Science.gov

Sample records for cell cycle dysfunction

  1. Postnatal telomere dysfunction induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through p21 activation

    PubMed Central

    Aix, Esther; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Óscar; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlota; Aguado, Tania

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that drive mammalian cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle soon after birth remain largely unknown. Here, we identify telomere dysfunction as a critical physiological signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We show that telomerase activity and cardiomyocyte telomere length decrease sharply in wild-type mouse hearts after birth, resulting in cardiomyocytes with dysfunctional telomeres and anaphase bridges and positive for the cell-cycle arrest protein p21. We further show that premature telomere dysfunction pushes cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle. Cardiomyocytes from telomerase-deficient mice with dysfunctional telomeres (G3 Terc−/−) show precocious development of anaphase-bridge formation, p21 up-regulation, and binucleation. In line with these findings, the cardiomyocyte proliferative response after cardiac injury was lost in G3 Terc−/− newborns but rescued in G3 Terc−/−/p21−/− mice. These results reveal telomere dysfunction as a crucial signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest after birth and suggest interventions to augment the regeneration capacity of mammalian hearts. PMID:27241915

  2. Chloroplast dysfunction causes multiple defects in cell cycle progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf mutant.

    PubMed

    Hudik, Elodie; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Domenichini, Séverine; Bourge, Mickaël; Soubigout-Taconnat, Ludivine; Mazubert, Christelle; Yi, Dalong; Bujaldon, Sandrine; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; De Veylder, Lieven; Bergounioux, Catherine; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile

    2014-09-01

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants.

  3. Nitrosative stress and redox-cycling agents synergize to cause mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Diers, Anne R; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Hogg, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide production by the endothelium is required for normal vascular homeostasis; however, in conditions of oxidative stress, interactions of nitric oxide with reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to underlie endothelial dysfunction. Beyond canonical nitric oxide signaling pathways, nitric oxide production results in the post-translational modification of protein thiols, termed S-nitrosation. The potential interplay between S-nitrosation and ROS remains poorly understood and is the focus of the current study. The effects of the S-nitrosating agent S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO) in combination with redox-cycling agents was examined in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). CysNO significantly impairs mitochondrial function and depletes the NADH/NAD(+) pool; however, these changes do not result in cell death. When faced with the additional stressor of a redox-cycling agent used to generate ROS, further loss of NAD(+) occurs, and cellular ATP pools are depleted. Cellular S-nitrosothiols also accumulate, and cell death is triggered. These data demonstrate that CysNO sensitizes endothelial cells to redox-cycling agent-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death and identify attenuated degradation of S-nitrosothiols as one potential mechanism for the enhanced cytotoxicity.

  4. Chloroplast Dysfunction Causes Multiple Defects in Cell Cycle Progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf Mutant1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Hudik, Elodie; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Domenichini, Séverine; Bourge, Mickaël; Soubigout-Taconnat, Ludivine; Mazubert, Christelle; Yi, Dalong; Bujaldon, Sandrine; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; De Veylder, Lieven; Bergounioux, Catherine; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants. PMID:25037213

  5. Clinical trial tests drug for tumors associated with Krebs-cycle dysfunction | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Krebs cycle is part of the complex process where cells turn food into energy. One of the elements of the Krebs cycle is succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). Loss of SDH activity in cells has been linked to tumor formation. This new trial is studying guadecitabine for tumors associated with Krebs cycle dysfunction. Learn more...

  6. Cell Cycle Regulation by Checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J.; O’Connell, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that monitor the order, integrity, and fidelity of the major events of the cell cycle. These include growth to the appropriate cell size, the replication and integrity of the chromosomes, and their accurate segregation at mitosis. Many of these mechanisms are ancient in origin and highly conserved, and hence have been heavily informed by studies in simple organisms such as the yeasts. Others have evolved in higher organisms, and control alternative cell fates with significant impact on tumor suppression. Here, we consider these different checkpoint pathways and the consequences of their dysfunction on cell fate. PMID:24906307

  7. Cell cycle regulation by checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Kevin J; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that monitor the order, integrity, and fidelity of the major events of the cell cycle. These include growth to the appropriate cell size, the replication and integrity of the chromosomes, and their accurate segregation at mitosis. Many of these mechanisms are ancient in origin and highly conserved, and hence have been heavily informed by studies in simple organisms such as the yeasts. Others have evolved in higher organisms, and control alternative cell fates with significant impact on tumor suppression. Here, we consider these different checkpoint pathways and the consequences of their dysfunction on cell fate.

  8. Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction in cells

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Martin D.; Nicholls, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction requires definition of the dysfunction to be investigated. Usually, it is the ability of the mitochondria to make ATP appropriately in response to energy demands. Where other functions are of interest, tailored solutions are required. Dysfunction can be assessed in isolated mitochondria, in cells or in vivo, with different balances between precise experimental control and physiological relevance. There are many methods to measure mitochondrial function and dysfunction in these systems. Generally, measurements of fluxes give more information about the ability to make ATP than do measurements of intermediates and potentials. For isolated mitochondria, the best assay is mitochondrial respiratory control: the increase in respiration rate in response to ADP. For intact cells, the best assay is the equivalent measurement of cell respiratory control, which reports the rate of ATP production, the proton leak rate, the coupling efficiency, the maximum respiratory rate, the respiratory control ratio and the spare respiratory capacity. Measurements of membrane potential provide useful additional information. Measurement of both respiration and potential during appropriate titrations enables the identification of the primary sites of effectors and the distribution of control, allowing deeper quantitative analyses. Many other measurements in current use can be more problematic, as discussed in the present review. PMID:21726199

  9. Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction in cells.

    PubMed

    Brand, Martin D; Nicholls, David G

    2011-04-15

    Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction requires definition of the dysfunction to be investigated. Usually, it is the ability of the mitochondria to make ATP appropriately in response to energy demands. Where other functions are of interest, tailored solutions are required. Dysfunction can be assessed in isolated mitochondria, in cells or in vivo, with different balances between precise experimental control and physiological relevance. There are many methods to measure mitochondrial function and dysfunction in these systems. Generally, measurements of fluxes give more information about the ability to make ATP than do measurements of intermediates and potentials. For isolated mitochondria, the best assay is mitochondrial respiratory control: the increase in respiration rate in response to ADP. For intact cells, the best assay is the equivalent measurement of cell respiratory control, which reports the rate of ATP production, the proton leak rate, the coupling efficiency, the maximum respiratory rate, the respiratory control ratio and the spare respiratory capacity. Measurements of membrane potential provide useful additional information. Measurement of both respiration and potential during appropriate titrations enables the identification of the primary sites of effectors and the distribution of control, allowing deeper quantitative analyses. Many other measurements in current use can be more problematic, as discussed in the present review.

  10. Simulating cell apoptosis induced sinus node dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kharche, Sanjay; Beling, John; Biktasheva, Irina V; Zhang, Henggui; Biktashev, Vadim N

    2013-01-01

    Sinus node dysfunction (SND) is correlated to the pacemaker sinoatrial node (SAN) cell apoptosis. This study explores the effect of such a dysfunctional SAN on electrical propagation into neighboring atrial tissue. The Fenton Karma model was extended to simulate mouse SAN and atrial cell action potentials. The cell models were incorporated into a 2D model consisting of a central SAN region surrounded by atrial tissue. The intercellular gap junctional coupling, as quantified by the diffusion constant, was estimated to give conduction speeds as observed in mouse atrial tissue. The size of mouse SAN pacemaking region was estimated using the 2D model. In multiple simulations, the effects of an increasing proportion of apoptotic pacemaker cells on atrial tissue pacing were simulated and quantified. The SAN size that gave a basal mouse atrial cycle length (ACL) of 295 ms was found to be 0.6 mm in radius. At low pacemaker cell apoptosis proportion, there was a drastic increase of ACL. At modest increase in the number of apoptotic cells, bradycardia was observed. The incidence of sinus arrest was also found to be high. When the number of apoptotic cells were 10% of the total number of pacemaking cells, all pacemaking was arrested. Phenomenological models have been developed to study mouse atrial electrophysiology and confirm experimental findings. The results show the significance of cell apoptosis as a major mechanism of SND.

  11. The microbial cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Nurse, P.; Streiblova, E.

    1984-01-01

    This book concentrates on the major problems of cell cycle control in microorganisms. A wide variety of microorganisms, ranging from bacteria and yeasts to hyphal fungi, algae, and ciliates are analyzed, with emphasis on the basic similarities among the organisms. Different ways of looking at cell cycle control which emphasize aspects of the problem such as circadian rhythms, limit cycle oscillators, and cell size models, are considered. New approaches such as the study of cell cycle mutants, and cloning of cell cycle control genes are also presented.

  12. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Cross, Frederick R; Umen, James G

    2015-05-01

    The position of Chlamydomonas within the eukaryotic phylogeny makes it a unique model in at least two important ways: as a representative of the critically important, early-diverging lineage leading to plants; and as a microbe retaining important features of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) that has been lost in the highly studied yeast lineages. Its cell biology has been studied for many decades and it has well-developed experimental genetic tools, both classical (Mendelian) and molecular. Unlike land plants, it is a haploid with very few gene duplicates, making it ideal for loss-of-function genetic studies. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle has a striking temporal and functional separation between cell growth and rapid cell division, probably connected to the interplay between diurnal cycles that drive photosynthetic cell growth and the cell division cycle; it also exhibits a highly choreographed interaction between the cell cycle and its centriole-basal body-flagellar cycle. Here, we review the current status of studies of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. We begin with an overview of cell-cycle control in the well-studied yeast and animal systems, which has yielded a canonical, well-supported model. We discuss briefly what is known about similarities and differences in plant cell-cycle control, compared with this model. We next review the cytology and cell biology of the multiple-fission cell cycle of Chlamydomonas. Lastly, we review recent genetic approaches and insights into Chlamydomonas cell-cycle regulation that have been enabled by a new generation of genomics-based tools. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  14. Analysis of mitochondrial dysfunction during cell death.

    PubMed

    Gogvadze, Vladimir; Orrenius, Sten; Zhivotovsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in various modes of cell death. Analysis of mitochondrial dysfunction and the release of proteins from the intermembrane space of mitochondria represent essential tools in cell death investigation. Here we describe how to evaluate release of intermembrane space proteins during apoptosis, alterations in the mitochondrial membrane potential, and oxygen consumption in apoptotic cells.

  15. Stem-cell therapy for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yiou, R

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies have been recently investigated in the field of organic erectile dysfunctions, such as those associated with diabetes or the treatment of prostate cancer. The overall aim is to repair the repair the underlying penile cellular damage. Here, we review the rationale behind the use of stem cells injection in post-radical prostatectomy erectile dysfunction (pRP-ED).Radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer induces complex neurologic and vascular injuries that cause one of the most difficult-to-treat forms of erectile dysfunction. Evidence from animal models replicating pRP-ED suggests that intracavernous injection of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) may represent the first curative approach. Several clinical trials are ongoing and two of them have been completed with encouraging results.

  16. Cell cycle effects of drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Dethlefsen, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Cell Growth and Division Cycle; Cell Cycle Effects of Alkylating Agents; Biological Effects of Folic Acid Antagonists with Antineoplastic Activity; and Bleomycin-Mode of Action with Particular Reference to the Cell Cycle.

  17. Rare damaging variants in DNA repair and cell cycle pathways are associated with hippocampal and cognitive dysfunction: a combined genetic imaging study in first-episode treatment-naive patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Li, M; Hu, X; Xiang, B; Deng, W; Wang, Q; Wang, Y; Zhao, L; Ma, X; Sham, P C; Northoff, G; Li, T

    2017-02-14

    Schizophrenia is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder where changes in both hippocampus and memory-related cognitive functions are central. However, the exact relationship between neurodevelopmental-genetic factors and hippocampal-cognitive dysfunction remains unclear. The general aim of our study is to link the occurrence of rare damaging mutations involved in susceptibility gene pathways to the structure and function of hippocampus in order to define genetically and phenotypically based subgroups in schizophrenia. In the present study, by analyzing the exome sequencing and magnetic resonance imaging data in 94 first-episode treatment-naive schizophrenia patients and 134 normal controls, we identified that a cluster of rare damaging variants (RDVs) enriched in DNA repair and cell cycle pathways was present only in a subgroup including 39 schizophrenic patients. Furthermore, we found that schizophrenic patients with this RDVs show increased resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) between left hippocampus (especially for left dentate gyrus) and left inferior parietal cortex, as well as decreased rsFC between left hippocampus and cerebellum. Moreover, abnormal rsFC was related to the deficits of spatial working memory (SWM; that is known to recruit the hippocampus) in patients with the RDVs. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that damaging rare variants of genes in DNA repair and cell cycle pathways are associated with aberrant hippocampal rsFC, which was further relative to cognitive deficits in first-episode treatment-naive schizophrenia. Therefore, our data provide some evidence for the occurrence of phenotypic alterations in hippocampal and SWM function in a genetically defined subgroup of schizophrenia.

  18. Glyphosate-based pesticides affect cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Marc, Julie; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Bellé, Robert

    2004-04-01

    Cell-cycle dysregulation is a hallmark of tumor cells and human cancers. Failure in the cell-cycle checkpoints leads to genomic instability and subsequent development of cancers from the initial affected cell. A worldwide used product Roundup 3plus, based on glyphosate as the active herbicide, was suggested to be of human health concern since it induced cell cycle dysfunction as judged from analysis of the first cell division of sea urchin embryos, a recognized model for cell cycle studies. Several glyphosate-based pesticides from different manufacturers were assayed in comparison with Roundup 3plus for their ability to interfere with the cell cycle regulation. All the tested products, Amega, Cargly, Cosmic, and Roundup Biovert induced cell cycle dysfunction. The threshold concentration for induction of cell cycle dysfunction was evaluated for each product and suggests high risk by inhalation for people in the vicinity of the pesticide handling sprayed at 500 to 4000 times higher dose than the cell-cycle adverse concentration.

  19. Cell cycle in mouse development.

    PubMed

    Ciemerych, Maria A; Sicinski, Peter

    2005-04-18

    Mice likely represent the most-studied mammalian organism, except for humans. Genetic engineering in embryonic stem cells has allowed derivation of mouse strains lacking particular cell cycle proteins. Analyses of these mutant mice, and cells derived from them, facilitated the studies of the functions of cell cycle apparatus at the organismal and cellular levels. In this review, we give some background about the cell cycle progression during mouse development. We next discuss some insights about in vivo functions of the cell cycle proteins, gleaned from mouse knockout experiments. Our text is meant to provide examples of the recent experiments, rather than to supply an extensive and complete list.

  20. How do prokaryotic cells cycle?

    PubMed

    Margolin, William; Bernander, Rolf

    2004-09-21

    This issue of Current Biology features five reviews covering various key aspects of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The topics include initiation of chromosome replication, assembly of the mitotic spindle, cytokinesis, the regulation of cell-cycle progression, and cell-cycle modeling, focusing mainly on budding yeast, fission yeast and animal cell model systems. The reviews underscore common themes as well as key differences in the way these processes are carried out and regulated among the different model organisms. Consequently, an important question is how cell-cycle mechanisms and controls have evolved, particularly in the broader perspective of the three domains of life.

  1. NETs and cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Robson, Michael I; Le Thanh, Phu; Schirmer, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    There are many ways that the nuclear envelope can influence the cell cycle. In addition to roles of lamins in regulating the master cell cycle regulator pRb and nuclear envelope breakdown in mitosis, many other nuclear envelope proteins influence the cell cycle through regulatory or structural functions. Of particular note among these are the nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that appear to influence cell cycle regulation through multiple separate mechanisms. Some NETs and other nuclear envelope proteins accumulate on the mitotic spindle, suggesting functional or structural roles in the cell cycle. In interphase exogenous overexpression of some NETs promotes an increase in G1 populations, while others promote an increase in G2/M populations, sometimes associated with the induction of senescence. Intriguingly, most of the NETs linked to the cell cycle are highly restricted in their tissue expression; thus, their misregulation in cancer could contribute to the many tissue-specific types of cancer.

  2. Stem-cell therapy for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Albersen, Maarten; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Lue, Tom

    2013-09-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common sexual disorder that men report to healthcare providers, and is the male sexual dysfunction that has been most investigated. Current treatments for ED focus on relieving the symptoms of ED and therefore tend to provide a temporary solution rather than a cure or reversing the cause. Recently, therapies based on stem cells (SCs) have had an increasing attention for their potential to restore erectile function. Preclinical studies showed that these cells might reverse the pathophysiological changes leading to ED, rather than treating the symptoms of ED. This review is intended to provide an overview of contemporary reports on the use of SCs to treat ED. We made an extensive search for reports on SC-based therapy for the management of ED, published in English between 1966 and 2013, using the search engines SciVerse-sciencedirect, SciVerse-scopus, Google Scholar and Pubmed, with the search terms 'erectile dysfunction', 'stem cells', 'multipotent stromal cells', 'adipose (tissue) derived stem cells', 'bone-marrow derived stem cells', 'animal model', 'diabetes', 'ageing', 'Peyronie's Disease' and 'cavernous nerve injury'. Fifty-four papers were identified and contributed, either as an original research report or review thereof, to this review. Several preclinical studies addressed SC-based therapies for the recovery of erectile function caused by a variety of both chronic and acute conditions. Overall, these studies showed beneficial effects of SC therapy, while evidence on the mechanisms of action of SC therapy varied between studies. One clinical trial investigated the short-term effects of SC therapy in diabetic patients with ED. Two more clinical trials are currently recruiting patients. The rapidly expanding and highly promising body of preclinical work on SC-based medicine providing a potential cure for ED, rather than merely symptom relief, is indicative of the increasing interest in regenerative options for sexual

  3. [Endothelial cell apoptosis in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui

    2012-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the most common male diseases, which seriously affects the patient's quality of life. The risk factors of ED include aging, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and unhealthy lifestyle, and its exact mechanism remains unclear. The apoptosis of endothelial cells in the corpus cavernosum penis may reduce NOS activity, block NO synthesis, and affect penile erection, and the mechanisms of their apoptosis vary with different causes of ED. This article updates the relationship between the apoptosis of endothelial cells and the development of ED.

  4. The Krebs cycle and mitochondrial mass are early victims of endothelial dysfunction: proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Addabbo, Francesco; Ratliff, Brian; Park, Hyeong-Cheon; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Ciszar, Anna; Krasnikov, Boris; Krasnikof, Boris; Sodhi, Komal; Zhang, Fung; Nasjletti, Alberto; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is associated with bioavailable nitric oxide deficiency and an excessive generation of reactive oxygen species. We modeled this condition by chronically inhibiting nitric oxide generation with subpressor doses of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) in C57B6 and Tie-2/green fluorescent protein mouse strains. L-NMMA-treated mice exhibited a slight reduction in vasorelaxation ability, as well as detectable abnormalities in soluble adhesion molecules (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1, and matrix metalloproteinase 9), which represent surrogate indicators of endothelial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis of the isolated microvasculature using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy revealed abnormal expression of a cluster of mitochondrial enzymes, which was confirmed using immunodetection. Aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1 expression levels were decreased in L-NMMA-treated animals; this phenotype was absent in nitric oxide synthase-1 and -3 knockout mice. Depletion of aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1 resulted in the inhibition of the Krebs cycle and enhanced pyruvate shunting toward the glycolytic pathway. To assess mitochondrial mass in vivo, co-localization of green fluorescent protein and MitoTracker fluorescence was detected by intravital microscopy. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity showed that L-NMMA-treated animals exhibited lower fluorescence of MitoTracker in microvascular endothelia as a result of reduced mitochondrial mass. These findings provide conclusive and unbiased evidence that mitochondriopathy represents an early manifestation of endothelial dysfunction, shifting cell metabolism toward "metabolic hypoxia" through the selective depletion of both aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1. These findings may contribute to an early preclinical diagnosis of endothelial dysfunction.

  5. The Krebs Cycle and Mitochondrial Mass Are Early Victims of Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Addabbo, Francesco; Ratliff, Brian; Park, Hyeong-Cheon; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Ungvari, Zoltan; Ciszar, Anna; Krasnikof, Boris; Sodhi, Komal; Zhang, Fung; Nasjletti, Alberto; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is associated with bioavailable nitric oxide deficiency and an excessive generation of reactive oxygen species. We modeled this condition by chronically inhibiting nitric oxide generation with subpressor doses of NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (L-NMMA) in C57B6 and Tie-2/green fluorescent protein mouse strains. L-NMMA-treated mice exhibited a slight reduction in vasorelaxation ability, as well as detectable abnormalities in soluble adhesion molecules (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1, and matrix metalloproteinase 9), which represent surrogate indicators of endothelial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis of the isolated microvasculature using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy revealed abnormal expression of a cluster of mitochondrial enzymes, which was confirmed using immunodetection. Aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1 expression levels were decreased in L-NMMA-treated animals; this phenotype was absent in nitric oxide synthase-1 and -3 knockout mice. Depletion of aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1 resulted in the inhibition of the Krebs cycle and enhanced pyruvate shunting toward the glycolytic pathway. To assess mitochondrial mass in vivo, co-localization of green fluorescent protein and MitoTracker fluorescence was detected by intravital microscopy. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity showed that L-NMMA-treated animals exhibited lower fluorescence of MitoTracker in microvascular endothelia as a result of reduced mitochondrial mass. These findings provide conclusive and unbiased evidence that mitochondriopathy represents an early manifestation of endothelial dysfunction, shifting cell metabolism toward “metabolic hypoxia” through the selective depletion of both aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1. These findings may contribute to an early preclinical diagnosis of endothelial dysfunction. PMID

  6. The Abbreviated Pluripotent Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kapinas, Kristina; Grandy, Rodrigo; Ghule, Prachi; Medina, Ricardo; Becker, Klaus; Pardee, Arthur; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Lian, Jane; Stein, Janet; van Wijnen, Andre; Stein, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells proliferate rapidly and divide symmetrically producing equivalent progeny cells. In contrast, lineage committed cells acquire an extended symmetrical cell cycle. Self-renewal of tissue-specific stem cells is sustained by asymmetric cell division where one progeny cell remains a progenitor while the partner progeny cell exits the cell cycle and differentiates. There are three principal contexts for considering the operation and regulation of the pluripotent cell cycle: temporal, regulatory andstructural. The primary temporal context that the pluripotent self-renewal cell cycle of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is a short G1 period without reducing periods of time allocated to S phase, G2, and mitosis. The rules that govern proliferation in hESCs remain to be comprehensively established. However, several lines of evidence suggest a key role for the naïve transcriptome of hESCs, which is competent to stringently regulate the ESC cell cycle. This supports the requirements of pluripotent cells to self propagate while suppressing expression of genes that confer lineage commitment and/or tissue specificity. However, for the first time, we consider unique dimensions to the architectural organization and assembly of regulatory machinery for gene expression in nuclear microenviornments that define parameters of pluripotency. From both fundamental biological and clinical perspectives, understanding control of the abbreviated embryonic stem cell cycle can provide options to coordinate control of proliferation versus differentiation. Wound healing, tissue engineering, and cell-based therapy to mitigate developmental aberrations illustrate applications that benefit from knowledge of the biology of the pluripotent cell cycle. PMID:22552993

  7. The abbreviated pluripotent cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Kapinas, Kristina; Grandy, Rodrigo; Ghule, Prachi; Medina, Ricardo; Becker, Klaus; Pardee, Arthur; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Lian, Jane; Stein, Janet; van Wijnen, Andre; Stein, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells proliferate rapidly and divide symmetrically producing equivalent progeny cells. In contrast, lineage committed cells acquire an extended symmetrical cell cycle. Self-renewal of tissue-specific stem cells is sustained by asymmetric cell division where one progeny cell remains a progenitor while the partner progeny cell exits the cell cycle and differentiates. There are three principal contexts for considering the operation and regulation of the pluripotent cell cycle: temporal, regulatory, and structural. The primary temporal context that the pluripotent self-renewal cell cycle of hESCs is a short G1 period without reducing periods of time allocated to S phase, G2, and mitosis. The rules that govern proliferation in hESCs remain to be comprehensively established. However, several lines of evidence suggest a key role for the naïve transcriptome of hESCs, which is competent to stringently regulate the embryonic stem cell (ESC) cell cycle. This supports the requirements of pluripotent cells to self-propagate while suppressing expression of genes that confer lineage commitment and/or tissue specificity. However, for the first time, we consider unique dimensions to the architectural organization and assembly of regulatory machinery for gene expression in nuclear microenviornments that define parameters of pluripotency. From both fundamental biological and clinical perspectives, understanding control of the abbreviated ESC cycle can provide options to coordinate control of proliferation versus differentiation. Wound healing, tissue engineering, and cell-based therapy to mitigate developmental aberrations illustrate applications that benefit from knowledge of the biology of the pluripotent cell cycle.

  8. Cell cycle regulation in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pietras, Eric M; Warr, Matthew R; Passegué, Emmanuelle

    2011-11-28

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all lineages of blood cells. Because HSCs must persist for a lifetime, the balance between their proliferation and quiescence is carefully regulated to ensure blood homeostasis while limiting cellular damage. Cell cycle regulation therefore plays a critical role in controlling HSC function during both fetal life and in the adult. The cell cycle activity of HSCs is carefully modulated by a complex interplay between cell-intrinsic mechanisms and cell-extrinsic factors produced by the microenvironment. This fine-tuned regulatory network may become altered with age, leading to aberrant HSC cell cycle regulation, degraded HSC function, and hematological malignancy.

  9. Dysfunctional mitochondrial fission impairs cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Javier; León, Marian; Ponsoda, Xavier; García-García, Francisco; Bort, Roque; Serna, Eva; Barneo-Muñoz, Manuela; Palau, Francesc; Dopazo, Joaquín; López-García, Carlos; Torres, Josema

    2016-12-01

    We have recently shown that mitochondrial fission is induced early in reprogramming in a Drp1-dependent manner; however, the identity of the factors controlling Drp1 recruitment to mitochondria was unexplored. To investigate this, we used a panel of RNAi targeting factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and we observed that MiD51, Gdap1 and, to a lesser extent, Mff were found to play key roles in this process. Cells derived from Gdap1-null mice were used to further explore the role of this factor in cell reprogramming. Microarray data revealed a prominent down-regulation of cell cycle pathways in Gdap1-null cells early in reprogramming and cell cycle profiling uncovered a G2/M growth arrest in Gdap1-null cells undergoing reprogramming. High-Content analysis showed that this growth arrest was DNA damage-independent. We propose that lack of efficient mitochondrial fission impairs cell reprogramming by interfering with cell cycle progression in a DNA damage-independent manner.

  10. The cell cycle and pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Christopher; Philpott, Anna

    2013-04-15

    PSCs (pluripotent stem cells) possess two key properties that have made them the focus of global research efforts in regenerative medicine: they have unlimited expansion potential under conditions which favour their preservation as PSCs and they have the ability to generate all somatic cell types upon differentiation (pluripotency). Conditions have been defined in vitro in which pluripotency is maintained, or else differentiation is favoured and is directed towards specific somatic cell types. However, an unanswered question is whether or not the core cell cycle machinery directly regulates the pluripotency and differentiation properties of PSCs. If so, then manipulation of the cell cycle may represent an additional tool by which in vitro maintenance or differentiation of PSCs may be controlled in regenerative medicine. The present review aims to summarize our current understanding of links between the core cell cycle machinery and the maintenance of pluripotency in ESCs (embryonic stem cells) and iPSCs (induced PSCs).

  11. Myc and cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Bretones, Gabriel; Delgado, M Dolores; León, Javier

    2015-05-01

    Soon after the discovery of the Myc gene (c-Myc), it became clear that Myc expression levels tightly correlate to cell proliferation. The entry in cell cycle of quiescent cells upon Myc enforced expression has been described in many models. Also, the downregulation or inactivation of Myc results in the impairment of cell cycle progression. Given the frequent deregulation of Myc oncogene in human cancer it is important to dissect out the mechanisms underlying the role of Myc on cell cycle control. Several parallel mechanisms account for Myc-mediated stimulation of the cell cycle. First, most of the critical positive cell cycle regulators are encoded by genes induced by Myc. These Myc target genes include Cdks, cyclins and E2F transcription factors. Apart from its direct effects on the transcription, Myc is able to hyperactivate cyclin/Cdk complexes through the induction of Cdk activating kinase (CAK) and Cdc25 phosphatases. Moreover, Myc antagonizes the activity of cell cycle inhibitors as p21 and p27 through different mechanisms. Thus, Myc is able to block p21 transcription or to induce Skp2, a protein involved in p27 degradation. Finally, Myc induces DNA replication by binding to replication origins and by upregulating genes encoding proteins required for replication initiation. Myc also regulates genes involved in the mitotic control. A promising approach to treat tumors with deregulated Myc is the synthetic lethality based on the inhibition of Cdks. Thus, the knowledge of the Myc-dependent cell cycle regulatory mechanisms will help to discover new therapeutic approaches directed against malignancies with deregulated Myc. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Myc proteins in cell biology and pathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating retinal ganglion cell loss and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mead, Ben; Tomarev, Stanislav

    2016-10-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGC) bear the sole responsibility of propagating visual stimuli to the brain. Their axons, which make up the optic nerve, project from the retina to the brain through the lamina cribrosa and in rodents, decussate almost entirely at the optic chiasm before synapsing at the superior colliculus. For many traumatic and degenerative ocular conditions, the dysfunction and/or loss of RGC is the primary determinant of visual loss and are the measurable endpoints in current research into experimental therapies. To actually measure these endpoints in rodent models, techniques must ascertain both the quantity of surviving RGC and their functional capacity. Quantification techniques include phenotypic markers of RGC, retrogradely transported fluorophores and morphological measurements of retinal thickness whereas functional assessments include electroretinography (flash and pattern) and visual evoked potential. The importance of the accuracy and reliability of these techniques cannot be understated, nor can the relationship between RGC death and dysfunction. The existence of up to 30 types of RGC complicates the measuring process, particularly as these may respond differently to disease and treatment. Since the above techniques may selectively identify and ignore particular subpopulations, their appropriateness as measures of RGC survival and function may be further limited. This review discusses the above techniques in the context of their subtype specificity.

  13. What cycles the cell? -Robust autonomous cell cycle models.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Orit; Louzoun, Yoram

    2009-12-01

    The cell cycle is one of the best studied cellular mechanisms at the experimental and theoretical levels. Although most of the important biochemical components and reactions of the cell cycle are probably known, the precise way the cell cycle dynamics are driven is still under debate. This phenomenon is not atypical to many other biological systems where the knowledge of the molecular building blocks and the interactions between them does not lead to a coherent picture of the appropriate dynamics. We here propose a methodology to develop plausible models for the driving mechanisms of embryonic and cancerous cell cycles. We first define a key property of the system (a cyclic behaviour in the case of the embryonic cell cycle) and set mathematical constraints on the types of two variable simplified systems robustly reproducing such a cyclic behaviour. We then expand these robust systems to three variables and reiterate the procedure. At each step, we further limit the type of expanded systems to fit the known microbiology until a detailed description of the system is obtained. This methodology produces mathematical descriptions of the required biological systems that are more robust to changes in the precise function and rate constants. This methodology can be extended to practically any type of subcellular mechanism.

  14. TP53 dysfunction in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting-Xun; Young, Ken H; Xu, Wei; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The aberrations of TP53 gene and dysregulation of the TP53 pathway are important in the pathogenesis of many human cancers, including malignant lymphomas, especially for diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). By regulating many downstream target genes or molecules, TP53 governs major defenses against tumor growth and promotes cellular DNA repair, apoptosis, autophagy, cell cycle arrest, signaling, transcription, immune or inflammatory responses and metabolism. Dysfunction of TP53, including microRNA regulations, copy number alterations of TP53 pathway and TP53 itself, dysregulation of TP53 regulators, and somatic mutations by abnormal TP53 function modes, play an important role in lymphoma generation, progression and invasion. The role of TP53 in DLBCL has been widely explored recently. In this review, we summarized recent advances on different mechanisms of TP53 in DLBCL and new therapeutic approaches to overcome TP53 inactivation.

  15. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids.

  16. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  17. Autoradiography and the Cell Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, C. Weldon

    1992-01-01

    Outlines the stages of a cell biology "pulse-chase" experiment in which the students apply autoradiography techniques to learn about the concept of the cell cycle. Includes (1) seed germination and plant growth; (2) radioactive labeling and fixation of root tips; (3) feulgen staining of root tips; (4) preparation of autoradiograms; and…

  18. Autoradiography and the Cell Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, C. Weldon

    1992-01-01

    Outlines the stages of a cell biology "pulse-chase" experiment in which the students apply autoradiography techniques to learn about the concept of the cell cycle. Includes (1) seed germination and plant growth; (2) radioactive labeling and fixation of root tips; (3) feulgen staining of root tips; (4) preparation of autoradiograms; and…

  19. Paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability in cells with dysfunctional telomeres: Implication in multinucleation and chemosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong-Eun; Woo, Seon Rang; Kang, Chang-Mo; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun Ran; Park, In-chul; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kim, Hae Kwon; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Paclitaxel serves as a stimulator of chromosomal fusion in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. {yields} Typical fusions involve p-arms, but paclitaxel-induced fusions occur between both q- and p-arms. {yields} Paclitaxel-stimulated fusions in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional evoke prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest and delay multinucleation. {yields} Upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel promotes chromosomal instability and subsequent apoptosis. {yields} Chromosomal fusion enhances paclitaxel chemosensitivity under telomere dysfunction. -- Abstract: The anticancer effect of paclitaxel is attributable principally to irreversible promotion of microtubule stabilization and is hampered upon development of chemoresistance by tumor cells. Telomere shortening, and eventual telomere erosion, evoke chromosomal instability, resulting in particular cellular responses. Using telomerase-deficient cells derived from mTREC-/-p53-/- mice, here we show that, upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel propagates chromosomal instability by stimulating chromosomal end-to-end fusions and delaying the development of multinucleation. The end-to-end fusions involve both the p- and q-arms in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. Paclitaxel-induced chromosomal fusions were accompanied by prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest, delayed multinucleation, and apoptosis. Telomere dysfunctional cells with mutlinucleation eventually underwent apoptosis. Thus, as telomere erosion proceeds, paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability, and both apoptosis and chemosensitization eventually develop.

  20. Ischemia-induced endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Keep, R F; Andjelkovic, A V; Stamatovic, S M; Shakui, P; Ennis, S R

    2005-01-01

    Hemorrhagic transformation upon reperfusion therapy has focused attention on ischemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. This study examined whether hyperglycemia may induce hemorrhagic transformation by enhancing endothelial mitochondrial damage during ischemia and whether preconditioning (PC) stimuli may limit ischemia-induced endothelial damage. In vivo, rats received 2.8 M D-glucose or arabinose (1 ml/100 g; i.p.) prior to undergoing two hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion and transcardiac fixation for electron microscopy. In vitro, brain endothelial cells were exposed to a PC impulse (short-term oxygen glucose deprivation; OGD) prior to an injurious event (5 hours OGD). Endothelial injury was assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase release. Hyperglycemia during cerebral ischemia resulted in marked changes in endothelial morphology and mitochondrial swelling. Thus, in the ischemic hemisphere, there was no evidence of endothelial mitochondrial swelling in normoglycemic rats (mean profile width 0.22 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.17 +/- 0.01 microm in contralateral hemisphere) but there was marked swelling in hyperglycemic rats (0.44 +/- 0.02 microm). In vitro, cells preconditioned with one hour of OGD one day prior to 5 hours of OGD, showed reduced lactate dehydrogenase release (p < 0.05). In conclusion, hyperglycemia may have specific adverse effects on endothelial cell mitochondria during ischemia. Preventing those effects may help to ameliorate blood-brain barrier disruption on reperfusion. Insights into how to prevent endothelial injury may come from determining the mechanisms involved in endothelial preconditioning.

  1. Metabolic dysfunction following weight-cycling in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, SE; Parkinson, JRC; Henley, AB; Sahuri, M; Sanchez-Canon, GJ; Bell, JD

    2016-01-01

    Background Combatting over-weight or obesity can lead to large fluctuations in an individual’s body weight, often referred to as weight cycling or “yo-yo” dieting. Current evidence regarding the potentially damaging effects of these changes is conflicting. Methods Here, we assess the metabolic effects of weight cycling in a murine model, comprising three dietary switches to normal or high fat diets at 6 week intervals; male C57BL/6 mice were fed either a control (C) or high fat (F) diet for 6 weeks (n=140/group). C and F groups were then either maintained on their initial diet (CC and FF respectively) or switched to a high fat (CF) or control (FC) diet (n=35/group). For the final 6 week interval, CC and CF groups were returned to the control diet (CCC and CFC groups) while FC and FF groups were placed on a high fat diet (FCF and FFF) (n=28/group). Results For the majority of metabolic outcomes changes aligned with dietary switches; however assessment of neuropeptides and receptors involved in appetite regulation and reward signalling pathways reveal variable patterns of expression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that multiple cycling events leads to a significant increase in internal fat deposition, even when compared to animals maintained on a high fat diet (Internal Fat: FCF: 7.4 ± 0.2g vs. FFF: 5.6 ± 0.2g; p<0.01). Conclusions Increased internal adipose tissue is strongly linked to the development of metabolic syndrome associated conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and hypertension. While further work will be required to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the neuronal control of energy homeostasis, these studies provide a causative link between weight cycling and adverse health. PMID:27840414

  2. Cell Cycle Regulation and Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; McArthur, Grant

    2016-06-01

    Dysregulation of cell cycle control is a hallmark of melanomagenesis. Agents targeting the G1-S and G2-M checkpoints, as well as direct anti-mitotic agents, have all shown promising preclinical activity in melanoma. However, in vivo, standalone single agents targeting cell cycle regulation have only demonstrated modest efficacy in unselected patients. The advent of specific CDK 4/6 inhibitors targeting the G1-S transition, with an improved therapeutic index, is a significant step forward. Potential synergy exists with the combination of CDK4/6 inhibitors with existing therapies targeting the MAPK pathway, particularly in subsets of metastatic melanomas such as NRAS and BRAF mutants. This reviews summaries of the latest developments in both preclinical and clinical data with cell cycle-targeted therapies in melanoma.

  3. Mitochondrial dynamics during cell cycling.

    PubMed

    Horbay, Rostyslav; Bilyy, Rostyslav

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are the cell's power plant that must be in a proper functional state in order to produce the energy necessary for basic cellular functions, such as proliferation. Mitochondria are 'dynamic' in that they are constantly undergoing fission and fusion to remain in a functional state throughout the cell cycle, as well as during other vital processes such as energy supply, cellular respiration and programmed cell death. The mitochondrial fission/fusion machinery is involved in generating young mitochondria, while eliminating old, damaged and non-repairable ones. As a result, the organelles change in shape, size and number throughout the cell cycle. Such precise and accurate balance is maintained by the cytoskeletal transporting system via microtubules, which deliver the mitochondrion from one location to another. During the gap phases G1 and G2, mitochondria form an interconnected network, whereas in mitosis and S-phase fragmentation of the mitochondrial network will take place. However, such balance is lost during neoplastic transformation and autoimmune disorders. Several proteins, such as Drp1, Fis1, Kif-family proteins, Opa1, Bax and mitofusins change in activity and might link the mitochondrial fission/fusion events with processes such as alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis, necrosis, cell cycle arrest, and malignant growth. All this indicates how vital proper functioning of mitochondria is in maintaining cell integrity and preventing carcinogenesis.

  4. Metabolic Profiling in Association with Vascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction Following Non-Toxic Cadmium Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Nong, Qingjiao; Mao, Baoyu; Pan, Xue

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the metabolic profile of non-toxic cadmium (Cd)-induced dysfunctional endothelial cells using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs (n = 6 per group) were treated with 0, 1, 5, or 10 μM cadmium chloride (CdCl2) for 48 h. Cell phenotypes, including nitric oxide (NO) production, the inflammatory response, and oxidative stress, were evaluated in Cd-exposed and control HUVECs. Cd-exposed and control HUVECs were analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight/mass spectrometry. Compared to control HUVECs, Cd-exposed HUVECs were dysfunctional, exhibiting decreased NO production, a proinflammatory state, and non-significant oxidative stress. Further metabolic profiling revealed 24 significantly-altered metabolites in the dysfunctional endothelial cells. The significantly-altered metabolites were involved in the impaired tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, activated pyruvate metabolism, up-regulated glucogenic amino acid metabolism, and increased pyrimidine metabolism. The current metabolic findings further suggest that the metabolic changes linked to TCA cycle dysfunction, glycosylation of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP), and compensatory responses to genomic instability and energy deficiency may be generally associated with dysfunctional phenotypes, characterized by decreased NO production, a proinflammatory state, and non-significant oxidative stress, in endothelial cells following non-toxic Cd exposure. PMID:28872622

  5. Cell cycle regulation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heber-Katz, Ellen; Zhang, Yong; Bedelbaeva, Khamila; Song, Fengyu; Chen, Xiaoping; Stocum, David L

    2013-01-01

    Regeneration of ear punch holes in the MRL mouse and amputated limbs of the axolotl show a number of similarities. A large proportion of the fibroblasts of the uninjured MRL mouse ear are arrested in G2 of the cell cycle, and enter nerve-dependent mitosis after injury to form a ring-shaped blastema that regenerates the ear tissue. Multiple cell types contribute to the establishment of the regeneration blastema of the urodele limb by dedifferentiation, and there is substantial reason to believe that the cells of this early blastema are also arrested in G2, and enter mitosis under the influence of nerve-dependent factors supplied by the apical epidermal cap. Molecular analysis reveals other parallels, such as; (1) the upregulation of Evi5, a centrosomal protein that prevents mitosis by stabilizing Emi1, a protein that inhibits the degradation of cyclins by the anaphase promoting complex and (2) the expression of sodium channels by the epidermis. A central feature in the entry into the cell cycle by MRL ear fibroblasts is a natural downregulation of p21, and knockout of p21 in wild-type mice confers regenerative capacity on non-regenerating ear tissue. Whether the same is true for entry into the cell cycle in regenerating urodele limbs is presently unknown.

  6. [Cell cycle regulation in cancer stem cells].

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Shoichiro

    2015-05-01

    In addition to the properties of self-renewal and multipotency, cancer stem cells share the characteristics of their distinct cell cycle status with somatic stem cells. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained in a quiescent state with this characteristic conferring resistance to anticancer therapies that target dividing cells. Elucidation of the mechanisms of CSC quiescence might therefore be expected to provide further insight into CSC behaviors and lead to the elimination of cancer. This review summarizes several key regulators of the cell cycle in CSCs as well as attempts to define future challenges in this field, especially from the point of view of the application of our current understandings to the clinical medicine.

  7. Virus manipulation of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, R; Costa, H; Parkhouse, R M E

    2012-07-01

    Viruses depend on host cell resources for replication and access to those resources may be limited to a particular phase of the cell cycle. Thus manipulation of cell cycle is a commonly employed strategy of viruses for achieving a favorable cellular environment. For example, viruses capable of infecting nondividing cells induce S phase in order to activate the host DNA replication machinery and provide the nucleotide triphosphates necessary for viral DNA replication (Flemington in J Virol 75:4475-4481, 2001; Sullivan and Pipas in Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 66:179-202, 2002). Viruses have developed several strategies to subvert the cell cycle by association with cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase complexes and molecules that regulate their activity. Viruses tend to act on cellular proteins involved in a network of interactions in a way that minimal protein-protein interactions lead to a major effect. The complex and interactive nature of intracellular signaling pathways controlling cell division affords many opportunities for virus manipulation strategies. Taking the maxim "Set a thief to catch a thief" as a counter strategy, however, provides us with the very same virus evasion strategies as "ready-made tools" for the development of novel antivirus therapeutics. The most obvious are attenuated virus vaccines with critical evasion genes deleted. Similarly, vaccines against viruses causing cancer are now being successfully developed. Finally, as viruses have been playing chess with our cell biology and immune responses for millions of years, the study of their evasion strategies will also undoubtedly reveal new control mechanisms and their corresponding cellular intracellular signaling pathways.

  8. Epithelia: Understanding the Cell Biology of Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Daniel J-K; Jasper, Heinrich

    2017-03-06

    Barrier dysfunction in the intestine is a common characteristic of aging organisms. A recent study provides new insight into the cell biology of this phenomenon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. N-acetyl cysteine protects human oral keratinocytes from Bis-GMA-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by inhibiting reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and the PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Gu, Ying-xin; Mo, Jia-ji; Shi, Jun-yu; Qiao, Shi-chong; Lai, Hong-chang

    2015-12-01

    Bisphenol-A-glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA) released from dental resin materials causes various toxic effects on gingival epithelium. Thus the underlying mechanisms of its cytotoxicity should be elucidated for safety use. One potential cause of cell damage is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) beyond the capacity of a balanced redox regulation. In this study, we found that exposure of human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) to Bis-GMA caused apoptosis and G1/S cell cycle arrest in parallel with an increased ROS level. Moreover, Bis-GMA induced a depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential, an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, an activation of caspase-3 and altered expressions of cell cycle-related proteins (p21, PCNA, cyclinD1). Furthermore, the co-treatment of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) obviously attenuated Bis-GMA-induced toxicity. Here we also evaluated the effects of Bis-GMA on the ROS-related PI3k/Akt pathway. We found that Bis-GMA inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, whereas the amount of phosphorylated Akt was reverted to the control level in the presence of NAC. Our findings suggested that the toxic effects of Bis-GMA were related to ROS production and the antioxidant NAC effectively reduced Bis-GMA-mediated cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Progress in researches on stem cell therapy for erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan-bin; Gou, Xin

    2009-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) commonly results from endothelial dysfunction and erectile nerve damage. Recent researches have focused on the preclinical studies of stem cell-based therapies targeted at repairing penile endothelium and protecting erectile nerves. Early studies showed that stem cell- or gene-modified stem cell-based therapies may have enduring efficacy and eventually lead to a cure for ED. Such stem cells as embryonic, mesenchymal, muscle-derived and adipose-derived ones and endothelial progenitor cells all have differentiation potentials and obvious advantages in protecting and repairing both nervi erigentes and corpus cavernosum vascular endothelial cells. Stem cell-based therapies promise to be an effective approach to human erectile dysfunction.

  11. Endothelial Cell Dysfunction and the Pathobiology of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gimbrone, Michael A.; García-Cardeña, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of the endothelial lining of lesion-prone areas of the arterial vasculature is an important contributor to the pathobiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD), in its broadest sense, encompasses a constellation of various non-adaptive alterations in functional phenotype, which have important implications for the regulation of hemostasis and thrombosis, local vascular tone and redox balance, and the orchestration of acute and chronic inflammatory reactions within the arterial wall. In this review, we trace the evolution of the concept of endothelial cell dysfunction, focusing on recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie its pivotal roles in atherosclerotic lesion initiation and progression; explore its relationship to classic, as well as more recently defined, clinical risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease; consider current approaches to the clinical assessment of endothelial cell dysfunction; and outline some promising new directions for its early detection and treatment. PMID:26892962

  12. Sulfated lentinan induced mitochondrial dysfunction leads to programmed cell death of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Yaofeng; Shen, Lili; Qian, Yumei; Yang, Jinguang; Wang, Fenglong

    2017-04-01

    Sulphated lentinan (sLTN) is known to act as a resistance inducer by causing programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is largely unknown. Using tobacco BY-2 cell model, morphological and biochemical studies revealed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to sLNT induced PCD. Cell viability, and HO/PI fluorescence imaging and TUNEL assays confirmed a typical cell death process caused by sLNT. Acetylsalicylic acid (an ROS scavenger), diphenylene iodonium (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases) and protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (a protonophore and an uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation) inhibited sLNT-induced H2O2 generation and cell death, suggesting that ROS generation linked, at least partly, to a mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-like activation. This conclusion was further confirmed by double-stained cells with the mitochondria-specific marker MitoTracker RedCMXRos and the ROS probe H2DCFDA. Moreover, the sLNT-induced PCD of BY-2 cells required cellular metabolism as up-regulation of the AOX family gene transcripts and induction of the SA biosynthesis, the TCA cycle, and miETC related genes were observed. It is concluded that mitochondria play an essential role in the signaling pathway of sLNT-induced ROS generation, which possibly provided new insight into the sLNT-mediated antiviral response, including PCD.

  13. Cell cycle regulation by protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Deanna M

    2014-01-01

    Cell division is controlled by a highly regulated program to accurately duplicate and segregate chromosomes. An important feature of the cell cycle regulatory program is that key cell cycle proteins are present and active during specific cell cycle stages but are later removed or inhibited to maintain appropriate timing. The ubiquitin-proteasome system has emerged as an important mechanism to target cell cycle proteins for degradation at critical junctures during cell division. Two key E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes that target key cell cycle proteins are the Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein complex and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. This chapter focuses on the role of these E3 ubiquitin ligases and how ubiquitin-dependent degradation of central cell cycle regulatory proteins advances the cell cycle.

  14. ATM Inhibition Potentiates Death of Androgen Receptor-inactivated Prostate Cancer Cells with Telomere Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vidyavathi; Wu, Min; Ciavattone, Nicholas; McKenty, Nathan; Menon, Mani; Barrack, Evelyn R.; Reddy, G. Prem-Veer; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a role in maintaining telomere stability in prostate cancer cells, as AR inactivation induces telomere dysfunction within 3 h. Since telomere dysfunction in other systems is known to activate ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathways, we investigated the role of ATM-mediated DDR signaling in AR-inactivated prostate cancer cells. Indeed, the induction of telomere dysfunction in cells treated with AR-antagonists (Casodex or MDV3100) or AR-siRNA was associated with a dramatic increase in phosphorylation (activation) of ATM and its downstream effector Chk2 and the presenceof phosphorylated ATM at telomeres, indicating activation of DDR signaling at telomeres. Moreover, Casodex washout led to the reversal of telomere dysfunction, indicating repair of damaged telomeres. ATM inhibitor blocked ATM phosphorylation, induced PARP cleavage, abrogated cell cycle checkpoint activation and attenuated the formation of γH2AX foci at telomeres in AR-inactivated cells, suggesting that ATM inhibitor induces apoptosis in AR-inactivated cells by blocking the repair of damaged DNA at telomeres. Finally, colony formation assay revealed a dramatic decrease in the survival of cells co-treated with Casodex and ATM inhibitor as compared with those treated with either Casodex or ATM inhibitor alone. These observations indicate that inhibitors of DDR signaling pathways may offer a unique opportunity to enhance the potency of AR-targeted therapies for the treatment of androgen-sensitive as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:26336104

  15. Reversing T-cell Dysfunction and Exhaustion in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zarour, Hassane M.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of chronic antigen exposure in chronic viral infections and cancer, T cells become exhausted/dysfunctional. These exhausted T cells exhibit defective proliferative capacities and cytokine production, but are not totally inert and may exert lytic functions. Importantly, exhausted T cells upregulate multiple inhibitory receptors (IRs)/immune checkpoints that bind to their ligands expressed by tumor cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Immune checkpoint blockades with anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and/or anti- programmed death 1 (PD-1) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) successfully reinvigorate tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TILs) and provide persistent clinical benefits to a large number of patients with advanced cancer. This great and long-awaited success for the immunotherapy of cancer has infused considerable enthusiasm in the field of oncology and fostered the development of combinatorial strategies to target the multiple mechanisms of tumor-induced T cell dysfunction. Here, we propose to review the critical immunoregulatory mechanisms driving T cell exhaustion in the TME. We will also discuss the development of promising combinatorial immunotherapies to counteract the mechanisms of tumor-induced T cell dysfunction to improve the clinical efficacy of current immune checkpoint blockades. As our understanding of the mechanisms supporting tumor-induced T cell dysfunction improves based upon preclinical and clinical studies, we expect that novel combinatorial immunotherapies will emerge to improve the clinical outcome of patients with advanced cancers. PMID:27084739

  16. Cell cycle regulation during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Sumedha; Bouchard, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    To replicate their genomes in cells and generate new progeny, viruses typically require factors provided by the cells that they have infected. Subversion of the cellular machinery that controls replication of the infected host cell is a common activity of many viruses. Viruses employ different strategies to deregulate cell cycle checkpoint controls and modulate cell proliferation pathways. A number of DNA and RNA viruses encode proteins that target critical cell cycle regulators to achieve cellular conditions that are beneficial for viral replication. Many DNA viruses induce quiescent cells to enter the cell cycle; this is thought to increase pools of deoxynucleotides and thus, facilitate viral replication. In contrast, some viruses can arrest cells in a particular phase of the cell cycle that is favorable for replication of the specific virus. Cell cycle arrest may inhibit early cell death of infected cells, allow the cells to evade immune defenses, or help promote virus assembly. Although beneficial for the viral life cycle, virus-mediated alterations in normal cell cycle control mechanisms could have detrimental effects on cellular physiology and may ultimately contribute to pathologies associated with the viral infection, including cell transformation and cancer progression and maintenance. In this chapter, we summarize various strategies employed by DNA and RNA viruses to modulate the replication cycle of the virus-infected cell. When known, we describe how these virus-associated effects influence replication of the virus and contribute to diseases associated with infection by that specific virus.

  17. "Constructing" the Cell Cycle in 3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Isil; Turan, Merve

    2012-01-01

    The cycle of duplication and division, known as the "cell cycle," is the essential mechanism by which all living organisms reproduce. This activity allows students to develop an understanding of the main events that occur during the typical eukaryotic cell cycle mostly in the process of mitotic phase that divides the duplicated genetic material…

  18. "Constructing" the Cell Cycle in 3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Isil; Turan, Merve

    2012-01-01

    The cycle of duplication and division, known as the "cell cycle," is the essential mechanism by which all living organisms reproduce. This activity allows students to develop an understanding of the main events that occur during the typical eukaryotic cell cycle mostly in the process of mitotic phase that divides the duplicated genetic material…

  19. Advances in bone marrow stem cell therapy for retinal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Park, Susanna S; Moisseiev, Elad; Bauer, Gerhard; Anderson, Johnathon D; Grant, Maria B; Zam, Azhar; Zawadzki, Robert J; Werner, John S; Nolta, Jan A

    2017-01-01

    The most common cause of untreatable vision loss is dysfunction of the retina. Conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma remain leading causes of untreatable blindness worldwide. Various stem cell approaches are being explored for treatment of retinal regeneration. The rationale for using bone marrow stem cells to treat retinal dysfunction is based on preclinical evidence showing that bone marrow stem cells can rescue degenerating and ischemic retina. These stem cells have primarily paracrine trophic effects although some cells can directly incorporate into damaged tissue. Since the paracrine trophic effects can have regenerative effects on multiple cells in the retina, the use of this cell therapy is not limited to a particular retinal condition. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells are being explored in early clinical trials as therapy for various retinal conditions. These bone marrow stem cells include mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear cells and CD34(+) cells. Autologous therapy requires no systemic immunosuppression or donor matching. Intravitreal delivery of CD34(+) cells and mononuclear cells appears to be tolerated and is being explored since some of these cells can home into the damaged retina after intravitreal administration. The safety of intravitreal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has not been well established. This review provides an update of the current evidence in support of the use of bone marrow stem cells as treatment for retinal dysfunction. The potential limitations and complications of using certain forms of bone marrow stem cells as therapy are discussed. Future directions of research include methods to optimize the therapeutic potential of these stem cells, non-cellular alternatives using extracellular vesicles, and in vivo high-resolution retinal imaging to detect cellular changes in the retina following cell therapy.

