunoglobulin (Ig)M antibody to sheep erythrocytes was investigated for its usefulness in studying B-cell activation and regulation in 24 patients with humoral immunodeficiency. Cells from 3 of 15 patients with common variable agammaglobulinemia produced some plaques (range 40--160/10(6) cells; normal range 80--1240/10(6)), but those from the other 12, from all 7 with x-linked agammaglobulinemia and from the 2 with x-linked immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM failed to produce any detectable plaques. In co-cultures of patient and normal cells a very good correlation was seen between results of the plaque assay and an IgM biosynthesis assay in detecting excessive suppressor cell activity. Cells from 7 of 15 common variable agammaglobulinemics, from 3 of 7 x-linked agammaglobulinemics, and from both patients with hyper-IgM caused significant suppression of IgM biosynthesis and(or) plaque formation by normal cells. The observations in the last two groups and discordance for excess suppressor activity in identical twins with common variable agammaglobulinemia suggest that the activity develops secondarily to whatever their primary defects may be. Culturing non-T cells from common variable agammaglobulinemics exhibiting excessive suppressor cell activity with normal T cells resulted in plaque formation in four of five patients so studied; in all five the suppressor activity was found in the T-cell population. The availability of a plaque assay for the study of blood cells from immunodeficient patients provides a new probe to examine the cellular nature of such defects. PMID:376549

  14. Human iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cell Sprouting Assay in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Activation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by growth factors initiates a cascade of events in vivo consisting of EC tip cell selection, sprout formation, EC stalk cell proliferation, and ultimately vascular stabilization by support cells. Although EC functional assays can recapitulate one or more aspects of angiogenesis in vitro, they are often limited by a lack of definition to the substratum and lack of dependence on key angiogenic signaling axes. Here, we designed and characterized a chemically-defined model of endothelial sprouting behavior in vitro using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs). Thiol-ene photopolymerization was used to rapidly encapsulate iPSC-ECs at high density in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel spheres and subsequently to rapidly encapsulate iPSC-EC-containing hydrogel spheres in a cell-free over-layer. The hydrogel sprouting array here maintained pro-angiogenic phenotype of iPSC-ECs and supported growth factor-dependent proliferation and sprouting behavior. The sprouting model responded appropriately to several reference pharmacological angiogenesis inhibitors, which suggests the functional role of vascular endothelial growth factor, NF-κB, matrix metalloproteinase-2/9, protein kinase activity, and β-tubulin in endothelial sprouting. A blinded screen of 38 putative vascular disrupting compounds (pVDCs) from the US Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast library identified five compounds th

  15. Sensitivity of edge detection methods for quantifying cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Treloar, Katrina K; Simpson, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative imaging methods to analyze cell migration assays are not standardized. Here we present a suite of two-dimensional barrier assays describing the collective spreading of an initially-confined population of 3T3 fibroblast cells. To quantify the motility rate we apply two different automatic image detection methods to locate the position of the leading edge of the spreading population after 24, 48 and 72 hours. These results are compared with a manual edge detection method where we systematically vary the detection threshold. Our results indicate that the observed spreading rates are very sensitive to the choice of image analysis tools and we show that a standard measure of cell migration can vary by as much as 25% for the same experimental images depending on the details of the image analysis tools. Our results imply that it is very difficult, if not impossible, to meaningfully compare previously published measures of cell migration since previous results have been obtained using different image analysis techniques and the details of these techniques are not always reported. Using a mathematical model, we provide a physical interpretation of our edge detection results. The physical interpretation is important since edge detection algorithms alone do not specify any physical measure, or physical definition, of the leading edge of the spreading population. Our modeling indicates that variations in the image threshold parameter correspond to a consistent variation in the local cell density. This means that varying the threshold parameter is equivalent to varying the location of the leading edge in the range of approximately 1-5% of the maximum cell density.

  16. HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS IN CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Gimbrone, Michael A.; Cotran, Ramzi S.; Folkman, Judah

    1974-01-01

    Human endothelial cells, obtained by collagenase treatment of term umbilical cord veins, were cultured using Medium 199 supplemented with 20% fetal calf serum. Small clusters of cells initially spread on plastic or glass, coalesced and grew to form confluent monolayers of polygonal cells by 7 days. Cells in primary and subcultures were identified as endothelium by the presence of Weibel-Palade bodies by electron microscopy. A morphologically distinct subpopulation of cells contaminating some primary endothelial cultures was selectively subcultured, and identified by ultrastructural criteria as vascular smooth muscle. Autoradiography of endothelial cells after exposure to [3H]thymidine showed progressive increases in labeling in growing cultures beginning at 24 h. In recently confluent cultures, labeling indices were 2.4% in central closely packed regions, and 53.2% in peripheral growing regions. 3 days after confluence, labeling was uniform, being 3.5 and 3.9% in central and peripheral areas, respectively. When small areas of confluent cultures were experimentally "denuded," there were localized increases in [3H]thymidine labeling and eventual reconstitution of the monolayer. Liquid scintillation measurements of [3H]thymidine incorporation in primary and secondary endothelial cultures in microwell trays showed a similar correlation of DNA synthesis with cell density. These data indicate that endothelial cell cultures may provide a useful in vitro model for studying pathophysiologic factors in endothelial regeneration. PMID:4363161

  17. Development of an ELISA assay for the quantification of soluble huntingtin in human blood cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Huntington’s disease (HD) is a monogenic disorder caused by an aberrant expansion of CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene (HTT). Pathogenesis is associated with expression of the mutant (mHTT) protein in the CNS, with its levels most likely related to disease progression and symptom severity. Since non-invasive methods to quantify HTT in the CNS do not exist, measuring amount of soluble HTT in peripheral cells represents an important step in development of disease-modifying interventions in HD. Results An ELISA assay using commercially available antibodies was developed to quantify HTT levels in complex matrices like mammalian cell cultures lysates and human samples. The immunoassay was optimized using a recombinant full-length HTT protein, and validated both on wild-type and mutant HTT species. The ability of the assay to detect significant variations of soluble HTT levels was evaluated using an HSP90 inhibitor that is known to enhance HTT degradation. Once optimized, the bioassay was applied to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HD patients, demonstrating good potential in tracking the disease course. Conclusions The method described here represents a validated, simple and rapid bio-molecular assay to evaluate soluble HTT levels in blood cells as useful tool in disease and pharmacodynamic marker identification for observational and clinical trials. PMID:24274906

  18. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  19. Induction and repair of DNA damage measured by the comet assay in human T lymphocytes separated by immunomagnetic cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Bausinger, Julia; Speit, Günter

    2014-11-01

    The comet assay is widely used in human biomonitoring to measure DNA damage in whole blood or isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a marker of exposure to genotoxic agents. Cytogenetic assays with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated cultured T lymphocytes are also frequently performed in human biomonitoring. Cytogenetic effects (micronuclei, chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges) may be induced in vivo but also occur ex vivo during the cultivation of lymphocytes as a consequence of DNA damage present in lymphocytes at the time of sampling. To better understand whether DNA damage measured by the comet assay in PBMC is representative for DNA damage in T cells, we comparatively investigated DNA damage and its repair in PBMC and T cells obtained by immunomagnetic cell sorting. PBMC cultures and T cell cultures were exposed to mutagens with different modes of genotoxic action and DNA damage was measured by the comet assay after the end of a 2h exposure and after 18h post-incubation. The mutagens tested were methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), (±)-anti-B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), styrene oxide and potassium bromate. MMS and potassium bromate were also tested by the modified comet assay with formamido pyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) protein. The results indicate that the mutagens tested induce DNA damage in PBMC and T cells in the same range of concentrations and removal of induced DNA lesions occurs to a comparable extent. Based on these results, we conclude that the comet assay with PBMC is suited to predict DNA damage and its removal in T cells.

  20. Tocopherol production in plant cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Caretto, Sofia; Nisi, Rossella; Paradiso, Annalisa; De Gara, Laura

    2010-05-01

    Tocopherols, collectively known as vitamin E, are lipophilic antioxidants, essential dietary components for mammals and exclusively synthesized by photosynthetic organisms. Of the four forms (alpha, beta, gamma and delta), alpha-tocopherol is the major vitamin E form present in green plant tissues, and has the highest vitamin E activity. Synthetic alpha-tocopherol, being a racemic mixture of eight different stereoisomers, always results less effective than the natural form (R,R,R) alpha-tocopherol. This raises interest in obtaining this molecule from natural sources, such as plant cell cultures. Plant cell and tissue cultures are able to produce and accumulate valuable metabolites that can be used as food additives, nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Sunflower cell cultures, growing under heterotrophic conditions, were exploited to establish a suitable in vitro production system of natural alpha-tocopherol. Optimization of culture conditions, precursor feeding and elicitor application were used to improve the tocopherol yields of these cultures. Furthermore, these cell cultures were useful to investigate the relationship between alpha-tocopherol biosynthesis and photomixotrophic culture conditions, revealing the possibility to enhance tocopherol production by favouring sunflower cell photosynthetic properties. The modulation of alpha-tocopherol levels in plant cell cultures can provide useful hints for a regulatory impact on tocopherol metabolism.

  1. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  2. Detecting kinase activities from single cell lysate using concentration-enhanced mobility shift assay.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Lih Feng; Sarkar, Aniruddh; Kolitz, Sarah; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Han, Jongyoon

    2014-08-05

    Electrokinetic preconcentration coupled with mobility shift assays can give rise to very high detection sensitivities. We describe a microfluidic device that utilizes this principle to detect cellular kinase activities by simultaneously concentrating and separating substrate peptides with different phosphorylation states. This platform is capable of reliably measuring kinase activities of single adherent cells cultured in nanoliter volume microwells. We also describe a novel method utilizing spacer peptides that significantly increase separation resolution while maintaining high concentration factors in this device. Thus, multiplexed kinase measurements can be implemented with single cell sensitivity. Multiple kinase activity profiling from single cell lysate could potentially allow us to study heterogeneous activation of signaling pathways that can lead to multiple cell fates.

  3. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue. PMID:27600217

  4. Insect cell culture in reagent bottles.

    PubMed

    Rieffel, S; Roest, S; Klopp, J; Carnal, S; Marti, S; Gerhartz, B; Shrestha, B

    2014-01-01

    Growing insect cells with high air space in culture vessel is common from the early development of suspension cell culture. We believed and followed it with the hope that it allows sufficient air for optimal cell growth. However, we missed to identify how much air exactly cells need for its growth and multiplication. Here we present the innovative method that changed the way we run insect cell culture. The method is easy to adapt, cost-effective and useful for both academic and industrial research labs. We believe this method will revolutionize the way we run insect cell culture by increasing throughput in a cost-effective way. In our study we identified:•Insect cells need to be in suspension; air space in culture vessel and type of culture vessel is of less importance. Shaking condition that introduces small air bubbles and maintains it in suspension for longer time provides better oxygen transfer in liquid. For this, high-fill volume in combination with speed and shaking diameter are important.•Commercially available insect cells are not fragile as original isolates. These cells can easily withstand higher shaking speed.•Growth condition in particular lab set-up needs to be optimized. The condition used in one lab may not be optimum for another lab due to different incubators from different vendors.

  5. Improving the reproducibility of the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay for the detection of xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Payne, J; Jones, C; Lakhani, S; Kortenkamp, A

    2000-03-29

    The MCF-7 cell proliferation assay is potentially a simple and highly reproducible tool for the identification of estrogenic compounds. However, its widespread use has been complicated by the lack of a standardised protocol, resulting in considerable inter-laboratory variability. We have explored the sources of variability both in relation to cell lines and test regimens and report on optimised procedures for the identification of estrogenic agents. Two supposedly identical MCF-7 parent cell lines (designated UCL and SOP), and the BUS subline were cultured according to an existing protocol, and responses to 17-estradiol (E2) assessed. Despite yielding almost identical EC50 values, the proliferative response varied widely between cell lines from 0.98-fold over controls (UCL) to 8.9-fold (BUS) indicating major differences between them. The underlying causes may be genetic, and to assess this we used comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH), a technique which allows the detection of DNA sequence copy number changes on a genome-wide scale. Although numerous similarities existed between the different cell lines, the least oestrogen-responsive line (MCF-7/UCL) exhibited the greatest number of cytogenetic changes, many of which were not seen in MCF-7/SOP cells. We suggest that care must be taken, therefore, when choosing a cell line for MCF-7 cell-based experiments. Selecting the MCF-7/SOP line for further work, we carried out a thorough and systematic optimisation of the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, finding that a 72-h period in oestrogen-free medium before treatment strongly influenced the cells response to E2. With 1 nM E2, proliferation increased from 1.5-fold to 6.5-fold relative to vehicle-treated controls, a response similar to that seen with MCF-7/BUS cells in the E-SCREEN protocol devised by Soto et al. With parent MCF-7 cells, other laboratories have reported only 4.5-fold increases as maximal. Here we present evidence that the choice of cell line and culture

  6. Live-cell migration and adhesion turnover assays.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, J; Young, K; Brown, Claire M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has revolutionized the way live-cell imaging is achieved. At the same time, it is also potentially harmful to a living specimen. Therefore, the specimen must be monitored for viability and health before, during, and after imaging sessions. Methods for monitoring cell viability and health will be discussed in this chapter. Another key to successful live-cell imaging is to minimize light exposure as much as possible. A summary of strategies for minimizing light exposure including maximizing the light throughput of the microscope and the sensitivity of light detection is presented. Various fluorescence microscopy techniques are presented with a focus on how the light is delivered to the sample (i.e., light density) and pros and cons for use with living specimens. The reader is also directed to other publications that go into these topics in more detail. Methods are described on how to prepare samples for single cell migration assays, how to measure cell migration rates (e.g., bright-field, semi-automated, and automated), and how to measure focal adhesion turnover rates. Details of how to correct images for background intensity and field-illumination uniformity artifacts for quantitative imaging are also described. Overall, this chapter will be helpful to scientists who are interested in imaging live specimens using fluorescence microscopy techniques. It will be of particular interest to anyone wanting to perform quantitative fluorescence imaging, and wanting to measure cell migration rates, and focal adhesion dynamics.

  7. Impedimetric quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel cultured in a paper-based microchamber.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-01-15

    Recently, 3D cell culture technique was proposed to provide a more physiologically-meaningful environment for cell-based assays. With the development of microfluidics technology, cellular response can be quantified by impedance measurement technique in a real-time and non-invasive manner. However, handling of these microfluidic systems requires a trained engineering personnel and the operation is not compatible to traditional biological research laboratories. In this work, we incorporated the impedance measurement technique to paper-based 3D cell culture model and demonstrated non-invasive quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel during the culture course. A cellulose filter paper was patterned with an array of circular microchambers. Cells were encapsulated in hydrogel and loaded to the microchambers for culturing cells in 3D environment. At the preset schedule during the culture course, the paper was placed on a glass substrate with measurement electrodes for the impedance measurement. Cells in each microchamber was represented by impedance magnitude and cell proliferation could be studied over time. Also, conventional bio-assay was performed to further confirm the feasibility of the impedimetric quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel cultured in the paper-based microchamber. This technique provides a convenient, fast, and non-invasive approach to monitor cells cultured in 3D environment. It has potential to be developed for routine 3D cell culture protocol in biological research laboratories.

  8. Cell based assays for anti-Plasmodium activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mokgethi-Morule, Thabang; N'Da, David D

    2016-03-10

    Malaria remains one of the most common and deadly infectious diseases worldwide. The severity of this global public health challenge is reflected by the approximately 198 million people, who were reportedly infected in 2013 and by the more than 584,000 related deaths in that same year. The rising emergence of drug resistance towards the once effective artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) has become a serious concern and warrants more robust drug development strategies, with the objective of eradicating malaria infections. The intricate biology and life cycle of Plasmodium parasites complicate the understanding of the disease in such a way that would enhance the development of more effective chemotherapies that would achieve radical clinical cure and that would prevent disease relapse. Phenotypic cell based assays have for long been a valuable approach and involve the screening and analysis of diverse compounds with regards to their activities towards whole Plasmodium parasites in vitro. To achieve the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of malaria eradication by 2020, new generation drugs that are active against all parasite stages (erythrocytic (blood), exo-erythrocytic (liver stages and gametocytes)) are needed. Significant advances are being made in assay development to overcome some of the practical challenges of assessing drug efficacy, particularly in the liver and transmission stage Plasmodium models. This review discusses primary screening models and the fundamental progress being made in whole cell based efficacy screens of anti-malarial activity. Ongoing challenges and some opportunities for improvements in assay development that would assist in the discovery of effective, safe and affordable drugs for malaria treatments are also discussed.

  9. Cell culture from sponges: pluripotency and immortality.

    PubMed

    de Caralt, Sònia; Uriz, María J; Wijffels, René H

    2007-10-01

    Sponges are a source of compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications. In this article, methods of sponge cell culture for production of these bioactive compounds are reviewed, and new approaches for overcoming the problem of metabolite supply are examined. The use of embryos is proposed as a new source of sponge material for cell culture. Stem cells are present in high amounts in embryos and are more versatile and resistant to infections than adult cells. Additionally, genetic engineering and cellular research on apoptotic mechanisms are promising new fields that might help to improve cell survival in sponge-cell lines. We propose that one topic for future research should be how to reduce apoptosis, which appears to be very high in sponge cell cultures.

  10. Cell-based assays in GPCR drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Siehler, Sandra

    2008-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals into the intracellular space, and play key roles in the physiological regulation of virtually every cell and tissue. Characteristic for the GPCR superfamily of cell surface receptors are their seven transmembrane-spanning alpha-helices, an extracellular N terminus and intracellular C-terminal tail. Besides transmission of extracellular signals, their activity is modulated by cellular signals in an auto- or transregulatory fashion. The molecular complexity of GPCRs and their regulated signaling networks triggered the interest in academic research groups to explore them further, and their drugability and role in pathophysiology triggers pharmaceutical research towards small molecular weight ligands and therapeutic antibodies. About 30% of marketed drugs target GPCRs, which underlines the importance of this target class. This review describes current and emerging cellular assays for the ligand discovery of GPCRs.

  11. Microbubble Array Diffusion Assay for the Detection of Cell Secreting Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bobo, Bryan; Phalen, Dana; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Piepenbrink, Michael S.; Zheng, Bo; Mosmann, Tim R.; Kobie, James J.; DeLouise, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) makes them an ideal tool in both clinical and research applications due to their ability to recognize and bind specific epitopes with high affinity and selectivity. While mAbs offer significant therapeutic potential, their utility is overshadowed by the cost associated with their production, which often relies on the ability to identify minority antigen specific cells out of a heterogeneous population. To address concerns with suboptimal methods for screening cells, we have developed a cell sorting array comprised of nanoliter spherical cell culture compartments, termed microbubble (MB) wells. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept system for the detection of cell secreted factors from both immortalized cell lines and primary B cell samples. Exploiting the unique ability of the MB well architecture to accumulate cell secreted factors as well as affinity capture coatings, we demonstrate on chip detection and recovery of antibody secreting cells for sequencing of immunoglobin genes. Furthermore, rapid image capture and analysis capabilities were developed for the processing of large MB arrays, thus facilitating the ability to conduct high-throughput screening of heterogeneous cell samples faster and more efficiently than ever before. The proof-of-concept assays presented herein lay the groundwork for the progression of MB well arrays as an advanced on chip cell sorting technology. PMID:25079889

  12. Porcine mitral valve interstitial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Lester, W; Rosenthal, A; Granton, B; Gotlieb, A I

    1988-11-01

    There are connective tissue cells present within the interstitium of the heart valves. This study was designed to isolate and characterize mitral valve interstitial cells from the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. Explants obtained from the distal part of the leaflet, having been scraped free of surface endocardial cells, were incubated in medium 199 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Cells grew out of the explant after 3 to 5 days and by 3 weeks these cells were harvested and passaged. Passages 1 to 22 were characterized in several explant sets. The cells showed a growth pattern reminiscent of fibroblasts. Growth was dependent on serum concentration. Cytoskeletal localization of actin and myosin showed prominent stress fibers. Ultrastructural studies showed many elongated cells with prominent stress fibers and some gap junctions and few adherens junctions. There were as well cells with fewer stress fibers containing prominent Golgi complex and dilated endoplasmic reticulum. In the multilayered superconfluent cultures, the former cells tended to be on the substratum of the dish or surface of the multilayered culture, whereas the latter was generally located within the layer of cells. Extracellular matrix was prominent in superconfluent cultures, often within the layers as well. Labeling of the cells with antibody HHF 35 (Tsukada T, Tippens D, Gordon D, Ross R, Gown AM: Am J Pathol 126:51, 1987), which recognizes smooth muscle cell actin, showed prominent staining of the elongated stress fiber-containing cells and much less in the secretory type cells. These studies show that interstitial mitral valve cells can be grown in culture and that either two different cell types or one cell type with two phenotypic expressions is present in culture.

  13. In vitro toxicity assay of cisplatin on mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shabani, R; Ashtari, K; Behnam, B; Izadyar, F; Asgari, H; Asghari Jafarabadi, M; Ashjari, M; Asadi, E; Koruji, M

    2016-06-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer affecting men in reproductive age, and cisplatin is one of the major helpful chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of this cancer. In addition, exposure of testes cancer cells to cisplatin could potentially eliminate tumour cells from germ cells in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cisplatin on viability of mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell line (EL-4) and neonatal mouse spermatogonial cells in vitro. In this study, the isolated spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) and EL-4 were divided into six groups including control (received medium), sham (received DMSO in medium) and experimental groups which received different doses of cisplatin (0.5, 5, 10 and 15 μg ml(-1) ). Cells viability was evaluated with MTT assay. The identity of the cultured cells was confirmed by the expression of specific markers. Our finding showed that viability of both SSC and EL-4 cells was reduced with the dose of 15 μg/ml when compared to the control group (P ≤ 0.05). Also, the differences between the IC50 in doses 10 and 15 μg/ml at different time were significant (P ≤ 0.05). The number of TUNEL-positive cells was increased, and the BAX and caspase-3 expressions were upregulated in EL4 cells for group that received an effective dose of cisplatin). In conclusion, despite the dramatic effects of cisplatin on both cells, spermatogonial stem cells could form colony in culture.

  14. Rapid on-chip apoptosis assay on human carcinoma cells based on annexin-V/quantum dot probes.

    PubMed

    Montón, Helena; Medina-Sánchez, Mariana; Soler, Joan Antoni; Chałupniak, Andrzej; Nogués, Carme; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-03-18

    Despite all the efforts made over years to study the cancer expression and the metastasis event, there is not a clear understanding of its origins and effective treatment. Therefore, more specialized and rapid techniques are required for studying cell behaviour under different drug-based treatments. Here we present a quantum dot signalling-based cell assay carried out in a segmental microfluidic device that allows studying the effect of anti-cancer drugs in cultured cell lines by monitoring phosphatidylserine translocation that occurs in early apoptosis. The developed platform combines the automatic generation of a drug gradient concentration, allowing exposure of cancer cells to different doses, and the immunolabeling of the apoptotic cells using quantum dot reporters. Thereby a complete cell-based assay for efficient drug screening is performed showing a clear correlation between drug dose and amount of cells undergoing apoptosis.

  15. Advances in cell culture: anchorage dependence

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cells are of great interest for various biotechnological applications. (i) They represent a formidable production means of viruses for vaccination purposes at very large scales (in 1000–6000 l reactors) using microcarriers, and in the last decade many more novel viral vaccines have been developed using this production technology. (ii) With the advent of stem cells and their use/potential use in clinics for cell therapy and regenerative medicine purposes, the development of novel culture devices and technologies for adherent cells has accelerated greatly with a view to the large-scale expansion of these cells. Presently, the really scalable systems—microcarrier/microcarrier-clump cultures using stirred-tank reactors—for the expansion of stem cells are still in their infancy. Only laboratory scale reactors of maximally 2.5 l working volume have been evaluated because thorough knowledge and basic understanding of critical issues with respect to cell expansion while retaining pluripotency and differentiation potential, and the impact of the culture environment on stem cell fate, etc., are still lacking and require further studies. This article gives an overview on critical issues common to all cell culture systems for adherent cells as well as specifics for different types of stem cells in view of small- and large-scale cell expansion and production processes. PMID:25533097

  16. Culture of rodent spermatogonial stem cells, male germline stem cells of the postnatal animal.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Hiroshi; Brinster, Ralph L

    2008-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), postnatal male germline stem cells, are the foundation of spermatogenesis, during which an enormous number of spermatozoa is produced daily by the testis throughout life of the male. SSCs are unique among stem cells in the adult body because they are the only cells that undergo self-renewal and transmit genes to subsequent generations. In addition, SSCs provide an excellent and powerful model to study stem cell biology because of the availability of a functional assay that unequivocally identifies the stem cell. Development of an in vitro culture system that allows an unlimited supply of SSCs is a crucial technique to manipulate genes of the SSC to generate valuable transgenic animals, to study the self-renewal mechanism, and to develop new therapeutic strategies for infertility. In this chapter, we describe a detailed protocol for the culture of mouse and rat SSCs. A key factor for successful development of the SSC culture system was identification of in vitro growth factor requirements for the stem cell using a defined serum-free medium. Because transplantation assays using immunodeficient mice demonstrated that extrinsic factors for self-renewal of SSCs appear to be conserved among many mammalian species, culture techniques for SSCs of other species, including farm animals and humans, are likely to be developed in the coming 5-10 years.

  17. Mitigation of variation observed in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) based HIV-1 neutralization assay by donor cell pooling.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Lindsay; Brown, Bruce K; Delsarto Macedo, Camila; Wesberry-Schmierer, Maggie; Ngauy, Viseth; Rosa Borges, Andrew; Michael, Nelson L; Marovich, Mary A; Montefiori, David C; Polonis, Victoria R

    2013-12-01

    Cultured primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) represent a potentially physiologic in vitro model of HIV-1 infection, but assessment of antibody-mediated HIV-1 neutralization using PBMC has been hindered by donor variability and lack of a sustainable individual PBMC source. To advance this model for HIV vaccine evaluation, intra- and inter-assay variability were assessed using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies and PBMC targets from multiple HIV-seronegative donors. Inter-assay variability was introduced by using different PBMC for virus propagation, and more substantially, for assay targets. Neutralization titers varied by as much as 4 logs when using different individual donor PBMC as targets; variability was antibody-specific, with the greatest variation observed using an individual polyclonal plasma. Pooling of multiple PBMC donors significantly reduced median inter-assay variation to the level of intra-assay variation, suggesting a pathway forward for establishing a uniform, sustainable and standardized approach to the assessment of antibody function using a PBMC model.

  18. Enumeration of Neural Stem Cells Using Clonal Assays

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Gunaseelan; Yu, Yuan Hong; Tham, Muly; Gan, Hui Theng; Ramasamy, Srinivas; Sankaran, Shvetha; Hariharan, Srivats; Ahmed, Sohail

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to self-renew and generate the three major neural lineages — astrocytes, neurons and oligodendrocytes. NSCs and neural progenitors (NPs) are commonly cultured in vitro as neurospheres. This protocol describes in detail how to determine the NSC frequency in a given cell population under clonal conditions. The protocol begins with the seeding of the cells at a density that allows for the generation of clonal neurospheres. The neurospheres are then transferred to chambered coverslips and differentiated under clonal conditions in conditioned medium, which maximizes the differentiation potential of the neurospheres. Finally, the NSC frequency is calculated based on neurosphere formation and multipotency capabilities. Utilities of this protocol include the evaluation of candidate NSC markers, purification of NSCs, and the ability to distinguish NSCs from NPs. This method takes 13 days to perform, which is much shorter than current methods to enumerate NSC frequency. PMID:27768074

  19. Culture and Manipulation of Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lois G.; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The direct manipulation of embryonic cells is an important tool for addressing key questions in cell and developmental biology. C. elegans is relatively unique among genetic model systems in being amenable to manipulation of embryonic cells. Embryonic cell manipulation has allowed the identification of cell interactions by direct means, and it has been an important technique for dissecting mechanisms by which cell fates are specified, cell divisions are oriented, and morphogenesis is accomplished. Here, we present detailed methods for isolating, manipulating and culturing embryonic cells of C. elegans. PMID:22226523

  20. Live cell quality control and utility of real-time cell electronic sensing for assay development.

    PubMed

    Kirstein, Shelli L; Atienza, Josephine M; Xi, Biao; Zhu, Jenny; Yu, Naichen; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiao; Abassi, Yama A

    2006-10-01

    In this paper we have explored the utility of the real-time cell electronic sensing (RTCES, ACEA Biosciences Inc., San Diego, CA) system for monitoring the quality of live cells in cell-based assays as well as for assay development. We have demonstrated that each cell type displays unique growth kinetic profiles that provide a quantitative account of cell behavior and can be used as a diagnostic tool for cellular quality control. The utility of the specific signature patterns was shown by demonstrating the significant differences in primary cell behavior depending on the supplier. In addition, the RT-CES system was able to differentiate cell behavior depending on the passage stage of the cells. The utility of the RT-CES system as an assay development tool was demonstrated in cytotoxicity assays. The RT-CES system not only provides information regarding the potency of cytotoxic compounds, but in addition relates potency to the rate of the response for each concentration of the compound tested, which is important for understanding the mechanism of compound action. Moreover, real-time display of cytotoxicity data by the RT-CES system allows for calculation of real-time 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values or determination of optimal IC(50) value. In summary, the RT-CES system provides high content and information-rich data that are beyond the scope of single-point assays.

  1. Understanding photoreceptor outer segment phagocytosis: use and utility of RPE cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Francesca; Safa, Hussein; Finnemann, Silvia C

    2014-09-01

    RPE cells are the most actively phagocytic cells in the human body. In the eye, RPE cells face rod and cone photoreceptor outer segments at all times but contribute to shedding and clearance phagocytosis of distal outer segment tips only once a day. Analysis of RPE phagocytosis in situ has succeeded in identifying key players of the RPE phagocytic mechanism. Phagocytic processes comprise three distinct phases, recognition/binding, internalization, and digestion, each of which is regulated separately by phagocytes. Studies of phagocytosis by RPE cells in culture allow specifically analyzing and manipulating these distinct phases to identify their molecular mechanisms. Here, we compare similarities and differences of primary, immortalized, and stem cell-derived RPE cells in culture to RPE cells in situ with respect to phagocytic function. We discuss in particular potential pitfalls of RPE cell culture phagocytosis assays. Finally, we point out considerations for phagocytosis assay development for future studies.

  2. Microfabricated elastomeric stencils for micropatterning cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Folch, A; Jo, B H; Hurtado, O; Beebe, D J; Toner, M

    2000-11-01

    Here we present an inexpensive method to fabricate microscopic cellular cultures, which does not require any surface modification of the substrate prior to cell seeding. The method utilizes a reusable elastomeric stencil (i.e., a membrane containing thru holes) which seals spontaneously against the surface. The stencil is applied to the cell-culture substrate before seeding. During seeding, the stencil prevents the substrate from being exposed to the cell suspension except on the hole areas. After cells are allowed to attach and the stencil is peeled off, cellular islands with a shape similar to the holes remain on the cell-culture substrate. This solvent-free method can be combined with a wide range of substrates (including biocompatible polymers, homogeneous or nonplanar surfaces, microelectronic chips, and gels), biomolecules, and virtually any adherent cell type.

  3. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  4. Myosin types in cultured muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Fluorescent antibodies against fast skeletal, slow skeletal, and ventricular myosins were applied to muscle cultures from embryonic pectoralis and ventricular myocadium of the chicken. A number of spindle-shaped mononucleated cells, presumably myoblasts, and all myotubes present in skeletal muscle cultures were labeled by all three antimyosin antisera. In contrast, in cultures from ventricular myocardium all muscle cells were labeled by anti-ventricular myosin, whereas only part of them were stained by anti-slow skeletal myosin and rare cells reacted with anti-fast skeletal myosin. The findings indicate that myosin(s) present in cultured embryonic skeletal muscle cells contains antigenic determinants similar to those present in adult fast skeletal, slow skeletal, and ventricular myosins. PMID:6156177

  5. Development of micropatterning technology for cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, T; Inoue, K; Sugawara, T

    1990-01-01

    The manipulation of regional cell adhesiveness by surface design could provide micropatterned cell culturing. Based on the photoreactive chemistry of a phenylazide group, a novel surface micropatterning technology for cultured cells was successfully developed. The principle is as follows: 1) a photoreactive hydrophilic co-polymer with phenylazide was cast on a hydrophobic matrix surface, 2) a photoreactive hydrophobic co-polymer was cast on a hydrophilic matrix; 3) a photomask with a given pattern was tightly placed on the cast film; and 4) after UV irradiation and subsequent washing, bovine endothelial cells (ECs) were seeded and cultured. ECs adhered and grew only on nonhydrophilic regions, eventually resulting in micropatterning of ECs. The micropatterns of cultured ECs prepared by 1) and 2) were negative- and positive-type patterns to that of the photomask used, respectively.

  6. Measurement of DNA damage in individual cells using the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet) assay.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Janet M; Spanswick, Victoria J; Hartley, John A

    2011-01-01

    The Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet) assay is a simple, versatile and sensitive method for measuring DNA damage in individual cells, allowing the determination of heterogeneity of response within a cell population. The basic alkaline technique described is for the determination of DNA strand break damage and its repair at a single cell level. Specific modifications to the method use a lower pH ('neutral' assay), or allow the measurement of DNA interstrand cross-links. It can be further adapted to, for example, study specific DNA repair mechanisms, be combined with fluorescent in situ hybridisation, or incorporate lesion specific enzymes.

  7. High content cell-based assay for the inflammatory pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-07-01

    Cellular inflammation is a non-specific immune response to tissue injury that takes place via cytokine network orchestration to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. However chronic inflammation that lasts for a longer period, plays the key role in human diseases like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer development. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways may be effective in targeting and modulating their outcome. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that effectively combines the pro-inflammatory features with the pro-apoptotic potential. Increased levels of TNF-α observed during acute and chronic inflammatory conditions are believed to induce adverse phenotypes like glucose intolerance and abnormal lipid profile. Natural products e. g., amygdalin, cinnamic acid, jasmonic acid and aspirin have proven efficacy in minimizing the TNF-α induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Cell lysis-free quantum dot (QDot) imaging is an emerging technique to identify the cellular mediators of a signaling cascade with a single assay in one run. In comparison to organic fluorophores, the inorganic QDots are bright, resistant to photobleaching and possess tunable optical properties that make them suitable for long term and multicolor imaging of various components in a cellular crosstalk. Hence we tested some components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway during TNF-α induced inflammation and the effects of aspirin in HepG2 cells by QDot multicolor imaging technique. Results demonstrated that aspirin showed significant protective effects against TNF-α induced cellular inflammation. The developed cell based assay paves the platform for the analysis of cellular components in a smooth and reliable way.

  8. A Reproducible Immunopotency Assay to Measure Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Mediated T cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Debra D.; Centanni, John M.; Bhatia, Neehar; Emler, Carol A.; Drier, Diana; Leverson, Glen E.; McKenna, David H.; Gee, Adrian P.; Lindblad, Robert; Hei, Derek J.; Hematti, Peiman

    2014-01-01

    Background The T cell suppressive property of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been considered a major mode of action and basis for their utilization in a number of human clinical trials. However, there is no well-established reproducible assay to measure MSC-mediated T cell suppression. Methods At the University of Wisconsin-Madison Production Assistance for Cellular Therapy (PACT) Center we developed an in vitro quality control T cell suppression immunopotency assay (IPA) which utilizes anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies to stimulate T cell proliferation. We measured MSC-induced suppression of CD4+ T cell proliferation at various effector to target cell ratios using defined peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in parallel compared to a reference standard MSC product. We calculated an IPA value for suppression of CD4+ T cells for each MSC product. Results Eleven MSC products generated at three independent PACT centers were evaluated for cell surface phenotypic markers and T cell suppressive properties. Flow cytometry results demonstrated typical MSC cell surface marker profiles. There was significant variability in the level of suppression of T cell proliferation with IPA values ranging from 27% to 88%. However, MSC suppression did not correlate with HLA-DR expression. Discussion We have developed a reproducible immunopotency assay to measure allogeneic MSC-mediated suppression of CD4+ T cells. Additional studies may be warranted to determine how these in vitro assay results may correlate with other immunomodulatory properties of MSCs, in addition to evaluating the ability of this assay to predict in vivo efficacy. PMID:25455739

  9. Cell Image Velocimetry (CIV): boosting the automated quantification of cell migration in wound healing assays.

    PubMed

    Milde, Florian; Franco, Davide; Ferrari, Aldo; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Poulikakos, Dimos; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-11-01

    Cell migration is commonly quantified by tracking the speed of the cell layer interface in wound healing assays. This quantification is often hampered by low signal to noise ratio, in particular when complex substrates are employed to emulate in vivo cell migration in geometrically complex environments. Moreover, information about the cell motion, readily available inside the migrating cell layers, is not usually harvested. We introduce Cell Image Velocimetry (CIV), a combination of cell layer segmentation and image velocimetry algorithms, to drastically enhance the quantification of cell migration by wound healing assays. The resulting software analyses the speed of the interface as well as the detailed velocity field inside the cell layers in an automated fashion. CIV is shown to be highly robust for images with low signal to noise ratio, low contrast and frame shifting and it is portable across various experimental settings. The modular design and parametrization of CIV is not restricted to wound healing assays and allows for the exploration and quantification of flow phenomena in any optical microscopy dataset. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of CIV in wound healing assays over topographically engineered surfaces and quantify the relative merits of differently aligned gratings on cell migration.

  10. Comparison of rat and hamster hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kornbrust, D.J.; Barfknect, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated marked differences in the capacity of hepatocytes from rats or hamsters to mediate the metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens to genotoxic (i.e., mutagenic) products. Thus far, very few investigations of species differences in DNA repair have been performed. Therefore, a comparison of the relative extent of DNA repair elicited by various genotoxic chemicals in rat and hamster hepatocyes was conducted, using the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair (HPC/DR) assay. Of the ll chemicals tested, eight were more potent in inducing DNA repair in hamster hepatocytes than in rat hepatocytes. Dimethylnitrosamine, diethylnitrosamine, 2-acetylaminofluorene, 9-aminoacridine, pararosaniline hydrochloride, 1-naphthylamine, benzidine and 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane were all active in hamster hepatocytes at a concentration at least ten times less than the lowest effective concentration in rat hepatocytes. The direct-acting alkylating agent, methylmethane sulfonate, was equipotent inducing DNA repair in both rat and hamster hepatocytes, indicating that the differences in DNA repair observed for the other chemicals were probably not a result of species differences in DNA repair capacities. In contrast, 1-nitropyrene produced a greater DNA repair response in rat hepatocyes than hamster hepatocytes, while the bacterial mutagen 3-(chloromethyl)pyridine hydrochloride was inactive in both hepatocyte systems. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using hamster hepatocytes in the HPC/DR assay and illustrate the utility of performing the assay with hepatocytes from more than one species.

  11. Banks of cell cultures for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Radaeva, I F; Bogryantseva, M P; Nechaeva, E A

    2012-08-01

    Seeding and working cell banks were created and stored in cell culture collection. The banks were certified in accordance with international and national requirements. Cultures of 293, MT-4, L-68, FECH-16-1, FECH-16-2, 4647, MDCK, CHO TK(-), and CHO pE cells were recommended by Medical Immunobiological Preparation Committee for the use in the production of medical immunobiological preparations. The stock is sufficient enough for supplying standard cell material for the production of medical immunobiological preparations over few decades.

  12. Assay Establishment and Validation of a High-Throughput Screening Platform for Three-Dimensional Patient-Derived Colon Cancer Organoid Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Boehnke, Karsten; Iversen, Philip W.; Schumacher, Dirk; Lallena, María José; Haro, Rubén; Amat, Joaquín; Haybaeck, Johannes; Liebs, Sandra; Lange, Martin; Schäfer, Reinhold; Regenbrecht, Christian R. A.; Reinhard, Christoph; Velasco, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    The application of patient-derived three-dimensional culture systems as disease-specific drug sensitivity models has enormous potential to connect compound screening and clinical trials. However, the implementation of complex cell-based assay systems in drug discovery requires reliable and robust screening platforms. Here we describe the establishment of an automated platform in 384-well format for three-dimensional organoid cultures derived from colon cancer patients. Single cells were embedded in an extracellular matrix by an automated workflow and subsequently self-organized into organoid structures within 4 days of culture before being exposed to compound treatment. We performed validation of assay robustness and reproducibility via plate uniformity and replicate-experiment studies. After assay optimization, the patient-derived organoid platform passed all relevant validation criteria. In addition, we introduced a streamlined plate uniformity study to evaluate patient-derived colon cancer samples from different donors. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using patient-derived tumor samples for high-throughput assays and their integration as disease-specific models in drug discovery. PMID:27233291

  13. Assay Establishment and Validation of a High-Throughput Screening Platform for Three-Dimensional Patient-Derived Colon Cancer Organoid Cultures.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Karsten; Iversen, Philip W; Schumacher, Dirk; Lallena, María José; Haro, Rubén; Amat, Joaquín; Haybaeck, Johannes; Liebs, Sandra; Lange, Martin; Schäfer, Reinhold; Regenbrecht, Christian R A; Reinhard, Christoph; Velasco, Juan A

    2016-10-01

    The application of patient-derived three-dimensional culture systems as disease-specific drug sensitivity models has enormous potential to connect compound screening and clinical trials. However, the implementation of complex cell-based assay systems in drug discovery requires reliable and robust screening platforms. Here we describe the establishment of an automated platform in 384-well format for three-dimensional organoid cultures derived from colon cancer patients. Single cells were embedded in an extracellular matrix by an automated workflow and subsequently self-organized into organoid structures within 4 days of culture before being exposed to compound treatment. We performed validation of assay robustness and reproducibility via plate uniformity and replicate-experiment studies. After assay optimization, the patient-derived organoid platform passed all relevant validation criteria. In addition, we introduced a streamlined plate uniformity study to evaluate patient-derived colon cancer samples from different donors. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using patient-derived tumor samples for high-throughput assays and their integration as disease-specific models in drug discovery.

  14. Human endothelial cell-based assay for endotoxin as sensitive as the conventional Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay.

    PubMed

    Unger, Ronald E; Peters, Kirsten; Sartoris, Anne; Freese, Christian; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2014-03-01

    Endotoxin, also known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced by bacteria can be present in any liquid or on any biomaterial even if the material is sterile. Endotoxin in mammals can cause fever, inflammation, cell and tissue damage and irreversible septic shock and death. In the body, endothelial cells making up the blood vasculature and endothelial cells in vitro rapidly react to minute amounts of endotoxin resulting in a rapid induction of the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin. In this study we have used immunofluorescent staining to evaluate the expression of E-selectin on human microvascular endothelial cells from the skin (HDMEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to various concentrations of LPS. In addition, the sensitivity of detection was compared with the most widely used assay for the presence of endotoxin, the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay (LAL). The detection of E-selectin on endothelial cells in the presence of LPS for 4 h was found to be at least as sensitive in detecting the same concentration using the LAL assay. A cell adhesion molecule-enzyme immunosorbent assay was also developed and used to quantify LPS using the endothelial cell model. A comparison of LAL and the immunofluorescent staining method was carried out with solutions, nanoparticles, biomaterial extracts and endothelial cells grown directly on biomaterials. Under all conditions, the endothelial/E-selectin model system was positive for the test samples that were positive by LAL. Thus, we propose the use of this highly sensitive, rapid, reproducible assay for the routine testing of endotoxin in all steps in the manufacturing process of materials destined for use in humans. This can give a rapid feedback and localization of bacterial contamination sources with the LAL being reserved for the testing of the final product.

  15. Effects of diluents on cell culture viability measured by automated cell counter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron; Leith, Matthew; Tu, Roger; Tahim, Gurpreet; Sudra, Anish; Bhargava, Swapnil

    2017-01-01

    Commercially available automated cell counters based on trypan blue dye-exclusion are widely used in industrial cell culture process development and manufacturing to increase throughput and eliminate inherent variability in subjective interpretation associated with manual hemocytometers. When using these cell counters, sample dilution is often necessary to stay within the assay measurement range; however, the effect of time and diluents on cell culture is not well understood. This report presents the adverse effect of phosphate buffered saline as a diluent on cell viability when used in combination with an automated cell counter. The reduced cell viability was attributed to shear stress introduced by the automated cell counter. Furthermore, length of time samples were incubated in phosphate buffered saline also contributed to the observed drop in cell viability. Finally, as erroneous viability measurements can severely impact process decisions and product quality, this report identifies several alternative diluents that can maintain cell culture viability over time in order to ensure accurate representation of cell culture conditions. PMID:28264018

  16. Stability of human mesenchymal stem cells during in vitro culture: considerations for cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Binato, R; de Souza Fernandez, T; Lazzarotto-Silva, C; Du Rocher, B; Mencalha, A; Pizzatti, L; Bouzas, L F; Abdelhay, E

    2013-02-01

    Ex vivo expansion and manipulation of human mesenchymal stem cells are important approaches to immunoregulatory and regenerative cell therapies. Although these cells show great potential for use, issues relating to their overall nature emerge as problems in the field. The need for extensive cell quantity amplification in vitro to obtain sufficient cell numbers for use, poses a risk of accumulating genetic and epigenetic abnormalities that could lead to sporadic malignant cell transformation. In this study, we have examined human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, over extended culture time, using cytogenetic analyses, mixed lymphocyte reactions, proteomics and gene expression assays to determine whether the cultures would retain their potential for use in subsequent passages. Results indicate that in vitro cultures of these cells demonstrated chromosome variability after passage 4, but their immunomodulatory functions and differentiation capacity were maintained. At the molecular level, changes were observed from passage 5 on, indicating initiation of differentiation. Together, these results lead to the hypothesis that human mesenchymal stem cells cultures can be used successfully in cell therapy up to passage 4. However, use of cells from higher passages would have to be analysed case by case.

  17. Detection of nonhemagglutinating influenza a(h3) viruses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in quantitative influenza virus culture.