  20. Stem cell therapy for voiding and erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Vaegler, Martin; Lenis, Andrew T; Daum, Lisa; Renninger, M; Bastian, Amend; Stenzl, Arnulf; Damaser, Margot S; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Voiding dysfunction comprises a variety of disorders, including stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder, and affects millions of men and women worldwide. Erectile dysfunction (ED) also decreases quality of life for millions of men, as well as for their partners. Advanced age and diabetes are common comorbidities that can exacerbate and negatively impact upon the development of these disorders. Therapies that target the pathophysiology of these conditions to halt progression are not currently available. However, stem cell therapy could fill this therapeutic void. Stem cells can reduce inflammation, prevent fibrosis, promote angiogenesis, recruit endogenous progenitor cells, and differentiate to replace damaged cells. Adult multipotent stem cell therapy, in particular, has shown promise in case reports and preclinical animal studies. Stem cells have also enabled advances in urological tissue engineering by facilitating ex vivo construction of bladder wall and urethral tissue (using a patient's own cells) prior to transplantation. More recent studies have focused on bioactive factor secretion and homing of stem cells. In the future, clinicians are likely to utilize allogeneic stem cell sources, intravenous systemic delivery, and ex vivo cell enhancement to treat voiding dysfunction and ED. PMID:22710667

  1. Progenitor Cell Dysfunctions Underlie Some Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Melanie; Wong, Victor W.; Rennert, Robert C.; Davis, Christopher R.; Longaker, Michael T.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells and progenitor cells are integral to tissue homeostasis and repair. They contribute to health through their ability to self-renew and commit to specialized effector cells. Recently, defects in a variety of progenitor cell populations have been described in both preclinical and human diabetes. These deficits affect multiple aspects of stem cell biology, including quiescence, renewal, and differentiation, as well as homing, cytokine production, and neovascularization, through mechanisms that are still unclear. More important, stem cell aberrations resulting from diabetes have direct implications on tissue function and seem to persist even after return to normoglycemia. Understanding how diabetes alters stem cell signaling and homeostasis is critical for understanding the complex pathophysiology of many diabetic complications. Moreover, the success of cell-based therapies will depend on a more comprehensive understanding of these deficiencies. This review has three goals: to analyze stem cell pathways dysregulated during diabetes, to highlight the effects of hyperglycemic memory on stem cells, and to define ways of using stem cell therapy to overcome diabetic complications. PMID:26079815

  2. Cytofluorometric assessment of cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Ilio; Jemaà, Mohamed; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Metivier, Didier; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of cellular senescence, a stress response that prevents the propagation of cells that have accumulated potentially oncogenic alterations, is a permanent loss of proliferative potential. Thus, at odds with quiescent cells, which resume proliferation when stimulated to do so, senescent cells cannot proceed through the cell cycle even in the presence of mitogenic factors. Here, we describe a set of cytofluorometric techniques for studying how chemical and/or physical stimuli alter the cell cycle in vitro, in both qualitative and quantitative terms. Taken together, these methods allow for the identification of bona fide cytostatic effects as well as for a refined characterization of cell cycle distributions, providing information on proliferation, DNA content as well as on the presence of cell cycle phase-specific markers. At the end of the chapter, a set of guidelines is offered to assist researchers that approach the study of the cell cycle with the interpretation of results.

  3. High Glucose Causes Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Dysfunction by Promoting Mitochondrial Fission: Role of a GLUT1 Blocker.

    PubMed

    Choi, He Yun; Park, Ji Hye; Jang, Woong Bi; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Da Yeon; Kang, Songhwa; Kim, Yeon Ju; Yun, Jisoo; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia is the primary characteristic of diabetes and is associated with many complications. The role of hyperglycemia in the dysfunction of human cardiac progenitor cells that can regenerate damaged cardiac tissue has been investigated, but the exact mechanism underlying this association is not clear. Thus, we examined whether hyperglycemia could regulate mitochondrial dynamics and lead to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction, and whether blocking glucose uptake could rescue this dysfunction. High glucose in cardiac progenitor cells results in reduced cell viability and decreased expression of cell cycle-related molecules, including CDK2 and cyclin E. A tube formation assay revealed that hyperglycemia led to a significant decrease in the tube-forming ability of cardiac progenitor cells. Fluorescent labeling of cardiac progenitor cell mitochondria revealed that hyperglycemia alters mitochondrial dynamics and increases expression of fission-related proteins, including Fis1 and Drp1. Moreover, we showed that specific blockage of GLUT1 improved cell viability, tube formation, and regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac progenitor cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that high glucose leads to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction through an increase in mitochondrial fission, and that a GLUT1 blocker can rescue cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction and downregulation of mitochondrial fission. Combined therapy with cardiac progenitor cells and a GLUT1 blocker may provide a novel strategy for cardiac progenitor cell therapy in cardiovascular disease patients with diabetes.

  4. Cell division cycle 45 promotes papillary thyroid cancer progression via regulating cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Shi, Run; Zhao, Sha; Li, Xiaona; Lu, Shan; Bu, Hemei; Ma, Xianghua

    2017-05-01

    Cell division cycle 45 was reported to be overexpressed in some cancer-derived cell lines and was predicted to be a candidate oncogene in cervical cancer. However, the clinical and biological significance of cell division cycle 45 in papillary thyroid cancer has never been investigated. We determined the expression level and clinical significance of cell division cycle 45 using The Cancer Genome Atlas, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. A great upregulation of cell division cycle 45 was observed in papillary thyroid cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, overexpression of cell division cycle 45 positively correlates with more advanced clinical characteristics. Silence of cell division cycle 45 suppressed proliferation of papillary thyroid cancer cells via G1-phase arrest and inducing apoptosis. The oncogenic activity of cell division cycle 45 was also confirmed in vivo. In conclusion, cell division cycle 45 may serve as a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for papillary thyroid cancer.

  5. Model Organisms for Studying the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of the cell-division cycle is fundamental for the growth, development, and reproduction of all species of life. In the past several decades, a conserved theme of cell cycle regulation has emerged from research in diverse model organisms. A comparison of distinct features of several diverse model organisms commonly used in cell cycle studies highlights their suitability for various experimental approaches, and recaptures their contributions to our current understanding of the eukaryotic cell cycle. A historic perspective presents a recollection of the breakthrough upon unfolding the universal principles of cell cycle control by scientists working with diverse model organisms, thereby appreciating the discovery pathways in this field. A comprehensive understanding is necessary to address current challenging questions about cell cycle control. Advances in genomics, proteomics, quantitative methodologies, and approaches of systems biology are redefining the traditional concept of what constitutes a model organism and have established a new era for development of novel, and refinement of the established model organisms. Researchers working in the field are no longer separated by their favorite model organisms; they have become more integrated into a larger community for gaining greater insights into how a cell divides and cycles. The new technologies provide a broad evolutionary spectrum of the cell-division cycle and allow informative comparisons among different species at a level that has never been possible, exerting unimaginable impact on our comprehensive understanding of cell cycle regulation.

  6. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  7. Gene copy number and cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bose, Indrani

    2006-03-01

    The cell cycle is an orderly sequence of events which ultimately lead to the division of a single cell into two daughter cells. In the case of DNA damage by radiation or chemicals, the damage checkpoints in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle are activated. This results in an arrest of the cell cycle so that the DNA damage can be repaired. Once this is done, the cell continues with its usual cycle of activity. We study a mathematical model of the DNA damage checkpoint in the G2 phase which arrests the transition from the G2 to the M (mitotic) phase of the cell cycle. The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in activating the pathways leading to cell cycle arrest in mammalian systems. If the DNA damage is severe, the p53 proteins activate other pathways which bring about apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Loss of the p53 gene results in the proliferation of cells containing damaged DNA, i.e., in the growth of tumors which may ultimately become cancerous. There is some recent experimental evidence which suggests that the mutation of a single copy of the p53 gene (in the normal cell each gene has two identical copies) is sufficient to trigger the formation of tumors. We study the effect of reducing the gene copy number of the p53 and two other genes on cell cycle arrest and obtain results consistent with experimental observations.

  8. Epigenetic Dysfunction in Turner Syndrome Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Bradly J; Hong, Lee Kyung; Whitmire, Jason K; Su, Maureen A

    2016-05-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal condition associated with partial or complete absence of the X chromosome that involves characteristic findings in multiple organ systems. In addition to well-known clinical characteristics such as short stature and gonadal failure, TS is also associated with T cell immune alterations and chronic otitis media, suggestive of a possible immune deficiency. Recently, ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat on the X chromosome (UTX), a histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase, has been identified as a downregulated gene in TS immune cells. Importantly, UTX is an X-linked gene that escapes X-chromosome inactivation and thus is haploinsufficient in TS. Mice with T cell-specific UTX deficiency have impaired clearance of chronic viral infection due to decreased frequencies of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, which are critical for B cell antibody generation. In parallel, TS patients have decreased Tfh frequencies in peripheral blood. Together, these findings suggest that haploinsufficiency of the X-linked UTX gene in TS T cells underlies an immune deficit, which may manifest as increased predisposition to chronic otitis media.

  9. Intradialytic hypertension and its association with endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Inrig, Jula K; Van Buren, Peter; Kim, Catherine; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Povsic, Thomas J; Toto, Robert D

    2011-08-01

    Intradialytic hypertension is associated with adverse outcomes, yet the mechanism is uncertain. Patients with intradialytic hypertension exhibit imbalances in endothelial-derived vasoregulators nitric oxide and endothelin-1, indirectly suggesting endothelial cell dysfunction. We hypothesized that intradialytic hypertension is associated in vivo with endothelial cell dysfunction, a novel predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. We performed a case-control cohort study including 25 hemodialysis (HD) subjects without (controls) and 25 with intradialytic hypertension (an increase in systolic BP pre- to postdialysis ≥10 mmHg ≥4/6 consecutive HD sessions). The primary outcome was peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) assessed by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH(br)) and cell surface marker expression (CD34(+)CD133(+)). We also assessed endothelial function by ultrasonographic measurement of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) normalized for shear stress. Parametric and nonparametric t tests were used to compare EPCs, FMD, and BP. Baseline characteristics and comorbidities were similar between groups. Compared with controls, 2-week average predialysis systolic BP was lower among subjects with intradialytic hypertension (144.0 versus 155.5 mmHg), but postdialysis systolic BP was significantly higher (159.0 versus 128.1 mmHg). Endothelial cell function was impaired among subjects with intradialytic hypertension as measured by decreased median ALDH(br) cells and decreased CD34(+)CD133(+) cells (ALDH(br), 0.034% versus 0.053%; CD34(+)CD133(+), 0.033% versus 0.059%). FMD was lower among subjects with intradialytic hypertension (1.03% versus 1.67%). Intradialytic hypertension is associated with endothelial cell dysfunction. We propose that endothelial cell dysfunction may partially explain the higher event rates observed in these patients.

  10. [Advance of neurogenic erectile dysfunction therapy by stem cells].

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Jian; Zhu, Guang-You

    2010-06-01

    Neurogenic erectile dysfunction (NED) commonly results from erectile nerve damage. Recent researches have focused on the preclinical study of stem cell-based therapies targeted at repairing and protecting nervi erigentes. In this paper, researches of NESCs, MDSCs, ASCs and MSCs in NED are reviewed. Early studies have demonstrated that stem cells and gene modified stem cells were effective to the therapy of ED, even likely to cure ED. Stem cells are expected to be applied in the clinical therapy of NED. Stem cells as a new therapy technique will bring up a new challenge in forensic clinical medicine.

  11. Crosstalk between stem cell and cell cycle machineries.

    PubMed

    Kareta, Michael S; Sage, Julien; Wernig, Marius

    2015-12-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, defined by an unlimited self-renewal capacity and an undifferentiated state, are best typified by embryonic stem cells. These cells have a unique cell cycle compared to somatic cells as defined by a rapid progression through the cell cycle and a minimal time spent in G1. Recent reports indicate that pluripotency and cell cycle regulation are mechanistically linked. In this review, we discuss the reciprocal co-regulation of these processes, how this co-regulation may prevent differentiation, and how cellular reprogramming can re-establish the unique cell cycle regulation in induced pluripotent stem cells. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Stem Cells in Male Sexual Dysfunction: Are We Getting Somewhere?

    PubMed

    Soebadi, Mohammad Ayodhia; Milenkovic, Uros; Weyne, Emmanuel; Castiglione, Fabio; Albersen, Maarten

    2017-04-01

    Stem cells for sexual disorders are steadily being introduced into clinical trials. Two conditions of importance are the main target for this line of treatment, especially when regarding the wide array of translational and basic science highlighting the potential advantages of regenerative therapy: erectile dysfunction (ED) and more recently Peyronie disease (PD). Cellular therapy offers a treatment modality that might reverse disease progression. It would be used in a curative setting, in contrast to other pharmaceutical agents that are currently available. To review basic preclinical studies and recent clinical trials of stem cells on ED and PD. A search of the medical literature for the following terms was performed using PubMed: stem cells, cellular therapy, erectile dysfunction, Peyronie's disease, and clinical trial. A non-systematic narrative review and critical reflection on preclinical and clinical studies administering stem cells for ED and PD in animal models and human subjects. Numerous studies have confirmed the beneficial functional effects of stem cell injection in established animal models on ED and PD. Various stem cell types have been adopted, from embryonic to adult mesenchymal cell types. Each cell type offers distinctive advantages and disadvantages. Diverse administrations of stem cells were investigated, with insignificant variability in the ultimate results. Stem cells appear to have a pronounced paracrine effect, rather than the classic engraftment and differentiation hypothesis. Phase 1 clinical trials using stem cells have not reported any severe adverse events in animals. However, these results cannot be extrapolated to draw any conclusions about efficacy in human patients. Stem cells have an established efficacy in preclinical studies and early clinical trials. Studies are currently being published demonstrating the safety of intrapenile injection of autologous bone marrow- and adipose tissue-derived stem cells. Soebadi MA, Milenkovic U

  13. Cell cycle control and seed development

    PubMed Central

    Dante, Ricardo A.; Larkins, Brian A.; Sabelli, Paolo A.

    2014-01-01

    Seed development is a complex process that requires coordinated integration of many genetic, metabolic, and physiological pathways and environmental cues. Different cell cycle types, such as asymmetric cell division, acytokinetic mitosis, mitotic cell division, and endoreduplication, frequently occur in sequential yet overlapping manner during the development of the embryo and the endosperm, seed structures that are both products of double fertilization. Asymmetric cell divisions in the embryo generate polarized daughter cells with different cell fates. While nuclear and cell division cycles play a key role in determining final seed cell numbers, endoreduplication is often associated with processes such as cell enlargement and accumulation of storage metabolites that underlie cell differentiation and growth of the different seed compartments. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of different cell cycle mechanisms operating during seed development and their impact on the growth, development, and function of seed tissues. Particularly, the roles of core cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent-kinases and their inhibitors, the Retinoblastoma-Related/E2F pathway and the proteasome-ubiquitin system, are discussed in the contexts of different cell cycle types that characterize seed development. The contributions of nuclear and cellular proliferative cycles and endoreduplication to cereal endosperm development are also discussed. PMID:25295050

  14. Cell cycle control and seed development.

    PubMed

    Dante, Ricardo A; Larkins, Brian A; Sabelli, Paolo A

    2014-01-01

    Seed development is a complex process that requires coordinated integration of many genetic, metabolic, and physiological pathways and environmental cues. Different cell cycle types, such as asymmetric cell division, acytokinetic mitosis, mitotic cell division, and endoreduplication, frequently occur in sequential yet overlapping manner during the development of the embryo and the endosperm, seed structures that are both products of double fertilization. Asymmetric cell divisions in the embryo generate polarized daughter cells with different cell fates. While nuclear and cell division cycles play a key role in determining final seed cell numbers, endoreduplication is often associated with processes such as cell enlargement and accumulation of storage metabolites that underlie cell differentiation and growth of the different seed compartments. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of different cell cycle mechanisms operating during seed development and their impact on the growth, development, and function of seed tissues. Particularly, the roles of core cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent-kinases and their inhibitors, the Retinoblastoma-Related/E2F pathway and the proteasome-ubiquitin system, are discussed in the contexts of different cell cycle types that characterize seed development. The contributions of nuclear and cellular proliferative cycles and endoreduplication to cereal endosperm development are also discussed.

  15. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  16. The peri-cell-cycle in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Beeckman, T; Burssens, S; Inzé, D

    2001-03-01

    The root systems of plants proliferate via de novo formed meristems originating from differentiated pericycle cells. The identity of putative signals responsible for triggering some of the pericycle cells to re-enter the cell cycle remains unknown. Here, the cell cycle regulation in the pericycle of seedling roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) HEYNH: is studied shortly after germination using various strategies. Based on the detailed analysis of the promoter-beta-glucuronidase activity of four key cell cycle regulatory genes, combined with cell length measurements, microdensitometry of DNA content, and experiments with a cell cycle-blocking agent, a model is proposed for cell cycle regulation in the pericycle at the onset of lateral root initiation. The results clearly show that before the first lateral root is initiated, the pericycle consists of dissimilar cell files in respect of their cell division history. Depending on the distance behind the root tip and on position in relation to the vascular tissue, particular pericycle cells remain in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle and are apparently more susceptible to lateral root initiation than others.

  17. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  18. Stretched cell cycle model for proliferating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Mark R.; Kan, Andrey; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Marchingo, Julia M.; Wellard, Cameron J.; Markham, John F.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic variation in cell cycle time is a consistent feature of otherwise similar cells within a growing population. Classic studies concluded that the bulk of the variation occurs in the G1 phase, and many mathematical models assume a constant time for traversing the S/G2/M phases. By direct observation of transgenic fluorescent fusion proteins that report the onset of S phase, we establish that dividing B and T lymphocytes spend a near-fixed proportion of total division time in S/G2/M phases, and this proportion is correlated between sibling cells. This result is inconsistent with models that assume independent times for consecutive phases. Instead, we propose a stretching model for dividing lymphocytes where all parts of the cell cycle are proportional to total division time. Data fitting based on a stretched cell cycle model can significantly improve estimates of cell cycle parameters drawn from DNA labeling data used to monitor immune cell dynamics. PMID:24733943

  19. Dysbiosis--a consequence of Paneth cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Nita H; Bevins, Charles L

    2013-11-30

    The complex community of colonizing microbes inhabiting the mucosal surfaces of mammals is vital to homeostasis and normal physiology in the host. When the composition of this microbiota is unfavorably altered, termed dysbiosis, the host is rendered more susceptible to a variety of chronic diseases. In the mammalian small intestine, specialized secretory epithelial cells, named Paneth cells, produce a variety of secreted antimicrobial peptides that fundamentally influence the composition of the microbiota. Recent investigations have identified numerous genetic and environmental factors that can disrupt normal Paneth cell function, resulting in compromised antimicrobial peptide secretion and consequent dysbiosis. These findings suggest that Paneth cell dysfunction should be considered a common cause of dysbiosis.

  20. Platycodin D induced apoptosis and autophagy in PC-12 cells through mitochondrial dysfunction pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chuan-Chuan; Zhang, Cheng; Yao, Jun-Hua; Lai, Shang-Hai; Han, Bing-Jie; Li, Wei; Tang, Bing; Wan, Dan; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the in vitro cytotoxicity of platycodin D was evaluated in human PC-12, SGC-7901, BEL-7402, HeLa and A549 cancer cell lines. PC-12 cells were sensitive to platycodin D treatment, with an IC50 value of 13.5 ± 1.2 μM. Morphological and comet assays showed that platycodin D effectively induced apoptosis in PC-12 cells. Platycodin D increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Platycodin D induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in the PC-12 cell line. Platycodin D can induce autophagy. In addition, platycodin D can down-regulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x, and up-regulate the levels of Bid protein in the PC-12 cells. The results demonstrated that platycodin D induced PC-12 cell apoptosis through a ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

  1. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  2. Lactobacillus Decelerates Cervical Epithelial Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Vielfort, Katarina; Weyler, Linda; Söderholm, Niklas; Engelbrecht, Mattias; Löfmark, Sonja; Aro, Helena

    2013-01-01

    We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells. PMID:23675492

  3. Interorgan Crosstalk Contributing to β-Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Amo-Shiinoki, Kikuko; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) results from pancreatic β-cell failure in the setting of insulin resistance. In the early stages of this disease, pancreatic β-cells meet increased insulin demand by both enhancing insulin-secretory capacity and increasing β-cell mass. As the disease progresses, β-cells fail to maintain these compensatory responses. This involves both extrinsic signals and mediators intrinsic to β-cells, which adversely affect β-cells by impairing insulin secretion, decreasing proliferative capacities, and ultimately causing apoptosis. In recent years, it has increasingly been recognized that changes in circulating levels of various factors from other organs play roles in β-cell dysfunction and cellular loss. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of interorgan communications underlying β-cell failure during the progression of T2DM. PMID:28168202

  4. Nucleosome architecture throughout the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Özgen; Flores, Oscar; Aldea, Martí; Soler-López, Montserrat; Orozco, Modesto

    2016-01-28

    Nucleosomes provide additional regulatory mechanisms to transcription and DNA replication by mediating the access of proteins to DNA. During the cell cycle chromatin undergoes several conformational changes, however the functional significance of these changes to cellular processes are largely unexplored. Here, we present the first comprehensive genome-wide study of nucleosome plasticity at single base-pair resolution along the cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We determined nucleosome organization with a specific focus on two regulatory regions: transcription start sites (TSSs) and replication origins (ORIs). During the cell cycle, nucleosomes around TSSs display rearrangements in a cyclic manner. In contrast to gap (G1 and G2) phases, nucleosomes have a fuzzier organization during S and M phases, Moreover, the choreography of nucleosome rearrangements correlate with changes in gene expression during the cell cycle, indicating a strong association between nucleosomes and cell cycle-dependent gene functionality. On the other hand, nucleosomes are more dynamic around ORIs along the cell cycle, albeit with tighter regulation in early firing origins, implying the functional role of nucleosomes on replication origins. Our study provides a dynamic picture of nucleosome organization throughout the cell cycle and highlights the subsequent impact on transcription and replication activity.

  5. Nucleosome architecture throughout the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Deniz, Özgen; Flores, Oscar; Aldea, Martí; Soler-López, Montserrat; Orozco, Modesto

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes provide additional regulatory mechanisms to transcription and DNA replication by mediating the access of proteins to DNA. During the cell cycle chromatin undergoes several conformational changes, however the functional significance of these changes to cellular processes are largely unexplored. Here, we present the first comprehensive genome-wide study of nucleosome plasticity at single base-pair resolution along the cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We determined nucleosome organization with a specific focus on two regulatory regions: transcription start sites (TSSs) and replication origins (ORIs). During the cell cycle, nucleosomes around TSSs display rearrangements in a cyclic manner. In contrast to gap (G1 and G2) phases, nucleosomes have a fuzzier organization during S and M phases, Moreover, the choreography of nucleosome rearrangements correlate with changes in gene expression during the cell cycle, indicating a strong association between nucleosomes and cell cycle-dependent gene functionality. On the other hand, nucleosomes are more dynamic around ORIs along the cell cycle, albeit with tighter regulation in early firing origins, implying the functional role of nucleosomes on replication origins. Our study provides a dynamic picture of nucleosome organization throughout the cell cycle and highlights the subsequent impact on transcription and replication activity. PMID:26818620

  6. ATM Inhibition Potentiates Death of Androgen Receptor-inactivated Prostate Cancer Cells with Telomere Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vidyavathi; Wu, Min; Ciavattone, Nicholas; McKenty, Nathan; Menon, Mani; Barrack, Evelyn R; Reddy, G Prem-Veer; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2015-10-16

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a role in maintaining telomere stability in prostate cancer cells, as AR inactivation induces telomere dysfunction within 3 h. Since telomere dysfunction in other systems is known to activate ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathways, we investigated the role of ATM-mediated DDR signaling in AR-inactivated prostate cancer cells. Indeed, the induction of telomere dysfunction in cells treated with AR-antagonists (Casodex or MDV3100) or AR-siRNA was associated with a dramatic increase in phosphorylation (activation) of ATM and its downstream effector Chk2 and the presenceof phosphorylated ATM at telomeres, indicating activation of DDR signaling at telomeres. Moreover, Casodex washout led to the reversal of telomere dysfunction, indicating repair of damaged telomeres. ATM inhibitor blocked ATM phosphorylation, induced PARP cleavage, abrogated cell cycle checkpoint activation and attenuated the formation of γH2AX foci at telomeres in AR-inactivated cells, suggesting that ATM inhibitor induces apoptosis in AR-inactivated cells by blocking the repair of damaged DNA at telomeres. Finally, colony formation assay revealed a dramatic decrease in the survival of cells co-treated with Casodex and ATM inhibitor as compared with those treated with either Casodex or ATM inhibitor alone. These observations indicate that inhibitors of DDR signaling pathways may offer a unique opportunity to enhance the potency of AR-targeted therapies for the treatment of androgen-sensitive as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Stem cells: novel players in the treatment of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyang; Albersen, Maarten; Jin, Xunbo; Lin, Guiting

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by their capacity for both self-renewal and directed differentiation; thus, they represent great promise for regenerative medicine. Historically, stem cells have been categorized as either embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or adult stem cells (ASCs). It was previously believed that only ESCs hold the ability to differentiate into any cell type, whereas ASCs have the capacity to give rise only to cells of a given germ layer. More recently, however, numerous studies demonstrated the ability of ASCs to differentiate into cell types beyond their tissue origin. The aim of this review was to summarize contemporary evidence regarding stem cell availability, differentiation, and more specifically, the potential of these cells in the diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) in both animal models and human research. We performed a search on PubMed for articles related to definition, localisation and circulation of stem cells as well as the application of stem cells in both diagnosis and treatment of ED. Strong evidence supports the concept that stem cell therapy is potentially the next therapeutic approach for ED. To date, a large spectrum of stem cells, including bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose tissue-derived stem cells and muscle-derived stem cells, have been investigated for neural, vascular, endothelial or smooth muscle regeneration in animal models for ED. In addition, several subtypes of ASCs are localized in the penis, and circulating endogenous stem cells can be employed to predict the outcome of ED and ED-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22002437

  8. Ubiquitin ligases and cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonardo K; Reed, Steven I

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a pivotal role in the sequence of events leading to cell division known as the cell cycle. Not only does ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis constitute a critical component of the core oscillator that drives the cell cycle in all eukaryotes, it is also central to the mechanisms that ensure that the integrity of the genome is maintained. These functions are primarily carried out by two families of E3 ubiquitin ligases, the Skp/cullin/F-box-containing and anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome complexes. However, beyond those functions associated with regulation of central cell cycle events, many peripheral cell cycle-related processes rely on ubiquitylation for signaling, homeostasis, and dynamicity, involving additional types of ubiquitin ligases and regulators. We are only beginning to understand the diversity and complexity of this regulation.

  9. Red Blood Cell Dysfunction Induced by High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Dusten; Srinivasan, Ramprasad; Benson, Tyler; Haigh, Stephen; Coyle, Danielle; Batra, Neil; Keil, Ryan; Sturm, Robert; Blanco, Victor; Palascak, Mary; Franco, Robert S.; Tong, Wilson; Chatterjee, Tapan; Hui, David Y.; Davidson, W. Sean; Aronow, Bruce J.; Kalfa, Theodosia; Manka, David; Peairs, Abigail; Blomkalns, Andra; Fulton, David J.; Brittain, Julia E.; Weintraub, Neal L.; Bogdanov, Vladimir Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-fat diet (HFD) promotes endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory monocyte activation, which contribute to atherosclerosis in obesity. We investigated whether HFD also induces the dysfunction of red blood cells (RBCs), which serve as a reservoir for chemokines via binding to Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC). Methods and Results A 60% HFD for 12 weeks, which produced only minor changes in lipid profile in C57/BL6 mice, markedly augmented the levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 bound to RBCs, which in turn stimulated macrophage migration through an endothelial monolayer. Levels of RBC-bound KC were also increased by HFD. These effects of HFD were abolished in DARC−/− mice. In RBCs from HFD-fed wild-type and DARC−/− mice, levels of membrane cholesterol and phosphatidylserine externalization were increased, fostering RBC-macrophage inflammatory interactions and promoting macrophage phagocytosis in vitro. When labeled ex vivo and injected into wild-type mice, RBCs from HFD-fed mice exhibited ≈3-fold increase in splenic uptake. Finally, RBCs from HFD-fed mice induced increased macrophage adhesion to the endothelium when they were incubated with isolated aortic segments, indicating endothelial activation. Conclusions RBC dysfunction, analogous to endothelial dysfunction, occurs early during diet-induced obesity and may serve as a mediator of atherosclerosis. These findings may have implications for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in obesity, a worldwide epidemic. PMID:26467254

  10. Cell Cycle Deregulation in Ewing's Sarcoma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski, Ashley A.; Randall, R. Lor; Lessnick, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a highly aggressive pediatric tumor of bone that usually contains the characteristic chromosomal translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12). This translocation encodes the oncogenic fusion protein EWS/FLI, which acts as an aberrant transcription factor to deregulate target genes necessary for oncogenesis. One key feature of oncogenic transformation is dysregulation of cell cycle control. It is therefore likely that EWS/FLI and other cooperating mutations in Ewing's sarcoma modulate the cell cycle to facilitate tumorigenesis. This paper will summarize current published data associated with deregulation of the cell cycle in Ewing's sarcoma and highlight important questions that remain to be answered. PMID:21052502

  11. Cell cycle regulates cell type in the Arabidopsis sepal.

    PubMed

    Roeder, Adrienne H K; Cunha, Alexandre; Ohno, Carolyn K; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2012-12-01

    The formation of cellular patterns during development requires the coordination of cell division with cell identity specification. This coordination is essential in patterning the highly elongated giant cells, which are interspersed between small cells, in the outer epidermis of the Arabidopsis thaliana sepal. Giant cells undergo endocycles, replicating their DNA without dividing, whereas small cells divide mitotically. We show that distinct enhancers are expressed in giant cells and small cells, indicating that these cell types have different identities as well as different sizes. We find that members of the epidermal specification pathway, DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 (DEK1), MERISTEM LAYER1 (ATML1), Arabidopsis CRINKLY4 (ACR4) and HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 (HDG11), control the identity of giant cells. Giant cell identity is established upstream of cell cycle regulation. Conversely, endoreduplication represses small cell identity. These results show not only that cell type affects cell cycle regulation, but also that changes in the cell cycle can regulate cell type.

  12. Transcriptional landscape of the human cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Chen, Sujun; Wang, Su; Soares, Fraser; Fischer, Martin; Meng, Feilong; Du, Zhou; Lin, Charles; Meyer, Clifford; DeCaprio, James A; Brown, Myles; Liu, X Shirley; He, Housheng Hansen

    2017-03-28

    Steady-state gene expression across the cell cycle has been studied extensively. However, transcriptional gene regulation and the dynamics of histone modification at different cell-cycle stages are largely unknown. By applying a combination of global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq), RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and histone-modification Chip sequencing (ChIP-seq), we depicted a comprehensive transcriptional landscape at the G0/G1, G1/S, and M phases of breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Importantly, GRO-seq and RNA-seq analysis identified different cell-cycle-regulated genes, suggesting a lag between transcription and steady-state expression during the cell cycle. Interestingly, we identified genes actively transcribed at early M phase that are longer in length and have low expression and are accompanied by a global increase in active histone 3 lysine 4 methylation (H3K4me2) and histone 3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac) modifications. In addition, we identified 2,440 cell-cycle-regulated enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) that are strongly associated with differential active transcription but not with stable expression levels across the cell cycle. Motif analysis of dynamic eRNAs predicted Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) as a key regulator of G1/S transition, and this identification was validated experimentally. Taken together, our combined analysis characterized the transcriptional and histone-modification profile of the human cell cycle and identified dynamic transcriptional signatures across the cell cycle.

  13. Dual role of lipoproteins in endothelial cell dysfunction in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stancu, Camelia S; Toma, Laura; Sima, Anca V

    2012-08-01

    The endothelium is a key constituent of the vascular wall, being actively involved in maintaining the structural integrity and proper functioning of blood vessels. Hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and aging are important risk factors for the dysfunction of endothelial cells (EC). Circulating lipoproteins (Lp) synthesized and secreted from the intestine or liver have an important role in supplying peripheral tissues with fatty acids from triglyceride rich lipoproteins (TGRLp) for energy production or storage, and cholesterol from low density lipoproteins (LDL) or high density lipoproteins (HDL) for the synthesis of cellular membranes and steroid hormones. Under pathological conditions, Lp may suffer alterations in concentration and composition and become aggressors for EC. Modified LDL, remnant Lp, TGRLp lipolysis products, dysfunctional HDL are involved in the changes induced in EC morphology (reduced glycocalyx, overdeveloped endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and basement membrane), loose intercellular junctions, increased oxidative and inflammatory stress, nitric oxide/redox imbalance, excess Lp transport and storage, as well as loss of anti-thrombotic properties, all of these being characteristics of endothelial dysfunction. Normal HDL are able to counteract the harmful effects of atherogenic Lp in EC but under persistent pathological conditions they lose the protective properties and become pro-atherogenic. This review summarises recent advances in understanding the role of Lp in the induction of endothelial dysfunction and the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Its main focus is the antagonistic role of atherogenic Lp (LDL, VLDL, dysfunctional HDL) versus anti-atherogenic Lp (HDL), also pointing out the potential targets for arresting or reversing this process.

  14. Intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction in ATM-deficient lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Mark; Goldstine, Jimena V; Gatti, Richard A

    2007-09-15

    One of the characteristic features of cells from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is that they are in a state of continuous oxidative stress and exhibit constitutive activation of pathways that normally respond to oxidative damage. In this report, we investigated whether the oxidative stress phenotype of A-T cells might be a reflection of an intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitotracker Red staining showed that the structural organization of mitochondria in A-T cells was abnormal compared to wild-type. Moreover, A-T cells harbored a much larger population of mitochondria with decreased membrane potential (DeltaPsi) than control cells. In addition, the basal expression levels of several nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative damage responsive genes whose proteins are targeted to the mitochondria--polymerase gamma, mitochondrial topoisomerase I, peroxiredoxin 3 and manganese superoxide dismutase--are elevated in A-T cells. Consistent with these results, we found that overall mitochondrial respiratory activity was diminished in A-T compared to wild-type cells. Treating A-T cells with the antioxidant, alpha lipoic acid (ALA), restored mitochondrial respiration rates to levels approaching those of wild-type. When wild-type cells were transfected with ATM-targeted siRNA, we observed a small but significant reduction in the respiration rates of mitochondria. Moreover, mitochondria in A-T cells induced to stably express full-length ATM, exhibited respiration rates approaching those of wild-type cells. Taken together, our results provide evidence for an intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction in A-T cells, and implicate a requirement for ATM in the regulation of mitochondrial function.

  15. Post-exercise left ventricular dysfunction measured after a long-duration cycling event

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this research, an extension to our previous work published in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine in 2009, we studied subjects that differed in terms of age and training status and assessed the impact of prolonged exercise on systolic and left ventricular diastolic function and cardiac biomarkers levels, recognized as identifiers of cardiac damage and dysfunction. We also assessed the possible influence of event duration, exercise intensity and weight loss (dehydration) on left ventricular diastolic function. Findings Ninety-one male cyclists were assessed by echocardiography and serum biomarkers before and after the 2005 Quebrantahuesos cycling event (206 km long and with an accumulated slope of 3800 m). Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and cardiac biomarkers were assessed in blood serum. Echocardiograms measured left ventricular internal dimension during diastole and systole, left ventricular posterior wall thickness during diastole, interventricular septum thickness during diastole, left ventricular ejection fraction and diastolic filling. The heart rate of 50 cyclists was also monitored during the race to evaluate exercise intensity. Echocardiograph results indicated that left ventricular diastolic and systolic function decreased after the race, with systolic function reduced to a significant degree. Left ventricular ejection fraction was below 55% in 29 cyclists. The decrease in left ventricular systolic and diastolic function did not correlate with age, training status, race duration, weight loss or exercise intensity. Conclusions Left ventricular systolic and diastolic function was reduced and cardiac biomarkers were increased after the cycling event, but the mechanisms behind such outcomes remain unclear. PMID:23706119

  16. Targeting cell cycle regulation in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Moralli, Santiago; Tarrado-Castellarnau, Míriam; Miranda, Anibal; Cascante, Marta

    2013-05-01

    Cell proliferation is an essential mechanism for growth, development and regeneration of eukaryotic organisms; however, it is also the cause of one of the most devastating diseases of our era: cancer. Given the relevance of the processes in which cell proliferation is involved, its regulation is of paramount importance for multicellular organisms. Cell division is orchestrated by a complex network of interactions between proteins, metabolism and microenvironment including several signaling pathways and mechanisms of control aiming to enable cell proliferation only in response to specific stimuli and under adequate conditions. Three main players have been identified in the coordinated variation of the many molecules that play a role in cell cycle: i) The cell cycle protein machinery including cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)-cyclin complexes and related kinases, ii) The metabolic enzymes and related metabolites and iii) The reactive-oxygen species (ROS) and cellular redox status. The role of these key players and the interaction between oscillatory and non-oscillatory species have proved essential for driving the cell cycle. Moreover, cancer development has been associated to defects in all of them. Here, we provide an overview on the role of CDK-cyclin complexes, metabolic adaptations and oxidative stress in regulating progression through each cell cycle phase and transitions between them. Thus, new approaches for the design of innovative cancer therapies targeting crosstalk between cell cycle simultaneous events are proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Temporary corneal stem cell dysfunction after radiation therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, H; Shimazaki, J; Tsubota, K

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiation therapy can cause corneal and conjunctival abnormalities that sometimes require surgical treatment. Corneal stem cell dysfunction is described, which recovered after the cessation of radiation. METHODS: A 44-year-old man developed a corneal epithelial abnormality associated with conjunctival and corneal inflammation following radiation therapy for maxillary cancer. He experienced ocular pain and loss of vision followed by conjunctival epithelialisation of the upper and lower parts of the cornea. RESULTS: Examination of brush cytology samples showed goblet cells in the upper and lower parts of the cornea, which showed increased fluorescein permeability, and intraepithelial lymphocytes. Impression cytology showed goblet cells in the same part of the cornea. Specular microscopy revealed spindle type epithelial cells. Patient follow up included artificial tears and an antibiotic ophthalmic ointment. The corneal abnormalities resolved after 4 months with improved visual acuity without any surgical intervention, but the disappearance of the palisades of Vogt did not recover at 1 year after radiation. CONCLUSION: Radiation therapy in this patient caused temporary stem cell dysfunction which resulted in conjunctivalisation in a part of the cornea. Although limbal stem cell function did not fully recover, this rare case suggested that medical options should be considered before surgery. Images PMID:8976704

  18. Interplay between cell growth and cell cycle in plants.

    PubMed

    Sablowski, Robert; Carnier Dornelas, Marcelo

    2014-06-01

    The growth of organs and whole plants depends on both cell growth and cell-cycle progression, but the interaction between both processes is poorly understood. In plants, the balance between growth and cell-cycle progression requires coordinated regulation of four different processes: macromolecular synthesis (cytoplasmic growth), turgor-driven cell-wall extension, mitotic cycle, and endocycle. Potential feedbacks between these processes include a cell-size checkpoint operating before DNA synthesis and a link between DNA contents and maximum cell size. In addition, key intercellular signals and growth regulatory genes appear to target at the same time cell-cycle and cell-growth functions. For example, auxin, gibberellin, and brassinosteroid all have parallel links to cell-cycle progression (through S-phase Cyclin D-CDK and the anaphase-promoting complex) and cell-wall functions (through cell-wall extensibility or microtubule dynamics). Another intercellular signal mediated by microtubule dynamics is the mechanical stress caused by growth of interconnected cells. Superimposed on developmental controls, sugar signalling through the TOR pathway has recently emerged as a central control point linking cytoplasmic growth, cell-cycle and cell-wall functions. Recent progress in quantitative imaging and computational modelling will facilitate analysis of the multiple interconnections between plant cell growth and cell cycle and ultimately will be required for the predictive manipulation of plant growth.

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Immune Cell Metabolism in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a life threatening condition mediated by systemic infection, but also triggered by hemorrhage and trauma. These are significant causes of organ injury implicated in morbidity and mortality, as well as post-sepsis complications associated with dysfunction of innate and adaptive immunity. The role of cellular bioenergetics and loss of metabolic plasticity of immune cells is increasingly emerging in the pathogenesis of sepsis. This review describes mitochondrial biology and metabolic alterations of immune cells due to sepsis, as well as indicates plausible therapeutic opportunities. PMID:28378540

  20. Mechanics and regulation of cell shape during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew G; Paluch, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Many cell types undergo dramatic changes in shape throughout the cell cycle. For individual cells, a tight control of cell shape is crucial during cell division, but also in interphase, for example during cell migration. Moreover, cell cycle-related cell shape changes have been shown to be important for tissue morphogenesis in a number of developmental contexts. Cell shape is the physical result of cellular mechanical properties and of the forces exerted on the cell. An understanding of the causes and repercussions of cell shape changes thus requires knowledge of both the molecular regulation of cellular mechanics and how specific changes in cell mechanics in turn effect global shape changes. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on the control of cell morphology, both in terms of general cell mechanics and specifically during the cell cycle.

  1. Fuel cell and advanced turbine power cycle

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.J.

    1995-10-19

    Solar Turbines, Incorporated (Solar) has a vested interest in the integration of gas turbines and high temperature fuel cells and in particular, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Solar has identified a parallel path approach to the technology developments needed for future products. The primary approach is to move away from the simple cycle industrial machines of the past and develop as a first step more efficient recuperated engines. This move was prompted by the recognition that the simple cycle machines were rapidly approaching their efficiency limits. Improving the efficiency of simple cycle machines is and will become increasingly more costly. Each efficiency increment will be progressively more costly than the previous step.

  2. Endothelial cell dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the STOX1 model of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Ducat, Aurélien; Doridot, Ludivine; Calicchio, Rosamaria; Méhats, Celine; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Castille, Johann; Barbaux, Sandrine; Couderc, Betty; Jacques, Sébastien; Letourneur, Franck; Buffat, Christophe; Le Grand, Fabien; Laissue, Paul; Miralles, Francisco; Vaiman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a disease of pregnancy involving systemic endothelial dysfunction. However, cardiovascular consequences of preeclampsia are difficult to analyze in humans. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the cardiovascular dysfunction induced by preeclampsia by examining the endothelium of mice suffering of severe preeclampsia induced by STOX1 overexpression. Using Next Generation Sequencing on endothelial cells of mice carrying either transgenic or control embryos, we discovered significant alterations of gene networks involved in inflammation, cell cycle, and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, the heart of the preeclamptic mice revealed cardiac hypertrophy associated with histological anomalies. Bioinformatics comparison of the networks of modified genes in the endothelial cells of the preeclamptic mice and HUVECs exposed to plasma from preeclamptic women identified striking similarities. The cardiovascular alterations in the pregnant mice are comparable to those endured by the cardiovascular system of preeclamptic women. The STOX1 mice could help to better understand the endothelial dysfunction in the context of preeclampsia, and guide the search for efficient therapies able to protect the maternal endothelium during the disease and its aftermath. PMID:26758611

  3. Cell cycle regulation of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C; Fajas, Lluis

    2015-04-01

    Specific cellular functions, such as proliferation, survival, growth, or senescence, require a particular adaptive metabolic response, which is fine tuned by members of the cell cycle regulators families. Currently, proteins such as cyclins, CDKs, or E2Fs are being studied in the context of cell proliferation and survival, cell signaling, cell cycle regulation, and cancer. We show in this review that cellular, animal and molecular studies provided enough evidence to prove that these factors play, in addition, crucial roles in the control of mitochondrial function; finally resulting in a dual proliferative and metabolic response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cell cycle regulated gene expression in yeasts.

    PubMed

    McInerny, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression through the mitotic cell cycle, so that genes are transcribed at particular cell cycle times, is widespread among eukaryotes. In some cases, it appears to be important for control mechanisms, as deregulated expression results in uncontrolled cell divisions, which can cause cell death, disease, and malignancy. In this review, I describe the current understanding of such regulated gene expression in two established simple eukaryotic model organisms, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In these two yeasts, the global pattern of cell cycle gene expression has been well described, and most of the transcription factors that control the various waves of gene expression, and how they are in turn themselves regulated, have been characterized. As related mechanisms occur in all other eukaryotes, including humans, yeasts offer an excellent paradigm to understand this important molecular process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell cycle regulation by microRNAs in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangming; Blelloch, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The ability to self-renew and to differentiate into at least one-cell lineage defines a stem cell. Self-renewal is a process by which stem cells proliferate without differentiation. Proliferation is achieved through a series of highly regulated events of the cell cycle. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short noncoding RNAs whose importance in these events is becoming increasingly appreciated. In this chapter, we discuss the role of miRNAs in regulating the cell cycle in various stem cells with a focus on embryonic stem cells. We also present the evidence indicating that cell cycle-regulating miRNAs are incorporated into a large regulatory network to control the self-renewal of stem cells by inducing or inhibiting differentiation. In addition, we discuss the function of cell cycle-regulating miRNAs in cancer.

  6. Regulation of Circulating Progenitor Cells in Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boilson, Barry A.; Larsen, Katarina; Harbuzariu, Adriana; Delacroix, Sinny; Korinek, Josef; Froehlich, Harald; Bailey, Kent R.; Scott, Christopher G.; Shapiro, Brian P.; Boerrigter, Guido; Chen, Horng H.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.; Simari, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Reductions in numbers of circulating progenitor cells (CD34+ cell subsets) have been demonstrated in patients at risk for, or in the presence of, cardiovascular disease. The mediators of these reductions remain undefined. To determine whether neurohumoral factors might regulate circulating CD34+ cell subsets in vivo, we studied complementary canine models of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Methods and Results A pacing model of severe LV dysfunction and a hypertensive renal wrap (RW) model in which dogs were randomized to receive deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) were studied. Circulating CD34+ cell subsets including hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs:CD34+/CD45dim/VEGFR2-) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs:CD34+/CD45-/VEGFR2+) were quantified. Additionally, the effect of mineralocorticoid excess on circulating progenitor cells in normal dogs was studied. The majority of circulating CD34+ cells expressed CD45 dimly and did not express VEGFR2, consistent with an HPC phenotype. HPCs were decreased in response to pacing, and this decrease correlated with plasma aldosterone levels (Spearman Rank correlation = -0.67, p=0.03). In the RW model, administration of DOCA resulted in decreased HPCs. No changes were seen in EPCs in either model. Normal dogs treated with DOCA exhibited a decrease in HPCs in peripheral blood but not bone marrow associated with decreased telomerase activity. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that mineralocorticoid excess, either endogenous or exogenous, results in reduction in HPCs. These data suggest that mineralocorticoids may induce accelerated senescence of progenitor cells leading to their reduced survival and decline in numbers. PMID:20573992

  7. Acanthamoeba induces cell-cycle arrest in host cells.

    PubMed

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Jayasekera, Samantha; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2004-08-01

    Acanthamoeba can cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and eye keratitis. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of these emerging diseases remain unclear. In this study, the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) were determined. Two isolates of Acanthamoeba belonging to the T1 genotype (GAE isolate) and T4 genotype (keratitis isolate) were used, which showed severe cytotoxicity on HBMEC and HCEC, respectively. No tissue specificity was observed in their ability to exhibit binding to the host cells. To determine the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle, a cell-cycle-specific gene array was used. This screened for 96 genes specific for host cell-cycle regulation. It was observed that Acanthamoeba inhibited expression of genes encoding cyclins F and G1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6, which are proteins important for cell-cycle progression. Moreover, upregulation was observed of the expression of genes such as GADD45A and p130 Rb, associated with cell-cycle arrest, indicating cell-cycle inhibition. Next, the effect of Acanthamoeba on retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation was determined. pRb is a potent inhibitor of G1-to-S cell-cycle progression; however, its function is inhibited upon phosphorylation, allowing progression into S phase. Western blotting revealed that Acanthamoeba abolished pRb phosphorylation leading to cell-cycle arrest at the G1-to-S transition. Taken together, these studies demonstrated for the first time that Acanthamoeba inhibits the host cell cycle at the transcriptional level, as well as by modulating pRb phosphorylation using host cell-signalling mechanisms. A complete understanding of Acanthamoeba-host cell interactions may help in developing novel strategies to treat Acanthamoeba infections.

  8. Decision for cell fate: deubiquitinating enzymes in cell cycle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Song, Myoung-Hyun; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    All organs consisting of single cells are consistently maintaining homeostasis in response to stimuli such as free oxygen, DNA damage, inflammation, and microorganisms. The cell cycle of all mammalian cells is regulated by protein expression in the right phase to respond to proliferation and apoptosis signals. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins by several protein-editing enzymes are associated with cell cycle regulation by their enzymatic functions. Ubiquitination, one of the PTMs, is also strongly related to cell cycle regulation by protein degradation or signal transduction. The importance of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which have a reversible function for ubiquitination, has recently suggested that the function of DUBs is also important for determining the fate of proteins during cell cycle processing. This article reviews and summarizes the diverse roles of DUBs, including DNA damage, cell cycle processing, and regulation of histone proteins, and also suggests the possibility for therapeutic targets.

  9. Chromatin states define tumour-specific T cell dysfunction and reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Philip, Mary; Fairchild, Lauren; Sun, Liping; Horste, Ellen L; Camara, Steven; Shakiba, Mojdeh; Scott, Andrew C; Viale, Agnes; Lauer, Peter; Merghoub, Taha; Hellmann, Matthew D; Wolchok, Jedd D; Leslie, Christina S; Schietinger, Andrea

    2017-05-25

    Tumour-specific CD8 T cells in solid tumours are dysfunctional, allowing tumours to progress. The epigenetic regulation of T cell dysfunction and therapeutic reprogrammability (for example, to immune checkpoint blockade) is not well understood. Here we show that T cells in mouse tumours differentiate through two discrete chromatin states: a plastic dysfunctional state from which T cells can be rescued, and a fixed dysfunctional state in which the cells are resistant to reprogramming. We identified surface markers associated with each chromatin state that distinguished reprogrammable from non-reprogrammable PD1(hi) dysfunctional T cells within heterogeneous T cell populations from tumours in mice; these surface markers were also expressed on human PD1(hi) tumour-infiltrating CD8 T cells. Our study has important implications for cancer immunotherapy as we define key transcription factors and epigenetic programs underlying T cell dysfunction and surface markers that predict therapeutic reprogrammability.

  10. Chandelier Cells in Functional and Dysfunctional Neural Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiqing; Zhang, Peng; Wyskiel, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Chandelier cells (ChCs; also called axo-axonic cells) are a specialized GABAergic interneuron subtype that selectively innervates pyramidal neurons at the axon initial segment (AIS), the site of action potential generation. ChC connectivity allows for powerful yet precise modulation of large populations of pyramidal cells, suggesting ChCs have a critical role in brain functions. Dysfunctions in ChC connectivity are associated with brain disorders such as epilepsy and schizophrenia; however, whether this is causative, contributory or compensatory is not known. A likely stumbling block toward mechanistic discoveries and uncovering potential therapeutic targets is the apparent lack of rudimentary understanding of ChCs. For example, whether cortical ChCs are inhibitory or excitatory remains unresolved, and thus whether altered ChC activity results in altered inhibition or excitation is not clear. Recent studies have shed some light onto this excitation-inhibition controversy. In addition, new findings have identified preferential cell-type connectivities established by cortical ChCs, greatly expanding our understanding of the role of ChCs in the cortical microcircuit. Here we aim to bring more attention to ChC connectivity to better understand its role in neural circuits, address whether ChCs are inhibitory or excitatory in light of recent findings and discuss ChC dysfunctions in brain disorders. PMID:27199673

  11. Cell cycle control across the eukaryotic kingdom.

    PubMed

    Harashima, Hirofumi; Dissmeyer, Nico; Schnittger, Arp

    2013-07-01

    Almost two billion years of evolution have generated a vast and amazing variety of eukaryotic life with approximately 8.7 million extant species. Growth and reproduction of all of these organisms depend on faithful duplication and distribution of their chromosomes to the newly forming daughter cells in a process called the cell cycle. However, most of what is known today about cell cycle control comes from a few model species that belong to the unikonts; that is, to only one of five 'supergroups' that comprise the eukaryotic kingdom. Recently, analyzing species from distantly related clades is providing insights into general principles of cell cycle regulation and shedding light on its evolution. Here, referring to animal and fungal as opposed to non-unikont systems, especially flowering plants from the archaeplastid supergroup, we compare the conservation of central cell cycle regulator functions, the structure of network topologies, and the evolutionary dynamics of substrates of core cell cycle kinases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Aging effects on intestinal homeostasis associated with expansion and dysfunction of intestinal epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Moorefield, Emily C; Andres, Sarah F; Blue, R Eric; Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Mah, Amanda T; Santoro, M Agostina; Ding, Shengli

    2017-08-29

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs) are critical to maintain intestinal epithelial function and homeostasis. We tested the hypothesis that aging promotes IESC dysfunction using old (18-22 months) and young (2-4 month) Sox9-EGFP IESC reporter mice. Different levels of Sox9-EGFP permit analyses of active IESC (Sox9-EGFP(Low)), activatable reserve IESC and enteroendocrine cells (Sox9-EGFP(High)), Sox9-EGFP(Sublow) progenitors, and Sox9-EGFP(Negative) differentiated lineages. Crypt-villus morphology, cellular composition and apoptosis were measured by histology. IESC function was assessed by crypt culture, and proliferation by flow cytometry and histology. Main findings were confirmed in Lgr5-EGFP and Lgr5-LacZ mice. Aging-associated gene expression changes were analyzed by Fluidigm mRNA profiling. Crypts culture from old mice yielded fewer and less complex enteroids. Histology revealed increased villus height and Paneth cells per crypt in old mice. Old mice showed increased numbers and hyperproliferation of Sox9-EGFP(Low) IESC and Sox9-EGFP(High) cells. Cleaved caspase-3 staining demonstrated increased apoptotic cells in crypts and villi of old mice. Gene expression profiling revealed aging-associated changes in mRNAs associated with cell cycle, oxidative stress and apoptosis specifically in IESC. These findings provide new, direct evidence for aging associated IESC dysfunction, and define potential biomarkers and targets for translational studies to assess and maintain IESC function during aging.

  13. Cycle life test of secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the life cycling program on rechargeable calls are reported. Information on required data, the use of which the data will be put, application details, including orbital description, charge control methods, load rquirements, etc., are given. Cycle tests were performed on 660 sealed, nickel cadmium cells. The cells consisted of seven sample classifications ranging form 3.0 to 20 amp. hours. Nickel cadmium, silver cadmium, and silver zinc sealed cells, excluding synchronous orbit and accelerated test packs were added. The capacities of the nickel cadmium cells, the silver cadmium and the silver zinc cells differed in range of amp hrs. The cells were cylced under different load, charge control, and temperature conditions. All cell packs are recharged by use of a pack voltage limit. All charging is constant current until the voltage limit is reached.

  14. Cell cycle regulation of Rho signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    David, Muriel; Petit, Dominique; Bertoglio, Jacques

    2012-08-15

    The dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton and its regulation by Rho GTPases are essential to maintain cell shape, to allow cell motility and are also critical during cell cycle progression and mitosis. Rho GTPases and their effectors are involved in cell rounding at mitosis onset, in chromosomes alignment and are required for contraction of the actomyosin ring that separates daughter cells at the end of mitosis. Recent studies have revealed how a number of nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases during these processes. This review will focus on how the cell cycle machinery, in turn, regulates expression of proteins in the Rho signaling pathways through transcriptional activation, ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation and modulates their activity through phosphorylation by mitotic kinases.

  15. Modeling of Sonos Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories (NVSMS) have many advantages. These memories are electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs). They utilize low programming voltages, endure extended erase/write cycles, are inherently resistant to radiation, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. The SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. The SONOS floating gate charge and voltage, tunneling current, threshold voltage, and drain current were characterized during an erase cycle. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental device data.