    PubMed

    van Baalen, C A; Els, C; Sprong, L; van Beek, R; van der Vries, E; Osterhaus, A D M E; Rimmelzwaan, G F

    2014-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of novel antiviral drugs against influenza virus in clinical trials, it is necessary to quantify infectious virus titers in respiratory tract samples from patients. Typically, this is achieved by inoculating virus-susceptible cells with serial dilutions of clinical specimens and detecting the production of progeny virus by hemagglutination, since influenza viruses generally have the capacity to bind and agglutinate erythrocytes of various species through their hemagglutinin (HA). This readout method is no longer adequate, since an increasing number of currently circulating influenza A virus H3 subtype (A[H3]) viruses display a reduced capacity to agglutinate erythrocytes. Here, we report the magnitude of this problem by analyzing the frequency of HA-deficient A(H3) viruses detected in The Netherlands from 1999 to 2012. Furthermore, we report the development and validation of an alternative method for monitoring the production of progeny influenza virus in quantitative virus cultures, which is independent of the capacity to agglutinate erythrocytes. This method is based on the detection of viral nucleoprotein (NP) in virus culture plates by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and it produced results similar to those of the hemagglutination assay using strains with good HA activity, including A/Brisbane/059/07 (H1N1), A/Victoria/210/09 (H3N2), other seasonal A(H1N1), A(H1N1)pdm09, and the majority of A(H3) virus strains isolated in 2009. In contrast, many A(H3) viruses that have circulated since 2010 failed to display HA activity, and infectious virus titers were determined only by detecting NP. The virus culture ELISA described here will enable efficacy testing of new antiviral compounds in clinical trials during seasons in which nonhemagglutinating influenza A viruses circulate.

  18. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A.; Bradford, William D.; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein−based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation. PMID:25823586

  19. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A; Bradford, William D; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S; Li, Rong

    2015-03-30

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein-based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation.

  20. Alginate as a cell culture substrate for growth and differentiation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Razeih; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Samiei, Shahram; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Davari, Maliheh; Nazemroaya, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Abouzar; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells' behavior in alginate beads that establish 3D environment for cellular growth and mimic extracellular matrix versus the conventional 2D monolayer culture. RPE cells were encapsulated in alginate beads by dripping alginate cell suspension into CaCl2 solution. Beads were suspended in three different media including Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/F12 alone, DMEM/F12 supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum (FBS), and DMEM/F12 supplemented with 30 % human amniotic fluid (HAF). RPE cells were cultivated on polystyrene under the same conditions as controls. Cell phenotype, cell proliferation, cell death, and MTT assay, immunocytochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR were performed to evaluate the effect of alginate on RPE cells characteristics and integrity. RPE cells can survive and proliferate in alginate matrixes. Immunocytochemistry analysis exhibited Nestin, RPE65, and cytokeratin expressions in a reasonable number of cultured cells in alginate beads. Real-time PCR data demonstrated high levels of Nestin, CHX10, RPE65, and tyrosinase gene expressions in RPE cells immobilized in alginate when compared to 2D monolayer culture systems. The results suggest that alginate can be used as a reliable scaffold for maintenance of RPE cells' integrity and in vitro propagation of human retinal progenitor cells for cell replacement therapies in retinal diseases.

  1. Fabrication of transplantable corneal epithelial and oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets using a novel temperature-responsive closed culture device.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ryota; Kobayashi, Toyoshige; Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Kitano, Yuriko; Watanabe, Hiroya; Mizutani, Manabu; Nozaki, Takayuki; Senda, Naoko; Saitoh, Kazuo; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Takeda, Shizu

    2015-05-01

    Temperature-responsive culture surfaces make it possible to harvest transplantable carrier-free cell sheets. Here, we applied temperature-responsive polymer for polycarbonate surfaces with previously developed closed culture devices for an automated culture system in order to fabricate transplantable stratified epithelial cell sheets. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses and colony-forming assays revealed that corneal epithelial and oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets could be harvested with the temperature-responsive closed culture devices. The results were similar to those obtained using temperature-responsive culture inserts. These results indicate that the novel temperature-responsive closed culture device is useful for fabricating transplantable stratified epithelial cell sheets.

  2. Establishment, characterization, and toxicological application of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) primary skin fibroblast cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sarah J; Zychowski, Gregory V; Bauman, Sandy W; Higgins, Benjamin M; Raudsepp, Terje; Gollahon, Lauren S; Wooten, Kimberly J; Cole, Jennifer M; Godard-Codding, Céline

    2014-12-16

    Pollution is a well-known threat to sea turtles but its impact is poorly understood. In vitro toxicity testing presents a promising avenue to assess and monitor the effects of environmental pollutants in these animals within the legal constraints of their endangered status. Reptilian cell cultures are rare and, in sea turtles, largely derived from animals affected by tumors. Here we describe the full characterization of primary skin fibroblast cell cultures derived from biopsies of multiple healthy loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta), and the subsequent optimization of traditional in vitro toxicity assays to reptilian cells. Characterization included validating fibroblast cells by morphology and immunocytochemistry, and optimizing culture conditions by use of growth curve assays with a fractional factorial experimental design. Two cell viability assays, MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and an assay measuring cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) expression by quantitative PCR were optimized in the characterized cells. MTT and LDH assays confirmed cytotoxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid at 500 μM following 72 and 96 h exposures while CYP1A5 induction was detected after 72 h exposure to 0.1-10 μM benzo[a]pyrene. This research demonstrates the validity of in vitro toxicity testing in sea turtles and highlights the need to optimize mammalian assays to reptilian cells.

  3. T-Cell Proliferation Assay: Determination of Immunodominant T-Cell Epitopes of Food Allergens.

    PubMed

    Masilamani, Madhan; Pascal, Mariona; Sampson, Hugh A

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of allergen-specific T cells is critical to understand their contribution to disease pathogenesis. The identification of immunodominant T-cell epitopes is crucial for development of T-cell-based vaccines. Peptide-specific T-cell proliferation studies are usually performed in a library of short synthetic peptides (15mer or 20mer) with 3 or 5 offset spanning the entire length of the allergen. T-cell peptide epitopes lack the primary and tertiary structure of the native protein to cross-link IgE, but retain the ability to stimulate T cells. The peptides sequences can also be obtained either by in silico approaches and in vitro binding assays. The efficacy of T-cell epitope-based peptide immunotherapy has been proven in certain allergies. The present methodology describes T-cell proliferation assays using whole blood sample from allergic subjects.

  4. Hurel -- an in vivo-surrogate assay platform for cell-based studies.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gregory T

    2009-09-01

    Accurate prediction of the human response to potential pharmaceuticals is difficult, often unreliable, and invariably expensive. Traditional in vitro cell culture assays are of limited value, because they do not accurately mimic the complex environment to which a drug candidate is subjected within the human body. While in vivo animal studies can account for the complex inter-cellular and inter-tissue effects not observable from in vitro assays, animal studies are expensive, labour intensive, time consuming, and unpopular. In addition, there is considerable concern as to whether animal studies can predict human risk sufficiently precisely, because, first, there is no known mechanistic basis for extrapolation from high to low doses, and second, cross-species extrapolation has frequently been found to be problematic with respect to toxicity and pharmacokinetic characteristics. To address these limitations, an interactive, cell-based microfluidic biochip called a Hurel was developed. The Hurel system consists of living cells segregated into interconnected "tissue" or "organ" compartments. The organ compartments are connected by a re-circulating culture medium that acts as a "blood surrogate". The fluidics are designed so that the primary elements of the circulatory system, and more importantly, the interactions of the organ systems, are accurately mimicked. Drug candidates are exposed to a more-realistic animal or human physiological environment, thus providing a higher and more accurate informational content than can the traditional in vitro assays. By affording dynamic assessment of potential toxicity, metabolism, and bioavailability, the device's capabilities hold the potential to markedly improve the prioritisation of drug leads prior to animal studies.

  5. Increased mechanosensitivity of cells cultured on nanotopographies

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Joshua D.; Lim, Jung Yul; Donahue, Henry J.

    2012-01-01

    Enhancing cellular mechanosensitivity is recognized as a novel tool for successful musculoskeletal tissue engineering. We examined the hypothesis that mechanosensitivity of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is enhanced on nanotopographic substrates relative to flat surfaces. hMSCs were cultured on polymer-demixed, randomly distributed nanoisland surfaces with varying island heights and changes in intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, in response to fluid flow induced shear stress were quantifide. Stem cells cultured on specific scale nanotopographies displayed greater intracellular calcium responses to fluid flow. hMSCs cultured on 10-20 nm high nanoislands displayed a greater percentage of cells responding in calcium relative to cells cultured on flat control, and showed greater average [Ca2+]i increase relative to cells cultured on other nanoislands (45-80 nm high nanoislands). As [Ca2+]i is an important regulator of downstream signaling, as well as proliferation and differentiation of hMSCs, this observation suggests that specific scale nanotopographies provide an optimal milieu for promoting stem cell mechanotransduction activity. That mechanical signals and substrate nanotopography may synergistically regulate cell behavior is of significant interest in the development of regenerative medicine protocols. PMID:20851397

  6. Genotoxic effects of selected biocides on RTG-2 fish cells by means of a modified Fast Micromethod Assay.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fortún, S; Llorente, M T; Castaño, A

    2005-06-01

    A sensitive in vitro assay for detecting DNA damage in RTG-2 cells culture is described. This assay employs a dye, PicoGreen double stranded DNA (dsDNA) quantitation reagent, which becomes intensely fluorescent upon binding nucleic acids. The assay includes a simple and rapid 50-min sample lysis in the presence of EDTA, SDS, and high urea concentration at pH 10, followed by time-dependent DNA denaturation at pH 11.6 after NaOH addition. The time course and the extent of DNA denaturation are followed in a microplate fluorescence reader at room temperature for less than 1h. Comparative studies between suspension and fixed RTG-2 cells indicated that it is possible to apply this methodology in both cases with good results. Neutral red assay was used for to determine the cellular viability when RTG-2 cultures were exposed to tetrakis(hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC) and benzalkonium chloride (BC), as biocides used in the disinfection of cooling towers. The results obtained by neutral red assay indicate IC(50(48)) values of 0.017 (0.011-0.028) and 2.71 (1.91-3.86) mg/L for tetrakis(hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride and benzalkonium chloride, respectively. DNA damage has been evaluated for both disinfectants in RTG-2 culture, by exposure to 1/10-, 1/25-, 1/50-, and 1/100-IC(50(48)) value, and the results obtained indicate a strain scission factor (SSF) of 0.126+/-0.014, 0.181+/-0.014, 0.217+/-0.013, and 0.245+/-0.013 in cell suspensions, and 0.077+/-0.019, 0.107+/-0.014, 0.151+/-0.014, and 0.202+/-0.015 in attached cells for tetrakis(hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride; while the SSF values for benzalkonium chloride are 0.023+/-0.009, 0.033+/-0.017, 0.068+/-0.012, and 0.088+/-0.015 in cell suspensions, and 0.033+/-0.010, 0.044+/-0.011, 0.080+/-0.009, and 0.093+/-0.010 in attached cells. Thus, the assay proposed in this study has made it possible to show DNA damage in RTG-2 cells when exposed to 0.2(1/100 IC(50(48))) and 300(1/10 IC(50(48))) Hg/L of tetrakis

  7. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  8. Performance of the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture assay for rapid detection of bacteria and resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Dodémont, Magali; De Mendonça, Ricardo; Nonhoff, Claire; Roisin, Sandrine; Denis, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    Nonduplicate blood cultures that were positive for Gram-negative bacilli (n = 125) were tested by the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay; 117 (90.7%) isolates were members of the panel. For identification and resistance markers, the agreements with routine methods were 97.4% (114/117) and 92.3% (12/13). The BC-GN assay is a rapid and accurate tool for the detection of pathogens from blood cultures and could be integrated alongside conventional systems to enable faster patient management, but the clinical benefits should be further evaluated.

  9. Performance evaluation of 3D polystyrene 96-well plates with human neural stem cells in a calcium assay.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yinzhi; Kisaalita, William S

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we have generated a high-throughput screening (HTS)-compatible 3D cell culture platform by chemically "welding" polystyrene scaffolds into standard 2D polystyrene 96-well plates. The variability of scaffolds was minimized by introducing automation into the fabrication process. The fabricated 3D cell culture plates were compared with several commercially available 3D cell culture platforms with light and scanning electron microscopy. Voltage-gated calcium channel functionality was used to access the Z' factors of all plates, including a 2D standard plate control. It was found that with the No-Wash Fluo-4 calcium assay and neural progenitor cells, all plates display acceptable Z' factors for use in HTS. The plates with "welded" polystyrene scaffolds have several advantages, such as being versatile and economical, and are ready to use off the shelf. These characteristics are especially desired in HTS preclinical drug discovery applications.

  10. Primary cell cultures of bovine colon epithelium: isolation and cell culture of colonocytes.

    PubMed

    Föllmann, W; Weber, S; Birkner, S

    2000-10-01

    Epithelial cells from bovine colon were isolated by mechanical preparation combined with an enzymatic digestion from colon specimens derived from freshly slaughtered animals. After digestion with collagenase I, the isolated tissue was centrifuged on a 2% D-sorbitol gradient to separate epithelial crypts which were seeded in collagen I-coated culture flasks. By using colon crypts and omitting the seeding of single cells a contamination by fibroblasts was prevented. The cells proliferated under the chosen culture conditions and formed monolayer cultures which were maintained for several weeks, including subcultivation steps. A population doubling time of about 21 hr was estimated in the log phase of the corresponding growth curve. During the culture period the cells were characterized morphologically and enzymatically. By using antibodies against cytokeratine 7 and 13 the isolated cells were identified as cells of epithelial origin. Antibodies against vimentin served as negative control. Morphological features such as microvilli, desmosomes and tight junctions, which demonstrated the ability of the cultured cells to restore an epithelial like monolayer, were shown by ultrastructural investigations. The preservation of the secretory function of the cultured cells was demonstrated by mucine cytochemistry with alcian blue staining. A stable expression of enzyme activities over a period of 6 days in culture occurred for gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, acid phosphatase and NADH-dehydrogenase activity under the chosen culture conditions. Activity of alkaline phosphatase decreased to about 50% of basal value after 6 days in culture. Preliminary estimations of the metabolic competence of these cells revealed cytochrome P450 1A1-associated EROD activity in freshly isolated cells which was stable over 5 days in cultured cells. Then activity decreased completely. This culture system with primary epithelial cells from the colon will be used further as a model for the colon

  11. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for rapid detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci directly from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2014-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylococcus spp., the nuc gene for S. aureus, and the mecA gene for methicillin resistance. The detection limit of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was 10(3) CFU/ml per PCR for each gene target. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was evaluated using 118 clinical isolates from various specimen types and a total of 350 positive blood cultures from a continuous monitoring blood culture system. The results obtained with the multiplex real-time PCR assay for the three targets were in agreement with those of conventional identification and susceptibility testing methods except for one organism. Of 350 positive bottle cultures, the sensitivities of the multiplex real-time PCR kit were 100% (166/166 cultures), 97.2% (35/36 cultures), and 99.2% (117/118 cultures) for the 16S rRNA, nuc, and mecA genes, respectively, and the specificities for all three targets were 100%. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays are very useful for the rapid accurate diagnosis of staphylococcal BSIs. In addition, the Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays could have an important impact on the choice of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, based on detection of the mecA gene.

  12. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation <10% intraexperiment, <20% interexperiment). A proof-of-principle drug screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis.

  13. A method for establishing human primary gastric epithelial cell culture from fresh surgical gastric tissues.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Faisal; Yang, Xuesong; Wen, Qingping; Yan, Qiu

    2015-08-01

    At present, biopsy specimens, cancer cell lines and tissues obtained by gastric surgery are used in the study and analysis of gastric cancer, including the molecular mechanisms and proteomics. However, fibroblasts and other tissue components may interfere with these techniques. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop a procedure for the isolation of viable human gastric epithelial cells from gastric surgical tissues. A method was developed to culture human gastric epithelial cells using fresh, surgically excised tissues and was evaluated using immunocytochemistry, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and cell viability assays. Low cell growth was observed surrounding the gastric tissue on the seventh day of tissue explant culture. Cell growth subsequently increased, and at 12 days post-explant a high number of pure epithelial cells were detected. The gastric cancer cells exhibited rapid growth with a doubling time of 13-52 h, as compared to normal cells, which had a doubling time of 20-53 h. Immunocytochemical analyses of primary gastric cells revealed positive staining for cytokeratin 18 and 19, which indicated that the culture was comprised of pure epithelial cells and contained no fibroblasts. Furthermore, PAS staining demonstrated that the cultured gastric cells produced neutral mucin. Granulin and carbohydrate antigen 724 staining confirmed the purity of gastric cancer and normal cells in culture. This method of cell culture indicated that the gastric cells in primary culture consisted of mucin-secreting gastric epithelial cells, which may be useful for the study of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

  14. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  15. Cell-based assays in practice: cell markers from autofluorescent proteins of the GFP-family.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Michael; Kredel, Simone; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Heilker, Ralf

    2008-09-01

    The more recently discovered anthozoan fluorescent proteins (FPs) and the classic Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (avGFP) as well as their derivatives have become versatile tools as live cell markers in fluorescence microscopy. In this review, we show the use of these FPs in drug discovery assays. Assay examples are given for the application of FPs in multiplexed imaging, as photosensitizers, as fluorescent timers, as pulse-chase labels and for robotically integrated compound testing. The development of fast microscopic imaging devices has enabled the application of automated fluorescence microscopy combined with image analysis to pharmaceutical high throughput drug discovery assays, generally referred to as High Content Screening (HCS).

  16. Cell culture models of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Béranger, F; Mangé, A; Solassol, J; Lehmann, S

    2001-11-30

    In this review, we describe the generation and use of cell culture models of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, also known as prion diseases. These models include chronically prion-infected cell lines, as well as cultures expressing variable amounts of wild-type, mutated, or chimeric prion proteins. These cell lines have been widely used to investigate the biology of both the normal and the pathological isoform of the prion protein. They have also contributed to the comprehension of the pathogenic processes occurring in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and in the development of new therapeutic approaches of these diseases.

  17. Glycosylation of Fluorophenols by Plant Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Kei; Kubota, Naoji; Kondo, Yoko; Sato, Daisuke; Hamada, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    Fluoroaromatic compounds are used as agrochemicals and released into environment as pollutants. Glycosylation of 2-, 3-, and 4-fluorophenols using plant cell cultures of Nicotiana tabacum was investigated to elucidate their potential to metabolize these compounds. Cultured N. tabacum cells converted 2-fluorophenol into its β-glucoside (60%) and β-gentiobioside (10%). 4-Fluorophenol was also glycosylated to its β-glucoside (32%) and β-gentiobioside (6%) by N. tabacum cells. On the other hand, N. tabacum glycosylated 3-fluorophenol to β-glucoside (17%). PMID:19564930

  18. Assay to measure the secretion of sphingosine-1-phosphate from cells induced by S1P lyase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Loetscher, Erika; Schneider, Karolina; Beerli, Christian; Billich, Andreas

    2013-04-12

    Inhibitors of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) degrading enzyme S1P lyase (SPL) may be useful in the therapy of inflammatory diseases by preventing lymphocyte recruitment to diseased tissues. Here we describe a cellular assay for such inhibitors, which takes advantage of the observation that a fraction of the intracellular S1P accumulated in the presence of SPL inhibitors is secreted into the medium of cultured cells. The secreted S1P is then quantified using an S1P-sensitive reporter cell line. In the routine assay protocol, human HEK293T cells are treated with SPL inhibitors in the presence of phosphatase inhibitors and sphingosine; while the phosphatase inhibitors are included to prevent the degradation of S1P secreted from the cells, sphingosine is added as source for intracellular S1P that is prone to SPL degradation. The secreted S1P in the supernatant of the cell cultures is then quantified by measuring calcium flux induced in CHO-K1 cells expressing the human S1P3 receptor. Using this method SPL inhibitors were shown to induce a concentration-dependent increase of extracellular S1P under the conditions used; thus, the assay allows for the ranking of SPL inhibitors according to their potency on living cells.

  19. Pitfalls in cell culture work with xanthohumol.

    PubMed

    Motyl, M; Kraus, B; Heilmann, J

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol, the most abundant prenylated chalcone in hop (Humulus lupulus L.) cones, is well known to exert several promising pharmacological activities in vitro and in vivo. Among these, the chemopreventive, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects are probably the most interesting. As xanthohumol is hardly soluble in water and able to undergo conversion to isoxanthohumol we determined several handling characteristics for cell culture work with this compound. Recovery experiments revealed that working with xanthohumol under cell culture conditions requires a minimal amount of 10% FCS to increase its solubility to reasonable concentrations (-50-75 micromol/l) for pharmacological in vitro tests. Additionally, more than 50% of xanthohumol can be absorbed to various plastic materials routinely used in the cell culture using FCS concentrations below 10%. In contrast, experiments using fluorescence microscopy in living cells revealed that detection of cellular intake of xanthohumol is hampered by concentrations above 1% FCS.

  20. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  1. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  2. Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Protect Neurons and Modulate Microglia in Cell Culture Models of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sushil; Yang, Bing; Strong, Roger; Xi, Xiao Pei; Brenneman, Miranda; Grotta, James C.; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Savitz, Sean I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although several studies have provided evidence for the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (MNCs) in animal models of stroke, the mechanisms underlying their benefits remain largely unknown. We have determined the neuroprotective potential of MNCs in primary neuronal cultures exposed to various injuries in vitro. Methods Cortical neurons in culture were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation, hypoxia, or hydrogen peroxide and cell death was assayed by MTT, caspase-3 activation or TUNEL labelling at 24 hrs. Cultures were randomized to co-treatment with MNC-derived supernatants or media before injury exposure. In separate experiments, macrophage or microglial cultures were exposed to lipopolypolysacharide (LPS) in the presence and absence of MNC-derived supernatants. Neuronal cultures were then exposed to conditioned media derived from activated macrophages or microglia. Cytokines from the supernantants of MNC cultures exposed to normoxia or hypoxia were also estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Results MNC-derived supernatants attenuated neuronal death induced by OGD, hypoxia, hydrogen peroxide, and conditioned macrophage/microglial media and contain a number of trophic factors including IL-10, IGF-1, VEGF, and SDF-1. Conclusion MNCs provide broad neuroprotection against a variety of injuries relevant to stroke. PMID:20629187

  3. Rapid assays for lectin toxicity and binding changes that reflect altered glycosylation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-06-03

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids, or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, as well as those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also generate spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes expressed

  4. A cell-based phenotypic assay to identify cardioprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Stephanie; Olm-Shipman, Adam; Walters, Andrew; Urciuoli, William R.; Devito, Stefanie; Nadtochiy, Sergiy M.; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Brookes, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Tissue ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury underlies several leading causes of death such as heart-attack and stroke. The lack of clinical therapies for IR injury may be partly due to the difficulty of adapting IR injury models to high-throughput screening (HTS). Objective To develop a model of IR injury that is both physiologically relevant and amenable to HTS. Methods and Results A micro-plate based respirometry apparatus was used. Controlling gas flow in the plate head space, coupled with the instrument’s mechanical systems, yielded a 24 well model of IR injury in which H9c2 cardiomyocytes were transiently trapped in a small volume, rendering them ischemic. Following initial validation with known protective molecules, the model was used to screen a 2000 molecule library, with post IR cell death as an endpoint. pO2 and pH monitoring in each well also afforded metabolic data. Ten protective, detrimental and inert molecules from the screen were subsequently tested in a Langendorff perfused heart model of IR injury, revealing strong correlations between the screening endpoint and both recovery of cardiac function (negative r2=0.66), and infarct size (positive, r2=0.62). Relationships between the effects of added molecules on cellular bioenergetics, and protection against IR injury, were also studied. Conclusion This novel cell-based assay can predict either protective or detrimental effects on IR injury in the intact heart. Its application may help identify therapeutic or harmful molecules. PMID:22394516

  5. Eradication of Mycoplasma contaminations from cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Cord C; Drexler, Hans G

    2014-04-14

    Mycoplasma contaminations have a multitude of effects on cultured cell lines that may influence the results of experiments or pollute bioactive substances isolated from the eukaryotic cells. The elimination of mycoplasma contaminations from cell cultures with antibiotics has been proven to be a practical alternative to discarding and re-establishing important or irreplaceable cell lines. Different fluoroquinolones, tetracyclins, pleuromutilins, and macrolides shown to have strong anti-mycoplasma properties are employed for the decontamination. These antibiotics are applied as single treatments, as combination treatment of two antibiotics in parallel or successively, or in combination with a surface-active peptide to enhance the action of the antibiotic. The protocols in this unit allow eradication of mycoplasmas, prevention of the development of resistant mycoplasma strains, and potential cure of heavily contaminated and damaged cells. Consistent and permanent alterations to eukaryotic cells attributable to the treatment have not been demonstrated.

  6. Growth Factor-Dependent Proliferation of the Pancreatic β-cell Line βTC-tet: An Assay for β-cell Mitogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Milo-Landesman, Dalit

    2002-01-01

    The ability to expand normal pancreatic islet β cells in culture would significantly advance the prospects of cell therapy for diabetes. A number of growth factors can stimulate limited islet cell replication, however other factors may exist which are more effective β-cell-specific mitogens. The search for novel β-cell growth factors has been hampered by the lack of a β-cell-specific proliferation assay. We developed a simple and sensitive assay for β-cell growth factors based on a conditionally-transformed mouse β-cell line (βTC-tet). These cells express the SV40 T antigen (Tag) oncoprotein under control of the tetracycline (Tc) operon regulatory system. In the presence of Tc, Tag expression is tightly shut off and the cells undergo complete growth arrest. Here we show that the growth-arrested cells can proliferate in response to growth factors in the absence of Tag. Using this assay, a number of growth factors previously shown to be mitogenic to a mixed islet cell population were found to induce proliferation of pure β cells. We conclude that growth-arrested βTC-tet cells can be employed in a survey of factors from various sources for identifying novel factors with β-cell mitogenic activity. PMID:11900281

  7. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (Keystone Sym)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal is to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate chemical effects using a single stem cell culture technique that would improve throughput and provide quantitative markers of differentiation and cell number. To this end, we have used an adherent cell differentiation ...

  8. High Content Imaging (HCI) on Miniaturized Three-Dimensional (3D) Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-01-01

    High content imaging (HCI) is a multiplexed cell staining assay developed for better understanding of complex biological functions and mechanisms of drug action, and it has become an important tool for toxicity and efficacy screening of drug candidates. Conventional HCI assays have been carried out on two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer cultures, which in turn limit predictability of drug toxicity/efficacy in vivo; thus, there has been an urgent need to perform HCI assays on three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. Although 3D cell cultures better mimic in vivo microenvironments of human tissues and provide an in-depth understanding of the morphological and functional features of tissues, they are also limited by having relatively low throughput and thus are not amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS). One attempt of making 3D cell culture amenable for HTS is to utilize miniaturized cell culture platforms. This review aims to highlight miniaturized 3D cell culture platforms compatible with current HCI technology. PMID:26694477

  9. A Fluid Membrane-Based Soluble Ligand Display System for Live CellAssays

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Nair, Pradeep N.; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Groves, Jay T.

    2005-10-14

    Cell communication modulates numerous biological processes including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, invasion and differentiation. Correspondingly, there has been significant interest in the development of surface display strategies for the presentation of signaling molecules to living cells. This effort has primarily focused on naturally surface-bound ligands, such as extracellular matrix components and cell membranes. Soluble ligands (e.g. growth factors and cytokines) play an important role in intercellular communications, and their display in a surface-bound format would be of great utility in the design of array-based live cell assays. Recently, several cell microarray systems that display cDNA, RNAi, or small molecules in a surface array format were proven to be useful in accelerating high-throughput functional genetic studies and screening therapeutic agents. These surface display methods provide a flexible platform for the systematic, combinatorial investigation of genes and small molecules affecting cellular processes and phenotypes of interest. In an analogous sense, it would be an important advance if one could display soluble signaling ligands in a surface assay format that allows for systematic, patterned presentation of soluble ligands to live cells. Such a technique would make it possible to examine cellular phenotypes of interest in a parallel format with soluble signaling ligands as one of the display parameters. Herein we report a ligand-modified fluid supported lipid bilayer (SLB) assay system that can be used to functionally display soluble ligands to cells in situ (Figure 1A). By displaying soluble ligands on a SLB surface, both solution behavior (the ability to become locally enriched by reaction-diffusion processes) and solid behavior (the ability to control the spatial location of the ligands in an open system) could be combined. The method reported herein benefits from the naturally fluid state of the supported membrane, which allows

  10. Multilayer-based lab-on-a-chip systems for perfused cell-based assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzbach, Udo; Sonntag, Frank; Grünzner, Stefan; Busek, Mathias; Schmieder, Florian; Franke, Volker

    2014-12-01

    A novel integrated technology chain of laser-microstructured multilayer foils for fast, flexible, and low-cost manufacturing of lab-on-a-chip devices especially for complex cell and tissue culture applications, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-cells ratio, was developed and established. Initially the microfluidic system is constructively divided into individual layers, which are formed by separate foils or plates. Based on the functional boundary conditions and the necessary properties of each layer, their corresponding foils and plates are chosen. In the third step, the foils and plates are laser microstructured and functionalized from both sides. In the fourth and last manufacturing step, the multiple plates and foils are joined using different bonding techniques like adhesive bonding, welding, etc. This multilayer technology together with pneumatically driven micropumps and valves permits the manufacturing of fluidic structures and perfusion systems, which spread out above multiple planes. Based on the established lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays, a multilayer microfluidic system with two parallel connected cell culture chambers was successfully implemented.

  11. Effect of hawthorn (Crataegus oxycantha) crude extract and chromatographic fractions on multiple activities in a cultured cardiomyocyte assay.

    PubMed

    Long, S R; Carey, R A; Crofoot, K M; Proteau, P J; Filtz, T M

    2006-11-01

    Extracts of hawthorn (Crataegus oxycantha) have become popular herbal supplements for their well-recognized cardiotonic effects. Many commercial preparations have been used successfully in the treatment of congestive heart failure, although the active principles within these extracts have yet to be conclusively identified. Several hawthorn preparations were studied and found to have negative chronotropic effects in a cultured neonatal murine cardiomyocyte assay using unpaced cells. As compared to conventional cardiac drugs (i.e., epinephrine, milrinone, ouabain, or propranolol), hawthorn extract has a unique activity profile. Hawthorn extract appears to be anti-arrhythmic and capable of inducing rhythmicity in quiescent cardiomyocytes. Hawthorn extract does not cause beta-adrenergic receptor blockade at concentrations which cause negative chronotropic effects. Commercial hawthorn preparations, extracts prepared from dried leaves and those made from dried berries have similar chronotropic activities. When crude extracts are separated using size-exclusion chromatography, several fractions retain multiple cardiac activities. Assays with chromatographic fractions reveal that multiple dissimilar cardioactive components may exist within the extract, making the identification of individual active constituents more challenging.

  12. Sensitivity of solid culture, broth culture, and real-time PCR assays for milk and colostrum samples from Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-infectious dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Emilie; McKenna, Shawn; Chaffer, Marcelo; Keefe, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) can be shed in feces, milk, and colostrum. The goal of this study was to assess assays that detect MAP in these sample types, including effects of lactation stage or season. Understanding the performance of these assays could improve how they are used, limiting the risk of infection to calves. Forty-six previously confirmed MAP-positive cows from 7 Atlantic Canadian dairy farms were identified for colostrum sampling and monthly sampling of milk and feces over a 12-mo period. Samples were assayed for MAP using solid culture, broth culture, and direct real-time PCR (qPCR). Across assay types, test sensitivity when applied to milk samples averaged 25% of that when applied to fecal samples. For colostrum samples, sensitivity depended on assay type, with sensitivity of qPCR being approximately 46% of that in feces. Across sample types, sensitivity of qPCR was higher than that of the other assays. Sensitivity of qPCR, when applied to milk samples, was significantly higher in summer than in other seasons. Summer was also the season with highest agreement between milk and fecal samples collected within the same month. Our results suggest that qPCR would detect more cows shedding MAP in their milk and colostrum than solid or broth culture assays, particularly during the summer, thus providing better management information to limit exposure of calves to this infectious organism.

  13. A high-throughput cell migration assay using scratch wound healing, a comparison of image-based readout methods

    PubMed Central

    Yarrow, Justin C; Perlman, Zachary E; Westwood, Nicholas J; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2004-01-01

    Background Cell migration is a complex phenomenon that requires the coordination of numerous cellular processes. Investigation of cell migration and its underlying biology is of interest to basic scientists and those in search of therapeutics. Current migration assays for screening small molecules, siRNAs, or other perturbations are difficult to perform in parallel at the scale required to screen large libraries. Results We have adapted the commonly used scratch wound healing assay of tissue-culture cell monolayers to a 384 well plate format. By mechanically scratching the cell substrate with a pin array, we are able to create characteristically sized wounds in all wells of a 384 well plate. Imaging of the healing wounds with an automated fluorescence microscope allows us to distinguish perturbations that affect cell migration, morphology, and division. Readout requires ~1 hr per plate but is high in information content i.e. high content. We compare readouts using different imaging technologies, automated microscopy, scanners and a fluorescence macroscope, and evaluate the trade-off between information content and data acquisition rate. Conclusions The adaptation of a wound healing assay to a 384 well format facilitates the study of aspects of cell migration, tissue reorganization, cell division, and other processes that underlie wound healing. This assay allows greater than 10,000 perturbations to be screened per day with a quantitative, high-content readout, and can also be used to characterize small numbers of perturbations in detail. PMID:15357872

  14. In vitro cytotoxicity assays: comparison of LDH, neutral red, MTT and protein assay in hepatoma cell lines following exposure to cadmium chloride.

    PubMed

    Fotakis, George; Timbrell, John A

    2006-01-05

    The aim of this study was to compare four in vitro cytotoxicity assays and determine their ability to detect early cytotoxic events. Two hepatoma cell lines, namely HTC and HepG2 cells, were exposed to cadmium chloride (0-300 microM) for 3, 5 and 8 h. Following exposure to the toxic metal cytotoxicity was determined with the lactate dehydrogenase leakage assay (LDH), a protein assay, the neutral red assay and the methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. In HTC cells no toxicity was observed for any incubation period when the LDH leakage, the MTT and the protein assay were employed whereas the neutral red assay revealed early cytotoxicity starting after incubation of HTC cells with CdCl(2) for 3 h. In the case of HepG2 cells the MTT assay reveals cytotoxicity due to CdCl(2) exposure after 3 h whereas no such effect is seen with the other three assays. Following 5 h exposure of HepG2 cells to CdCl(2), toxicity is observed with the MTT assay at lower concentrations compared to the ones required for detection of toxicity with the LDH leakage and the neutral red assay. In conclusion different sensitivity was observed for each assay with the neutral red and the MTT assay being the most sensitive in detecting cytotoxic events compared to the LDH leakage and the protein assay.

  15. Cytocompatibility of porous biphasic calcium phosphate granules with human mesenchymal cells by a multiparametric assay.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Fabio; Alves, Gutemberg; Fernandes, Gustavo; König, Bruno; Rossi, Alexandre J R; Granjeiro, Jose

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the cytocompatibility of injectable and moldable restorative biomaterials based on granules of dense or porous biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) with human primary mesenchymal cells, in order to validate them as tools for stem cell-induced bone regeneration. Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA/beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) (60:40) granules were obtained by the addition of wax spheres and pressing at 20 MPa, while dense materials were compacted by pressing at 100 MPa, followed by thermal treatment (1100°C), grinding, and sieving. Extracts were prepared by 24-h incubation of granules on culture media, with subsequent exposition of human primary mesenchymal cells. Three different cell viability parameters were evaluated on the same samples. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the granules revealed distinct dense and porous surfaces. After cell exposition to extracts, no significant differences on mitochondrial activity (2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenly)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide) or cell density (Crystal Violet Dye Elution) were observed among groups. However, Neutral Red assay revealed that dense materials extracts induced lower levels of total viable cells to porous HA/β-TCP (P < 0.01). Calcium ion content was also significantly lower on the extracts of dense samples. Porogenic treatments on BCP composites do not affect cytocompatibility, as measured by three different parameters, indicating that these ceramics are well suited for further studies on future bioengineering applications.

  16. Mammosphere Formation Assay from Human Breast Cancer Tissues and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Coombes, Charles R.; Stebbing, Justin; Castellano, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Similar to healthy tissues, many blood and solid malignancies are now thought to be organised hierarchically, with a subset of stem-like cancer cells that self-renew while giving rise to more differentiated progeny. Understanding and targeting these cancer stem cells in breast cancer, which may possess enhanced chemo- and radio-resistance compared to the non-stem tumor bulk, has become an important research area. Markers including CD44, CD24, and ALDH activity can be assessed using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to prospectively isolate cells that display enhanced tumorigenicity when implanted into immunocompromised mice: the mammosphere assay has also become widely used for its ability to retrospectively identify sphere-forming cells that develop from single stem cell-like clones. Here we outline approaches for the appropriate culturing of mammospheres from cell lines or primary patient samples, their passaging, and calculations to estimate sphere forming efficiency (SFE). First we discuss key considerations and pitfalls in the appropriate planning and interpretation of mammosphere experiments. PMID:25867607

  17. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  18. Culture and Isolation of Brain Tumor Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Vora, Parvez; Venugopal, Chitra; McFarlane, Nicole; Singh, Sheila K

    2015-08-03

    Brain tumors are typically composed of heterogeneous cells that exhibit distinct phenotypic characteristics and proliferative potentials. Only a relatively small fraction of cells in the tumor with stem cell properties, termed brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), possess an ability to differentiate along multiple lineages, self-renew, and initiate tumors in vivo. This unit describes protocols for the culture and isolation BTICs. We applied culture conditions and assays originally used for normal neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro to a variety of brain tumors. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting for the neural precursor cell surface marker CD133/CD15, BTICs can be isolated and studied prospectively. Isolation of BTICs from GBM bulk tumor will enable examination of dissimilar morphologies, self-renewal capacities, tumorigenicity, and therapeutic sensitivities. As cancer is also considered a disease of unregulated self-renewal and differentiation, an understanding of BTICs is fundamental to understanding tumor growth. Ultimately, it will lead to novel drug discovery approaches that strategically target the functionally relevant BTIC population.

  19. Nick translation - a new assay for monitoring DNA damage and repair in cultured human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, R.D.; Matheson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    An in vitro assay has been developed to detect DNA damage and repair following chemical treatment of human diploid fibroblasts. DNA damage is measured by following the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I-catalyzed incorporation of radiolabeled deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) into the DNA of lysolecithin-permeabilized cells. DNA strand breaks with free 3' OH termini serve as template sites for incorporation, and decrease of this incorporation with time, following removal of the test chemical, indicates loss (repair) of initial damage. Inhibition of the DNA excision repair process by the addition of the repair inhibitors arabinofuranosyl cytosine (ara-C) and hydroxyurea (HU) during the incubation period gives rise to an increased number of template sites, manifesting itself in increased incorporation and indicating the induction of long-patch excision repair. Results presented demonstrate that all 14 direct-acting carcinogens tested and 8 of 14 carcinogens requiring metabolic activation give positive indication of DNA damage, repair, or both. Eleven of 14 noncarcinogens tested were scored as negative, the other 3 having previously been shown to interact with cellular DNA. This assay is shown to have predictive capability at least equal to that of UDS assays but to allow a broader spectrum of genotoxic effects to be analyzed.

  20. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics.

  1. Effects of teicoplanin on cell number of cultured cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kashkolinejad-Koohi, Tahere; Saadat, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Teicoplanin is a glycopeptide antibiotic with a wide variation in human serum half-life. It is also a valuable alternative of vancomycin. There is however no study on its effect on cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of teicoplanin on cultured cell lines CHO, Jurkat E6.1 and MCF-7. The cultured cells were exposed to teicoplanin at final concentrations of 0–11000 μg/ml for 24 hours. To determine cell viability, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test was performed. At low concentrations of teicoplanin the numbers of cultured cells (due to cell proliferation) were increased in the three cell lines examined. The maximum cell proliferation rates were observed at concentrations of 1000, 400, and 200 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. Cell toxicity was observed at final concentrations over 2000, 6000, and 400 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. A dose-dependent manner of cell toxicity was observed. Our present findings indicated that teicoplanin at clinically used concentrations induced cell proliferation. It should therefore be used cautiously, particularly in children, pregnant women and patients with cancer. PMID:27486356

  2. Lipid Accumulation in Hypoxic Tissue Culture Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Gerald B.; Barcza, Maureen A.; Bush, Marilyn E.

    1977-01-01

    Lipid droplets have long been recognized by light microscopy to accumulate in hypoxic cells both in vivo and in vitro. In the present tissue culture experiments, correlative electron microscopic observations and lipid analyses were performed to determine the nature and significance of lipid accumulation in hypoxia. Strain L mouse fibroblasts were grown in suspension culture, both aerobically and under severe oxygen restriction obtained by gassing cultures daily with an 8% CO2-92% nitrogen mixture. After 48 hours, hypoxic cells showed an increase in total lipid/protein ratio of 42% over control cells. Most of this increase was accounted for by an elevation in the level of cellular triglyceride from 12.3 ± 0.9 μg/mg cell protein in aerobic cultures to 41.9 ± 0.7 in the hypoxic cultures, an increase of 240%. Levels of cellular free fatty acids (FFA) were 96% higher in the hypoxic cultures. No significant changes in the levels of cellular phospholipid or cholesterol were noted. Electron microscopic examination revealed the accumulation of homogeneous cytoplasmic droplets. The hypoxic changes were reversible upon transferring the cultures to aerobic atmospheres with disappearance of the lipid. These experiments indicate that hypoxic injury initially results in triglyceride and FFA accumulation from an inability to oxidize fatty acids taken up from the media and not from autophagic processes, as described in other types of cell injury associated with the sequestration of membranous residues and intracellular cholesterol and phospholipid accumulation. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 1Figure 2 PMID:196505

  3. Proliferation assay of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells exposed to atmospheric-pressure plasmas at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taichi; Ando, Ayumi; Hirano, Kazumi; Ogura, Chika; Kanazawa, Tatsuya; Ikeguchi, Masamichi; Seki, Atsushi; Nishihara, Shoko; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    Proliferation assays of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells have been performed with cell culture media exposed to atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APPs), which generate reactive species in the media at room temperature. It is found that serum in cell culture media functions as a scavenger of highly reactive species and tends to protect cells in the media against cellular damage. On the other hand, if serum is not present in a cell culture medium when it is exposed to APP, the medium becomes cytotoxic and cannot be detoxified by serum added afterwards. Plasma-induced cytotoxic media hinder proliferation of mouse ES cells and may even cause cell death. It is also shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that organic compounds in cell culture media are in general not significantly modified by plasma exposure. These results indicate that if there is no serum in media when they are exposed to APPs, highly reactive species (such as OH radicals) generated in the media by the APP exposure are immediately converted to less reactive species (such as H2O2), which can no longer readily react with serum that is added to the medium after plasma exposure. This study has clearly shown that it is these less reactive species, rather than highly reactive species, that make the medium cytotoxic to mouse ES cells.

  4. Neurofilament expression in cultured rat adenohypophysial cells.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, J L; Salinas, E

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate in cultured rat adenohypophysial cells: a) the presence of neurofilaments of 200 kDa (NF-H), b) the effect of thyroid hormone (T(3)) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) on the expression of NF-H and c) the possible role of NF-H on thyrotropin (TSH) secretion. The presence of NF-H was observed by immunocytochemistry in cultured rat adenohypophysial cells. The exposure to T(3) for 12 h produced a significant increase in NF-H expression; whereas incubation with TRH or T(3)+TRH resulted in no change. The cells treated with T(3) or TRH or T(3)+TRH for 24 h showed no alteration. However, incubation for 48 h with TRH or T(3)+TRH caused significant decrease in NF-H expression. Incubation with NF-H antibodies produced a significant inhibition of calcium-induced TSH release in digitonin-permeabilized adenohypophysial cells. These results provide evidence that NF-H is present in cultured rat adenohypophysial cells, and that T(3) and TRH can modify NF-H expression. It can be suggested that in cultured adenohypophysial cells, NF-H may play a role in the secretory process.

  5. Cell Culture on MEMS Platforms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Ming; Tong, Wen Hao; Choudhury, Deepak; Rahim, Nur Aida Abdul; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated systems provide an excellent platform for the culture of cells, and are an extremely useful tool for the investigation of cellular responses to various stimuli. Advantages offered over traditional methods include cost-effectiveness, controllability, low volume, high resolution, and sensitivity. Both biocompatible and bio-incompatible materials have been developed for use in these applications. Biocompatible materials such as PMMA or PLGA can be used directly for cell culture. However, for bio-incompatible materials such as silicon or PDMS, additional steps need to be taken to render these materials more suitable for cell adhesion and maintenance. This review describes multiple surface modification strategies to improve the biocompatibility of MEMS materials. Basic concepts of cell-biomaterial interactions, such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion are covered. Finally, the applications of these MEMS materials in Tissue Engineering are presented. PMID:20054478

  6. A new cell-based assay to evaluate myogenesis in mouse myoblast C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kodaka, Manami; Yang, Zeyu; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Maruyama, Junichi; Xu, Xiaoyin; Sarkar, Aradhan; Ichimura, Ayana; Nasu, Yusuke; Ozawa, Takeaki; Iwasa, Hiroaki; Ishigami-Yuasa, Mari; Ito, Shigeru; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; and others

    2015-08-15

    The development of the efficient screening system of detecting compounds that promote myogenesis and prevent muscle atrophy is important. Mouse C2C12 cells are widely used to evaluate myogenesis but the procedures of the assay are not simple and the quantification is not easy. We established C2C12 cells expressing the N-terminal green fluorescence protein (GFP) and the C-terminal GFP (GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells). GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells do not exhibit GFP signals until they are fused. The signal intensity correlates with the expression of myogenic markers and myofusion. Myogenesis-promoting reagents, such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and β-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA), enhance the signals, whereas the poly-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-FMK, suppresses it. GFP signals are observed when myotubes formed by GFP1–10 cells are fused with single nuclear GFP11 cells, and enhanced by IGF1, GPA, and IBS008738, a recently-reported myogenesis-promoting reagent. Fusion between myotubes formed by GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells is associated with the appearance of GFP signals. IGF1 and GPA augment these signals, whereas NSC23766, Rac inhibitor, decreases them. The conditioned medium of cancer cells suppresses GFP signals during myogenesis and reduces the width of GFP-positive myotubes after differentiation. Thus the novel split GFP-based assay will provide the useful method for the study of myogenesis, myofusion, and atrophy. - Highlights: • C2C12 cells expressing split GFP proteins show GFP signals when mix-cultured. • The GFP signals correlate with myogenesis and myofusion. • The GFP signals attenuate under the condition that muscle atrophy is induced.