  16. Krebs cycle dysfunction shapes epigenetic landscape of chromatin: novel insights into mitochondrial regulation of aging process.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai; Hiltunen, Mikko; Kauppinen, Anu

    2014-07-01

    Although there is a substantial literature that mitochondria have a crucial role in the aging process, the mechanism has remained elusive. The role of reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial DNA injuries, and a decline in mitochondrial quality control has been proposed. Emerging studies have demonstrated that Krebs cycle intermediates, 2-oxoglutarate (also known as α-ketoglutarate), succinate and fumarate, can regulate the level of DNA and histone methylation. Moreover, citrate, also a Krebs cycle metabolite, can enhance histone acetylation. Genome-wide screening studies have revealed that the aging process is linked to significant epigenetic changes in the chromatin landscape, e.g. global demethylation of DNA and histones and increase in histone acetylation. Interestingly, recent studies have revealed that the demethylases of DNA (TET1-3) and histone lysines (KDM2-7) are members of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-OGDO). The 2-OGDO enzymes are activated by oxygen, iron and the major Krebs cycle intermediate, 2-oxoglutarate, whereas they are inhibited by succinate and fumarate. Considering the endosymbiont origin of mitochondria, it is not surprising that Krebs cycle metabolites can control the gene expression of host cell by modifying the epigenetic landscape of chromatin. It seems that age-related disturbances in mitochondrial metabolism can induce epigenetic reprogramming, which promotes the appearance of senescent phenotype and degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction remodels one-carbon metabolism in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaoyan Robert; Ong, Shao-En; Goldberger, Olga; Peng, Jun; Sharma, Rohit; Thompson, Dawn A; Vafai, Scott B; Cox, Andrew G; Marutani, Eizo; Ichinose, Fumito; Goessling, Wolfram; Regev, Aviv; Carr, Steven A; Clish, Clary B; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a spectrum of human disorders, ranging from rare, inborn errors of metabolism to common, age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. How these lesions give rise to diverse pathology is not well understood, partly because their proximal consequences have not been well-studied in mammalian cells. Here we provide two lines of evidence that mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leads to alterations in one-carbon metabolism pathways. First, using hypothesis-generating metabolic, proteomic, and transcriptional profiling, followed by confirmatory experiments, we report that mitochondrial DNA depletion leads to an ATF4-mediated increase in serine biosynthesis and transsulfuration. Second, we show that lesioning the respiratory chain impairs mitochondrial production of formate from serine, and that in some cells, respiratory chain inhibition leads to growth defects upon serine withdrawal that are rescuable with purine or formate supplementation. Our work underscores the connection between the respiratory chain and one-carbon metabolism with implications for understanding mitochondrial pathogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10575.001 PMID:27307216

  19. Thymic epithelial cell development and its dysfunction in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Li, Hongran; Luo, Haiying; Zhao, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are the key components in thymic microenvironment for T cells development. TECs, composed of cortical and medullary TECs, are derived from a common bipotent progenitor and undergo a stepwise development controlled by multiple levels of signals to be functionally mature for supporting thymocyte development. Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family members including the receptor activator for NF κ B (RANK), CD40, and lymphotoxin β receptor (LT β R) cooperatively control the thymic medullary microenvironment and self-tolerance establishment. In addition, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), Wnt, and Notch signals are essential for establishment of functional thymic microenvironment. Transcription factors Foxn1 and autoimmune regulator (Aire) are powerful modulators of TEC development, differentiation, and self-tolerance. Dysfunction in thymic microenvironment including defects of TEC and thymocyte development would cause physiological disorders such as tumor, infectious diseases, and autoimmune diseases. In the present review, we will summarize our current understanding on TEC development and the underlying molecular signals pathways and the involvement of thymus dysfunction in human diseases.

  20. Cell Cycle Regulators and Cell Death in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zebell, Sophia G.; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Various cell death mechanisms are integral to host defense in both plants and mammals. Plant defense against biotrophic pathogens is associated with programmed cell death (PCD) of the infected cell. This effector-triggered PCD is partly analogous to pyroptosis, an inflammatory host cell death process that plays a crucial role in defense against microbial infections in mammals. Plant effector-triggered PCD also shares with mammalian apoptosis the involvement of cell cycle regulators as signaling components. Here we explore the similarities between these different cell death programs as they relate to host defense and their relationship to the cell-cycle. PMID:26468745

  1. Cell-Cycle Regulators and Cell Death in Immunity.

    PubMed

    Zebell, Sophia G; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-10-14

    Various cell death mechanisms are integral to host defense in both plants and mammals. Plant defense against biotrophic pathogens is associated with programmed cell death (PCD) of the infected cell. This effector-triggered PCD is partly analogous to pyroptosis, an inflammatory host cell death process that plays a crucial role in defense against microbial infections in mammals. Plant effector-triggered PCD also shares with mammalian apoptosis the involvement of cell-cycle regulators as signaling components. Here we explore the similarities between these different cell death programs as they relate to host defense and their relationship to the cell cycle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. T-cell alloimmunity and chronic allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Safinia, Niloufar; Afzali, Behdad; Atalar, Kerem; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert I

    2010-12-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the standard treatment to improve both the quality of life and survival in patients with various end-stage organ diseases. The primary barrier against successful transplantation is recipient alloimmunity and the need to be maintained on immunosuppressive therapies with associated side effects. Despite such treatments in renal transplantation, after death with a functioning graft, chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) is the most common cause of late allograft loss. Recipient recognition of donor histocompatibility antigens, via direct, indirect, and semidirect pathways, is critically dependent on the antigen-presenting cell (APC) and elicits effector responses dominated by recipient T cells. In allograft rejection, the engagement of recipient and donor cells results in recruitment of T-helper (Th) cells of the Th1 and Th17 lineage to the graft. In cases in which the alloresponse is dominated by regulatory T cells (Tregs), rejection can be prevented and the allograft tolerated with minimum or no immunosuppression. Here, we review the pathways of allorecognition that underlie CAD and the T-cell effector phenotypes elicited as part of the alloresponse. Future therapies including depletion of donor-reactive lymphocytes, costimulation blockade, negative vaccination using dendritic cell subtypes, and Treg therapy are inferred from an understanding of these mechanisms of allograft rejection.

  3. SAFT nickel hydrogen cell cycling status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borthomieu, Yannick; Duquesne, Didier

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the NiH2 cell development is given. The NiH2 SAFT system is an electrochemical (single or dual) stack (IPV). The stack is mounted in an hydroformed Inconel 718 vessel operating at high pressure, equipped with 'rabbit ears' ceramic brazed electrical feedthroughs. The cell design is described: positive electrode, negative electrode, and stack configuration. Overviews of low earth orbit and geostationary earth orbit cyclings are provided. DPA results are also provided. The cycling and DPA results demonstrate that SAFT NiH2 is characterized by high reliability and very stable performances.

  4. Natural flavonoids targeting deregulated cell cycle progression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rana Pratap; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2006-03-01

    The prolonged duration requiring alteration of multi-genetic and epigenetic molecular events for cancer development provides a strong rationale for cancer prevention, which is developing as a potential strategy to arrest or reverse carcinogenic changes before the appearance of the malignant disease. Cell cycle progression is an important biological event having controlled regulation in normal cells, which almost universally becomes aberrant or deregulated in transformed and neoplastic cells. In this regard, targeting deregulated cell cycle progression and its modulation by various natural and synthetic agents are gaining widespread attention in recent years to control the unchecked growth and proliferation in cancer cells. In fact, a vast number of experimental studies convincingly show that many phytochemicals halt uncontrolled cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Among these phytochemicals, natural flavonoids have been identified as a one of the major classes of natural anticancer agents exerting antineoplastic activity via cell cycle arrest as a major mechanism in various types of cancer cells. This review is focused at the modulatory effects of natural flavonoids on cell cycle regulators including cyclin-dependent kinases and their inhibitors, cyclins, p53, retinoblastoma family of proteins, E2Fs, check-point kinases, ATM/ATR and survivin controlling G1/S and G2/M check-point transitions in cell cycle progression, and discusses how these molecular changes could contribute to the antineoplastic effects of natural flavonoids.

  5. Endothelial cell dysfunction in viral hemorrhage and edema

    PubMed Central

    Mackow, Erich R.; Gorbunova, Elena E.; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N.

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium maintains a vascular barrier by controlling platelet and immune cell interactions, capillary tone and interendothelial cell (EC) adherence. Here we suggest common elements in play during viral infection of the endothelium that alter normal EC functions and contribute to lethal hemorrhagic or edematous diseases. In viral reservoir hosts, infection of capillaries and lymphatic vessels may direct immunotolerance without disease, but in the absence of these cognate interactions they direct the delayed onset of human disease characterized by thrombocytopenia and vascular leakage in a severe endothelial dysfunction syndrome. Here we present insight into EC controls of hemostasis, immune response and capillary permeability that are altered by viral infection of the endothelium. PMID:25601858

  6. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  7. Stem cell transplantation reverses chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Martirosian, Vahan; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Hanna, Nevine; Tran, Katherine K.; Liao, Alicia C.; Christie, Lori-Ann; Parihar, Vipan K.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    The frequent use of chemotherapy to combat a range of malignancies can elicit severe cognitive dysfunction often referred to as “chemobrain”, a condition that can persist long after the cessation of treatment in as many as 75% of survivors. While cognitive health is a critical determinant of therapeutic outcome, chemobrain remains an unmet medical need that adversely impacts quality of life in pediatric and adult cancer survivors. Using a rodent model of chemobrain, we showed that chronic cyclophosphamide treatment induced significant performance based decrements on behavioral tasks designed to interrogate hippocampal and cortical function. Intrahippocampal transplantation of human neural stem cells resolved all cognitive impairments when animals were tested one month after the cessation of chemotherapy. In transplanted animals, grafted cells survived (8%) and differentiated along neuronal and astroglial lineages, where improved cognition was associated with reduced neuroinflammation and enhanced host dendritic arborization. Stem cell transplantation significantly reduced the number of activated microglia after cyclophosphamide treatment in the brain. Granule and pyramidal cell neurons within the dentate gyrus and CA1 subfields of the hippocampus exhibited significant reductions in dendritic complexity, spine density, immature and mature spine types following chemotherapy, adverse effects that were eradicated by stem cell transplantation. Our findings provide the first evidence that cranial transplantation of stem cells can reverse the deleterious effects of chemobrain, through a trophic support mechanism involving the attenuation of neuroinflammation and the preservation host neuronal architecture. PMID:25687405

  8. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  9. Cell cycle regulation of glucocorticoid receptor function.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, S C; Qi, M; DeFranco, D B

    1992-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) nuclear translocation, transactivation and phosphorylation were examined during the cell cycle in mouse L cell fibroblasts. Glucocorticoid-dependent transactivation of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter was observed in G0 and S phase synchronized L cells, but not in G2 synchronized cells. G2 effects were selective on the glucocorticoid hormone signal transduction pathway, since glucocorticoid but not heavy metal induction of the endogenous Metallothionein-1 gene was also impaired in G2 synchronized cells. GRs that translocate to the nucleus of G2 synchronized cells in response to dexamethasone treatment were not efficiently retained there and redistributed to the cytoplasmic compartment. In contrast, GRs bound by the glucocorticoid antagonist RU486 were efficiently retained within nuclei of G2 synchronized cells. Inefficient nuclear retention was observed for both dexamethasone- and RU486-bound GRs in L cells that actively progress through G2 following release from an S phase arrest. Finally, site-specific alterations in GR phosphorylation were observed in G2 synchronized cells suggesting that cell cycle regulation of specific protein kinases and phosphatases could influence nuclear retention, recycling and transactivation activity of the GR. Images PMID:1505524

  10. Control points within the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures.

  11. Cell cycle regulation of human endometrial stromal cells during decidualization.

    PubMed

    Logan, Philip C; Steiner, Michael; Ponnampalam, Anna P; Mitchell, Murray D

    2012-08-01

    Differentiation of endometrial stromal cells into decidual cells is crucial for optimal endometrial receptivity. Data from our previous microarray study implied that expression of many cell cycle regulators are changed during decidualization and inhibition of DNA methylation in vitro. In this study, we hypothesized that both the classic progestin treatment and DNA methylation inhibition would inhibit stromal cell proliferation and cell cycle transition. The human endometrial stromal cell line (HESC) was treated from 2 days to 18 days with the DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZA), a mixture of estradiol/progestin/cyclic adenosine monophosphate ([cAMP]; medroxy-progesterone acetate [MPA mix]) or both. Cell growth was measured by cell counting, cell cycle transition and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry, expression of cell cycle regulators were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blotting, and change in DNA methylation profiles were detected by methylation-specific PCR. Both AZA and MPA mix inhibited the proliferation of HESC for at least 7 days. Treatment with MPA mix resulted in an early G0/G1 inhibition followed by G2/M phase inhibition at 18 days. In contrast, AZA treatment inhibited cell cycle progression at the G2/M phase throughout. The protein levels of p21(Cip1)and 14-3-3σ were increased with both AZA and MPA mix treatments without any change in the DNA methylation profiles of the genes. Our data imply that the decidualization of HESC is associated with cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase initially and G2/M phase at later stages. Our results also suggest that p53 pathway members play a role in the cell cycle regulation of endometrial stromal cells.

  12. Mitochondrial dynamics and the cell cycle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nuclear-mitochondrial (NM) communication impacts many aspects of plant development including vigor, sterility and viability. Dynamic changes in mitochondrial number, shape, size, and cellular location takes place during the cell cycle possibly impacting the process itself and leading to distribution...

  13. Dynamic ubiquitin signaling in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Gilberto, Samuel; Peter, Matthias

    2017-08-07

    The cell division cycle is driven by a collection of enzymes that coordinate DNA duplication and separation, ensuring that genomic information is faithfully and perpetually maintained. The activity of the effector proteins that perform and coordinate these biological processes oscillates by regulated expression and/or posttranslational modifications. Ubiquitylation is a cardinal cellular modification and is long known for driving cell cycle transitions. In this review, we emphasize emerging concepts of how ubiquitylation brings the necessary dynamicity and plasticity that underlie the processes of DNA replication and mitosis. New studies, often focusing on the regulation of chromosomal proteins like DNA polymerases or kinetochore kinases, are demonstrating that ubiquitylation is a versatile modification that can be used to fine-tune these cell cycle events, frequently through processes that do not involve proteasomal degradation. Understanding how the increasing variety of identified ubiquitin signals are transduced will allow us to develop a deeper mechanistic perception of how the multiple factors come together to faithfully propagate genomic information. Here, we discuss these and additional conceptual challenges that are currently under study toward understanding how ubiquitin governs cell cycle regulation. © 2017 Gilberto and Peter.

  14. Vascular endothelial cells and dysfunctions: role of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Favero, Gaia; Foglio, Eleonora; Rossini, Claudia; Castrezzati, Stefania; Lonati, Claudio; Rezzani, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Several pathological conditions, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes, ischemia/reperfusion injury and nicotine-induced vasculopathy, are associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction characterized by altered secretory output of endothelial cells. Therefore there is a search for molecules and interventions that could restore endothelial function, in particular augmenting NO production, reducing the generation of free radicals and vasoconstrictors and preventing undesired inflammation. The pineal hormone melatonin exhibits several endothelium protective properties: it scavenges free radicals, activates antioxidant defence enzymes, normalizes lipid and blood pressure profile and increases NO bioavailability. Melatonin improved vascular function in experimental hypertension, reducing intimal infiltration and restoring NO production. Melatonin improved the NO pathway also in animal models for the study of diabetes and prevented NO down-regulation and adhesive molecules up-regulation in nicotine-induced vasculopathy. The protection against endothelial damage, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation and leukocyte infiltration might contribute to the beneficial effects against ischemia-reperfusion injury by melatonin. Therefore, melatonin administration has endothelium-protective potential in several pathological conditions. Nevertheless, it still needs to be established, whether melatonin is able to revert already established endothelial dysfunction in these conditions.

  15. Methylglyoxal Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Death in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of glucose is aberrantly increased in hyperglycemia, which causes various harmful effects on the liver. Methylglyoxal is produced during glucose degradation and the levels of methylglyoxal are increased in diabetes patients. In this study we investigated whether methylglyoxal induces mitochondrial impairment and apoptosis in HepG2 cells and induces liver toxicity in vivo. Methylglyoxal caused apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells. Moreover, methylglyoxal significantly promoted the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted glutathione (GSH) content. Pretreatment with antioxidants caused a marked decrease in methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis, indicating that oxidant species are involved in the apoptotic process. Methylglyoxal treatment induced mitochondrial permeability transition, which represents mitochondrial impairment. However, pretreatment with cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the formation of the permeability transition pore, partially inhibited methylglyoxal-induced cell death. Furthermore, acute treatment of mice with methylglyoxal increased the plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), indicating liver toxicity. Collectively, our results showed that methylglyoxal increases cell death and induces liver toxicity, which results from ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:25343013

  16. Human endothelial progenitor cells isolated from COPD patients are dysfunctional.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoran; Xie, Canmao

    2012-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). More than 44% of these patients present with generalized atherosclerosis at autopsy. It is accepted that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) participate in the repair of dysfunctional endothelium and thus protects against atherosclerosis. However, whether COPD affects the repairing capacity of EPCs is unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether and how EPCs are involved in the vascular repair process in patients with COPD. In our study, EPCs from 25 COPD and 16 control patients were isolated by Ficoll density-gradient centrifugation and identified using fluorescence activated cell sorting. Transwell Migratory Assay was performed to determine the number of EPC colony-forming units and the adherent capacity late-EPCs to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Following arterial damage in NOD/SCID mice, the number of EPCs incorporated at the injured vascular site was determined using a fluorescence microscope. We found that the number of EPC clusters and cell migration, as well as the expression of CXCR4, was significantly decreased in patients with COPD. Additionally, the number of late-EPCs adherent to HUVEC tubules was significantly reduced, and fewer VEGFR2(+)-staining cells were incorporated into the injured site in COPD patients. Our study demonstrates that EPC capacity of repair was affected in COPD patients, which may contribute to altered vascular endothelium in this patient population.

  17. Linking the Cell Cycle to Cell Fate Decisions.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) retain the ability to differentiate into a wide range of cell types while undergoing self-renewal. They also exhibit an unusual mode of cell cycle regulation, reflected by a cell cycle structure where G1 and G2 phases are truncated. When individual PSCs are exposed to specification cues, they activate developmental programs and remodel the cell cycle so that the length of G1 and overall cell division times increase. The response of individual stem cells to pro-differentiation signals is strikingly heterogeneous, resulting in asynchronous differentiation. Recent evidence indicates that this phenomenon is due to cell cycle-dependent mechanisms that restrict the initial activation of developmental genes to the G1 phase. This suggests a broad biological mechanism where multipotent cells are 'primed' to initiate cell fate decisions during their transition through G1. Here, I discuss mechanisms underpinning the commitment towards the differentiated state and its relation to the cell cycle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Endometrial blood flow measured by xenon 133 clearance in women with normal menstrual cycles and dysfunctional uterine bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, I.S.; McCarron, G.; Hutton, B.; Macey, D.

    1987-01-01

    Endometrial blood flow was measured through the menstrual cycle in nonpregnant women (28 studies of 17 women with normal menstrual cycles and 32 studies of 20 women with dysfunctional uterine bleeding) with use of a clearance technique in which 100 to 400 microCi of the gamma-emitting isotope, xenon 133 in saline solution was instilled into the uterine cavity. The mean (+/- SEM) endometrial blood flow in normal cycles was 27.7 +/- 2.6 ml/100 gm/min, with a significant elevation in the middle to late follicular phase, followed by a substantial fall and a secondary slow luteal phase rise that was maintained until the onset of menstruation. There was a significant correlation between plasma estradiol levels and endometrial blood flow in the follicular but not the luteal phase. Blood flow patterns in women with ovulatory dysfunctional bleeding were similar to normal, except for a significantly lower middle follicular rate. Women with anovulatory dysfunctional bleeding exhibited exceedingly variable flow rates.

  19. Deoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber L. induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Miaoxian; Chung, Hau Yin; Li, Yaolan

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Deoxyelephantopin (ESD) inhibited cell proliferation in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. {yields} ESD induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases via modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. {yields} ESD triggered apoptosis by dysfunction of mitochondria and induction of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways. {yields} ESD also triggered Akt, ERK, and JNK signaling pathways. -- Abstract: Deoxyelephantopin (ESD), a naturally occurring sesquiterpene lactone present in the Chinese medicinal herb, Elephantopus scaber L. exerted anticancer effects on various cultured cancer cells. However, the cellular mechanisms by which it controls the development of the cancer cells are unavailable, particularly the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. In this study, we found that ESD inhibited the CNE cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases was also found. Western blotting analysis showed that modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins was responsible for the ESD-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, ESD also triggered apoptosis in CNE cells. Dysfunction in mitochondria was found to be associated with the ESD-induced apoptosis as evidenced by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{Psi}m), the translocation of cytochrome c, and the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. Despite the Western blotting analysis showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (cleavage of caspases-3, -7, -8, -9, and -10) were triggered in the ESD-induced apoptosis, additional analysis also showed that the induction of apoptosis could be achieved by the caspase-independent manner. Besides, Akt, ERK and JNK pathways were found to involve in ESD-induced cell death. Overall, our findings provided the first evidence that ESD induced cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in CNE cells. ESD could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC).

  20. FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

    1999-12-01

    A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

  1. Principles of targeting endothelial cell metabolism to treat angiogenesis and endothelial cell dysfunction in disease

    PubMed Central

    Goveia, Jermaine; Stapor, Peter; Carmeliet, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is the orchestral conductor of blood vessel function. Pathological blood vessel formation (a process termed pathological angiogenesis) or the inability of endothelial cells (ECs) to perform their physiological function (a condition known as EC dysfunction) are defining features of various diseases. Therapeutic intervention to inhibit aberrant angiogenesis or ameliorate EC dysfunction could be beneficial in diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, respectively, but current strategies have limited efficacy. Based on recent findings that pathological angiogenesis and EC dysfunction are accompanied by EC-specific metabolic alterations, targeting EC metabolism is emerging as a novel therapeutic strategy. Here, we review recent progress in our understanding of how EC metabolism is altered in disease and discuss potential metabolic targets and strategies to reverse EC dysfunction and inhibit pathological angiogenesis. PMID:25063693

  2. Modeling of SONOS Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat H.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories as a flash memory has many advantages. These electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs) utilize low programming voltages, have a high erase/write cycle lifetime, are radiation hardened, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. In this paper, the SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental data.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell combined cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Bevc, F.P.; Lundberg, W.L.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The integration of the solid oxide fuel cell and combustion turbine technologies can result in combined-cycle power plants, fueled with natural gas, that have high efficiencies and clean gaseous emissions. Results of a study are presented in which conceptual designs were developed for 3 power plants based upon such an integration, and ranging in rating from 3 to 10 MW net ac. The plant cycles are described and characteristics of key components summarized. Also, plant design-point efficiency estimates are presented as well as values of other plant performance parameters.

  4. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  5. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  6. Saccadic Burst Cell Membrane Dysfunction Is Responsible for Saccadic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Ramat, Stefano; Optican, Lance M.; Miura, Kenichiro; Leigh, R. John; Zee, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Saccadic oscillations threaten clear vision by causing image motion on the retina. They are either purely horizontal (ocular flutter) or multidimensional (opsoclonus). We propose that ion channel dysfunction in the burst cell membrane is the underlying abnormality. We have tested this hypothesis by simulating a neuromimetic computational model of the burst neurons. This biologically realistic model mimics the physiologic properties and anatomic connections in the brainstem saccade generator. A rebound firing after sustained inhibition, called post-inhibitory rebound (PIR), and reciprocal inhibition between premotor saccadic burst neurons are the key features of this conceptual scheme. PIR and reciprocal inhibition make the circuits that generate the saccadic burst inherently unstable and can lead to oscillations unless stabilized by external inhibition. Our simulations suggest that alterations in membrane properties that lead to an increase in PIR, a reduction in external glycinergic inhibition, or both can cause saccadic oscillations. PMID:19145136

  7. Cell cycle nucleic acids, polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Lowe, Keith S.; Larkins, Brian A.; Dilkes, Brian R.; Sun, Yuejin

    2007-08-14

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content, cell cycle progression, cell number and/or composition of plants.

  8. Stem Cell Therapy in Bladder Dysfunction: Where Are We? And Where Do We Have to Go?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Rae; Song, Yun Seob; Lee, Hong Jun

    2013-01-01

    To date, stem cell therapy for the bladder has been conducted mainly on an experimental basis in the areas of bladder dysfunction. The therapeutic efficacy of stem cells was originally thought to be derived from their ability to differentiate into various cell types. Studies about stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction have been limited to an experimental basis and have been less focused than bladder regeneration. Bladder dysfunction was listed in MESH as “urinary bladder neck obstruction”, “urinary bladder, overactive”, and “urinary bladder, neurogenic”. Using those keywords, several articles were searched and studied. The bladder dysfunction model includes bladder outlet obstruction, cryoinjured, diabetes, ischemia, and spinal cord injury. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs), bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and skeletal muscle derived stem cells (SkMSCs) are used for transplantation to treat bladder dysfunction. The main mechanisms of stem cells to reconstitute or restore bladder dysfunction are migration, differentiation, and paracrine effects. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction and to provide the status of stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction. PMID:24151627

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in blood cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ehinger, Johannes K; Morota, Saori; Hansson, Magnus J; Paul, Gesine; Elmér, Eskil

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, where the progressive degeneration of motor neurons results in muscle atrophy, paralysis and death. Abnormalities in both central nervous system and muscle mitochondria have previously been demonstrated in patient samples, indicating systemic disease. In this case-control study, venous blood samples were acquired from 24 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and 21 age-matched controls. Platelets and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and mitochondrial oxygen consumption measured in intact and permeabilized cells with additions of mitochondrial substrates, inhibitors and titration of an uncoupler. Respiratory values were normalized to cell count and for two markers of cellular mitochondrial content, citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA, respectively. Mitochondrial function was correlated with clinical staging of disease severity. Complex IV (cytochrome c-oxidase)-activity normalized to mitochondrial content was decreased in platelets from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients both when normalized to citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA copy number. In mononuclear cells, complex IV-activity was decreased when normalized to citrate synthase activity. Mitochondrial content was increased in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient platelets. In mononuclear cells, complex I activity declined and mitochondrial content increased progressively with advancing disease stage. The findings are, however, based on small subsets of patients and need to be confirmed. We conclude that when normalized to mitochondria-specific content, complex IV-activity is reduced in blood cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and that there is an apparent compensatory increase in cellular mitochondrial content. This supports systemic involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and suggests further study of mitochondrial function in blood cells as a future biomarker for the

  10. Double vs. single intrauterine insemination per cycle: use in gonadotropin cycles and in diagnostic categories of ovulatory dysfunction and male factor infertility.

    PubMed

    Randall, Gary W; Gantt, Pickens A

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of offering double intrauterine insemination (IUI) to clients in our fertility program. In this prospective, nonrandomized study, 595 couples with ovulatory dysfunction, endometriosis, male factor, unexplained, tubal factor and combined diagnoses utilizing clomiphene citrate-hCG (CC-hCG), CC-gonadotropin-hCG (CC-Gn-hCG), Gn-hCG, lupron-Gn-hCG (L-Gn-hCG) or luteinizing hormone (LH) surge monitoring of natural cycles were offered single or double IUI in a total of 1276 cycles. Single IUIs were performed at 36 hours following hCG or the day following LH surge; double IUIs were performed 18 and 36 hours following hCG or the day of and day following LH surge. Single versus double IUI clinical pregnancy outcomes were compared between ovarian stimulation protocols and diagnostic categories. One hundred ten clinical pregnancies occurred for 508 couples in 999 single IUI cycles (fecundity, 11.0%); 45 clinical pregnancies for 174 couples occurred in 277 double IUI cycles (16.2%, p < 0.004). The single IUI group was younger than the double IUI group (32.8 vs. 33.7, p < 0.004). Differences for fecundity were noted regarding diagnostic categories between single and double IUI groups (ovulation dysfunction, 12.9% vs 19.5%, p < 0.048, and male factor, 7.9% vs. 17.5%, p < 0.030) and ovulation protocols (CC-Gn-hCG, 13.0% vs. 21.3%, p < 0.031, and L-Gn-hCG, 4.2% vs. 25.0%, p < 0.002). Double IUI is superior to single IUI overall, especially when comparing Gn-containing ovarian stimulation protocols or within the ovulatory dysfunction and male factor diagnostic categories.

  11. Westinghouse fuel cell combined cycle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veyo, S.

    1996-12-31

    Efficiency (voltage) of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) should increase with operating pressure, and a pressurized SOFC could function as the heat addition process in a Brayton cycle gas turbine (GT) engine. An overall cycle efficiency of 70% should be possible. In cogeneration, half of the waste heat from a PSOFC/GT should be able to be captured in process steam and hot water, leading to a fuel effectiveness of about 85%. In order to make the PSOFC/GT a commercial reality, satisfactory operation of the SOFC at elevated pressure must be verified, a pressurized SOFC generator module must be designed, built, and tested, and the combined cycle and parameters must be optimized. A prototype must also be demonstrated. This paper describes progress toward making the PSOFC/GT a reality.

  12. Cell shape dynamics during the staphylococcal cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, João M.; Fernandes, Pedro B.; Vaz, Filipa; Pereira, Ana R.; Tavares, Andreia C.; Ferreira, Maria T.; Pereira, Pedro M.; Veiga, Helena; Kuru, Erkin; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Brun, Yves V.; Filipe, Sérgio R.; Pinho, Mariana G.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an aggressive pathogen and a model organism to study cell division in sequential orthogonal planes in spherical bacteria. However, the small size of staphylococcal cells has impaired analysis of changes in morphology during the cell cycle. Here we use super-resolution microscopy and determine that S. aureus cells are not spherical throughout the cell cycle, but elongate during specific time windows, through peptidoglycan synthesis and remodelling. Both peptidoglycan hydrolysis and turgor pressure are required during division for reshaping the flat division septum into a curved surface. In this process, the septum generates less than one hemisphere of each daughter cell, a trait we show is common to other cocci. Therefore, cell surface scars of previous divisions do not divide the cells in quadrants, generating asymmetry in the daughter cells. Our results introduce a need to reassess the models for division plane selection in cocci. PMID:26278781

  13. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  14. 4D chromatin dynamics in cycling cells

    PubMed Central

    Strickfaden, Hilmar; Zunhammer, Andreas; van Koningsbruggen, Silvana; Köhler, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    This live cell study of chromatin dynamics in four dimensions (space and time) in cycling human cells provides direct evidence for three hypotheses first proposed by Theodor Boveri in seminal studies of fixed blastomeres from Parascaris equorum embryos: (I) Chromosome territory (CT) arrangements are stably maintained during interphase. (II) Chromosome proximity patterns change profoundly during prometaphase. (III) Similar CT proximity patterns in pairs of daughter nuclei reflect symmetrical chromosomal movements during anaphase and telophase, but differ substantially from the arrangement in mother cell nucleus. Hypothesis I could be confirmed for the majority of interphase cells. A minority, however, showed complex, rotational movements of CT assemblies with large-scale changes of CT proximity patterns, while radial nuclear arrangements were maintained. A new model of chromatin dynamics is proposed. It suggests that long-range DNA-DNA interactions in cell nuclei may depend on a combination of rotational CT movements and locally constrained chromatin movements. PMID:21327076

  15. Short dysfunctional telomeres impair the repair of arsenite-induced oxidative damage in mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jennifer P A; Banerjee, Birendranath; Fang, Wanru; Poonepalli, Anuradha; Balakrishnan, Lakshmidevi; Low, Grace Kah Mun; Bhattacharjee, Rabindra N; Akira, Shizuo; Jayapal, Manikandan; Melendez, Alirio J; Baskar, Rajamanickam; Lee, Han-Woong; Hande, M Prakash

    2008-03-01

    Telomeres and telomerase appear to participate in the repair of broken DNA ends produced by oxidative damage. Arsenite is an environmental contaminant and a potent human carcinogen, which induces oxidative stress on cells via the generation of reactive oxygen species affecting cell viability and chromosome stability. It promotes telomere attrition and reduces cell survival by apoptosis. In this study, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice lacking telomerase RNA component (mTERC(-/-) mice) with long (early passage or EP) and short (late passage or LP) telomeres to investigate the extent of oxidative damage by comparing the differences in DNA damage, chromosome instability, and cell survival at 24 and 48 h of exposure to sodium arsenite (As3+; NaAsO2). There was significantly high level of DNA damage in mTERC(-/-) cells with short telomeres as determined by alkaline comet assay. Consistent with elevated DNA damage, increased micronuclei (MN) induction reflecting gross genomic instability was also observed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed that increasing doses of arsenite augmented the chromosome aberrations, which contributes to genomic instability leading to possibly apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest. Microarray analysis has revealed that As3+ treatment altered the expression of 456 genes of which 20% of them have known functions in cell cycle and DNA damage signaling and response, cell growth, and/or maintenance. Results from our studies imply that short dysfunctional telomeres impair the repair of oxidative damage caused by arsenite. The results will have implications in risk estimation as well as cancer chemotherapy. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Molecular regulation of the diatom cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Huysman, Marie J J; Vyverman, Wim; De Veylder, Lieven

    2014-06-01

    Accounting for almost one-fifth of the primary production on Earth, the unicellular eukaryotic group of diatoms plays a key ecological and biogeochemical role in our contemporary oceans. Furthermore, as producers of various lipids and pigments, and characterized by their finely ornamented silica cell wall, diatoms hold great promise for different industrial fields, including biofuel production, nanotechnology, and pharmaceutics. However, in spite of their major ecological importance and their high commercial value, little is known about the mechanisms that control the diatom life and cell cycle. To date, both microscopic and genomic analyses have revealed that diatoms exhibit specific and unique mechanisms of cell division compared with those found in the classical model organisms. Here, we review the structural peculiarities of diatom cell proliferation, highlight the regulation of their major cell cycle checkpoints by environmental factors, and discuss recent progress in molecular cell division research. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. A thermodynamic cycle for the solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Jenkins, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    A solar cell is a heat engine, but textbook treatments are not wholly satisfactory from a thermodynamic standpoint, since they present solar cells as directly converting the energy of light into electricity, and the current in the circuit as maintained by an electrostatic potential. We propose a thermodynamic cycle in which the gas of electrons in the p phase serves as the working substance. The interface between the p and n phases acts as a self-oscillating piston that modulates the absorption of heat from the photons so that it may perform a net positive work during a complete cycle of its motion, in accordance with the laws of thermodynamics. We draw a simple hydrodynamical analogy between this model and the ;putt-putt; engine of toy boats, in which the interface between the water's liquid and gas phases serves as the piston. We point out some testable consequences of this model.

  18. A metabolic thermodynamic theory of cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummer, A.; Ocone, R.

    2003-08-01

    Due to its intrinsic complexity, a complete mathematical description of the cell cycle appears a difficult task. Nevertheless, a preliminary analysis, based on molecular biology, can help in clarifying what are the reliable tools for a quantitative approach. In a previous paper [Physica A 321 (3-4) (2003) 587], the steps to be followed to formulate a metabolic statistical thermodynamics have been established. Here we present a simple mathematical model for the interaction of CyclinB and Cdh1 [The Cell Cycle. An Introduction, Oxford University Press, New York, 1993], with the aim of analysing the properties of the system from a thermodynamic viewpoint. The model is shown to define the Gibbs phase integral of the system and the general Gibbs energy function is obtained. This, together with the analogue of the temperature, defines the working tools indispensable for the formulation of a metabolic statistical thermodynamic-like theory.

  19. Cell cycle regulation in human embryonic stem cells: links to adaptation to cell culture.

    PubMed

    Barta, Tomas; Dolezalova, Dasa; Holubcova, Zuzana; Hampl, Ales

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle represents not only a tightly orchestrated mechanism of cell replication and cell division but it also plays an important role in regulation of cell fate decision. Particularly in the context of pluripotent stem cells or multipotent progenitor cells, regulation of cell fate decision is of paramount importance. It has been shown that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) show unique cell cycle characteristics, such as short doubling time due to abbreviated G1 phase; these properties change with the onset of differentiation. This review summarizes the current understanding of cell cycle regulation in hESCs. We discuss cell cycle properties as well as regulatory machinery governing cell cycle progression of undifferentiated hESCs. Additionally, we provide evidence that long-term culture of hESCs is accompanied by changes in cell cycle properties as well as configuration of several cell cycle regulatory molecules.

  20. Treatment of bladder dysfunction using stem cell or tissue engineering technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Heon; Lee, Hong Jun; Song, Yun Seob

    2014-04-01

    Tissue engineering and stem cell transplantation are two important options that may help overcome limitations in the current treatment strategy for bladder dysfunction. Stem cell therapy holds great promise for treating pathophysiology, as well as for urological tissue engineering and regeneration. To date, stem cell therapy in urology has mainly focused on oncology and erectile dysfunction. The therapeutic potency of stem cells (SCs) was originally thought to derive from their ability to differentiate into various cell types including smooth muscle. The main mechanisms of SCs in reconstituting or restoring bladder function are migration, differentiation, and paracrine effects. Nowadays, paracrine effects of stem cells are thought to be more prominent because of their stimulating effects on stem cells and adjacent cells. Studies of stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction have been limited to experimental models and have been less focused on tissue engineering for bladder regeneration. Bladder outlet obstruction is a representative model. Adipose-derived stem cells, bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and skeletal muscle-derived stem cells or muscle precursor cells are used for transplantation to treat bladder dysfunction. The aim of this study is to review stem cell therapy and updated tissue regeneration as treatments for bladder dysfunction and to provide the current status of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for bladder dysfunction including its mechanisms and limitations.

  1. Treatment of Bladder Dysfunction Using Stem Cell or Tissue Engineering Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Lee, Hong Jun

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and stem cell transplantation are two important options that may help overcome limitations in the current treatment strategy for bladder dysfunction. Stem cell therapy holds great promise for treating pathophysiology, as well as for urological tissue engineering and regeneration. To date, stem cell therapy in urology has mainly focused on oncology and erectile dysfunction. The therapeutic potency of stem cells (SCs) was originally thought to derive from their ability to differentiate into various cell types including smooth muscle. The main mechanisms of SCs in reconstituting or restoring bladder function are migration, differentiation, and paracrine effects. Nowadays, paracrine effects of stem cells are thought to be more prominent because of their stimulating effects on stem cells and adjacent cells. Studies of stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction have been limited to experimental models and have been less focused on tissue engineering for bladder regeneration. Bladder outlet obstruction is a representative model. Adipose-derived stem cells, bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and skeletal muscle-derived stem cells or muscle precursor cells are used for transplantation to treat bladder dysfunction. The aim of this study is to review stem cell therapy and updated tissue regeneration as treatments for bladder dysfunction and to provide the current status of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for bladder dysfunction including its mechanisms and limitations. PMID:24741410

  2. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed. PMID:25914884

  3. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed.

  4. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  5. Ionizing radiation damage to cells: effects of cell cycle redistribution.

    PubMed

    Chen, P L; Brenner, D J; Sachs, R K

    1995-04-01

    If a population of cycling cells is exposed to a fixed dose of ionizing radiation delivered over time T, it is sometimes observed that increasing T increases the amount of cell killing. This is essentially because at first the radiation preferentially kills cells in a sensitive portion of the cycle and the surviving, more resistant cells then have time to reach more sensitive stages. We refer to this effect as population resensitization, caused by redistribution within the cell cycle. We investigate the effect theoretically by employing the McKendrick-von Foerster equation for age-structured proliferating cell populations, generalized by introducing a radiation damage term. Within our formalism, we show that population resensitization occurs whenever: (a) prior to irradiation the cell population has the stable age-distribution approached asymptotically by an unirradiated population, and (b) T is sufficiently small. Examples and other cases are outlined. The methods of Volterra integral equations, renewal theory, and positive semigroup theory are applied. The effect of varying T is evaluated by considering the ultimate amplitude of the stable age-distribution population at times much greater than both the irradiation duration and the average cell-cycle time. The main biological limitations of the formalism are the following: considering only radiation damage which is not subject to enzymatic repair or quadratic misrepair, using an overly naive method of ensuring loss of cell cycle synchrony, neglecting nonlinear effects such as density inhibition of growth, and neglecting radiatively induced perturbations of the cell cycle. Possible methods for removing these limitations are briefly discussed.

  6. Reprogramming the Cell Cycle for Endoreduplication in Rodent Trophoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    MacAuley, Alasdair; Cross, James C.; Werb, Zena

    1998-01-01

    Differentiation of trophoblast giant cells in the rodent placenta is accompanied by exit from the mitotic cell cycle and onset of endoreduplication. Commitment to giant cell differentiation is under developmental control, involving down-regulation of Id1 and Id2, concomitant with up-regulation of the basic helix-loop-helix factor Hxt and acquisition of increased adhesiveness. Endoreduplication disrupts the alternation of DNA synthesis and mitosis that maintains euploid DNA content during proliferation. To determine how the mammalian endocycle is regulated, we examined the expression of the cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases during the transition from replication to endoreduplication in the Rcho-1 rat choriocarcinoma cell line. We cultured these cells under conditions that gave relatively synchronous endoreduplication. This allowed us to study the events that occur during the transition from the mitotic cycle to the first endocycle. With giant cell differentiation, the cells switched cyclin D isoform expression from D3 to D1 and altered several checkpoint functions, acquiring a relative insensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and a coincident serum independence. The initiation of S phase during endocycles appeared to involve cycles of synthesis of cyclins E and A, and termination of S was associated with abrupt loss of cyclin A and E. Both cyclins were absent from gap phase cells, suggesting that their degradation may be necessary to allow reinitiation of the endocycle. The arrest of the mitotic cycle at the onset of endoreduplication was associated with a failure to assemble cyclin B/p34cdk1 complexes during the first endocycle. In subsequent endocycles, cyclin B expression was suppressed. Together these data suggest several points at which cell cycle regulation could be targeted to shift cells from a mitotic to an endoreduplicative cycle. PMID:9529378

  7. PD-1 marks dysfunctional regulatory T cells in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, Daniel E.; Goods, Brittany A.; Lucca, Liliana E.; Lerner, Benjamin A.; Raddassi, Khadir; van Dijk, David; Hernandez, Amanda L.; Duan, Xiangguo; Gunel, Murat; Coric, Vlad; Krishnaswamy, Smita; Hafler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapies targeting the immune checkpoint receptor programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) have shown remarkable efficacy in treating cancer. CD4+CD25hiFoxP3+ Tregs are critical regulators of immune responses in autoimmunity and malignancies, but the functional status of human Tregs expressing PD-1 remains unclear. We examined functional and molecular features of PD-1hi Tregs in healthy subjects and patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), combining functional assays, RNA sequencing, and cytometry by time of flight (CyTOF). In both patients with GBM and healthy subjects, circulating PD-1hi Tregs displayed reduced suppression of CD4+ effector T cells, production of IFN-γ, and molecular signatures of exhaustion. Transcriptional profiling of tumor-resident Tregs revealed that several genes coexpressed with PD-1 and associated with IFN-γ production and exhaustion as well as enrichment in exhaustion signatures compared with circulating PD-1hi Tregs. CyTOF analysis of circulating and tumor-infiltrating Tregs from patients with GBM treated with PD-1-blocking antibodies revealed that treatment shifts the profile of circulating Tregs toward a more exhausted phenotype reminiscent of that of tumor-infiltrating Tregs, further increasing IFN-γ production. Thus, high PD-1 expression on human Tregs identifies dysfunctional, exhausted Tregs secreting IFN-γ that exist in healthy individuals and are enriched in tumor infiltrates, possibly losing function as they attempt to modulate the antitumoral immune responses. PMID:27182555

  8. Cell cycle regulation of Golgi membrane dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Danming; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is a membranous organelle in the cell that plays essential roles in protein and lipid trafficking, sorting, processing and modification. Its basic structure is a stack of closely aligned flattened cisternae. In mammalian cells, dozens of Golgi stacks are often laterally linked into a ribbon-like structure. Biogenesis of the Golgi during cell division occurs through a sophisticated disassembly and reassembly process that can be divided into three distinct but cooperative steps, including the deformation and reformation of the Golgi cisternae, stacks and ribbon. Here, we review our current understanding of the protein machineries that control these three steps in the cycle of mammalian cell division: GRASP65 and GRASP55 in Golgi stack and ribbon formation; ubiquitin and AAA ATPases in post-mitotic Golgi membrane fusion; and golgins and cytoskeleton in Golgi ribbon formation. PMID:23453991

  9. Fuel cell and advanced turbine power cycle

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Solar has a vested interest in integration of gas turbines and high temperature fuels (particularly solid oxide fuel cells[SOFC]); this would be a backup for achieving efficiencies on the order of 60% with low exhaust emissions. Preferred cycle is with the fuel cell as a topping system to the gas turbine; bottoming arrangements (fuel cells using the gas turbine exhaust as air supply) would likely be both larger and less efficient unless complex steam bottoming systems are added. The combined SOFC and gas turbine will have an advantage because it will have lower NOx emissions than any heat engine system. Market niche for initial product entry will be the dispersed or distributed power market in nonattainment areas. First entry will be of 1-2 MW units between the years 2000 and 2004. Development requirements are outlined for both the fuel cell and the gas turbine.

  10. Obesity and aging: determinants of endothelial cell dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias

    2010-10-01

    Endothelial cells are both the source and target of factors contributing to atherosclerosis. After the discovery of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) by Robert F. Furchgott in 1980 it soon became clear that endothelial cells also release vasoactive factors distinct from nitric oxide (NO) namely, endothelium-derived contracting factors (EDCF) as well as hyperpolarizing factors (EDHF). Vasoactive factors derived from endothelial cells include NO/EDRF, reactive oxygen species, endothelins and angiotensins which have either EDRF or EDCF functions, cyclooxygenase-derived EDCFs and EDRFs, and EDHFs. Endothelial factors are formed by enzymes such as NO synthase, cyclooxygenase, converting enyzmes, NADPH oxidases, and epoxigenases, among others, and participate in the regulation of vascular homeostasis under physiological conditions; however, their abnormal regulation due to endothelial cell dysfunction contributes to disease processes such as atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, and renal disease. Because of recent changes in world demographics and the declining health status of the world's population, both aging and obesity as independent risk factors for atherosclerosis-related diseases such as coronary artery disease and stroke, will continue to increase in the years to come. Obesity and associated conditions such as arterial hypertension and diabetes are now also some of the primary health concerns among children and adolescents. The similarities of pathomechanisms activated in obesity and aging suggest that obesity--at least in the vasculature--can be considered to have effects consistent with accelerated, "premature" aging. Pathomechanisms as well as the clinical issues of obesity- and aging-associated vascular changes important for atherosclerosis development and prevention are discussed.

  11. New insights into cell cycle regulation and DNA damage response in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suvorova, Irina I; Katolikova, Natalia V; Pospelov, Valery A

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have unlimited proliferative potential, while retaining the ability to differentiate into descendants of all three embryonic layers. High proliferation rate of ESCs is accompanied by a shortening of the G(1) phase and the lack of G(1) checkpoint following DNA damage. The absence of G(1) arrest in ESCs after DNA damage is likely caused by a dysfunction of the p53-dependent p21Waf1 pathway that is a key event for the maintenance of pluripotency. There are controversial data on the functional status of p53, but it is well established that one of the key p53 target-p21Waf1-is expressed in ESCs at a very low level. Despite the lack of G(1) checkpoint, ESCs are capable to repair DNA defects; moreover the DNA damage response (DDR) signaling operates very effectively throughout the cell cycle. This review covers also the results obtained with the reprogramming of somatic cells into the induced pluripotent stem cells, for which have been shown that a partial dysfunction of the p53Waf1 pathway increases the frequency of generation of pluripotent cells. In summary, these results indicate that the G(1) checkpoint control and DDR are distinct from somatic cells and their status is tightly connected with maintaining of pluripotency and self-renewal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mir-33 regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Ryan M; Salerno, Alessandro G; Ramírez, Cristina M; Chamorro-Jorganes, Aránzazu; Wanschel, Amarylis C; Lasunción, Miguel A; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Suárez, Yajaira; Baldán, Ángel; Esplugues, Enric

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated at the cellular level and is essential for cellular growth. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of noncoding RNAs, have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, acting predominantly at the posttranscriptional level. Recent work from our group and others has shown that hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-33b, miRNAs located within intronic sequences of the Srebp genes, regulate cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that hsa-miR-33 family members modulate the expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and cell proliferation. MiR-33 inhibits the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) and cyclin D1 (CCND1), thereby reducing cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Overexpression of miR-33 induces a significant G1 cell cycle arrest in Huh7 and A549 cell lines. Most importantly, inhibition of miR-33 expression using 2′fluoro/methoxyethyl-modified (2′F/MOE-modified) phosphorothioate backbone antisense oligonucleotides improves liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH) in mice, suggesting an important role for miR-33 in regulating hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. Altogether, these results suggest that Srebp/miR-33 locus may cooperate to regulate cell proliferation and cell cycle progression and may also be relevant to human liver regeneration. PMID:22333591

  13. Mir-33 regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Pauta, Montse; Allen, Ryan M; Salerno, Alessandro G; Ramírez, Cristina M; Chamorro-Jorganes, Aranzazu; Wanschel, Amarylis C; Lasuncion, Miguel A; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Suarez, Yajaira; Baldan, Ángel; Esplugues, Enric; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2012-03-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated at the cellular level and is essential for cellular growth. microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of noncoding RNAs, have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, acting predominantly at posttranscriptional level. Recent work from our group and others has shown that hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-33b, miRNAs located within intronic sequences of the Srebp genes, regulate cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that hsa-miR-33 family members modulate the expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and cell proliferation. MiR-33 inhibits the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) and cyclin D1 (CCND1), thereby reducing cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Overexpression of miR-33 induces a significant G 1 cell cycle arrest in Huh7 and A549 cell lines. Most importantly, inhibition of miR-33 expression using 2'fluoro/methoxyethyl-modified (2'F/MOE-modified) phosphorothioate backbone antisense oligonucleotides improves liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH) in mice, suggesting an important role for miR-33 in regulating hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. Altogether, these results suggest that Srebp/miR-33 locus may cooperate to regulate cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and may also be relevant to human liver regeneration.

  14. Cycle length restitution in sinoatrial node cells: a theory for understanding spontaneous action potential dynamics.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Patric; Onal, Birce; Hund, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Normal heart rhythm (sinus rhythm) is governed by the sinoatrial node, a specialized and highly heterogeneous collection of spontaneously active myocytes in the right atrium. Sinoatrial node dysfunction, characterized by slow and/or asynchronous pacemaker activity and even failure, is associated with cardiovascular disease (e.g. heart failure, atrial fibrillation). While tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular and ionic basis of automaticity in sinoatrial node cells, the dynamics governing sinoatrial nodel cell synchrony and overall pacemaker function remain unclear. Here, a well-validated computational model of the mouse sinoatrial node cell is used to test the hypothesis that sinoatrial node cell dynamics reflect an inherent restitution property (cycle length restitution) that may give rise to a wide range of behavior from regular periodicity to highly complex, irregular activation. Computer simulations are performed to determine the cycle length restitution curve in the computational model using a newly defined voltage pulse protocol. The ability of the restitution curve to predict sinoatrial node cell dynamics (e.g., the emergence of irregular spontaneous activity) and susceptibility to termination is evaluated. Finally, ionic and tissue level factors (e.g. ion channel conductances, ion concentrations, cell-to-cell coupling) that influence restitution and sinoatrial node cell dynamics are explored. Together, these findings suggest that cycle length restitution may be a useful tool for analyzing cell dynamics and dysfunction in the sinoatrial node.

  15. Proliferation and cell cycle dynamics in the developing stellate ganglion.

    PubMed

    Gonsalvez, David G; Cane, Kylie N; Landman, Kerry A; Enomoto, Hideki; Young, Heather M; Anderson, Colin R

    2013-04-03

    Cell proliferation during nervous system development is poorly understood outside the mouse neocortex. We measured cell cycle dynamics in the embryonic mouse sympathetic stellate ganglion, where neuroblasts continue to proliferate following neuronal differentiation. At embryonic day (E) 9.5, when neural crest-derived cells were migrating and coalescing into the ganglion primordium, all cells were cycling, cell cycle length was only 10.6 h, and S-phase comprised over 65% of the cell cycle; these values are similar to those previously reported for embryonic stem cells. At E10.5, Sox10(+) cells lengthened their cell cycle to 38 h and reduced the length of S-phase. As cells started to express the neuronal markers Tuj1 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) at E10.5, they exited the cell cycle. At E11.5, when >80% of cells in the ganglion were Tuj1(+)/TH(+) neuroblasts, all cells were again cycling. Neuroblast cell cycle length did not change significantly after E11.5, and 98% of Sox10(-)/TH(+) cells had exited the cell cycle by E18.5. The cell cycle length of Sox10(+)/TH(-) cells increased during late embryonic development, and ∼25% were still cycling at E18.5. Loss of Ret increased neuroblast cell cycle length at E16.5 and decreased the number of neuroblasts at E18.5. A mathematical model generated from our data successfully predicted the relative change in proportions of neuroblasts and non-neuroblasts in wild-type mice. Our results show that, like other neurons, sympathetic neuron differentiation is associated with exit from the cell cycle; sympathetic neurons are unusual in that they then re-enter the cell cycle before later permanently exiting.

  16. Cell cycle of globose basal cells in rat olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huard, J M; Schwob, J E

    1995-05-01

    The olfactory epithelium of adult mammals has the unique property of generating olfactory sensory neurons throughout life. Cells of the basal compartment, which include horizontal and globose basal cells, are responsible for the ongoing process of neurogenesis in this system. We report here that the globose basal cells in olfactory epithelium of rats, as in mice, are the predominant type of proliferating cell, and account for 97.6% of the actively dividing cells in the basal compartment of the normal epithelium. Globose basal cells have not been fully characterized in terms of their proliferative properties, and the dynamic aspects of neurogenesis are not well understood. As a consequence, it is uncertain whether cell kinetic properties are under any regulation that could affect the rate of neurogenesis. To address this gap in our knowledge, we have determined the duration of both the synthesis phase (S-phase) and the full cell cycle of globose basal cells in adult rats. The duration of the S-phase was found to be 9 hr in experiments utilizing sequential injections of either IdU followed by BrdU or 3H-thy followed by BrdU. The duration of the cell cycle was determined by varying the time interval between the injections of 3H-thy and BrdU and tracking the set of cells that exit S shortly after the first injection. With this paradigm, the interval required for these cells to traverse G2, M, G1, and a second S-phase, is equivalent to the duration of one mitotic cycle and equals 17 hr. These observations serve as the foundation to assess whether the cell cycle duration is subject to regulation in response to experimental injury, and whether such regulation is partly responsible for changes in the rate of neurogenesis in such settings.

  17. Methionine cycle kinetics and arginine supplementation in endothelial dysfunction of ESRD

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To investigate the effect of arginine supplementation on metabolic pathways involved in endothelial dysfunction of end stage renal disease (ESRD), we conducted a study on 11 ESRD patients age 49+/-16; wt 93+/-26 kg receiving an adequate protein and energy intake for 1 week, followed by a primed, con...

  18. Mitochondrial Regulation of Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Antico Arciuch, Valeria Gabriela; Elguero, María Eugenia; Poderoso, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Eukaryotic mitochondria resulted from symbiotic incorporation of α-proteobacteria into ancient archaea species. During evolution, mitochondria lost most of the prokaryotic bacterial genes and only conserved a small fraction including those encoding 13 proteins of the respiratory chain. In this process, many functions were transferred to the host cells, but mitochondria gained a central role in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis, and in the modulation of metabolism; accordingly, defective organelles contribute to cell transformation and cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most cell and transcriptional effects of mitochondria depend on the modulation of respiratory rate and on the production of hydrogen peroxide released into the cytosol. The mitochondrial oxidative rate has to remain depressed for cell proliferation; even in the presence of O2, energy is preferentially obtained from increased glycolysis (Warburg effect). In response to stress signals, traffic of pro- and antiapoptotic mitochondrial proteins in the intermembrane space (B-cell lymphoma-extra large, Bcl-2-associated death promoter, Bcl-2 associated X-protein and cytochrome c) is modulated by the redox condition determined by mitochondrial O2 utilization and mitochondrial nitric oxide metabolism. In this article, we highlight the traffic of the different canonical signaling pathways to mitochondria and the contributions of organelles to redox regulation of kinases. Finally, we analyze the dynamics of the mitochondrial population in cell cycle and apoptosis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1150–1180. PMID:21967640

  19. [Cell cycle, mitosis and therapeutic applications].