  7. High-throughput viability assay using an autonomously bioluminescent cell line with a bacterial Lux reporter.

    PubMed

    Class, Bradley; Thorne, Natasha; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Cell viability assays are extensively used to determine cell health, evaluate growth conditions, and assess compound cytotoxicity. Most existing assays are endpoint assays, in which data are collected at one time point after termination of the experiment. The time point at which toxicity of a compound is evident, however, depends on the mechanism of that compound. An ideal cell viability assay allows the determination of compound toxicity kinetically without having to terminate the assay prematurely. We optimized and validated a reagent-addition-free cell viability assay using an autoluminescent HEK293 cell line that stably expresses bacterial luciferase and all substrates necessary for bioluminescence. This cell viability assay can be used for real-time, long-term measurement of compound cytotoxicity in live cells with a signal-to-basal ratio of 20- to 200-fold and Z-factors of ~0.6 after 24-, 48- 72-, or 96-h incubation with compound. We also found that the potencies of nine cytotoxic compounds correlated well with those measured by four other commonly used cell viability assays. The results demonstrated that this kinetic cell viability assay using the HEK293(lux) autoluminescent cell line is useful for high-throughput evaluation of compound cytotoxicity.

  8. Analysis of Histone Deacetylase-Dependent Effects on Cell Migration Using the Stripe Assay.

    PubMed

    Mertsch, Sonja; Thanos, Solon

    2017-01-01

    For normal embryonic development/morphogenesis, cell migration and homing are well-orchestrated and important events requiring specific cellular mechanisms. In diseases such as cancer deregulated cell migration represents a major problem. Therefore, numerous efforts are under way to understand the molecular mechanisms of tumor cell migration and to generate more efficient tumor therapies. Cell migration assays are one of the most commonly used functional assays. The wound-healing assay or the Boyden chamber assay are variations of these assays. Nearly all of them are two-dimensional assays and the cells can only migrate on one substrate at a time. This is in contrast to the in vivo situation where the cells are faced simultaneously with different surfaces and interact with different cell types. To approach this in vivo situation we used a modified version of the stripe assay designed by Bonhoeffer and colleagues to examine mechanisms of axonal guidance. The design of this assay allows cells to decide between two different substrates offered at the same time. Utilizing alternating neuronal substrates for migration analyses we can partially mimic the complex in vivo situation for brain tumor cells. Here we describe the detailed protocol to perform a modified version of the stripe assay in order to observe substrate-dependent migration effects in vitro, to analyze the effect of Rho-dependent kinases (ROCKS), of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and of other molecules on glioma cells.

  9. Integrated bioprocessing for plant cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Choi, J W; Cho, G H; Byun, S Y; Kim, D I

    2001-01-01

    Plant cell suspension culture has become the focus of much attention as a tool for the production of secondary metabolites including paclitaxel, a well-known anticancer agent. Recently, it has also been regarded as one of the host systems for the production of recombinant proteins. In order to produce phytochemicals using plant cell cultures, efficient processes must be developed with adequate bioreactor design. Most of the plant secondary metabolites are toxic to cells at the high concentrations required during culture. Therefore, if the product could be removed in situ during culture, productivity might be enhanced due to the alleviation of this toxicity. In situ removal or extractive bioconversion of such products can be performed by in situ extraction with various kinds of organic solvents. In situ adsorption using polymeric resins is another possibility. Using the fact that secondary metabolites are generally hydrophobic, various integrated bioprocessing techniques can be designed not only to lower toxicity, but also to enhance productivity. In this article, in situ extraction, in situ adsorption, utilization of cyclodextrins, and the application of aqueous two-phase systems in plant cell cultures are reviewed.

  10. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal antibodies for identification of mycobacteria from early cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Verstijnen, C P; Ly, H M; Polman, K; Richter, C; Smits, S P; Maselle, S Y; Peerbooms, P; Rienthong, D; Montreewasuwat, N; Koanjanart, S

    1991-01-01

    A simple enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the identification of cultured mycobacteria belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, the Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium kansasii has been developed (R. Schöningh, C. P. H. J. Verstijnen, S. Kuijper, and A. H. J. Kolk. J. Clin. Microbiol. 28:708-713, 1990). The test for the routine identification of cultured mycobacteria was introduced in five clinical laboratories located in Tanzania, Thailand, Vietnam, and The Netherlands. The ELISA can be conducted without an ELISA reader since the test can be read visually. The results of identification of 255 strains of the M. tuberculosis complex by microbiological means and by ELISA were compared; the specificity and the sensitivity were 100%. For the M. avium complex, the specificity was 100% and the sensitivity was 64%. All 26 M. kansasii strains tested could be identified as M. kansasii. The ELISA described here proved to be useful in both well- and modestly equipped laboratories and may replace the microbiological method of identification of M. tuberculosis and M. kansasii. PMID:1909344

  11. EPA Method 1615. Measurement of Enterovirus and Norovirus Occurrence in Water by Culture and RT-qPCR. II. Total Culturable Virus Assay

    PubMed Central

    Fout, G. Shay; Cashdollar, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    A standardized method is required when national studies on virus occurrence in environmental and drinking waters utilize multiple analytical laboratories. The U.S Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Method 1615 was developed with the goal of providing such a standard for measuring Enterovirus and Norovirus in these waters. Virus is concentrated from water using an electropositive filter, eluted from the filter surface with beef extract, and then concentrated further using organic flocculation. Herein we present the protocol from Method 1615 for filter elution, secondary concentration, and measurement of total culturable viruses. A portion of the concentrated eluate from each sample is inoculated onto ten replicate flasks of Buffalo Green Monkey kidney cells. The number of flasks demonstrating cytopathic effects is used to quantify the most probable number (MPN) of infectious units per liter. The method uses a number of quality controls to increase data quality and to reduce interlaboratory and intralaboratory variation. Laboratories must meet defined performance standards. Method 1615 was evaluated by examining virus recovery from reagent-grade and ground waters seeded with Sabin poliovirus type 3. Mean poliovirus recoveries with the total culturable assay were 111% in reagent grade water and 58% in groundwaters. PMID:27684193

  12. Culture of human cell lines by a pathogen-inactivated human platelet lysate.

    PubMed

    Fazzina, R; Iudicone, P; Mariotti, A; Fioravanti, D; Procoli, A; Cicchetti, E; Scambia, G; Bonanno, G; Pierelli, L

    2016-08-01

    Alternatives to the use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) have been investigated to ensure xeno-free growth condition. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of human platelet lysate (PL) as a substitute of FBS for the in vitro culture of some human cell lines. PL was obtained by pools of pathogen inactivated human donor platelet (PLT) concentrates. Human leukemia cell lines (KG-1, K562, JURKAT, HL-60) and epithelial tumor cell lines (HeLa and MCF-7) were cultured with either FBS or PL. Changes in cell proliferation, viability, morphology, surface markers and cell cycle were evaluated for each cell line. Functional characteristics were analysed by drug sensitivity test and cytotoxicity assay. Our results demonstrated that PL can support growth and expansion of all cell lines, although the cells cultured in presence of PL experienced a less massive proliferation compared to those grown with FBS. We found a comparable percentage of viable specific marker-expressing cells in both conditions, confirming lineage fidelity in all cultures. Functionality assays showed that cells in both FBS- and PL-supported cultures maintained their normal responsiveness to adriamycin and NK cell-mediated lysis. Our findings indicate that PL is a feasible serum substitute for supporting growth and propagation of haematopoietic and epithelial cell lines with many advantages from a perspective of process standardization, ethicality and product safety.

  13. Fluorescence assay for mitochondrial permeability transition in cardiomyocytes cultured in a microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Marie Louise Muff; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Treiman, Marek

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) is a voltage-dependent, large-conductance channel of the inner mitochondrial membrane with an important role in a range of pathophysiological conditions. To facilitate studies of pharmacological pore modulation, we describe an assay in a model using neonatal cardiomyocytes in a 96-well microtiter plate format. In the presence of mitochondrial membrane potential Delta Psi m, accumulation of rhodamine-123 in mitochondria (40,000 cells/well, 2.6 microM rhodamine-123) caused fluorescence signal quenching. Following substitution of dye-free buffer, dequenching occurred on the distribution of rhodamine-123 into the extracellular volume. The addition of a small buffer volume containing digitonin (final concentration 10 microg/ml) and Ca(2+) (final concentrations up to 100 microM free Ca(2+)) caused dequenching (Delta F) due to Delta Psi m dissipation by MPTP, as evidenced by inhibition in the presence of cyclosporin A (0.2-2 microM) and facilitation by pH 6.2. Delta F due to Delta Psi m-dissipating agent carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) or alamethicin (10 microM) was insensitive to either pH or cyclosporin A. Inhibition of Ca(2+)-induced (but not of FCCP- or alamethicin-induced) Delta F by glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3 beta) antagonist SB216763 and adenosine, acting at the level of intracellular signaling and plasma membrane receptors, respectively, is shown to illustrate potential applications of this assay. Limitation of the assay to cells with energized mitochondria is stressed.

  14. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  15. Three-Dimensional Cultures of Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an ideal “model organism” for studying tissue specificity and gene expression in mammals: it is one of the few organs that develop after birth and it undergoes multiple cycles of growth, differentiation and regression during the animal’s lifetime in preparation for the important function of lactation. The basic “functional differentiation” unit in the gland is the mammary acinus made up of a layer of polarized epithelial cells specialized for milk production surrounded by myoepithelial contractile cells, and the two-layered structure is surrounded by basement membrane. Much knowledge about the regulation of mammary gland development has been acquired from studying the physiology of the gland and of lactation in rodents. Culture studies, however, were hampered by the inability to maintain functional differentiation on conventional tissue culture plastic. We now know that the microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and tissue architecture, plays a crucial role in directing functional differentiation of organs. Thus, in order for culture systems to be effective experimental models, they need to recapitulate the basic unit of differentiated function in the tissue or organ and to maintain its three-dimensional (3D) structure. Mouse mammary culture models evolved from basic monolayers of cells to an array of complex 3D systems that observe the importance of the microenvironment in dictating proper tissue function and structure. In this chapter, we focus on how 3D mouse mammary epithelial cultures have enabled investigators to gain a better understanding of the organization, development and function of the acinus, and to identify key molecular, structural, and mechanical cues important for maintaining mammary function and architecture. The accompanying chapter of Vidi et al. describes 3D models developed for human cells. Here, we describe how mouse primary epithelial cells and cell lines—essentially those we use in our

  16. Cell-of-Origin of Cancer versus Cancer Stem Cells: Assays and Interpretations.

    PubMed

    Rycaj, Kiera; Tang, Dean G

    2015-10-01

    A tumor originates from a normal cell that has undergone tumorigenic transformation as a result of genetic mutations. This transformed cell is the cell-of-origin for the tumor. In contrast, an established clinical tumor is sustained by subpopulations of self-renewing cancer cells operationally called cancer stem cells (CSC) that can generate, intraclonally, both tumorigenic and nontumorigenic cells. Identifying and characterizing tumor cell-of-origin and CSCs should help elucidate tumor cell heterogeneity, which, in turn, should help understand tumor cell responses to clinical treatments, drug resistance, tumor relapse, and metastatic spread. Both tumor transplantation and lineage-tracing assays have been helpful in characterizing these cancer cell populations, although each system has its strengths and caveats. In this article, we briefly review and summarize advantages and limitations of both assays in support of a combinatorial approach to accurately define the roles of both cancer-initiating and cancer-propagating cells. As an aside, we also wish to clarify the definitions of cancer cell-of-origin and CSCs, which are often interchangeably used by mistake.

  17. Human T cell priming assay: depletion of peripheral blood lymphocytes in CD25(+) cells improves the in vitro detection of weak allergen-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Vocanson, Marc; Achachi, Amine; Mutez, Virginie; Cluzel-Tailhardat, Magalie; Varlet, Béatrice Le; Rozières, Aurore; Fournier, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    possible to induce T cell priming to most of the moderate/weak allergens, including lipophilic molecules highly insoluble in culture media. Therefore, the present optimized in vitro human T cell priming assay is a valuable method to detect the sensitizing properties of chemical allergens.

  18. Agrobacterium tumefaciens Interaction with Suspension-Cultured Tomato Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Nicola T.; Binns, Andrew N.

    1985-01-01

    Adherence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to suspension-cultured tomato cells has been characterized using a quantitative binding assay. Saturable binding of radiolabeled A. tumefaciens to plant cells resulted in 100 to 300 bacteria bound per cell. Specificity of A. tumefaciens binding was also inferred from two additional results: (a) an initial incubation of plant cells with A. tumefaciens reduced subsequent binding of radiolabeled A. tumefaciens by 60% to 75%; (b) tomato cells bound less than three E. coli per cell. Protease treatment of plant cells had no effect on subsequent bacterial binding, but prior treatment of plant cells with pectinolytic enzymes increased binding 2- to 3-fold. Pectin-enriched and neutral polymer-enriched fractions were obtained from tomato cell walls. The soluble pectin-enriched fraction inhibited binding of bacteria to plant cells by 85% to 95%, whereas the neutral polymer fraction only partially inhibited binding. Preliminary characterization of the activity showed it is heat stable, partially inactivated by protease treatment, and substantially inactivated by acid hydrolysis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664024

  19. Real-time PCR assay is superior to other methods for the detection of mycoplasma contamination in the cell lines of the National Cell Bank of Iran.

    PubMed

    Molla Kazemiha, Vahid; Bonakdar, Shahin; Amanzadeh, Amir; Azari, Shahram; Memarnejadian, Arash; Shahbazi, Shirin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mahdian, Reza

    2016-08-01

    Mycoplasmas are the most important contaminants of cell cultures throughout the world. They are considered as a major problem in biological studies and biopharmaceutical economic issues. In this study, our aim was to find the best standard technique as a rapid method with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the detection of mycoplasma contamination in the cell lines of the National Cell Bank of Iran. Thirty cell lines suspected to mycoplasma contamination were evaluated by five different techniques including microbial culture, indirect DNA DAPI staining, enzymatic mycoalert(®) assay, conventional PCR and real-time PCR. Five mycoplasma-contaminated cell lines were assigned as positive controls and five mycoplasma-free cell lines as negative controls. The enzymatic method was performed using the mycoalert(®) mycoplasma detection kit. Real-time PCR technique was conducted by PromoKine diagnostic kits. In the conventional PCR method, mycoplasma genus-specific primers were designed to analyze the sequences based on a fixed and common region on 16S ribosomal RNA with PCR product size of 425 bp. Mycoplasma contamination was observed in 60, 56.66, 53.33, 46.66 and 33.33 % of 30 different cell cultures by real-time PCR, PCR, enzymatic mycoalert(®), indirect DNA DAPI staining and microbial culture methods, respectively. The analysis of the results of the different methods showed that the real-time PCR assay was superior the other methods with the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, predictive value of positive and negative results of 100 %. These values were 94.44, 100, 96.77, 100 and 92.85 % for the conventional PCR method, respectively. Therefore, this study showed that real-time PCR and PCR assays based on the common sequences in the 16S ribosomal RNA are reliable methods with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures and other biological products.

  20. Enhanced growth medium and method for culturing human mammary epithelial cells

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for isolating and culturing human mammary epithelial cells of both normal and malignant origin. Tissue samples are digested with a mixture including the enzymes collagenase and hyaluronidase to produce clumps of cells substantially free from stroma and other undesired cellular material. Growing the clumps of cells in mass culture in an enriched medium containing particular growth factors allows for active cell proliferation and subculture. Clonal culture having plating efficiencies of up to 40% or greater may be obtained using individual cells derived from the mass culture by plating the cells on appropriate substrates in the enriched media. The clonal growth of cells so obtained is suitable for a quantitative assessment of the cytotoxicity of particular treatment. An exemplary assay for assessing the cytotoxicity of the drug adriamycin is presented.

  1. Effect of radiofrequency radiation in cultured mammalian cells: A review.

    PubMed

    Manna, Debashri; Ghosh, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile phone related technologies will continue to increase in the foreseeable future worldwide. This has drawn attention to the probable interaction of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation with different biological targets. Studies have been conducted on various organisms to evaluate the alleged ill-effect on health. We have therefore attempted to review those work limited to in vitro cultured cells where irradiation conditions were well controlled. Different investigators have studied varied endpoints like DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, cellular morphology and viability to weigh the genotoxic effect of such radiation by utilizing different frequencies and dose rates under various irradiation conditions that include continuous or pulsed exposures and also amplitude- or frequency-modulated waves. Cells adapt to change in their intra and extracellular environment from different chemical and physical stimuli through organized alterations in gene or protein expression that result in the induction of stress responses. Many studies have focused on such effects for risk estimations. Though the effects of microwave radiation on cells are often not pronounced, some investigators have therefore combined radiofrequency radiation with other physical or chemical agents to observe whether the effects of such agents were augmented or not. Such reports in cultured cellular systems have also included in this review. The findings from different workers have revealed that, effects were dependent on cell type and the endpoint selection. However, contradictory findings were also observed in same cell types with same assay, in such cases the specific absorption rate (SAR) values were significant.

  2. Microfluidic cell culture systems with integrated sensors for drug screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grist, Samantha; Yu, Linfen; Chrostowski, Lukas; Cheung, Karen C.

    2012-03-01

    Cell-based testing is a key step in drug screening for cancer treatments. A microfluidic platform can permit more precise control of the cell culture microenvironment, such as gradients in soluble factors. These small-scale devices also permit tracking of low cell numbers. As a new screening paradigm, a microscale system for integrated cell culture and drug screening promises to provide a simple, scalable tool to apply standardized protocols used in cellular response assays. With the ability to dynamically control the microenvironment, we can create temporally varying drug profiles to mimic physiologically measured profiles. In addition, low levels of oxygen in cancerous tumors have been linked with drug resistance and decreased likelihood of successful treatment and patient survival. Our work also integrates a thin-film oxygen sensor with a microfluidic oxygen gradient generator which will in future allow us to create spatial oxygen gradients and study effects of hypoxia on cell response to drug treatment. In future, this technology promises to improve cell-based validation in the drug discovery process, decreasing the cost and increasing the speed in screening large numbers of compounds.

  3. Electrophoretic mobilities of cultured human embryonic kidney cells in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Data on the electrophoretic mobility distributions of cells in the new D-1 buffer and the interlaboratory standardization of urokinase assay methods are presented. A table of cell strains and recent data on cell dispersal methods are also included. It was decided that glycerol in A-1 electrophoretic mobility data on cultured human embryonic kidney cells subjected to electrophoresis in this buffer. The buffer composition is presented.

  4. The effect of stem cell proliferation regulators demonstrated with an in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Pragnell, I B; Wright, E G; Lorimore, S A; Adam, J; Rosendaal, M; DeLamarter, J F; Freshney, M; Eckmann, L; Sproul, A; Wilkie, N

    1988-07-01

    Spleen colony formation after transplantation of bone marrow cells into irradiated mice has been used as an assay for hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S), but has serious limitations intrinsic to an in vivo assay. In this report we describe experiments using an in vitro clonogenic assay that is especially suitable for studies of stem cell regulation as defined growth factors and normal untreated bone marrow can be used. We have demonstrated that the colony-forming cells have proliferative properties in common with CFU-S and respond to specific proliferation regulators previously detected using the spleen colony assay.

  5. Cell culture and senescence in uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Dominique Nadine; Bartnitzke, Sabine; Belge, Gazanfer; Drieschner, Norbert; Helmke, Burkhard Maria; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2010-10-01

    The in vitro growth of cells from uterine fibroids is characterized by an early onset of senescence. Often, an even lower growth potential than that of matching myometrial cells is noted. Also, the tremendous differences in the expression of the high mobility group protein HMGA2 seen when comparing fibroids of different genetic subtypes are surprisingly not reflected by significant differences in their growth potential in vitro. We aimed to evaluate possible changes of the HMGA2 expression level between the native tissue and cell cultures, so we performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction studies that revealed a marked decrease of the HMGA2 mRNA in culture in those cases with overexpression of HMGA2. In the two cases initially showing the highest expression, it decreased by approximately 97%. Associated with the decrease of HMGA2 was a clearly increased expression of the senescence-associated p19(Arf). Together, these findings explain the similar behavior of cell cultures from fibroids of different genetic subgroups and may also offer an explanation for the early onset of in vitro senescence in these cell cultures.

  6. Genotoxicity studies of methyl isocyanate in Salmonella, Drosophila, and cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Zeiger, E.; Haworth, S.; Ivett, J.; Valencia, R.

    1987-01-01

    The genotoxic effects of methyl isocyanate (MIC) were investigated using four short-term tests: the Salmonella reversion assay (Ames test), the Drosophila sex-linked recessive lethal assay, and the sister chromatic exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberration assays in cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. No evidence was found for the induction of mutations in either Salmonella or Drosophila. MIC did, however, induce SCEs and chromosomal aberrations in CHO cells both in the presence and absence of Aroclor-induced rat liver S-9.

  7. Crossing barriers: the new dimension of 2D cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Van Horssen, Remco; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2011-01-01

    In our body cells move in three dimensions, embedded in an extracellular matrix that varies in composition, density and stiffness, and this movement is fundamental to life. Next to 3D cell migration assays, representing these physiological circumstances, still we need 2D migrations assays to perform detailed studies on the contribution of matrix-components and (extra)cellular proteins to cell movements. Next to the debate on differences between 3D and 2D migration, there also are many new perspectives on the use and development of novel or modified 2D cell migration assays. Of special significance is the introduction of so-called barrier migration assays, methods that avoid cell and matrix damage, as complementation or replacement of scratch/wound healing assays. Here, we discuss the possibilities and limitations of different 2D barrier migration assays.

  8. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-10-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures.

  9. Measurement of polyphosphoinositides in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Frank T

    2009-01-01

    The seven phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), often collectively referred to as polyphosphoinositides (PPIn), are a minor component of eukaryotic cell membranes. Nevertheless, their synthesis is needed for an ever-increasing spectrum of cellular processes, including regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, chemotaxis, membrane trafficking, glucose uptake, and organelle acidification. PPIn metabolism is regulated dynamically by a network of kinases and phosphatases. Furthermore, synthesis of PPIn can be provoked by external stimuli; for example, the second messenger phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate rapidly and transiently accumulates in cells challenged with agonists such as PDGF that activate receptor tyrosine kinases. The measurement of PPIn levels in in vivo cultured cells has been vital to our understanding of the metabolism and function of these important signaling molecules; methods are described herein that allow measurement of PPIn levels in culture cells in vivo.

  10. Real-time PCR assays compared to culture-based approaches for identification of aerobic bacteria in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Melendez, J H; Frankel, Y M; An, A T; Williams, L; Price, L B; Wang, N-Y; Lazarus, G S; Zenilman, J M

    2010-12-01

    Chronic wounds cause substantial morbidity and disability. Infection in chronic wounds is clinically defined by routine culture methods that can take several days to obtain a final result, and may not fully describe the community of organisms or biome within these wounds. Molecular diagnostic approaches offer promise for a more rapid and complete assessment. We report the development of a suite of real-time PCR assays for rapid identification of bacteria directly from tissue samples. The panel of assays targets 14 common, clinically relevant, aerobic pathogens and demonstrates a high degree of sensitivity and specificity using a panel of organisms commonly associated with chronic wound infection. Thirty-nine tissue samples from 29 chronic wounds were evaluated and the results compared with those obtained by culture. As revealed by culture and PCR, the most common organisms were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) followed by Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The sensitivities of the PCR assays were 100% and 90% when quantitative and qualitative culture results were used as the reference standard, respectively. The assays allowed the identification of bacterial DNA from ten additional organisms that were not revealed by quantitative or qualitative cultures. Under optimal conditions, the turnaround time for PCR results is as short as 4-6 h. Real-time PCR is a rapid and inexpensive approach that can be easily introduced into clinical practice for detection of organisms directly from tissue samples. Characterization of the anaerobic microflora by real-time PCR of chronic wounds is warranted.

  11. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  12. Progress Towards Drosophila Epithelial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila epithelial research is at the forefront of the field; however, there are no well-characterized epithelial cell lines that could provide a complementary in vitro model for studies conducted in vivo. Here, a protocol is described that produces epithelial cell lines. The method uses genetic manipulation of oncogenes or tumor suppressors to induce embryonic primary culture cells to rapidly progress to permanent cell lines. It is, however, a general method and the type of cells that comprise a given line is not controlled experimentally. Indeed, only a small fraction of the lines produced are epithelial in character. For this reason, additional work needs to be done to develop a more robust epithelial cell-specific protocol. It is expected that Drosophila epithelial cell lines will have great utility for in vitro analysis of epithelial biology, particularly high-throughput analyses such as RNAi screens. PMID:23097097

  13. [In vitro chemosensitivity testing with the human tumor stem cell assay (HTSCA) in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Dittrich, C

    1984-06-22

    Clonogenic assays have attracted most attention in the field of chemosensitivity testing procedures. For many practical reasons and theoretical considerations detailed in this paper the human tumour stem cell assay (HTSCA) has proven most suitable for this purpose. The slightly modified method originally described by Hamburger and Salmon was used for testing tumour specimens of patients with breast cancer. 77 samples from 65 different patients were sent to our laboratory. 51% of the specimens were suitable for testing. 56% of all tested samples were biopsies and 44% were effusions. To enhance cell yield and viability solid tumours were disaggregated enzymatically using an enzyme cocktail consisting of collagenase 0.15% and DNase 0.015%. The median viability of the solid samples was 55%, that of the effusions was 91%. 44% of the culture samples showed colony growth (greater than 5 colonies per control plate) and 28% sufficient colony growth (greater than 20 colonies per control plate). The average number of colonies per control plate was 65, the average cloning efficiency was 0.0111%. Half of the samples with sufficient colony growth (5/11) was adequate for drug prediction. Positive correlation of sensitivity was observed in 2/2 and correct resistance prediction in 3/3.

  14. Detection and quantification of apoptosis in primary cells using Taqman® protein assay.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Christina; Pfrommer, Heike; Tatagiba, Marcos S; Roser, Florian

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods to detect apoptosis using cleaved caspase-3 and each harbors its own advantages and disadvantages. When primary cell cultures are used, the disadvantages of the standard methods can make apoptosis detection difficult due to their slow growth rate and replicative senescence, thereby limiting the available cell number and experiment time span. In this chapter, we describe apoptosis detection and quantification using an innovative method named TaqMan(®) protein assay. TaqMan(®) protein assay uses antibodies and proximity ligation for quantitative real-time PCR. Biotinylated antibodies are labeled with oligonucleotides. When the labeled antibodies bind in close proximity, the oligonucleotides are connected using DNA ligase. The ligation product is amplified and detected using Taqman(®) based Real-Time PCR. Using this technique, we can not only detect apoptosis with a 1,000-fold higher sensitivity than western blot, but we can also exactly quantify cleaved caspase-3 expression. Thereby apoptosis can be determined and quantified in a fast reliable manner.

  15. 3D culture for cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Zuppinger, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses historical milestones, recent developments and challenges in the area of 3D culture models with cardiovascular cell types. Expectations in this area have been raised in recent years, but more relevant in vitro research, more accurate drug testing results, reliable disease models and insights leading to bioartificial organs are expected from the transition to 3D cell culture. However, the construction of organ-like cardiac 3D models currently remains a difficult challenge. The heart consists of highly differentiated cells in an intricate arrangement.Furthermore, electrical “wiring”, a vascular system and multiple cell types act in concert to respond to the rapidly changing demands of the body. Although cardiovascular 3D culture models have been predominantly developed for regenerative medicine in the past, their use in drug screening and for disease models has become more popular recently. Many sophisticated 3D culture models are currently being developed in this dynamic area of life science. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  16. Computerized microfluidic cell culture using elastomeric channels and Braille displays.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Futai, Nobuyuki; Cho, Brenda S; Takayama, Shuichi

    2004-11-09

    Computer-controlled microfluidics would advance many types of cellular assays and microscale tissue engineering studies wherever spatiotemporal changes in fluidics need to be defined. However, this goal has been elusive because of the limited availability of integrated, programmable pumps and valves. This paper demonstrates how a refreshable Braille display, with its grid of 320 vertically moving pins, can power integrated pumps and valves through localized deformations of channel networks within elastic silicone rubber. The resulting computerized fluidic control is able to switch among: (i) rapid and efficient mixing between streams, (ii) multiple laminar flows with minimal mixing between streams, and (iii) segmented plug-flow of immiscible fluids within the same channel architecture. The same control method is used to precisely seed cells, compartmentalize them into distinct subpopulations through channel reconfiguration, and culture each cell subpopulation for up to 3 weeks under perfusion. These reliable microscale cell cultures showed gradients of cellular behavior from C2C12 myoblasts along channel lengths, as well as differences in cell density of undifferentiated myoblasts and differentiation patterns, both programmable through different flow rates of serum-containing media. This technology will allow future microscale tissue or cell studies to be more accessible, especially for high-throughput, complex, and long-term experiments. The microfluidic actuation method described is versatile and computer programmable, yet simple, well packaged, and portable enough for personal use.

  17. Prevention and Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Nikfarjam, Laleh; Farzaneh, Parvaneh

    2012-01-01

    One of the main problems in cell culture is mycoplasma infection. It can extensively affect cell physiology and metabolism. As the applications of cell culture increase in research, industrial production and cell therapy, more concerns about mycoplasma contamination and detection will arise. This review will provide valuable information about: 1. the ways in which cells are contaminated and the frequency and source of mycoplasma species in cell culture; 2. the ways to prevent mycoplasma contamination in cell culture; 3. the importance of mycoplasma tests in cell culture; 4. different methods to identify mycoplasma contamination; 5. the consequences of mycoplasma contamination in cell culture and 6. available methods to eliminate mycoplasma contamination. Awareness about the sources of mycoplasma and pursuing aseptic techniques in cell culture along with reliable detection methods of mycoplasma contamination can provide an appropriate situation to prevent mycoplasma contamination in cell culture. PMID:23508237

  18. Probing nanoparticle interactions in cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Sabuncu, Ahmet C; Grubbs, Janna; Qian, Shizhi; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M; Stacey, Michael W; Beskok, Ali

    2012-06-15

    Nanoparticle research is often performed in vitro with little emphasis on the potential role of cell culture medium. In this study, gold nanoparticle interactions with cell culture medium and two cancer cell lines (human T-cell leukemia Jurkat and human pancreatic carcinoma PANC1) were investigated. Gold nanoparticles of 10, 25, 50, and 100 nm in diameter at fixed mass concentration were tested. Size distributions and zeta potentials of gold nanoparticles suspended in deionized (DI) water and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Media (DMEM) supplemented with fetal calf serum (FCS) were measured using dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique. In DI water, particle size distributions exhibited peaks around their nominal diameters. However, the gold nanoparticles suspended in DMEM supplemented with FCS formed complexes around 100 nm, regardless of their nominal sizes. The DLS and UV-vis spectroscopy results indicate gold nanoparticle agglomeration in DMEM that is not supplemented by FCS. The zeta potential results indicate that protein rich FCS increases the dispersion quality of gold nanoparticle suspensions through steric effects. Cellular uptake of 25 and 50 nm gold nanoparticles by Jurkat and PANC1 cell lines were investigated using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The intracellular gold level of PANC1 cells was higher than that of Jurkat cells, where 50 nm particles enter cells at faster rates than the 25 nm particles.

  19. Bioactive Copper-Doped Glass Scaffolds Can Stimulate Endothelial Cells in Co-Culture in Combination with Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Subha N.; Brandl, Andreas; Hiller, Daniel; Hoppe, Alexander; Gbureck, Uwe; Horch, Raymund E.; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Kneser, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive glass (BG) scaffolds are being investigated for bone tissue engineering applications because of their osteoconductive and angiogenic nature. However, to increase the in vivo performance of the scaffold, including enhancing the angiogenetic growth into the scaffolds, some researchers use different modifications of the scaffold including addition of inorganic ionic components to the basic BG composition. In this study, we investigated the in vitro biocompatibility and bioactivity of Cu2+-doped BG derived scaffolds in either BMSC (bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells)-only culture or co-culture of BMSC and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC). In BMSC-only culture, cells were seeded either directly on the scaffolds (3D or direct culture) or were exposed to ionic dissolution products of the BG scaffolds, kept in permeable cell culture inserts (2D or indirect culture). Though we did not observe any direct osteoinduction of BMSCs by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay or by PCR, there was increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, observed by PCR and ELISA assays. Additionally, the scaffolds showed no toxicity to BMSCs and there were healthy live cells found throughout the scaffold. To analyze further the reasons behind the increased VEGF expression and to exploit the benefits of the finding, we used the indirect method with HDMECs in culture plastic and Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds with or without BMSCs in cell culture inserts. There was clear observation of increased endothelial markers by both FACS analysis and acetylated LDL (acLDL) uptake assay. Only in presence of Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds with BMSCs, a high VEGF secretion was demonstrated by ELISA; and typical tubular structures were observed in culture plastics. We conclude that Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds release Cu2+, which in turn act on BMSCs to secrete VEGF. This result is of significance for the application of BG scaffolds in bone tissue engineering approaches. PMID

  20. The novel herbicide oxaziclomefone inhibits cell expansion in maize cell cultures without affecting turgor pressure or wall acidification.

    PubMed

    O'Looney, Nichola; Fry, Stephen C

    2005-11-01

    Oxaziclomefone [OAC; IUPAC name 3-(1-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-1-methylethyl)-3,4-dihydro-6-methyl-5-phenyl-2H-1,3-oxazin-4-one] is a new herbicide that inhibits cell expansion in grass roots. Its effects on cell cultures and mode of action were unknown. In principle, cell expansion could be inhibited by a decrease in either turgor pressure or wall extensibility. Cell expansion was estimated as settled cell volume; cell division was estimated by cell counting. Membrane permeability to water was measured by a novel method involving simultaneous assay of the efflux of (3)H(2)O and [(14)C]mannitol from a 'bed' of cultured cells. Osmotic potential was measured by depression of freezing point. OAC inhibited cell expansion in cultures of maize (Zea mays), spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and rose (Rosa sp.), with an ID(50) of 5, 30 and 250 nm, respectively. In maize cultures, OAC did not affect cell division for the first 40 h. It did not affect the osmotic potential of cell sap or culture medium, nor did it impede water transport across cell membranes. It did not affect cells' ability to acidify the apoplast (medium), which may be necessary for 'acid growth'. As OAC did not diminish turgor pressure, its ability to inhibit cell expansion must depend on changes in wall extensibility. It could be a valuable tool for studies on cell expansion.

  1. The Effect of Spaceflight on Bone Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the response of bone to mechanical loading (unloading) is extremely important in defining the means of adaptation of the body to a variety of environmental conditions such as during heightened physical activity or in extended explorations of space or the sea floor. The mechanisms of the adaptive response of bone are not well defined, but undoubtedly they involve changes occurring at the cellular level of bone structure. This proposal has intended to examine the hypothesis that the loading (unloading) response of bone is mediated by specific cells through modifications of their activity cytoskeletal elements, and/or elaboration of their extracellular matrices. For this purpose, this laboratory has utilized the results of a number of previous studies defining molecular biological, biochemical, morphological, and ultrastructural events of the reproducible mineralization of a primary bone cell (osteoblast) culture system under normal loading (1G gravity level). These data and the culture system then were examined following the use of the cultures in two NASA shuttle flights, STS-59 and STS-63. The cells collected from each of the flights were compared to respective synchronous ground (1G) control cells examined as the flight samples were simultaneously analyzed and to other control cells maintained at 1G until the time of shuttle launch, at which point they were terminated and studied (defined as basal cells). Each of the cell cultures was assayed in terms of metabolic markers- gene expression; synthesis and secretion of collagen and non-collagenous proteins, including certain cytoskeletal components; assembly of collagen into macrostructural arrays- formation of mineral; and interaction of collagen and mineral crystals during calcification of the cultures. The work has utilized a combination of biochemical techniques (radiolabeling, electrophoresis, fluorography, Western and Northern Blotting, and light microscopic immunofluorescence) and structural

  2. Cell division modulates prion accumulation in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Ghaemmaghami, Sina; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Perkins, Beth; Ullman, Julie; May, Barnaby C H; Cohen, Fred E; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2007-11-13

    The phenotypic effect of prions on host cells is influenced by the physical properties of the prion strain and its level of accumulation. In mammalian cell cultures, prion accumulation is determined by the interplay between de novo prion formation, catabolism, cell division, and horizontal cell-to-cell transmission. Understanding this dynamic enables the analytical modeling of protein-based heritability and infectivity. Here, we quantitatively measured these competing effects in a subline of neuroblastoma (N2a) cells and propose a concordant reaction mechanism to explain the kinetics of prion propagation. Our results show that cell division leads to a predictable reduction in steady-state prion levels but not to complete clearance. Scrapie-infected N2a cells were capable of accumulating different steady-state levels of prions, dictated partly by the rate of cell division. We also show that prions in this subline of N2a cells are transmitted primarily from mother to daughter cells, rather than horizontal cell-to-cell transmission. We quantitatively modeled our kinetic results based on a mechanism that assumes a subpopulation of prions is capable of self-catalysis, and the levels of this subpopulation reach saturation in fully infected cells. Our results suggest that the apparent effectiveness of antiprion compounds in culture may be strongly influenced by the growth phase of the target cells.

  3. [Good cell culture practice--implementation of a relational cell culture database].

    PubMed

    Philipp, Marcel O; Falkner, Erwin; Kapeller, Barbara; Eberl, Heidrun; Frick, Wolfram; Macfelda, Karin; Losert, Udo M

    2002-01-01

    The claim for cell culture to provide validable in vitro models for biomedical research postulates evasion of possible fatal record keeping errors. A prototype of a relational computer database for IBM-compatible personal computers using Microsoft(r) Windows 95/98/2000 and NT for administration of cell culture data has been developed using Microsoft(r) Access 98 (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, USA), -Access Basic, -Visual Basic and Structured Query Language (SQL) (IBM Corporation, Armonk, USA), and was tested successfully. The modular software application manages the many aspects of cell culture laboratory record keeping like detailed information on tissue donor, primary cell isolation/cell line origin, immunohistochemical/molecular biological characterisation, cell countings at passaging/subcultivation/cell aliquotation and cryopreservation. One main feature is a collection of all methods performed at our cell culture laboratory, where linked tables and files store specific informations. Entries into the database are checked via validation rules for correctness to avoid mistakes. The developed prototype has been demonstrated to be an adaptable, reliable tool for improving quality of information storage according to Good Scientific Practice (GSP), Good Cell Culture Practice (GCCP) and general ISO certification trends.

  4. Advances in wound-healing assays for probing collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Yang, Yongliang; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2012-02-01

    Collective cell migration plays essential roles in a wide spectrum of biological processes, such as embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and cancer metastasis. Numerous wound-healing assays based on mechanical, chemical, optical, and electrical approaches have been developed to create model "wounds" in cell monolayers to study the collective cell migration processes. These approaches can result in different microenvironments for cells to migrate and possess diverse assay characteristics in terms of simplicity, throughput, reproducibility, and multiplexability. In this review, we provide an overview of advances in wound-healing assays and discuss their advantages and limitations in studying collective cell migration.

  5. 3D inverted colloidal crystals in realistic cell migration assays for drug screening applications.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Kuo, Cheng-Hwa R; Guck, Jochen; Sivaniah, Easan

    2011-12-01

    Screening drugs for their specific impact on cell mechanics, in addition to targeting adhesion and proteolysis, will be important for successfully moderating migration in infiltrative disorders including cancer metastasis. We present 3D inverted colloidal crystals made of hydrogel as a realistic cell migration assay, where the geometry and stiffness can be set independently to mimic the tissue requirements in question. We show the utility of this 3D assay for drug screening purposes, specifically in contrast to conventional 2D migration studies, by surveying the effects of commonly used cytoskeletal toxins that impact cell mechanics. This assay allows studying large cell numbers for good statistics but at single-cell resolution.

  6. Use of an adaptable cell culture kit for performing lymphocyte and monocyte cell cultures in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, J. P.; Lewis, M. L.; Roquefeuil, S. B.; Chaput, D.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of experiments performed in recent years on board facilities such as the Space Shuttle/Spacelab have demonstrated that many cell systems, ranging from simple bacteria to mammalian cells, are sensitive to the microgravity environment, suggesting gravity affects fundamental cellular processes. However, performing well-controlled experiments aboard spacecraft offers unique challenges to the cell biologist. Although systems such as the European 'Biorack' provide generic experiment facilities including an incubator, on-board 1-g reference centrifuge, and contained area for manipulations, the experimenter must still establish a system for performing cell culture experiments that is compatible with the constraints of spaceflight. Two different cell culture kits developed by the French Space Agency, CNES, were recently used to perform a series of experiments during four flights of the 'Biorack' facility aboard the Space Shuttle. The first unit, Generic Cell Activation Kit 1 (GCAK-1), contains six separate culture units per cassette, each consisting of a culture chamber, activator chamber, filtration system (permitting separation of cells from supernatant in-flight), injection port, and supernatant collection chamber. The second unit (GCAK-2) also contains six separate culture units, including a culture, activator, and fixation chambers. Both hardware units permit relatively complex cell culture manipulations without extensive use of spacecraft resources (crew time, volume, mass, power), or the need for excessive safety measures. Possible operations include stimulation of cultures with activators, separation of cells from supernatant, fixation/lysis, manipulation of radiolabelled reagents, and medium exchange. Investigations performed aboard the Space Shuttle in six different experiments used Jurkat, purified T-cells or U937 cells, the results of which are reported separately. We report here the behaviour of Jurkat and U937 cells in the GCAK hardware in ground

  7. Use of an adaptable cell culture kit for performing lymphocyte and monocyte cell cultures in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hatton, J P; Lewis, M L; Roquefeuil, S B; Chaput, D; Cazenave, J P; Schmitt, D A

    1998-08-01

    The results of experiments performed in recent years on board facilities such as the Space Shuttle/Spacelab have demonstrated that many cell systems, ranging from simple bacteria to mammalian cells, are sensitive to the microgravity environment, suggesting gravity affects fundamental cellular processes. However, performing well-controlled experiments aboard spacecraft offers unique challenges to the cell biologist. Although systems such as the European 'Biorack' provide generic experiment facilities including an incubator, on-board 1-g reference centrifuge, and contained area for manipulations, the experimenter must still establish a system for performing cell culture experiments that is compatible with the constraints of spaceflight. Two different cell culture kits developed by the French Space Agency, CNES, were recently used to perform a series of experiments during four flights of the 'Biorack' facility aboard the Space Shuttle. The first unit, Generic Cell Activation Kit 1 (GCAK-1), contains six separate culture units per cassette, each consisting of a culture chamber, activator chamber, filtration system (permitting separation of cells from supernatant in-flight), injection port, and supernatant collection chamber. The second unit (GCAK-2) also contains six separate culture units, including a culture, activator, and fixation chambers. Both hardware units permit relatively complex cell culture manipulations without extensive use of spacecraft resources (crew time, volume, mass, power), or the need for excessive safety measures. Possible operations include stimulation of cultures with activators, separation of cells from supernatant, fixation/lysis, manipulation of radiolabelled reagents, and medium exchange. Investigations performed aboard the Space Shuttle in six different experiments used Jurkat, purified T-cells or U937 cells, the results of which are reported separately. We report here the behaviour of Jurkat and U937 cells in the GCAK hardware in ground

  8. Plant cell cultures: bioreactors for industrial production.

    PubMed

    Ruffoni, Barbara; Pistelli, Laura; Bertoli, Alessandra; Pistelli, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    The recent biotechnology boom has triggered increased interest in plant cell cultures, since a number of firms and academic institutions investigated intensively to rise the production of very promising bioactive compounds. In alternative to wild collection or plant cultivation, the production of useful and valuable secondary metabolites in large bioreactors is an attractive proposal; it should contribute significantly to future attempts to preserve global biodiversity and alleviate associated ecological problems. The advantages of such processes include the controlled production according to demand and a reduced man work requirement. Plant cells have been grown in different shape bioreactors, however, there are a variety of problems to be solved before this technology can be adopted on a wide scale for the production of useful plant secondary metabolites. There are different factors affecting the culture growth and secondary metabolite production in bioreactors: the gaseous atmosphere, oxygen supply and CO2 exchange, pH, minerals, carbohydrates, growth regulators, the liquid medium rheology and cell density. Moreover agitation systems and sterilization conditions may negatively influence the whole process. Many types ofbioreactors have been successfully used for cultivating transformed root cultures, depending on both different aeration system and nutrient supply. Several examples of medicinal and aromatic plant cultures were here summarized for the scale up cultivation in bioreactors.

  9. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  10. A Novel Microfluidic Assay for Rapid Phenotypic Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Bacteria Detected in Clinical Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Spaak, Johanna; Cars, Otto; Tängdén, Thomas; Lagerbäck, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Background Appropriate antibiotic therapy is critical in the management of severe sepsis and septic shock to reduce mortality, morbidity and health costs. New methods for rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing are needed because of increasing resistance rates to standard treatment. Aims The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a novel microfluidic method and the potential to directly apply this method on positive blood cultures. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, tigecycline and/or vancomycin for Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus were determined using a linear antibiotic concentration gradient in a microfluidic assay. Bacterial growth along the antibiotic gradient was monitored using automated time-lapse photomicrography and growth inhibition was quantified by measuring greyscale intensity changes in the images. In addition to pure culture MICs, vancomycin MICs were determined for S. aureus from spiked and clinical blood cultures following a short centrifugation step. The MICs were compared with those obtained with the Etest and for S. aureus and vancomycin also with macrodilution. Results The MICs obtained with the microfluidic assay showed good agreement internally as well as with the Etest and macrodilution assays, although some minor differences were noted between the methods. The time to possible readout was within the range of 2 to 5 h. Conclusions The examined microfluidic assay has the potential to provide rapid and accurate MICs using samples from positive clinical blood cultures and will now be tested using other bacterial species and antibiotics. PMID:27974860

  11. Artifacts by marker enzyme adsorption on nanomaterials in cytotoxicity assays with tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Kolle, Susanne N.; Hasenkamp, Laura-Carolin; Böser, Alexander; Vogel, Sandra; von Vacano, Bernhard; van Ravenzwaay, Ben; Landsiedel, Robert

    2011-07-01

    We used precision cut lung slices (PCLS) to study the cytotoxicity of cobalt ferrite nanomaterials with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA) stabilization. Using mitochondrial activity as an indicator of cytotoxicity (WST-1 assay) increasing concentrations of cobalt ferrite nanomaterial caused increasing levels of cytotoxicity in PCLS irrespective of BSA stabilization. However, there was no increase in released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels caused by BSA stabilized nanomaterial indicating concentration depended cytotoxictiy. Moreover, non-stabilized nanomaterial caused a decrease of background LDH levels in the PCLS culture supernatant confirmed by complementary methods. Direct characterization of the protein corona of extracted nanomaterial shows that the LDH decrease is due to adsorption of LDH onto the surface of the non-stabilized nanomaterial, correlated with strong agglomeration. Preincubation with serum protein blocks the adsorption of LDH and stabilizes the nanomaterial at low agglomeration. We have thus demonstrated the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials in PCLS does not correlate with disrupted membrane integrity followed by LDH release. Furthermore, we found that intracellular enzymes such as the marker enzyme LDH are able to bind onto surfaces of nanomaterial and thereby adulterate the detection of toxic effects. A replacement of BSA by LDH or a secondary LDH-on-BSA-corona were not observed, confirming earlier indications that the protein corona exchange rate are slow or vanishing on inorganic nanomaterial. Thus, the method(s) to assess nanomaterial-mediated effects have to be carefully chosen based on the cellular effect and possible nano-specific artifacts.