    PubMed

    Levy, Antonin; Albiges-Sauvin, Laurence; Massard, Christophe; Soria, Jean-Charles; Deutsch, Eric

    2011-10-01

    Genomic DNA is constantly under stress of endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. Without proper care, the DNA damage causes an alteration of the genomic structure and can lead to cell death or the occurrence of mutations involved in tumorigenesis. During the process of evolution, organisms have acquired a series of response mechanisms and repair of DNA damage, thereby ensuring the maintenance of genome stability and faithful transmission of genetic information. The checkpoints are the major mechanisms by which a cell can respond to DNA damage, either by actively stopping the cell cycle or by induction of apoptosis. Two parallel signalling pathways, ATM and ATR respond to genotoxic stress by activating their downstream target proteins including the two effectors kinases CHK1 and CHK2. Promising preliminary data render these proteins potential targets for therapeutic development against cancer.

  20. Cytokines in Endocrine Dysfunction of Plasma Cell Disorders.

    PubMed

    Feigerlová, Eva; Battaglia-Hsu, Shyue-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MG) are classically associated with lytic bone lesions, hypercalcemia, anemia, and renal insufficiency. However, in some cases, symptoms of endocrine dysfunction are more prominent than these classical signs and misdiagnosis can thus be possible. This concerns especially the situation where the presence of M-protein is limited and the serum protein electrophoresis (sPEP) appears normal. To understand the origin of the endocrine symptoms associated with MG, we overview here the current knowledge on the complexity of interactions between cytokines and the endocrine system in MG and discuss the perspectives for both the diagnosis and treatments for this class of diseases. We also illustrate the role of major cytokines and growth factors such as IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and VEGF in the endocrine system, as these tumor-relevant signaling molecules not only help the clonal expansion and invasion of the tumor cells but also influence cellular metabolism through autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine mechanisms. We further discuss the broader impact of these tumor environment-derived molecules and proinflammatory state on systemic hormone signaling. The diagnostic challenges and clinical work-up are illustrated from the point of view of an endocrinologist.

  1. The cell cycle rallies the transcription cycle: Cdc28/Cdk1 is a cell cycle-regulated transcriptional CDK.

    PubMed

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Enserink, Jorrit M

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) Kin28, Bur1 and Ctk1 regulate basal transcription by phosphorylating the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II. However, very little is known about the involvement of the cell cycle CDK Cdc28 in the transcription process. We have recently shown that, upon cell cycle entry, Cdc28 kinase activity boosts transcription of a subset of genes by directly stimulating the basal transcription machinery. Here, we discuss the biological significance of this finding and give our view of the kinase-dependent role of Cdc28 in regulation of RNA polymerase II.

  2. Gadd45a deletion aggravates hematopoietic stem cell dysfunction in ATM-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulin; Yang, Runan; Guo, Peng; Ju, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase plays an essential role in the maintenance of genomic stability. ATM-deficient (ATM(-/-)) mice exhibit hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) dysfunction and a high incidence of lymphoma. Gadd45a controls cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA repair, and is involved in the ATM-p53 mediated DNA damage response. However, the role of Gadd45a in regulating the functionality of ATM(-/-) HSCs is unknown. Here we report that Gadd45a deletion did not rescue the defects of T-cells and B-cells development in ATM(-/-) mice. Instead, ATM and Gadd45a double knockout (ATM(-/-) Gadd45a(-/-)) HSCs exhibited an aggravated defect in long-term self-renewal capacity compared to ATM(-/-) HSCs in HSC transplantation experiments. Further experiments revealed that the aggravated defect of ATM(-/-) Gadd45a(-/-) HSCs was due to a reduction of cell proliferation, associated with an accumulation of DNA damage and subsequent activation of DNA damage response including an up-regulation of p53-p21 signaling pathway. Additionally, ATM(-/-) Gadd45a(-/-) mice showed an increased incidence of hematopoietic malignancies, as well as an increased rate of metastasis than ATM(-/-) mice. In conclusion, Gadd45a deletion aggravated the DNA damage accumulation, which subsequently resulted in a further impaired self-renewal capacity and an increased malignant transformation in ATM(-/-) HSCs.

  3. Arsenic trioxide inhibits glioma cell growth through induction of telomerase displacement and telomere dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ye; Li, Yunqian; Ma, Chengyuan; Song, Yang; Xu, Haiyang; Yu, Hongquan; Xu, Songbai; Mu, Qingchun; Li, Haisong; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas are resistant to many kinds of treatment, including chemotherapy, radiation and other adjuvant therapies. As2O3 reportedly induces ROS generation in cells, suggesting it may be able to induce telomerase suppression and telomere dysfunction in glioblastoma cells. We show here that As2O3 induces ROS generation as well as telomerase phosphorylation in U87, U251, SHG4 and C6 glioma cells. It also induces translocation of telomerase from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, thereby decreasing total telomerase activity. These effects of As2O3 trigger an extensive DNA damage response at the telomere, which includes up-regulation of ATM, ATR, 53BP1, γ-H2AX and Mer11, in parallel with telomere fusion and 3′-overhang degradation. This ultimately results in induction of p53- and p21-mediated cell apoptosis, G2/M cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence. These results provide new insight into the antitumor effects of As2O3 and can perhaps contribute to solving the problem of glioblastoma treatment resistance. PMID:26871293

  4. Scaffolding during the cell cycle by A-kinase anchoring proteins.

    PubMed

    Han, B; Poppinga, W J; Schmidt, M

    2015-12-01

    Cell division relies on coordinated regulation of the cell cycle. A process including a well-defined series of strictly regulated molecular mechanisms involving cyclin-dependent kinases, retinoblastoma protein, and polo-like kinases. Dysfunctions in cell cycle regulation are associated with disease such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Compartmentalization of cellular signaling is a common strategy used to ensure the accuracy and efficiency of cellular responses. Compartmentalization of intracellular signaling is maintained by scaffolding proteins, such as A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). AKAPs are characterized by their ability to anchor the regulatory subunits of protein kinase A (PKA), and thereby achieve guidance to different cellular locations via various targeting domains. Next to PKA, AKAPs also associate with several other signaling elements including receptors, ion channels, protein kinases, phosphatases, small GTPases, and phosphodiesterases. Taking the amount of possible AKAP signaling complexes and their diverse localization into account, it is rational to believe that such AKAP-based complexes regulate several critical cellular events of the cell cycle. In fact, several AKAPs are assigned as tumor suppressors due to their vital roles in cell cycle regulation. Here, we first briefly discuss the most important players of cell cycle progression. After that, we will review our recent knowledge of AKAPs linked to the regulation and progression of the cell cycle, with special focus on AKAP12, AKAP8, and Ezrin. At last, we will discuss this specific AKAP subset in relation to diseases with focus on a diverse subset of cancer.

  5. The ciliary GTPase Arl13b regulates cell migration and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Pruski, Michal; Rajnicek, Ann; Yang, Zhifu; Clancy, Hannah; Ding, Yu-Qiang; McCaig, Colin D.; Lang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The GTPase ARL13B is localized to primary cilia; small cellular protrusions that act as antennae. Its defective ARL13B hennin (HNN) variant is linked causally with Joubert Syndrome, a developmental ciliopathy attributed to poor sensing of extracellular chemical gradients. We tested the hypothesis that impaired detection of extracellular voltage gradients also contributes to the HNN phenotype. In vitro, extracellular electric fields stimulated migration of wild type (WT) and HNN fibroblasts toward the cathode but the field only increased the migration speed of WT cells. Cilia on WT cells did not align to the field vector. HNN cells divided more slowly than WT cells, arresting at the G2/M phase. Mechanistically, HNN cells had reduced phospho-ERK1/2 signaling and elevated levels of Suppressor of Fused protein. These suggest that cells may not be able to read extracellular chemical cues appropriately, resulting in deficits in cell migration and proliferation. Finally, an increase in tubulin stabilization (more detyrosinated tubulin) confirmed the general stagnation of HNN cells, which may further contribute to slower migration and cell cycle progression. We conclude that Arl13b dysfunction resulted in HNN cell stagnation due to poor growth factor signaling and impaired detection of extracellular electrical gradients, and that the role of Arl13b in cell proliferation may be understated. PMID:26963749

  6. T Cell Receptor-induced Activation and Apoptosis In Cycling Human T Cells Occur throughout the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Michael; Zaks, Tal Z.; JL, Liu; LeRoith, Derek

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have found conflicting associations between susceptibility to activation-induced cell death and the cell cycle in T cells. However, most of the studies used potentially toxic pharmacological agents for cell cycle synchronization. A panel of human melanoma tumor-reactive T cell lines, a CD8+ HER-2/neu-reactive T cell clone, and the leukemic T cell line Jurkat were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Fractions enriched for the G0–G1, S, and G2–M phases of the cell cycle were assayed for T cell receptor-mediated activation as measured by intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytolytic recognition of tumor targets, and induction of Fas ligand mRNA. Susceptibility to apoptosis induced by recombinant Fas ligand and activation-induced cell death were also studied. None of the parameters studied was specific to a certain phase of the cell cycle, leading us to conclude that in nontransformed human T cells, both activation and apoptosis through T cell receptor activation can occur in all phases of the cell cycle. PMID:10588669

  7. Fungal Cell Cycle: A Unicellular versus Multicellular Comparison.

    PubMed

    Dörter, Ilkay; Momany, Michelle

    2016-12-01

    All cells must accurately replicate DNA and partition it to daughter cells. The basic cell cycle machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes. Most of the mechanisms that control the cell cycle were worked out in fungal cells, taking advantage of their powerful genetics and rapid duplication times. Here we describe the cell cycles of the unicellular budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the multicellular filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. We compare and contrast morphological landmarks of G1, S, G2, and M phases, molecular mechanisms that drive cell cycle progression, and checkpoints in these model unicellular and multicellular fungal systems.

  8. The cell-cycle state of stem cells determines cell fate propensity.

    PubMed

    Pauklin, Siim; Vallier, Ludovic

    2013-09-26

    Self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells are fundamentally associated with cell-cycle progression to enable tissue specification, organ homeostasis, and potentially tumorigenesis. However, technical challenges have impaired the study of the molecular interactions coordinating cell fate choice and cell-cycle progression. Here, we bypass these limitations by using the FUCCI reporter system in human pluripotent stem cells and show that their capacity of differentiation varies during the progression of their cell cycle. These mechanisms are governed by the cell-cycle regulators cyclin D1-3 that control differentiation signals such as the TGF-β-Smad2/3 pathway. Conversely, cell-cycle manipulation using a small molecule directs differentiation of hPSCs and provides an approach to generate cell types with a clinical interest. Our results demonstrate that cell fate decisions are tightly associated with the cell-cycle machinery and reveal insights in the mechanisms synchronizing differentiation and proliferation in developing tissues.

  9. Cell Cycle Regulators during Human Atrial Development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Ho; Joo, Chan Uhng; Ku, Ja Hong; Ryu, Chul Hee; Koh, Keum Nim; Koh, Gou Young; Ko, Jae Ki

    1998-01-01

    Objectives The molecular mechanisms that regulate cardiomyocyte cell cycle and terminal differentiation in humans remain largely unknown. To determine which cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclin kinase inhibitors (CKIs) are important for cardiomyocyte proliferation, we have examined protein levels of cyclins, CDKs and CKIs during normal atrial development in humans. Methods Atrial tissues were obtained in the fetus from inevitable abortion and in the adult during surgery, Cyclin and CDK proteins were determined by Western blot analysis, CDK activities were determined by phosphorylation amount using specific substrate. Results Most cyclins and CDKs were high during the fetal period and their levels decreased at different rates during the adult period. While the protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, CDK4, CDK6 and CDK2 were still detectable in adult atria, the protein levels of cyclin E, cyclin A, cyclin B, cdc2 and PCNA were not detectable. Interestingly, p27KIP 1 protein increased markedly in the adult period, while p21C IP 1 protein in atria was detectable only in the fetal period. While the activities of CDK6, CDK2 and cdc2 decreased markedly, the activity of CDK4 did not change from the fetal period to the adult period. Conclusion These findings indicate that marked reduction of protein levels and activities of cyclins and CDKs, and marked induction of p27KIP 1 in atria, are associated with the withdrawal of cardiac cell cycle in adult humans. PMID:9735660

  10. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo; Isegawa, Naohisa; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  11. Cell cycle regulation by long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Kotake, Yojiro; Niida, Hiroyuki; Ohhata, Tatsuya

    2013-12-01

    The mammalian cell cycle is precisely controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and related pathways such as the RB and p53 pathways. Recent research on long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) indicates that many lncRNAs are involved in the regulation of critical cell cycle regulators such as the cyclins, CDKs, CDK inhibitors, pRB, and p53. These lncRNAs act as epigenetic regulators, transcription factor regulators, post-transcription regulators, and protein scaffolds. These cell cycle-regulated lncRNAs mainly control cellular levels of cell cycle regulators via various mechanisms, and may provide diversity and reliability to the general cell cycle. Interestingly, several lncRNAs are induced by DNA damage and participate in cell cycle arrest or induction of apoptosis as DNA damage responses. Therefore, deregulations of these cell cycle regulatory lncRNAs may be involved in tumorigenesis, and they are novel candidate molecular targets for cancer therapy and diagnosis.

  12. Cell cycle proliferation decisions: the impact of single cell analyses.

    PubMed

    Matson, Jacob P; Cook, Jeanette G

    2017-02-01

    Cell proliferation is a fundamental requirement for organismal development and homeostasis. The mammalian cell division cycle is tightly controlled to ensure complete and precise genome duplication and segregation of replicated chromosomes to daughter cells. The onset of DNA replication marks an irreversible commitment to cell division, and the accumulated efforts of many decades of molecular and cellular studies have probed this cellular decision, commonly called the restriction point. Despite a long-standing conceptual framework of the restriction point for progression through G1 phase into S phase or exit from G1 phase to quiescence (G0), recent technical advances in quantitative single cell analysis of mammalian cells have provided new insights. Significant intercellular heterogeneity revealed by single cell studies and the discovery of discrete subpopulations in proliferating cultures suggests the need for an even more nuanced understanding of cell proliferation decisions. In this review, we describe some of the recent developments in the cell cycle field made possible by quantitative single cell experimental approaches. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Metabolism, cell growth and the bacterial cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jue D.; Levin, Petra A.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptation to fluctuations in nutrient availability is a fact of life for single-celled organisms in the ‘wild’. A decade ago our understanding of how bacteria adjust cell cycle parameters to accommodate changes in nutrient availability stemmed almost entirely from elegant physiological studies completed in the 1960s. In this Opinion article we summarize recent groundbreaking work in this area and discuss potential mechanisms by which nutrient availability and metabolic status are coordinated with cell growth, chromosome replication and cell division. PMID:19806155

  14. Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures. Part I. Cycling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadass, P.; Haran, Bala; White, Ralph; Popov, Branko N.

    The capacity fade of Sony 18650 Li-ion cells increases with increase in temperature. After 800 cycles, the cells cycled at RT and 45 °C showed a capacity fade of 30 and 36%, respectively. The cell cycled at 55 °C showed a capacity loss of about 70% after 490 cycles. The rate capability of the cells continues to decrease with cycling. Impedance measurements showed an overall increase in the cell resistance with cycling and temperature. Impedance studies of the electrode materials showed an increased positive electrode resistance when compared to that of the negative electrode for cells cycled at RT and 45 °C. However, cells cycled at 50 and 55 °C exhibit higher negative electrode resistance. The increased capacity fade for the cells cycled at high temperatures can be explained by taking into account the repeated film formation over the surface of anode, which results in increased rate of lithium loss and also in a drastic increase in the negative electrode resistance with cycling.

  15. Construction of 3D micropatterned surfaces with wormlike and superhydrophilic PEG brushes to detect dysfunctional cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianwen; Shi, Qiang; Ye, Wei; Fan, Qunfu; Shi, Hengchong; Wong, Shing-Chung; Xu, Xiaodong; Yin, Jinghua

    2014-12-10

    Detection of dysfunctional and apoptotic cells plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and therapy. To develop a portable and user-friendly platform for dysfunctional and aging cell detection, we present a facile method to construct 3D patterns on the surface of styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene elastomer (SEBS) with poly(ethylene glycol) brushes. Normal red blood cells (RBCs) and lysed RBCs (dysfunctional cells) are used as model cells. The strategy is based on the fact that poly(ethylene glycol) brushes tend to interact with phosphatidylserine, which is in the inner leaflet of normal cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cell membranes. We demonstrate that varied patterned surfaces can be obtained by selectively patterning atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators on the SEBS surface via an aqueous-based method and growing PEG brushes through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The relatively high initiator density and polymerization temperature facilitate formation of PEG brushes in high density, which gives brushes worm-like morphology and superhydrophilic property; the tendency of dysfunctional cells adhered on the patterned surfaces is completely different from well-defined arrays of normal cells on the patterned surfaces, providing a facile method to detect dysfunctional cells effectively. The PEG-patterned surfaces are also applicable to detect apoptotic HeLa cells. The simplicity and easy handling of the described technique shows the potential application in microdiagnostic devices.

  16. Cell cycle dysregulation in pituitary oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Muşat, Madalina; Vax, Vladimir V; Borboli, Ninetta; Gueorguiev, Maria; Bonner, Sarah; Korbonits, Márta; Grossman, Ashley B

    2004-01-01

    The cell cycle is the process by which cells grow, replicate their genome and divide. The cell cycle control system is a cyclically-operating biochemical device constructed from a set of interacting proteins that induce and coordinate proper progression through the cycle, and includes cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and their inhibitors (CDKI). There are mainly two families of CDKI, the INK family (INK4a/p16; INK4b/p15; INK4c/p18 and INK4d/p19) and the WAF/KIP family (WAF1/p21; KIP1/p27; KIP2/p57). Progression through the cell cycle is mainly dependent on fluctuations in the concentration of cyclins and CDKI achieved through the programmed degradation of these proteins by proteolysis within the ubiquitin-proteasome system. There is also a transcriptional regulation of cyclin expression, probably dependent on CDK phosphorylation. The p53 family--p53, p63 and p73--function as transcription factors that play a major role in regulating the response of mammalian cells to stressors and damage, in part through the transcriptional activation of genes involved in cell cycle control (e.g. p21), DNA repair, senescence, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Essential for the maintenance of euploidy during mitosis is human securin, identical to the product of the pituitary tumour-transforming gene (PTTG). Loss of regulation at the G1/S transition appears to be a common event among virtually all types of human tumours. Aberrations of one or more components of the pRb/p16/cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway seem to be a frequent event (80%) in pituitary tumours. The role of p27 is rather that of a haploinsufficient gene. p27-/- mice show an increased growth rate, due to increased cellularity, testicular and ovarian cell hyperplasia and infertility, and hyperplasia of the pituitary intermediate lobe with nearly 100% mortality caused by such a benign pituitary tumour. Although the p27 gene was not found to be mutated in human pituitary tumours and its mRNA expression was similar in tumour samples

  17. The islet endothelial cell: a novel contributor to beta cell secretory dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Meghan F; Hull, Rebecca L

    2017-06-01

    The pancreatic islet is highly vascularised, with an extensive capillary network. In addition to providing nutrients and oxygen to islet endocrine cells and transporting hormones to the peripheral circulation, islet capillaries (comprised primarily of islet endothelial cells) are an important source of signals that enhance survival and function of the islet beta cell. In type 2 diabetes, and animal models thereof, evidence exists of morphological and functional abnormalities in these islet endothelial cells. In diabetes, islet capillaries are thickened, dilated and fragmented, and islet endothelial cells express markers of inflammation and activation. In vitro data suggest that this dysfunctional islet endothelial phenotype may contribute to impaired insulin release from the beta cell. This review examines potential candidate molecules that may mediate the positive effects of islet endothelial cells on beta cell survival and function under normal conditions. Further, it explores possible mechanisms underlying the development of islet endothelial dysfunction in diabetes and reviews therapeutic options for ameliorating this aspect of the islet lesion in type 2 diabetes. Finally, considerations regarding differences between human and rodent islet vasculature and the potentially unforeseen negative consequences of strategies to expand the islet vasculature, particularly under diabetic conditions, are discussed.

  18. Analysis of Cell Cycle Switches in Drosophila Oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongyu; Huang, Yi-Chun; Deng, Wu-Min

    2015-01-01

    The study of Drosophila oogenesis provides invaluable information about signaling pathway regulation and cell cycle programming. During Drosophila oogenesis, a string of egg chambers in each ovariole progressively develops toward maturity. Egg chamber development consists of 14 stages. From stage 1 to stage 6 (mitotic cycle), main-body follicle cells undergo mitotic divisions. From stage 7 to stage 10a (endocycle), follicle cells cease mitosis but continue three rounds of endoreduplication. From stage 10b to stage 13 (gene amplification), instead of whole genome duplication, follicle cells selectively amplify specific genomic regions, mostly for chorion production. So far, Drosophila oogenesis is one of the most well studied model systems used to understand cell cycle switches, which furthers our knowledge about cell cycle control machinery and sheds new light on potential cancer treatments. Here, we give a brief summary of cell cycle switches, the associated signaling pathways and factors, and the detailed experimental procedures used to study the cell cycle switches.

  19. Investigational cell cycle inhibitors in clinical trials for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seok Joong; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2013-03-01

    Cancer-related cell cycle defects are often mediated by alterations in activity of diverse cell cycle regulators. The development of cell cycle inhibitors has undergone a gradual evolution, and new investigational drugs have been extensively tested as a single agent or combination with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. This review covers a broad perspective of how the cell cycle is deregulated in bladder cancer and discusses the clinical trials of cell cycle inhibitors. Although diverse cell cycle inhibitors have been considered as relevant drug candidates for cancer therapy owing to their potential role in restoring control of the cell cycle, these inhibitors have not been yet widely tested in human bladder cancer. Numerous studies already reported that deregulation of cell cycle controls has been commonly observed in bladder cancer cells, thus warranting clinical trials of these inhibitors in advanced bladder cancer patients. In addition, nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) show different clinical and molecular biological characteristics, although ∼ 10 - 20% of NMIBC will progress to MIBC. Therefore, adequate cell cycle inhibitors have to be chosen for bladder cancer treatment based on the different genetic features between NMIBC and MIBC related to cell cycle regulators.

  20. Oxidative stress and cell senescence combine to cause maximal renal tubular epithelial cell dysfunction and loss in an in vitro model of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Small, David M; Bennett, Nigel C; Roy, Sandrine; Gabrielli, Brian G; Johnson, David W; Gobe, Glenda C

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and cost of chronic kidney disease (CKD) are increasing. Renal tubular epithelial cell dysfunction and attrition, involving increased apoptosis and cell senescence, are central to the pathogenesis of CKD. The aim here was to use an in vitro model to investigate the separate and cumulative effects of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell senescence in promoting loss of renal mass. Human kidney tubular epithelial cells (HK2) were treated with moderate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for oxidative stress, with or without cell cycle inhibition (apigenin, API) for cell senescence. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and oxidative stress were measured by ATP assay, lipid peroxidation, total antioxidant capacity, mitochondrial function with confocal microscopy, MitoTracker Red CMXRos and live cell imaging with JC-1. In parallel, cell death and injury (i.e. apoptosis and Bax/Bcl-XL expression, lactate dehydrogenase), cell senescence (SA-β-galactosidase) and renal regenerative ability (cell proliferation), and their modulation with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) were investigated. H2O2 and API, separately, increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis and cell senescence. Although API caused cell senescence, it also induced oxidative stress at levels similar to H2O2 treatment alone, indicating that senescence and oxidative stress may be intrinsically linked. When H2O2 and API were delivered concurrently, their detrimental effects on renal cell loss were compounded. The antioxidant NAC attenuated apoptosis and senescence, and restored regenerative potential to the kidney. Oxidative stress and cell senescence both cause mitochondrial destabilization and cell loss and contribute to the development of the cellular characteristics of CKD. 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Energy metabolic dysfunction as a carcinogenic factor in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongyan; Shi, Zhenhua; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2016-03-01

    Cancer, as a leading cause of death, has attracted enormous public attention. Reprogramming of cellular energy metabolism is deemed to be one of the principal hallmarks of cancer. In this article, we reviewed the mutual relationships among environmental pollution factors, energy metabolic dysfunction, and various cancers. We found that most environmental pollution factors could induce cancers mainly by disturbing the energy metabolism. By triggering microenvironment alteration, energy metabolic dysfunction can be treated as a factor in carcinogenesis. Thus, we put forward that energy metabolism might be as a key point for studying carcinogenesis and tumor development to propose new methods for cancer prevention and therapy.

  2. Classic "broken cell" techniques and newer live cell methods for cell cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Lindsay; Bortone, Dante S; Lim, Curtis; Zambon, Alexander C

    2013-05-15

    Many common, important diseases are either caused or exacerbated by hyperactivation (e.g., cancer) or inactivation (e.g., heart failure) of the cell division cycle. A better understanding of the cell cycle is critical for interpreting numerous types of physiological changes in cells. Moreover, new insights into how to control it will facilitate new therapeutics for a variety of diseases and new avenues in regenerative medicine. The progression of cells through the four main phases of their division cycle [G(0)/G(1), S (DNA synthesis), G(2), and M (mitosis)] is a highly conserved process orchestrated by several pathways (e.g., transcription, phosphorylation, nuclear import/export, and protein ubiquitination) that coordinate a core cell cycle pathway. This core pathway can also receive inputs that are cell type and cell niche dependent. "Broken cell" methods (e.g., use of labeled nucleotide analogs) to assess for cell cycle activity have revealed important insights regarding the cell cycle but lack the ability to assess living cells in real time (longitudinal studies) and with single-cell resolution. Moreover, such methods often require cell synchronization, which can perturb the pathway under study. Live cell cycle sensors can be used at single-cell resolution in living cells, intact tissue, and whole animals. Use of these more recently available sensors has the potential to reveal physiologically relevant insights regarding the normal and perturbed cell division cycle.

  3. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with dysfunctional versus normally functioning congenitally bicuspid aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Vaturi, Mordehay; Perl, Leor; Leshem-Lev, Dorit; Dadush, Oshrat; Bental, Tamir; Shapira, Yaron; Yedidya, Idit; Greenberg, Gabi; Kornowski, Ran; Sagie, Alexander; Battler, Alexander; Lev, Eli I

    2011-07-15

    Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) may gradually develop significant valve dysfunction, whereas others remain free of dysfunction. Factors that determine the prognosis of BAV remain unclear. Because endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have a role in the repair of endothelial surfaces after injury, we hypothesized that EPCs may also be involved in preventing BAV degeneration. Accordingly, we compared EPC level and function in patients with BAV with versus without valve dysfunction. The study group included 22 patients with BAV and significant valve dysfunction (at least moderate aortic regurgitation and/or at least moderate aortic stenosis). The control group included 28 patients with BAV without valve dysfunction. All patients had 1 blood sample taken. Proportion of peripheral mononuclear cells expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CD133 and CD34 was evaluated by flow cytometry. EPC colony-forming units (CFUs) were grown from peripheral mononuclear cells, characterized, and counted after 7 days of culture. The 2 groups had similar clinical characteristics except for higher prevalence of hypertension in the dysfunctional valve group. Number of EPC CFUs was smaller in the dysfunctional valve group (32 CFUs/plate, 15 to 42.5, vs 48 CFUs/plate, 30 to 62.5, respectively, p = 0.01), and the migratory capacity of the cells in this group was decreased. In addition, the proportion of cells coexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CD133, and CD34 tended to be smaller in the dysfunctional valve group. In conclusion, patients with BAV and significant valve dysfunction appear to have circulating EPCs with impaired functional properties. These findings require validation by further studies.

  4. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chen-Ming; Wang, Shih-Wei; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Tzeng, Wen-Pei; Hsiao, Che-Jen; Liu, Shih-Chia; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-10-15

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  5. The Cell Cycle Switch Computes Approximate Majority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, Luca; Csikász-Nagy, Attila

    2012-09-01

    Both computational and biological systems have to make decisions about switching from one state to another. The `Approximate Majority' computational algorithm provides the asymptotically fastest way to reach a common decision by all members of a population between two possible outcomes, where the decision approximately matches the initial relative majority. The network that regulates the mitotic entry of the cell-cycle in eukaryotes also makes a decision before it induces early mitotic processes. Here we show that the switch from inactive to active forms of the mitosis promoting Cyclin Dependent Kinases is driven by a system that is related to both the structure and the dynamics of the Approximate Majority computation. We investigate the behavior of these two switches by deterministic, stochastic and probabilistic methods and show that the steady states and temporal dynamics of the two systems are similar and they are exchangeable as components of oscillatory networks.

  6. Local circadian clock gates cell cycle progression of transient amplifying cells during regenerative hair cycling

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Vollmers, Christopher; de la Cruz, Damon; Chaix, Amandine; Ramos, Raul; Panda, Satchidananda; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative cycling of hair follicles offers an unique opportunity to explore the role of circadian clock in physiological tissue regeneration. We focused on the role of circadian clock in actively proliferating transient amplifying cells, as opposed to quiescent stem cells. We identified two key sites of peripheral circadian clock activity specific to regenerating anagen hair follicles, namely epithelial matrix and mesenchymal dermal papilla. We showed that peripheral circadian clock in epithelial matrix cells generates prominent daily mitotic rhythm. As a consequence of this mitotic rhythmicity, hairs grow faster in the morning than in the evening. Because cells are the most susceptible to DNA damage during mitosis, this cycle leads to a remarkable time-of-day–dependent sensitivity of growing hair follicles to genotoxic stress. Same doses of γ-radiation caused dramatic hair loss in wild-type mice when administered in the morning, during mitotic peak, compared with the evening, when hair loss is minimal. This diurnal radioprotective effect becomes lost in circadian mutants, consistent with asynchronous mitoses in their hair follicles. Clock coordinates cell cycle progression with genotoxic stress responses by synchronizing Cdc2/Cyclin B-mediated G2/M checkpoint. Our results uncover diurnal mitotic gating as the essential protective mechanism in highly proliferative hair follicles and offer strategies for minimizing or maximizing cytotoxicity of radiation therapies. PMID:23690597

  7. Cell Cycle and Cell Size Dependent Gene Expression Reveals Distinct Subpopulations at Single-Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Dolatabadi, Soheila; Candia, Julián; Akrap, Nina; Vannas, Christoffer; Tesan Tomic, Tajana; Losert, Wolfgang; Landberg, Göran; Åman, Pierre; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Cell proliferation includes a series of events that is tightly regulated by several checkpoints and layers of control mechanisms. Most studies have been performed on large cell populations, but detailed understanding of cell dynamics and heterogeneity requires single-cell analysis. Here, we used quantitative real-time PCR, profiling the expression of 93 genes in single-cells from three different cell lines. Individual unsynchronized cells from three different cell lines were collected in different cell cycle phases (G0/G1 – S – G2/M) with variable cell sizes. We found that the total transcript level per cell and the expression of most individual genes correlated with progression through the cell cycle, but not with cell size. By applying the random forests algorithm, a supervised machine learning approach, we show how a multi-gene signature that classifies individual cells into their correct cell cycle phase and cell size can be generated. To identify the most predictive genes we used a variable selection strategy. Detailed analysis of cell cycle predictive genes allowed us to define subpopulations with distinct gene expression profiles and to calculate a cell cycle index that illustrates the transition of cells between cell cycle phases. In conclusion, we provide useful experimental approaches and bioinformatics to identify informative and predictive genes at the single-cell level, which opens up new means to describe and understand cell proliferation and subpopulation dynamics. PMID:28179914

  8. SUMOylation-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation plays critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancers were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could potentially be exploited in anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26601932

  9. Reproductive Toxicity of Endosulfan: Implication From Germ Cell Apoptosis Modulated by Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Genotoxic Response Genes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hua; Wang, Meimei; Wang, Lei; Dai, Hui; Wang, Min; Hong, Wei; Nie, Xinxin; Wu, Lijun; Xu, An

    2015-01-01

    Endosulfan as a new member of persistent organic pollutants has been shown to induce reproductive dysfunction in various animal models. However, the action mechanism of endosulfan-produced reproductive toxicity remains largely unknown. This study was focused on investigating the reproductive toxicity induced by α-endosulfan and clarifying the role of mitochondria and genotoxic response genes in germ cell apoptosis of Caenorhabditis elegans. Our data showed that endosulfan induced a dose-dependent decrease of life span, fecundity, and hatchability, whereas the germ cell apoptosis was dose-dependently increased. The mitochondria membrane potential was disrupted by endosulfan, leading to a significant increase of germ cell apoptosis in mev-1(kn-1) mutant. However, the apoptotic effects of endosulfan were blocked in mutants of cep-1(w40), egl-1(n487), and hus-1(op241), indicating conserved genotoxic response genes played an essential role in endosulfan-induced germ cell apoptosis. Furthermore, exposure to endosulfan induced the accumulation of HUS-1::GFP foci and the germ cell cycle arrest. These findings provided clear evidence that endosulfan caused significant adverse effects on the reproduction system of C. elegans and increased germ cell apoptosis, which was regulated by mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage response genes. This study may help to understand the signal transduction pathways involved in endosulfan-induced reproductive toxicity. PMID:25666835

  10. Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle

    DOEpatents

    Micheli, Paul L.; Williams, Mark C.; Sudhoff, Frederick A.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

  11. Induction of apoptosis by Cordyceps militaris fraction in human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells involved with mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Song, Liyan; Zheng, Qin; Hu, Xianjing; Yu, Rongmin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cordyceps militaris is widely used for various ethno medical conditions including cancer and inflammation complications in traditional Chinese medicine. Objective: To investigate the in vitro antitumor activity of Cordyceps militaris fraction (CMF) and the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptosis it induces in human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells. Materials and Methods: CMF was prepared according to our previous report. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. The rate of apoptosis, distribution of cell cycle and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were measured by flow cytometry. Caspase activities were analyzed by Western blot and oxygen consumption rate was recorded using the Oxytherm system. Results: The results demonstrated that CMF triggered growth inhibition in K562 cells with only minor toxicity on a normal human cell line and inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with IC50 value of 34.1 ± 2.0 μg/ml after 48 h incubation. This most likely resulted from cell cycle arrest at the S phase and the induction of apoptosis. In addition, CMF induced activation of caspase-3 and subsequent cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). The caspase signals may originate from mitochondrial dysfunction, which was supported by the finding of decreased mitochondria transmembrance potential and the lower oxygen consumption rate. Conclusion: CMF possessed the in vitro antitumor effect on K562 cells and CMF-induced apoptosis might be involved by the mitochondrial dysfunction and valuable to research and develop as a potential antitumor agency. PMID:25210321

  12. Dynamic translation regulation in Caulobacter cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Jared M; Li, Gene-Wei; Childers, W Seth; Perez, Adam M; Weissman, Jonathan S; Shapiro, Lucy; McAdams, Harley H

    2016-11-01

    Progression of the Caulobacter cell cycle requires temporal and spatial control of gene expression, culminating in an asymmetric cell division yielding distinct daughter cells. To explore the contribution of translational control, RNA-seq and ribosome profiling were used to assay global transcription and translation levels of individual genes at six times over the cell cycle. Translational efficiency (TE) was used as a metric for the relative rate of protein production from each mRNA. TE profiles with similar cell cycle patterns were found across multiple clusters of genes, including those in operons or in subsets of operons. Collections of genes associated with central cell cycle functional modules (e.g., biosynthesis of stalk, flagellum, or chemotaxis machinery) have consistent but different TE temporal patterns, independent of their operon organization. Differential translation of operon-encoded genes facilitates precise cell cycle-timing for the dynamic assembly of multiprotein complexes, such as the flagellum and the stalk and the correct positioning of regulatory proteins to specific cell poles. The cell cycle-regulatory pathways that produce specific temporal TE patterns are separate from-but highly coordinated with-the transcriptional cell cycle circuitry, suggesting that the scheduling of translational regulation is organized by the same cyclical regulatory circuit that directs the transcriptional control of the Caulobacter cell cycle.

  13. Calcium, a Cell Cycle Commander, Drives Colon Cancer Cell Diffpoptosis.

    PubMed

    Abd-Rabou, Ahmed A

    2017-03-01

    The story of the cell commonder, calcium, reaches into all corners of the cell and controls cell proliferation, differentiation, function, and even death. The calcium-driven eukaryotic revolution is one of the great turning points in the life history, happened about two billion years later when it was converted from a dangerous killer that had to be kept out of cell into the cell master which drives the cell. This review article will take the readers to a tour of tissues chosen to best show the calcium's many faces (proliferator, differentiator, and killer). The reader will first see calcium and its many helpers, such as the calcium-binding signaler protein calmodulin, directing the key events of the cell cycle. Then the tour will move onto the colon to show calcium driving the proliferation of progenitor cells, then the differentiation and ultimately the programmed death of their progeny. Moreover, the reader will learn of the striking disabling and bypassing of calcium-dependent control mechanisms during carcinogenesis. Finally, recommendations should be taken from the underlying mechanisms through which calcium masters the presistance, progression, and even apoptosis of colorectal cancer cells. Thus, this could be of great interest for designing of chemoprevention protocols.

  14. Drug-induced cell cycle modulation leading to cell-cycle arrest, nuclear mis-segregation, or endoreplication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer cell responses to chemotherapeutic agents vary, and this may reflect different defects in DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis control. Cytometry analysis only quantifies dye-incorporation to examine DNA content and does not reflect the biological complexity of the cell cycle in drug discovery screens. Results Using population and time-lapse imaging analyses of cultured immortalized cells expressing a new version of the fluorescent cell-cycle indicator, Fucci (Fluorescent Ubiquitination-based Cell Cycle Indicator), we found great diversity in the cell-cycle alterations induced by two anticancer drugs. When treated with etoposide, an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II, HeLa and NMuMG cells halted at the G2/M checkpoint. HeLa cells remained there, but NMuMG cells then overrode the checkpoint and underwent nuclear mis-segregation or avoided the checkpoint and entered the endoreplication cycle in a drug concentration dependent manner. In contrast, an inhibitor of Cdk4 led to G1 arrest or endoreplication in NMuMG cells depending upon the initial cell-cycle phase of drug exposure. Conclusions Drug-induced cell cycle modulation varied not only between different cell types or following treatment with different drugs, but also between cells treated with different concentrations of the same drug or following drug addition during different phases of the cell cycle. By combining cytometry analysis with the Fucci probe, we have developed a novel assay that fully integrates the complexity of cell cycle regulation into drug discovery screens. This assay system will represent a powerful drug-discovery tool for the development of the next generation of anti-cancer therapies. PMID:21226962

  15. SCYL1-BP1 affects cell cycle arrest in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells via Cyclin F and RRM2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhi, Qiaoming; Ye, Qin; Zhou, Chengyuan; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Wei; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Di; Li, Pu; Huo, Keke

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle is regulated via important biological mechanisms. Controlled expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins is crucial to maintain cell cycle progression. However, unbalanced protein expression leads to many diseases, such as cancer. Previous research suggests that SCYL1-BP1 function might be related to cell cycle progression and SCYL1-BP1 dysfunction to diseases through undefined mechanisms. In this research, an unbiased yeast two-hybrid screen was used to find protein(s) with potential biological relevance to SCYL1-BP1 function, and a novel interaction was recognized between SCYL1-BP1 and Cyclin F. This interaction was chosen as a paradigm to study SCYL1-BP1 function in cell cycle progression and its possible role in tumorigenesis. We found that SCYL1-BP1 binds to Cyclin F both in vivo and in vitro. SCYL1-BP1 overexpression promoted expression of the CCNF gene and simultaneously delayed Cyclin F protein degradation. SCYL1-BP1 knockdown reduced the expression of endogenous Cyclin F. It was also demonstrated in functional assays that SCYL1-BP1 overexpression induces G2/M arrest in cultured liver cells. Furthermore, SCYL1-BP1 sustained RRM2 protein expression by reducing its ubiquitination. Thus, we propose that SCYL1- BP1 affects the cell cycle through increasing steady state levels of Cyclin F and RRM2 proteins, thus constituting a dual regulatory circuit. This study provides a possible mechanism for SCYL1-BP1-mediated cell cycle regulation and related diseases.

  16. Basal p21 controls population heterogeneity in cycling and quiescent cell cycle states

    PubMed Central

    Overton, K. Wesley; Spencer, Sabrina L.; Noderer, William L.; Meyer, Tobias; Wang, Clifford L.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity within a population of genetically identical cells is emerging as a common theme in multiple biological systems, including human cell biology and cancer. Using live-cell imaging, flow cytometry, and kinetic modeling, we showed that two states—quiescence and cell cycling—can coexist within an isogenic population of human cells and resulted from low basal expression levels of p21, a Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor (CKI). We attribute the p21-dependent heterogeneity in cell cycle activity to double-negative feedback regulation involving CDK2, p21, and E3 ubiquitin ligases. In support of this mechanism, analysis of cells at a point before cell cycle entry (i.e., before the G1/S transition) revealed a p21–CDK2 axis that determines quiescent and cycling cell states. Our findings suggest a mechanistic role for p21 in generating heterogeneity in both normal tissues and tumors. PMID:25267623

  17. Calcium signaling and cell cycle: Progression or death.

    PubMed

    Humeau, Juliette; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Vitale, Ilio; Nuñez, Lucia; Villalobos, Carlos; Kroemer, Guido; Senovilla, Laura

    2017-07-25

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration levels fluctuate in an ordered manner along the cell cycle, in line with the fact that Ca(2+) is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. Cell proliferation should be an error-free process, yet is endangered by mistakes. In fact, a complex network of proteins ensures that cell cycle does not progress until the previous phase has been successfully completed. Occasionally, errors occur during the cell cycle leading to cell cycle arrest. If the error is severe, and the cell cycle checkpoints work perfectly, this results into cellular demise by activation of apoptotic or non-apoptotic cell death programs. Cancer is characterized by deregulated proliferation and resistance against cell death. Ca(2+) is a central key to these phenomena as it modulates signaling pathways that control oncogenesis and cancer progression. Here, we discuss how Ca(2+) participates in the exogenous and endogenous signals controlling cell proliferation, as well as in the mechanisms by which cells die if irreparable cell cycle damage occurs. Moreover, we summarize how Ca(2+) homeostasis remodeling observed in cancer cells contributes to deregulated cell proliferation and resistance to cell death. Finally, we discuss the possibility to target specific components of Ca(2+) signal pathways to obtain cytostatic or cytotoxic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of cell cycle-regulated genes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xu; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy; Miller, Lance D; Lin, Kui; Jia, Yonghui; Kondu, Pinar; Wang, Long; Wong, Lim-Soon; Liu, Edison T; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Liu, Jianhua

    2005-03-01

    Cell cycle progression is both regulated and accompanied by periodic changes in the expression levels of a large number of genes. To investigate cell cycle-regulated transcriptional programs in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we developed a whole-genome oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray. Microarray analysis of both wild-type and cdc25 mutant cell cultures was performed to identify transcripts whose levels oscillated during the cell cycle. Using an unsupervised algorithm, we identified 747 genes that met the criteria for cell cycle-regulated expression. Peaks of gene expression were found to be distributed throughout the entire cell cycle. Furthermore, we found that four promoter motifs exhibited strong association with cell cycle phase-specific expression. Examination of the regulation of MCB motif-containing genes through the perturbation of DNA synthesis control/MCB-binding factor (DSC/MBF)-mediated transcription in arrested synchronous cdc10 mutant cell cultures revealed a subset of functional targets of the DSC/MBF transcription factor complex, as well as certain gene promoter requirements. Finally, we compared our data with those for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found approximately 140 genes that are cell cycle regulated in both yeasts, suggesting that these genes may play an evolutionarily conserved role in regulation of cell cycle-specific processes. Our complete data sets are available at http://giscompute.gis.a-star.edu.sg/~gisljh/CDC.

  19. From the cell cycle to population cycles in phytoplankton-nutrient interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pascual, M.; Caswell, H.

    1997-04-01

    The internal demographic structure of a population influences its dynamics and its response to the environment. Most models for phytoplankton ignore internal structure and group all cells in a single variable such as total biomass or density. However, a cell does have a life history, the cell division cycle. We investigate the significance of the cell cycle to phytoplankton population dynamics in a variable nutrient environment, using chemostate models. Following the transition point hypothesis, nutrient uptake affects cell development only within a limited segment of the cell cycle. Simulation results demonstrate oscillations in cell numbers and population structure generated by this interaction. When nutrient input is varied periodically, the population displays an aperiodic response with frequencies different from that of the forcing. These results also hold for a model that includes nutrient storage by the cells. These dynamics differ from those of traditional chemostate models and from cell cycle models driven by light cycles. Resource control of cell cycle progression may explain the time delays previously postulated to explain oscillatory transients in chemostate experiments. 78 refs., 22 figs.

  20. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle and specific cell synchronization with butyrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. The possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells was explored and the properties of butyrate-induced cell ...

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in treatment of erectile dysfunction: autologous or allogeneic cell sources?

    PubMed

    Mangir, Naside; Akbal, Cem; Tarcan, Tufan; Simsek, Ferruh; Turkeri, Levent

    2014-12-01

    To compare the efficacy of intracavernosal injection of autologous and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells as potential treatment of erectile dysfunction in an experimental rat model. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from rat paratesticular fat tissue. Bilateral cavernous nerve injury was carried out followed by immediate intracavernosal injection of either autologous or allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells or mesenchymal stem cell lysates. One month after injection, erectile function was evaluated by means of intracavernosal pressure measurement. All rats were eventually killed, and penile tissues were taken for immunhistochemical and molecular investigation. A total of 36 Sprague-Dawley rats were used. The mean maximum intracavernosal pressure in the sham-operated, autologous and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell injection groups were significantly better compared with the vehicle injection group (80.5 [3.56], 71.1 [2.9] and 69.2 [3.2] vs 40.33 [4.4], respectively). Mean maximum intracavernosal pressure to mean arterial pressure ratios in the autologous and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell and mesenchymal stem cell lysate injection groups were not significantly different. Intracavernosal injection of both autologous or allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells improve erectile functions in a rat model of cavernous nerve injury. Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells might provide clinicians with ready to use, standardized and, in certain cases, more effective products. More studies focusing on long-term immunological aspects of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells are required. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  2. Cell cycle regulation of central spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Masanori; Pavicic, Visnja; Grüneberg, Ulrike; Nigg, Erich A; Glotzer, Michael

    2004-08-19

    The bipolar mitotic spindle is responsible for segregating sister chromatids at anaphase. Microtubule motor proteins generate spindle bipolarity and enable the spindle to perform mechanical work. A major change in spindle architecture occurs at anaphase onset when central spindle assembly begins. This structure regulates the initiation of cytokinesis and is essential for its completion. Central spindle assembly requires the centralspindlin complex composed of the Caenorhabditis elegans ZEN-4 (mammalian orthologue MKLP1) kinesin-like protein and the Rho family GAP CYK-4 (MgcRacGAP). Here we describe a regulatory mechanism that controls the timing of central spindle assembly. The mitotic kinase Cdk1/cyclin B phosphorylates the motor domain of ZEN-4 on a conserved site within a basic amino-terminal extension characteristic of the MKLP1 subfamily. Phosphorylation by Cdk1 diminishes the motor activity of ZEN-4 by reducing its affinity for microtubules. Preventing Cdk1 phosphorylation of ZEN-4/MKLP1 causes enhanced metaphase spindle localization and defects in chromosome segregation. Thus, phosphoregulation of the motor domain of MKLP1 kinesin ensures that central spindle assembly occurs at the appropriate time in the cell cycle and maintains genomic stability.

  3. The G-quadruplex-stabilising agent RHPS4 induces telomeric dysfunction and enhances radiosensitivity in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, F; Siteni, S; Tanzarella, C; Stevens, M F; Sgura, A; Antoccia, A

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) interacting agents are a class of ligands that can bind to and stabilise secondary structures located in genomic G-rich regions such as telomeres. Stabilisation of G4 leads to telomere architecture disruption with a consequent detrimental effect on cell proliferation, which makes these agents good candidates for chemotherapeutic purposes. RHPS4 is one of the most effective and well-studied G4 ligands with a very high specificity for telomeric G4. In this work, we tested the in vitro efficacy of RHPS4 in astrocytoma cell lines, and we evaluated whether RHPS4 can act as a radiosensitising agent by destabilising telomeres. In the first part of the study, the response to RHPS4 was investigated in four human astrocytoma cell lines (U251MG, U87MG, T67 and T70) and in two normal primary fibroblast strains (AG01522 and MRC5). Cell growth reduction, histone H2AX phosphorylation and telomere-induced dysfunctional foci (TIF) formation were markedly higher in astrocytoma cells than in normal fibroblasts, despite the absence of telomere shortening. In the second part of the study, the combined effect of submicromolar concentrations of RHPS4 and X-rays was assessed in the U251MG glioblastoma radioresistant cell line. Long-term growth curves, cell cycle analysis and cell survival experiments, clearly showed the synergistic effect of the combined treatment. Interestingly the effect was greater in cells bearing a higher number of dysfunctional telomeres. DNA double-strand breaks rejoining after irradiation revealed delayed repair kinetics in cells pre-treated with the drug and a synergistic increase in chromosome-type exchanges and telomeric fusions. These findings provide the first evidence that exposure to RHPS4 radiosensitizes astrocytoma cells, suggesting the potential for future therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cell cycle controls stress response and longevity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dottermusch, Matthias; Lakner, Theresa; Peyman, Tobias; Klein, Marinella; Walz, Gerd; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a variety of genes and mechanisms that influence the rate of aging progression. In this study, we identified cell cycle factors as potent regulators of health and longevity in C. elegans. Focusing on the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk-2) and cyclin E (cye-1), we show that inhibition of cell cycle genes leads to tolerance towards environmental stress and longevity. The reproductive system is known as a key regulator of longevity in C. elegans. We uncovered the gonad as the central organ mediating the effects of cell cycle inhibition on lifespan. In particular, the proliferating germ cells were essential for conferring longevity. Steroid hormone signaling and the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 were required for longevity associated with cell cycle inhibition. Furthermore, we discovered that SKN-1 (ortholog of mammalian Nrf proteins) activates protective gene expression and induces longevity when cell cycle genes are inactivated. We conclude that both, germline absence and inhibition through impairment of cell cycle machinery results in longevity through similar pathways. In addition, our studies suggest further roles of cell cycle genes beyond cell cycle progression and support the recently described connection of SKN-1/Nrf to signals deriving from the germline. PMID:27668945

  5. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Ca(2+) Overload in Injured Sertoli Cells Exposed to Bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengmin; Qi, Suqin; Liu, Changjiang; Yang, Aixia; Fu, Wenjuan; Quan, Chao; Duan, Peng; Yu, Tingting; Yang, Kedi

    2017-03-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is well known as one of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and testicular toxicant. In this present study, we determined whether BPA caused cell injury through mitochondria impairment and ROS overproduction. The cellular ROS production, mitochondrial ATP synthetase activity and Ca(2+) concentration were examined. We have found BPA caused the cellular mitochondria dysfunction and followed by cell death in Sertoli cells. Moreover cytoplasm Ca(2+) overload was also involved. Furthermore, pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) could alleviate the damage by causing a remarkable decrease in ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. Collectively, our results showed that BPA exposure induced Sertoli cell apoptosis because of excessive ROS generation and mitochondrial dysfunction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 823-831, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The methylating agent streptozotocin induces persistent telomere dysfunction in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Paviolo, Natalia S; Santiñaque, Federico F; Castrogiovanni, Daniel C; Folle, Gustavo A; Bolzán, Alejandro D

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed chromosomal aberrations involving telomeres in the progeny of mammalian cells exposed to the methylating agent and antineoplastic/diabetogenic drug streptozotocin (STZ), to test whether it induces long-term telomere instability (by chromosome end loss and/or telomere dysfunction). Rat cells (ADIPO-P2 cell line, derived from Sprague-Dawley rat adipose cells) were treated with a single concentration of STZ (2mM). Chromosomal aberrations were analyzed 18h, 10 days, and 15 days after treatment, using PNA-FISH with a pan-telomeric probe [Cy3-(CCCTAA)3] to detect (TTAGGG)n repeats. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations in STZ-exposed cultures vs. untreated cultures at each time point analyzed. The yield of induced aberrations was very similar at each time point. Induction of aberrations not involving telomere dysfunction was only observed 18h and 15 days after treatment, whereas induction of telomere dysfunction-related aberrations by STZ (mainly in the form of telomere FISH signal loss and duplications, most of them chromatid-type aberrations) was observed at each time point. Our results show that STZ induces persistent telomere instability in mammalian cells, cytogenetically manifested as telomere dysfunction-related chromosomal aberrations. Neither telomere length nor telomerase activity is related to the telomere dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Telomere dysfunction in alveolar epithelial cells causes lung remodeling and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Naikawadi, Ram P; Disayabutr, Supparerk; Mallavia, Benat; Donne, Matthew L; Green, Gary; La, Janet L; Rock, Jason R; Looney, Mark R; Wolters, Paul J

    2016-09-08

    Telomeres are short in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Whether dysfunctional telomeres contribute directly to development of lung fibrosis remains unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate whether telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, mediated by deletion of the telomere shelterin protein TRF1, leads to pulmonary fibrosis in mice (SPC-Cre TRF1(fl/fl) mice). Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for 2 weeks increased γH2AX DNA damage foci, but not histopathologic changes in the lung. Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for up to 9 months resulted in short telomeres and lung remodeling characterized by increased numbers of type II AECs, α-smooth muscle actin(+) mesenchymal cells, collagen deposition, and accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase(+) lung epithelial cells. Deletion of TRF1 in collagen-expressing cells caused pulmonary edema, but not fibrosis. These results demonstrate that prolonged telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, but not collagen-expressing cells, leads to age-dependent lung remodeling and fibrosis. We conclude that telomere dysfunction in type II AECs is sufficient to cause lung fibrosis, and may be a dominant molecular defect causing IPF. SPC-Cre TRF1(fl/fl) mice will be useful for assessing cellular and molecular mechanisms of lung fibrosis mediated by telomere dysfunction.

  8. Telomere dysfunction in alveolar epithelial cells causes lung remodeling and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Naikawadi, Ram P.; Disayabutr, Supparerk; Mallavia, Benat; Donne, Matthew L.; Green, Gary; La, Janet L.; Rock, Jason R.; Looney, Mark R.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are short in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Whether dysfunctional telomeres contribute directly to development of lung fibrosis remains unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate whether telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, mediated by deletion of the telomere shelterin protein TRF1, leads to pulmonary fibrosis in mice (SPC-Cre TRF1fl/fl mice). Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for 2 weeks increased γH2AX DNA damage foci, but not histopathologic changes in the lung. Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for up to 9 months resulted in short telomeres and lung remodeling characterized by increased numbers of type II AECs, α-smooth muscle actin+ mesenchymal cells, collagen deposition, and accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase+ lung epithelial cells. Deletion of TRF1 in collagen-expressing cells caused pulmonary edema, but not fibrosis. These results demonstrate that prolonged telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, but not collagen-expressing cells, leads to age-dependent lung remodeling and fibrosis. We conclude that telomere dysfunction in type II AECs is sufficient to cause lung fibrosis, and may be a dominant molecular defect causing IPF. SPC-Cre TRF1fl/fl mice will be useful for assessing cellular and molecular mechanisms of lung fibrosis mediated by telomere dysfunction. PMID:27699234

  9. Thermal stress cycling of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal stress cycling was performed on gallium arsenide solar cells to investigate their electrical, mechanical, and structural integrity. Cells were cycled under low Earth orbit (LEO) simulated temperature conditions in vacuum. Cell evaluations consisted of power output values, spectral response, optical microscopy and ion microprobe mass analysis, and depth profiles on both front surface inter-grid areas and metallization contact grid lines. Cells were examined for degradation after 500, 5,000, 10,000 and 15,245 thermal cycles. No indication of performance degradation was found for any vendor's cell lot.