  12. Erythrocytic malaria growth or invasion inhibition assays with emphasis on suspension culture GIA.

    PubMed

    Haynes, J David; Moch, J Kathleen; Smoot, Douglas S

    2002-01-01

    Erythrocytic cycle malaria parasite growth or invasion inhibition assays (GIA) compare the effects of various test and control substances on malaria parasite growth in erythrocytes or invasion into erythrocytes in vitro. Although inhibitions by antimalarial drugs in vitro correlate well with drug protective levels required in vivo, as yet there are too few data to know how well inhibitions by antibodies in vitro correlate with the types and degrees of immune protection in vivo. Antibody-mediated GIA is frequently complicated by parasite strain-specific inhibitions, as well as nonspecific inhibitory factors generated in sera collected or stored under nonoptimal conditions. In this chapter, we describe methods for collecting and processing sera, for using different strains of parasite, and a simplified method for staining parasite DNA with Hoechst dye 33342 before quantitating parasites using ultraviolet (UV)-excited flow cytometry. We also describe a new type of GIA using suspension cultures in a 48-well plate. Critical to this method is enclosing the plate in a gassed, heat-sealed plastic bag, which, being low mass, can easily be rested at a 13.5 degrees angle on a rotor platform (114 rpm with 1-in. displacement) to produce gentle pulsatile waves of media in each well. The suspension GIA, which, relative to the static GIA, increased inhibition by one antibody and decreased inhibition by another (Table 1), may better simulate in vivo blood flow and may thus better predict in vivo efficacy.

  13. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Tony J.; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose–response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  14. A Macroscopic Mathematical Model for Cell Migration Assays Using a Real-Time Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Claudia; Carfora, Maria Francesca; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Natalini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Experiments of cell migration and chemotaxis assays have been classically performed in the so-called Boyden Chambers. A recent technology, xCELLigence Real Time Cell Analysis, is now allowing to monitor the cell migration in real time. This technology measures impedance changes caused by the gradual increase of electrode surface occupation by cells during the course of time and provide a Cell Index which is proportional to cellular morphology, spreading, ruffling and adhesion quality as well as cell number. In this paper we propose a macroscopic mathematical model, based on advection-reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, describing the cell migration assay using the real-time technology. We carried out numerical simulations to compare simulated model dynamics with data of observed biological experiments on three different cell lines and in two experimental settings: absence of chemotactic signals (basal migration) and presence of a chemoattractant. Overall we conclude that our minimal mathematical model is able to describe the phenomenon in the real time scale and numerical results show a good agreement with the experimental evidences. PMID:27680883

  15. A Macroscopic Mathematical Model for Cell Migration Assays Using a Real-Time Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Costanzo, Ezio; Ingangi, Vincenzo; Angelini, Claudia; Carfora, Maria Francesca; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Natalini, Roberto

    Experiments of cell migration and chemotaxis assays have been classically performed in the so-called Boyden Chambers. A recent technology, xCELLigence Real Time Cell Analysis, is now allowing to monitor the cell migration in real time. This technology measures impedance changes caused by the gradual increase of electrode surface occupation by cells during the course of time and provide a Cell Index which is proportional to cellular morphology, spreading, ruffling and adhesion quality as well as cell number. In this paper we propose a macroscopic mathematical model, based on advection-reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, describing the cell migration assay using the real-time technology. We carried out numerical simulations to compare simulated model dynamics with data of observed biological experiments on three different cell lines and in two experimental settings: absence of chemotactic signals (basal migration) and presence of a chemoattractant. Overall we conclude that our minimal mathematical model is able to describe the phenomenon in the real time scale and numerical results show a good agreement with the experimental evidences.

  16. Extensive proliferative capacity of single isolated CD34 human cord blood cells in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Xiao, M; Broxmeyer, H E; Horie, M; Grigsby, S; Lu, L

    1994-01-01

    Nonadherent, low-density T-lymphocyte-depleted (NALT-) CD34 cells from normal human cord blood were assessed in suspension culture for the effects of recombinant cytokines on their proliferation, differentiation, and generation of myeloid progenitor cells. In this cell population, 82% of cells expressed c-kit protein as assessed by in situ hybridization, and their cloning efficiency was 85% when cells were plated at low cell numbers with combinations of growth factors. CD34 cells were sorted as 1, 5, or 10 cell(s) per well and also at 5000 cells per dish to initiate stromal-free suspension cultures in the presence of steel factor (SLF), interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, and IL-3. Forty-eight percent of the wells started with a single CD34 cell were positive for growth after 14 days, and the wells contained greater than 5 x 10(3) cells by 21-28 days. Progenitors were assayed weekly with cultures initiated with 1 or 5000 cells. While the fold expansion of nucleated cells was greater in cultures initiated with one cell per well (> 5000 compared to 791-fold expansion for 5000 cells), the fold expansion of progenitors was greater than 5000 cells were used to initiate cultures. Under optimal conditions, there was, respectively, a 160-, 164-, and 57-fold output of high proliferative potential colony-forming cells, granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units, and erythroid burst-forming units/granulocyte erythroid macrophage megakaryocyte colony-forming units within 1-3 weeks for cultures initiated with 5000 CD34 cells compared with respective fold increases of 29, 16, and 1, for single-initiated cultures. These results demonstrate the expansion capacity of single CD34 cord blood cells and demonstrate that factors in addition to SLF, IL-1 alpha, and IL-3 are necessary for optimal expansion of progenitors from single isolated CD34 cells.

  17. Monoclonal antibody binding-site diversity assessment with a cell-based clustering assay.

    PubMed

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Zachwieja, Joseph; Gomez, Steven; Duey, Dana; Lippincott, John; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2014-03-01

    The diversity of a panel of antibodies that target a specific antigen can be established in various assay formats. In conventional epitope binning assays purified antibodies are tested in a pairwise manner: two antibodies that compete with each other for binding to an antigen are grouped into the same cluster or bin, while they are assigned to two different clusters when they do not compete. Here we present a high through put assay that enables grouping of crude hybridoma supernatants without a need for antibody purification. In addition, the assay does not require recombinant protein, because it is conducted on cells that express the antigen of interest. Hence, one can use the antibody-clustering assay for cell surface proteins that are not amenable to purification. Heavy chain variable region (VH) sequencing shows that VH composition within clusters is conserved. Finally, the assay is in good agreement with a conventional epitope binning assay with purified antigen.

  18. Standardization of the CFU-GM assay: Advantages of plating a fixed number of CD34+ cells in collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Dobo, Irène; Pineau, Danielle; Robillard, Nelly; Geneviève, Frank; Piard, Nicole; Zandecki, Marc; Hermouet, Sylvie

    2003-10-01

    We investigated whether plating a stable amount of CD34(+) cells improves the CFU-GM assay. Data of CFU-GM assays performed with leukaphereses products in two transplant centers using a commercial collagen-based medium and unified CFU-GM scoring criteria were pooled and analyzed according to the numbers of CD34(+) cells plated. A first series of 113 CFU-GM assays was performed with a fixed number of mononuclear cells (i.e., a variable number of CD34(+) cells). In these cultures the CFU-GM/CD34 ratio varied according to the number of CD34(+) cells plated: median CFUGM/CD34 ratios were 1/6.2 to 1/6.6 for grafts containing <2% CD34(+) cells, vs. 1/10.2 for grafts containing > or =2% CD34(+) cells. The median CFU-GM/CD34 ratio also varied depending on pathology: 1/9.3 for multiple myeloma (MM), 1/6.8 for Hodgkin's disease (HD), 1/6.5 for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and 1/4.5 for solid tumors (ST). A second series of 95 CFU-GM assays was performed with a fixed number of CD34(+) cells (220/ml). The range of median CFU-GM/CD34 ratios was narrowed to 1/7.0 to 1/5.2, and coefficients of variation for CFU-GM counts decreased by half to 38.1% (NHL), 36.1% (MM), 49.9% (HD), and 22.4% (ST). In addition, CFU-GM scoring was facilitated as the percentages of cultures with >50 CFU/GM/ml decreased from 6.7% to 43.8% when a variable number of CD34(+) cells was plated, to 4.5% to 16.7% when 220 CD34(+) cells/ml were plated. Hence, plating a fixed number of CD34(+) cells in collagen gels improves the CFU-GM assay by eliminating cell number-related variability and reducing pathology-related variability in colony growth.

  19. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    ALAPAN, YUNUS; KIM, CEONNE; ADHIKARI, ANIMA; GRAY, KAYLA E.; GURKAN-CAVUSOGLU, EVREN; LITTLE, JANE A.; GURKAN, UMUT A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  20. Stability of cultured dental follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shaomian; Norton, Jolanna; Wise, Gary E

    2004-06-01

    Because the dental follicle is required for tooth eruption, establishment of dental follicle cell (DFC) lines is needed for experimentation to determine how the cells regulate eruption. Thus, it is critical that the follicle cells in culture remain stable and neither become transformed nor differentiate. To determine the stability of rat DFC cultures in terms of exhibiting contact inhibition of growth when confluent (no transformation), DFC at different passages were analysed using flow cytometry. Gene expression of cyclin E was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as a further method to determine if growth was occurring when the cells were confluent. Alkaline phosphatase and von Kossa staining were also performed as a means of determining stability in terms of differentiation; that is, are the DFC maintaining their phenotype or are they differentiating into osteoblasts and osteocytes? After plating cells of a given passage, they initially underwent a rapid phase of growth with 30-40% of the cells in S, G(2) and M (dividing track) as determined by flow cytometry. The number of such cells declined to only 7-15% at preconfluency. At late confluency, only 2 and 5% of the cells were in the dividing track in passages 6 and 9, respectively, but in passage 12 this had risen to 15%. For a given passage of cells, cyclin E gene expression significantly declined in late confluency as compared to the early growth phase. However, in passage 12, the gene expression of cyclin E at late confluency was higher than the expression at late confluency in passage 6. Thus, the DFC were remarkably stable through passage 9, but by passage 12 it appeared that a small percentage of the cells had become transformed and had lost their contact inhibition growth properties. Alkaline phosphatase and von Kossa staining were negative for all passages, suggesting that the cells remained stable in terms of differentiation and did not differentiate into either osteoblasts or

  1. Stem cell media culture of melanoma results in the induction of a nonrepresentative neural expression profile.

    PubMed

    Anaka, Matthew; Freyer, Claudia; Gedye, Craig; Caballero, Otavia; Davis, Ian D; Behren, Andreas; Cebon, Jonathan

    2012-02-01

    The ability of cell lines to accurately represent cancer is a major concern in preclinical research. Culture of glioma cells as neurospheres in stem cell media (SCM) has been shown to better represent the genotype and phenotype of primary glioblastoma in comparison to serum cell lines. Despite the use of neurosphere-like models of many malignancies, there has been no robust analysis of whether other cancers benefit from a more representative phenotype and genotype when cultured in SCM. We analyzed the growth properties, transcriptional profile, and genotype of melanoma cells grown de novo in SCM, as while melanocytes share a common precursor with neural cells, melanoma frequently demonstrates divergent behavior in cancer stem cell assays. SCM culture of melanoma cells induced a neural lineage gene expression profile that was not representative of matched patient tissue samples and which could be induced in serum cell lines by switching them into SCM. There was no enrichment for expression of putative melanoma stem cell markers, but the SCM expression profile did overlap significantly with that of SCM cultures of glioma, suggesting that the observed phenotype is media-specific rather than melanoma-specific. Xenografts derived from either culture condition provided the best representation of melanoma in situ. Finally, SCM culture of melanoma did not prevent ongoing acquisition of DNA copy number abnormalities. In conclusion, SCM culture of melanoma does not provide a better representation of the phenotype or genotype of metastatic melanoma, and the resulting neural bias could potentially confound therapeutic target identification.

  2. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  3. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol using cultured human, monkey, and dog cells.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Kyo

    2009-03-01

    The cytotoxicity of musty odor-emitting substances, geosmin (GM) and 2-methylisoborneol, at a concentration of 10 ng/L - 300 mg/L was investigated using cultured mammalian cells. These two compounds exhibited no cytotoxicity in either the colony-formation of human KB cells or WST-1 assays of human-, monkey-, and dog-derived cells. These results suggest that the maximum concentration (700 ng/L) of GM found in the water of Lake Shinji is not toxic.

  4. Kinetic Modeling of ABCG2 Transporter Heterogeneity: A Quantitative, Single-Cell Analysis of the Side Population Assay

    PubMed Central

    Prasanphanich, Adam F.; White, Douglas E.; Gran, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    The side population (SP) assay, a technique used in cancer and stem cell research, assesses the activity of ABC transporters on Hoechst staining in the presence and absence of transporter inhibition, identifying SP and non-SP cell (NSP) subpopulations by differential staining intensity. The interpretation of the assay is complicated because the transporter-mediated mechanisms fail to account for cell-to-cell variability within a population or adequately control the direct role of transporter activity on staining intensity. We hypothesized that differences in dye kinetics at the single-cell level, such as ABCG2 transporter-mediated efflux and DNA binding, are responsible for the differential cell staining that demarcates SP/NSP identity. We report changes in A549 phenotype during time in culture and with TGFβ treatment that correlate with SP size. Clonal expansion of individually sorted cells re-established both SP and NSPs, indicating that SP membership is dynamic. To assess the validity of a purely kinetics-based interpretation of SP/NSP identity, we developed a computational approach that simulated cell staining within a heterogeneous cell population; this exercise allowed for the direct inference of the role of transporter activity and inhibition on cell staining. Our simulated SP assay yielded appropriate SP responses for kinetic scenarios in which high transporter activity existed in a portion of the cells and little differential staining occurred in the majority of the population. With our approach for single-cell analysis, we observed SP and NSP cells at both ends of a transporter activity continuum, demonstrating that features of transporter activity as well as DNA content are determinants of SP/NSP identity. PMID:27851764

  5. Tubulin dynamics in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Bovine neurotubulin has been labeled with dichlorotriazinyl- aminofluorescein (DTAF-tubulin) and microinjected into cultured mammalian cells strains PTK1 and BSC. The fibrous, fluorescence patterns that developed in the microinjected cells were almost indistinguishable from the pattern of microtubules seen in the same cells by indirect immunofluorescence. DTAF-tubulin participated in the formation of all visible, microtubule-related structures at all cell cycle stages for at least 48 h after injection. Treatments of injected cells with Nocodazole or Taxol showed that DTAF-tubulin closely mimicked the behavior of endogenous tubulin. The rate at which microtubules incorporated DTAF-tubulin depended on the cell-cycle stage of the injected cell. Mitotic microtubules became fluorescent within seconds while interphase microtubules required minutes. Studies using fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching confirmed this apparent difference in tubulin dynamics between mitotic and interphase cells. The temporal patterns of redistribution included a rapid phase (approximately 3 s) that we attribute to diffusion of free DTAF-tubulin and a second, slower phase that seems to represent the exchange of bleached DTAF-tubulin in microtubules with free, unbleached DTAF- tubulin. Mean half times of redistribution were 18-fold shorter in mitotic cells than they were in interphase cells. PMID:6501419

  6. A novel assay of biofilm antifungal activity reveals that amphotericin B and caspofungin lyse Candida albicans cells in biofilms.

    PubMed

    DiDone, Louis; Oga, Duana; Krysan, Damian J

    2011-08-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms is an important factor in its contribution to human disease. Assays to identify and characterize molecules with activity against fungal biofilms are crucial for the development of drugs with improved anti-biofilm activity. Here we report the application of an adenylate kinase (AK)-based cytotoxicity assay of fungal cell lysis to the characterization of agents active against C. albicans biofilms. We have developed three protocols for the AK assay. The first measures AK activity in the supernatants of biofilms treated with antifungal drugs and can be performed in parallel with a standard 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-caboxanilide-based biofilm susceptibility assay; a second, more sensitive protocol measures the AK activity present within the biofilm matrix; and a third procedure allows the direct visualization of lytic activity toward biofilms formed on catheter material. Amphotericin B and caspofungin, the two most effective anti-biofilm drugs currently used to treat fungal infections, both directly lyse planktonic C. albicans cells in vitro, leading to the release of AK into the culture medium. These studies serve to validate the AK-based lysis assay as a useful addition to the methods for the characterization of antifungal agents active toward biofilms and provide insights into the mode of action of amphotericin B and caspofungin against C. albicans biofilms.

  7. Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Mutations in Mammalian Cells Detected by the Flow Cytometry Mutation Assay and Characterized by Mutant Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Keysar, Stephen B.; Trncic, Nadira; LaRue, Susan M.; Fox, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Under hypoxic conditions, cells are more resistant to cell killing by ionizing radiation by a factor of 2.5 to 3, potentially compromising the efficacy of radiotherapy. It has been shown recently that hypoxic conditions alone are sufficient to generate mutations in vitro and in vivo, likely due to the creation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a decrease in mismatch and homologous recombination DNA repair activity. These factors are known precursors to the onset of genetic instability and poor prognosis. We have previously characterized the flow cytometry mutation assay and its sensitivity to detect significant mutant fractions induced by genotoxic agents that are not detected by other mammalian assays. Here we measure the mutant fraction induced by hypoxia. CHO AL cells cultured at <0.1% O2 for 24 h generated a significant mutant fraction of 120 × 10−5 and had growth kinetics and survival characteristics similar to those obtained with other mutagens. We investigated the role of ROS by treating cells with the radical scavenger DMSO, which significantly reduced hypoxia toxicity and mutagenesis. Single cells were sorted from the mutant population, and the resulting clonal populations were stained for five antigens encoded by genes found along chromosome 11 to generate mutant spectra. The mutations were primarily large deletions, similar to those in background mutants, but the frequency was higher. We have demonstrated that hypoxic conditions alone are sufficient to generate mutations in mammalian cells in culture and that the spectrum of mutations is similar to background mutations. PMID:20041756

  8. Fluorescent target array killing assay: a multiplex cytotoxic T-cell assay to measure detailed T-cell antigen specificity and avidity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Quah, Benjamin J C; Wijesundara, Danushka K; Ranasinghe, Charani; Parish, Christopher R

    2012-08-01

    Here we describe a multiplex, fluorescence-based, in vivo cytotoxic T-cell assay using the three vital dyes carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester, cell trace violet, and cell proliferation dye efluor 670. When used to label cells in combination, these dyes can discriminate >200 different target cell populations in the one animal due to each target population having a unique fluorescence signature based on fluorescence intensity and the different emission wavelengths of the dyes. This allows the simultaneous measurement of the in vivo killing of target cells pulsed with numerous peptides at different concentrations and the inclusion of many replicates. This fluorescent target array killing assay can be used to measure the fine antigen specificity and avidity of polyclonal cytotoxic T-cell responses in vivo, immunological parameters that were previously impossible to monitor.

  9. Side Effects of Culture Media Antibiotics on Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Laura; Montoya, Julio; López-Gallardo, Ester; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Besides the advance in scientific knowledge and the production of different compounds, cell culture can now be used to obtain cells for regenerative medicine. To avoid microbial contamination, antibiotics were usually incorporated into culture media. However, these compounds affect cell biochemistry and may modify the differentiation potential of cultured cells. To check this possibility, we grew human adipose tissue-derived stem cells and differentiated them to adipocyte with or without antibiotics commonly used in these culture protocols, such as a penicillin-streptomycin-amphotericin mix or gentamicin. We show that these antibiotics affect cell differentiation. Therefore, antibiotics should not be used in cell culture because aseptic techniques make these compounds unnecessary.

  10. Comparisons of cell culture medium using distribution of morphological features in microdevice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiroto; Enomoto, Junko; Ikeda, Yurika; Honda, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Junji; Kato, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    As the number of available cell types grows, it becomes necessary to develop more effective ways to optimize the cell-culture medium for each cell line and culture condition. However, because of the vast number of parameters that must be decided, such as the combination of components, optimization is both laborious and costly. Microdevices are a cost-effective way to perform such evaluations because they use only a small volume of media and enable high-throughput analyses. However, assays performed in microdevices are themselves minimized, and each assay unit (well/chamber) commonly contains an insufficient number of cells for comprehensive evaluations such as gene-expression or flow-cytometry analyses. To address this issue, we introduced image-based analysis in conjunction with microdevice assays; this approach allows quantification of every cell in each assay unit. To quantitatively profile differences in cellular behaviors in a microdevice under different culture media conditions, we developed a non-staining image-based analysis method that utilizes cellular morphology. Our approach combines the structural advantages of microdevices, which can increase the stability of images, and the quantitative advantages of an image-based cell evaluation technique that utilizes time-course population change in several morphological features. Our results demonstrate that cellular changes due to small alterations in the concentration of serum in medium or differences in the basal medium can be profiled using only microscopic images.

  11. Liposomes and MTT cell viability assay: an incompatible affair.

    PubMed

    Angius, Fabrizio; Floris, Alice

    2015-03-01

    The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay is commonly used to evaluate the cytotoxicity potential of drugs vehicled by liposomes. However, liposome delivering drugs could produce inconsistent values of MTT absorbance. On the basis of previous experiments demonstrating the MTT affinity for lipid droplets, this paper aims to show that empty-liposomes interfere, per se, on MTT assay due to its lipidic nature. This brings into question the use of MTT testing cytotoxicity when liposomes are involved in delivering drugs.

  12. Unsaturated compounds induce up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells in the in vitro sensitization assay LCSA.