  10. The molecular basis of carcinogenesis: understanding the cell cycle clock.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, R A

    1996-06-01

    The cell cycle clock is the central controller of cell proliferation that governs the progress of the cell through its growth cycle, its exit from the active cycle, and its decision to differentiate. Components of the clock are found to be functioning in an aberrant fashion in many types of malignancies. Notable among these is the retinoblastoma protein, pRB, which acts to restrain proliferation in normal cells and suffers inactivation in many types of tumour cells. Its activity is controlled by D-type cyclins in various cell types. We have deleted one of these cyclins--cyclin D1--from the mouse germline and find that its absence leads to a limited range of defects including hypoplastic retinae and the inability of the mammary epithelium to respond to pregnancy-associated hormonal stimulation. Cyclin D1 is overexpressed in many human breast cancers, pointing to a highly specific association of this cell cycle clock component with mammary cell proliferation.

  11. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Jayat, C; Ratinaud, M H

    1993-01-01

    Numerous flow cytometric analyses are based on DNA content studies. We have considered firstly monoparametric cell cycle analyses, which only take DNA content into account, but are sometimes of limited interest. Then, we have presented multiparametric analyses, which can be used to improve cycle phase identification by taking simultaneously into account DNA and other cellular components, or by considering some events occurring during cell cycle. Finally, we have discussed monoparametric and multiparametric cell cycle analysis interest in various application fields, particularly in pharmacology, toxicology, tumoral pathology and higher plant system studies.

  12. Quantitative Characterization of Cell Behaviors through Cell Cycle Progression via Automated Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Jeong, Younkoo; Jhiang, Sissy M.; Yu, Lianbo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Cell behaviors are reflections of intracellular tension dynamics and play important roles in many cellular processes. In this study, temporal variations in cell geometry and cell motion through cell cycle progression were quantitatively characterized via automated cell tracking for MCF-10A non-transformed breast cells, MCF-7 non-invasive breast cancer cells, and MDA-MB-231 highly metastatic breast cancer cells. A new cell segmentation method, which combines the threshold method and our modified edge based active contour method, was applied to optimize cell boundary detection for all cells in the field-of-view. An automated cell-tracking program was implemented to conduct live cell tracking over 40 hours for the three cell lines. The cell boundary and location information was measured and aligned with cell cycle progression with constructed cell lineage trees. Cell behaviors were studied in terms of cell geometry and cell motion. For cell geometry, cell area and cell axis ratio were investigated. For cell motion, instantaneous migration speed, cell motion type, as well as cell motion range were analyzed. We applied a cell-based approach that allows us to examine and compare temporal variations of cell behavior along with cell cycle progression at a single cell level. Cell body geometry along with distribution of peripheral protrusion structures appears to be associated with cell motion features. Migration speed together with motion type and motion ranges are required to distinguish the three cell-lines examined. We found that cells dividing or overlapping vertically are unique features of cell malignancy for both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas abrupt changes in cell body geometry and cell motion during mitosis are unique to highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, our live cell tracking system serves as an invaluable tool to identify cell behaviors that are unique to malignant and/or highly metastatic breast cancer cells. PMID:24911281

  13. Chlamydia pneumoniae promotes dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Annette R; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Witt, Colleen M; Yu, Jieh-Juen; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Chambers, James P; Perry, George; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2015-06-01

    The human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae has been implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we designed a study to evaluate pancreatic beta cells and mast cells during chlamydial infection. Our study revealed that C. pneumoniae infected mast cells significantly (p<0.005) decreased beta cell ATP and insulin production, in contrast to uninfected mast cells co-cultured with beta cells. Infected mast cells exhibited pyknotic nuclei and active caspase-3 and caspase-1 expression. Additionally, ex vivo analyses of tissues collected from C. pneumoniae infected mice showed increased interleukin-1β production in splenocytes and pancreatic tissues as was observed with in vitro mast cell-beta cell co-cultures during C. pneumoniae infection. Notably, infected mast cells promoted beta cell destruction. Our findings reveal the negative effect of C. pneumoniae on mast cells, and the consequential impact on pancreatic beta cell function and viability.

  14. Genetic instability in cancer cells by impaired cell cycle checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Makoto; Shimada, Midori; Niida, Hiroyuki

    2006-10-01

    Cells continuously encounter DNA damage caused either by damaging agents, including oxygen radicals and DNA replication errors caused by stalled replication forks, or by extracellular environments such as ultraviolet or ionizing irradiation. Such DNA damage poses a great threat to genome stability, potentially leading to loss or amplification of chromosome activity, which may result in cellular senescence, cancer or apoptosis. The DNA damage checkpoints coordinate an arrest in cell cycle progression with the DNA repair process, suppressing either mitotic catastrophe or proliferation of cells with damaged DNA. Numerous key players have been identified in terms of damage sensor proteins, transducer kinases and effectors, but their coordination and interconnectedness in damage control have only recently become evident. In this review, we discuss changes in chromatin structure, recruitment of mediator proteins and activation of transducer kinases in response to DNA damage. These cellular responses are important for determining the potential effects of current cancer therapies in terms of toxicity and efficacy.

  15. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  16. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  17. Life cycle testing of sodium/sulfur satellite battery cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flake, Richard A.

    Test results on sodium sulfur cells developed presently by the Air Force for NaS rechargeable batteries for baseload power applications are summarized. Cycle life data are presented on fourteen cells, some of which have accumulated more than 1900 days on test and/or more than 6000 cycles. Results demonstrated cycle life times to be sufficient for use on satellites in high-altitude orbits.

  18. Characteristics and Behavior of Cycled Aged Lithium Ion Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    service cycle and provide the cornerstone for safety analysis. 18650 Cells with representative chemistry of cells contained in current Army procured...their relevance to this effort warrants inclusion. 1-3 EXPERIMENTAL Representative 18650 cells were cycled at different rates and environmental...conditions. The 18650 chemistry used in this effort is a LiCoO2 lithium ion electrochemical cell. The bulk of this effort was conducted with 1.5 Amp-hr

  19. Why should we study the plant cell cycle?

    PubMed

    Inzé, Dirk

    2003-04-01

    Description of the molecular biology of plant and animal cell cycles highlights similarities and critical differences. The cell cycle is a point of control in both growth and development and deepening understanding of underlying processes and mechanisms may have many practical applications.

  20. Regulation of the Embryonic Cell Cycle During Mammalian Preimplantation Development.

    PubMed

    Palmer, N; Kaldis, P

    2016-01-01

    The preimplantation development stage of mammalian embryogenesis consists of a series of highly conserved, regulated, and predictable cell divisions. This process is essential to allow the rapid expansion and differentiation of a single-cell zygote into a multicellular blastocyst containing cells of multiple developmental lineages. This period of development, also known as the germinal stage, encompasses several important developmental transitions, which are accompanied by dramatic changes in cell cycle profiles and dynamics. These changes are driven primarily by differences in the establishment and enforcement of cell cycle checkpoints, which must be bypassed to facilitate the completion of essential cell cycle events. Much of the current knowledge in this area has been amassed through the study of knockout models in mice. These mouse models are powerful experimental tools, which have allowed us to dissect the relative dependence of the early embryonic cell cycles on various aspects of the cell cycle machinery and highlight the extent of functional redundancy between members of the same gene family. This chapter will explore the ways in which the cell cycle machinery, their accessory proteins, and their stimuli operate during mammalian preimplantation using mouse models as a reference and how this allows for the usually well-defined stages of the cell cycle to be shaped and transformed during this unique and critical stage of development. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Flavopiridol potently induces small cell lung cancer apoptosis during S phase in a manner that involves early mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Litz, Julie; Carlson, Patricia; Warshamana-Greene, G Sakuntala; Grant, Steven; Krystal, Geoffrey W

    2003-10-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is defective in many of the regulatory mechanisms that control cell cycle progression. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of flavopiridol, a pan-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, on growth and apoptosis of SCLC cell lines. Cell growth was monitored using 3-(4,5dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and clonogenic assays. Induction of apoptosis was assessed using multiple assays, including flow cytometric determination of DNA content and mitochondrial membrane potential, terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and Western blot analysis of procaspase 3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Flavopiridol induced growth inhibition and cytotoxicity in multiple SCLC cell lines, with an IC(50) of 50-100 nM and an LD(50) of 150-200 nM in 72-h MTT assays. The cytotoxicity seen in the MTT assay proved to be apoptosis by several criteria. Interestingly, inhibition of caspase activation with the caspase inhibitor Boc-Asp(OMe)-CH(2)F reduced TUNEL labeling by 40% but did not have any effect on the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (detected as early as 4 h after drug exposure) or cytotoxicity in MTT assays. These results suggest that the primary event in flavopiridol-induced apoptosis involves induction of mitochondrial dysfunction. Cells synchronized with aphidicolin at the G(1)-S border and treated with flavopiridol during S phase showed a marked increase in apoptosis compared with an asynchronous population or a population treated during G(2)-M. Despite the increased apoptosis, a significant proportion of synchronized cells proceeded through S, G(2)-M, and into G(1) phase in the presence of flavopiridol, demonstrating that a high-grade cell cycle arrest is not required for apoptosis. Cells synchronized at the G(1)-S border treated with a short exposure to flavopiridol also showed more than a 10-fold decrease in

  2. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) Aggregation Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction during Oxidative Stress-induced Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Masanori; Kubo, Takeya; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Harada, Naoki; Izawa, Takeshi; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamaji, Ryouichi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2017-01-01

    Glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a multifunctional protein that also mediates cell death under oxidative stress. We reported previously that the active-site cysteine (Cys-152) of GAPDH plays an essential role in oxidative stress-induced aggregation of GAPDH associated with cell death, and a C152A-GAPDH mutant rescues nitric oxide (NO)-induced cell death by interfering with the aggregation of wild type (WT)-GAPDH. However, the detailed mechanism underlying GAPDH aggregate-induced cell death remains elusive. Here we report that NO-induced GAPDH aggregation specifically causes mitochondrial dysfunction. First, we observed a correlation between NO-induced GAPDH aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction, when GAPDH aggregation occurred at mitochondria in SH-SY5Y cells. In isolated mitochondria, aggregates of WT-GAPDH directly induced mitochondrial swelling and depolarization, whereas mixtures containing aggregates of C152A-GAPDH reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, treatment with cyclosporin A improved WT-GAPDH aggregate-induced swelling and depolarization. In doxycycline-inducible SH-SY5Y cells, overexpression of WT-GAPDH augmented NO-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and increased mitochondrial GAPDH aggregation, whereas induced overexpression of C152A-GAPDH significantly suppressed mitochondrial impairment. Further, NO-induced cytochrome c release into the cytosol and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria were both augmented in cells overexpressing WT-GAPDH but ameliorated in C152A-GAPDH-overexpressing cells. Interestingly, GAPDH aggregates induced necrotic cell death via a permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. The expression of either WT- or C152A-GAPDH did not affect other cell death pathways associated with protein aggregation, such as proteasome inhibition, gene expression induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress, or autophagy. Collectively, these results suggest that NO-induced GAPDH

  3. Honokiol induces cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cells through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Ju; Wu, Chien-Lin; Liu, Ju-Fang; Fong, Yi-Chin; Hsu, Sheng-Feng; Li, Te-Mao; Su, Yi-Chang; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2010-05-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a malignant primary bone tumor that responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the present study, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of a honokiol, an active component isolated and purified from the Magnolia officinalis in human chondrosarcoma cells. Honokiol-induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (including: JJ012 and SW1353) but not primary chondrocytes. Honokiol also induces upregulation of Bax and Bak, downregulation of Bcl-XL and dysfunction of mitochondria in chondrosarcoma cells. Honokiol triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as indicated by changes in cytosol-calcium levels. We also found that honokiol increased the expression and activities of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and calpain. Transfection of cells with GRP78 or calpain siRNA reduced honokiol-mediated cell apoptosis in JJ012 cells. Importantly, animal studies have revealed a dramatic 53% reduction in tumor volume after 21days of treatment. This study demonstrates that honokiol may be a novel anti-cancer agent targeting chondrosarcoma cells. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rethinking cell-cycle-dependent gene expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen

    2017-06-21

    Three studies of gene expression during the division cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe led to the proposal that a large number of genes are expressed at particular times during the S. pombe cell cycle. Yet only a small fraction of genes proposed to be expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner are reproducible in all three published studies. In addition to reproducibility problems, questions about expression amplitudes, cell-cycle timing of expression, synchronization artifacts, and the problem with methods for synchronizing cells must be considered. These problems and complications prompt the idea that caution should be used before accepting the conclusion that there are a large number of genes expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner in S. pombe.

  5. Index markers of chronic fatigue syndrome with dysfunction of TCA and urea cycles.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Emi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Kume, Satoshi; Yamato, Masanori; Jin, Guanghua; Tajima, Seiki; Goda, Nobuhito; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Sanae; Yamaguti, Kouzi; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2016-10-11

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a persistent and unexplained pathological state characterized by exertional and severely debilitating fatigue, with/without infectious or neuropsychiatric symptoms, lasting at least 6 consecutive months. Its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Here, we performed comprehensive metabolomic analyses of 133 plasma samples obtained from CFS patients and healthy controls to establish an objective diagnosis of CFS. CFS patients exhibited significant differences in intermediate metabolite concentrations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and urea cycles. The combination of ornithine/citrulline and pyruvate/isocitrate ratios discriminated CFS patients from healthy controls, yielding area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 0.801 (95% confidential interval [CI]: 0.711-0.890, P < 0.0001) and 0.750 (95% CI: 0.584-0.916, P = 0.0069) for training (n = 93) and validation (n = 40) datasets, respectively. These findings provide compelling evidence that a clinical diagnostic tool could be developed for CFS based on the ratios of metabolites in plasma.

  6. Index markers of chronic fatigue syndrome with dysfunction of TCA and urea cycles

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Emi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Kume, Satoshi; Yamato, Masanori; Jin, Guanghua; Tajima, Seiki; Goda, Nobuhito; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Sanae; Yamaguti, Kouzi; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a persistent and unexplained pathological state characterized by exertional and severely debilitating fatigue, with/without infectious or neuropsychiatric symptoms, lasting at least 6 consecutive months. Its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Here, we performed comprehensive metabolomic analyses of 133 plasma samples obtained from CFS patients and healthy controls to establish an objective diagnosis of CFS. CFS patients exhibited significant differences in intermediate metabolite concentrations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and urea cycles. The combination of ornithine/citrulline and pyruvate/isocitrate ratios discriminated CFS patients from healthy controls, yielding area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 0.801 (95% confidential interval [CI]: 0.711–0.890, P < 0.0001) and 0.750 (95% CI: 0.584–0.916, P = 0.0069) for training (n = 93) and validation (n = 40) datasets, respectively. These findings provide compelling evidence that a clinical diagnostic tool could be developed for CFS based on the ratios of metabolites in plasma. PMID:27725700

  7. Regulation of the endothelial cell cycle by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Fasanaro, Pasquale; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio

    2010-01-15

    Degradation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins by the 26S-proteasome complex represents a crucial quantitative control mechanism. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a pivotal role in the complex molecular network regulating the progression both between and within each cell-cycle phase. Two major complexes are involved: the SKP1-CUL1-F-box-protein complex (SCF) and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Notwithstanding structural similarities, SCF and APC/C display different cellular functions and mechanisms of action. SCF modulates all cell-cycle stages and plays a prominent role at G1/S transition mainly through three regulatory subunits: Skp2, Fbw7, and beta-TRCP. APC/C, regulated by Cdc20 or Cdh1 subunits, has a crucial role in mitosis. In this review, we will describe how the endothelial cell cycle is regulated by the UPS. We will illustrate the principal SCF- and APC/C-dependent molecular mechanisms that modulate cell growth, allowing a unidirectional cell-cycle progression. Then, we will focus our attention on UPS modulation by oxidative stress, a pathogenic stimulus that causes endothelial dysfunction and is involved in numerous cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Regulatory pathways coordinating cell cycle progression in early Xenopus development.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Tetsuya; Villa, Linda M; Capelluto, Daniel G S; Finkielstein, Carla V

    2011-01-01

    The African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is used extensively as a model organism for studying both cell development and cell cycle regulation. For over 20 years now, this model organism has contributed to answering fundamental questions concerning the mechanisms that underlie cell cycle transitions--the cellular components that synthesize, modify, repair, and degrade nucleic acids and proteins, the signaling pathways that allow cells to communicate, and the regulatory pathways that lead to selective expression of subsets of genes. In addition, the remarkable simplicity of the Xenopus early cell cycle allows for tractable manipulation and dissection of the basic components driving each transition. In this organism, early cell divisions are characterized by rapid cycles alternating phases of DNA synthesis and division. The post-blastula stages incorporate gap phases, lengthening progression, and allowing more time for DNA repair. Various cyclin/Cdk complexes are differentially expressed during the early cycles with orderly progression being driven by both the combined action of cyclin synthesis and degradation and the appropriate selection of specific substrates by their Cdk components. Like other multicellular organisms, chief developmental events in early Xenopus embryogenesis coincide with profound remodeling of the cell cycle, suggesting that cell proliferation and differentiation events are linked and coordinated through crosstalk mechanisms acting on signaling pathways involving the expression of cell cycle control genes.

  9. Human Dendritic Cells Mitigate NK-Cell Dysfunction Mediated by Nonselective JAK1/2 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Curran, Shane A; Shyer, Justin A; St Angelo, Erin T; Talbot, Lillian R; Sharma, Sneh; Chung, David J; Heller, Glenn; Hsu, Katharine C; Betts, Brian C; Young, James W

    2017-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors have achieved positive responses in myeloproliferative neoplasms, but at the expense of decreased natural killer (NK) cell numbers and compromised function. Selective JAK2 inhibition may also have a role in preventing and treating graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although JAK inhibitors can impair monocyte-derived dendritic cell (moDC) activation and function and suppress effector T-cell responses, the effects on NK cells and the relevant mechanisms remain undefined. Using common γc cytokines and distinct human dendritic cell (DC) subtypes, we compared the effects of a JAK2-specific (TG101348) with a less selective JAK1/2 (ruxolitinib) inhibitor on NK-cell activation and function. Ruxolitinib treatment completely blocked IL2, IL15, and DC-mediated STAT5 phosphorylation, along with the capacity of NK cells to secrete IFNγ or lyse NK cell-sensitive targets. Only NK-cell proliferation stimulated by moDCs resisted ruxolitinib treatment. In contrast, TG101348 treatment of stimulated NK cells resulted in far less functional compromise. TG101348 completely inhibited only soluble IL15-mediated STAT5 phosphorylation, which Langerhans-type DCs (LCs), presenting membrane-bound IL15 in trans, could salvage. These results demonstrate that ruxolitinib's nonselective inhibition of JAK1/2 results in profound NK-cell dysfunction by blocking downstream pSTAT5, hence providing a persuasive rationale for the development of selective JAK2 inhibitors for immunotherapeutic applications. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(1); 52-60. ©2016 AACR.

  10. The Cell Cycle: An Activity Using Paper Plates to Represent Time Spent in Phases of the Cell Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Yvette D.

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, students are given the opportunity to combine skills in math and geometry for a biology lesson in the cell cycle. Students utilize the data they collect and analyze from an online onion-root-tip activity to create a paper-plate time clock representing a 24-hour cell cycle. By dividing the paper plate into appropriate phases of…

  11. The Cell Cycle: An Activity Using Paper Plates to Represent Time Spent in Phases of the Cell Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Yvette D.

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, students are given the opportunity to combine skills in math and geometry for a biology lesson in the cell cycle. Students utilize the data they collect and analyze from an online onion-root-tip activity to create a paper-plate time clock representing a 24-hour cell cycle. By dividing the paper plate into appropriate phases of…

  12. Effect of immunosuppression on the human mesangial cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, XIAOSHUANG; WORKENEH, BIRUH; HU, ZHAOYONG; LI, RONGSHAN

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of immunosuppressive agents [tacrolimus (Tac), cyclosporine A (CsA), mycophenolic acid (MMF) and methylprednisone (MP)] on the proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptotic rate of human mesangial cells. Cultured human mesangial cells were treated with several concentrations of the immunosuppressive agents for 24, 48 or 72 h. Cell cycle progression, proliferation and apoptosis were analyzed using an MTT assay and flow cytometry. Tac and CsA significantly inhibited the proliferation of human mesangial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed that Tac and CsA arrested mesangial cells in the G0/G1 phase, preventing them from entering S phase. Similarly, MP inhibited human mesangial cell growth by causing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. MMF also inhibited mesangial cell proliferation, but accomplished this by preventing progression from S phase to the G2/M phase. The combination of MP and MMF synergistically inhibited mesangial cell proliferation. Tac, CsA, MP and MMF inhibited proliferation of human mesangial cells by blocking progression of the cell cycle. In conclusion, these agents, sequentially or in combination, may be used to effectively treat mesangial proliferative glomerular disease. PMID:25370945

  13. The pattern of retinal ganglion cell dysfunction in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Majander, A; Robson, A G; João, C; Holder, G E; Chinnery, P F; Moore, A T; Votruba, M; Stockman, A; Yu-Wai-Man, P

    2017-09-01

    Leber inherited optic neuropathy (LHON) is characterized by subacute bilateral loss of central vision due to dysfunction and loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Comprehensive visual electrophysiological investigations (including pattern reversal visual evoked potentials, pattern electroretinography and the photopic negative response) performed on 13 patients with acute and chronic LHON indicate early impairment of RGC cell body function and severe axonal dysfunction. Temporal, spatial and chromatic psychophysical tests performed on 7 patients with acute LHON and 4 patients with chronic LHON suggest severe involvement or loss of the midget, parasol and bistratified RGCs associated with all three principal visual pathways. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Stem cell therapy for the treatment of Leydig cell dysfunction in primary hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Peak, Taylor C; Haney, Nora M; Wang, William; DeLay, Kenneth J; Hellstrom, Wayne J

    2016-01-01

    The production of testosterone occurs within the Leydig cells of the testes. When production fails at this level from either congenital, acquired, or systemic disorders, the result is primary hypogonadism. While numerous testosterone formulations have been developed, none are yet fully capable of replicating the physiological patterns of testosterone secretion. Multiple stem cell therapies to restore androgenic function of the testes are under investigation. Leydig cells derived from bone marrow, adipose tissue, umbilical cord, and the testes have shown promise for future therapy for primary hypogonadism. In particular, the discovery and utilization of a group of progenitor stem cells within the testes, known as stem Leydig cells (SLCs), has led not only to a better understanding of testicular development, but of treatment as well. When combining this with an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to Leydig cell dysfunction, researchers and physicians will be able to develop stem cell therapies that target the specific step in the steroidogenic process that is deficient. The current preclinical studies highlight the complex nature of regenerating this steroidogenic process and the problems remain unresolved. In summary, there appears to be two current directions for stem cell therapy in male primary hypogonadism. The first method involves differentiating adult Leydig cells from stem cells of various origins from bone marrow, adipose, or embryonic sources. The second method involves isolating, identifying, and transplanting stem Leydig cells into testicular tissue. Theoretically, in-vivo re-activation of SLCs in men with primary hypogonadism due to age would be another alternative method to treat hypogonadism while eliminating the need for transplantation. PMID:27822338

  15. Cell cycle-dependent induction of autophagy, mitophagy and reticulophagy.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Vitale, Ilio; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Hickman, John A; Geneste, Olivier; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-09-15

    When added to cells, a variety of autophagy inducers that operate through distinct mechanisms and target different organelles for autophagic destruction (mitochondria in mitophagy, endoplasmic reticulum in reticulophagy) rarely induce autophagic vacuolization in more than 50% or the cells. Here we show that this heterogeneity may be explained by cell cycle-specific effects. The BH3 mimetic ABT737, lithium, rapamycin, tunicamycin or nutrient depletion stereotypically induce autophagy preferentially in the G(1) and S phases of the cell cycle, as determined by simultaneous monitoring of cell cycle markers and the cytoplasmic aggregation of GFP-LC3 in autophagic vacuoles. These results point to a hitherto neglected crosstalk between autophagic vacuolization and cell cycle regulation.

  16. Brucella abortus Cell Cycle and Infection Are Coordinated.

    PubMed

    De Bolle, Xavier; Crosson, Sean; Matroule, Jean-Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular pathogens. The recent development of methods and genetically engineered strains allowed the description of cell-cycle progression of Brucella abortus, including unipolar growth and the ordered initiation of chromosomal replication. B. abortus cell-cycle progression is coordinated with intracellular trafficking in the endosomal compartments. Bacteria are first blocked at the G1 stage, growth and chromosome replication being resumed shortly before reaching the intracellular proliferation compartment. The control mechanisms of cell cycle are similar to those reported for the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and they are crucial for survival in the host cell. The development of single-cell analyses could also be applied to other bacterial pathogens to investigate their cell-cycle progression during infection.

  17. Viral manipulation of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Chaurushiya, Mira S.; Weitzman, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    Recognition and repair of DNA damage is critical for maintaining genomic integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis. In eukaryotic cells, the sensing and repair of DNA damage are exquisitely coordinated with cell cycle progression and checkpoints, in order to prevent the propagation of damaged DNA. The carefully maintained cellular response to DNA damage is challenged by viruses, which produce a large amount of exogenous DNA during infection. Viruses also express proteins that perturb cellular DNA repair and cell cycle pathways, promoting tumorigenesis in their quest for cellular domination. This review presents an overview of strategies employed by viruses to manipulate DNA damage responses and cell cycle checkpoints as they commandeer the cell to maximize their own viral replication. Studies of viruses have identified key cellular regulators and revealed insights into molecular mechanisms governing DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, and transformation. PMID:19473887

  18. Flow cytometry methods for the study of cell-cycle parameters of planarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hara; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2009-05-01

    Due to their characteristic inaccessibility and low numbers, little is known about the cell-cycle dynamics of most stem cells in vivo. A powerful, established methodology to study cell-cycle dynamics is flow cytometry, which is used routinely to study the cell-cycle dynamics of proliferating cells in vitro. Its use in heterogeneous mixtures of cells obtained from whole animals, however, is complicated by the relatively low abundance of cycling to non-cycling cells. We report on flow cytometric methods that take advantage of the abundance of proliferating stem cells in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. The optimized protocols allow us to measure cell-cycle dynamics and follow BrdU-labeled cells specifically in complex mixtures of cells. These methods expand on the growing toolkit being developed to study stem cell biology in planarians, and open the door to detailed cytometric studies of a collectively totipotent population of adult stem cells in vivo.

  19. Cycle life test. [of secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Statistical information concerning cell performance characteristics and limitations of secondary spacecraft cells is presented. Weaknesses in cell design as well as battery weaknesses encountered in various satellite programs are reported. Emphasis is placed on improving the reliability of space batteries.

  20. E4F1 dysfunction results in autophagic cell death in myeloid leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hatchi, Elodie; Rodier, Geneviève; Sardet, Claude

    2011-01-01

    The multifunctional E4F1 protein was originally identified as a cellular target of the E1A adenoviral oncoprotein. Although E4F1 is implicated in several key oncogenic pathways, its roles in tumorigenesis remain unclear. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of myeloid leukemia (histiocytic sarcomas, HS) based on the genetic inactivation of the tumor suppressor Ink4a/Arf locus, we have recently unraveled an unsuspected function of E4F1 in the survival of leukemic cells. In vivo, genetic ablation of E4F1 in established myeloid tumors results in tumor regression. E4F1 inactivation results in a cascade of alterations originating from dysfunctional mitochondria that induce increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and ends in massive autophagic cell death in HS transformed, but not normal myeloid cells. E4F1 depletion also induces cell death in various human myeloid leukemic cell lines, including acute myeloid leukemic (AML) cell lines. Interestingly, the E4F1 protein is overexpressed in a large proportion of human AML samples. These data provide new insights into E4F1-associated survival functions implicated in tumorigenesis and could open the path for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:22024746

  1. E4F1 dysfunction results in autophagic cell death in myeloid leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Hatchi, Elodie; Rodier, Geneviève; Sardet, Claude; Le Cam, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    The multifunctional E4F1 protein was originally identified as a cellular target of the E1A adenoviral oncoprotein. Although E4F1 is implicated in several key oncogenic pathways, its roles in tumorigenesis remain unclear. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of myeloid leukemia (histiocytic sarcomas, HS) based on the genetic inactivation of the tumor suppressor Ink4a/Arf locus, we have recently unraveled an unsuspected function of E4F1 in the survival of leukemic cells. In vivo, genetic ablation of E4F1 in established myeloid tumors results in tumor regression. E4F1 inactivation results in a cascade of alterations originating from dysfunctional mitochondria that induce increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and ends in massive autophagic cell death in HS transformed, but not normal myeloid cells. E4F1 depletion also induces cell death in various human myeloid leukemic cell lines, including acute myeloid leukemic (AML) cell lines. Interestingly, the E4F1 protein is overexpressed in a large proportion of human AML samples. These data provide new insights into E4F1-associated survival functions implicated in tumorigenesis and could open the path for new therapeutic strategies.

  2. Cell cycle control, checkpoint mechanisms, and genotoxic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, R E; Kaufmann, W K; Paules, R S

    1999-01-01

    The ability of cells to maintain genomic integrity is vital for cell survival and proliferation. Lack of fidelity in DNA replication and maintenance can result in deleterious mutations leading to cell death or, in multicellular organisms, cancer. The purpose of this review is to discuss the known signal transduction pathways that regulate cell cycle progression and the mechanisms cells employ to insure DNA stability in the face of genotoxic stress. In particular, we focus on mammalian cell cycle checkpoint functions, their role in maintaining DNA stability during the cell cycle following exposure to genotoxic agents, and the gene products that act in checkpoint function signal transduction cascades. Key transitions in the cell cycle are regulated by the activities of various protein kinase complexes composed of cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) molecules. Surveillance control mechanisms that check to ensure proper completion of early events and cellular integrity before initiation of subsequent events in cell cycle progression are referred to as cell cycle checkpoints and can generate a transient delay that provides the cell more time to repair damage before progressing to the next phase of the cycle. A variety of cellular responses are elicited that function in checkpoint signaling to inhibit cyclin/Cdk activities. These responses include the p53-dependent and p53-independent induction of Cdk inhibitors and the p53-independent inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk molecules themselves. Eliciting proper G1, S, and G2 checkpoint responses to double-strand DNA breaks requires the function of the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene product. Several human heritable cancer-prone syndromes known to alter DNA stability have been found to have defects in checkpoint surveillance pathways. Exposures to several common sources of genotoxic stress, including oxidative stress, ionizing radiation, UV radiation, and the genotoxic compound benzo[a]pyrene, elicit cell cycle

  3. Microbial Translocation and B Cell Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosal barrier disrupted in HIV disease, resulting in increased systemic exposure to microbial products such as Lipo Polys Accharide (LPS). The association of enhanced microbial translocation and B cell dysfunction in HIV disease is not fully understood. High dose and short term exposure of microbial Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) agonists were used as vaccine adjuvants, however, low dose and long term exposure of TLR agonists could be harmful. The characteristics of B cell dysfunction in HIV disease included B cell, especially memory B cell depletion, enhanced levels of autoimmune antibodies and impaired vaccine or antigen responsiveness. This review discusses and explores the possibility of the effect of microbial translocation on memory B cell depletion and impaired vaccine responses in HIV infection. By determining the mechanisms of B cell depletion and perturbations in HIV disease, it may be possible to design interventions that can improve immune responses to vaccines, reduce selected opportunistic infections and perhaps slow disease progression. PMID:23869197

  4. Stem cell therapy ameliorates bladder dysfunction in an animal model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Soler, Roberto; Füllhase, Claudius; Hanson, Ariel; Campeau, Lysanne; Santos, Cesar; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2012-04-01

    Different cell based therapies have been tested, focusing on motor function. We evaluated the effect of human amniotic fluid stem cells and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (ALLCELLS, Emeryville, California) on bladder dysfunction in a rat model of Parkinson disease. A nigrostriatal lesion was induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in 96 athymic nude female rats divided into 3 treatment groups. After 2 weeks the groups were injected with human amniotic fluid stem cells, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and vehicle for sham treatment, respectively. At 3, 7, 14 and 28 days the bladder function of 8 rats per group was analyzed by conscious cystometry. Brains were extracted for immunostaining. The nigrostriatal lesion caused bladder dysfunction, which was consistent in sham treated animals throughout the study. Several cystometric parameters improved 14 days after human amniotic fluid stem cell or bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell injection, concomitant with the presence of human stem cells in the brain. At 14 days only a few cells were observed in a more caudal and lateral position. At 28 days the functional improvement subsided and human stem cells were no longer seen. Human stem cell injection improved the survival of dopaminergic neurons until 14 days. Human stem cells expressed superoxide dismutase-2 and seemed to modulate the expression of interleukin-6 and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor by host cells. Cell therapy with human amniotic fluid stem cells and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells temporarily ameliorated bladder dysfunction in a Parkinson disease model. In contrast to integration, cells may act on the injured environment via cell signaling. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The intestinal epithelial cell cycle: uncovering its 'cryptic' nature.

    PubMed

    McKernan, Declan P; Egan, Laurence J

    2015-03-01

    To discuss the recent landmark findings that have increased our understanding not only of the role of the epithelial cell cycle in the homeostasis of the small intestine, but also its relevance to inflammation and cancer. Recent data have unveiled novel information on protein interactions directly involved in the cell cycle as well as in the pathways that transduce external environmental signals to the cell cycle. A growing body of the recent evidence confirms the importance of food as well as hormonal regulation in the gut on cell cycle. Information on the contribution of the epithelial microenvironment, including the microbiota, has grown substantially in the recent years as well as on the gene-environment interactions and the multiple epigenetic mechanisms involved in regulating cell-cycle proteins and signalling. Finally, further studies investigating the dysregulation of the cell cycle during inflammation and proliferation have increased our understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. This review highlights some of the most recent advances that further emphasize the importance of the cell cycle in the small intestine during homeostasis as well as in inflammation and cancer.

  6. Melatonin protects against lipid-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in hepatocytes and inhibits stellate cell activation during hepatic fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Das, Nabanita; Mandala, Ashok; Naaz, Shamreen; Giri, Suresh; Jain, Mukul; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish; Reiter, Russel J; Roy, Sib Sankar

    2017-05-01

    Lipid generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in consequence to mitochondrial fission followed by inflammation in propagating hepatic fibrosis. The interaction of SIRT1/Mitofusin2 is critical for maintaining mitochondrial integrity and functioning, which is disrupted upon excess lipid infiltration during the progression of steatohepatitis. The complex interplay between hepatic stellate cells and steatotic hepatocytes is critically regulated by extracellular factors including increased circulating free fatty acids during fibrogenesis. Melatonin, a potent antioxidant, protects against lipid-mediated mitochondrial ROS generation. Lipotoxicity induces disruption of SIRT1 and Mitofusin2 interaction leading to mitochondrial morphological disintegration in hepatocytes. Further, fragmented mitochondria leads to mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and melatonin protects against all these lipotoxicity-mediated dysfunctions. These impaired mitochondrial dynamics also enhances the cellular glycolytic flux and reduces mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate that potentiates ROS production. High glycolytic flux generates metabolically unfavorable milieu in hepatocytes leading to inflammation, which is abrogated by melatonin. The melatonin-mediated protection against mitochondrial dysfunction was also observed in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice through restoration of enzymatic activities associated with respiratory chain and TCA cycle. Subsequently, melatonin reduces hepatic fat deposition and inflammation in HFD-fed mice. Thus, melatonin disrupts the interaction between steatotic hepatocyte and stellate cells, leading to the activation of the latter to abrogate collagen deposition. Altogether, the results of the current study document that the pharmacological intervention with low dose of melatonin could abrogate lipotoxicity-mediated hepatic stellate cell activation and prevent the fibrosis progression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A

  7. Exacerbation of Endometriosis Due To Regulatory T-Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukiko; Mori, Taisuke; Ito, Fumitake; Koshiba, Akemi; Takaoka, Osamu; Kataoka, Hisashi; Maeda, Eiko; Okimura, Hiroyuki; Mori, Takahide; Kitawaki, Jo

    2017-09-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with altered immune response to endometrial cells facilitating the implantation and proliferation of ectopic endometrial tissues. Although regulatory T (Treg) cells play a key role in T cell-mediated immune response and development of immune disorders, their significance in endometriosis remains to be elucidated. Recently, CD4+CD45RA- forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3)hi T cells, activated Treg cells, have been identified as a functionally true suppressive population of Treg cells. To investigate the role of Treg cells in endometriosis. Three Treg cell fractions (resting Treg cells, activated Treg cells, and non-Treg cells) were examined using flow cytometry in the endometrioma, endometrium, peritoneal fluid, and peripheral blood obtained from women with (n = 27) and without (n = 28) endometriosis. A mouse model of endometriosis was made in Foxp3tm3Ayr/J (Foxp3DTR) C57BL/6 Treg cell-depleted mice (n = 28). In women with endometrioma, the proportion of activated Treg cells in the endometrioma and the endometrium, but not in the peritoneal fluid or peripheral blood, was significantly decreased compared with that in women without endometriosis. In Foxp3DTR/diphtheria toxin mice, the number and weight of endometriotic lesions, inflammatory cytokine levels and angiogenetic factors were significantly increased compared with those in control mice. Treg cell deficiency exaggerates local inflammation and angiogenesis and simultaneously facilitates the attachment and growth of endometrial implants. The findings provide an insight into dysregulated immune response for the pathogenesis and development.

  8. Interplay between the cell cycle and double-strand break response in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Beishline, Kate; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle is intimately associated with the ability of cells to sense and respond to and repair DNA damage. Understanding how cell cycle progression, particularly DNA replication and cell division, are regulated and how DNA damage can affect these processes has been the subject of intense research. Recent evidence suggests that the repair of DNA damage is regulated by the cell cycle, and that cell cycle factors are closely associated with repair factors and participate in cellular decisions regarding how to respond to and repair damage. Precise regulation of cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA damage is essential to maintain genomic stability and avoid the accumulation of chromosomal aberrations that can promote tumor formation. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of how mammalian cells induce cell cycle checkpoints in response to DNA double-strand breaks. In addition, we discuss how cell cycle factors modulate DNA repair pathways to facilitate proper repair of DNA lesions.

  9. Cell cycle transitions: a common role for stoichiometric inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Michael; Tyson, John J; Novák, Béla

    2017-09-20

    The cell division cycle is the process by which eukaryotic cells replicate their chromosomes and partition them to two daughter cells. To maintain the integrity of the genome, proliferating cells must be able to block progression through the division cycle at key transition points (called 'checkpoints'), if there have been problems in the replication of the chromosomes or their biorientation on the mitotic spindle. These checkpoints are governed by protein-interaction networks, composed of phase-specific cell-cycle activators and inhibitors. Examples include Cdk1:Clb5 and its inhibitor Sic1 at the G1/S checkpoint in budding yeast, APC:Cdc20 and its inhibitor MCC at the mitotic checkpoint, and PP2A:B55 and its inhibitor ENSA at the mitotic-exit checkpoint. Each of these inhibitors is a substrate as well as a stoichiometric inhibitor of the cell-cycle activator. Because the production of each inhibitor is promoted by a regulatory protein that is itself inhibited by the cell cycle activator, their interaction network presents a regulatory motif characteristic of a 'feedback-amplified domineering substrate' (FADS). We describe how the FADS motif responds to signals in the fashion of a bistable toggle switch, and then we discuss how this toggle switch accounts for the abrupt and irreversible nature of three specific cell-cycle checkpoints. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  10. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Implications for The Genesis of Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Hsu, Ming-I; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age, is characterized by hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Women with PCOS have a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and endothelial dysfunction. The mechanisms underlying these risks are unclear. Human peripheral blood contains circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) derived from bone marrow that have the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, which may contribute to vessel homeostasis and repair. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia, which may result in EPC dysfunction. In this review, we summarize the potential mechanisms of EPC dysfunction in PCOS, which possibly result in a higher genesis of CVDs in PCOS-affected subjects. PMID:24520442

  11. The human meibomian gland epithelial cell line as a model to study meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Ulrike; Garreis, Fabian

    2017-10-01

    The meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is the leading cause of dry eye disease (DED) throughout the world. The investigation of MGD lacks suitable in vivo and in vitro models. In 2010 a human meibomian gland epithelial cell line (HMGEC) was established, so far the only available meibomian gland cell line. The characterization of HMGEC is of major importance to clarify its suitability for studying the meibomian gland (patho)physiology in vitro. The current culture protocol and new concepts of HMGEC culture will be compared. Hormones are believed to be a key factor in meibomian gland dysfunction thus HMGEC responsiveness to hormone stimulation is crucial to elucidate the hormonal influence on the meibomian gland. This review will summarize current findings about HMGEC and discuss its role in the meibomian gland dysfunction research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Resveratrol protects against mitochondrial dysfunction through autophagy activation in human nucleus pulposus cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baolong; Xu, Linfei; Zhuo, Naiqiang; Shen, Jieliang

    2017-09-05

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) is closely related with aging, whereas mitochondrial damage is a common feature of aging that results in cell apoptosis. Resveratrol (RES) is a natural antioxidant that protects against mitochondrial dysfunction in various cells. This study aimed to investigate the protective role of RES against mitochondrial dysfunction and human nucleus pulposus cell (NPC) apoptosis. We found that mitochondrial dysfunction and NPC apoptosis could be induced under oxidative stress by 100 μmol/l of H2O2. However, RES tended to attenuate the H2O2-mediated cytotoxicity. Therefore, autophagic state was evaluated in NPCs to further reveal the underlying mechanism. Results showed that RES reversed the impaired autophagy induced by H2O2, and this increased autophagic flux was confirmed by the addition of bafilomycin A1. Moreover, pretreatment with 3-methyladenine showed that the potential mechanism of RES to prevent deteriorating mitochondrial function and cell apoptosis was related to autophagy activation. Furthermore, MRI and histological detection were employed to provide more solid evidence that RES injection in an IVDD rabbit model effectively retards the degenerative process of the intervertebral discs in vivo. In summary, these results suggested that RES could alleviate mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis under oxidative stress and may delay the progression of disc degeneration, whose mechanism is associated with an advantageous role of autophagy induced by RES. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Disconnected circadian and cell cycles in a tumor-driven cell line.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, Julie S; Yeom, Mijung; Reyes, Bryan A; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Shin

    2010-11-01

    Cell division occurs at a specific time of day in numerous species, suggesting that the circadian and cell cycles are coupled in vivo. By measuring the cell cycle rhythm in real-time, we recently showed that the circadian and cell cycles are not coupled in immortalized fibroblasts, resulting in a rapid rate of cell division even though the circadian rhythm is normal in these cells. Here we report that tumor-driven Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells have perfectly temperature compensated circadian clocks, but the periods of their cell cycle gene expression rhythms are temperature-dependent, suggesting that their circadian and cell cycles are not connected. These data support our hypothesis that decoupling of the circadian and cell cycles may underlie aberrant cell division in tumor cells.

  14. SUMOylation-Mediated Regulation of Cell Cycle Progression and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2015-12-01

    Protein conjugation with Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMOylation) has critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancer were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could be exploited in anticancer therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cold nights impair leaf growth and cell cycle progression in maize through transcriptional changes of cell cycle genes.

    PubMed

    Rymen, Bart; Fiorani, Fabio; Kartal, Fatma; Vandepoele, Klaas; Inzé, Dirk; Beemster, Gerrit T S

    2007-03-01

    Low temperature inhibits the growth of maize (Zea mays) seedlings and limits yield under field conditions. To study the mechanism of cold-induced growth retardation, we exposed maize B73 seedlings to low night temperature (25 degrees C /4 degrees C, day/night) from germination until the completion of leaf 4 expansion. This treatment resulted in a 20% reduction in final leaf size compared to control conditions (25 degrees C/18 degrees C, day/night). A kinematic analysis of leaf growth rates in control and cold-treated leaves during daytime showed that cold nights affected both cell cycle time (+65%) and cell production (-22%). In contrast, the size of mature epidermal cells was unaffected. To analyze the effect on cell cycle progression at the molecular level, we identified through a bioinformatics approach a set of 43 cell cycle genes and analyzed their expression in proliferating, expanding, and mature cells of leaves exposed to either control or cold nights. This analysis showed that: (1) the majority of cell cycle genes had a consistent proliferation-specific expression pattern; and (2) the increased cell cycle time in the basal meristem of leaves exposed to cold nights was associated with differential expression of cell cycle inhibitors and with the concomitant down-regulation of positive regulators of cell division.

  16. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Antioxidant therapy and pharmacological

  17. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Conclusion PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction

  18. Regulation of sister chromatid cohesion during the mitotic cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ge; Yu, HongTao

    2015-11-01

    Orderly execution of two critical events during the cell cycle--DNA replication and chromosome segregation--ensures the stable transmission of genetic materials. The cohesin complex physically connects sister chromatids during DNA replication in a process termed sister chromatid cohesion. Timely establishment and dissolution of sister chromatid cohesion is a prerequisite for accurate chromosome segregation, and is tight regulated by the cell cycle machinery and cohesin-associated proteins. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the molecular understanding of sister chromatid cohesion during the mitotic cell cycle.

  19. DNA double-strand breaks activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Kalifa, Lidza; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Staversky, Rhonda J; Sia, Elaine A; Brookes, Paul S; O'Reilly, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Excessive nuclear or mitochondrial DNA damage can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased energy production, and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although numerous cell signaling pathways are activated when cells are injured, the ataxia telangiectasia mutant (ATM) protein has emerged as a major regulator of the response to both mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Because mitochondrial dysfunction is often a response to excessive DNA damage, it has been difficult to determine whether nuclear and/or mitochondrial DNA DSBs activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA DSBs were generated in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line by infecting with retroviruses expressing the restriction endonuclease PstI fused to a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) or nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and a hemagglutinin antigen epitope tag (HA). Expression of MTS-PstI-HA or NLS-PstI-HA activated the DNA damage response defined by phosphorylation of ATM, the tumor suppressor protein p53 (TP53), KRAB-associated protein (KAP)-1, and structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC)-1. Phosphorylated ATM and SMC1 were detected in nuclear fractions, whereas phosphorylated TP53 and KAP1 were detected in both mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. PstI also enhanced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and inhibited cell growth. This response to DNA damage occurred in the absence of detectable mitochondrial dysfunction and excess production of ROS. These findings reveal that DNA DSBs are sufficient to activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction and suggest that the activated form of ATM and some of its substrates are restricted to the nuclear compartment, regardless of the site of DNA damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitro-Arachidonic Acid Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Cell Line of Kidney Proximal Tubular Cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Cassina, Adriana; Rios, Natalia; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Boggia, José; Radi, Rafael; Rubbo, Homero; Trostchansky, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA) is a cell signaling nitroalkene that exerts anti-inflammatory activities during macrophage activation. While angiotensin II (ANG II) produces an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells, little is known regarding the potential protective effects of NO2-AA in ANG II-mediated kidney injury. As such, this study examines the impact of NO2-AA on ANG II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in an immortalized renal proximal tubule cell line (HK-2 cells). Treatment of HK-2 cells with ANG II increases the production of superoxide (O2●-), nitric oxide (●NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) expression, peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and mitochondrial dysfunction. Using high-resolution respirometry, it was observed that the presence of NO2-AA prevented ANG II-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Attempting to address mechanism, we treated isolated rat kidney mitochondria with ONOO-, a key mediator of ANG II-induced mitochondrial damage, in the presence or absence of NO2-AA. Whereas the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and ATP synthase (ATPase) were diminished upon exposure to ONOO-, they were restored by pre-incubating the mitochondria with NO2-AA. Moreover, NO2-AA prevents oxidation and nitration of mitochondrial proteins. Combined, these data demonstrate that ANG II-mediated oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction is abrogated by NO2-AA, identifying this compound as a promising pharmacological tool to prevent ANG II-induced renal disease.

  1. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  2. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  3. Ca2+ signaling, genes and the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Machaca, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the concentration and spatial distribution of Ca2+ ions in the cytoplasm constitute a ubiquitous intracellular signaling module in cellular physiology. With the advent of Ca2+ dyes that allow direct visualization of Ca2+ transients, combined with powerful experimental tools such as electrophysiological recordings, intracellular Ca2+ transients have been implicated in practically every aspect of cellular physiology, including cellular proliferation. Ca2+ signals are associated with different phases of the cell cycle and interfering with Ca2+ signaling or downstream pathways often disrupts progression of the cell cycle. Although there exists a dependence between Ca2+ signals and the cell cycle the mechanisms involved are not well defined and given the cross-talk between Ca2+ and other signaling modules, it is difficult to assess the exact role of Ca2+ signals in cell cycle progression. Two exceptions however, include fertilization and T-cell activation, where well-defined roles for Ca2+ signals in mediating progression through specific stages of the cell cycle have been clearly established. In the case of T-cell activation Ca2+ regulates entry into the cell cycle through the induction of gene transcription. PMID:21084120

  4. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  5. Krebs cycle rewired for macrophage and dendritic cell effector functions.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Dylan Gerard; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2017-07-07

    The Krebs cycle is an amphibolic pathway operating in the mitochondrial matrix of all eukaryotic organisms. In response to proinflammatory stimuli, macrophages and dendritic cells undergo profound metabolic remodelling to support the biosynthetic and bioenergetic requirements of the cell. Recently, it has been discovered that this metabolic shift also involves the rewiring of the Krebs cycle to regulate cellular metabolic flux and the accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates, notably, citrate, succinate and fumarate. Interestingly, a new role for Krebs cycle intermediates as signalling molecules and immunomodulators that dictate the inflammatory response has begun to emerge. This review will discuss the latest developments in Krebs cycle rewiring and immune cell effector functions, with a particular focus on the regulation of cytokine production. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Adenosine induces G2/M cell-cycle arrest by inhibiting cell mitosis progression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun-Zhi; Tang, Bo; Yu, Lu; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Jian-Fa; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2009-12-16

    Cellular adenosine accumulates under stress conditions. Few papers on adenosine are concerned with its function in the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the essential mechanism by which all living things reproduce and the target machinery when cells encounter stresses, so it is necessary to examine the relationship between adenosine and the cell cycle. In the present study, adenosine was found to induce G-2/M cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, adenosine was found to modulate the expression of some important proteins in the cell cycle, such as cyclin B and p21, and to inhibit the transition of metaphase to anaphase in mitosis.

  7. Cerebral mast cells contribute to postoperative cognitive dysfunction by promoting blood brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Susu; Dong, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Nana; Sun, Jie; Qian, Yanning

    2016-02-01

    Trauma induced neuroinflammation plays a key role in the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). The blood-brain barrier (BBB), a highly specialized endothelial layer, is exquisitely sensitive to inflammatory insults, which can result in numerous neurocognitive syndromes. While brain mast cells are the "first responder" in the injury, the functional interactions between mast cells and the BBB remain poorly understood. Our results demonstrate that tibial fracture surgery can induce cognitive impairment relating to an inflammatory response and destabilization of the BBB. Disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn)--which acts as a mast cell stabilizer--inhibited this effect. Specifically, cromolyn resulted in ameliorated cognitive ability, decrease of inflammatory cytokines and increase of BBB stability. Taken together, these results suggest that activated mast cells contributed to central nervous system inflammation and cognitive dysfunction by promoting BBB disruption, and interactions between mast cells and the BBB could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for POCD.

  8. Mechanisms of sulindac-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Barbara; Barbier, Valerie; Brickner, Howard; Welsh, John; Fotedar, Arun; McClelland, Michael

    2005-02-28

    The mechanism underlying the chemopreventive effects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac remains unclear. Its active metabolite, sulindac sulfide, induces cell cycle arrest as well as apoptosis in mammalian cell lines. We now show that in murine thymocytes, sulindac sulfide-induced cell death is p53, bax, Fas, and FasL independent. In contrast, bcl2 transgenic thymocytes are resistant to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that sulindac sulfide-induced cell cycle arrest in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) is partly mediated by the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) and the cyclin kinase inhibitor p21waf1/cip1. Furthermore, MEFs deficient in p21 or Rb are more susceptible to sulindac sulfide-induced cell death. These results suggest that sulindac may selectively target premalignant cells with cell cycle checkpoint deficits.

  9. Cell cycle progression in response to oxygen levels.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, Brian; Druker, Jimena; Rocha, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia' or decreases in oxygen availability' results in the activation of a number of different responses at both the whole organism and the cellular level. These responses include drastic changes in gene expression, which allow the organism (or cell) to cope efficiently with the stresses associated with the hypoxic insult. A major breakthrough in the understanding of the cellular response to hypoxia was the discovery of a hypoxia sensitive family of transcription factors known as the hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). The hypoxia response mounted by the HIFs promotes cell survival and energy conservation. As such, this response has to deal with important cellular process such as cell division. In this review, the integration of oxygen sensing with the cell cycle will be discussed. HIFs, as well as other components of the hypoxia pathway, can influence cell cycle progression. The role of HIF and the cell molecular oxygen sensors in the control of the cell cycle will be reviewed.

  10. Ebola VP40 in Exosomes Can Cause Immune Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pleet, Michelle L.; Mathiesen, Allison; DeMarino, Catherine; Akpamagbo, Yao A.; Barclay, Robert A.; Schwab, Angela; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Sampey, Gavin C.; Lepene, Benjamin; Nekhai, Sergei; Aman, M. J.; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is an enveloped, ssRNA virus from the family Filoviridae capable of causing severe hemorrhagic fever with up to 80–90% mortality rates. The most recent outbreak of EBOV in West Africa starting in 2014 resulted in over 11,300 deaths; however, long-lasting persistence and recurrence in survivors has been documented, potentially leading to further transmission of the virus. We have previously shown that exosomes from cells infected with HIV-1, HTLV-1 and Rift Valley Fever virus are able to transfer viral proteins and non-coding RNAs to naïve recipient cells, resulting in an altered cellular activity. In the current manuscript, we examined the effect of Ebola structural proteins VP40, GP, NP and VLPs on recipient immune cells, as well as the effect of exosomes containing these proteins on naïve immune cells. We found that VP40-transfected cells packaged VP40 into exosomes, and that these exosomes were capable of inducing apoptosis in recipient immune cells. Additionally, we show that presence of VP40 within parental cells or in exosomes delivered to naïve cells could result in the regulation of RNAi machinery including Dicer, Drosha, and Ago 1, which may play a role in the induction of cell death in recipient immune cells. Exosome biogenesis was regulated by VP40 in transfected cells by increasing levels of ESCRT-II proteins EAP20 and EAP45, and exosomal marker proteins CD63 and Alix. VP40 was phosphorylated by Cdk2/Cyclin complexes at Serine 233 which could be reversed with r-Roscovitine treatment. The level of VP40-containing exosomes could also be regulated by treated cells with FDA-approved Oxytetracycline. Additionally, we utilized novel nanoparticles to safely capture VP40 and other viral proteins from Ebola VLPs spiked into human samples using SDS/reducing agents, thus minimizing the need for BSL-4 conditions for most downstream assays. Collectively, our data indicates that VP40 packaged into exosomes may be responsible for the

  11. Configuration and performance of fuel cell-combined cycle options

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, L.K.; Le, P.H.; Sudhoff, F.A.

    1995-12-31

    The natural gas, indirect-fired, carbonate fuel-cell-bottomed, combined cycle (NG-IFCFC) and the topping natural-gas/solid-oxide fuel-cell combined cycle (NG-SOFCCC) are introduced as novel power-plant systems for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20-200 mega-watt (MW) size range. The novel NG-IFCFC power-plant system configures the ambient pressure molten-carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger: The topping solid-oxide fuel-cell (SOFC) combined cycle is not new. The purpose of combining a gas turbine with a fuel cell was to inject pressurized air into a high-pressure fuel cell and to reduce the size, and thereby, to reduce the cost of the fuel cell. Today, the SOFC remains pressurized, but excess chemical energy is combusted and the thermal energy is utilized by the Carnot cycle heat engine to complete the system. ASPEN performance results indicate efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFCFC or NG-SOFCCC are better than conventional fuel cell or gas turbine steam-bottomed cycles, but with smaller and less expensive components. Fuel cell and gas turbine systems should not be viewed as competitors, but as an opportunity to expand to markets where neither gas turbines nor fuel cells alone would be commercially viable. Non-attainment areas are the most likely markets.

  12. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P < 0.05) compared with unliganded conditions. The alterations in cell cycle duration were observed in the S and G2/M phases, whereas the G1 phase was indistinguishable under liganded and unliganded conditions. In addition, ERα knockdown in MCF-7 cells accelerated mitotic exit, whereas transfection of ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with exogenous ERα significantly shortened the S and G2/M phases (by 9.1 hours, P < 0.05) compared with parental cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with antiestrogens revealed that tamoxifen yields a slower cell cycle progression through the S and G2/M phases than fulvestrant does, presumably because of the destabilizing effect of fulvestrant on ERα protein. Together, these results show that ERα modulates breast cancer cell proliferation by regulating events during the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen.

  13. Intercellular Coupling of the Cell Cycle and Circadian Clock in Adult Stem Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Matsu-Ura, Toru; Dovzhenok, Andrey; Aihara, Eitaro; Rood, Jill; Le, Hung; Ren, Yan; Rosselot, Andrew E; Zhang, Tongli; Lee, Choogon; Obrietan, Karl; Montrose, Marshall H; Lim, Sookkyung; Moore, Sean R; Hong, Christian I

    2016-12-01

    Circadian clock-gated cell division cycles are observed from cyanobacteria to mammals via intracellular molecular connections between these two oscillators. Here we demonstrate WNT-mediated intercellular coupling between the cell cycle and circadian clock in 3D murine intestinal organoids (enteroids). The circadian clock gates a population of cells with heterogeneous cell-cycle times that emerge as 12-hr synchronized cell division cycles. Remarkably, we observe reduced-amplitude oscillations of circadian rhythms in intestinal stem cells and progenitor cells, indicating an intercellular signal arising from differentiated cells governing circadian clock-dependent synchronized cell division cycles. Stochastic simulations and experimental validations reveal Paneth cell-secreted WNT as the key intercellular coupling component linking the circadian clock and cell cycle in enteroids.

  14. Interaction of the Circadian Cycle with the Cell Cycle in Pyrocystis fusiformis.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, B M

    1982-07-01

    Dividing pairs or single cells of the large dinoflagellate, Pyrocystis fusiformis Murray, were isolated in capillary tubes and their morphology was observed over a number of days, either in a light-dark cycle or in constant darkness. Morphological stages were correlated with the first growth stage, G(1), DNA synthesis, S, the second growth stage, G(2), mitosis, M, and cytokinesis, C, segments of the cell division cycle. The S phase was identified by measuring the nuclear DNA content of cells of different morphologies by the fluorescence of 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dichloride.Cells changed from one morphological stage to the next only during the night phase of the circadian cycle, both under light-dark conditions and in continuous darkness. Cells in all segments of the cell division cycle displayed a circadian rhythm in bioluminescence. These findings are incompatible with a mechanism for circadian oscillations that invokes cycling in G(q), an hypothesized side loop from G(1). All morphological stages, not only division, appear to be phased by the circadian clock.

  15. Interaction of the Circadian Cycle with the Cell Cycle in Pyrocystis fusiformis12

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Beatrice M.

    1982-01-01

    Dividing pairs or single cells of the large dinoflagellate, Pyrocystis fusiformis Murray, were isolated in capillary tubes and their morphology was observed over a number of days, either in a light-dark cycle or in constant darkness. Morphological stages were correlated with the first growth stage, G1, DNA synthesis, S, the second growth stage, G2, mitosis, M, and cytokinesis, C, segments of the cell division cycle. The S phase was identified by measuring the nuclear DNA content of cells of different morphologies by the fluorescence of 4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dichloride. Cells changed from one morphological stage to the next only during the night phase of the circadian cycle, both under light-dark conditions and in continuous darkness. Cells in all segments of the cell division cycle displayed a circadian rhythm in bioluminescence. These findings are incompatible with a mechanism for circadian oscillations that invokes cycling in Gq, an hypothesized side loop from G1. All morphological stages, not only division, appear to be phased by the circadian clock. PMID:16662459

  16. Apicomplexan cell cycle flexibility: centrosome controls the clutch

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ti; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome serves as a central hub coordinating multiple cellular events in eukaryotes. A recent study in Toxoplasma gondii revealed a unique bipartite structure of the centrosome, which coordinates the nuclear cycle (S-phase and mitosis) and budding cycle (cytokinesis) of the parasite, and deciphers the principle behind flexible apicomplexan cell division modes. PMID:25899747

  17. Damage to Olfactory Progenitor Cells Is Involved in Cigarette Smoke-Induced Olfactory Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ueha, Rumi; Ueha, Satoshi; Kondo, Kenji; Sakamoto, Takashi; Kikuta, Shu; Kanaya, Kaori; Nishijima, Hironobu; Matsushima, Kouji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke is a major cause of olfactory dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanisms by which cigarette smoke interferes with the highly regenerative olfactory nerve system remain unclear. To investigate whether cigarette smoke induces olfactory dysfunction by disrupting cell proliferation and cell survival in the olfactory epithelium (OE), we developed a mouse model of smoking that involved intranasal administration of a cigarette smoke solution (CSS). Immunohistological analyses and behavioral testing showed that CSS administration during a period of 24 days reduced the number of olfactory marker protein-positive mature olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the OE and induced olfactory dysfunction. These changes coincided with a reduction in the number of SOX2(+) ORN progenitors and Ki-67(+) proliferating cells in the basal layer of the OE, an increase in the number of caspase-3(+) apoptotic cells, and an increase in the expression of mRNA for the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6. Notably, the proliferating ORN progenitor population recovered after cessation of treatment with CSS, resulting in the subsequent restoration of mature ORN numbers and olfaction. These results suggest that SOX2(+) ORN progenitors are targets of CSS-induced impairment of the OE, and that by damaging the ORN progenitor population and increasing ORN death, CSS exposure eventually overwhelms the regenerative capacity of the epithelium, resulting in reduced numbers of mature ORNs and olfactory dysfunction.

  18. Trigeminal star-like platinum complexes induce cancer cell senescence through quadruplex-mediated telomere dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Mu, Ge; Zhong, Yi-Fang; Zhang, Tian-Peng; Cao, Qian; Ji, Liang-Nian; Zhao, Yong; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-12-01

    Two trigeminal star-like platinum complexes were synthesized to induce the formation of human telomere G-quadruplex (hTel G4) with extremely high selectivity and affinity. The induced hTel G4 activates strong telomeric DNA damage response (TDDR), resulting in telomere dysfunction and cell senescence.

  19. Genetics and epithelial cell dysfunction in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Riordan, J.R.; Buchwald, M.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the advances being made in the study of the physiology, cell biology, and molecular genetics of cystic fibrosis. Emphasis is placed on various areas of research that involve epithelial cells (e.g., the CF-specific phenotypes exhibited by epithelial cells, abnormalities in epithelium ion transport, chloride channel regulation in CF epithelial.) Coverage is presented on the current status of CF, including data on the incidence of the disease, its mode of inheritance, chromosomal localization, genetic heterogeneity, and screening and management.

  20. Cinnamomum cassia essential oil and its major constituent cinnamaldehyde induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human oral squamous cell carcinoma HSC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Lun; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Wang, Shu-Ping; Chou, Su-Tze; Shih, Ying

    2017-02-01

    Cinnamomum cassia essential oil (CC-EO) has various functional properties, such as anti-microbial, hypouricemic, anti-tyrosinase and anti-melanogenesis activities. The present study aimed to evaluate the anti-cancer activities of CC-EO and its major constituent, cinnamaldehyde, in human oral squamous cell carcinoma HSC-3 cells. Determination of the cell viability, apoptotic characteristics, DNA damage, cell cycle analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential, cytosolic Ca(2+) level and intracellular redox status were performed. Our results demonstrated that CC-EO and cinnamaldehyde significantly decreased cell viability and caused morphological changes. The cell cycle analysis revealed that CC-EO and cinnamaldehyde induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in HSC-3 cells. The apoptotic characteristics (DNA laddering and chromatin condensation) and DNA damage were observed in the CC-EO-treated and cinnamaldehyde-treated HSC-3 cells. Moreover, CC-EO and cinnamaldehyde promoted an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, induced mitochondrial dysfunction and activated cytochrome c release. The results of ROS production and intracellular redox status demonstrated that CC-EO and cinnamaldehyde significantly increased the ROS production and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels, and the cellular glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase activity were significantly reduced in HSC-3 cells. Our results suggest that CC-EO and cinnamaldehyde may possess anti-oral cancer activity in HSC-3 cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 456-468, 2017.

  1. Regulation of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle by light and dark

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    By growing cells in alternating periods of light and darkness, we have found that the synchronization of phototrophically grown Chlamydomonas populations is regulated at two specific points in the cell cycle: the primary arrest (A) point, located in early G1, and the transition (T) point, located in mid-G1. At the A point, cell cycle progression becomes light dependent. At the T point, completion of the cycle becomes independent of light. Cells transferred from light to dark at cell cycle position between the two regulatory points enter a reversible resting state in which they remain viable and metabolically active, but do not progress through their cycles. The photosystem II inhibitor dichlorophenyldimethylurea (DCMU) mimics the A point block induced by darkness. This finding indicates that the A point block is mediated by a signal that operates through photosynthetic electron transport. Cells short of the T point will arrest in darkness although they contain considerable carbohydrate reserves. After the T point, a sharp increase occurs in starch degradation and in the endogenous respiration rate, indicating that some internal block to the availability of stored energy reserves has now been released, permitting cell cycle progression. PMID:6767730

  2. Phosphorylation network dynamics in the control of cell cycle transitions.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Daniel; Krasinska, Liliana; Coudreuse, Damien; Novák, Béla

    2012-10-15

    Fifteen years ago, it was proposed that the cell cycle in fission yeast can be driven by quantitative changes in the activity of a single protein kinase complex comprising a cyclin - namely cyclin B - and cyclin dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1). When its activity is low, Cdk1 triggers the onset of S phase; when its activity level exceeds a specific threshold, it promotes entry into mitosis. This model has redefined our understanding of the essential functional inputs that organize cell cycle progression, and its main principles now appear to be applicable to all eukaryotic cells. But how does a change in the activity of one kinase generate ordered progression through the cell cycle in order to separate DNA replication from mitosis? To answer this question, we must consider the biochemical processes that underlie the phosphorylation of Cdk1 substrates. In this Commentary, we discuss recent findings that have shed light on how the threshold levels of Cdk1 activity that are required for progression through each phase are determined, how an increase in Cdk activity generates directionality in the cell cycle, and why cell cycle transitions are abrupt rather than gradual. These considerations lead to a general quantitative model of cell cycle control, in which opposing kinase and phosphatase activities have an essential role in ensuring dynamic transitions.

  3. Methamphetamine Alters the Normal Progression by Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Austin R.; Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a potent psychostimulant with a high addictive capacity, which induces many deleterious effects on the brain. Chronic MA abuse leads to cognitive dysfunction and motor impairment. MA affects many cells in the brain, but the effects on astrocytes of repeated MA exposure is not well understood. In this report, we used Gene chip array to analyze the changes in the gene expression profile of primary human astrocytes treated with MA for 3 days. Range of genes were found to be differentially regulated, with a large number of genes significantly downregulated, including NEK2, TTK, TOP2A, and CCNE2. Gene ontology and pathway analysis showed a highly significant clustering of genes involved in cell cycle progression and DNA replication. Further pathway analysis showed that the genes downregulated by multiple MA treatment were critical for G2/M phase progression and G1/S transition. Cell cycle analysis of SVG astrocytes showed a significant reduction in the percentage of cell in the G2/M phase with a concomitant increase in G1 percentage. This was consistent with the gene array and validation data, which showed that repeated MA treatment downregulated the genes associated with cell cycle regulation. This is a novel finding, which explains the effect of MA treatment on astrocytes and has clear implication in neuroinflammation among the drug abusers. PMID:25290377

  4. Methamphetamine alters the normal progression by inducing cell cycle arrest in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Austin R; Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a potent psychostimulant with a high addictive capacity, which induces many deleterious effects on the brain. Chronic MA abuse leads to cognitive dysfunction and motor impairment. MA affects many cells in the brain, but the effects on astrocytes of repeated MA exposure is not well understood. In this report, we used Gene chip array to analyze the changes in the gene expression profile of primary human astrocytes treated with MA for 3 days. Range of genes were found to be differentially regulated, with a large number of genes significantly downregulated, including NEK2, TTK, TOP2A, and CCNE2. Gene ontology and pathway analysis showed a highly significant clustering of genes involved in cell cycle progression and DNA replication. Further pathway analysis showed that the genes downregulated by multiple MA treatment were critical for G2/M phase progression and G1/S transition. Cell cycle analysis of SVG astrocytes showed a significant reduction in the percentage of cell in the G2/M phase with a concomitant increase in G1 percentage. This was consistent with the gene array and validation data, which showed that repeated MA treatment downregulated the genes associated with cell cycle regulation. This is a novel finding, which explains the effect of MA treatment on astrocytes and has clear implication in neuroinflammation among the drug abusers.

  5. Effects of HMGB-1 Overexpression on Cell-Cycle Progression in MCF-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sarah; Lee, Jin Young; Yoon, Byung-Koo; Bae, DukSoo

    2004-01-01

    High mobility group-1 (HMGB-1) enhances the DNA interactions and possesses a transcriptional activation potential for several families of sequence-specific transcriptional activators. In order to examine the effect of HMGB-1 on the cell cycle progression in MCF-7 cells, the HMGB-1 expression vector was transfected into synchronized MCF-7 cells, and the effect of HMGB-1 overexpression on the cell cycle was examined. The HMGB-1 protein level in the transfected cells increased 4.87-fold compared to the non-transfected cells. There were few changes in the cell cycle phase distribution after HMGB-1 overexpression in the MCF-7 cells. Following the estrogen treatment, the cell cycle progressed in both the HMGB-1 overexpressed MCF-7 and the mock-treated cells. However, a larger proportion of HMGB-1 overexpressing MCF-7 cells progressed to the either S or G2 phase than the mock-treated cells. The mRNA levels of the cell cycle regulators changed after being treated with estrogen in both the HMGB-1 overexpressing MCF-7 and the mock-treated cells, but the changes in the expression level of the cell cycle regulator genes were more prominent in the HMGB-1 overexpressing MCF-7 cells than in the mock-treated cells. In conclusion, HMGB-1 overexpression itself does not alter the MCF-7 cell cycle progression, but the addition of estrogen to the HMGB-1 overexpressing MCF-7 cells appears to accelerate the cell cycle progression. PMID:15201494

  6. Mathematical model of the cell division cycle of fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Bela; Pataki, Zsuzsa; Ciliberto, Andrea; Tyson, John J.

    2001-03-01

    Much is known about the genes and proteins controlling the cell cycle of fission yeast. Can these molecular components be spun together into a consistent mechanism that accounts for the observed behavior of growth and division in fission yeast cells? To answer this question, we propose a mechanism for the control system, convert it into a set of 14 differential and algebraic equations, study these equations by numerical simulation and bifurcation theory, and compare our results to the physiology of wild-type and mutant cells. In wild-type cells, progress through the cell cycle (G1→S→G2→M) is related to cyclic progression around a hysteresis loop, driven by cell growth and chromosome alignment on the metaphase plate. However, the control system operates much differently in double-mutant cells, wee1- cdc25Δ, which are defective in progress through the latter half of the cell cycle (G2 and M phases). These cells exhibit "quantized" cycles (interdivision times clustering around 90, 160, and 230 min). We show that these quantized cycles are associated with a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in the mechanism, when the wee1 and cdc25 genes are disabled.

  7. Cell-cycle involvement in autophagy and apoptosis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, Maria; Farrugia, Gianluca; Balzan, Rena

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis are two eukaryotic processes required to ensure maintenance of genomic integrity, especially in response to DNA damage. The ease with which yeast, amongst other eukaryotes, can switch from cellular proliferation to cell death may be the result of a common set of biochemical factors which play dual roles depending on the cell's physiological state. A wide variety of homologues are shared between different yeasts and metazoans and this conservation confirms their importance. This review gives an overview of key molecular players involved in yeast cell-cycle regulation, and those involved in mechanisms which are induced by cell-cycle dysregulation. One such mechanism is autophagy which, depending on the severity and type of DNA damage, may either contribute to the cell's survival or death. Cell-cycle dysregulation due to checkpoint deficiency leads to mitotic catastrophe which in turn leads to programmed cell death. Molecular players implicated in the yeast apoptotic pathway were shown to play important roles in the cell cycle. These include the metacaspase Yca1p, the caspase-like protein Esp1p, the cohesin subunit Mcd1p, as well as the inhibitor of apoptosis protein Bir1p. The roles of these molecular players are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tumor-induced immune dysfunctions caused by myeloid suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Bronte, V; Serafini, P; Apolloni, E; Zanovello, P

    2001-01-01

    In the late 1970s, several findings suggested that accessory cells distinct from lymphocytes might suppress immune reactivity in tumor-bearing hosts. Studies in animal models and patients later confirmed that cells driven to act as dominant immune suppressors by growing cancers could subvert the immune system. These cells have also been termed natural suppressors, a functional definition connoting their ability to hamper various T- and B-lymphocyte responses without prior activation and independently from antigen and MHC restriction. These properties were attributed to distinct cell populations. The phenotypic discrepancies, together with the lack of antigen specificity, have generated serious restraints to research on tumor-induced suppression. Recent evidence indicates that suppressor cells are closely related to immature myeloid precursors and can be found in several situations that can exert adverse effects on the immunotherapy of cancer. The present review is an attempt to address the nature and properties of immature myeloid suppressors and their relationship to dendritic cells and macrophages, with the aim of clarifying the complex network of tumor-induced, negative regulators of the immune system.

  9. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  10. Blimp-1–mediated CD4 T cell exhaustion causes CD8 T cell dysfunction during chronic toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Dustin A.; Bhadra, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    CD8, but not CD4, T cells are considered critical for control of chronic toxoplasmosis. Although CD8 exhaustion has been previously reported in Toxoplasma encephalitis (TE)–susceptible model, our current work demonstrates that CD4 not only become exhausted during chronic toxoplasmosis but this dysfunction is more pronounced than CD8 T cells. Exhausted CD4 population expressed elevated levels of multiple inhibitory receptors concomitant with the reduced functionality and up-regulation of Blimp-1, a transcription factor. Our data demonstrates for the first time that Blimp-1 is a critical regulator for CD4 T cell exhaustion especially in the CD4 central memory cell subset. Using a tamoxifen-dependent conditional Blimp-1 knockout mixed bone marrow chimera as well as an adoptive transfer approach, we show that CD4 T cell–intrinsic deletion of Blimp-1 reversed CD8 T cell dysfunction and resulted in improved pathogen control. To the best of our knowledge, this is a novel finding, which demonstrates the role of Blimp-1 as a critical regulator of CD4 dysfunction and links it to the CD8 T cell dysfunctionality observed in infected mice. The critical role of CD4-intrinsic Blimp-1 expression in mediating CD4 and CD8 T cell exhaustion may provide a rational basis for designing novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27481131

  11. Association between diffuse myocardial fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Niss, Omar; Fleck, Robert; Makue, Fowe; Alsaied, Tarek; Desai, Payal; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Malik, Punam; Taylor, Michael D; Quinn, Charles T

    2017-07-13

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA)-related cardiomyopathy is characterized by diastolic dysfunction and hyperdynamic features. Diastolic dysfunction portends early mortality in SCA. Diastolic dysfunction is associated with microscopic myocardial fibrosis in SCA mice, but the cause of diastolic dysfunction in humans with SCA is unknown. We used cardiac magnetic resonance measurements of extracellular volume fraction (ECV) to discover and quantify diffuse myocardial fibrosis in 25 individuals with SCA (mean age, 23 ± 13 years) and determine the association between diffuse myocardial fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction. ECV was calculated from pre- and post-gadolinium T1 measurements of blood and myocardium, and diastolic function was assessed by echocardiography. ECV was markedly increased in all participants compared with controls (0.44 ± 0.08 vs 0.26 ± 0.02, P < .0001), indicating the presence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis. Seventeen patients (71%) had diastolic abnormalities, and 7 patients (29%) met the definition of diastolic dysfunction. Participants with diastolic dysfunction had higher ECV (0.49 ± 0.07 vs 0.37 ± 0.04, P = .01) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP; 191 ± 261 vs 33 ± 33 pg/mL, P = .04) but lower hemoglobin (8.4 ± 0.3 vs 10.9 ± 1.4 g/dL, P = .004) compared with participants with normal diastolic function. Participants with the highest ECV values (≥0.40) were more likely to have diastolic dysfunction (P = .003) and increased left atrial volume (57 ± 11 vs 46 ± 12 mL/m(2), P = .04) compared with those with ECV <0.4. ECV correlated with hemoglobin (r = -0.46, P = .03) and NT-proBNP (r = 0.62, P = .001). In conclusion, diffuse myocardial fibrosis, determined by ECV, is a common and previously underappreciated feature of SCA that is associated with diastolic dysfunction, anemia, and high NT-proBNP. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis is a novel mechanism that appears to underlie diastolic dysfunction in SCA. © 2017 by The American

  12. Metformin restores the mitochondrial network and reverses mitochondrial dysfunction in Down syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Antonella; Nitti, Maria; Mollo, Nunzia; Paladino, Simona; Procaccini, Claudio; Faicchia, Deriggio; Calì, Gaetano; Genesio, Rita; Bonfiglio, Ferdinando; Cicatiello, Rita; Polishchuk, Elena; Polishchuk, Roman; Pinton, Paolo; Matarese, Giuseppe; Conti, Anna; Nitsch, Lucio

    2017-01-13

    Alterations in mitochondrial activity and morphology have been demonstrated in human cells and tissues from individuals with Down syndrome (DS), as well as in DS mouse models. An impaired activity of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α/PPARGC1Adue to the overexpression of chromosome 21 genes, such as NRIP1/RIP140, has emerged as an underlying cause of mitochondrial dysfunction in DS. We tested the hypothesis that the activation of the PGC-1α pathway might indeed reverse this mitochondrial dysfunction.

  13. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. J.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.; Lee, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  14. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. J.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.

    2010-01-11

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  15. Grow₂: the HIF system, energy homeostasis and the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Moniz, Sónia; Biddlestone, John; Rocha, Sónia

    2014-05-01

    Cell cycle progression is an energy demanding process and requires fine-tuned metabolic regulation. Cells must overcome an energy restriction checkpoint before becoming committed to progress through the cell cycle. Aerobic organisms need oxygen for the metabolic conversion of nutrients into energy. As such, environmental oxygen is a critical signalling molecule regulating cell fate. The Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) are a family of transcription factors that respond to changes in environmental oxygen and cell energy and coordinate a transcriptional program which forms an important part of the cellular response to a hostile environment. A significant proportion of HIF-dependent transcriptional target genes, code for proteins that are involved in energy homeostasis. In this review we discuss the role of the HIF system in the regulation of energy homeostasis in response to changes in environmental oxygen and the impact on cell cycle control, and address the implications of the deregulation of this effect in cancer.

  16. Large scale spontaneous synchronization of cell cycles in amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, Carl

    2014-03-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. We show that substrate-growtn cell populations spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state and provide opportunities for synchronization theories beyond classic Kuramoto models.

  17. Antioxidants enhance the recovery of three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin-induced testicular dysfunction, pituitary-testicular axis, and fertility in rats.

    PubMed

    Kilarkaje, Narayana; Mousa, Alyaa M; Al-Bader, Maie M; Khan, Khalid M

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the effects of an antioxidant cocktail (AC) on bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP)-induced testicular dysfunction. In vivo study. Research laboratory. Adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were treated with three cycles of 21 days each of therapeutically relevant dose levels of BEP (0.75, 7.5, and 1.5 mg/kg) with or without the AC (a mixture of α-tocopherol, L-ascorbic acid, Zn, and Se). Sperm parameters, fertility, serum hormone levels (ELISA), testicular histopathology, and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and transferrin (Western blotting and immunohistochemistry) were evaluated at the end of treatment and a 63-day recovery period. At the end of treatment, the AC improved BEP-induced decrease in sperm motility and increase in abnormality but had no effect on reduced sperm count, fertility, and tubular atrophy, although it up-regulated germ cell proliferation. The AC normalized reduced inhibin B levels, but had no effect on decreased transferrin and testosterone and elevated LH levels. At the end of the recovery period, the AC enhanced the expression of PCNA and transferrin, repopulation of germ cells, LH-testosterone axis, and fertility, but had no effect on reduced FSH and elevated inhibin B levels. The antioxidants protect and then enhance the recovery of testicular and reproductive endocrine functions when administered concomitantly with BEP therapy. The AC may be beneficial to regain testicular functions after chemotherapy. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Yde, Pernille; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2009-06-01

    During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent α that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent α was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences in the subdiffusive exponents from granules measured in different stages of cell division. Also, our results for the exponent displayed no significant dependence on the position of the granule within the cell. The observation that the cytoplasm is more elastic during interphase than during mitotic cell division is consistent with the fact that elastic cytoskeletal elements such as microtubules are less abundantly present during cell division than during interphase.

  19. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Yde, Pernille; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene B

    2009-07-01

    During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent alpha that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent alpha was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences in the subdiffusive exponents from granules measured in different stages of cell division. Also, our results for the exponent displayed no significant dependence on the position of the granule within the cell. The observation that the cytoplasm is more elastic during interphase than during mitotic cell division is consistent with the fact that elastic cytoskeletal elements such as microtubules are less abundantly present during cell division than during interphase.

  20. p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} deficiency induces mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ae Jeong; Jee, Hye Jin; Song, Naree; Kim, Minjee; Jeong, Seon-Young; Yun, Jeanho

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells exhibited an increase in mitochondrial mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression levels of PGC-1{alpha} and AMPK were upregulated in p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proliferation of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells in galactose medium was significantly impaired. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21 may play a role in maintaining proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function. -- Abstract: p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression. However, the role of p21 in mitochondrial function remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the effect of p21 deficiency on mitochondrial function in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. We found that there was a significant increase in the mitochondrial mass of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells, as measured by 10-N-nonyl-acridine orange staining, as well as an increase in the mitochondrial DNA content. In contrast, p53{sup -/-} cells had a mitochondrial mass comparable to that of wild-type HCT116 cells. In addition, the expression levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis regulators PGC-1{alpha} and TFAM and AMPK activity were also elevated in p21{sup -/-} cells, indicating that p21 deficiency induces the rate of mitochondrial biogenesis through the AMPK-PGC-1{alpha} axis. However, the increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in p21{sup -/-} cells did not accompany an increase in the cellular steady-state level of ATP. Furthermore, p21{sup -/-} cells exhibited significant proliferation impairment in galactose medium, suggesting that p21 deficiency induces a defect in the mitochondrial respiratory chain in HCT116 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of p21 results in an aberrant increase in the mitochondrial mass and in mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 cells, indicating that p21 is required to maintain proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function.

  1. Stem and progenitor cell dysfunction in human trisomies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binbin; Filippi, Sarah; Roy, Anindita; Roberts, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Trisomy 21, the commonest constitutional aneuploidy in humans, causes profound perturbation of stem and progenitor cell growth, which is both cell context dependent and developmental stage specific and mediated by complex genetic mechanisms beyond increased Hsa21 gene dosage. While proliferation of fetal hematopoietic and testicular stem/progenitors is increased and may underlie increased susceptibility to childhood leukemia and testicular cancer, fetal stem/progenitor proliferation in other tissues is markedly impaired leading to the characteristic craniofacial, neurocognitive and cardiac features in individuals with Down syndrome. After birth, trisomy 21-mediated premature aging of stem/progenitor cells may contribute to the progressive multi-system deterioration, including development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25520324

  2. Thermally regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell power cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehouse, J. H.

    1986-07-01

    Two innovative thermodynamic power cycles are analytically examined for future engineering feasibility. The power cycles use a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell for electrical energy production and use the thermal dissociation of water for regeneration of the hydrogen and oxygen. The TDS (thermal dissociation system) uses a thermal energy input at over 2000 K to thermally dissociate the water. The other cycle, the HTE (high temperature electrolyzer) system, dissociates the water using an electrolyzer operating at high temperature (1300 K) which receives its electrical energy from the fuel cell. The primary advantages of these cycles is that they are basically a no moving parts system, thus having the potential for long life and high reliability, and they have the potential for high thermal efficiency. Both cycles are shown to be classical heat engines with ideal efficiency close to Carnot cycle efficiency. The feasibility of constructing actual cycles is investigated by examining process irreversibilities and device efficiencies for the two types of cycles. The results show that while the processes and devices of the 2000 K TDS exceed current technology limits, the high temperature electrolyzer system appears to be a state-of-the-art technology development. The requirements for very high electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies are seen as determining the feasbility of the HTE system, and these high efficiency devices are currently being developed. It is concluded that a proof-of-concept HTE system experiment can and should be conducted.

  3. Thermally regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehouse, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Two innovative thermodynamic power cycles are analytically examined for future engineering feasibility. The power cycles use a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell for electrical energy production and use the thermal dissociation of water for regeneration of the hydrogen and oxygen. The TDS (thermal dissociation system) uses a thermal energy input at over 2000 K to thermally dissociate the water. The other cycle, the HTE (high temperature electrolyzer) system, dissociates the water using an electrolyzer operating at high temperature (1300 K) which receives its electrical energy from the fuel cell. The primary advantages of these cycles is that they are basically a no moving parts system, thus having the potential for long life and high reliability, and they have the potential for high thermal efficiency. Both cycles are shown to be classical heat engines with ideal efficiency close to Carnot cycle efficiency. The feasibility of constructing actual cycles is investigated by examining process irreversibilities and device efficiencies for the two types of cycles. The results show that while the processes and devices of the 2000 K TDS exceed current technology limits, the high temperature electrolyzer system appears to be a state-of-the-art technology development. The requirements for very high electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies are seen as determining the feasbility of the HTE system, and these high efficiency devices are currently being developed. It is concluded that a proof-of-concept HTE system experiment can and should be conducted.

  4. Antibody-engineered nanoparticles selectively inhibit mesenchymal cells isolated from patients with chronic lung allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cova, Emanuela; Colombo, Miriam; Inghilleri, Simona; Morosini, Monica; Miserere, Simona; Peñaranda-Avila, Jesus; Santini, Benedetta; Piloni, Davide; Magni, Sara; Gramatica, Furio; Prosperi, Davide; Meloni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung allograft dysfunction represents the main cause of death after lung transplantation, and so far there is no effective therapy. Mesenchymal cells (MCs) are primarily responsible for fibrous obliteration of small airways typical of chronic lung allograft dysfunction. Here, we engineered gold nanoparticles containing a drug in the hydrophobic section to inhibit MCs, and exposing on the outer hydrophilic surface a monoclonal antibody targeting a MC-specific marker (half-chain gold nanoparticles with everolimus). Half-chain gold nanoparticles with everolimus have been synthesized and incubated with MCs to evaluate the effect on proliferation and apoptosis. Drug-loaded gold nanoparticles coated with the specific antibody were able to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis without stimulating an inflammatory response, as assessed by in vitro experiments. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of our nanoparticles in inhibiting MCs and open new perspectives for a local treatment of chronic lung allograft dysfunction.

  5. Keith's MAGIC: Cloning and the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Wells, D N

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Professor Keith Campbell's critical contribution to the discovery that a somatic cell from an adult animal can be fully reprogrammed by oocyte factors to form a cloned individual following nuclear transfer (NT)(Wilmut et al., 1997 ) overturned a dogma concerning the reversibility of cell fate that many scientists had considered to be biologically impossible. This seminal experiment proved the totipotency of adult somatic nuclei and finally confirmed that adult cells could differentiate without irreversible changes to the genetic material.

  6. Duplication of the genome in normal and cancer cell cycles.

    PubMed

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Calvi, Brian R

    2002-01-01

    It is critical to discover the mechanisms of normal cell cycle regulation if we are to fully understand what goes awry in cancer cells. The normal eukaryotic cell tightly regulates the activity of origins of DNA replication so that the genome is duplicated exactly once per cell cycle. Over the last ten years much has been learned concerning the cell cycle regulation of origin activity. It is now clear that the proteins and cell cycle mechanisms that control origin activity are largely conserved from yeast to humans. Despite this conservation, the composition of origins of DNA replication in higher eukaryotes remains ill defined. A DNA consensus for predicting origins has yet to emerge, and it is of some debate whether primary DNA sequence determines where replication initiates. In this review we outline what is known about origin structure and the mechanism of once per cell cycle DNA replication with an emphasis on recent advances in mammalian cells. We discuss the possible relevance of these regulatory pathways for cancer biology and therapy.

  7. Cell cycle deregulation by methyl isocyanate: Implications in liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Hariom; Raghuram, Gorantla V; Jain, Deepika; Ahirwar, Alok K; Khan, Saba; Jain, Subodh K; Pathak, Neelam; Banerjee, Smita; Maudar, Kewal K; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2014-03-01

    Liver is often exposed to plethora of chemical toxins. Owing to its profound physiological role and central function in metabolism and homeostasis, pertinent succession of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells is of prime importance to maintain cellular proliferation. Although recent evidence has displayed a strong association between exposures to methyl isocyanate (MIC), one of the most toxic isocyanates, and neoplastic transformation, molecular characterization of the longitudinal effects of MIC on cell cycle regulation has never been performed. Here, we sequentially delineated the status of different proteins arbitrating the deregulation of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells treated with MIC. Our data reaffirms the oncogenic capability of MIC with elevated DNA damage response proteins pATM and γ-H2AX, deregulation of DNA damage check point genes CHK1 and CHK2, altered expression of p53 and p21 proteins involved in cell cycle arrest with perturbation in GADD-45 expression in the treated cells. Further, alterations in cyclin A, cyclin E, CDK2 levels along with overexpression of mitotic spindle checkpoints proteins Aurora A/B, centrosomal pericentrin protein, chromosomal aberrations, and loss of Pot1a was observed. Thus, MIC impacts key proteins involved in cell cycle regulation to trigger genomic instability as a possible mechanism of developmental basis of liver carcinogenesis.

  8. Pancreatic Cancer-derived Exosomes Causes Paraneoplastic β-cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Javeed, Naureen; Sagar, Gunisha; Dutta, Shamit K.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Lau, Julie S.; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Truty, Mark; Petersen, Gloria M.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Chari, Suresh T.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Pancreatic cancer (PC) frequently causes diabetes. We recently proposed adrenomedullin (AM) as a candidate mediator of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in PC. How PC-derived AM reaches β-cells remote from the cancer to induce β-cell dysfunction is unknown. We tested a novel hypothesis that PC sheds AM-containing exosomes into circulation which are transported to β-cells and impair insulin secretion. Methods We characterized exosomes from conditioned media of PC-cell lines (n=5) and portal/peripheral venous blood of PC patients (n=20). Western blot analysis showed the presence of AM in PC-Exosomes. We determined the effect of AM-containing PC-Exosomes on insulin secretion from INS-1 β-cells and human islets, and showed how exosomes internalize into β-cells. We studied the interaction between β-cell AM receptors and AM present in PC-Exosomes. In addition, we studied the effect of AM on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response genes and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species generation in β-cells. Results Exosomes were found to be the predominant extracellular vesicles secreted by PC into culture media and human plasma. PC-Exosomes contained AM and CA19-9, readily entered β-cells through caveolin-mediated endocytosis or macropinocytosis, and inhibited insulin secretion. AM in PC-Exosomes interacted with its receptor on β-cells. AM receptor blockade abrogated the inhibitory effect of exosomes on insulin secretion. β-cells exposed to AM or PC-Exosomes showed upregulation of ER stress genes and increased reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Conclusions Pancreatic cancer causes paraneoplastic β-cell dysfunction by shedding AM+/CA19-9+ exosomes into circulation that inhibit insulin secretion, likely through AM-induced ER stress and failure of the UPR. PMID:25355928

  9. Combined cycle phosphoric acid fuel cell electric power system

    SciTech Connect

    Mollot, D.J.; Micheli, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    By arranging two or more electric power generation cycles in series, combined cycle systems are able to produce electric power more efficiently than conventional single cycle plants. The high fuel to electricity conversion efficiency results in lower plant operating costs, better environmental performance, and in some cases even lower capital costs. Despite these advantages, combined cycle systems for the 1 - 10 megawatt (MW) industrial market are rare. This paper presents a low noise, low (oxides of nitrogen) NOx, combined cycle alternative for the small industrial user. By combining a commercially available phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) with a low-temperature Rankine cycle (similar to those used in geothermal applications), electric conversion efficiencies between 45 and 47 percent are predicted. While the simple cycle PAFC is competitive on a cost of energy basis with gas turbines and diesel generators in the 1 to 2 MW market, the combined cycle PAFC is competitive, on a cost of energy basis, with simple cycle diesel generators in the 4 to 25 MW market. In addition, the efficiency and low-temperature operation of the combined cycle PAFC results in a significant reduction in carbon dioxide emissions with NO{sub x} concentration on the order of 1 parts per million (per weight) (ppmw).

  10. HCdc14A is involved in cell cycle regulation of human brain vascular endothelial cells following injury induced by high glucose, free fatty acids and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingjing; Zhou, Houguang; Tao, Yinghong; Guo, Zhuangli; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yanyan; Tang, Yuping; Hu, Renming; Dong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle processes play a vital role in vascular endothelial proliferation and dysfunction. Cell division cycle protein 14 (Cdc14) is an important cell cycle regulatory phosphatase. Previous studies in budding yeast demonstrated that Cdc14 could trigger the inactivation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), which are required for mitotic exit and cytokinesis. However, the exact function of human Cdc14 (hCdc14) in cell cycle regulation during vascular diseases is yet to be elucidated. There are two HCdc14 homologs: hCdc14A and hCdc14B. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of hCdc14A in high glucose-, free fatty acids (FFAs)-, and hypoxia-induced injury in cultured human brain vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs). Data revealed that high glucose, FFA, and hypoxia down-regulated hCdc14A expression remarkably, and also affected the expression of other cell cycle-related proteins such as cyclin B, cyclin D, cyclin E, and p53. Furthermore, the combined addition of the three stimuli largely blocked cell cycle progression, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis. We also determined that hCdc14A was localized mainly to centrosomes during interphase and spindles during mitosis using confocal microscopy, and that it could affect the expression of other cycle-related proteins. More importantly, the overexpression of hCdc14A accelerated cell cycle progression, enhanced cell proliferation, and promoted neoplastic transformation, whereas the knockdown of hCdc14A using small interfering RNA produced the opposite effects. Therefore, these findings provide novel evidence that hCdc14A might be involved in cell cycle regulation in cultured HBVECs during high glucose-, FFA-, and hypoxia-induced injury.

  11. Immediate Dysfunction of Vaccine-Elicited CD8+ T Cells Primed in the Absence of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Larocca, Rafael A.; Aid, Malika; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Borducchi, Erica N.; Yates, Kathleen B.; Abbink, Peter; Kirilova, Marinela; Ng’ang’a, David; Bramson, Jonathan; Haining, W. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cell help is critical for optimal CD8+ T cell memory differentiation and maintenance in many experimental systems. In addition, many reports have identified reduced primary CD8+ T cell responses in the absence of CD4+ T cell help, which often coincides with reduced Ag or pathogen clearance. In this study, we demonstrate that absence of CD4+ T cells at the time of adenovirus vector immunization of mice led to immediate impairments in early CD8+ T cell functionality and differentiation. Unhelped CD8+ T cells exhibited a reduced effector phenotype, decreased ex vivo cytotoxicity, and decreased capacity to produce cytokines. This dysfunctional state was imprinted within 3 d of immunization. Unhelped CD8+ T cells expressed elevated levels of inhibitory receptors and exhibited transcriptomic exhaustion and anergy profiles by gene set enrichment analysis. Dysfunctional, impaired effector differentiation also occurred following immunization of CD4+ T cell–deficient mice with a poxvirus vector. This study demonstrates that following priming with viral vectors, CD4+ T cell help is required to promote both the expansion and acquisition of effector functions by CD8+ T cells, which is accomplished by preventing immediate dysfunction. PMID:27448585

  12. Global Dynamical Properties of the Yeast Cell Cycle Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chao

    2004-03-01

    The interactions between proteins, DNA, and RNA in living cells constitute molecular networks that govern various cellular functions. To investigate the global dynamical properties and stabilities of such networks, we studied the network regulating the cell division (cell cycle) of the budding yeast. With the use of both discrete (Boolean) and continuous (ODEs) dynamical models, it was demonstrated that the cell-cycle network is extremely stable and robust for its function. The biological stationary state--the G1 state--is a global attractor of the dynamics. The biological pathway--the cell-cycle sequence of protein states--is a globally attracting trajectory of the dynamics. These properties are largely preserved with respect to small perturbations to the network. These results suggest that cellular regulatory networks are robustly designed for their functions.

  13. The Timing of T Cell Priming and Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Obst, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of specific lymphocytes is the central tenet of the clonal selection paradigm. Antigen recognition by T cells triggers a series of events that produces expanded clones of differentiated effector cells. TCR signaling events are detectable within seconds and minutes and are likely to continue for hours and days in vivo. Here, I review the work done on the importance of TCR signals in the later part of the expansion phase of the primary T cell response, primarily regarding the regulation of the cell cycle in CD4+ and CD8+ cells. The results suggest a degree of programing by early signals for effector differentiation, particularly in the CD8+ T cell compartment, with optimal expansion supported by persistent antigen presentation later on. Differences to CD4+ T cell expansion and new avenues toward a molecular understanding of cell cycle regulation in lymphocytes are discussed. PMID:26594213

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell-based gene therapy for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Lee, H J; Song, Y S

    2016-05-01

    Despite the overwhelming success of PDE5 inhibitor (PDE5I), the demand for novel pharmacotherapeutic and surgical options for ED continues to rise owing to the increased proportion of elderly individuals in the population, in addition to the growing percentage of ED patients who do not respond to PDE5I. Surgical treatment of ED is associated with many complications, thus warranting the need for nonsurgical therapies. Moreover, none of the above-mentioned treatments essentially corrects, cures or prevents ED. Although gene therapy is a promising option, many challenges and obstacles such as local inflammatory response and random transgene expression, in addition to other safety issues, limit its use at the clinical level. The use of stem cell therapy alone also has many shortcomings. To overcome these inadequacies, many scientists and clinicians are investigating new gene and stem cell therapies.

  15. Tumor-Induced CD8+ T-Cell Dysfunction in Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and one of the most common types of cancers. The limited success of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes have highlighted the need to develop new therapies like antitumor immunotherapy. CD8+ T-cells represent a major arm of the cell-mediated anti-tumor response and a promising target for developing T-cell-based immunotherapies against lung cancer. Lung tumors, however, have been considered to possess poor immunogenicity; even so, lung tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell clones can be established that possess cytotoxicity against autologous tumor cells. This paper will focus on the alterations induced in CD8+ T-cells by lung cancer. Although memory CD8+ T-cells infiltrate lung tumors, in both tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and malignant pleural effusions, these cells are dysfunctional and the effector subset is reduced. We propose that chronic presence of lung tumors induces dysfunctions in CD8+ T-cells and sensitizes them to activation-induced cell death, which may be associated with the poor clinical responses observed in immunotherapeutic trials. Getting a deeper knowledge of the evasion mechanisms lung cancer induce in CD8+ T-cells should lead to further understanding of lung cancer biology, overcome tumor evasion mechanisms, and design improved immunotherapeutic treatments for lung cancer. PMID:23118782

  16. Tumor-induced CD8+ T-cell dysfunction in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and one of the most common types of cancers. The limited success of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes have highlighted the need to develop new therapies like antitumor immunotherapy. CD8+ T-cells represent a major arm of the cell-mediated anti-tumor response and a promising target for developing T-cell-based immunotherapies against lung cancer. Lung tumors, however, have been considered to possess poor immunogenicity; even so, lung tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell clones can be established that possess cytotoxicity against autologous tumor cells. This paper will focus on the alterations induced in CD8+ T-cells by lung cancer. Although memory CD8+ T-cells infiltrate lung tumors, in both tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and malignant pleural effusions, these cells are dysfunctional and the effector subset is reduced. We propose that chronic presence of lung tumors induces dysfunctions in CD8+ T-cells and sensitizes them to activation-induced cell death, which may be associated with the poor clinical responses observed in immunotherapeutic trials. Getting a deeper knowledge of the evasion mechanisms lung cancer induce in CD8+ T-cells should lead to further understanding of lung cancer biology, overcome tumor evasion mechanisms, and design improved immunotherapeutic treatments for lung cancer.

  17. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A; Hoegger, Dominik C; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A

    2013-01-29

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization.

  18. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A.; Hoegger, Dominik C.; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization. PMID:23267082

  19. Role of Complement in Red Cell Dysfunction in Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    3 Introduction Trauma-induced changes in the red blood cells ( RBC ) contribute to the reduction of blood flow to distant...The expression of C4d on the surface of RBCs was measured by flow cytometry and expressed as mean fluorescence intensity. (A) Representative data. (B...measured by flow cytometry. Fluorescence levels of RBCs were acquired for 30 seconds using FACScan flow cytometer to establish a baseline for intra- 8

  20. Post-transcriptional RNA Regulons Affecting Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Blackinton, Jeff G.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular growth cycle is initiated and maintained by punctual, yet agile, regulatory events involving modifications of cell cycle proteins as well as coordinated gene expression to support cyclic checkpoint decisions. Recent evidence indicates that post-transcriptional partitioning of messenger RNA subsets by RNA-binding proteins help physically localize, temporally coordinate, and efficiently translate cell cycle proteins. This dynamic organization of mRNAs encoding cell cycle components contributes to the overall economy of the cell cycle consistent with the post-transcriptional RNA regulon model of gene expression. This review examines several recent studies demonstrating the coordination of mRNA subsets encoding cell cycle proteins during nuclear export and subsequent coupling to protein synthesis, and discusses evidence for mRNA coordination of p53 targets and the DNA damage response pathway. We consider how these observations may connect to upstream and downstream post-transcriptional coordination and coupling of splicing, export, localization, and translation. Published examples from yeast, nematode, insect, and mammalian systems are discussed, and we consider genetic evidence supporting the conclusion that dysregulation of RNA regulons may promote pathogenic states of growth such as carcinogenesis. PMID:24882724

  1. Intravenous administration of Honokiol provides neuroprotection and improves functional recovery after traumatic brain injury through cell cycle inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiquan; Liao, Zhengbu; Sun, Xiaochuan; Shi, Quanhong; Huo, Gang; Xie, Yanfeng; Tang, Xiaolan; Zhi, Xinggang; Tang, Zhaohua

    2014-11-01

    Recently, increasing evidence has shown that cell cycle activation is a key factor of neuronal death and neurological dysfunction after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study aims to investigate the effects of Honokiol, a cell cycle inhibitor, on attenuating the neuronal damage and facilitating functional recovery after TBI in rats, in an attempt to unveil its underlying molecular mechanisms in TBI. This study suggested that delayed intravenous administration of Honokiol could effectively ameliorate TBI-induced sensorimotor and cognitive dysfunctions. Meanwhile, Honokiol treatment could also reduce the lesion volume and increase the neuronal survival in the cortex and hippocampus. The neuronal degeneration and apoptosis in the cortex and hippocampus were further significantly attenuated by Honokiol treatment. In addition, the expression of cell cycle-related proteins, including cyclin D1, CDK4, pRb and E2F1, was significantly increased and endogenous cell cycle inhibitor p27 was markedly decreased at different time points after TBI. And these changes were significantly reversed by post-injury Honokiol treatment. Furthermore, the expression of some of the key cell cycle proteins such as cyclin D1 and E2F1 and the associated apoptosis in neurons were both remarkably attenuated by Honokiol treatment. These results show that delayed intravenous administration of Honokiol could effectively improve the functional recovery and attenuate the neuronal cell death, which is probably, at least in part, attributed to its role as a cell cycle inhibitior. This might give clues to developing attractive therapies for future clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bax alpha perturbs T cell development and affects cell cycle entry of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, H J; Gil-Gómez, G; Kirberg, J; Berns, A J

    1996-01-01

    Bax alpha can heterodimerize with Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L), countering their effects, as well as promoting apoptosis on overexpression. We show that bax alpha transgenic mice have greatly reduced numbers of mature T cells, which results from an impaired positive selection in the thymus. This perturbation in positive selection is accompanied by an increase in the number of cycling thymocytes. Further to this, mature T cells overexpressing Bax alpha have lower levels of p27Kip1 and enter S phase more rapidly in response to interleukin-2 stimulation than do control T cells, while the converse is true of bcl-2 transgenic T cells. These data indicate that apoptotic regulatory proteins can modulate the level of cell cycle-controlling proteins and thereby directly impact on the cell cycle. Images PMID:9003775

  3. Microvesicles Derived from Indoxyl Sulfate Treated Endothelial Cells Induce Endothelial Progenitor Cells Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Andres; Guerrero, Fatima; Buendia, Paula; Obrero, Teresa; Aljama, Pedro; Carracedo, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in chronic kidney disease patients. Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a typical protein-bound uremic toxin that cannot be effectively cleared by conventional dialysis. Increased IS is associated with the progression of chronic kidney disease and development of cardiovascular disease. After endothelial activation by IS, cells release endothelial microvesicles (EMV) that can induce endothelial dysfunction. We developed an in vitro model of endothelial damage mediated by IS to evaluate the functional effect of EMV on the endothelial repair process developed by endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). EMV derived from IS-treated endothelial cells were isolated by ultracentrifugation and characterized for miRNAs content. The effects of EMV on healthy EPCs in culture were studied. We observed that IS activates endothelial cells and the generated microvesicles (IsEMV) can modulate the classic endothelial roles of progenitor cells as colony forming units and form new vessels in vitro. Moreover, 23 miRNAs were contained in IsEMV including four (miR-181a-5p, miR-4454, miR-150-5p, and hsa-let-7i-5p) that were upregulated in IsEMV compared with control endothelial microvesicles. Other authors have found that miR-181a-5p, miR-4454, and miR-150-5p are involved in promoting inflammation, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Interestingly, we observed an increase in NFκB and p53, and a decrease in IκBα in EPCs treated with IsEMV. Our data suggest that IS is capable of inducing endothelial vesiculation with different membrane characteristics, miRNAs and other molecules, which makes maintaining of vascular homeostasis of EPCs not fully functional. These specific characteristics of EMV could be used as novel biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of vascular disease.

  4. The Dynamical Mechanisms of the Cell Cycle Size Checkpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shi-Fu; Yan, Jie; Liu, Zeng-Rong; Yang, Ling

    2012-10-01

    Cell division must be tightly coupled to cell growth in order to maintain cell size, whereas the mechanisms of how initialization of mitosis is regulated by cell size remain to be elucidated. We develop a mathematical model of the cell cycle, which incorporates cell growth to investigate the dynamical properties of the size checkpoint in embryos of Xenopus laevis. We show that the size checkpoint is naturally raised from a saddle-node bifurcation, and in a mutant case, the cell loses its size control ability due to the loss of this saddle-node point.

  5. Nanoparticle Improved Stem Cell Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction in a Rat Model of Cavernous Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haocheng; Dhanani, Nadeem; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R; Wang, Grace; Cao, Yanna; Ko, Tien C; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Run

    2016-03-01

    Recently intracavernous injection of stem cells has garnered great interest as a potential treatment of erectile dysfunction. However, most stem cells are washed out immediately after intracavernous injection. The goal of this study was to investigate using NanoShuttle™ magnetic nanoparticles to maintain stem cells in the corpus cavernosum after intracavernous injection, thereby improving stem cell therapy of erectile dysfunction in an animal model. Adipose derived stem cells were magnetized with NanoShuttle magnetic nanoparticles to create Nano-adipose derived stem cells. A total of 24 rats underwent bilateral cavernous nerve crush and were randomly assigned to 3 groups, including adipose derived stem cells, Nano-adipose derived stem cells and Nano-adipose derived stem cells plus magnet. Cells were tracked at days 1, 3, 5 and 9 after intracavernous injection. Another 40 rats with bilateral cavernous nerve crush were randomly assigned to 4 groups, including bilateral cavernous nerve crush, bilateral cavernous nerve crush plus adipose derived stem cell intracavernous injection, bilateral cavernous nerve crush plus Nano-adipose derived stem cell intracavernous injection and bilateral cavernous nerve crush plus Nano-adipose derived stem cell intracavernous injection plus magnet. Functional testing and histological analysis were performed 4 weeks after intracavernous injection. In the in vitro study 1) NanoShuttle magnetic nanoparticles were successfully bound to adipose derived stem cells and 2) Nano-adipose derived stem cells migrated toward the magnet. In the in vivo study 1) cell tracking showed that Nano-adipose derived stem cells were successfully retained in the corpus cavernosum using the magnet for up to 3 days while most adipose derived stem cells were washed out in other groups by day 1 after intracavernous injection, and 2) intracavernous pressure/mean arterial pressure, and αSMA (α-smooth muscle actin) and PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion

  6. Creatine kinase in cell cycle regulation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong-Bin

    2016-08-01

    The phosphocreatine-creatine kinase (CK) shuttle system is increasingly recognized as a fundamental mechanism for ATP homeostasis in both excitable and non-excitable cells. Many intracellular processes are ATP dependent. Cell division is a process requiring a rapid rate of energy turnover. Cell cycle regulation is also a key point to understanding the mechanisms underlying cancer progression. It has been known for about 40 years that aberrant CK levels are associated with various cancers and for over 30 years that CK is involved in mitosis regulation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been investigated sufficiently until recently. By maintaining ATP at sites of high-energy demand, CK can regulate cell cycle progression by affecting the intracellular energy status as well as by influencing signaling pathways that are essential to activate cell division and cytoskeleton reorganization. Aberrant CK levels may impair cell viability under normal or stressed conditions and induce cell death. The involvement of CK in cell cycle regulation and cellular energy metabolism makes it a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in cancer. To understand the multiple physiological/pathological functions of CK, it is necessary to identify CK-binding partners and regulators including proteins, non-coding RNAs and participating endogenous small molecular weight chemical compounds. This review will focus on molecular mechanisms of CK in cell cycle regulation and cancer progression. It will also discuss the implications of recent mechanistic studies, the emerging problems and future challenges of the multifunctional enzyme CK.

  7. SLipid-induced cell dysfunction and cell death: lessons from yeast.

    PubMed

    Kohlwein, Sepp D; Petschnigg, Julia

    2007-12-01

    The 2001 Nobel Prize in Medicine, awarded to two yeast researchers for contributions to understanding the eukaryotic cell cycle, spotlighted yeast as an experimental model system in biomedical research. Major discoveries of molecular processes underlying lipid and biomembrane biogenesis were first made in yeast: secretory pathways, vesicle and membrane fusion, and the unfolded protein response. The discovery of programmed cell death that is conserved at multiple levels (quite intriguing for a unicellular organism), and energy metabolism controlled by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways, and the target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway (originally discovered in yeast)-all refer to functional and structural similarities with mammalian cells beyond the mere metabolic level. This article reviews recently uncovered aspects of fatty acid-associated malfunctions and lipotoxicity in yeast that may aid in understanding the molecular basis of lipid-associated disorders in mammals.