    PubMed

    Frohwein, Thomas Armin; Sonnenburg, Anna; Zuberbier, Torsten; Stahlmann, Ralf; Schreiner, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Unsaturated compounds are known to cause false-positive reactions in the local lymph node assay (LLNA) but not in the guinea pig maximization test. We have tested a panel of substances (succinic acid, undecylenic acid, 1-octyn-3-ol, fumaric acid, maleic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, squalene, and arachidonic acid) in the loose-fit coculture-based sensitization assay (LCSA) to evaluate whether unspecific activation of dendritic cells is a confounder for sensitization testing in vitro. Eight out of 10 tested substances caused significant up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells cocultured with keratinocytes and would have been classified as sensitizers; only succinic acid was tested negative, and squalene had to be excluded from data analysis due to poor solubility in cell culture medium. Based on human data, only undecylenic acid can be considered a true sensitizer. The true sensitizing potential of 1-octyn-3-ol is uncertain. Fumaric acid and its isomer maleic acid are not known as sensitizers, but their esters are contact allergens. A group of 18- to 20-carbon chain unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid) elicited the strongest reaction in vitro. This is possibly due to the formation of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators in the cell culture causing nonspecific activation of dendritic cells. In conclusion, both the LLNA and the LCSA seem to provide false-positive results for unsaturated fatty acids. The inclusion of T cells in dendritic cell-based in vitro sensitization assays may help to eliminate false-positive results due to nonspecific dendritic cell activation. This would lead to more accurate prediction of sensitizers, which is paramount for consumer health protection and occupational safety.

  13. Agent-Based Computational Modeling of Cell Culture ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Quantitative characterization of cellular dose in vitro is needed for alignment of doses in vitro and in vivo. We used the agent-based software, CompuCell3D (CC3D), to provide a stochastic description of cell growth in culture. The model was configured so that isolated cells assumed a “fried egg shape” but became increasingly cuboidal with increasing confluency. The surface area presented by each cell to the overlying medium varies from cell-to-cell and is a determinant of diffusional flux of toxicant from the medium into the cell. Thus, dose varies among cells for a given concentration of toxicant in the medium. Computer code describing diffusion of H2O2 from medium into each cell and clearance of H2O2 was calibrated against H2O2 time-course data (25, 50, or 75 uM H2O2 for 60 min) obtained with the Amplex Red assay for the medium and the H2O2-sensitive fluorescent reporter, HyPer, for cytosol. Cellular H2O2 concentrations peaked at about 5 min and were near baseline by 10 min. The model predicted a skewed distribution of surface areas, with between cell variation usually 2 fold or less. Predicted variability in cellular dose was in rough agreement with the variation in the HyPer data. These results are preliminary, as the model was not calibrated to the morphology of a specific cell type. Future work will involve morphology model calibration against human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. Our results show, however, the potential of agent-based modeling

  14. Ultra-thin Polyethylene glycol Coatings for Stem Cell Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Samantha K.

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a widely accessible and a clinically relevant cell type that are having a transformative impact on regenerative medicine. However, current clinical expansion methods can lead to selective changes in hMSC phenotype resulting from relatively undefined cell culture surfaces. Chemically defined synthetic surfaces can aid in understanding stem cell behavior. In particular we have developed chemically defined ultra-thin coatings that are stable over timeframes relevant to differentiation of hMSCs (several weeks). The approach employs synthesis of a copolymer with distinct chemistry in solution before application to a substrate. This provides wide compositional flexibility and allows for characterization of the orthogonal crosslinking and peptide binding groups. Characterization is done in solution by proton NMR and after crosslinking by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The solubility of the copolymer in ethanol and low temperature crosslinking, expands its applicability to plastic substrates, in addition to silicon, glass, and gold. Cell adhesive peptides, namely Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) fragments, are coupled to coating via different chemistries resulting in the urethane, amide or the thioester polymer-peptide bonds. Development of azlactone-based chemistry allowed for coupling in water at low peptide concentrations and resulted in either an amide or thioester bonds, depending on reactants. Characterization of the peptide functionalized coating by XPS, infrared spectroscopy and cell culture assays, showed that the amide linkages can present peptides for multiple weeks, while shorter-term presentation of a few days is possible using the more labile thioester bond. Regardless, coatings promoted initial adhesion and spreading of hMSCs in a peptide density dependent manner. These coatings address the following challenges in chemically defined cell culture simultaneously: (i) substrate adaptability, (ii) scalability over large areas

  15. Paper/PMMA Hybrid 3D Cell Culture Microfluidic Platform for the Study of Cellular Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Chen, Ming-Jie

    2017-04-06

    Studying cellular crosstalk is important for understanding tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. Moreover, a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture model can provide a more physiologically meaningful culture microenvironment. However, studying cellular crosstalk in a 3D cell culture model involves tedious processing. In this study, a paper/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) hybrid 3D cell culture microfluidic platform was successfully developed for the study of cellular crosstalk. The platform was a paper substrate with culture microreactors placed on a PMMA substrate with hydrogel-infused channels. Different types of cells were directly seeded and cultured in the microreactors. Aberrant cell proliferation of the affected cells was induced by secretions from transfected cells, and the proliferation ratios were investigated using a colorimetric method. The results showed that the responses of cellular crosstalk were different in different types of cells. Moreover, neutralizing and competitive assays were performed to show the functionality of the platform. Additionally, the triggered signaling pathways of the affected cells were directly analyzed by a subsequent immunoassay. The microfluidic platform provides a simple method for studying cellular crosstalk and the corresponding signaling pathways in a 3D culture model.

  16. Advantages and challenges of microfluidic cell culture in polydimethylsiloxane devices.

    PubMed

    Halldorsson, Skarphedinn; Lucumi, Edinson; Gómez-Sjöberg, Rafael; Fleming, Ronan M T

    2015-01-15

    Culture of cells using various microfluidic devices is becoming more common within experimental cell biology. At the same time, a technological radiation of microfluidic cell culture device designs is currently in progress. Ultimately, the utility of microfluidic cell culture will be determined by its capacity to permit new insights into cellular function. Especially insights that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to obtain with macroscopic cell culture in traditional polystyrene dishes, flasks or well-plates. Many decades of heuristic optimization have gone into perfecting conventional cell culture devices and protocols. In comparison, even for the most commonly used microfluidic cell culture devices, such as those fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), collective understanding of the differences in cellular behavior between microfluidic and macroscopic culture is still developing. Moving in vitro culture from macroscopic culture to PDMS based devices can come with unforeseen challenges. Changes in device material, surface coating, cell number per unit surface area or per unit media volume may all affect the outcome of otherwise standard protocols. In this review, we outline some of the advantages and challenges that may accompany a transition from macroscopic to microfluidic cell culture. We focus on decisive factors that distinguish macroscopic from microfluidic cell culture to encourage a reconsideration of how macroscopic cell culture principles might apply to microfluidic cell culture.

  17. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  18. Neurosphere and adherent culture conditions are equivalent for malignant glioma stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Reyner, Karina; Deleyrolle, Loic; Millette, Sebastien; Azari, Hassan; Day, Bryan W.; Stringer, Brett W.; Boyd, Andrew W.; Johns, Terrance G.; Blot, Vincent; Duggal, Rohit; Reynolds, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Certain limitations of the neurosphere assay (NSA) have resulted in a search for alternative culture techniques for brain tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Recently, reports have described growing glioblastoma (GBM) TICs as a monolayer using laminin. We performed a side-by-side analysis of the NSA and laminin (adherent) culture conditions to compare the growth and expansion of GBM TICs. GBM cells were grown using the NSA and adherent culture conditions. Comparisons were made using growth in culture, apoptosis assays, protein expression, limiting dilution clonal frequency assay, genetic affymetrix analysis, and tumorigenicity in vivo. In vitro expansion curves for the NSA and adherent culture conditions were virtually identical (P=0.24) and the clonogenic frequencies (5.2% for NSA vs. 5.0% for laminin, P=0.9) were similar as well. Likewise, markers of differentiation (glial fibrillary acidic protein and beta tubulin III) and proliferation (Ki67 and MCM2) revealed no statistical difference between the sphere and attachment methods. Several different methods were used to determine the numbers of dead or dying cells (trypan blue, DiIC, caspase-3, and annexin V) with none of the assays noting a meaningful variance between the two methods. In addition, genetic expression analysis with microarrays revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Finally, glioma cells derived from both methods of expansion formed large invasive tumors exhibiting GBM features when implanted in immune-compromised animals. A detailed functional, protein and genetic characterization of human GBM cells cultured in serum-free defined conditions demonstrated no statistically meaningful differences when grown using sphere (NSA) or adherent conditions. Hence, both methods are functionally equivalent and remain suitable options for expanding primary high-grade gliomas in tissue culture. PMID:25806119

  19. Rapid isolation of dengue-neutralizing antibodies from single cell-sorted human antigen-specific memory B-cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Cox, Kara S; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Zhifeng; Horton, Melanie S; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xin-Min; Dubey, Sheri A; DiStefano, Daniel J; Ettenger, Andrew; Fong, Rachel H; Doranz, Benjamin J; Casimiro, Danilo R; Vora, Kalpit A

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring antigen-specific memory B cells and the antibodies they encode is important for understanding the specificity, breadth and duration of immune response to an infection or vaccination. The antibodies isolated could further help design vaccine antigens for raising relevant protective immune responses. However, developing assays to measure and isolate antigen-specific memory B cells is technically challenging due to the low frequencies of these cells that exist in the circulating blood. Here, we describe a flow cytometry method to identify and isolate dengue envelope-specific memory B cells using a labeled dengue envelope protein. We enumerated dengue-envelope specific memory B cells from a cohort of dengue seropositive donors using this direct flow cytometry assay. A more established and conventional assay, the cultured B ELISPOT, was used as a benchmark comparator. Furthermore, we were able to confirm the single-sorted memory B-cell specificity by culturing B cells and differentiating them into plasma cells using cell lines expressing CD40L. The culture supernatants were assayed for antigen binding and the ability of the antibodies to neutralize the cognate dengue virus. Moreover, we successfully isolated the heavy and light Ig sequences and expressed them as full-length recombinant antibodies to reproduce the activity seen in culture supernatants. Mapping of these antibodies revealed a novel epitope for dengue 2 virus serotype. In conclusion, we established a reproducible methodology to enumerate antigen-specific memory B cells and assay their encoded antibodies for functional characterization.

  20. Rapid isolation of dengue-neutralizing antibodies from single cell-sorted human antigen-specific memory B-cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kara S.; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Zhifeng; Horton, Melanie S.; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xin-Min; Dubey, Sheri A.; DiStefano, Daniel J.; Ettenger, Andrew; Fong, Rachel H.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Vora, Kalpit A.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring antigen-specific memory B cells and the antibodies they encode is important for understanding the specificity, breadth and duration of immune response to an infection or vaccination. The antibodies isolated could further help design vaccine antigens for raising relevant protective immune responses. However, developing assays to measure and isolate antigen-specific memory B cells is technically challenging due to the low frequencies of these cells that exist in the circulating blood. Here, we describe a flow cytometry method to identify and isolate dengue envelope-specific memory B cells using a labeled dengue envelope protein. We enumerated dengue-envelope specific memory B cells from a cohort of dengue seropositive donors using this direct flow cytometry assay. A more established and conventional assay, the cultured B ELISPOT, was used as a benchmark comparator. Furthermore, we were able to confirm the single-sorted memory B-cell specificity by culturing B cells and differentiating them into plasma cells using cell lines expressing CD40L. The culture supernatants were assayed for antigen binding and the ability of the antibodies to neutralize the cognate dengue virus. Moreover, we successfully isolated the heavy and light Ig sequences and expressed them as full-length recombinant antibodies to reproduce the activity seen in culture supernatants. Mapping of these antibodies revealed a novel epitope for dengue 2 virus serotype. In conclusion, we established a reproducible methodology to enumerate antigen-specific memory B cells and assay their encoded antibodies for functional characterization. PMID:26491897

  1. A novel clonality assay for the assessment of canine T cell proliferations.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stefan M; Moore, Peter F

    2012-01-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based clonality assays are an important tool to differentiate neoplastic from reactive lymphocyte populations. A recent description of the canine T cell receptor γ locus identified a large number of formerly unknown genes, and determined the locus topology consisting of 8 cassettes with up to 3 variable (V) genes, 2 joining (J) genes and one constant (C) gene each. Given that these data were not available when existing canine T cell clonality assays were developed, it is likely that they will fail to detect a subset of clonal lymphocyte populations. The objective of this study was to gauge the potential of canine T cell clonality assays to detect all rearranged T cell receptor γ genes and to develop an improved clonality assay. The primer sequences of existing clonality assays were aligned to the reference sequences of all rearranged genes and genes were scored as to the likelihood of being recognized by a primer. All four assays likely recognized subgroup Vγ2 and Vγ6 genes but 3 out of 4 assays were unlikely to detect subgroup Vγ3 and Vγ7 genes. All assays likely recognized Jγx-2 genes, but only two assays were likely to detect most Jγx-1 genes. Two assays had forward primers located as close as four nucleotides to the junctional region. A new multiplex PCR was designed with all primers combined in a single tube. An alternative primer set allowed identification of variable gene usage through gene specific forward primers. The coverage of all rearranged genes facilitated the detection of multiple clonal rearrangements per neoplastic sample. The new assay detected clonal DNA at a concentration of 5% within polyclonal background but detection thresholds were dependent on the gene usage of clonal rearrangements as well as the position of the clonal peak in respect to the polyclonal background. The new multiplex assay recognized 12/12 (100%) of confirmed neoplastic samples as compared to 2/12 (17%) by an existing assay. On a

  2. Microtiter micromass cultures of limb-bud mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, D F; Solursh, M

    1988-02-01

    A method is described for growing high-density micromass cultures of chick and mouse limb mesenchyme cells in 96-well microtiter plates (microT microM cultures). Rapid quantitative estimates of chondrogenic expression were obtained by automated spectrophotometric analysis of Alcian-blue-stained cartilage matrix extracts performed in the wells in which the cells had been grown. Quantitative estimates of myogenic expression were obtained similarly using anti-sarcomere myosin monoclonal antibody and modified ELISA techniques. This microT microM-ELISA method may be adapted for use with other antigens for which specific antibodies are available. These methods were used to compare cartilage and muscle differentiation in 1 to 4 d microT microM cultures grown in serum-containing (SCM) and defined (DM) media. The DM contains minimal additives (insulin, hydrocortisone, and in some cases, ascorbate or transferrin) and supports both chondrogenesis and myogenesis. The colorimetric analyses agree well with the morphologic appraisal of chondrogenesis and myogenesis. Similar numbers of cartilage nodules formed in all cultures, but in DM the nodules failed to enlarge; explaining the reduced matrix synthesis in DM as compared with SCM, and suggesting that nodule enlargement is a discrete, serum-dependent step. Studies of selected additives to DM show that transferrin enhances myogenesis, ascorbic acid enhances chondrogenesis, and retinoic acid inhibits chondrogenesis. Together, the microT microM system, in situ colorimetric assays of chondrogenesis and myogenesis, and DM will allow rapid prescreening of teratogens and screening of various bioactive compounds (e.g., hormones, growth factors, vitamins, adhesion factors) for effects on limb mesenchymal cell differentiation.

  3. Development of a Lentivirus Vector-Based Assay for Non-Destructive Monitoring of Cell Fusion Activity

    PubMed Central

    Neshati, Zeinab; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Guangqian; Schalij, Martin J.; de Vries, Antoine A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-to-cell fusion can be quantified by endowing acceptor and donor cells with latent reporter genes/proteins and activators of these genes/proteins, respectively. One way to accomplish this goal is by using a bipartite lentivirus vector (LV)-based cell fusion assay system in which the cellular fusion partners are transduced with a flippase-activatable Photinus pyralis luciferase (PpLuc) expression unit (acceptor cells) or with a recombinant gene encoding FLPeNLS+, a nuclear-targeted and molecularly evolved version of flippase (donor cells). Fusion of both cell populations will lead to the FLPe-dependent generation of a functional PpLuc gene. PpLuc activity is typically measured in cell lysates, precluding consecutive analysis of one cell culture. Therefore, in this study the PpLuc-coding sequence was replaced by that of Gaussia princeps luciferase (GpLuc), a secretory protein allowing repeated analysis of the same cell culture. In myotubes the spread of FLPeNLS+ may be limited due to its nuclear localization signal (NLS) causing low signal outputs. To test this hypothesis, myoblasts were transduced with LVs encoding either FLPeNLS+ or an NLS-less version of FLPe (FLPeNLS−) and subsequently co-cultured in different ratios with myoblasts containing the FLPe-activatable GpLuc expression cassette. At different times after induction of cell-to-cell fusion the GpLuc activity in the culture medium was determined. FLPeNLS+ and FLPeNLS− both activated the latent GpLuc gene but when the percentage of FLPe-expressing myoblasts was limiting, FLPeNLS+ generally yielded slightly higher signals than FLPeNLS− while at low acceptor-to-donor cell ratios FLPeNLS− was usually superior. The ability of FLPeNLS+ to spread through myofibers and to induce reporter gene expression is thus not limited by its NLS. However, at high FLPe concentrations the presence of the NLS negatively affected reporter gene expression. In summary, a rapid and simple chemiluminescence assay for

  4. Development of a lentivirus vector-based assay for non-destructive monitoring of cell fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Neshati, Zeinab; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Guangqian; Schalij, Martin J; de Vries, Antoine A F

    2014-01-01

    Cell-to-cell fusion can be quantified by endowing acceptor and donor cells with latent reporter genes/proteins and activators of these genes/proteins, respectively. One way to accomplish this goal is by using a bipartite lentivirus vector (LV)-based cell fusion assay system in which the cellular fusion partners are transduced with a flippase-activatable Photinus pyralis luciferase (PpLuc) expression unit (acceptor cells) or with a recombinant gene encoding FLPeNLS+, a nuclear-targeted and molecularly evolved version of flippase (donor cells). Fusion of both cell populations will lead to the FLPe-dependent generation of a functional PpLuc gene. PpLuc activity is typically measured in cell lysates, precluding consecutive analysis of one cell culture. Therefore, in this study the PpLuc-coding sequence was replaced by that of Gaussia princeps luciferase (GpLuc), a secretory protein allowing repeated analysis of the same cell culture. In myotubes the spread of FLPeNLS+ may be limited due to its nuclear localization signal (NLS) causing low signal outputs. To test this hypothesis, myoblasts were transduced with LVs encoding either FLPeNLS+ or an NLS-less version of FLPe (FLPeNLS-) and subsequently co-cultured in different ratios with myoblasts containing the FLPe-activatable GpLuc expression cassette. At different times after induction of cell-to-cell fusion the GpLuc activity in the culture medium was determined. FLPeNLS+ and FLPeNLS- both activated the latent GpLuc gene but when the percentage of FLPe-expressing myoblasts was limiting, FLPeNLS+ generally yielded slightly higher signals than FLPeNLS- while at low acceptor-to-donor cell ratios FLPeNLS- was usually superior. The ability of FLPeNLS+ to spread through myofibers and to induce reporter gene expression is thus not limited by its NLS. However, at high FLPe concentrations the presence of the NLS negatively affected reporter gene expression. In summary, a rapid and simple chemiluminescence assay for quantifying

  5. Evaluation of 309 Environmental Chemicals Using a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Kelly J.; Barrier, Marianne; Jeffay, Susan; Nichols, Harriette P.; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C.; Singh, Amar V.; Reif, David M.; Sipes, Nisha S.; Judson, Richard S.; Dix, David J.; Kavlock, Robert; Hunter, Edward S.; Knudsen, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    The vast landscape of environmental chemicals has motivated the need for alternative methods to traditional whole-animal bioassays in toxicity testing. Embryonic stem (ES) cells provide an in vitro model of embryonic development and an alternative method for assessing developmental toxicity. Here, we evaluated 309 environmental chemicals, mostly food-use pesticides, from the ToxCast™ chemical library using a mouse ES cell platform. ES cells were cultured in the absence of pluripotency factors to promote spontaneous differentiation and in the presence of DMSO-solubilized chemicals at different concentrations to test the effects of exposure on differentiation and cytotoxicity. Cardiomyocyte differentiation (α,β myosin heavy chain; MYH6/MYH7) and cytotoxicity (DRAQ5™/Sapphire700™) were measured by In-Cell Western™ analysis. Half-maximal activity concentration (AC50) values for differentiation and cytotoxicity endpoints were determined, with 18% of the chemical library showing significant activity on either endpoint. Mining these effects against the ToxCast Phase I assays (∼500) revealed significant associations for a subset of chemicals (26) that perturbed transcription-based activities and impaired ES cell differentiation. Increased transcriptional activity of several critical developmental genes including BMPR2, PAX6 and OCT1 were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation. Multiple genes involved in reactive oxygen species signaling pathways (NRF2, ABCG2, GSTA2, HIF1A) were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation as well. A multivariate model built from these data revealed alterations in ABCG2 transporter was a strong predictor of impaired ES cell differentiation. Taken together, these results provide an initial characterization of metabolic and regulatory pathways by which some environmental chemicals may act to disrupt ES cell growth and differentiation. PMID:21666745

  6. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Reverté, Laia; Soliño, Lucía; Carnicer, Olga; Diogène, Jorge; Campàs, Mònica

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs. PMID:25431968

  7. Determination of Metabolic Viability and Cell Mass Using a Tandem Resazurin/Sulforhodamine B Assay.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filomena S G; Starostina, Irina G; Ivanova, Vilena V; Rizvanov, Albert A; Oliveira, Paulo J; Pereira, Susana P

    2016-05-04

    The identification of rapid, reliable, and highly reproducible biological assays that can be standardized and routinely used in preclinical tests constitutes a promising approach to reducing drug discovery costs and time. This unit details a tandem, rapid, and reliable cell viability method for preliminary screening of chemical compounds. This assay measures metabolic activity and cell mass in the same cell sample using a dual resazurin/sulforhodamine B assay, eliminating the variation associated with cell seeding and excessive manipulations in assays that test different cell samples across plates. The procedure also reduces the amount of cells, test compound, and reagents required, as well as the time expended in conventional tests, thus resulting in a more confident prediction of toxic thresholds for the tested compounds. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Use of cryopreserved transiently transfected cells in high-throughput pregnane X receptor transactivation assay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhengrong; Puglisi, Jaime; Connors, David; Stewart, Jeremy; Herbst, John; Marino, Anthony; Sinz, Michael; O'Connell, Jonathan; Banks, Martyn; Dickinson, Kenneth; Cacace, Angela

    2007-03-01

    Cryopreserved, transiently transfected HepG2 cells were compared to freshly transfected HepG2 cells for use in a pregnane X receptor (PXR) transactivation assay. Assay performance was similar for both cell preparations; however, cryopreserved cells demonstrated less interassay variation. Validation with drugs of different PXR activation potencies and efficacies demonstrated an excellent correlation (r(2) > 0.95) between cryopreserved and fresh cells. Cryopreservation did not change the effect of known CYP3A4 inducers that have poor cell permeability, indicating that cryopreservation had little effect on membrane permeability. In addition, cryopreserved HepG2 cells did not exhibit enhanced susceptibility to cytotoxic compounds compared to transiently transfected control cells. The use of cryopreserved cells enables this assay to run with enhanced efficiency.

  9. Cytopathogenicity of Naegleria for cultured neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fulford, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    The cytopathic activity of live Naegleria amoebae and cell-free lysates of Naegleria for B-103 rat neuroblastoma cells was investigated using a /sup 51/Cr release assay. Live amoebae and cell-free lysates of N. fowleri, N. australiensis, N. lovaniensis, and N. gruberi all induced sufficient damage to radiolabeled B-103 cells to cause a significant release of chromium. The cytotoxic activity present in the cell-free lysates of N. fowleri can be recovered in the supernatant fluid following centrifugation at 100,000xg and precipitation of the 100,000xg supernatant fluid with ammonium sulfate. Initial characterization of the cytotoxic factor indicates that it is a heat labile, pH sensitive, soluble protein. The cytotoxic activity i