  8. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields and the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlke, Megan A.

    Exposure to nanosecond pulsed electrical fields (nsPEFs) can cause poration of external and internal cell membranes, DNA damage, and disassociation of cytoskeletal components, all of which are capable of disrupting a cell's ability to replicate. The phase of the cell cycle at the time of exposure is linked to differential sensitivities to nsPEFs across cell lines, as DNA structure, membrane elasticity, and cytoskeletal structure change dramatically during the cell cycle. Additionally, nsPEFs are capable of activating cell cycle checkpoints, which could lead to apoptosis or slow population growth. NsPEFs are emerging as a method for treating tumors via apoptotic induction; therefore, investigating the relevance of nsPEFs and the cell cycle could translate into improved efficacy in tumor treatment. Populations of Jurkat and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were examined post-exposure (10 ns pulse trains at 150kV/cm) by analysis of DNA content via propidium iodide staining and flow cytometric analysis at various time points (1, 6, and 12h post-exposure) to determine population distribution in cell cycle phases. Additionally, CHO and Jurkat cells were synchronized in G1/S and G2/M phases, pulsed, and analyzed to evaluate the role of cell cycle phase in survival of nsPEFs. CHO populations appeared similar to sham populations post-nsPEFs but exhibited arrest in the G1 phase at 6h after exposure. Jurkat cells exhibited increased cell death after nsPEFs compared to CHO cells but did not exhibit checkpoint arrest at any observed time point. The G1/S phase checkpoint is partially controlled by the action of p53; the lack of an active p53 response in Jurkat cells could contribute to their ability to pass this checkpoint and resist cell cycle arrest. Both cell lines exhibited increased sensitivity to nsPEFs in G2/M phase. Live imaging of CHO cells after nsPEF exposure supports the theory of G1/S phase arrest, as a reduced number of cells undergo mitosis within 24 h when

  9. Perinatal testosterone exposure potentiates vascular dysfunction by ERβ suppression in endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiguo; Ren, Mingming; Li, Ling; Zhu, Yin; Chu, Zhigang; Zhu, Zhigang; Ruan, Qiongfang; Lou, Wenting; Zhang, Haimou; Han, Zhen; Huang, Xiaodong; Xiang, Wei; Wang, Tao; Yao, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent clinical cohort study shows that testosterone therapy increases cardiovascular diseases in men with low testosterone levels, excessive circulating androgen levels may play a detrimental role in the vascular system, while the potential mechanism and effect of testosterone exposure on the vascular function in offspring is still unknown. Our preliminary results showed that perinatal testosterone exposure in mice induces estrogen receptor β (ERβ) suppression in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in offspring but not mothers, while estradiol (E2) had no effect. Further investigation showed that ERβ suppression is due to perinatal testosterone exposure-induced epigenetic changes with altered DNA methylation on the ERβ promoter. During aging, EPCs with ERβ suppression mobilize to the vascular wall, differentiate into ERβ-suppressed mouse endothelial cells (MECs) with downregulated expression of SOD2 (mitochondrial superoxide dismutase) and ERRα (estrogen-related receptor α). This results in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA damage, and the dysfunction of mitochondria and fatty acid metabolism, subsequently potentiating vascular dysfunction. Bone marrow transplantation of EPCs that overexpressed with either ERβ or a SIRT1 single mutant SIRT1-C152(D) that could modulate SIRT1 phosphorylation significantly ameliorated vascular dysfunction, while ERβ knockdown worsened the problem. We conclude that perinatal testosterone exposure potentiates vascular dysfunction through ERβ suppression in EPCs.

  10. The Endocrine Dyscrasia that Accompanies Menopause and Andropause Induces Aberrant Cell Cycle Signaling that Triggers Cell Cycle Reentry of Post-mitotic Neurons, Neurodysfunction, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Craig S.; Bowen, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are the physiological factors that regulate neurogenesis during embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. These hormones support the formation of brain structures such as dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture of information (memories). Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories in animals (e.g. infantile amnesia). In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Since sex hormones control when and how neurons proliferate and differentiate, the endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause is a key signaling event that impacts neurogenesis and the acquisition, processing, storage and recall of memories. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in endocrine signaling with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle with neurite retraction that leads to neuron dysfunction and death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the ratio of LH:sex steroids as driving aberrant mitotic events mediated by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor, amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ, and the activation of Cdk5, a key regulator of cell cycle progression and tau phosphorylation (a cardinal feature of both neurogenesis and

  11. Angiotensin II Causes β-Cell Dysfunction Through an ER Stress-Induced Proinflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stanley M H; Lau, Yeh-Siang; Miller, Alyson A; Ku, Jacqueline M; Potocnik, Simon; Ye, Ji-Ming; Woodman, Owen L; Herbert, Terence P

    2017-10-01

    The metabolic syndrome is associated with an increase in the activation of the renin angiotensin system, whose inhibition reduces the incidence of new-onset diabetes. Importantly, angiotensin II (AngII), independently of its vasoconstrictor action, causes β-cell inflammation and dysfunction, which may be an early step in the development of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine how AngII causes β-cell dysfunction. Islets of Langerhans were isolated from C57BL/6J mice that had been infused with AngII in the presence or absence of taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) and effects on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, inflammation, and β-cell function determined. The mechanism of action of AngII was further investigated using isolated murine islets and clonal β cells. We show that AngII triggers ER stress, an increase in the messenger RNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and promotes β-cell dysfunction in murine islets of Langerhans both in vivo and ex vivo. These effects were significantly attenuated by TUDCA, an inhibitor of ER stress. We also show that AngII-induced ER stress is required for the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and is caused by reactive oxygen species and IP3 receptor activation. These data reveal that the induction of ER stress is critical for AngII-induced β-cell dysfunction and indicates how therapies that promote ER homeostasis may be beneficial in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  12. Nitrones Reverse Hyperglycemia-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction in Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Headley, Colwyn A.; DiSilvestro, David; Hemann, Craig; Bryant, Kelsey E.; Chen, Chun-Aun; Das, Amlan; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Durand, Grégory; Villamena, Frederick A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia has been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction through heightened ROS production. Since nitrones reverse eNOS dysfunction, increase antioxidant enzyme activity, and suppress pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and mitochondrial dysfunction from ROS-induced toxicity, the objective of this study was to determine whether nitrone spin traps DMPO, PBN and PBN-LA were effective at duplicating these effects and improving glucose uptake in an in vitro model of hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction using bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). BAEC were cultured in DMEM medium with low (5.5 mM glucose, LG) or high glucose (50 mM, HG) for 14 days to model in vivo hyperglycemia as experienced in humans with metabolic disease. Improvements in cell viability, intracellular oxidative stress, NO and tetrahydrobiopterin levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, glucose transport, and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured from single treatment of BAEC cells with nitrones for 24 h after hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia significantly increased intracellular ROS by 50%, decreased cell viability by 25%, reduced NO bioavailability by 50%, and decreased BH4 levels by 15% thereby decreasing NO production. Intracellular glucose transport and SOD activity were also decreased by 50% and 25% respectively. Nitrone (PBN and DMPO, 50 μM) treatment of BAEC cells grown in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in in the normalization of outcome measures except for SOD and catalase activities. Our findings demonstrate that the nitrones reverse the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in BAEC cells. We believe that in vivo testing of these nitrone compounds in models of cardiometabolic disease is warranted. PMID:26774452

  13. Regulation of cell cycle and DNA repair in post-mitotic GABA neurons in psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Benes, Francine M

    2011-06-01

    Disturbances of cell cycle regulation and DNA repair in post-mitotic neurons have been implicated in degenerative and malignant diseases of the human brain. Recent work is now suggesting that abnormal regulation of these functions in GABA cells of the adult hippocampus may also play a role in two neuropsychiatric disorders. In schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, a network of genes involved in the regulation of GAD₆₇, a marker for the functional differentiation of GABA cells, show pronounced changes in expression and include kainate receptor subunits, TGFβ and Wnt signaling pathways, epigenetic factors and transcription factors. One of these genes, cyclin D2, is involved in the regulation of cell cycle and DNA repair and appears to be a pivotal element in linking GAD₆₇ expression with these functional clusters of genes. Dysfunction of post-mitotic GABAergic neurons in the adult hippocampus of patients with psychotic disorders is associated with changes in the expression of genes that are involved in the maintenance of functional and genomic integrity of GABA cells. The nature of these changes is quite different in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, suggesting that a common cell phenotype (in this case, decreased GAD₆₇ expression) may involve two fundamentally different molecular endophenotypes and reflect unique susceptibility genes involved in the respective disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Cell cycles and proliferation patterns in Haematococcus pluvialis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Litao

    2016-09-01

    Most studies on Haematococcus pluvialis have been focused on cell growth and astaxanthin accumulation; far less attention has been paid to cell cycles and proliferation patterns. The purpose of this study was to clarify cell cycles and proliferation patterns in H. pluvialis microscopically using a camera and video recorder system. The complicated life history of H. pluvialis can be divided into two stages: the motile stage and the non-motile stage. All the cells can be classified into forms as follows: motile cell, non-motile cell, zoospore and aplanospore. The main cell proliferation, both in the motile phase and non-motile phase in H. pluvialis, is by asexual reproduction. Under normal growth conditions, a motile cell usually produces two, sometimes four, and exceptionally eight zoospores. Under unfavorable conditions, the motile cell loses its flagella and transforms into a non-motile cell, and the non-motile cell usually produces 2, 4 or 8 aplanospores, and occasionally 20-32 aplanospores, which further develop into non-motile cells. Under suitable conditions, the non-motile cell is also able to release zoospores. The larger non-motile cells produce more than 16 zoospores, and the smaller ones produce 4 or 8 zoospores. Vegetative reproduction is by direct cell division in the motile phase and by occasional cell budding in the non-motile phase. There is, as yet, no convincing direct evidence for sexual reproduction.

  15. Cell cycles and proliferation patterns in Haematococcus pluvialis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Litao

    2017-09-01

    Most studies on Haematococcus pluvialis have been focused on cell growth and astaxanthin accumulation; far less attention has been paid to cell cycles and proliferation patterns. The purpose of this study was to clarify cell cycles and proliferation patterns in H. pluvialis microscopically using a camera and video recorder system. The complicated life history of H. pluvialis can be divided into two stages: the motile stage and the non-motile stage. All the cells can be classified into forms as follows: motile cell, nonmotile cell, zoospore and aplanospore. The main cell proliferation, both in the motile phase and non-motile phase in H. pluvialis, is by asexual reproduction. Under normal growth conditions, a motile cell usually produces two, sometimes four, and exceptionally eight zoospores. Under unfavorable conditions, the motile cell loses its flagella and transforms into a non-motile cell, and the non-motile cell usually produces 2, 4 or 8 aplanospores, and occasionally 20-32 aplanospores, which further develop into non-motile cells. Under suitable conditions, the non-motile cell is also able to release zoospores. The larger non-motile cells produce more than 16 zoospores, and the smaller ones produce 4 or 8 zoospores. Vegetative reproduction is by direct cell division in the motile phase and by occasional cell budding in the non-motile phase. There is, as yet, no convincing direct evidence for sexual reproduction.

  16. Association Between Regular Cannabis Use and Ganglion Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Schwitzer, Thomas; Schwan, Raymund; Albuisson, Eliane; Giersch, Anne; Lalanne, Laurence; Angioi-Duprez, Karine; Laprevote, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Because cannabis use is a major public health concern and cannabis is known to act on central neurotransmission, studying the retinal ganglion cells in individuals who regularly use cannabis is of interest. To determine whether the regular use of cannabis could alter the function of retinal ganglion cells in humans. For this case-control study, individuals who regularly use cannabis, as well as healthy controls, were recruited, and data were collected from February 11 to October 28, 2014. Retinal function was used as a direct marker of brain neurotransmission abnormalities in complex mental phenomena. Amplitude and implicit time of the N95 wave on results of pattern electroretinography. Twenty-eight of the 52 participants were regular cannabis users (24 men and 4 women; median age, 22 years [95% CI, 21-24 years]), and the remaining 24 were controls (20 men and 4 women; median age, 24 years [95% CI, 23-27 years]). There was no difference between groups in terms of age (P = .13) or sex (P = .81). After adjustment for the number of years of education and alcohol use, there was a significant increase for cannabis users of the N95 implicit time on results of pattern electroretinography (median, 98.6 milliseconds [95% CI, 93.4-99.5]) compared with controls (median, 88.4 milliseconds [95% CI, 85.0-91.1]), with 8.4 milliseconds as the median of the differences (95% CI, 4.9-11.5; P < .001, Wald logistic regression). A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis (area under the curve, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.73-0.95]; P < .001) revealed, for a cutoff value of 91.13 milliseconds, a sensitivity of 78.6% (95% CI, 60.5%-89.8%) and a specificity of 75.0% (95% CI, 55.1%-88.0%) for correctly classifying both cannabis users and controls in their corresponding group. The positive predictive value was 78.6% (95% CI, 60.5%-89.8%), and the negative predictive value was 75.0% (95% CI, 55.1%-88.0%). Our results demonstrate a delay in transmission of action potentials by the

  17. Vitamin K4 inhibits the proliferation and induces apoptosis of U2OS osteosarcoma cells via mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Di, Weihua; Khan, Muhammad; Gao, Yong; Cui, Jing; Wang, Deqiang; Qu, Mingfen; Feng, Liangtao; Maryam, Amara; Gao, Hongwen

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin K (VK) is a group of fat‑soluble vitamins, which serve important roles in blood coagulation and bone metabolism. A recent study reported that several VK subtypes possess antitumor properties, however the antitumor effects of VK in osteosarcoma are unknown. The present study aimed to identify the antitumor effects of VK in osteosarcoma and the possible underlying mechanism of action. The effect of VK4 on cell viability was determined using a 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cellular and nuclear morphological changes were observed by phase contrast microscopy. Cell cycle analysis, apoptotic rate, mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by flow cytometry. In vitro cancer cell migration activities were evaluated using a Wound healing assay and Transwell microplates. The results demonstrated that VK4 arrested the cells in S phase and induced apoptosis. Additional mechanistic studies indicated that the induction of apoptosis by VK4 was associated with the increased production of reactive oxygen species, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased Bcl‑2 family protein expression levels and activation of caspase‑3. In conclusion, the results suggest that the sensitivity of U2OS osteosarcoma cells to VK4 may be as a result of mitochondrial dysfunction. As it is readily available for human consumption, VK4 may therefore present a novel therapeutic candidate for the treatment of patients with osteosarcoma.

  18. Somatic Stem Cells and Their Dysfunction in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Djokovic, Dusan; Calhaz-Jorge, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that somatic stem cells (SSCs) of different types prominently contribute to endometrium-associated disorders such as endometriosis. We reviewed the pertinent studies available on PubMed, published in English language until December 2014 and focused on the involvement of SSCs in the pathogenesis of this common gynecological disease. A concise summary of the data obtained from in vitro experiments, animal models, and human tissue analyses provides insights into the SSC dysregulation in endometriotic lesions. In addition, a set of research results is presented supporting that SSC-targeting, in combination with hormonal therapy, may result in improved control of the disease, while a more in-depth characterization of endometriosis SSCs may contribute to the development of early-disease diagnostic tests with increased sensitivity and specificity. Key message: Seemingly essential for the establishment and progression of endometriotic lesions, dysregulated SSCs, and associated molecular alterations hold a promise as potential endometriosis markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:25593975

  19. Cycle life characteristics of Li-TiS2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deligiannis, Frank; Shen, D.; Huang, C. K.; Surampudi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The development of lithium ambient temperature rechargeable cells is discussed. During the development process, we hope to gain a greater understanding of the materials and the properties of the Li-TiS2 cell and its components. The design will meet the requirements of 100 Wh/Kg and 1000 cycles, at 50 percent depth-of-discharge, by 1995.

  20. Regulation of the cell cycle and centrosome biology by deubiquitylases.

    PubMed

    Darling, Sarah; Fielding, Andrew B; Sabat-Pośpiech, Dorota; Prior, Ian A; Coulson, Judy M

    2017-09-12

    Post-translational modification of proteins by ubiquitylation is increasingly recognised as a highly complex code that contributes to the regulation of diverse cellular processes. In humans, a family of almost 100 deubiquitylase enzymes (DUBs) are assigned to six subfamilies and many of these DUBs can remove ubiquitin from proteins to reverse signals. Roles for individual DUBs have been delineated within specific cellular processes, including many that are dysregulated in diseases, particularly cancer. As potentially druggable enzymes, disease-associated DUBs are of increasing interest as pharmaceutical targets. The biology, structure and regulation of DUBs have been extensively reviewed elsewhere, so here we focus specifically on roles of DUBs in regulating cell cycle processes in mammalian cells. Over a quarter of all DUBs, representing four different families, have been shown to play roles either in the unidirectional progression of the cell cycle through specific checkpoints, or in the DNA damage response and repair pathways. We catalogue these roles and discuss specific examples. Centrosomes are the major microtubule nucleating centres within a cell and play a key role in forming the bipolar mitotic spindle required to accurately divide genetic material between daughter cells during cell division. To enable this mitotic role, centrosomes undergo a complex replication cycle that is intimately linked to the cell division cycle. Here, we also catalogue and discuss DUBs that have been linked to centrosome replication or function, including centrosome clustering, a mitotic survival strategy unique to cancer cells with supernumerary centrosomes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Bridges between Cell Cycle Regulation and Self-Renewal Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Viatour, Patrick

    2012-11-01

    Stem cells are a unique population that lies at the summit of any, or at least most, biological systems. They can differentiate in a variety of mature cell types, but they also have the ability to self-renew, that is, the capacity to divide and retain all the features of the mother cell. The regulation of self-renewal has been studied for many years, but several aspects of this regulation are still vague. The combined decision to divide and self-renew or differentiate suggests that the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and cell cycle activity are intermingled. While inactivation of many cell cycle regulators impacts the physiological and pathological biology of stem cells, the exact mechanisms that link the decision to enter the cell cycle and the choice of the cellular fate are poorly understood. The multiplicity of signals and pathways regulating self-renewal add to the complexity of the phenomenon. Here, I will review the described links between the cell cycle and self-renewal and discuss the role of the niche in the regulation of both mechanisms.

  2. Cycle life characteristics of Li-TiS2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deligiannis, Frank; Shen, D.; Huang, C. K.; Surampudi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The development of lithium ambient temperature rechargeable cells is discussed. During the development process, we hope to gain a greater understanding of the materials and the properties of the Li-TiS2 cell and its components. The design will meet the requirements of 100 Wh/Kg and 1000 cycles, at 50 percent depth-of-discharge, by 1995.

  3. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Rany; Ghanem, Hussein

    2013-01-12

    Erectile dysfunction is a common clinical entity that affects mainly men older than 40 years. In addition to the classical causes of erectile dysfunction, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, several common lifestyle factors, such as obesity, limited or an absence of physical exercise, and lower urinary tract symptoms, have been linked to the development of erectile dysfunction. Substantial steps have been taken in the study of the association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Erectile dysfunction is a strong predictor for coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular assessment of a non-cardiac patient presenting with erectile dysfunction is now recommended. Substantial advances have occurred in the understanding of the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction that ultimately led to the development of successful oral therapies, namely the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. However, oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have limitations, and present research is thus investigating cutting-edge therapeutic strategies including gene and cell-based technologies with the aim of discovering a cure for erectile dysfunction.

  4. Live Cell Imaging of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sexual Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Laura; Vjestica, Aleksandar; Dudin, Omaya; Bendezú, Felipe; Martin, Sophie G

    2017-07-21

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an invaluable model system for studying the principles that drive sexual differentiation and the meiotic cell division cycle. We describe a simple protocol for microscopic observation of the entire sexual life cycle that can be adapted to focus on specific stages of sexual differentiation. After growth to exponential phase in a nitrogen-rich medium, cell cultures are switched to a nitrogen-deprived medium until the population is enriched for the specific stage of the sexual lifecycle to be studied. Cells are then mounted in easily constructed customized agarose pad chambers for imaging. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Analyzing transcription dynamics during the budding yeast cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Leman, Adam R; Bristow, Sara L; Haase, Steven B

    2014-01-01

    Assaying global cell cycle-regulated transcription in budding yeast involves extracting RNA from a synchronous population and proper normalization of detected transcript levels. Here, we describe synchronization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell populations by centrifugal elutriation, followed by the isolation of RNA for microarray analysis. Further, we outline the computational methods required to directly compare RNA abundance from individual time points within an experiment and to compare independent experiments. Together, these methods describe the complete workflow necessary to observe RNA abundance during the cell cycle.

  6. The yeast cell-cycle network is robustly designed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangting; Long, Tao; Lu, Ying; Ouyang, Qi; Tang, Chao

    2004-04-01

    The interactions between proteins, DNA, and RNA in living cells constitute molecular networks that govern various cellular functions. To investigate the global dynamical properties and stabilities of such networks, we studied the cell-cycle regulatory network of the budding yeast. With the use of a simple dynamical model, it was demonstrated that the cell-cycle network is extremely stable and robust for its function. The biological stationary state, the G1 state, is a global attractor of the dynamics. The biological pathway, the cell-cycle sequence of protein states, is a globally attracting trajectory of the dynamics. These properties are largely preserved with respect to small perturbations to the network. These results suggest that cellular regulatory networks are robustly designed for their functions.

  7. Cell cycling with the SEB: a personal view.

    PubMed

    Bryant, John

    2014-06-01

    This review, written from a personal perspective, traces firstly the development of plant cell cycle research from the 1970s onwards, with some focus on the work of the author and of Dr Dennis Francis. Secondly there is a discussion of the support for and discussion of plant cell cycle research in the SEB, especially through the activities of the Cell Cycle Group within the Society's Cell Biology Section. In the main part of the review, selected aspects of DNA replication that have of been of special interest to the author are discussed. These are DNA polymerases and associated proteins, pre-replication events, regulation of enzymes and other proteins, nature and activation of DNA replication origins, and DNA endoreduplication. For all these topics, there is mention of the author's own work, followed by a brief synthesis of current understanding and a look to possible future developments.

  8. Cdks, cyclins and CKIs: roles beyond cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shuhui; Kaldis, Philipp

    2013-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are serine/threonine kinases and their catalytic activities are modulated by interactions with cyclins and Cdk inhibitors (CKIs). Close cooperation between this trio is necessary for ensuring orderly progression through the cell cycle. In addition to their well-established function in cell cycle control, it is becoming increasingly apparent that mammalian Cdks, cyclins and CKIs play indispensable roles in processes such as transcription, epigenetic regulation, metabolism, stem cell self-renewal, neuronal functions and spermatogenesis. Even more remarkably, they can accomplish some of these tasks individually, without the need for Cdk/cyclin complex formation or kinase activity. In this Review, we discuss the latest revelations about Cdks, cyclins and CKIs with the goal of showcasing their functional diversity beyond cell cycle regulation and their impact on development and disease in mammals.

  9. Cyclin and DNA Distributed Cell Cycle Model for GS-NS0 Cells

    PubMed Central

    García Münzer, David G.; Kostoglou, Margaritis; Georgiadis, Michael C.; Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N.; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cell cultures are intrinsically heterogeneous at different scales (molecular to bioreactor). The cell cycle is at the centre of capturing heterogeneity since it plays a critical role in the growth, death, and productivity of mammalian cell cultures. Current cell cycle models use biological variables (mass/volume/age) that are non-mechanistic, and difficult to experimentally determine, to describe cell cycle transition and capture culture heterogeneity. To address this problem, cyclins—key molecules that regulate cell cycle transition—have been utilized. Herein, a novel integrated experimental-modelling platform is presented whereby experimental quantification of key cell cycle metrics (cell cycle timings, cell cycle fractions, and cyclin expression determined by flow cytometry) is used to develop a cyclin and DNA distributed model for the industrially relevant cell line, GS-NS0. Cyclins/DNA synthesis rates were linked to stimulatory/inhibitory factors in the culture medium, which ultimately affect cell growth. Cell antibody productivity was characterized using cell cycle-specific production rates. The solution method delivered fast computational time that renders the model’s use suitable for model-based applications. Model structure was studied by global sensitivity analysis (GSA), which identified parameters with a significant effect on the model output, followed by re-estimation of its significant parameters from a control set of batch experiments. A good model fit to the experimental data, both at the cell cycle and viable cell density levels, was observed. The cell population heterogeneity of disturbed (after cell arrest) and undisturbed cell growth was captured proving the versatility of the modelling approach. Cell cycle models able to capture population heterogeneity facilitate in depth understanding of these complex systems and enable systematic formulation of culture strategies to improve growth and productivity. It is envisaged that this

  10. Lithocholic acid induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gafar, Ahmed A; Draz, Hossam M; Goldberg, Alexander A; Bashandy, Mohamed A; Bakry, Sayed; Khalifa, Mahmoud A; AbuShair, Walid; Titorenko, Vladimir I; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Lithocholic acid (LCA) is a secondary bile acid that is selectively toxic to human neuroblastoma, breast and prostate cancer cells, whilst sparing normal cells. We previously reported that LCA inhibited cell viability and proliferation and induced apoptosis and necrosis of androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in the toxicity of LCA in PC-3 and autophagy deficient, androgen-independent DU-145 cells. LCA induced ER stress-related proteins, such as CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (p-eIF2α) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK) in both cancer cell-types. The p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) and B cell lymphoma-like protein 11 (BIM) levels were decreased at overtly toxic LCA concentrations, although PUMA levels increased at lower LCA concentrations in both cell lines. LCA induced autophagy-related conversion of microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (LC3BI-LC3BII), and autophagy-related protein ATG5 in PC-3 cells, but not in autophagy-deficient DU-145 cells. LCA (>10 µM) increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration-dependently in PC-3 cells, whereas ROS levels were not affected in DU-145 cells. Salubrinal, an inhibitor of eIF2α dephosphorylation and ER stress, reduced LCA-induced CHOP levels slightly in PC-3, but not DU-145 cells. Salubrinal pre-treatment increased the cytotoxicity of LCA in PC-3 and DU-145 cells and resulted in a statistically significant loss of cell viability at normally non-toxic concentrations of LCA. The late-stage autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 exacerbated LCA toxicity at subtoxic LCA concentrations in PC-3 cells. The antioxidant α-tocotrienol strongly inhibited the toxicity of LCA in PC-3 cells, but not in DU-145 cells. Collectively

  11. Lithocholic acid induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gafar, Ahmed A.; Draz, Hossam M.; Goldberg, Alexander A.; Bashandy, Mohamed A.; Bakry, Sayed; Khalifa, Mahmoud A.; AbuShair, Walid; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    Lithocholic acid (LCA) is a secondary bile acid that is selectively toxic to human neuroblastoma, breast and prostate cancer cells, whilst sparing normal cells. We previously reported that LCA inhibited cell viability and proliferation and induced apoptosis and necrosis of androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in the toxicity of LCA in PC-3 and autophagy deficient, androgen-independent DU-145 cells. LCA induced ER stress-related proteins, such as CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (p-eIF2α) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK) in both cancer cell-types. The p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) and B cell lymphoma-like protein 11 (BIM) levels were decreased at overtly toxic LCA concentrations, although PUMA levels increased at lower LCA concentrations in both cell lines. LCA induced autophagy-related conversion of microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (LC3BI–LC3BII), and autophagy-related protein ATG5 in PC-3 cells, but not in autophagy-deficient DU-145 cells. LCA (>10 µM) increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration-dependently in PC-3 cells, whereas ROS levels were not affected in DU-145 cells. Salubrinal, an inhibitor of eIF2α dephosphorylation and ER stress, reduced LCA-induced CHOP levels slightly in PC-3, but not DU-145 cells. Salubrinal pre-treatment increased the cytotoxicity of LCA in PC-3 and DU-145 cells and resulted in a statistically significant loss of cell viability at normally non-toxic concentrations of LCA. The late-stage autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 exacerbated LCA toxicity at subtoxic LCA concentrations in PC-3 cells. The antioxidant α-tocotrienol strongly inhibited the toxicity of LCA in PC-3 cells, but not in DU-145 cells. Collectively

  12. Digital Holographic Microscopy for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Cell Cycle Arrest in L929 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Falck Miniotis, Maria; Mukwaya, Anthonny; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has emerged as a powerful non-invasive tool for cell analysis. It has the capacity to analyse multiple parameters simultaneously, such as cell- number, confluence and phase volume. This is done while cells are still adhered and growing in their culture flask. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DHM was able to monitor drug-induced cell cycle arrest in cultured cells and thus provide a non-disruptive alternative to flow cytometry. DHM parameters from G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrested L929 mouse fibroblast cells were collected. Cell cycle arrest was verified with flow cytometry. This study shows that DHM is able to monitor phase volume changes corresponding to either a G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest. G1-phase arrest with staurosporine correlated with a decrease in the average cell phase volume and G2/M-phase arrest with colcemid and etoposide correlated with an increase in the average cell phase volume. Importantly, DHM analysis of average cell phase volume was of comparable accuracy to flow cytometric measurement of cell cycle phase distribution as recorded following dose-dependent treatment with etoposide. Average cell phase volume changes in response to treatment with cell cycle arresting compounds could therefore be used as a DHM marker for monitoring cell cycle arrest in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:25208094

  13. Sesamin Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang; Wang, Guo-Dong; Ma, Ming-Zhe; Deng, Ru-Yuan; Guo, Li-Qun; Zhang, Jun-Xiu; Yang, Jie-Ren; Su, Qing

    2015-06-09

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the direct modulators of β-cells, have been shown to cause insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis through increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Sesamin has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative activity. This study was designed to investigate whether sesamin protects against AGEs-evoked β-cell damage via its antioxidant property. The effects of sesamin were examined in C57BL/6J mice and MIN6 cell line. In in vivo studies, mice were intraperitoneally injected with AGEs (120 mg/kg) and orally treated with sesamin (160 mg/kg) for four weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin releasing tests were performed. Insulin content, ROS generation and β-cell apoptosis in pancreatic islets were also measured. In in vitro studies, MIN6 cells were pretreated with sesamin (50 or 100 μM) and then exposed to AGEs (200 mg/L) for 24 h. Insulin secretion, β-cell death, ROS production as well as expression and activity of NADPH oxidase were determined. Sesamin treatment obviously ameliorated AGE-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. These effects were associated with decreased ROS production, down-regulated expression of p67(phox) and p22(phox), and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. These results suggest that sesamin protects β-cells from damage caused by AGEs through suppressing NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  14. Sesamin Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang; Wang, Guo-Dong; Ma, Ming-Zhe; Deng, Ru-Yuan; Guo, Li-Qun; Zhang, Jun-Xiu; Yang, Jie-Ren; Su, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the direct modulators of β-cells, have been shown to cause insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis through increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Sesamin has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative activity. This study was designed to investigate whether sesamin protects against AGEs-evoked β-cell damage via its antioxidant property. The effects of sesamin were examined in C57BL/6J mice and MIN6 cell line. In in vivo studies, mice were intraperitoneally injected with AGEs (120 mg/kg) and orally treated with sesamin (160 mg/kg) for four weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin releasing tests were performed. Insulin content, ROS generation and β-cell apoptosis in pancreatic islets were also measured. In in vitro studies, MIN6 cells were pretreated with sesamin (50 or 100 μM) and then exposed to AGEs (200 mg/L) for 24 h. Insulin secretion, β-cell death, ROS production as well as expression and activity of NADPH oxidase were determined. Sesamin treatment obviously ameliorated AGE-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. These effects were associated with decreased ROS production, down-regulated expression of p67phox and p22phox, and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. These results suggest that sesamin protects β-cells from damage caused by AGEs through suppressing NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:26066015

  15. Cell cycle regulation by the bacterial nucleoid.

    PubMed

    Adams, David William; Wu, Ling Juan; Errington, Jeff

    2014-12-01

    Division site selection presents a fundamental challenge to all organisms. Bacterial cells are small and the chromosome (nucleoid) often fills most of the cell volume. Thus, in order to maximise fitness and avoid damaging the genetic material, cell division must be tightly co-ordinated with chromosome replication and segregation. To achieve this, bacteria employ a number of different mechanisms to regulate division site selection. One such mechanism, termed nucleoid occlusion, allows the nucleoid to protect itself by acting as a template for nucleoid occlusion factors, which prevent Z-ring assembly over the DNA. These factors are sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that exploit the precise organisation of the nucleoid, allowing them to act as both spatial and temporal regulators of bacterial cell division. The identification of proteins responsible for this process has provided a molecular understanding of nucleoid occlusion but it has also prompted the realisation that substantial levels of redundancy exist between the diverse systems that bacteria employ to ensure that division occurs in the right place, at the right time.

  16. CIRCADIAN CLOCK AND CELL CYCLE GENE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Richard P.; Qu, Xiaoyu; Laffin, Brian; Earnest, David; Porter, Weston W.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (HC-11) and mammary tissues were analyzed for developmental changes in circadian clock, cellular proliferation and differentiation marker genes. Expression of the clock genes, Per1 and Bmal1, were elevated in differentiated HC-11 cells whereas Per2 mRNA levels were higher in undifferentiated cells. This differentiation-dependent profile of clock gene expression was consistent with that observed in mouse mammary glands as Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA levels were elevated in late pregnant and lactating mammary tissues, while Per2 expression was higher in proliferating virgin and early pregnant glands. In both HC-11 cells and mammary glands, elevated Per2 expression was positively correlated with c-Myc and Cyclin D1 mRNA levels while Per1 and Bmal1 expression changed in conjunction with ß-casein mRNA levels. Interestingly, developmental stage had differential effects on rhythms of clock gene expression in the mammary gland. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may play a role in mouse mammary gland development and differentiation. PMID:16261617

  17. Regulation of the cell division cycle in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyin

    2012-10-01

    The cell division cycle is tightly regulated by the activation and inactivation of a series of proteins that control the replication and segregation of organelles to the daughter cells. During the past decade, we have witnessed significant advances in our understanding of the cell cycle in Trypanosoma brucei and how the cycle is regulated by various regulatory proteins. However, many other regulators, especially those unique to trypanosomes, remain to be identified, and we are just beginning to delineate the signaling pathways that drive the transitions through different cell cycle stages, such as the G(1)/S transition, G(2)/M transition, and mitosis-cytokinesis transition. Trypanosomes appear to employ both evolutionarily conserved and trypanosome-specific molecules to regulate the various stages of its cell cycle, including DNA replication initiation, spindle assembly, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis initiation and completion. Strikingly, trypanosomes lack some crucial regulators that are well conserved across evolution, such as Cdc6 and Cdt1, which are involved in DNA replication licensing, the spindle motor kinesin-5, which is required for spindle assembly, the central spindlin complex, which has been implicated in cytokinesis initiation, and the actomyosin contractile ring, which is located at the cleavage furrow. Conversely, trypanosomes possess certain regulators, such as cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases, and mitotic centromere-associated kinesins, that are greatly expanded and likely play diverse cellular functions. Overall, trypanosomes apparently have integrated unique regulators into the evolutionarily conserved pathways to compensate for the absence of those conserved molecules and, additionally, have evolved certain cell cycle regulatory pathways that are either different from its human host or distinct between its own life cycle forms.

  18. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process. PMID:26265439

  19. Mast cell activation is involved in stress-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction in the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chan Juan; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Chang Qing; Zhang, Kuo; Zhou, Shu Pei; Duan, Li Ping

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of mast cell in stress-induced barrier dysfunction in the esophagus and its possible pathway involved using mast cell-deficient (Ws/Ws) rats. Ws/Ws rats and normal (+/+) rats were submitted to chronic restraint stress (CRS) 2 h/day for 7 days. Tissues were obtained from distal esophagus. Mast cells were counted under Alcian blue-safranin O stain. Activation of mast cells was assessed using transmission electron microscope. Esophageal epithelial barrier dysfunction was evaluated by measuring intercellular spaces (ICS) and by quantifying tight junction (TJ) proteins. The localization and expression of mast cell-derived tryptase and proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) were assessed. A higher number of mast cells and higher proportion of activated mast cells were observed in CRS +/+ rats compared with non-stress controls. Increased ICS and decreased expression of some TJ proteins were observed in the CRS +/+ rats but not in the CRS Ws/Ws rats. Tryptase and its receptor PAR-2 were found elevated concomitantly by nearly 100% in CRS +/+ rats, but not in CRS Ws/Ws rats. Mast cells play an important role in stress-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction in esophagus. The mechanism may involve the activation of PAR-2 by mast cell-derived tryptase, causing proinflammatory responses and the subsequent disruption of the epithelial TJ proteins and a disturbed cytoskeleton function, resulting in dilated intercellular spaces. © 2015 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Alteration of Cell Cycle Mediated by Zinc in Human Bronchial ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Zinc (Zn2+), a ubiquitous ambient air contaminant, presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung and is linked to adverse human health effects. To further elucidate the adaptive and apoptotic cellular responses of human airway cells to Zn2+, we performed pilot studies to examine cell cycle perturbation upon exposure using a normal human bronchial epithelial cell culture (BEAS-2B). BEAS-2B cells were treated with low (0, 1, 2 µM) and apoptotic (3 µM) doses of Zn2+ plus 1 µM pyrithione, a Zn2+-specific ionophore facilitating cellular uptake, for up to 24 h. Fixed cells were then stained with propidium iodine (PI) and cell cycle phase was determined by fluorescent image cytometry. Initial results report the percentage of cells in the S phase after 18 h exposure to 1, 2, and 3 µM Zn2+ were similar (8%, 7%, and 12%, respectively) compared with 7% in controls. Cells exposed to 3 µM Zn2+ increased cell populations in G2/M phase (76% versus 68% in controls). Interestingly, exposure to 1 µM Zn2+ resulted in decreased (59%) cells in G2/M. While preliminary, these pilot studies suggest Zn2+ alters cell cycle in BEAS-2B cells, particularly in the G2/M phase. The G2/M checkpoint maintains DNA integrity by enabling initiation of DNA repair or apoptosis. Our findings suggest that the adaptive and apoptotic responses to Zn2+ exposure may be mediated via perturbation of the cell cycle at the G2/M checkpoint. This work was a collaborative summer student project. The st

  1. Choreography of the Mycobacterium replication machinery during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Trojanowski, Damian; Ginda, Katarzyna; Pióro, Monika; Hołówka, Joanna; Skut, Partycja; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2015-02-17

    It has recently been demonstrated that bacterial chromosomes are highly organized, with specific positioning of the replication initiation region. Moreover, the positioning of the replication machinery (replisome) has been shown to be variable and dependent on species-specific cell cycle features. Here, we analyzed replisome positions in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a slow-growing bacterium that exhibits characteristic asymmetric polar cell extension. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy analyses revealed that the replisome is slightly off-center in mycobacterial cells, a feature that is likely correlated with the asymmetric growth of Mycobacterium cell poles. Estimates of the timing of chromosome replication in relation to the cell cycle, as well as cell division and chromosome segregation events, revealed that chromosomal origin-of-replication (oriC) regions segregate soon after the start of replication. Moreover, our data demonstrate that organization of the chromosome by ParB determines the replisome choreography. Despite significant progress in elucidating the basic processes of bacterial chromosome replication and segregation, understanding of chromosome dynamics during the mycobacterial cell cycle remains incomplete. Here, we provide in vivo experimental evidence that replisomes in Mycobacterium smegmatis are highly dynamic, frequently splitting into two distinct replication forks. However, unlike in Escherichia coli, the forks do not segregate toward opposite cell poles but remain in relatively close proximity. In addition, we show that replication cycles do not overlap. Finally, our data suggest that ParB participates in the positioning of newly born replisomes in M. smegmatis cells. The present results broaden our understanding of chromosome segregation in slow-growing bacteria. In view of the complexity of the mycobacterial cell cycle, especially for pathogenic representatives of the genus, understanding the mechanisms and factors that affect chromosome

  2. Establishment of Human Papillomavirus Infection Requires Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pyeon, Dohun; Pearce, Shane M.; Lank, Simon M.; Ahlquist, Paul; Lambert, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are DNA viruses associated with major human cancers. As such there is a strong interest in developing new means, such as vaccines and microbicides, to prevent HPV infections. Developing the latter requires a better understanding of the infectious life cycle of HPVs. The HPV infectious life cycle is closely linked to the differentiation state of the stratified epithelium it infects, with progeny virus only made in the terminally differentiating suprabasal compartment. It has long been recognized that HPV must first establish its infection within the basal layer of stratified epithelium, but why this is the case has not been understood. In part this restriction might reflect specificity of expression of entry receptors. However, this hypothesis could not fully explain the differentiation restriction of HPV infection, since many cell types can be infected with HPVs in monolayer cell culture. Here, we used chemical biology approaches to reveal that cell cycle progression through mitosis is critical for HPV infection. Using infectious HPV16 particles containing the intact viral genome, G1-synchronized human keratinocytes as hosts, and early viral gene expression as a readout for infection, we learned that the recipient cell must enter M phase (mitosis) for HPV infection to take place. Late M phase inhibitors had no effect on infection, whereas G1, S, G2, and early M phase cell cycle inhibitors efficiently prevented infection. We conclude that host cells need to pass through early prophase for successful onset of transcription of the HPV encapsidated genes. These findings provide one reason why HPVs initially establish infections in the basal compartment of stratified epithelia. Only this compartment of the epithelium contains cells progressing through the cell cycle, and therefore it is only in these cells that HPVs can establish their infection. By defining a major condition for cell susceptibility to HPV infection, these results also have

  3. Real-Time Cell Cycle Imaging in a 3D Cell Culture Model of Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Spoerri, Loredana; Beaumont, Kimberley A; Anfosso, Andrea; Haass, Nikolas K

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant cell cycle progression is a hallmark of solid tumors; therefore, cell cycle analysis is an invaluable technique to study cancer cell biology. However, cell cycle progression has been most commonly assessed by methods that are limited to temporal snapshots or that lack spatial information. Here, we describe a technique that allows spatiotemporal real-time tracking of cell cycle progression of individual cells in a multicellular context. The power of this system lies in the use of 3D melanoma spheroids generated from melanoma cells engineered with the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI). This technique allows us to gain further and more detailed insight into several relevant aspects of solid cancer cell biology, such as tumor growth, proliferation, invasion, and drug sensitivity.

  4. Periodic gene expression program of the fission yeast cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Rustici, Gabriella; Mata, Juan; Kivinen, Katja; Lió, Pietro; Penkett, Christopher J; Burns, Gavin; Hayles, Jacqueline; Brazma, Alvis; Nurse, Paul; Bähler, Jürg

    2004-08-01

    Cell-cycle control of transcription seems to be universal, but little is known about its global conservation and biological significance. We report on the genome-wide transcriptional program of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle, identifying 407 periodically expressed genes of which 136 show high-amplitude changes. These genes cluster in four major waves of expression. The forkhead protein Sep1p regulates mitotic genes in the first cluster, including Ace2p, which activates transcription in the second cluster during the M-G1 transition and cytokinesis. Other genes in the second cluster, which are required for G1-S progression, are regulated by the MBF complex independently of Sep1p and Ace2p. The third cluster coincides with S phase and a fourth cluster contains genes weakly regulated during G2 phase. Despite conserved cell-cycle transcription factors, differences in regulatory circuits between fission and budding yeasts are evident, revealing evolutionary plasticity of transcriptional control. Periodic transcription of most genes is not conserved between the two yeasts, except for a core set of approximately 40 genes that seem to be universally regulated during the eukaryotic cell cycle and may have key roles in cell-cycle progression.

  5. Microgravity modifies the cell cycle in the lentil root meristem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driss-Ecole, D.; Yu, F.; Legué, V.; Perbal, G.

    In order to investigate the effects of microgravity on the cell cycle, lentil seedlings were grown in space as follows: 1 - in microgravity for 29h (Fmug), 2 - on the 1g centrifuge (F1g), 3 - in microgravity for 25h and then on the 1g centrifuge for 4h (Fmug+1g), 4 - on the 1g centrifuge for 25h and then in microgravity for 4h (F1g+mug). There were no statistical differences in mean root length after 29h in the four samples. The DNA content of nuclei in the root meristem was estimated by image analysis after sectioning and staining by the Feulgen technique. Three different regions, each of 0.2mm length (a, b, c), were distinguished basal to the root cap junction (RCJ). No difference in the distribution of nuclear DNA contents was found in region c (the furthest from the RCJ) in all four growth conditions. However, the nuclear DNA distributions were different in regions a and b in microgravity and on the 1g centrifuge (there were more cycling cells in 1g than in 1mug). When roots were grown in 1g and transferred to microgravity (F1g+mug), the proportion of cycling cells was increased. In the (Fmug+1g) sample, by contrast, the cell cycle was not modified by the transfer from 1mug to 1g. Microgravity perturbed the cell cycle by lengthening the G1 phase in the lentil root meristem.

  6. Optical measurement of cycle-dependent cell growth.

    PubMed

    Mir, Mustafa; Wang, Zhuo; Shen, Zhen; Bednarz, Michael; Bashir, Rashid; Golding, Ido; Prasanth, Supriya G; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-08-09

    Determining the growth patterns of single cells offers answers to some of the most elusive questions in contemporary cell biology: how cell growth is regulated and how cell size distributions are maintained. For example, a linear growth in time implies that there is no regulation required to maintain homeostasis; an exponential pattern indicates the opposite. Recently, there has been great effort to measure single cells using microelectromechanical systems technology, and several important questions have been explored. However, a unified, easy-to-use methodology to measure the growth rate of individual adherent cells of various sizes has been lacking. Here we demonstrate that a newly developed optical interferometric technique, known as spatial light interference microscopy, can measure the cell dry mass of many individual adherent cells in various conditions, over spatial scales from micrometers to millimeters, temporal scales ranging from seconds to days, and cell types ranging from bacteria to mammalian cells. We found evidence of exponential growth in Escherichia coli, which agrees very well with other recent reports. Perhaps most importantly, combining spatial light interference microscopy with fluorescence imaging provides a unique method for studying cell cycle-dependent growth. Thus, by using a fluorescent reporter for the S phase, we measured single cell growth over each phase of the cell cycle in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells and found that the G2 phase exhibits the highest growth rate, which is mass-dependent and can be approximated by an exponential.

  7. Optical measurement of cycle-dependent cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Mustafa; Wang, Zhuo; Shen, Zhen; Bednarz, Michael; Bashir, Rashid; Golding, Ido; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Determining the growth patterns of single cells offers answers to some of the most elusive questions in contemporary cell biology: how cell growth is regulated and how cell size distributions are maintained. For example, a linear growth in time implies that there is no regulation required to maintain homeostasis; an exponential pattern indicates the opposite. Recently, there has been great effort to measure single cells using microelectromechanical systems technology, and several important questions have been explored. However, a unified, easy-to-use methodology to measure the growth rate of individual adherent cells of various sizes has been lacking. Here we demonstrate that a newly developed optical interferometric technique, known as spatial light interference microscopy, can measure the cell dry mass of many individual adherent cells in various conditions, over spatial scales from micrometers to millimeters, temporal scales ranging from seconds to days, and cell types ranging from bacteria to mammalian cells. We found evidence of exponential growth in Escherichia coli, which agrees very well with other recent reports. Perhaps most importantly, combining spatial light interference microscopy with fluorescence imaging provides a unique method for studying cell cycle-dependent growth. Thus, by using a fluorescent reporter for the S phase, we measured single cell growth over each phase of the cell cycle in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells and found that the G2 phase exhibits the highest growth rate, which is mass-dependent and can be approximated by an exponential. PMID:21788503

  8. Arresting cell cycles and the effect on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Vande Berg, Jerry S; Robson, Martin C

    2003-06-01

    Wounds that contain a significant number of fibroblasts that are arrested because of senescence, damaged DNA, or enduring quiescence do not heal. As the arrested population of cells decreases and more cells that divide and contribute to wound repair populate the wound, the wound is more likely to achieve closure. Having an understanding of the regulatory mechanisms within the cell cycle is important to wound repair, particularly chronic wounds. The theory of cellular senescence in chronic wounds is new and has never been tested. Studies seem to show that senescent cells in chronic wounds are a significant part of the wounding process. Senescence is irreversible, and senescent cells are refractory to growth factor therapy. Future growth factor therapies or genetic transfections that are capable of repairing the short circuit in cycling cells or overriding the senescent condition will be important partners in the successful treatment of chronic wound patients.

  9. Changing gears in the cell cycle: histoblasts and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ninov, Nikolay; Martín-Blanco, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Although the molecular elements controlling cell cycle progression are well established, the mechanisms regulating how cell proliferation is triggered in response to extrinsic stimuli and how cell divisions change speed, particularly in stem or tumor cells or regenerative tissues, are poorly understood. One exceptional model system in which these events are precisely defined is Drosophila abdominal morphogenesis, in which stem-like histoblasts build the adult epidermis at metamorphosis by undergoing a series of sequential transitions from a non-proliferative to a growing, and finally to an invasive epithelium. We have recently uncovered in histoblasts an internal logic modulating cell cycle transitions that should constitute a reference paradigm for the study of other equivalent processes in stem cell, cancer or developmental biology.

  10. Neuronal cell cycle: the neuron itself and its circumstances.

    PubMed

    Frade, José M; Ovejero-Benito, María C

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are usually regarded as postmitotic cells that undergo apoptosis in response to cell cycle reactivation. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates the existence of a defined developmental program that induces DNA replication in specific populations of neurons, which remain in a tetraploid state for the rest of their adult life. Similarly, de novo neuronal tetraploidization has also been described in the adult brain as an early hallmark of neurodegeneration. The aim of this review is to integrate these recent developments in the context of cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death in neurons. We conclude that a variety of mechanisms exists in neuronal cells for G1/S and G2/M checkpoint regulation. These mechanisms, which are connected with the apoptotic machinery, can be modulated by environmental signals and the neuronal phenotype itself, thus resulting in a variety of outcomes ranging from cell death at the G1/S checkpoint to full proliferation of differentiated neurons.

  11. Divide or Conquer: Cell Cycle Regulation of Invasive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Kohrman, Abraham Q; Matus, David Q

    2017-01-01

    Cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) occurs during normal embryonic development and is a fundamental feature of cancer metastasis. The underlying cellular and genetic machinery required for invasion has been difficult to identify, due to a lack of adequate in vivo models to accurately examine invasion in single cells at subcellular resolution. Recent evidence has documented a functional link between cell cycle arrest and invasive activity. While cancer progression is traditionally thought of as a disease of uncontrolled cell proliferation, cancer cell dissemination, a critical aspect of metastasis, may require a switch from a proliferative to an invasive state. In this work, we review evidence that BM invasion requires cell cycle arrest and discuss the implications of this concept with regard to limiting the lethality associated with cancer metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Choreography of the Mycobacterium Replication Machinery during the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Trojanowski, Damian; Ginda, Katarzyna; Pióro, Monika; Hołówka, Joanna; Skut, Partycja; Jakimowicz, Dagmara

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has recently been demonstrated that bacterial chromosomes are highly organized, with specific positioning of the replication initiation region. Moreover, the positioning of the replication machinery (replisome) has been shown to be variable and dependent on species-specific cell cycle features. Here, we analyzed replisome positions in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a slow-growing bacterium that exhibits characteristic asymmetric polar cell extension. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy analyses revealed that the replisome is slightly off-center in mycobacterial cells, a feature that is likely correlated with the asymmetric growth of Mycobacterium cell poles. Estimates of the timing of chromosome replication in relation to the cell cycle, as well as cell division and chromosome segregation events, revealed that chromosomal origin-of-replication (oriC) regions segregate soon after the start of replication. Moreover, our data demonstrate that organization of the chromosome by ParB determines the replisome choreography. PMID:25691599

  13. Regulation of p27Kip1 phosphorylation and G1 cell cycle progression by protein phosphatase PPM1G

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chuang; Wang, Gaohang; Wrighton, Katharine H; Lin, Han; Songyang, Zhou; Feng, Xin-Hua; Lin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle, an essential process leading to the cell division, is stringently controlled by the key cell cycle regulators, cyclin-CDK complexes, whose activity is further regulated by a variety of mechanisms. p27Kip1 is a cyclin-CDK inhibitor that arrests the cell cycle at the G1 phase by blocking the activation of cyclin E-CDK2 complex, preventing the improper entry to the cell cycle. Dysfunction of p27 has been frequently observed in many types of human cancers, resulting from p27 protein degradation and cytoplasmic mislocalization, which are highly regulated by the phosphorylation status of p27. Although the kinases that phosphorylate p27 have been extensively studied, phosphatases that dephosphorylate p27 remain to be elucidated. By using genomic phosphatase screening, we identified a PPM family phosphatase, PPM1G, which could reduce p27 phosphorylation at T198. We further confirmed that PPM1G is a novel p27 phosphatase by demonstrating that PPM1G can interact with and dephosphorylate p27 in cells and in vitro. Functionally, ectopic expression of PPM1G enhanced p27 protein stability and delayed cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. In accordance, knockdown of PPM1G accelerated p27 degradation during G1 phase and rendered cells resistant to the cell cycle arrest induced by serum deprivation. Mechanistically, PPM1G inhibited the interaction of p27 to 14-3-3θ, a chaperone protein that facilitates p27 nuclear export. Knockdown of PPM1G promoted the cytoplasmic localization of p27. Taken together, our studies identified PPM1G as a novel regulator of p27 that dephosphorylates p27 at T198 site and, together with p27 kinases, PPM1G controls cell cycle progression by maintaining the proper level of p27 protein. PMID:27822412

  14. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase dysfunction causes cerebrovascular endothelial cell degeneration in rat prefrontal cortex slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Cerebrovascular endothelial cell dysfunction resulting in imbalance of cerebral blood flow contributes to the onset of psychiatric disorders such as depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Although decrease in Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity has been reported in the patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, the contribution of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase to endothelial cell dysfunction remains poorly understood. Here, by using rat neonatal prefrontal cortex slice cultures, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase by ouabain induced endothelial cell injury. Treatment with ouabain significantly decreased immunoreactive area of rat endothelial cell antigen-1 (RECA-1), a marker of endothelial cells, in a time-dependent manner. Ouabain also decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio and phosphorylation level of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) (Ser9), which were prevented by lithium carbonate. On the other hand, ouabain-induced endothelial cell injury was exacerbated by concomitant treatment with LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3- (PI3-) kinase. We also found that xestospongin C, an inhibitor of inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor, but not SEA0400, an inhibitor of Na(+), Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), protected endothelial cells from cytotoxicity of ouabain. These results suggest that cerebrovascular endothelial cell degeneration induced by Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibition resulting in Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and activation of GSK3β signaling underlies pathogenesis of these psychiatric disorders.

  15. Bcl-2 delays cell cycle through mitochondrial ATP and ROS.

    PubMed

    Du, Xing; Fu, Xufeng; Yao, Kun; Lan, Zhenwei; Xu, Hui; Cui, Qinghua; Yang, Elizabeth

    2017-02-22

    Bcl-2 inhibits cell proliferation by delaying G0/G1 to S phase entry. We tested the hypothesis that Bcl-2 regulates S phase entry through mitochondrial pathways. Existing evidence indicates mitochondrial adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signals in cell survival and cell death, however, the molecular details of how these 2 processes are linked remain unknown. In this study, 2 cell lines stably expressing Bcl-2, 3T3Bcl-2 and C3HBcl-2, and vector-alone PB controls were arrested in G0/G1 phase by serum starvation and contact inhibition, and ATP and ROS were measured during re-stimulation of cell cycle entry. Both ATP and ROS levels were decreased in G0/G1 arrested cells compared with normal growing cells. In addition, ROS levels were significant lower in synchronized Bcl-2 cells than those in PB controls. After re-stimulation, ATP levels increased with time, reaching peak value 1-3 hours ahead of S phase entry for both Bcl-2 cells and PB controls. Consistent with 2 hours of S phase delay, Bcl-2 cells reached ATP peaks 2 hours later than PB control, which suggests a rise in ATP levels is required for S phase entry. To examine the role of ATP and ROS in cell cycle regulation, ATP and ROS level were changed. We observed that elevation of ATP accelerated cell cycle progression in both PB and Bcl-2 cells, and decrease of ATP and ROS to the level equivalent to Bcl-2 cells delayed S phase entry in PB cells. Our results support the hypothesis that Bcl-2 protein regulates mitochondrial metabolism to produce less ATP and ROS, which contributes to S phase entry delay in Bcl-2 cells. These findings reveal a novel mechanistic basis for understanding the link between mitochondrial metabolism and tumor-suppressive function of Bcl-2.

  16. Regulation of mitochondrial morphology and cell cycle by microRNA-214 targeting Mitofusin2.

    PubMed

    Bucha, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Debashis; Bhattacharyya, Nitai Pada

    2015-10-02

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by the increase in CAG repeats beyond 36 at the exon1 of the gene Huntingtin (HTT). Among the various dysfunctions of biological processes in HD, transcription deregulation due to abnormalities in actions of transcription factors has been considered to be one of the important pathological conditions. In addition, deregulation of microRNA (miRNA) expression has been described in HD. Earlier, expression of microRNA-214 (miR-214) has been shown to increase in HD cell models and target HTT gene; the expression of the later being inversely correlated to that of miR-214. In the present communication, we observed that the expressions of several HTT co-expressed genes are modulated by exogenous expression of miR-214 or by its mutant. Among several HTT co-expressed genes, MFN2 was shown to be the direct target of miR-214. Exogenous expression of miR-214, repressed the expression of MFN2, increased the distribution of fragmented mitochondria and altered the distribution of cells in different phases of cell cycle. In summary, we have shown that increased expression of miR-214 observed in HD cell model could target MFN2, altered mitochondrial morphology and deregulated cell cycle. Inhibition of miR-214 could be a possible target of intervention in HD pathogenesis.

  17. Pathogenic Correlates of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV)-Associated B Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Kuhrt, David; Siewe, Basile; Xu, Cuiling; Haret-Richter, George S; Craigo, Jodi; Labranche, Celia; Montefiori, David C; Landay, Alan; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona

    2017-09-20

    We compared and contrasted pathogenic (pigtailed macaques-PTMs) and nonpathogenic (African green monkeys-AGMs) SIVsab infections to assess the significance of the B-cell dysfunction observed in SIV/HIV infection. We report that the loss of B cells is specifically associated with the pathogenic SIV infection, while in the nonpathogenic natural hosts B cells rapidly increase in both LNs and intestine. SIV-associated B-cell dysfunction associated to the pathogenic SIV infection is characterized by loss of naïve B cells; loss of resting memory B cells due to their redistribution to the gut; increases of the activated B cells and circulating tissue-like memory B cells and expansion of the B regulatory cells. While circulating B cells are virtually restored to preinfection levels during the chronic pathogenic SIV infection, restoration is mainly due to an expansion of the "exhausted", virus-specific B cells, i.e., activated memory cells and tissue-like memory B cells. Despite of the B-cell dysfunction, SIV-specific Ab production was higher in the PTMs than in AGMs, with the caveat that rapid disease progression in PTMs was strongly associated with lack of anti-SIV Ab. Neutralization titers, the avidity and maturation of immune responses did not differ between pathogenic and nonpathogenic infections, with the exception of the conformational epitope recognition, which evolved from low to high conformations in the nonpathogenic host. The patterns of humoral immune responses in the natural host are therefore more similar to those observed in HIV-infected subjects, suggesting that natural hosts may be more appropriate for modeling the immunization strategies aimed at preventing HIV disease progression. The numerous differences between the pathogenic and nonpathogenic infections with regard to dynamics of the memory B-cell subsets point to their role in the pathogenesis of HIV/SIV infections, and suggest that monitoring B cells may be a reliable approach for assessing disease

  18. Life-cycle costs of high-performance cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R.; Burger, D.; Reiter, L.

    1985-01-01

    A life cycle cost analysis of high efficiency cells was presented. Although high efficiency cells produce more power, they also cost more to make and are more susceptible to array hot-spot heating. Three different computer analysis programs were used: SAMICS (solar array manufacturing industry costing standards), PVARRAY (an array failure mode/degradation simulator), and LCP (lifetime cost and performance). The high efficiency cell modules were found to be more economical in this study, but parallel redundancy is recommended.

  19. Proteasome Dysfunction Mediates High Glucose-Induced Apoptosis in Rodent Beta Cells and Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Broca, Christophe; Varin, Elodie; Armanet, Mathieu; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Bosco, Domenico; Dalle, Stéphane; Wojtusciszyn, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS), a major cellular protein degradation machinery, plays key roles in the regulation of many cell functions. Glucotoxicity mediated by chronic hyperglycaemia is detrimental to the function and survival of pancreatic beta cells. The aim of our study was to determine whether proteasome dysfunction could be involved in beta cell apoptosis in glucotoxic conditions, and to evaluate whether such a dysfunction might be pharmacologically corrected. Therefore, UPS activity was measured in GK rats islets, INS-1E beta cells or human islets after high glucose and/or UPS inhibitor exposure. Immunoblotting was used to quantify polyubiquitinated proteins, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through CHOP expression, and apoptosis through the cleavage of PARP and caspase-3, whereas total cell death was detected through histone-associated DNA fragments measurement. In vitro, we found that chronic exposure of INS-1E cells to high glucose concentrations significantly decreases the three proteasome activities by 20% and leads to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. We showed that pharmacological blockade of UPS activity by 20% leads to apoptosis in a same way. Indeed, ER stress was involved in both conditions. These results were confirmed in human islets, and proteasome activities were also decreased in hyperglycemic GK rats islets. Moreover, we observed that a high glucose treatment hypersensitized beta cells to the apoptotic effect of proteasome inhibitors. Noteworthily, the decreased proteasome activity can be corrected with Exendin-4, which also protected against glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings reveal an important role of proteasome activity in high glucose-induced beta cell apoptosis, potentially linking ER stress and glucotoxicity. These proteasome dysfunctions can be reversed by a GLP-1 analog. Thus, UPS may be a potent target to treat deleterious metabolic conditions leading to type 2 diabetes. PMID:24642635

  20. Aberrant cell cycle regulation in rat liver cells induced by post-initiation treatment with hepatocarcinogens/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoters.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Watanabe, Yousuke; Onda, Nobuhiko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to determine the onset time of hepatocarcinogen/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoter-specific cell proliferation, apoptosis and aberrant cell cycle regulation after post-initiation treatment. Six-week-old rats were treated with the genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, carbadox (CRB), the marginally hepatocarcinogenic leucomalachite green (LMG), the tumor promoter, β-naphthoflavone (BNF) or the non-carcinogenic hepatotoxicant, acetaminophen, for 2, 4 or 6 weeks during the post-initiation phase using a medium-term liver bioassay. Cell proliferation activity, expression of G2 to M phase- and spindle checkpoint-related molecules, and apoptosis were immunohistochemically analyzed at week 2 and 4, and tumor promotion activity was assessed at week 6. At week 2, hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific aberrant cell cycle regulation was not observed. At week 4, BNF and LMG increased cell proliferation together with hepatotoxicity, while CRB did not. Additionally, BNF and CRB reduced the number of cells expressing phosphorylated-histone H3 in both ubiquitin D (UBD)(+) cells and Ki-67(+) proliferating cells, suggesting development of spindle checkpoint dysfunction, regardless of cell proliferation activity. At week 6, examined hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increased preneoplastic hepatic foci expressing glutathione S-transferase placental form. These results suggest that some hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increase their toxicity after post-initiation treatment, causing regenerative cell proliferation. In contrast, some genotoxic hepatocarcinogens may disrupt the spindle checkpoint without facilitating cell proliferation at the early stage of tumor promotion. This suggests that facilitation of cell proliferation and disruption of spindle checkpoint function are induced by different mechanisms during hepatocarcinogenesis. Four weeks of post-initiation treatment may be sufficient to induce hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific cellular responses

  1. A role for homologous recombination proteins in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Bosshard, Sandra; Urban, Zuzanna; Mermod, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to DNA breaks, especially double-stranded breaks (DSBs), by activating the DNA damage response (DDR), which encompasses DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint signaling. The DNA damage signal is transmitted to the checkpoint machinery by a network of specialized DNA damage-recognizing and signal-transducing molecules. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA repair proteins themselves may also directly contribute to the checkpoint control. Here, we investigated the role of homologous recombination (HR) proteins in normal cell cycle regulation in the absence of exogenous DNA damage. For this purpose, we used Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing the Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators (Fucci). Systematic siRNA-mediated knockdown of HR genes in these cells demonstrated that the lack of several of these factors alters cell cycle distribution, albeit differentially. The knock-down of MDC1, Rad51 and Brca1 caused the cells to arrest in the G2 phase, suggesting that they may be required for the G2/M transition. In contrast, inhibition of the other HR factors, including several Rad51 paralogs and Rad50, led to the arrest in the G1/G0 phase. Moreover, reduced expression of Rad51B, Rad51C, CtIP and Rad50 induced entry into a quiescent G0-like phase. In conclusion, the lack of many HR factors may lead to cell cycle checkpoint activation, even in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, indicating that these proteins may play an essential role both in DNA repair and checkpoint signaling.

  2. Diabetic ketoacidosis elicits systemic inflammation associated with cerebrovascular endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Close, Taylor E; Cepinskas, Gediminas; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Rose, Keeley L; Summers, Kelly; Patterson, Eric K; Fraser, Douglas D

    2013-08-01

    To determine if the DKA-induced inflammation in juvenile mice provokes activation and dysfunction of CVECs. DKA in juvenile mice was induced with administration of STZ and ALX. Blood from DKA mice was assessed for cytokines and soluble cell adhesion proteins, and either DKA plasma or exogenous compounds were applied to immortalized bEND3. DKA increased circulating levels of IL-6, IL-8(KC), MCP-1, IL-10, sE-selectin, sICAM-1, and sVCAM-1. Stimulation of bEND3 with DKA plasma caused cellular activation (increased ROS and activation of NF-κΒ), upregulation of a proadhesive phenotype (E-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1), and increased leukocyte-bEND3 interaction (leukocyte rolling/adhesion). TEER, a measure of bEND3 monolayer integrity, was decreased by DKA plasma. Activation and dysfunction of bEND3 with DKA plasma were suppressed by plasma heat treatment (56°C, 1 hour) and replicated with the application of DKA recombinant cytomix (IL-6, IL-8[KC], MCP-1, and IL-10), implicating circulating inflammatory protein(s) as mediators. Treatment of bEND3 with β-OH-butyrate, the main ketone elevated in DKA, failed to mimic the DKA plasma-induced activation and dysfunction of bEND3. DKA elicits systemic inflammation associated with CVEC activation and dysfunction, possibly contributing to DKA-associated intracranial microvascular complications. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  4. Modulation of endothelial cell phenotype by physical activity: impact on obesity-related endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bender, Shawn B; Laughlin, M Harold

    2015-07-01

    Increased levels of physical activity are associated with reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and mortality in obesity and diabetes. Available evidence suggests that local factors, including local hemodynamics, account for a significant portion of this CVD protection, and numerous studies have interrogated the therapeutic benefit of physical activity/exercise training in CVD. Less well established is whether basal differences in endothelial cell phenotype between/among vasculatures related to muscle recruitment patterns during activity may account for reports of nonuniform development of endothelial dysfunction in obesity. This is the focus of this review. We highlight recent work exploring the vulnerability of two distinct vasculatures with established differences in endothelial cell phenotype. Specifically, based largely on dramatic differences in underlying hemodynamics, arteries perfusing soleus muscle (slow-twitch muscle fibers) and those perfusing gastrocnemius muscle (fast-twitch muscle fibers) in the rat exhibit an exercise training-like versus an untrained endothelial cell phenotype, respectively. In the context of obesity, therefore, arteries to soleus muscle exhibit protection from endothelial dysfunction compared with vulnerable arteries to gastrocnemius muscle. This disparate vulnerability is consistent with numerous animal and human studies, demonstrating increased skeletal muscle blood flow heterogeneity in obesity coincident with reduced muscle function and exercise intolerance. Mechanistically, we highlight emerging areas of inquiry exploring novel aspects of hemodynamic-sensitive signaling in endothelial cells and the time course of physical activity-associated endothelial adaptations. Lastly, further exploration needs to consider the impact of endothelial heterogeneity on the development of endothelial dysfunction because endothelial dysfunction independently predicts CVD events. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Modulating putative endothelial progenitor cells for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wils, Julien; Favre, Julie; Bellien, Jérémy

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes induces a decrease in the number and function of different pro-angiogenic cell types generically designated as putative endothelial progenitor cells (EPC), which encompasses cells from myeloid origin that act in a paracrine fashion to promote angiogenesis and putative "true" EPC that contribute to endothelial replacement. This not only compromises neovasculogenesis in ischemic tissues but also impairs, at an early stage, the reendotheliziation process at sites of injury, contributing to the development of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular complications. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia promote putative EPC dysregulation by affecting the SDF-1/CXCR-4 and NO pathways and the p53/SIRT1/p66Shc axis that contribute to their mobilization, migration, homing and vasculogenic properties. To optimize the clinical management of patients with hypoglycemic agents, statins and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, which display pleiotropic effects on putative EPC, is a first step to improve their number and angiogenic potential but specific strategies are needed. Among them, mobilizing therapies based on G-CSF, erythropoietin or CXCR-4 antagonism have been developed to increase putative EPC number to treat ischemic diseases with or without prior cell isolation and transplantation. Growth factors, genetic and pharmacological strategies are also evaluated to improve ex vivo cultured EPC function before transplantation. Moreover, pharmacological agents increasing in vivo the bioavailability of NO and other endothelial factors demonstrated beneficial effects on neovascularization in diabetic ischemic models but their effects on endothelial dysfunction remain poorly evaluated. More experiments are warranted to develop orally available drugs and specific agents targeting p66Shc to reverse putative EPC dysfunction in the expected goal of preventing endothelial dysfunction and diabetic cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2016. Published by

  6. Mast Cell Inhibition Attenuates Myocardial Damage, Adverse Remodeling and Dysfunction during Fulminant Myocarditis in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Yair; Rinkevich-Shop, Shunit; Konen, Eli; Goitein, Orly; Kushnir, Tammar; Epstein, Frederick H.; Feinberg, Micha S.; Leor, Jonathan; Landa-Rouben, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Background Myocarditis is a life-threatening heart disease characterized by myocardial inflammation, necrosis and chronic fibrosis. While mast cell inhibition has been suggested to prevents fibrosis in rat myocarditis, little is known about its effectiveness in attenuating cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in myocarditis. Thus, we sought to test the hypothesis that mast cell inhibition will attenuate the inflammatory reaction and associated left ventricular (LV) remodeling and dysfunction after fulminant autoimmune myocarditis. Methods and Results To induce experimental autoimmune myocarditis, we immunized 30 rats with porcine cardiac myosin twice at a 7-day interval. On day 8 animals were randomized into treatment either with an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 25mg/kg of cromolyn sodium (n=13), or an equivalent volume (~0.5ml IP) of normal saline (n=11). All animals were scanned by serial echocardiography studies before treatment (baseline echocardiogram) and after 20 days of cromolyn sodium (28 days after immunization). Furthermore, serial cardiac magnetic resonance was performed in a subgroup of 12 animals. After 20 days of treatment (28 days from first immunization), hearts were harvested for histopathological analysis. By echocardiography, cromolyn sodium prevented LV dilatation and attenuated LV dysfunction, compared with controls. Postmortem analysis of hearts showed that cromolyn sodium reduced myocardial fibrosis, as well as the number and size of cardiac mast cells in the inflamed myocardium, compared with controls. Conclusions Our study suggests that mast cell inhibition with cromolyn sodium attenuates adverse LV remodeling and dysfunction in myocarditis. This mechanism-based therapy is clinically relevant and could improve the outcome of patients at risk for inflammatory cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:23172937

  7. Modulation of endothelial cell phenotype by physical activity: impact on obesity-related endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, M. Harold

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of physical activity are associated with reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and mortality in obesity and diabetes. Available evidence suggests that local factors, including local hemodynamics, account for a significant portion of this CVD protection, and numerous studies have interrogated the therapeutic benefit of physical activity/exercise training in CVD. Less well established is whether basal differences in endothelial cell phenotype between/among vasculatures related to muscle recruitment patterns during activity may account for reports of nonuniform development of endothelial dysfunction in obesity. This is the focus of this review. We highlight recent work exploring the vulnerability of two distinct vasculatures with established differences in endothelial cell phenotype. Specifically, based largely on dramatic differences in underlying hemodynamics, arteries perfusing soleus muscle (slow-twitch muscle fibers) and those perfusing gastrocnemius muscle (fast-twitch muscle fibers) in the rat exhibit an exercise training-like versus an untrained endothelial cell phenotype, respectively. In the context of obesity, therefore, arteries to soleus muscle exhibit protection from endothelial dysfunction compared with vulnerable arteries to gastrocnemius muscle. This disparate vulnerability is consistent with numerous animal and human studies, demonstrating increased skeletal muscle blood flow heterogeneity in obesity coincident with reduced muscle function and exercise intolerance. Mechanistically, we highlight emerging areas of inquiry exploring novel aspects of hemodynamic-sensitive signaling in endothelial cells and the time course of physical activity-associated endothelial adaptations. Lastly, further exploration needs to consider the impact of endothelial heterogeneity on the development of endothelial dysfunction because endothelial dysfunction independently predicts CVD events. PMID:25934096

  8. Cell-cycle regulation in embryonic stem cells: centrosomal decisions on self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Koledova, Zuzana; Krämer, Alwin; Kafkova, Leona Raskova; Divoky, Vladimir

    2010-11-01

    Embryonic stem cells seem to have the intriguing capacity to divide indefinitely while retaining their pluripotency. This self-renewal is accomplished by specialized mechanisms of cell-cycle control. In the last few years, several studies have provided evidence for a direct link between cell-cycle regulation and cell-fate decisions in stem cells. In this review, we discuss the peculiarities of embryonic stem cell-cycle control mechanisms, implicate their involvement in cell-fate decisions, and distinguish centrosomes as important players in the self-renewal versus differentiation roulette.

  9. Thermal stress cycling of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janousek, B. K.; Francis, R. W.; Wendt, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal cycling experiment was performed on GaAs solar cells to establish the electrical and structural integrity of these cells under the temperature conditions of a simulated low-Earth orbit of 3-year duration. Thirty single junction GaAs cells were obtained and tests were performed to establish the beginning-of-life characteristics of these cells. The tests consisted of cell I-V power output curves, from which were obtained short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor, and cell efficiency, and optical micrographs, spectral response, and ion microprobe mass analysis (IMMA) depth profiles on both the front surfaces and the front metallic contacts of the cells. Following 5,000 thermal cycles, the performance of the cells was reexamined in addition to any factors which might contribute to performance degradation. It is established that, after 5,000 thermal cycles, the cells retain their power output with no loss of structural integrity or change in physical appearance.

  10. Identification of a novel EGF-sensitive cell cycle checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Francesca . E-mail: francesca.walker@ludwig.edu.au; Zhang Huihua; Burgess, Antony W.

    2007-02-01

    The site of action of growth factors on mammalian cell cycle has been assigned to the boundary between the G1 and S phases. We show here that Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) is also required for mitosis. BaF/3 cells expressing the EGFR (BaF/wtEGFR) synthesize DNA in response to EGF, but arrest in S-phase. We have generated a cell line (BaF/ERX) with defective downregulation of the EGFR and sustained activation of EGFR signalling pathways: these cells undergo mitosis in an EGF-dependent manner. The transit of BaF/ERX cells through G2/M strictly requires activation of EGFR and is abolished by AG1478. This phenotype is mimicked by co-expression of ErbB2 in BaF/wtEGFR cells, and abolished by inhibition of the EGFR kinase, suggesting that sustained signalling of the EGFR, through impaired downregulation of the EGFR or heterodimerization, is required for completion of the cycle. We have confirmed the role of EGFR signalling in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle using a human tumor cell line which overexpresses the EGFR and is dependent on EGFR signalling for growth. These findings unmask an EGF-sensitive checkpoint, helping to understand the link between sustained EGFR signalling, proliferation and the acquisition of a radioresistant phenotype in cancer cells.

  11. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  12. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  13. Thermal stress cycling of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janousek, B. K.; Francis, R. W.; Wendt, J. P.

    A thermal cycling experiment was performed on GaAs solar cells to establish the electrical and structural integrity of these cells under the temperature conditions of a simulated low-Earth orbit of 3-year duration. Thirty single junction GaAs cells were obtained and tests were performed to establish the beginning-of-life characteristics of these cells. The tests consisted of cell I-V power output curves, from which were obtained short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor, and cell efficiency, and optical micrographs, spectral response, and ion microprobe mass analysis (IMMA) depth profiles on both the front surfaces and the front metallic contacts of the cells. Following 5,000 thermal cycles, the performance of the cells was reexamined in addition to any factors which might contribute to performance degradation. It is established that, after 5,000 thermal cycles, the cells retain their power output with no loss of structural integrity or change in physical appearance.

  14. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  15. Regulation of mammalian cell cycle progression in the regenerating liver.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Anuradha; Lorenzen, Stephan; Herzel, Hanspeter; Bernard, Samuel

    2011-08-21

    The process of cell division in mammalian cells is orchestrated by cell-cycle-dependent oscillations of cyclin protein levels. Cyclin levels are controlled by redundant transcriptional, post-translational and degradation feedback loops. How each of these separate loops contributes to the regulation of the key cell cycle events and to the connection between the G1-S transition and the subsequent mitotic events is under investigation. Here, we present an integrated computational model of the mammalian cell cycle based on the sequential activation of cyclins. We validate the model against experimental data on liver cells (hepatocytes), which undergo one or two rounds of synchronous circadian-clock gated cell divisions during liver regeneration, after partial hepatectomy (PH). The model exhibits bandpass filter properties that allow the system to ignore strong but transient, or sustained but weak damages after PH. Bifurcation analysis of the model suggests two different threshold mechanisms for the progression of the cell through mitosis. These results are coherent with the notion that the mitotic exit in mammalian cells is bistable, and suggests that Cdc20 homologue 1 (Cdh1) is an important regulator of mitosis. Regulation by Cdh1 also explains the observed G2/M phase prolongation after hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulation during S phase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Entrainability of cell cycle oscillator models with exponential growth of cell mass.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Mitsuyuki; Enkhkhudulmur, Tsog-Erdene; Katayama, Norihiro; Karashima, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Among various aspects of cell cycle, understanding synchronization mechanism of cell cycle is important because of the following reasons. (1)Cycles of cell assembly should synchronize to form an organ. (2) Synchronizing cell cycles are required to experimental analysis of regulatory mechanisms of cell cycles. (3) Cell cycle has a distinct phase relationship with the other biological rhythms such as circadian rhythm. However, forced as well as mutual entrainment mechanisms are not clearly known. In this study, we investigated entrainability of cell cycle models of yeast cell under the periodic forcing to both of the cell mass and molecular dynamics. Dynamics of models under study involve the cell mass growing exponentially. In our result, they are shown to allow only a limited frequency range for being entrained by the periodic forcing. In contrast, models with linear growth are shown to be entrained in a wider frequency range. It is concluded that if the cell mass is included in the cell cycle regulation, its entrainability is sensitive to a shape of growth curve assumed in the model.

  17. Cell Division, a new open access online forum for and from the cell cycle community.

    PubMed

    Kaldis, Philipp; Pagano, Michele

    2006-04-03

    Cell Division is a new, open access, peer-reviewed online journal that publishes cutting-edge articles, commentaries and reviews on all exciting aspects of cell cycle control in eukaryotes. A major goal of this new journal is to publish timely and significant studies on the aberrations of the cell cycle network that occur in cancer and other diseases.

  18. The enigmatic effects of caffeine in cell cycle and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Ann M.

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine may very well be the most frequently ingested neuroactive drug in the world. Mechanistically, caffeine has been reported to affect cell cycle function, induce programmed cell death or apoptosis and perturb key cell cycle regulatory proteins. Although the effects of caffeine have been heavily investigated, much of the research data regarding caffeine's effects on cell cycle and proliferation seem ambiguous. One important factor may be that caffeine has been used experimentally in numerous cell types under a variety of conditions at concentrations ranging from micromolar to high millimolar. Physiologically, achieving experimental blood levels of caffeine would be extremely difficult without adverse side effects. Therefore, the relevance of experimental data obtained by using high concentrations of caffeine is not clear and may account for some of the discrepancies in the literature. This review attempts to reconcile data regarding the cellular effects of caffeine by examining reported effects on cell cycle, proliferation and apoptosis with careful attention to differences in experimental conditions and caffeine concentration utilized. PMID:16709440

  19. Vertebrate Cell Cycle Modulates Infection by Protozoan Parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, James A.; Crane, Mark St. J.

    1981-11-01

    Synchronized HeLa cell populations were exposed to Trypanosoma cruzi or Toxoplasma gondii, obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that cause Chagas' disease and toxoplasmosis, respectively, in humans. The ability of the two parasites to infect HeLa cells increased as the HeLa cells proceeded from the G1 phase to the S phase of their growth cycle and decreased as the cells entered G2-M. Characterization of the S-phase cell surface components responsible for this phenomenon could be beneficial in the development of vaccines against these parasitic diseases.

  20. High efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Morehead, H.

    1995-10-19

    An outline of the Westinghouse high-efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycle is presented. The following topics are discussed: The Westinghouse SOFC pilot manufacturing facility, cell scale-up plan, pressure effects on SOFC power and efficiency, sureCell versus conventional gas turbine plants, sureCell product line for distributed power applications, 20 MW pressurized-SOFC/gas turbine power plant, 10 MW SOFC/CT power plant, sureCell plant concept design requirements, and Westinghouse SOFC market entry.

  1. Cathepsin inhibition-induced lysosomal dysfunction enhances pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis in high glucose.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minjeong; Lee, Jaemeun; Seo, Hye-Young; Lim, Ji Sun; Kim, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway that plays an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. We previously showed that the inhibition of autophagy causes pancreatic β-cell apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy is a protective mechanism for the survival of pancreatic β-cells. The current study demonstrates that treatment with inhibitors and knockdown of the lysosomal cysteine proteases such as cathepsins B and L impair autophagy, enhancing the caspase-dependent apoptosis of INS-1 cells and islets upon exposure to high concentration of glucose. Interestingly, treatment with cathepsin B and L inhibitors prevented the proteolytic processing of cathepsins B, D and L, as evidenced by gradual accumulation of the respective pro-forms. Of note, inhibition of aspartic cathepsins had no effect on autophagy and cell viability, suggesting the selective role of cathepsins B and L in the regulation of β-cell autophagy and apoptosis. Lysosomal localization of accumulated pro-cathepsins in the presence of cathepsin B and L inhibitors was verified via immunocytochemistry and lysosomal fractionation. Lysotracker staining indicated that cathepsin B and L inhibitors led to the formation of severely enlarged lysosomes in a time-dependent manner. The abnormal accumulation of pro-cathepsins following treatment with inhibitors of cathepsins B and L suppressed normal lysosomal degradation and the processing of lysosomal enzymes, leading to lysosomal dysfunction. Collectively, our findings suggest that cathepsin defects following the inhibition of cathepsin B and L result in lysosomal dysfunction and consequent cell death in pancreatic β-cells.

  2. The reproductive-cell cycle theory of aging: an update.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    The Reproductive-Cell Cycle Theory posits that the hormones that regulate reproduction act in an antagonistic pleiotrophic manner to control aging via cell cycle signaling; promoting growth and development early in life in order to achieve reproduction, but later in life, in a futile attempt to maintain reproduction, become dysregulated and drive senescence. Since reproduction is the most important function of an organism from the perspective of the survival of the species, if reproductive-cell cycle signaling factors determine the rate of growth, determine the rate of development, determine the rate of reproduction, and determine the rate of senescence, then by definition they determine the rate of aging and thus lifespan. The theory is able to explain: 1) the simultaneous regulation of the rate of aging and reproduction as evidenced by the fact that environmental conditions and experimental interventions known to extend longevity are associated with decreased reproductive-cell cycle signaling factors, thereby slowing aging and preserving fertility in a hostile reproductive environment; 2) two phenomena that are closely related to species lifespan-the rate of growth and development and the ultimate size of the animal; 3). the apparent paradox that size is directly proportional to lifespan and inversely proportional to fertility between species but vice versa within a species; 4). how differing rates of reproduction between species is associated with differences in their lifespan; 5). why we develop aging-related diseases; and 6). an evolutionarily credible reason for why and how aging occurs-these hormones act in an antagonistic pleiotrophic manner via cell cycle signaling; promoting growth and development early in life in order to achieve reproduction, but later in life, in a futile attempt to maintain reproduction, become dysregulated and drive senescence (dyosis). In essence, the Reproductive-Cell Cycle Theory can explain aging in all sexually reproductive life

  3. Coordinating cell polarity and cell cycle progression: what can we learn from flies and worms?

    PubMed

    Noatynska, Anna; Tavernier, Nicolas; Gotta, Monica; Pintard, Lionel

    2013-08-07

    Spatio-temporal coordination of events during cell division is crucial for animal development. In recent years, emerging data have strengthened the notion that tight coupling of cell cycle progression and cell polarity in dividing cells is crucial for asymmetric cell division and ultimately for metazoan development. Although it is acknowledged that such coupling exists, the molecular mechanisms linking the cell cycle and cell polarity machineries are still under investigation. Key cell cycle regulators control cell polarity, and thus influence cell fate determination and/or differentiation, whereas some factors involved in cell polarity regulate cell cycle timing and proliferation potential. The scope of this review is to discuss the data linking cell polarity and cell cycle progression, and the importance of such coupling for asymmetric cell division. Because studies in model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have started to reveal the molecular mechanisms of this coordination, we will concentrate on these two systems. We review examples of molecular mechanisms suggesting a coupling between cell polarity and cell cycle progression.

  4. Coordinating cell polarity and cell cycle progression: what can we learn from flies and worms?

    PubMed Central

    Noatynska, Anna; Tavernier, Nicolas; Gotta, Monica; Pintard, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Spatio-temporal coordination of events during cell division is crucial for animal development. In recent years, emerging data have strengthened the notion that tight coupling of cell cycle progression and cell polarity in dividing cells is crucial for asymmetric cell division and ultimately for metazoan development. Although it is acknowledged that such coupling exists, the molecular mechanisms linking the cell cycle and cell polarity machineries are still under investigation. Key cell cycle regulators control cell polarity, and thus influence cell fate determination and/or differentiation, whereas some factors involved in cell polarity regulate cell cycle timing and proliferation potential. The scope of this review is to discuss the data linking cell polarity and cell cycle progression, and the importance of such coupling for asymmetric cell division. Because studies in model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have started to reveal the molecular mechanisms of this coordination, we will concentrate on these two systems. We review examples of molecular mechanisms suggesting a coupling between cell polarity and cell cycle progression. PMID:23926048

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells alleviate oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the airways.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Zhang, Yuelin; Wiegman, Coen H; Adcock, Ian M; Lian, Qizhou; Mak, Judith C W; Bhavsar, Pankaj K; Chung, Kian Fan

    2017-09-11

    Oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to inflammation and remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) protect against lung damage in animal models of COPD. It is unknown whether these effects occur through attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction in airway cells. To examine the effect of induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs (iPSC-MSCs) on oxidative stress-induce mitochondrial dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) in vitro and in mouse lungs in vivo. ASMCs were co-cultured with iPSC-MSCs in the presence of cigarette smoke medium (CSM), and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and apoptosis were measured. Conditioned media from iPSC-MSCs and trans-well co-cultures were used to detect any paracrine effects. The effect of systemic injection of iPSC-MSCs on airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness in ozone-exposed mice was also investigated. Co-culture of iPSC-MSCs with ASMCs attenuated CSM-induced mitochondrial ROS, apoptosis and ΔΨm loss in ASMCs. iPSC-MSC-conditioned media or trans-well co-cultures with iPSC-MSCs reduced CSM-induced mitochondrial ROS but not ΔΨm or apoptosis in ASMCs. Mitochondrial transfer from iPSC-MSCs to ASMCs was observed after direct co-culture and was enhanced by CSM. iPSC-MSCs attenuated ozone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, airway hyper-responsiveness and inflammation in mouse lungs. iPSC-MSCs offered protection against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in human ASMCs and in mouse lungs, whilst reducing airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness. These effects are, at least partly, dependent on cell-cell contact that allows for mitochondrial transfer, and paracrine regulation. Therefore, iPSC-MSCs show promise as a therapy for oxidative stress-dependent lung diseases such as COPD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. PCB-induced endothelial cell dysfunction: Role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Helyar, Simon G.; Patel, Bella; Headington, Kevin; Assal, Mary El; Chatterjee, Prabal K.; Pacher, Pal; Mabley, Jon G.

    2009-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental pollutants implicated in the development of pro-inflammatory events critical in the pathology of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. PCB exposure of endothelial cells results in increased cellular oxidative stress, activation of stress and inflammatory pathways leading to increased expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules and ultimately cell death, all of which can lead to development of atherosclerosis. To date no studies have been performed to examine the direct effects of PCB exposure on the vasculature relaxant response which if impaired may predispose individuals to hypertension, an additional risk factor for atherosclerosis. Overactivation of the DNA repair enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) following oxidative/nitrosative stress in endothelial cells and subsequent depletion of NADPH has been identified as a central mediator of cellular dysfunction. The aim therefore was to investigate whether 2,2′,4,6,6′-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 104) directly causes endothelial cell dysfunction via increased oxidative stress and subsequent overactivation of PARP. Exposure of ex vivo rat aortic rings to PCB 104 impaired the acetylcholine-mediated relaxant response, an effect that was dependent on both concentration and exposure time. In vitro exposure of mouse endothelial cells to PCB 104 resulted in increased cellular oxidative stress through activation of the cytochrome p450 enzyme CYP1A1 with subsequent overactivation of PARP and NADPH depletion. Pharmacological inhibition of CYP1A1 or PARP protected against the PCB 104-mediated endothelial cell dysfunction. In conclusion, the environmental contaminants, PCBs, can activate PARP directly impairing endothelial cell function that may predispose exposed individuals to development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. PMID:19549508

  7. Rescue of dysfunctional autophagy attenuates hyperinflammatory responses from cystic fibrosis cells.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Matthew L; Blohmke, Christoph J; Falsafi, Reza; Fjell, Chris D; Madera, Laurence; Turvey, Stuart E; Hancock, Robert E W

    2013-02-01

    A hallmark feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) is progressive pulmonary obstruction arising from exaggerated host proinflammatory responses to chronic bacterial airway colonization. The mechanisms for these heightened inflammatory responses have been only partially characterized, hampering development of effective anti-inflammatory therapies. The aim of this study was to identify and validate novel dysfunctional processes or pathways driving the hyperinflammatory phenotype of CF cells using systems biology and network analysis to examine transcriptional changes induced by innate defense regulator (IDR)-1018, an anti-inflammatory peptide. IDR-1018 selectively attenuated hyperinflammatory cytokine production from CF airway cells and PBMCs stimulated with multiple bacterial ligands, including flagellin (FliC). Network analysis of CF cell transcriptional responses to FliC and IDR-1018 identified dysfunctional autophagy as the target of the peptide via modulation of upstream adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-Akt signaling. After treatment with FliC, CF cells were found to have elevated levels of the autophagosome marker LC3-II, and GFP-LC3-transfected CF airway cells showed abnormal perinuclear accumulation of GFP(+) structures. In both instances, treatment of CF cells with IDR-1018 abolished the accumulation of LC3 induced by FliC. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagosome-lysosome fusion with bafilomycinA1 attenuated the anti-inflammatory and autophagosome-clearing effects of IDR-1018, as did a chemical inhibitor of Akt and an activator of AMPK. These findings were consistent with hypotheses generated in silico, demonstrating the utility of systems biology and network analysis approaches for providing pathway-level insights into CF-associated inflammation. Collectively, these data suggest that dysfunctional autophagosome clearance contributes to heightened inflammatory responses from CF transmembrane receptor mutant cells and highlight autophagy and

  8. Modelling cell cycle synchronisation in networks of coupled radial glial cells.

    PubMed

    Barrack, Duncan S; Thul, Rüdiger; Owen, Markus R

    2015-07-21

    Radial glial cells play a crucial role in the embryonic mammalian brain. Their proliferation is thought to be controlled, in part, by ATP mediated calcium signals. It has been hypothesised that these signals act to locally synchronise cell cycles, so that clusters of cells proliferate together, shedding daughter cells in uniform sheets. In this paper we investigate this cell cycle synchronisation by taking an ordinary differential equation model that couples the dynamics of intracellular calcium and the cell cycle and extend it to populations of cells coupled via extracellular ATP signals. Through bifurcation analysis we show that although ATP mediated calcium release can lead to cell cycle synchronisation, a number of other asynchronous oscillatory solutions including torus solutions dominate the parameter space and cell cycle synchronisation is far from guaranteed. Despite this, numerical results indicate that the transient and not the asymptotic behaviour of the system is important in accounting for cell cycle synchronisation. In particular, quiescent cells can be entrained on to the cell cycle via ATP mediated calcium signals initiated by a driving cell and crucially will cycle in near synchrony with the driving cell for the duration of neurogenesis. This behaviour is highly sensitive to the timing of ATP release, with release at the G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle far more likely to lead to near synchrony than release during mid G1 phase. This result, which suggests that ATP release timing is critical to radial glia cell cycle synchronisation, may help us to understand normal and pathological brain development.

  9. FOXM1 participates in PLK1-regulated cell cycle progression in renal cell cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHE; ZHANG, GUOJUN; KONG, CHUIZE

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of entry into and progression through mitosis is important for cell proliferation. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is involved in multiple stages of mitosis. Forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1) has multiple functions in tumorigenesis and, in elevated levels, is frequently associated with cancer progression. The present study reports that FOXM1, a substrate of PLK1, controls the transcription mechanism that mediates the PLK1-dependent regulation of the cell cycle. The present study investigated the expression of PLK1 and FOXM1 in the clear renal cell carcinoma 769-P and ACHN cell lines, and indicated that the expression of PLK1 and FOXM1 are correlated in human renal cell cancer cell lines and that the suppression of PLK1 may decrease the expression of FOXM1. The knockdown of FOXM1 or PLK1 in renal cell cancer cell lines caused cell cycle progression to be blocked. As a result, the present study indicated the involvement of FOXM1 in PLK1-regulated cell cycle progression. PMID:27073539

  10. Long Cycle Life Secondary Lithium Cells Utilizing Tetrahydrofuran.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    11D-Ri49 762 LONG CYCLE LIFE SECONDARY LITHIUM CELLS UTILIZING 1/1 TETRRHYDROFURAN(U) EIC LABS INC NORWOOD MR K M ABRAHAM ET AL. APR 84 TR-12 N80914...Contract No. N00014-77-C-0155 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 12 I LONG CYCLE LIFE SECONDARY LITHIUM CELLS UTILIZING TETRAHYDROFURAN By K. M. Abraham J. S. Foos...CONTRACT OF GRANT NUMBER(s) K. 14. Abraham , j. S. Foos and J. L. Goldman N00014-77-C-0155 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10PRAM ELEORMNT

  11. Regulated protein kinases and phosphatases in cell cycle decisions.

    PubMed

    Novak, Bela; Kapuy, Orsolya; Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Tyson, John J

    2010-12-01

    Many aspects of cell physiology are controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, which together determine the phosphorylation state of targeted substrates. Some of these target proteins are themselves kinases or phosphatases or other components of a regulatory network characterized by feedback and feed-forward loops. In this review we describe some common regulatory motifs involving kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates, focusing particularly on bistable switches involved in cellular decision processes. These general principles are applied to cell cycle transitions, with special emphasis on the roles of regulated phosphatases in orchestrating progression from one phase to the next of the DNA replication-division cycle.

  12. Regulated protein kinases and phosphatases in cell cycle decisions

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Bela; Kapuy, Orsolya; Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Tyson, John J

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of cell physiology are controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, which together determine the phosphorylation state of targeted substrates. Some of these target proteins are themselves kinases or phosphatases or other components of a regulatory network characterized by feedback and feed-forward loops. In this review we describe some common regulatory motifs involving kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates, focusing particularly on bistable switches involved in cellular decision processes. These general principles are applied to cell cycle transitions, with special emphasis on the roles of regulated phosphatases in orchestrating progression from one phase to the next of the DNA replication-division cycle. PMID:20678910

  13. Computation intelligent for eukaryotic cell-cycle gene network.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shinq-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Tao; Lee, Tsu-Tian

    2006-01-01

    Computational intelligent approaches is adopted to construct the S-system of eukaryotic cell cycle for further analysis of genetic regulatory networks. A highly nonlinear power-law differential equation is constructed to describe the transcriptional regulation of gene network from the time-courses dataset. Global artificial algorithm, based on hybrid differential evolution, can achieve global optimization for the highly nonlinear differential gene network modeling. The constructed gene regulatory networks will be a reference for researchers to realize the inhibitory and activatory operator for genes synthesis and decomposition in Eukaryotic cell cycle.

  14. How does a bacterium grow during its cell cycle?

    PubMed

    Burdett, I D; Kirkwood, T B

    1983-07-07

    Rod-shaped bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis appear to extend continuously in length between divisions. However, the kinetics of growth of the individual cell in the steady state is still unknown. A brief, critical account of the main approaches used to determine the pattern of surface extension is given. In general, these approaches are of three types. Firstly, attempts have been made to relate average cell size to growth rate of the culture and to determine possible stages in the cell cycle at which the rate of length extension might change. Secondly, comparisons have been made between the measured length distribution of cells and theoretical distributions, based on three primary hypotheses (linear, bilinear and exponential growth). Thirdly, the principle of Collins and Richmond, involving the calculation of growth rate from the length distributions of extant, separating and new-born cells, is described. It is emphasized that there is a strong element of variation in size at different stages of the cell cycle. This variation imposes severe limitations on models which utilize only average cellular dimensions. We conclude that the Collins-Richmond principle affords the most powerful approach to the analysis of bacterial growth kinetics. However, we propose that the method be modified to permit calculation of separate rates of growth of cells between discernible events in the cell cycle, as well as simply between birth and division.

  15. A Novel Role for Programmed Cell Death Receptor Ligand-1 in Sepsis-Induced Intestinal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Youping; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Chen, Yaping; Monaghan, Sean Farrell; Patel, Sima; Huang, Xin; Heffernan, Daithi Seamus; Ayala, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Studies imply that intestinal barrier dysfunction is a key contributor to morbid events associated with sepsis. Recently, the co-inhibitory molecule programmed death-ligand1 (PD-L1) has been shown to be involved in the regulation of intestinal immune tolerance and/or inflammation. Our previous studies showed that PD-L1 gene deficiency reduced sepsis-induced intestinal injury morphologically. However, it is not known how PD-L1 expression impacts intestinal barrier dysfunction during sepsis. Here we tested the hypothesis that PD-L1 expressed on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) has a role in sepsis-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. To address this, C57BL/6 or PD-L1 gene knockout mice were subjected to experimental sepsis and PD-L1 expression, intestinal permeability and tissue cytokine levels were assessed. Subsequently, septic or nonseptic colonic samples (assigned by pathology report) were immunohistochemically stained for PD-L1 in a blinded fashion. Finally, human Caco2 cells were used for in vitro studies. The results demonstrated that PD-L1 was constitutively expressed and sepsis significantly upregulates PD-L1 in IECs from C57BL/6 mice. Concurrently, we observed increased PD-L1 expression in colon tissue samples from septic patients. PD-L1 gene deficiency reduced ileal permeability and tissue levels of IL-6, TNF-α and MCP-1, and prevented ileal tight junction protein loss compared with WT after sepsis. Comparatively, while Caco2 cell monolayers also responded to inflammatory cytokine stimulation with elevated PD-L1 expression, increased monolayer permeability and altered/decreased monolayer tight junction protein morphology/expression, these changes were reversed by PD-L1 blocking antibody. Together these data indicate that ligation of PD-L1 plays a novel role in mediating the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. PMID:27782294

  16. Fructose induces mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers apoptosis in skeletal muscle cells by provoking oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Natasha; Maurya, Chandan K; Arha, Deepti; Avisetti, Deepa R; Prathapan, Ayyappan; Raj, Palayyan S; Raghu, Kozhiparambil G; Kalivendi, Shasi V; Tamrakar, Akhilesh Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance, a major characteristic of type 2 diabetes. There is evidence that oxidative stress results from the increased production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, tissue damage, insulin resistance, and other complications observed in type 2 diabetes. It has been suggested that intake of high fructose contributes to insulin resistance and other metabolic disturbances. However, there is limited information about the direct effect of fructose on the mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle, the major metabolic determinant of whole body insulin activity. Here, we assessed the effect of fructose exposure on mitochondria-mediated mechanisms in skeletal muscle cells. Exposure of L6 myotubes to high fructose stimulated the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide (NO), and the expression of inducible NO synthase. Fructose-induced oxidative stress was associated with increased translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 to the nucleus, decreases in mitochondrial DNA content and mitochondrial dysfunctions, as evidenced by decreased activities of citrate synthase and mitochondrial dehydrogenases, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased activity of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes, and impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism. Furthermore, positive Annexin-propidium iodide staining and altered expression of Bcl-2 family members and caspases in L6 myotubes indicated that the cells progressively became apoptotic upon fructose exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that exposure of skeletal muscle cells to fructose induced oxidative stress that decreased mitochondrial DNA content and triggered mitochondrial dysfunction, which caused apoptosis.

  17. Impact of cell cycle delay on micronucleus frequency in TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Zhanna; Spellman, Richard A; Thiffeault, Catherine; Dobo, Krista L; Schuler, Maik

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies with TK6 cells have shown that extending the recovery period after pulse treatment allows for greater micronucleus expression for some compounds. This study explores the role of cell cycle delay in micronucleus expression after pulse treatment with three model genotoxins [mitomycin C, etoposide (ETOP), vinblastine]. Cells were treated for 4 hr and allowed to recover for 36 hr with samples removed at various time points during the recovery period and analyzed for cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and micronucleus frequency. Our results show that mitomycin C causes cell cycle delay for 20 hr after pulse treatment and cell cycle perturbation is no longer evident after 36 hr of recovery. The micronucleus frequency of cells sampled at 36 hr is doubled when compared with cells sampled at 20 hr after mitomycin C removal. When cells were treated with indirect acting genotoxins (ETOP, vinblastine), cell cycle perturbation was not observed at the 20 hr time point. Micronucleus frequency after treatment with either ETOP or vinblastine did not differ between the 20 hr and the 36 hr time point. All three compounds induced similar levels of apoptosis ranging from 4.5 to 5.6% with maximum induction occurring at the 36-hr time point. We conclude that TK6 cells exhibit extended cell cycle arrest after exposure to MMC and can go on to express micronuclei, after overcoming cell cycle arrest.

  18. Visualisation of cell cycle modifications by X-ray irradiation of single HeLa cells using fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators.

    PubMed

    Kaminaga, K; Noguchi, M; Narita, A; Sakamoto, Y; Kanari, Y; Yokoya, A

    2015-09-01

    To explore the effects of X-ray irradiation on mammalian cell cycle dynamics, single cells using the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) technique were tracked. HeLa cells expressing Fucci were used to visualise cell cycle modifications induced by irradiation. After cultured HeLa-Fucci cells were exposed to 5 Gy X-rays, fluorescent cell images were captured every 20 min for 48 h using a fluorescent microscope. Time dependence of the fluorescence intensity of S/G2 cells was analysed to examine the cell cycle dynamics of irradiated and non-irradiated control cells. The results showed that irradiated cells could be divided into two populations: one with similar cell cycle dynamics to that of non-irradiated cells, and another displaying a prolonged G2 phase. Based on these findings, it is proposed in this article that an underlying switch mechanism is involved in cell cycle regulation and the G2/M checkpoint of HeLa cells. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  20. DREAMs make plant cells to cycle or to become quiescent.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2016-12-01

    Cell cycle phase specific oscillation of gene transcription has long been recognized as an underlying principle for ordered processes during cell proliferation. The G1/S-specific and G2/M-specific cohorts of genes in plants are regulated by the E2F and the MYB3R transcription factors. Mutant analysis suggests that activator E2F functions might not be fully required for cell cycle entry. In contrast, the two activator-type MYB3Rs are part of positive feedback loops to drive the burst of mitotic gene expression, which is necessary at least to accomplish cytokinesis. Repressor MYB3Rs act outside the mitotic time window during cell cycle progression, and are important for the shutdown of mitotic genes to impose quiescence in mature organs. The two distinct classes of E2Fs and MYB3Rs together with the RETINOBLATOMA RELATED are part of multiprotein complexes that may be evolutionary related to what is known as DREAM complex in animals. In plants, there are multiple such complexes with distinct compositions and functions that may be involved in the coordinated cell cycle and developmental regulation of E2F targets and mitotic genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Histone supply regulates S phase timing and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Günesdogan, Ufuk; Jäckle, Herbert; Herzig, Alf

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotes package DNA into nucleosomes that contain a core of histone proteins. During DNA replication, nucleosomes are disrupted and re-assembled with newly synthesized histones and DNA. Despite much progress, it is still unclear why higher eukaryotes contain multiple core histone genes, how chromatin assembly is controlled, and how these processes are coordinated with cell cycle progression. We used a histone null mutation of Drosophila melanogaster to show that histone supply levels, provided by a defined number of transgenic histone genes, regulate the length of S phase during the cell cycle. Lack of de novo histone supply not only extends S phase, but also causes a cell cycle arrest during G2 phase, and thus prevents cells from entering mitosis. Our results suggest a novel cell cycle surveillance mechanism that monitors nucleosome assembly without involving the DNA repair pathways and exerts its effect via suppression of CDC25 phosphatase String expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02443.001 PMID:25205668

  2. Cinnamon polyphenols attenuate cell swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction following oxygen-glucose deprivation in glial cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Astrocyte swelling is an integral component of cytotoxic brain edema in ischemic injury. While mechanisms underlying astrocyte swelling are likely multifactorial, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are hypothesized to contribute to such swelling. We investigated the protective effects of...

  3. Mitochondria-specific accumulation of amyloid β induces mitochondrial dysfunction leading to apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Cha, Moon-Yong; Han, Sun-Ho; Son, Sung Min; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Choi, Young-Ju; Byun, Jayoung; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are best known as the essential intracellular organelles that host the homeostasis required for cellular survival, but they also have relevance in diverse disease-related conditions, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide is the key molecule in AD pathogenesis, and has been highlighted in the implication of mitochondrial abnormality during the disease progress. Neuronal exposure to Aβ impairs mitochondrial dynamics and function. Furthermore, mitochondrial Aβ accumulation has been detected in the AD brain. However, the underlying mechanism of how Aβ affects mitochondrial function remains uncertain, and it is questionable whether mitochondrial Aβ accumulation followed by mitochondrial dysfunction leads directly to neuronal toxicity. This study demonstrated that an exogenous Aβ(1-42) treatment, when applied to the hippocampal cell line of mice (specifically HT22 cells), caused a deleterious alteration in mitochondria in both morphology and function. A clathrin-mediated endocytosis blocker rescued the exogenous Aβ(1-42)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the mitochondria-targeted accumulation of Aβ(1-42) in HT22 cells using Aβ(1-42) with a mitochondria-targeting sequence induced the identical morphological alteration of mitochondria as that observed in the APP/PS AD mouse model and exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. In addition, subsequent mitochondrial dysfunctions were demonstrated in the mitochondria-specific Aβ(1-42) accumulation model, which proved indistinguishable from the mitochondrial impairment induced by exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Finally, cellular toxicity was directly induced by mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation, which mimics the apoptosis process in exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation is the necessary and sufficient condition for Aβ-mediated mitochondria impairments, and leads

  4. Propofol reduces liver dysfunction caused by tumor necrosis factor-α production in Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazheng; Kandatsu, Nobuhisa; Feng, Guo-Gang; Jiang, Jia-Zhen; Huang, Lei; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Okada, Shoshiro; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    The present study, conducted in rats, investigated whether propofol attenuates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-triggered liver dysfunction via regulation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production in activated Kupffer cells. Rats received LPS (500 μg/kg) under Urethane™ sedation (1 g/kg) in combination with propofol (5 mg/kg/h) or Intralipid™ from 1 h before to 6 h after LPS administration. Some rats were treated with 10 mg/kg gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) to induce Kupffer cell depletion. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), TNF-α mRNA and protein expression, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis were evaluated in hepatocytes. Immunofluorescence staining revealed expression of the pan-macrophage marker CD68 as well as TNF-α in Kupffer cells. ALT and AST serum levels increased approximately four-fold in LPS-exposed rats compared with Intralipid™-treated rats at 6 h after LPS administration, whereas propofol and GdCl3 reduced the LPS-induced increases. LPS simultaneously augmented TNF-α expression in Kupffer cells, followed by increased caspase-3 activity and apoptosis in hepatocytes. Immunofluorescence staining and immunoblotting assay showed that TNF-α expression in Kupffer cells was inhibited by propofol and GdCl3, resulting in a reduction of caspase-3 activity and apoptosis in LPS-treated rat hepatocytes. Propofol (5 mg/kg/h) attenuated LPS-triggered liver dysfunction via inhibition of TNF-α production in activated Kupffer cells. These results suggest that propofol is capable of inhibiting inflammation-induced liver dysfunction in vivo.

  5. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin(+)) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34(+)CD38(-)Lin(-/low)). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 (7μM) and G2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypobaric Treatment Effects on Chilling Injury, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and the Ascorbate-Glutathione (AsA-GSH) Cycle in Postharvest Peach Fruit.

    PubMed

    Song, Lili; Wang, Jinhua; Shafi, Mohammad; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Jie; Wu, Jiasheng; Wu, Aimin

    2016-06-08

    In this study, hypobaric treatment effects were investigated on chilling injury, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in peach fruit stored at 0 °C. Internal browning of peaches was dramatically reduced by applying 10-20 kPa pressure. Hypobaric treatment markedly inhibited membrane fluidity increase, whereas it kept mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) concentration and cytochrome C oxidase (CCO) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity relatively high in mitochondria. Similarly, 10-20 kPa pressure treatment reduced the level of decrease observed in AsA and GSH concentrations, while it enhanced ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) activities related to the AsA-GSH cycle. Furthermore, comparative transcriptomic analysis showed that differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with the metabolism of glutathione, ascorbate, and aldarate were up-regulated in peaches treated with 10-20 kPa for 30 days at 0 °C. Genes encoding GR, MDHAR, and APX were identified and exhibited higher expression in fruits treated with low pressure than in fruits treated with normal atmospheric pressure. Our findings indicate that the alleviation of chilling injury by hypobaric treatment was associated with preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and triggering the AsA-GSH cycle by the transcriptional up-regulation of related enzymes.

  7. RAD001 (everolimus) induces dose-dependent changes to cell cycle regulation and modifies the cell cycle response to vincristine.

    PubMed

    Saunders, P O; Weiss, J; Welschinger, R; Baraz, R; Bradstock, K F; Bendall, L J

    2013-10-01

    More than 50% of adults and ~20% of children with pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) relapse following treatment. Dismal outcomes for patients with relapsed or refractory disease mandate novel approaches to therapy. We have previously shown that the combination of the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 (everolimus) and the chemotherapeutic agent vincristine increases the survival of non-obese diabetic/severe combined immuno-deficient (NOD/SCID) mice bearing human ALL xenografts. We have also shown that 16 μM RAD001 synergized with agents that cause DNA damage or microtubule disruption in pre-B ALL cells in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that RAD001 has dose-dependent effects on the cell cycle in ALL cells, with 1.5 μM RAD001 inhibiting pRb, Ki67 and PCNA expression and increasing G0/1 cell cycle arrest, whereas 16 μM RAD001 increases pRb, cyclin D1, Ki67 and PCNA, with no evidence of an accumulation of cells in G0/1. Transition fr